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L AKE -C OOK C ORRIDOR

THE VILLAGE OF BUFFALO GROVE LAKE COOK CORRIDOR MARKET STUDY AND PLAN APRIL 2018


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS THE VILLAGE OF BUFFALO GROVE

CONSULTANT PLANNING TEAM

Beverly Sussman, Village President Jeffrey Berman, Trustee Andrew Stein, Trustee Lester A. Ottenheimer III, Trustee David Weidenfeld, Trustee Joanne Johnson, Trustee Dr. Eric Smith, Trustee Janet Sirabian, Village Clerk

Domenic Salpietra, Regional Leader of Planning Baixin Ren, Urban Planner Gaute Grindheim, Project Manager

Dane Bragg, Village Manager Jennifer Maltas, Deputy Village Manager Christopher Stilling, Director of Community Development Nicole Woods, Principal Planner

L AKE -C OOK C ORRIDOR

Tracy Morse, President Janet Henderson, Director Christian Beaudoin, Director of Research David Barnett, Senior Research Analyst Jack Trager, Senior Research Analyst Eric Russell, Principal Luay Aboona, Principal William Loftus, President Brian Kravets, IT Systems Manager

THE CORRIDOR PLANNING GROUP Dr. Gregg Stern Randy Seebach Tom Healy Julie Schmidt Ryan Risinger Mike Rolfs Matt Burdeen Gene Looft Max Tolsky

Barbara Monson-Peterson Jeffery Berman David Weidenfeld Chris Stilling Nicole Woods Jennifer Maltas Dane Bragg Frank Cesario The Village of Buffalo Grove 50 Raupp Boulevard Buffalo Grove, IL 60089 Phone: 847-459-2500 Fax: 847-459-7906


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Key Plan

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CONTENTS INTRODUCTION

Project Overview

1 PART 1.

PROJECT BACKGROUND

7

PART 2.

CORE PRINCIPLES AND GOALS

PART 3.

THE VISION

31

37

Community Engagement Summary Market Assessment Summary Existing Conditions Summary

The 10 Guiding Principles 4 Key Goals

A Scaled Development Approach Stage 1-Redesigning Town Center & Chase Plaza Stage 2-Reimagining Central Corridor Stage 3-Future progression

PART 4.

IMPLEMENTATION

83

Recommendations and Action steps


1 I Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan


Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan I 2

I

INTRODUCTION PROJECT OVERVIEW


3 I Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan

PROJECT OVERVIEW

WHERE IS THE LAKE COOK CORRIDOR AND WHY DOES BUFFALO GROVE NEED A PLAN FOR IT?

The Village of Buffalo Grove is located 35 miles northwest of Chicago, Illinois. In

2016,

the

Village

commissioned

the Lake Cook Corridor Market Study

The Lake Cook Corridor is located in the southern half of Buffalo Grove and is bordered by Arlington Heights Road, Old Checker Road, N. Buffalo Grove Road, IL83 McHenry Road, and Lake Cook Road. The area

expands over 472 acres and is focused around Lake Cook Road, which generally follows the jurisdictional boundary line between Cook and Lake Counties.

HIGHLAND POINT PARK

PA

Strathmore

MIKE RYLKO COMMUNITY PARK

and Plan to develop a long-term plan

The Highlands

for one of the Village’s key assets, the

the

Corridor.

The

project

E CK

E

CH

represents

WILLOW STREAM PARK

OLD

and

the

businesses

Village, as

well

as brokers, property owners, and other stakeholders. The Village is proud of the Plan and is committed to implementing its

LAKE COOK RD

Lexington Glen

RD

UF FA LO

Vintage

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Manchester Greens

Chase Plaza

Golf ClubPublic Works Village Hall

ROA D ND ILA Staples

Targ

BoA Walmart

EMMERICH EAST PARK

E RD

Buffalo Grove

Sam’ Club

OV GR

Buffalo Grove Park District

O AL FF

Strathmore

LAKE COOK RD

St. Mary School

Shell Walgreens

JewelOsco

Symphony of Buffalo Grove

BU

NorthShore Medical Group

P BLVD UP RA

Study Area Limits

Police Dept

Wyndham Garden Hotel

WEIDNER DR

next chapter of the Lake Cook Corridor.

St. Mary Church

GOLF COURSE

Corridor Boundary

The Grove

Circle Drive

R RD

PNC Burdeen’s Jewelry

Buffalo Grove Town Center Performing Arts Center

Turnberry

DNE

Business Campus

USPS

S

recommendations to pave a path for the

BUFFALO CREEK FOREST PRESERVE

Roseglen

K EE CR

residents

amongst

CKER

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its

discussions

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data collection and analysis, charrettes,

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PAULINE AVE

Town Place

GROVE RD

nearly two years of consensus building, and

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R

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EN Belmont RY RD Village Assisted Living N BUFFALO

the underlying objective of repositioning

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BP

Village Boundary

strategies to achieve that vision with

M

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vision as well as recommendations and

Cherbourg

WE

LAKE COOK CORRIDOR

H I G HL AN

Lake Cook Corridor. This plan includes a

0.1 MILE


Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan I 4

Located 35 miles northwest of Chicago, Illinois, Buffalo Grove is a premier, homerule municipality covering more than 9.25 square miles in both Cook and Lake Counties. Through the Tri-State Tollway (I-294), Illinois 53-290 corridors, two Metra train stations, and other transportation networks, Buffalo Grove is well connected to other communities and regions across Illinois, and the country.

Lake Cook Road connects Buffalo Grove to local roads as well as to a larger regional network of expressways, highways, and roads. With more than 40,000 vehicles traveling on it per day, Lake Cook Road is one of the most utilized roads in the region. The county jurisdictional divide along Lake Cook Road adds a further layer of complexity. Regional market and development experts have seen an influx of development and tenants exiting Cook County for more favorable consumer and property taxes in collar counties including Lake County.

Building upon these assets is Buffalo Grove’s strong financial status. The Village’s high bond ratings along with minimal debt are a testament to the Village’s strong fiscal management, excellent administration and capacity for future growth. Buffalo Grove has a distinctive local economy with an employment base of 20,000 day workers and 10 million square feet of commercial and industrial space. The Village’s advanced manufacturing centers, which include high-profile firms such as Siemens Industry Inc. and Flex are the community’s economic engine. Complementing these centers are commercial corridors scattered throughout Buffalo Grove. Some of the corridors have been recently developed while others are well-positioned for redevelopment.

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VERNON HILLS DEER PARK Buffalo Grove BARRINGTON

NORTHBROOK

ARLINGTON HEIGHTS SCHAUMBURG

94

294

90

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EVANSTON

TR AI N

O’Hare International Airport

in 0M /3

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CHICAGO

M ile

Although the Corridor has served as an important source of revenue and vitality for the Village, it is currently facing challenges. Regional and national shifts in market, demographic, housing, lifestyle, and travel and consumption patterns have contributed to the Corridor’s outdated development and high vacancy

HIGHLAND PARK

/1 Hr

LAKE COOK

355

25

Consequently, Buffalo Grove has commissioned this project to establish a long-term vision and plan for the Corridor which would take advantage of the Corridor’s high visibility, mix of land uses, notable landmarks, strong trade area demographics, and opportunities for redevelopment/development. The project’s underlying goal is to examine how the Village can best reposition the Lake Cook Corridor to optimize its growth potential by examining the Corridor’s development options to improve Buffalo ROCKFORD/ Grove’s identity, vitality, and fiscal sustainability. MADISON

The Village currently has a population of 42,000 and almost half of all Buffalo Grove households earn more than $100,000 per year. Village residents enjoy nationally-ranked public schools, expansive open spaces, access to employment centers, and other important amenities. Buffalo Grove’s high quality of life influences the local residential real estate market. In 2015, Crain’s Chicago Business Real Estate reported that homes in Buffalo Grove sold faster than any other community in the Chicago metropolitan area.

/1 hr TR AI N

In addition to its commercial core, the Corridor is home to residential developments, religious institutions, civic facilities, and open space that provide local character and culture to the community. One of the most prominent buildings is St. Mary’s Church. St. Mary’s was built in the late 1800's and its steeple has become an iconic landmark for Buffalo Grove residents as well as Lake Cook Road travelers. Another important component of the Corridor is the 140 acres of land, which is owned and operated by the Village of Buffalo Grove. This land consists of an 18-hole golf course (Buffalo Grove Golf Course) and a municipal campus that includes the Village Hall, Police Station, and Public Works Facility.

BUFFALO GROVE, IL

rates in both the retail and office areas. New shopping plazas, lifestyle centers, and other downtown-type development in nearby communities also present strong competition for the Corridor’s commercial.

RI VE

The Lake Cook Corridor is a significant asset to Buffalo Grove. It is one of the larger commercial centers in the Village with over one million square feet of commercial space. Much of this space is concentrated in the Town Center development (194,000 square feet) and Chase Plaza (93,000 square feet) located on the east and west side of the Corridor, respectively. Other smaller commercial centers and retail and service businesses are located in smaller plazas within the Corridor. Office space (570,000 square feet) is also a large component of the commercial development in the Corridor and houses a prominent base of healthcare providers, medical specialists, and rehabilitation care.

290

Loop


5 I Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan

THE PLAN'S OBJECTIVE The project’s underlying goal is to examine how the Village can best reposition the Lake Cook Corridor to optimize its growth potential and improve the Village’s identity, vitality, and fiscal sustainability. The Lake Cook Corridor Plan is not a specific development project proposal, rather it is a vision created through an intense public process aimed to establish broad consensus in the community about the Corridor’s future. It is a guide to help Buffalo Grove take a proactive role in steering future development and infrastructure to align with stated values and goals. Moreover, it will assist the Village to work with existing residential neighborhoods and institutions in and around the Corridor by coordinating and incorporating these assets into other land, accessibility, and open space enhancements. Such efforts will result in a coherent and positive image and identity along the Corridor. The Plan should be used as framework and guide for the Corridor. As it is a long-term plan providing

RELATIONSHIP TO OTHER LOCAL AND REGIONAL PLANS guidance over the next 15-20 years, it must not be viewed as a static document, but instead a flexible, dynamic, and living plan. Consequently, variations of the Plan maybe considered as the conditions of the market and Corridor change or as the community’s priorities change. The Village can update the Plan at any time so that it remains a relevant guide in shaping the future of the Corridor.

To ensure compatibility with other local and regional initiatives and optimize the opportunity for future partnerships, the Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan builds upon relevant Village, county, and regional plans, projects, and initiatives. Plans and studies directly related to this Plan are listed below: • Village of Buffalo Grove Strategic Plan 2018-2023 (2018) • Village of Buffalo Grove Economic Development Strategic Plan (2015) • Village of Buffalo Grove Downtown Development Hydraulic Analysis (2014) • Village of Buffalo Grove Comprehensive Plan (2009) • Village of Buffalo Grove Transit Station Area Study (2007) • Lake County Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy (2012) • Planning for Progress – Cook County’s Consolidated Plan and Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy, 2015-2019 (2015) • Homes for a Changing Region (2013) • Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning GOTO 2040 (2010)


Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan I 6

PLANNING PROCESS

PUBLIC OUTREACH

The Lake Cook Market Study and Plan process was divided into Five Stages. This stagedapproach was designed to include input from the project’s steering committee (the Corridor Planning Group) as well as Village residents, local officials, business owners, and other stakeholders. The project stages are shown below.

This Plan is the result of an almost two-year intensive community outreach and planning process. During each stage of the project, the team worked closely with stakeholders and community members to identify and understand their thoughts, concerns, and perspectives. These ideas were critical in shaping the approach, direction, and tone of the vision and plan. A more detailed discussion of the public outreach process and findings are outlined in the Community Engagement Summary section of this report.

JAN OCT 2017 2016

STAGE

2

MAR 2017 JULY 2017

EXISTING CONDITION & MARKETING ASSESSMENT

4

DEC 2017

STAGE DRAFT RECOMMENDATIONS

MAR 2018

JANUARY 2017

STAGE

1

KICK-OFF

STAGE OCT 2016 FEB 2017

3

FUTURE LAND USE AND DEVELOPMENT PLANNING

STAGE AUG 2017 NOV 2017

5

FINAL PLAN


7 I Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan


Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan I 8

PART

1I

PROJECT BACKGROUND COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT SUMMARY MARKET ASSESSMENT SUMMARY EXISTING CONDITIONS SUMMARY


9 I Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan


Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan I 10

I

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT SUMMARY


11 I Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT SUMMARY

CP WO G ME JU RKIN E TIN NE G 13 G SE 4 TH SSI 20 ON 17 3

CP WO G ME AP RKIN E TIN RIL G G 6T S E S 2 H 2 SI 01 ON 7 1

N SIO RE S MA I D E N R2 TG 1S T 2 ROU 01 P S 7 ES

PU FE BLIC BR UA MEE T RY I 7T N G 1 H2 01 7

The project team worked with the Village to establish the Corridor’s steering committee, called the Corridor Planning Group (CPG). The CPG consists of a diverse representation of stakeholders with various backgrounds and expertise. These leaders include business owners, residents, property owners and

other community leaders. In addition to guiding the project, CPG members also helped communicate project objectives, updates, and public input opportunities to the community at large. The CPG met seven times over the course of the project and provided meaningful guidance as the plan progressed.

CP WO G ME MA R K I N E T I N G Y1 G 0T S E S 3 H 2 SI 01 ON 7 2

THE CORRIDOR PLANNING GROUP

LIS JA TENI NU NG AR Y 2 SESS 4T I O N H2 01 1 LIS 7 T JA ENI NU NG AR Y 2 SESS 6T I O N H2 01 2 7 BU PR FFAL FE ESEN O GR BR UA TATIO OVE RO RY TA 2N N RY D2 01 7

KIC WI K-OF NT ER F 20 1

6

CP JA G ME NU E T AR ING Y1 7T 1 H2 01 7

From the onset, Buffalo Grove wanted the vision and plan for the Lake Cook Corridor to be derived organically by the community. Consequently, community engagement was the cornerstone of the Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan process. All aspects of the plan – its scope, direction, vision, and approach was influenced by the ideas, concerns, and perspectives of Buffalo Grove community members. These members include residents, businesses, property owners, local leaders, clubs, organizations, and other stakeholders.

PUBLIC MEETING 1 SURVEY FEB 8TH-FEB 15TH

1

KICK-OFF

2

EXISTING CONDITION & MARKETING ASSESSMENT

3

FUTURE LAND USE AND DEVELOPMENT PLANNING


Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan I 12

PUBLIC MEETINGS AND OPEN HOUSES

PUBLIC MEETING 2 SURVEY JULY 12TH-JULY 20TH

PUBLIC MEETING 3 SURVEY NOV 17TH - DEC 6TH

4

DRAFT RECOMMENDATIONS

5

FINAL PLAN

FIN SP AL P RIN LA G2 N 01 8

PU PU BLIC MA BLIC COM RC HE ME H 5 AR N TH ING T PE RIO -A PR D/ IL 6 TH 20 18

PU NO BLIC VE ME MB E T ER ING 16 TH 3 20 17

the communication channels of the Village's partners including the Buffalo Grove Park District, Buffalo Grove and Lincolnshire Chamber of Commerce, Indian Trails Library, Vernon Area Public Library, School District 102, School District 96 and Buffalo Grove Rotary. Those who had signed-up for project’s e-mail list were consistently provided project updates including notification of upcoming meetings. By the end of the project, approximately 600 people had signed up for the project e-mail list.

CP JA G ME NU E T AR ING Y4 TH 7 20 18

CP AU G ME GU E T ST ING 10 TH 5 20 17

and the

01 7

survey forms, communicate

PU JU BLIC LY 11 MEE T TH I 20 NG 2 17

presentations, videos, posters, face-to face-engagement to

project’s development as well as gather feedback on goal setting, visioning, prioritization, and design alternatives. These touch points were fundamental in building consensus as the project moved towards the final plan. All pubic open houses and meetings were advertised via press releases, newspaper articles, postcards, fliers, as well as Buffalo Grove’s TV channel, website, social media, e-news, and mailed newsletter. In addition, the meetings were advertised through

CP SE G ME PT EM E TIN BE G 6 R2 8T H2

Several Village-wide meetings and open houses were held to gather valuable input from the community on their goals for the project as well as their concerns and aspirations for the Corridor’s future. The total attendance count for all the meetings reached over 500. During each meeting, the project team utilized techniques such as real-time polling,


13 I Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan

ONLINE FORUM/SURVEYS For those who were unable to attend the public meetings and open houses, the project team hosted meeting materials, presentations, and feedback/ survey forums on the project website. The availability of these materials and survey forms were advertised through the Village e-news and the project’s subscriber list. The total number of participants for the all the surveys posted online was over 375.

SMALL GROUP SESSIONS AND PRESENTATIONS In addition to public meetings, the project team also held a series of small group sessions and presentations, the first of which were two Stakeholder Listening Sessions held early on in the project. Corridor property owners and businesses along with other stakeholders were invited to convey ideas, issues and opportunities for the Corridor to the project team in a small group setting.

Other small group sessions were conducted with interested stakeholder groups including the Buffalo Grove Rotary, Chamber and resident groups. During these sessions an overview of the project was presented and comments, ideas, and questions were gathered.


Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan I 14

KEY FINDINGS

PARTICIPANTS STATED THAT

Throughout the public engagement process several underlying concepts continued to emerge. These findings are grouped under the four major themes of land use, development and existing assets; accessibility; open space and natural resources; and plan approach and scope. The project team translated these key findings into the principles, goals, and a plan approach that guided the Corridor’s vision and plan. These foundational aspects are featured in Part 2 of the Plan.

THE FUTURE OF THE CORRIDOR SHOULD:

LAND USE, DEVELOPMENT AND EXISTING ASSETS

ACCESSIBILITY

OPEN SPACE AND NATURAL RESOURCES

• • • •

Be a destination/central gathering place Provide a diverse mix of uses Developed to be sustainable Respond to housing and retail/commercial market demand while not overplanning in the short to mid-term

• Prioritize pedestrian and bicycle paths and connections to larger networks to retail and entertainment centers • Look to mitigate negative traffic impacts • Be a welcoming gateway to the Village

• Provide broadly accessible open spaces • Incorporate recreational and cultural amenities and open spaces • Support the flexibility of the open space options and look to utilize open space to mitigate flood risk

THE PLAN FOR THE CORRIDOR SHOULD:

PLAN APPROACH AND SCOPE

• • • • • •

Be Embraced by the broad community Represent a unified and cohesive master plan Recognize the importance of flooding Provide information on how the project could be implemented Prioritize the Redevelopment of Town Center and Chase Plaza Provide the necessary flexibility to accommodate larger, long-term policy decisions that could affect the Corridor. Including, but not limited to: o The future programming of the existing golf course o The location of the municipal campus


15 I Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan


Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan I 16

I

MARKET ASSESSMENT SUMMARY


17 I Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan

HOUSING While currently a majority white population, Buffalo Grove has become increasingly diverse in the past few decades. This is especially true of the Asian population, which has doubled since 2000 and now represents 17.2 percent of the Village community.

DEMOGRAPHICS OVERVIEW DEMOGRAPHICS Buffalo Grove has a population of approximately 42,000 people and an average household size of 2.53, which is slightly lower than that of Cook County and significantly smaller than that of Lake County.

ESTIMATED RESIDENT POPULATION BY AGE GROUP BY YEAR

According to U.S. Census data, the Village has experienced a slight decrease in population of 3.7 percent between 2000 and 2016. The decrease contrasts with the slight population increase observed in Cook County of 2.0 percent and the significant population increase in Lake County of 10.2 percent. Buffalo Grove’s age profile indicates Village has an older demographic surrounding area. More specifically, the a relatively low millennial (age 18-34) and a higher baby-boomer (age 50-70)

that the than the Village has population population.

Many of today’s residents moved into Buffalo Grove during their younger years to raise their family. Although their children have grown and moved out, they remain in their family home for a variety of reasons including their affinity for the community, lack of housing choices, and/or impacts from the housing downturn. The lack of housing turnover is one of the contributing factors to the aging population. However, this age profile can shift as the market continues to recover and new housing development projects come on line.

2000 16.9 % 16.9%

2010

23.8 % 23.8%

16.4 % 16.4%

18.5 % 18.5%

26.0% 26.0 %

33.3 % 33.3% 21.7 % 21.7%

21.6 % 21.6%

22.1% 22.1 %

37.3 % 37.3%

2016

33.9 % 33.9%

28.8 % 28.8%

Source: U.S. Census Bureau. ESRI forecasts for 2016. Children: 0-17 Adults: 35-49

Young Adults: 18-34 Senior Adults: 50+

ESTIMATED RESIDENT POPULATION BY RACE BY YEAR

2000 3.3%

0.8%

8.4%

2010 1.0%

16.0 % 16.0%

17.2 % 17.2%

4.9% 88.7% 88.7 %

2016 1.0% 1.0%

5.8% 5.8%

76.7% 76.7 %

72.2 % 72.2%

Source: U.S. Census Bureau. ESRI forecasts for 2016. White Asian

Hispanic or Latino Black or African American

*Includes Hispanic or Latino residents of any race. **Includes Asian Indian, Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese, and Other Asian.

Most (69 percent) of the Village’s 16,829 housing units are single-family homes while the balance are multi-family buildings. Approximately 78.1 percent of the occupied housing units are owneroccupied while the remaining are renter-occupied units. This owner-occupancy rate is significantly higher than both Lake County (69.5 percent) and Cook County (50.1 percent) and is understandable given the high volume of single-family homes. The housing market in the Village is fairly tight. Approximately 4.8 percent of the housing units in the Village are vacant, while 9.7 percent and 7.1 percent of homes are vacant in Cook and Lake Counties, respectively. Overall housing prices remain competitive and the inventory is generally low. This trend has continued for the past few years and was highlighted in a Crain’s article which ran in March, 2017. The article listed Buffalo Grove as one of the ten suburbs that have the smallest supply of homes for sale. Another Crain’s article from 2015 named Buffalo Grove as the community with the fastest list-to-sell time in the Chicago region. Factors contributing to the tight, competitive market include excellent school districts, a strong park district, and valued public safety services, as well as Buffalo Grove’s reputation for being a tight-knit community. Additional factors include the pent-up demand and other impacts from the housing recession, rising interest rates, and the lack of local housing turnover.


Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan I 18

RESIDENTIAL OVERVIEW RESIDENTIAL MARKET TREND OUTLOOK National demographic trends continue to focus on millennials and retirees, as these two demographic groups continue to grow in prominence. Think tanks are currently examining and projecting how these cohorts and their lifestyles will shape the future economy, commercial landscape, and residential market. The increased demand for health and lifestyle services, experiential retail, and smaller homes reflect the preferences of these two demographics. As baby boomers are experiencing good health for extended periods of time, senior living facilities across the country are designed to attract this healthier group. For instance, more facilities across the country are offering independent living options to attract baby boomers that do not want assisted living services. Currently, the two senior living facilities in Buffalo Grove do not offer options for independent living. The real estate findings suggest that there is a depth in the market for additional housing, that could accommodate retirees as well as millennials. Moreover, the Lake Cook Corridor is an appropriate area to consider for such development as residential uses are adjacent to and contained within the Corridor along with nearby health services. However, any such developments will likely need to contain smaller square footages, low or no maintenance,

and numerous amenities such as walkability and proximity to retail desired by such populations. In recent studies by JLL, the most influential factor impacting young professionals’ choice of residence is “proximity to dining and entertainment options.”

which are 25.4 percent to 39.2 percent, respectively. •

The Village has a low housing vacancy rate of 4.8 percent, and most of the housing stock is composed of single-family homes. In comparison to neighboring municipalities, Buffalo Grove has a low supply of senior housing units for its growing number of senior residents, which can make the case for pursuing targeted development that provides greater senior living options.

Trends in senior living housing are geared towards independent living as aging residents remain healthy and are living longer than previous generations. Furthermore, because the two existing senior living facilities do not offer independent living options, there emerges an opportunity in Buffalo Grove to fill a development gap to cater to the more active adult.

RESIDENTIAL MARKET KEY FINDINGS: •

The Village’s population tends to be older with higher educational attainment and lower unemployment rates than Cook and Lake Counties. Nearly all (97 percent) of Buffalo Grove residents have a high school diploma and the majority (64 percent) have a bachelor’s degree. The yearend 2016 unemployment rate was 4.5 percent. Buffalo Grove has an estimated median household income of $116,579 and approximately 61.5 percent of Buffalo Grove households earn over $100,000 compared to households in Lake and Cook Counties

ESTIMATED EDUCATION LEVELS (2016) Buffalo Grove

Cook County

Lake County

Count

Percent

Percent

Percent

POPULATION, 25 YEARS AND OVER

30,158

100%

100%

100%

HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA OR HIGHER

29,313

97.2%

85.9%

90.0%

BACHELOR’S DEGREE OR HIGHER

19,391

64.3%

36.8%

44.2%

Cook County

Lake County

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2010 Summary File 1. ESRI estimates for 2016.

ESTIMATED HOUSEHOLD INCOME (2015) Buffalo Grove Count

Percent

Percent

Percent

LESS THAN $25,000

639

5.4%

23.9%

14.0%

$25,000 TO $49,999

1,069

9.1%

21.8%

17.9%

$50,000 TO $74,999

1,276

10.9%

16.9%

16.5%

$75,000 TO $99,999

1,536

13.1%

11.9%

12.5%

$100,000 TO $149,999

3,095

26.3%

13.3%

17.1%

$150,000 AND OVER

4,138

35.2%

12.1%

22.1%

TOTAL HOUSEHOLDS

11,753

100%

100%

100%

$116,579

$55,251

$78,026

MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2011-2015 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates.


19 I Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan

OFFICE OVERVIEW OFFICE MARKET TRENDS The regional suburban office market is currently facing a series of emerging trends, all of which impact the office space within the Lake Cook Corridor. A key trend is the growing prominence of build-to-suit office construction, meaning that the developments are designed to the exact specifications of the tenants that will occupy them, and they imply that companies are not finding the properties or locations that meet their needs, even in a market with high vacancy. The most recent build-to-suit delivery was Zurich North American Insurance’s 753,000 squarefoot headquarters in Schaumburg. This project is a perfect example of the growing trend of companies seeking spaces and locations that are customized to their demands. Build-to-suit developments will continue to gain momentum in the market and present additional competition for existing and older office space, such as those in the Corridor and Buffalo Grove. Another key trend is corporate urban migration. Since 2012, JLL Research has tracked 83 suburban companies that have either relocated to downtown Chicago or opened satellite offices within the city. These companies have left nearly five million square feet in the suburbs and now occupy nearly six million square feet downtown. Much of this migration is due to the preferences for a younger labor pool.

Companies moving to downtown cite convenience, local innovation, and access to a large and skilled workforce as key factors. This migration from the suburbs to downtown has affected each submarket in the suburbs, including the West and North suburbs. In order to retain and attract skilled workforce and residents, many suburbs are examining different strategies including improved transportation systems, enhanced local amenities, and diverse housing options. A final trend facing the suburban office market is the push towards modern office space designs, as well as building amenities. Recognizing that suburban office properties must remain competitive beyond price, several owners have taken measures to update their offices in recent years. Throughout the suburbs, office owners are working to renovate their spaces to meet current demands for loft, flex, and/or openformat office space. In addition, office owners are refurbishing their buildings to provide tenants with building amenities to attract businesses. The top amenities include state-of-the-art fitness facilities, modern cafeterias and outdoor/gathering spaces. Tenants frequently state that if these amenities are not offered within their building, they must be available within walking distance of their office.

OFFICE OUTLOOK The office space in the Lake Cook Corridor is performing at similar levels of the adjacent areas. It continues to rely on its strengths of regional location, building condition, and affordable rental prices to occupy its spaces. However, for the Lake Cook Corridor’s office space to remain competitive in the market, the weaknesses and trends that can be realistically addressed should be explored. From a building and development standpoint, that means adding or redeveloping office facilities to include for loft, flex, and/or openformat office space, as well as state-of-the-art fitness facilities, modern cafeterias, and outdoor/ gathering spaces, and other appropriate amenities. Moreover, it is important to enhance the general environment of the Corridor, which includes providing more robust walkable retail and restaurant options. Other trends such as highway and mass transit accessibility and corporate urban migration are outside the control of developers, office property owners and tenants, as well as the Village. However, the driving forces behind these trends, such as the importance of accessibility and attracting young talent, should be recognized. The Corridor may not be able to support direct access to mass transit in the near future, but perhaps connections to mass transit should be considered. The Corridor can never fully compete with the young talent’s affinity for the density and vitality of downtown Chicago, but creating walkable lively business districts attractive to young professionals should be considered in any future plans for the Corridor. Although the current market dynamics suggest that


Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan I 20

additional net office space may not be supported, a Corridor that offers modern office space and amenities, walkability, and connections to road and mass transit networks could lead to market conditions that would support new or redeveloped office space in the future. In the case of the Corridor, public investment in access and amenities could stimulate eventual private investment in the local office sector.

The Lake Cook Corridor and the rest of the regional suburban office market is currently facing a series of trends including 2 spaces growing prominence of build-to-suit office construction, corporate urban migration and an increasing focus on building amenities.

Office space in the Lake Cook Corridor will continue to rely on its strengths to occupy its spaces. However, for the Lake Cook Corridor’s

office space to remain competitive in the market, those weaknesses and trends that can be realistically addressed should be explored. Although additional net office space may not be supported given current market dynamics, a Corridor with modern office space and amenities, walkability and connections to road and mass transit networks could create market conditions to support new or redeveloped office space.

OFFICE MARKET KEY FINDINGS: SUBURBAN OFFICE SPACE ALLOCATION BY BUILDING CLASS (2016)

The Lake Cook Corridor has approximately 543,000 square feet of office space, which represents roughly a quarter of office space in the Village. The majority of the Corridor’s office stock is evenly distributed between Class A and Class B product. The office space in the Lake Cook Corridor is performing adequately with a vacancy rate of 19.8 percent and net absorption of 1.46 percent in 2016. The average rental rates are approximately $22 per square foot. The Lake Cook Corridor’s fair performance is heavily influenced by a variety of strengths (regional location, proximity to talented labor pool, affordable pricing and appealing office space) and weaknesses (lack of direct accessibility to the highway and mass transit networks and lack of amenities).

Lake Cook Corridor

Buffalo Grove 2,118,335

Chicago Suburbs

TOTAL INVENTORY, IN SQUARE FEET

542,832

CLASS A INVENTORY, IN SQUARE FEET (% OF TOTAL)

260,069 (48%)

1,088,963 (52%)

54,540,242 (54%)

1,354,153,437 (53%)

CLASS B INVENTORY, IN SQUARE FEET (% OF TOTAL)

267,763 (49%)

875,878 (41%)

39,573,830 (38%)

1,127,261,236 (44%)

CLASS C INVENTORY, IN SQUARE FEET (% OF TOTAL)

15,000 (3%)

153,494

7,894,644 (8%)

70,783,688 (3%)

(7%)

102,008,716

U.S. Suburbs Total 2,552,198,361

Source: JLL Research, CoStar.

OFFICE MARKET STATISTICS (2016) Lake-Cook Corridor

Buffalo Grove

Chicago Suburban

U.S. Suburban

TOTAL INVENTORY, IN SQUARE FEET

542,832

2,118,335

102,008,716

2,552,198,361

VACANCY RATE

19.80%

12.60%

19.10%

16.00%

AVERAGE GROSS RENT ($ PER SQUARE FOOT, PER YEAR)

$21.91

$23.62

$23.98

$27.23

INVENTORY UNDER CONSTRUCTION, AS A % OF INVENTORY

0.00%

0.00%

0.58%

2.33%

2016 ABSORPTION, AS A % OF INVENTORY

1.46%

1.28%

0.75%

1.25%

Source: JLL Research and CoStar.


21 I Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan

RETAIL OVERVIEW RETAIL MARKET TRENDS While the Lake Cook Corridor looks to overcome its challenges and fulfill its potential, it should be cognizant of emerging national retail trends. A key retail trend is the shift toward housing retail in lively, mixed-use destinations. The market is generally moving away from single-purpose developments such as strip malls and enclosed shopping centers and towards mixed-use destinations centers. Such centers feature densities and a mix of uses (residential, open space, office, and commercial) to create energy, provide critical mass and foster an urban feel in a suburban setting. Key to these developments is seamless integration of uses under a unified development design which ties into the surrounding area. Successful mixed-use destinations create an identity for a community and become a social gathering place and civic hub. They are particularly favorable to millennials who are looking to leave the city for the suburbs but would like to maintain the convenience and accessibility they have grown accustomed to in urban environments. An underlying component of mixed-use destination centers is walkability. Studies have found that walkability in suburban retail centers leads to increased retail sales, property values, and occupancy rates. Aside from known healthy and sustainability benefit, walkability has clear benefits for landlords and developers.

A recent academic paper (2016) by the University of Arizona declared that “all else being equal, the benefits of greater walkability were capitalized into higher retail and apartment values by up to 9 percent.” As walkability is on the rise, parking visibility is on the decline. Destination mixed-use and other commercial centers are moving away from large surface area parking lots in front of their retail stores and commercial businesses. Today’s centers are now accommodating parking by integrating it into development, utilizing screening, and otherwise reducing its visibility so that developments and centers are more pedestrianoriented instead of auto-oriented. Many are also utilizing on-street parking for tenants that generate high-turnover customers. In addition to the external environment, the retail market is also experiencing a shift in retail marketing and operations. Today’s retailers are moving towards experiential retail and focusing on the customer’s experience. According to Elite Wealth Management, there were 34 billion visits to U.S. stores in 2010; by 2015, that number was below 17 billion – essentially reduced by half. Research is finding that to attract customers and generate sales in-store, the customer must now have a memorable experience, either based on the level of customer service, the ability to socialize with others, interact with the products offered, or the uniqueness of the store's design. According to a 2016 survey conducted by the National Retail Federation, the “in-store experience” is now the single most important factor in determining whether or not a customer will return to a retail outlet after an initial visit. Starbucks has led the movement in experiential

retail. Starbucks effectively transformed a simple coffee shop into a space where people can conduct business meetings, socialize, or work independently while using the store’s free Wi-Fi. Grocery stores are also starting to follow this trend as chains such as Whole Foods have started to include meeting areas, alcohol and coffee bars and Wi-Fi in their layout. In doing so, they are effectively turning their grocery store into places to socialize, work and relax, as well as shop. Grocery stores are finding that integrating multiple formats helps them stay ahead of the competition. Other examples of retailers that focus on their customer experience include: • Sporting goods stores, which integrate climbing walls or fishing demonstrations • Outdoor outfitters, which offer classes, training, and group events or trips • Home improvement stores, which provide do-ityourself project instruction or clubs • Clothing retailers, which offer sophisticated fittings or personal advisors In addition to offering customers a meaningful experience, many retailers are also offering online shopping and in-store pick options for their customers. In doing so, their stores become a crucial link in retail supply and distribution. E-commerce continues to grow in its share of retail sales, however, it still represents only 9.5 percent of total retail sales. Consequently, creating a welcoming and relevant retail environment has become more important than ever.


Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan I 22

Beyond the procurement of goods, the focus on customer experience has extended to the realm of services and entertainment. New cinemas and theaters now offer in-house dining and alcoholic beverages, along with concerts, lectures, and live performances. According to a 2015 Washington Post analysis, luxury movie theaters have experienced a growth rate that is double that of standard theaters. In the realm of fitness, the fastest growing segment of the industry is sport-specific training studios such as spin classes, yoga studios and pilates, which offer their clients a customized experience beyond that of a traditional gym. This continued preference for experiential retail is specifically important to young professionals who are willing to spend more on fitness, dining and entertainment, and this trend appears poised to continue. A final key trend impacting the retail environment is the explosive growth of fast casual dining options. Fast casual dining is defined as a restaurant type that does not offer a full-service (wait-staff based) experience, but promises higher quality and customized food options compared to a fast food restaurant. Per the global research firm Euromonitor International (2016), fast casual dining was the fastest growing segment of the entire food service industry at an annual rate of 10.4 percent, while the food service industry grew at a rate of 5.7 percent. While this trend has been noted nationally, it has had significant impact in the Chicago metropolitan area. As consumers continue to increase their likelihood to dine outside the home, and seek quality in their food and experience beyond that of a fast food restaurant, the growth of the fast casual industry is expected to increase in the next several years.

RETAIL OUTLOOK

RETAIL MARKET KEY FINDINGS:

The retail space in the Lake Cook Corridor is under performing. It has high vacancy rate (17.4percent) and negative absorption, and it is at the risk of additional decline in economic performance. In order for the Corridor to attract enhanced retail and become a growth engine for Buffalo Grove, new development is necessary. This vision must show development conducive to today’s defining trends of the destination environment, experiential retail, and walkability. It should incorporate a mix of uses that include residential for critical mass as well as retail tenants that attract patrons to spend a few hours in the area rather than a quick trip.

The Lake Cook Corridor has approximately 574,000 square feet of retail space, which represents roughly one third of retail space in the Village. The majority of the Corridor’s retail space is located within the two centers of Buffalo Grove Town Center and Chase Plaza.

The retail space in the Lake Cook Corridor is under performing relative to the rest of Buffalo Grove and the surrounding competing suburbs. The vacancy rate exceeds the local and regional suburban rates and net absorption is negative.

The Lake Cook Corridor’s retail performance is negatively influenced by its outdated design, poor connectivity, nearby competition, ownership dynamics, and accessibility issues. However, the Corridor does have the benefits of high traffic exposure, good trade area demographics and favorable tax conditions.

As e-commerce still only represents 9.5 percent of retail sales, the brick and mortar retail market is not dead, but it is evolving. There is a notable rise of mixed-use destination centers, walkability, experiential retail and entertainment, and fast casual restaurants.

In order for the Corridor to attract enhanced retail and become a growth engine for Buffalo Grove, new development is necessary. This vision must show development conducive to today’s defining trends of the destination environment, experiential retail and walkability. It should be sure to incorporate a mix of uses that include residential for critical mass as well as retail tenants that attract patrons to spend a few hours in the area rather than a quick trip.

The vision must also focus on meeting the needs of the robust residential and employee base in Buffalo Grove, while being mindful of the competition that exists in nearby corridors. This may require the attraction of non-traditional retailers that transform the Corridor into a destination with a unique retail mix that is not found elsewhere in the corridor proximity.

RETAIL MARKET STATISTICS (2016) Corridor

Buffalo Grove

Chicago Suburban

U.S. Suburban

TOTAL INVENTORY, IN SQUARE FEET

574,276

1,800,997

255,749,481

10,485,381,153

VACANCY RATE

17.4%

11.9%

8.0%

7.9%

AVERAGE RENT ($ PER SQUARE FOOT, PER YEAR)

$17.10

$16.33

$15.44

$16.54

2016 ABSORPTION, AS A % OF INVENTORY

-0.67%

0.36%

0.88%

1.01%

Source: JLL Research and CoStar data.


23 I Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan


Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan I 24

I

EXISTING CONDITIONS SUMMARY


25 I Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan

WAUKEGAN / MILWAUKEE

REGIONAL CONTEXT

DEER PARK Buffalo Grove BARRINGTON

NORTHBROOK

94

294

90

SCHAUMBURG

LE MI .5 12

International Airport. Located along Lake Cook Road, the Village has strategic access to the main Interstate Highway system (I-90, I-94, and I-294) in the region and is a major thoroughfare for the surrounding communities.

D

EVANSTON

TR AI N

O’Hare International Airport

in 0M /3

M ile

/1 Hr DR IV E

CHICAGO 355

Loop

290

APTAKISIC RD

1 MILE

Regional Context

BUFFALO GROVE STATION

LAKE COUN FOREST PRESERV

CKER

RD

Golf Course

Chase Business Plaza Park

Municipal Campus

Town Place

D

CHE

DR

OLD

BUFFALO CREEK FOREST PRESERVE

DEERFIELD PKWY

LAN

CHECKER RD

83

WEI

Buffalo Grove is along the Metra (commuter) rail line’s North Central Service (NCS) corridor which connects Chicago Union Station and Antioch. The Village can be accessed by two train stations, Buffalo Grove and Prairie View station, located along the eastern boundary of the Village.

N BUFFALO GROVE RD

CORRIDOR CONTEXT

N ARLINGTON HEIGHTS RD

Lake Cook Road generally follows the boundary of two major counties of Chicago, Lake County to the north and Cook County to the south. The road essentially divides the Village between these two county jurisdictions.

/1 Hr

ARLINGTON HEIGHTS

ROCKFORD/ MADISON

25

Buffalo Grove is a suburban community in the Metropolitan Chicago area. The Village is approximately 35 miles northwest of downtown Chicago and approximately 20 miles north of O’Hare

HIGHLAND PARK

/1 hr TR AI N

REGIONAL POSITION

LAKE COOK

RI VE

OVERVIEW

VERNON HILLS

Town Center The Grove 294

94

LAKE COOK RD

K AU ILW

HE

53

NR YR

D

EE E AV

S ELMHURST RD

E DUNDEE RD

S DE

NM

MC

0.5 MILE

Corridor Context WHEELING


Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan I 26

LAKE COOK CORRIDOR

PARKCHESTER PARK

Strathmore

Parkchester Estates

MIKE RYLKO COMMUNITY PARK

The Highlands

Village Boundary

WILLOW STREAM PARK

CKER

RD

Vintage

B

UF FA LO

K EE CR

WEI

472 Ac

Business Campus

Chase Plaza

St. Mary Church

Police Dept

Wyndham Garden Hotel

Golf ClubPublic Works Village Hall

Symphony of Buffalo Grove Staples

BoA Walmart

O AL FF

Sam’s Club

OV GR

Buffalo Grove Park District

E RD 0.1 MILE

Buffalo Grove

Arlington Heights

Target

BU

EMMERICH EAST PARK

P BLVD UP RA

WEIDNER DR

Strathmore

LAKE COOK RD

St. Mary School

Shell Walgreens

JewelOsco

Northwood Grove

S

NorthShore Medical Group

Corridor Boundary

The Grove

Circle Drive GOLF COURSE

Ridgewood

Buffalo Grove Town Center Performing Arts Center

Turnberry

R RD

PNC Burdeen’s Jewelry

USPS

Manchester Greens

DNE

PAULINE AVE

Town Place

GROVE RD

CHE

Roseglen Lexington Glen

N BUFFALO

E

CH

D GROVE DR

E CK

OLD

LAKE COOK RD

CH

EN Belmont RY RD Village Assisted Living

DR

R

CHECKER RD

BUFFALO CREEK FOREST PRESERVE

M

BP

ROA D

HI G HL AN

Cherbourg

ND

LAKE COOK CORRIDOR

ARLINGTON HTS RD

There are four major single-family attached developments within the study area, which is 37.7 acres in total with approximately 350 housing units. Single-family detached makes up a smaller portion at 72 units and 15.7 acres in total. The number of multifamily homes in the Town Place, Manchester Green, and Turnberry developments is 267 units in total. Among these, the highest density is Town Place at 27.9 units/acre. At the north end of the study area, Belmont Village Assisted Living for seniors has 158

BUFFALO GR STATION

HIGHLAND POINT PARK

Metra Station and three miles away from the Prairie View Metra Station. At approximately 472 acres, the study area is comprised of Town Center, Buffalo Grove Golf Club, the Village municipal campus, Buffalo Grove Business Park, Chase Plaza, the Grove, and residential neighborhoods. The area is a mix of single-family and multi-family residential, municipal institutions, educational uses, hotels, shopping centers, offices, cultural assets, and municipal open spaces.

There is a 45.5-acre Buffalo Grove Business Park at intersection of Arlington Heights Road and Lake Cook Road.

ILA

The study area is bordered by residential neighborhoods to the north, south, and east. Along the western border is the Buffalo Creek Forest Preserve that serves as a connection to the wider stream network throughout the area. The Corridor is approximately two miles away from the Buffalo Grove

units, with a density of 35.11 units/acre. Buffalo Grove Town Center, Chase Plaza and The Grove occupy 25.1 acres, 9.2 acres and 9.7 acres accordingly, which are the three major retail developments in the area.

WE

The study area is bound by Arlington Heights Road, Old Checker Road, N. Buffalo Grove Road, IL-83 McHenry Road, and Lake Cook Road.


27 I Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan

ZONING AND LAND USE

EXISTING LAND USE Village Boundary

OVERVIEW While there are numerous land uses indicated on the existing zoning map, the current conditions generally break down into three primary usage categories: residential, business, and office and research districts. The land use pattern in the Village is typical of other Chicagoland suburban neighborhoods. Land use in the district generally follows the zoning classification with the exception of the open spaces being zoned as residential.

Corridor Boundary

Single-Family Residential Multi-Family Residential Retail, Entertainment, Hotel Industrial Office Institutional

10% Open Space

7% Golf Course

2.8% Vacant Land

1% Agriculture 4% Transportation, Utilities & Waste

Hydrology Open Space Golf Course Vacant Land Transportation,Utilities and Waste

0.2% Under Construction

500 FT

0.7% Vacant Land

0.8% Hydrology

0.4% Hydrology

5% Multi-Family Residential

48% Single-Family Residential

5% Institutional

31% Golf Course

19% Retail, Entertainment & Hotel

10% Open Space

3% Office

12% Institutional

9% Industrial 5% Retail, Entertainment & Hotel

9% Single-Family Residential

5% Multi-Family Residential

Village Land Use Percentage

11% Office

1.4% Transportation, Utilities & Waste

Lake Cook Corridor Land Use Percentage

KEY FINDINGS 1. Inconsistency of Zoning Code with Land Use Within the study area there is an inconsistency of the zoning designation with the current land use. For instance, many of the open spaces and parks within the study 500 FT area, including the Buffalo Grove Golf Club and Willow 0.2 MILE Stream Park, are zoned residential. This inconsistency may cause confusion in setting a plan for the Corridor that can accurately guide future development. The study should consider better aligning zoning designations with anticipated land uses. 2. Diverse Land Use Components The Corridor study area has a more diverse and balanced land use profile compared to the Village’s overall land use mix. Open space plays a comparatively large role in the district, at 41 percent. Retail, entertainment, and hotel, the second largest category, makes up 19 percent of all land use. Residential is the next largest land use at 14 percent combined. The future planning of the Corridor has the opportunity to build on this diversity by focusing on a mix of uses, including residential mass, as identified

in the Market Analysis Report. In doing so, some elements of the current zoning designation and land use codes may need to be addressed in order to accommodate new typologies of mixed use suburban development including residential, commercial, and parking strategies. 3. Minimal Vacant Land, but Large Underutilized Spaces Only 3.1 acres, or 0.7% of the land area is vacant within the study area. This percentage is low compared to the overall Village and the region. However, along the Corridor there are large commercial developments that are significantly underutilized in terms of the quantity and quality of retail and commercial tenants. Furthermore, the amount of land area that these developments occupy is large compared to the amenities and tax base they provide to the Village. The parking area of the three main retail developments is at a ratio that is higher than the baseline Village zoning requirement. Consideration should be given to strategies that seek to reinvigorate these developments to become better performing retail centers or promote redevelopment of these areas with products that are more in tune with the current and future retail and commercial marketplace. 4. Lack of Consistent Character/Identity The study area is comprised of various building uses, sizes, and types built at different times in different architectural styles. The lack of an updated comprehensive plan or design standards has made it difficult to control the character of the district and the relationship between properties. The plan should facilitate development and a public realm that works together with the adjacent properties to form a cohesive district and a consistent identity.


Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan I 28

HYDROLOGY AND FLOODPLAIN

690Ft

68 5F t

RD 678

o

RD

7Ft

ff al

Cr ee

k

678Ft

S O AL FF

BU

MIKE RYLKO COMMUNITY PARK

OV GR

P

E

VD BL

RD

500 FT

H IG HL A

ND GROVE DR

M

CH

Village Boundary

EN

RY

RD

PAULINE AVE

O GROVE N BUFFAL RD

U

HIG POI

CHERBOURG PARK

N

68

ILA

RD

FF AL O

WEID

NER

RD

BUFFALO GROVE GOLF COURSE

O AL FF

P

E

OV GR

VD BL

CH RI K E M AR EM ST P A E

BU

LAKE COOK RD

UP RA

RD

WEIDNER DR

Trails Water features Golf Course Parks Forest Preserve

S

Corridor Boundary

500 FT

WE

0F

NER

673Ft

t

WEID

1. Floodplain Constraints 120 acres (12.8 percent) of the Corridor’s land lies LAKE COOK RD within the FEMA designated flood-ways and 100-year LAKE COOK RD Water features (River, Pond, Wetland) floodplain. A large portion of this area lies within the Flood-way 1% Annual Chance Flood Hazard Buffalo Grove Golf Club. While possible, modification 0.2% Annual Chance Flood Hazard to the floodplain and retention areas will necessitate approvals through numerous governmental and regulatory agencies and incur costs associated OPEN SPACE & PEDESTRIAN/BIKE TRAILS with such work. However, addressing flooding in the Corridor in a comprehensive and appropriate NICOLE DR PARK way, in balance with the other goals, objectives and R KE C CHECKER RD E CH constraints of the plan, allows for the most impactful WILLOW STREAM PARK redevelopment opportunity within the Corridor and OLD CHE CKER RD will reduce the impact on the downstream properties. 2. Open Space Accessibility and Connectivity A number of parks and open spaces are adjacent to BUFFALO CREEK the Corridor Study Area. Being adjacent toFOREST thesePRESERVE important natural and recreational assets in the area, the Corridor has a unique opportunity to leverage LAKE COOK RD this potential connectivity to complete and enhance a publicly accessible and well-connected open space network throughout the Village.

PAULINE AVE

EK RE C

As the largest single land area within the study area, the Buffalo Grove Golf Club is one of the largest open spaces within the Village. Utilized as a floodplain, the

CKER

B

the Corridor has a unique opportunity to leverage this potential connectivity to complete and enhance a publicly accessible and well-connected open space network throughout the Village.

CHE

Bu

ARLINGTON HTS RD

Parks and Open Spaces A number of parks and open spaces are adjacent to the Corridor Study Area. Being adjacent to these important natural and recreational assets in the area,

OLD

UP RA

Farrington Ditch enters the area from the north under Old Checker Road and continues in a southward direction through a pond and a series of closed conduits before its confluence with Buffalo Creek.

RD

EC

Farrington Ditch

The creek drains through the area in an open channel. The study area consists of both regulatory floodplain and flood-way associated with the creek. The creek then flows south through a bridge under Lake Cook Road. The residential properties located along the south side of the creek, south of Lake Cook Road, have experienced flooding. The structures on the properties are located above the flood plain.

KEY FINDINGS

RY

O GROVE N BUFFAL

area from 11.2 from

R KE

CH

ARLINGTON HTS RD

Hydrology The major watercourse through the study is Buffalo Creek, which traverses the area northwest to southeast. Buffalo Creek runs miles long as a tributary of the Des Plaines River west to east.

EN

DR

ILA ND

CH

WE

M

OVERVIEW South of Lake Cook Road, at the intersection withCHECKER RD Raupp Boulevard is Emmerich Park which is home to the Park District and serves the community through additional sports fields and multi-purpose open space.

ND GROVE DR

course serves the dual function of municipal amenity and civil infrastructure.

H IG HL A

ENVIRONMENTAL FEATURES


29 I Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan

B. Collector Streets Collector streets distribute traffic between the major streets and the local streets . The collector streets in the Lake Cook Corridor are all controlled

C. Local Streets Local streets provide direct access to private property and are accessed from the major streets and collectors. All remaining streets in the Lake Cook Corridor are classified as local streets and are controlled and maintained by the Village. These streets are generally two-lanes wide with parking permitted or restricted on one or both sides.

CH

EN

CHECKER RD

RY

RD

E

CH

OLD

CHE

CKER

RD

PAULINE AVE

RD

ARLINGTON HTS RD

A. Major Streets Major streets function as the primary travel routes through suburban areas and serve the broader region while connecting with the collectors and local streets. Major streets also carry high volumes of traffic at higher speeds, which can require design modifications in a commercial core area to calm traffic flow and ensure pedestrian safety.

R

E CK

DR

O GROVE N BUFFAL

STREETS Functional Classification and Jurisdiction

ND

M

ROA D

H IG H

STREETS, TRAFFIC AND SIGNAL CONTROL

LA ND GROVE DR

of the community. More than 70,000 vehicles pass through this central commercial area each day. An ideal transportation system in a suburban commercial core area is a comprehensive and multi-modal network of facilities that provide convenient access to goods and services, efficient vehicular circulation, safe mobility for pedestrians and bicyclists, and adequate parking for patrons and employees.

and maintained by the Village of Buffalo Grove and include Checker Road, Old Checker Road, Weidner Road, Raupp Boulevard, and Pauline Avenue. The collectors have limited continuity, are generally twolane streets with parking on one or both sides, and carry traffic volumes ranging from 1,650 to 3,100 vehicles per day.

ILA

OVERVIEW Lake Cook Road is a major gateway into and through Buffalo Grove as it connects the Village with the regional highway system to the east (Tri-State Tollway) and west (IL-53). Over the next couple of years, Lake Cook Road is scheduled for widening from Raupp Boulevard to Hastings Road. The convergence of Lake Cook Road with three of the Village’s north-south major streets, Buffalo Grove Road, IL-83 McHenry Road, and Arlington Heights Road forms the commercial core

Road, as well as Arlington Heights Road and Buffalo Grove Road to the south of Lake Cook Road, are controlled and maintained by Cook County. Arlington Heights Road and Buffalo Grove Road to the north of Lake Cook Road are controlled and maintained by Lake County. IL-83 McHenry Road is controlled and maintained by lDOT. These streets have a five-lane cross-section with two travel lanes in each direction and a center median that accommodates a left-turn lane at key intersections. The streets carry traffic volumes ranging from 11,400 to 39,600 vehicles per day.

WE

TRANSPORTATION AND TRANSIT

WEI

DNE

R RD

Major Street Collector Street Local Street IL State Route

LAKE COOK RD

County Highway S

Traffic Signal

BU

Stop Sign

O AL FF

LAKE COOK RD

Yield Sign

E RD

VD BL

OV GR

P UP RA

WEIDNER DR

The major streets in the Lake Cook Corridor are all under county or state jurisdiction, which limits the ability of the Village to unilaterally make improvements, control access, or unify street character. Lake Cook

Truck Route 500 FT

Average Daily Traffic (IDOT, 2014-2015)


Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan I 30

KEY FINDINGS 1.Coordination with Programmed County Transportation Capacity Projects The current four-lane road capacity of Lake Cook Road is inadequate accommodating the peak hour volumes using the roadway. When combined with the short spacing between the signalized intersections at Buffalo Grove Road, IL-83 McHenry Road and Weiland Road, substantial congestion currently occurs in the Corridor during the weekday peak periods, which can impede access and be a detriment to the success of the existing and future commercial businesses in the Corridor. Cook County’s Lake Cook Road widening plan will improve traffic operations and must be incorporated into the land use/transportation plan for the Corridor. The Village should continue to be an active participant in this project and other regional transportation projects that impact the Lake Cook Corridor, which is a key action step in the Village’s Economic Development Strategic Plan. 2. Internal Street Continuity within the Corridor There are no continuous north-south routes through the central and western portions of the Corridor between Arlington Heights Road and Buffalo Grove Road, a distance of over one mile. This is primarily due to the presence of the Buffalo Grove Golf Course. East-west continuity is also limited by the golf course, between Weidner Road and Church Road, and by the Buffalo Grove Town Center between Buffalo Grove Road and IL-83 McHenry Road. Local traffic cannot maneuver through the Corridor without encountering traffic, especially during rush hour. Further, the layout of the Buffalo Grove Town Center results in an inefficient street connection along Old

Checker Road between Buffalo Grove Road and IL83 McHenry Road. Any redevelopment plans within the Corridor should address these discontinuities to pull the Corridor together into a single cohesive commercial core. 3. Access to Public Transit Service Residents and employees in the Lake Cook Corridor do not currently have convenient access to scheduled (fixed-route) public transit service. With a Metra commuter rail stations located just two miles away, this lack of access results in increased automobile travel and may hamper efforts by Corridor businesses to attract and/or retain employees that reside in the City of Chicago or other non-local areas. There is a close correlation between development density and transit ridership, and redevelopment plans for the Lake Cook Corridor could be the impetus for a greater demand in public transit service to the benefit of current and future residents and employees. 4. Enhancing Connectivity, Closing Bicycle and Pedestrian System Gaps, and Increasing Street Crossing Safety Enhancing the multi-modal infrastructure in the Village and improving the commuter’s “last mile” is another key action step in the Economic Development Strategic Plan. The trail network is not entirely comprehensive, as the northern and southern neighborhoods divided by Lake Cook Road still lack effective connecting trails. There are a few gaps in the bicycle and pedestrian network that should be closed to maintain a continuous system throughout the Lake Cook Corridor and accommodate comfortable off-street travel between the Corridor’s residential subdivisions, businesses areas, and shopping centers.

These improvements could include the construction of new bicycle path or sidewalk segments, installation of new on-street bikeways (e.g. combined bike/parking lanes, paved shoulders or shared-lane markings), or replacement of existing narrower sidewalk with wider sidepaths or trails. The signalized intersections within the Corridor are the safest locations for pedestrians and bicyclists to cross the street. Several approaches of these intersections lack crosswalks, pedestrian signals, and/or countdown displays. Further, many of the crosswalks are worn or of the standard parallel line style that is less visible to motorists. The three mid-block pedestrian crossings on Old Checker Road that lead into Willow Stream Park would also benefit from supplemental safety enhancements. There is also a need for more widespread bicycle parking infrastructure within the major shopping centers in the Corridor, the Buffalo Grove Business Park, and the parks and forest preserve to encourage travel by bicycle for short-distance trips by area residents, employees, visitors and patrons.


31 I Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan


Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan I 32

PART

2I

CORE PRINCIPLES AND GOALS THE 10 GUIDING PRINCIPLES 4 KEY GOALS


33 I Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan

PRINCIPLES AND GOALS Creating a Corridor Plan with strong community engagement at its core was of utmost importance to the Village. To achieve this objective, the project team distilled and translated the main outreach findings into the meaningful guidelines that steered the development of the Vision and the Plan. These guidelines include the 10 Guiding Principles and the 4 Key Goals.

THE 10 GUIDING PRINCIPLES The first public meeting and early outreach activities yielded community input on the Plan’s scope, content, and general process. The project team summarized these findings into 10 Guiding Principles. As these were established early in the planning process, they provided a strong foundation and general guidance during the Plan’s initial development. The Corridor Plan should:

1 BE A UNIFIED AND COHESIVE MASTER PLAN FOR THE AREA.

2 INCORPORATE A DESTINATION AND CENTRAL GATHERING SPACE FOR THE COMMUNITY.

3

4

PROVIDE A DIVERSE MIX OF USES.

Retail Food & Beverage

Office

FEATURE DEVELOPMENT THAT IS SUSTAINABLE (ENVIRONMENTALLY, SOCIALLY, AND FISCALLY).

5 PROVIDE A WELCOMING GATEWAY TO THE VILLAGE.

Housing

The Corridor Plan should recommend that the Corridor retain its mix of uses and where The Corridor Vision and Plan

The Corridor Plan should

appropriate and feasible, look

As the Corridor Plan is a long-

The Corridor Plan should look

should study all the varying

include specific ideas and

to integrate and house a mix of

range plan, all development

to capitalize on the Corridor’s

elements and dynamics in the

recommendations to create a

uses in a single development or

ideas should show a high level of

function as a community gateway

Corridor and look to better unify

destination/central gathering

several developments (mixed-

sustainability. This sustainability

by indicating the arrival into

and coordinate them.

space in the Corridor. This type

use development). Areas with

should extend to environmental,

Buffalo Grove as well as invoke a

of environment would provide

a mix of uses and mixed-use

social, and fiscal considerations.

sense of Buffalo Grove’s identity

a stronger sense of identity,

developments tend to increase

vibrancy, and community

walkability and vitality and can

character for Buffalo Grove.

decrease traffic.

and community character.


Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan I 34

6

7

8

9

10

MITIGATE TRAFFIC CONGESTION.

FEATURE MULTI-MODAL ACCESSIBILITY FOR VEHICLES, PEDESTRIANS, AND BICYCLES

INCORPORATE RECREATIONAL AND CULTURAL AMENITIES AND OPEN SPACE.

PROVIDE BROADLY ACCESSIBLE OPEN SPACES.

FEATURE CONCEPTS THAT ARE EMBRACED BY THE COMMUNITY.

The Corridor Plan should look

The Corridor Plan should look

Although the Corridor is currently

All new open spaces added to

The Plan’s process should

to mitigate and calm traffic

to expand the accessibility of

home to some recreational and

the Corridor should be broadly

focus on building consensus

congestion in and around the

the Corridor beyond vehicles to

cultural amenities and open

and publicly accessible for all to

for a vision. Broad support from

Corridor where possible and

include pedestrians and bicycles.

space, the Plan should look

enjoy.

the community is critical to its

appropriate.

Such accessibility can help

to emphasize and enhance

increase vitality, enhance existing pedestrian and bicycle networks in the Village and help generate additional foot traffic necessary to support commercial centers.

these assets in the Corridor. Such assets can increase the Corridor’s appeal and distinctive character.

success.


35 I Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan

4 KEY GOALS During later stages of the project, the project team elicited more specific feedback from the community on the Corridor’s future. This feedback was distilled into Four Key Goals and used to guide the development and refinement of the Corridor’s Vision. These goals are related to the following elements: • Existing Assets • Land Use & Development •Accessibility • Open Space & Natural Resources As the 4 Key Goals was established after and built upon the 10 Guiding Principles, many concepts are re-emphasized.

CKER

Vintage

GOLF COURSE

Shell St. Mary Walgreens Church St. Mary BoA School

Police Dept Golf Club

JewelOsco

Staples

Target BUFFALO CREEK FOREST PRESERVE

LAKE COOK RD Walmart

UF FA LO

CENTRAL CORRIDOR

CHASE PLAZA + Business OFFICE AREA Campus Chase FUTURE Plaza OFFICE/RETAIL REDEVELOPMENT

OPEN SPACE AND GOLF COURSE OPTIONS WITH THE POTENTIAL FOR NER RESIDENTIAL RD & RETAIL DEVELOPMENT GOLF COURSE OPPORTUNITIES

WEID

Public Works

Village Hall

ROA D ND

JewelOsco

Buffalo Grove Staples

Target

Walmart Sam’s Club

E

OV GR RD

RD

BLVD

Buffalo Grove Park District

500 FT

Fixture

EMMERICH EAST PARK

O AL FF

LAKE COOK RD

MIXED-USE CENTER

Shell St. Mary Walgreens Church St. Mary BoA School

P UP RA

E

OV GR Strathmore

WEIDNER DR

O AL FF

BLVD

Buffalo Grove Park District

Sam’s Club

Turnberry COMMERCIAL/

BU

NorthShore Medical Group

Corridor Boundary

Circle Drive Police Dept

Golf Club

PNC Burdeen’s Jewelry

Buffalo Grove TOWN CENTER & Town Center Performing GROVE SHOPPING Arts Center CENTER The AREA Grove Symphony of

USPS

Manchester Greens

Wyndham Garden Hotel

BU

EMMERICH EAST PARK

Vintage

ILA

Village Boundary

ROA D ND ILA Symphony of Buffalo Grove

Lexington Glen

RD

PAULINE AVE

Town Place

S

Village Hall

P UP RA

LAKE COOK RD

Public Works

S

NorthShore Medical Group

WEIDNER DR

Strathmore

Circle Drive

Wyndham Garden Hotel

Corridor Boundary

The Grove

Turnberry

RD

PNC Burdeen’s Jewelry

Buffalo Grove Town Center Performing Arts Center

CKER

RD

Chase Plaza

USPS

CHE

Roseglen

K EE CR

NER

Business Campus

WILLOW STREAM PARK

OLD

Manchester Greens

K EE CR

WEID

C

Town Place

B

RD

UF FA LO

DR

R

KE

C HE

CHECKER RD

ARLINGTON HTS RD

Roseglen

RD

B

ARLINGTON HTS RD LAKE COOK RD

CHE

PAULINE AVE

O GROVE N BUFFAL

WILLOW STREAM PARK

OLD

Lexington Glen

O GROVE N BUFFAL

C

M CH EN Belmont RY RD Village Assisted Living BP

WE

Village Boundary

DR

Cherbourg

D GROVE DR

R

KE

C HE

EN Belmont RY RD Village Assisted Living

The Highlands

HI G HL AN

CH

BP

BUFFALO CREEK FOREST PRESERVE

HI G HL AN D GROVE DR

M

Parkchester Estates

MIKE RYLKO COMMUNITY PARK

The Highlands

Cherbourg

CHECKER RD

Strathmore

Parkchester Estates

MIKE RYLKO COMMUNITY PARK

WE

Strathmore

500 FT

Buffalo Grove

Buffalo Grove

1. EXISTING ASSETS

2. LAND USE DEVELOPMENT

Integrate the Corridor’s existing assets into the future vision. Existing Assets refers to some of the more permanent aspects of the Corridor such as the residential areas as well as key institutions located in and around the Corridor such as St. Mary’s Parish and the Chicago Jewish Funeral Parlor. The Plan should look to incorporate these assets into the vision.

Encourage a mix of land uses and development/redevelopment in the Corridor that can be supported by the market. To help ensure the long-term success and economic vitality of the Corridor, the plan should identify areas for development, redevelopment and reinvestment as well as a mix of uses. All of the land use and development recommendations should be grounded in market realities.


Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan I 36

Turnberry Circle Drive

GOLF COURSE

Wyndham Garden Hotel

EAST W EST

CONNECTION

Golf Club

PNC Burdeen’s Jewelry

Shell St. Mary Walgreens Church St. Mary BoA School

Police Dept Public Works

JewelOsco

Staples

Target BUFFALO CREEK FOREST PRESERVE

LAKE COOK RD Walmart

UF FA LO

WEID

NER

Business Campus

Chase Plaza

Golf Club

Village Hall

ROA D ND

JewelOsco

Symphony of Buffalo Grove Staples

Target

Walmart

EMMERICH EAST PARK

Sam’s Club

E

OV GR RD

RD

BLVD

Buffalo Grove Park District

O AL FF

BU

LAKE COOK RD

Public Works

P UP RA

E

OV GR Strathmore

Shell St. Mary Walgreens Church St. Mary BoA School

Police Dept NorthShore Medical Group

WEIDNER DR

O AL FF

BLVD

Buffalo Grove Park District

Sam’s Club

The Grove

Turnberry GOLF COURSE

Corridor Boundary

Buffalo Grove Town Center Performing Arts Center

Circle Drive

Wyndham Garden Hotel

PNC Burdeen’s Jewelry

USPS

Manchester Greens

RD

BU

EMMERICH EAST PARK

Vintage

ILA

Village Boundary

ROA D ND ILA Symphony of Buffalo Grove

Lexington Glen

RD

PAULINE AVE

Town Place

S

Village Hall

P UP RA

WEIDNER DR

LAKE COOK RD

The Grove

S

NorthShore Medical Group

Corridor Boundary

Strathmore

NORTH SOUTH CON NECTION

Business Campus

Chase Plaza

RD

CKER

RD

NER

Manchester Greens

Buffalo Grove Town Center Performing Arts Center

CHE

Roseglen

K EE CR

K EE CR

WEID

WILLOW STREAM PARK

OLD

USPS

500 FT

B

RD

UF FA LO

DR

C

Town Place

CTION CONNE

Vintage

R

KE

C HE

CHECKER RD

ARLINGTON HTS RD

Roseglen

RD

PAULINE AVE

H TH SOUT ER NOR CENT WN TO

CKER

B

ARLINGTON HTS RD LAKE COOK RD

CHE

M CH EN Belmont RY RD Village Assisted Living

O GROVE N BUFFAL

WILLOW STREAM PARK

OLD

Lexington Glen

O GROVE N BUFFAL

C

Cherbourg BP

WE

Village Boundary

DR

HI G HL A

R

KE

C HE

EN Belmont RY RD Village Assisted Living

The Highlands

N D GROVE DR

CH

BP

BUFFALO CREEK FOREST PRESERVE

HI G HL AN D GROVE DR

M

Parkchester Estates

MIKE RYLKO COMMUNITY PARK

The Highlands

Cherbourg

CHECKER RD

Strathmore

Parkchester Estates

MIKE RYLKO COMMUNITY PARK

WE

Strathmore

500 FT Buffalo Grove

Buffalo Grove

500 FT

3. ACCESSIBILITY

4. OPEN SPACE AND NATURAL RESOURCES

Create new and enhance existing connections within the Corridor. To mitigate traffic and create multi-modal accessibility, the Plan should provide new connections to ease bottlenecks, unlock access to new development sites, and provide greater neighborhood accessibility for residents to get in and around the Corridor. In addition, it needs to enhance existing connections with improved infrastructure, particularly for pedestrian and bicycle modes.

Enhance the Corridor’s existing open spaces, create new publicly accessible open spaces, and be sensitive to key environmental features. Open space and natural resources refers to active and passive open spaces as well as environmental features such as Buffalo Creek and Farrington Ditch. Future development should look to continuously balance open space and the built environment and provide new open space options that are publicly accessible. The Vision and Plan should also be sensitive to the area’s existing environmental features.

As the 4 Key Goals were integral to the Visioning process, the finalized Vision (presented in the next chapter) reflects and implements these core goals.


37 I Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan


Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan I 38

PART

3I

THE VISION A SCALED DEVELOPMENT APPROACH

STAGE 1: REDESIGNING TOWN CENTER & CHASE PLAZA STAGE 2: RE-IMAGINING CENTRAL CORRIDOR STAGE 3: FUTURE PROGRESSION


39 I Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan

EXISTING CONDITION

STAGE 1: REDESIGNING TOWN CENTER AND CHASE PLAZA

500 FT

STAGE 2: RE-IMAGINING CENTRAL CORRIDOR

Proposed Redevelopment Proposed New/Enhanced Street Connections

Proposed Redevelopment Proposed New/Enhanced Street Connections

500 FT

STAGE 3: FUTURE PROGRESSION

500 FT

Proposed Redevelopment Proposed New/Enhanced Street Connections

500 FT


Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan I 40

A SCALED DEVELOPMENT APPROACH The Vision for the Lake Cook Corridor Plan has been designed to guide the Village in making land use and development decisions. As a long-term vision, it needs to be specific enough to provide a clear picture of the Corridor’s future. However, it also needs to be flexible enough to respond to changing market demands and needs. Consequently, the vision presents general parameters not the exact specifications of the type and character of development that could occur. As noted in earlier sections, community outreach and market research led to the development of the guiding principles and key goals which helped to define the vision for the area. This vision results in a plan that utilizes a scaled approach that balances opportunities in the Corridor with market demands, now and in the future. The vision’s initial focus will be on key sites that are currently ripe for redevelopment. The focus then progresses to redevelop other areas of the Corridor as market demand increases or changes, and as the Village’s needs and decision making processes align with the longer term recommendations of the plan. All stages incorporate open space and provide options for maintaining or redesigning the golf course and/or exploring other open space options. The stages of the Corridor Plan are not intended to be associated with specific timelines, but suggest

a general order of potential development projects based on what is known about current market demand, the overall priorities expressed by the community and reflected in the 4 Key Goals. The flexibility of the Plan allows that if a particular part of the Corridor were to be considered for redevelopment out of sequence with the stages outlined due to differing circumstances, development could occur assuming the proposed deviation and project has the support of the Village.

STAGE 1: REDESIGNING TOWN CENTER CHASE PLAZA Concentrate on redeveloping two key sites.

AND

Highlights: Redesign Town Center into a walkable, vibrant, citycenter for the community with a new Main Street. • Redevelop Chase Plaza into a more modern retail plaza as well as an enhanced office park. • Retain open space flexibility by allowing for the existing golf course, park programming, or some • combination of the two.

STAGE 2: RE-IMAGINING CENTRAL CORRIDOR With the appropriate amount of market demand, the focus shifts towards redeveloping other sites in the corridor. Highlights: • Redevelop the existing municipal campus into residential and retail developments. • New east-west roadway connection along Church Street. • Open space flexibility Modified golf course and/or other open space programming. STAGE 3: FUTURE PROGRESSION Stage 3 looks further into the future. When market demand continues, the focus turns towards integrating and balancing open space and development, improving northsouth connectivity, and unifying new development with the existing character. Highlights: • Future development and redevelopment may include trail networks, multi-family housing, retail stores, and hotel. • Open space integration and options for golf activities and/ or various open space programming. New north-south roadway connection and improved eastwest connections.


41 I Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan


Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan I 42

I

THE STAGES


43 I Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan

BIRD EYE VIEW

N


Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan I 44

STAGE 1: REDESIGNING TOWN CENTER & CHASE PLAZA OVERVIEW

KEY HIGHLIGHTS/STRATEGIES Stage 1 allows the Village to begin implementation of the Plan with redevelopment that aligns with the needs and priorities of the Village. It serves as a critical catalyst that will initiate transformation by focusing on the underutilized sites of the Corridor and taking advantage of already improved land with existing utilities and infrastructure in place. Stage 1 focuses on the redevelopment of two key areas of the Corridor 1) Town Center and adjoining properties and 2) Chase Plaza. The Vision is to develop these two areas into mixed-use, pedestrianfocused commercial centers. Improved street connectivity and a focus on pedestrian-friendly public spaces will not only provide better access and circulation through these mixeduse districts, but also provide the framework for what will become a vibrant Village Center and establish a new identity for Buffalo Grove.

Town Center would be a walkable, vibrant, city-center for the community with a new Main Street.

Redesigned Town Center would be better connected to its surroundings.

Chase Plaza would be a more modern retail plaza as well as an enhanced office park.

Buffalo Grove Golf Club remains as golf course, park programming, or some combination of the two.


45 I Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan

SITE PLAN

SITE PLAN LEGEND

1 2

3

4 5

6

7

8

1

Retail

2

Entry Plaza

3

Multi-family Residential

4

Retail Street

5

Piazza

6

Village Plaza

7

Entertainment+Retail

8

Parking Garage

9

Office

10

Retail

11

Office Campus

12

Shopping Plaza

12

9

11

10

500 FT Proposed Redevelopment Proposed New/Enhanced Street Connections


Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan I 46

BUILDING USES

Retail Multi-family Residential Single-family Residential Entertainment Office Parking

Town Center Chase Plaza Office east of Chase Plaza Retail south of Lake Cook and east of Weidner Retail east of Weidner Summary

Retail (sq ft) 576,100 201,600

STAGE 1 BUILDING USE SUMMARY Entertainment Office Civic Multi-Family (sq ft) (sq ft) (sq ft) (sq ft) 45,600 401,800

Multi-Family (Units) 335

Town homes (sq ft)

Town homes (Units)

335

N/A

N/A

248,600 21,200 24,800 823,700

45,600

248,600

N/A

401,800


ROAD

47 I Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan

EN

DR

RY

WEI LA

CH

ND

M

CH

R

KE

EC

CHECKER RD

RD PAULINE AVE

KER

RD

ARLINGTON HTS RD

GROVE RD

CHEC

N BUFFALO

OLD

View from here

3

LAKE COOK RD

S O AL FF

BU E OV GR

24

RD

VD BL

NER DR

P UP RA

WE ID

Key Plan

LAKE COOK RD

A VISION FOR LAKE COOK CORRIDOR


Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan I 48

LAND USE & DEVELOPMENT VILLAGE CENTER: A ENTERTAINMENT CENTER

A NEW MAIN STREET, COMMUNITY PUBLIC SPACES MIXED

USE

&

The Vision is to transform the existing shopping center into a walkable and active mixed-use Village Center for the community to stroll, shop and dine. The development will be centered on a new two-way Main Street that is pedestrian oriented and will include a gateway to the development. The Village Center will support existing residential development and also include new residential opportunities to provide an increased patron base for the retail and commercial activity of the Center.

RETAIL

ACTIVITIES

&

NEW VILLAGE CENTER

The backbone of this district is the New Main Street which stretches from Lake Cook Road to Pauline Avenue. The new Main Street serves as the primary retail street of The Village Center. Street-level facades are recommended to feature windows, doorways, and architectural character related to the street to create an attractive pedestrian environment. Retail uses would also line McHenry Road (Route 83), however these buildings would be oriented towards Route 83, and tie into the overall development in the Village Center. Given the strong base of health care providers in the Corridor, other retailers revolving around health, nutrition and wellness and fitness may occupy the space and help create a niche. Anchoring the southern end of the street is the Village Plaza which is the central focus of the larger entertainment uses such as a movie theater, food and beverage establishments, entertainment and game venues, and/or possible civic or cultural uses such as a satellite library. The Plaza will serve as the gateway to the district and the focal point in establishing the new identity of Buffalo Grove. This plaza will be the active center of the Village and serve as host to public and cultural functions such as market days, holiday events, public art events, etc. The New Main Street also connects smaller public piazzas at key intersections with Church Street and Old Checker Road.

Entry Plaza

Retail Street Multi-family Residential

Piazza

Entertainment + Retail Village Plaza

New Main Street Retail Multi-family Residential Single-family Residential Entertainment Office Parking

Office

200 FT


EN

RY

WEI

CH

DR

LAND

M

CH

R

KE

EC

CHECKER RD

RD PAULINE AVE

KER

RD

GROVE RD

CHEC

N BUFFALO

OLD

ARLINGTON HTS RD

3

LAKE COOK RD

View from here S

LO FA

F BU

E

OV GR

24

RD

VD BL

NER DR

Key Plan

LAKE COOK RD

P UP RA

WE ID

A VISION FOR NEW VILLAGE CENTER

ROAD

49 I Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan


Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan I 50

VILLAGE CENTER TYPOLOGIES Development in the Village Center will include existing residential, new residential, and new and redeveloped commercial and retail uses. Development in this district is intended to be street focused with active ground uses, residential entrances, balconies, and roof terraces along the street. Retail uses include quick-casual eateries, restaurants, entertainment venues, theaters, public uses, residential amenities, and specialty retail establishments. Primary parking for retail venues is to be located internal to the block and screened from the primary pedestrian streets and public spaces. It should be noted that future densities and building height are subject to change as a result of market demands, and actual development proposals are presented.

BLOCK TYPOLOGIES

RETAIL STREET Use: Height: Parking: Parking Ratio:

Retail & Residential 1-3 Stories Surface, Structure, and On-Street Multi-family: 1.7 spaces/Unit General Retail: 1 space/250 sqft

MULTI-FAMILY RESIDENTIAL Use: Height: Parking: Parking Ratio:

Residential 2-5 Stories Surface & Structure Multi-family: 1.7 spaces/Unit

PUBLIC PLAZA Use: Height: Parking: Parking Ratio:

Retail & Entertainment 1-5 Stories Structure, Surface and On-Street General Retail: 1 space/250 sqft


CH

EN

DR

RY

WEI LAND

M

CH

R

KE

EC

CHECKER RD

RD

PAULINE AVE

KER

RD

GROVE RD

CHEC

N BUFFALO

OLD

ARLINGTON HTS RD

3

View from here LAKE COOK RD S O AL FF BU OV GR

24

E RD

VD BL

NER DR

Key Plan

LAKE COOK RD

P UP RA

WE ID

A VISION FOR MODERN SHOPPING PLAZA

ROAD

51 I Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan


Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan I 52

LAND USE & DEVELOPMENT

NEW CHASE PLAZA & OFFICE CAMPUS

TYPOLOGIES

CHASE PLAZA Development in Chase Plaza and the Office Park should hold the street edges and encourage a defined public realm and pedestrian right-of-way on the surrounding streets. Easy access for parking should be provided from key arterial roads such as Arlington Heights Road and Lake Cook Road. Development should also encourage spaces for people with a campus-like organization around public plazas and gardens, providing an amenity for employees and visitors.

Stage 1 will also create a new gateway at the west end of the Corridor by transforming Chase Plaza. This will include an improved office park as well as a retail plaza. Automobile-focused retail development is also an important part of retail demand along the Corridor and the currently underutilized Chase Plaza site is a prime location for improved development of this nature accommodating opportunities for large footprint retailers or possibly a big box store. However, the traditional models of “strip malls� found within the Corridor are outof-date and underutilized. The new vision of Chase plaza is to provide retail uses that accommodate car access and visibility from Lake Cook Road and Arlington Heights Road while creating a welcoming environment for people to traverse the retail area and spend time within the development. Ample sidewalk areas with outdoor seating line the storefronts, while a landscaped public space provides opportunities for small events such as markets, evening and weekend music events, and food stalls. OFFICE CAMPUS A new and improved Office Park located adjacent and to the east of Chase Plaza will benefit from this enhanced retail destination with better daytime amenities for employees and visitors including restaurants, grocery or specialty food retail, cleaners, etc. With improved nearby amenities, additional office development can be accommodated by consolidating surface parking into a parking garage and opening up new opportunities for land development within the existing office park.

Shopping Plaza Office Campus

Retail Office Parking

BLOCK TYPOLOGIES

SHOPPING PLAZA Use: Height: Parking: Parking Ratio:

Retail 1-2 Stories Surface General Retail: 1 space/250 sqft

OFFICE CAMPUS Use: Height: Parking: Parking Ratio:

Office 1-4 Stories Surface & Structure Offices: 1 space/300 sqft

200 FT


53 I Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan

ACCESSIBILITY

K

EC

CHECKER RD

CH

ER

RY

ILA

EN

RD

WE

CH

ND

M

DR

PAULINE AVE

RD

ARLINGTON HTS RD

NEW MAIN STREET

CKER

GROVE RD

CHE

N BUFFALO

OLD

OLD CHECKER RECONNECT

CHURCH RD EXTENSION

3

LAKE COOK RD S O AL FF

BU OV GR

24

E RD

VD BL

NER DR

P UP RA

WE ID

EXISTING

LAKE COOK RD

PROPOSED FOR STAGE I Road Bike/Ped Path Traffic Signal

Proposed New Roads 60' ROW Proposed New Roads 52' ROW Bike/Ped Path Traffic Signal Pedestrian Enhanced Intersection Connection to the Neighborhoods

Stage 1 aims to improve the connectivity and accessibility of the Corridor primarily around Town Center by breaking down the large block structure that exists and providing alternative routes of navigation through the Town Center district. The extensions of Church Street and Old Checker Road from Buffalo Grove Road. east to IL-83 McHenry Road provides cross Corridor connectivity as well as additional access and development opportunities through the interior of the Town Center area by creating new development blocks and street frontage. ROA D

STREET NETWORK, SIGNALS AND BIKE/PED TRAILS

500 FT

These smaller block sizes enhance the pedestrian nature of the district by providing more opportunities for retail and residential street activity on a pedestrianscaled block structure. Central to the pedestrian experience is the creation of a new Main Street that runs north and south through the center of the new Village Center. Careful consideration has been given to street design and Right-of-Way (ROW) dimensions in order to create a streetscape that is both adequate for vehicular traffic while prioritizing the pedestrian experience through ample sidewalks, street trees and landscaping, and flexibility for on-street parking or bicycle lanes. Accommodation of bicycle and pedestrian circulation is important in the design of streets through dedicated bicycle lanes, and improve signage. These dimensions correspond with the current Village rights-of-way and will help integrate the new streets with the rest of the Buffalo Grove street network subject to detailed engineering.


Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan I 54

60’ RIGHT OF WAY STREET ( OLD CHECKER & CHURCH ROAD EAST EXTENSION)

52’ RIGHT OF WAY STREET (NEW MAIN ST)

2 Traffic Lanes + 1 Side Parking + Pedestrian or

2 Traffic Lanes + Pedestrian

2 Traffic Lanes + On Street Dedicated Bike lane + Pedestrian

PARKING R.O.W 52’

15’ Sidewalk

11’ Vehicle Lane

11’ Vehicle Lane

15’ Sidewalk

15’ Sidewalk

Curb to Curb 22’ 11’ Vehicle Lane

11’ Vehicle Lane

8’ Parking

15’ Sidewalk

R.O.W 60’ Curb to Curb 30’


55 I Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan

OPEN SPACE As outlined in the previous sections, Stage 1 concentrates development and redevelopment opportunities in currently developed areas of the Corridor. The scale and density of development in these areas is intended to meet the market demands and needs of the Village for the short to mid-term. This strategy works to allow for new development while safeguarding the existing open space in the Corridor until demand and development opportunities consistent with the Vision of the Lake Cook Corridor Plan arise. This flexibility allows the Village to evaluate the use of the Corridor’s main open space, the Buffalo Grove Golf Club, independently of the primary development focus of Stage 1. The use and

nature of this open space is currently being evaluated as a separate topic of study within the Village. The plan allows and encourages this flexibility. In Stage 1 of the Plan, this area can remain an 18-hole golf course, can be reconfigured for a combination of 9-hole golf course and civic/cultural park programs, or be considered as a civic and recreational park in its entirety. Any development or reconfiguration of this area as part of the Buffalo Creek floodplain will need to address flood mitigation and should be held to a standard of not increasing flood risk to the surrounding residential and commercial developments.


Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan I 56

Buffalo Grove Golf Club

18-HOLE GOLF COURSE

Golf Course

500 FT

9-HOLE GOLF COURSE + OPEN SPACE PROGRAMS

Golf Course Open Space Programs

500 FT

G-Hole Golf Course & Golf-related activities

Lawn/Playgrounds

Sports Field

Sensory Park


57 I Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan

STAGE METRICS & FISCAL IMPACT

823,700

248,600

Retail Space

Office Space

sqft

sqft

335

Dwelling Units

Residential

Stage 1 plans for a critical mass of retail area to ensure the vibrancy of the new mixed-use Village Center. Immediate demand for retail in the Village can be accommodated in an initial phase of approximately 150,000 to 200,000 square feet while allowing opportunity for growth with additional office and residential developments. As retail trends continue to shift, the Corridor needs to accommodate traditional as well as new types of retail establishments focused on lifestyle experience including restaurant and

The increase in amenities through improved retail redevelopment will increase the value the Corridor has for businesses and employees. Additional office demand is expected particularly for health and medical related businesses as the development of the Corridor proceeds and aspires to increase physical as well as social health in the community by promoting walkability, social interactions, and civic and cultural experiences. The encouragement of these businesses will add to the spirit and identity of

In Stage 1, residential is located entirely in the mixed-use Village Center District. The bulk of this development is envisioned to be multi-family buildings of 3-5 stories, in line with the existing residential developments of Turnberry and Town Place. The new residential in the is anticipated to be market rate condominiums, apartments and/or active senior living, however the specifics of market demand at the time of development will ultimately determine what types are feasible and the overall density. In either

entertainment, civic/cultural amenities, food retail, etc.

the Corridor.

case, dense, multi-story typologies are encouraged to enhance the vibrancy and pedestrian nature of the new development districts.

uses,

neighborhood


Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan I 58

$250 M

$200 M

1,500

Retail sales

Market Value

Jobs

New retail development and renovation of 869,300 square feet could generate an estimated $253 million in direct sales, assuming 85% occupancy and an average of $342.48 sales per square foot. New retail tenancy, which includes experiential retail, quick service and full-service restaurants, food, and entertainment will help provide goods and services to meet demand in the local community.

For Stage 1, the total market value of redeveloped properties is $200 million. The total market value is taken from EAV of comparable properties in the surrounding communities of Buffalo Grove. These values were applied to the new development and square footage proposed in each stage.

Economic models project that the new development in Stage 1 could generate approximately 1,500 jobs.


59 I Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan

BIRD EYE VIEW

N


Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan I 60

STAGE 2: RE-IMAGINING CENTRAL CORRIDOR OVERVIEW As market demand continues to grow and opportunities arise, the municipal campus area of the Corridor located at the intersection of Raupp Blvd and Lake Cook Rd., could redevelop into residential and retail development. The Village Campus could be relocated off-site or the Village Hall and Police operations could be integrated into the redevelopment of Village Center. A new east-west roadway extension would be built to further unify the corridor and provide connectivity. The planning and integration of new residential development and open space maintains the flexibility of the Buffalo Grove Golf Club function. Improvements and renovation of the golf course are able to be balanced with new programming and development opportunities in accordance with the separate decision making process surrounding the long term function of the golf course in the Corridor.

KEY HIGHLIGHTS/STRATEGIES •

Municipal campus may move off-site and make way for residential and retail developments.

Bridging east-west and north-south sides of the Corridor.

The Buffalo Grove Golf Club can operate as a modified golf course and/or other open space programming.


61 I Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan

SITE PLAN

SITE PLAN LEGEND

1

Potentional new location of Village Hall & Police Station

1

2

2

Retail Plaza

3

Single-family Residential

4

Multi-family Residential

5

Retail

6

Hotel

3 6 4

5

500 FT Proposed Redevelopment Proposed New/Enhanced Street Connections


Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan I 62

BUILDING USES

Retail Multi-family Residential Single-family Residential Civic/Government Hotel Parking

Retail (sq ft) Residential and Retail along Lake Cook and Raupp New Municipal Campus Redeveloped Grove Shopping Center (Jewel) and Hotel and Retail East of Weidner Summary

STAGE 2 BUILDING USE SUMMARY Office Civic Multi-Family (sq ft) (sq ft) (sq ft)

143,600

Multi-Family (Units)

Town homes (sq ft)

Town homes (Units)

277,200

231

56,000

14

277,200

231

56,000

14

60,300 97,500 241,100

N/A

60,300


63 I Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan

LAND USE & DEVELOPMENT The Vision for Stage 2 builds off of Stage 1 and concentrates on the central part of the Corridor at the intersection of Raupp Boulevard and Lake Cook Road. Its particular focus is providing an alternative framework if the Village should opt to locate the municipal campus (Village Hall, Police Station, and Public Works Facility) elsewhere. If the Village decides to pursue campus relocation, the Vision is to redevelop the area as a secondary gateway and a residential neighborhood development. The

NEW CENTRAL CORRIDOR & MUNICIPAL CAMPUS

Municipal Campus + Police Station

Retail Plaza

Single-family Residential

Hotel Multi-family Residential

Retail

Retail Multi-family Residential Single-family Residential Civic/Government Hotel Parking

200 FT

secondary gateway would be formed via a small commercial node of retail development along Raupp Boulevard between Church Street and Lake Cook Road. The node would feature new retail space in one-to-two-story buildings. Prominent retailers and eateries that require high traffic visibility would be located closer to Lake Cook Road and oriented toward this arterial. The building design would then shift to a neighborhood-retail format on the southern side of Church Street and Raupp Boulevard to complement housing to the north. This type of format could include smaller signage, wider sidewalks, outdoor seating, and other plazas. Surface parking along with strong pedestrian links would serve as access to the developments. The new residential neighborhood development coupled with the existing residential neighborhoods in the Corridor would provide support for the retailers in this secondary gateway. The Vision for this central area also includes a new neighborhood development that consists of multi-family and townhome units. The multi-family developments would be located north of the Raupp


Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan I 64

Boulevard and Church Street intersection and serve as a transition between the retail node to the south and the open space to the north.

BLOCK TYPOLOGIES

The neighborhood component of Stage 2 also includes 14 townhomes located just east of the multi-family developments. The townhomes would be 1-3 stories tall and bridge the new multi-family developments to the west and the existing single-family homes in Manchester Green and Circle Drive. Parking for the multi-family and townhome development would be provided for via surface and/or structure parking.

Use: Height: Parking: Parking Ratio:

The Vision outlines a potential relocation site for Village Hall and the Police Station, which are the most visited facilities in the municipal campus. These buildings could be relocated in the lot just southwest of McHenry Road and Old Checker Road near the Community Arts Center. This would create a more robust municipal campus that weaves civic, community, and art facilities and landmarks and help to further establish Buffalo Grove’s identity. The new civic campus would be feature building configurations and designs that are modern and efficient in energy and space. The new campus would be served by surface and structured parking. As Stage 2 is further in the future, the Vision also recognizes the potential for other retail redevelopment, including in the Grove Shopping Center. The Vision anticipates the area to be redeveloped into more modern commercial development that would maintain but enhance the current shopping center’s strip center format.

RETAIL PLAZA Retail 1-2 Stories Surface General Retail: 1 space/250 sqft

MULTI-FAMILY RESIDENTIAL Use: Height: Parking: Parking Ratio:

Residential 2-5 Stories Surface & Structure Multi-family: 1.7 spaces/Unit

SINGLE-FAMILY RESIDENTIAL Use: Height: Parking: Parking Ratio:

Residential 1-3 Stories Surface & Structure Single-family: 2 spaces/Unit

VILLAGE CAMPUS Use: Height: Parking: Parking Ratio:

Government 1-3 Stories Surface & Structure Civic: 1 space/300 sqft


65 I Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan

ACCESSIBILITY

STREET NETWORK, SIGNALS AND BIKE/PED TRAILS

ROA D

Stage 2 builds upon the street network that was established in Stage 1 and further extends connectivity to the west by extending Church Street past Raupp Boulevard to align with the intersection of Weidner Road and Lake Cook Road. This opens up a new connection with the neighborhoods to the southwest of the Corridor and provides an alternative route into the Village Center that bypasses Lake Cook Road and the intersections with Buffalo Grove Road and IL-83 (McHenry Road).

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Consistent street Right-of-Way (ROW) sections are maintained to accommodate bicycle and pedestrian access and safety. Improvements to pedestrian crossings at key intersections may be necessary to facilitate safe access to and from The Village Center. Additional pathway and trail improvements would be made to connect east-west through the Corridor separate from Lake Cook Road.

ARLINGTON HTS RD

GROVE RD

CHE

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CHURCH ST EXTENSION

LAKE COOK RD

S O AL FF

BU OV GR

24

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VD BL

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P UP RA

WE ID

EXISTING

LAKE COOK RD

PROPOSED FOR STAGE I Road Bike/Ped Path Traffic Signal

Proposed New Roads 60' ROW Proposed New Roads 52' ROW Bike/Ped Path Pedestrian Enhanced Intersection Connection to the Neighborhoods

500 FT


Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan I 66

60’ RIGHT OF WAY STREET (CHURCH ROAD WEST EXTENSION)

52’ RIGHT OF WAY STREET (NORTH RAUPP ROAD EXTENSION)

2 Traffic Lanes + 1 Side Parking + Pedestrian or

2 Traffic Lanes + Pedestrian

2 Traffic Lanes + On Street Dedicated Bike lane + Pedestrian

PARKING R.O.W 52’

15’ Sidewalk

11’ Vehicle Lane

11’ Vehicle Lane

15’ Sidewalk

15’ Sidewalk

Curb to Curb 22’ 11’ Vehicle Lane

11’ Vehicle Lane

8’ Parking

15’ Sidewalk

R.O.W 60’ Curb to Curb 30’


67 I Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan

OPEN SPACE Stage 2 looks to enhance the integration of new development with the existing golf course/central open space. A clear delineation of development area and open space area is necessary to define and safeguard the larger open space network as a regional amenity. This should be explored through zoning and land use designation when proceeding with the implementation of this future phase. While the extension of Church Street and the location of new development at the intersection of Raupp Boulevard and Church Street will necessitate reconfiguration of this area of the golf course, Stage 2 seeks to maintain flexibility as a core tenant of its treatment of the golf course overall. The existing golf course could function as a modified golf course or a combination of golf course and civic/cultural park programs, or be considered as a civic and

recreational park in its entirety if at any point in the future the function of the golf course is re-evaluated. Potential recreational options could include sensory parks, great lawn, playgrounds or sports field, ice rink, farmers market, and floodscapes. This is the first stage of the Corridor Plan that anticipates development adjacent to or within the flood-plain. The rerouting of Farrington Ditch may be necessary in order to accommodate new development in this area. Prior to any approval for development, the Village should ensure that the impact on the floodplain and on future flooding within the Corridor has been thoroughly studied and effective measures for flood control and mitigation will be performed as part of such development.


Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan I 68

Buffalo Grove Golf Club

MODIFIED GOLF COURSE

Golf Course

500 FT

MODIFIED GOLF COURSE + OPEN SPACE PROGRAMS

Golf Course Open Space Programs

500 FT

Golf Course & Golf-Related Activities

Lawn/Playgrounds

Activity Field

Sensory Park


69 I Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan

STAGE METRICS & FISCAL IMPACT

241,100 sqft

Retail Space

As the majority of retail planned for the Corridor is located in the Village Center and has been initiated in Stage 1, Stage 2 looks only to capitalize on the relocation of the existing Municipal Campus by repositioning the sites along Lake Cook Road at Raupp Boulevard with automobile-focused retail and/ or commercial uses.

0

sqft

Office Space

Development of office space within the Corridor is anticipated to be located entirely in the mixeduse areas planned for Stage 1 of the plan. The redevelopment of existing office space may occur at any time during the plan timeline, but no new office is anticipated to occur within the Corridor anticipated to be developed during Stage 2 of the Plan. However, if market forces show demand for office in the future, it could be accommodated along this area of Lake Cook Road.

245

Dwelling Units

Residential

In Stage 2, residential is located along the north extension of Church Street at the intersection of Raupp Blvd. Stage 2 residential is envisioned to be a combination of multi-family buildings and singlefamily attached or townhouse development, however the specifics of market demand at the time of development will ultimately determine what types are proposed. This residential further expands the resident base of the Corridor from what is anticipated in Stage 1 and begins the enhancement of the golf course or open space edges with new residential.


Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan I 70

$70 M

$60 M

500

Retail sales

Market Value

Jobs

The new retail development of 241,100 square feet will generate an estimated $70 million in sales. This amount is adjusted for 85 percent occupancy and sales of $342.48 per square foot.

Using comparable EAV for retail, multi-family, and office buildings in similar communities, the redevelopment in Stage 2 is estimated to provide $60 million in market value.

Economic models project that the new development in Stage 2 could generate approximately 500 jobs.


71 I Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan

BIRD EYE VIEW

N


Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan I 72

STAGE 3: FUTURE PROGRESSION OVERVIEW Stage 3 aims to further interweave and balance open space and development. As market conditions allow and demand continues, the Vision is to capture and manage this growth by expanding the Corridor’s neighborhoods and residential options, but limiting the development to the far exteriors of the existing Buffalo Grove Golf Club to concentrate the open space and preserve the area's core hydraulic functions. To provide necessary access to these developments, the Vision also includes a north-south connection in the Corridor’s central section and reroutes and refines an east-west connection in the Corridor’s western section. Other aspects of Stage 3 include additional redevelopment of retail out lots and a new hotel along Lake Cook Road. Finally, the existing Buffalo Grove Golf Club would be modified into golf course with park programming or entirely with active/passive programing subject to community goals and market factors.

This stage outlines the maximum impact of development anticipated in the Corridor based on future market projections as well as the priorities and needs expressed by the community. It fosters future resident growth and a possible transformation of the open space to a regional recreational and cultural amenity for the Village with active park programming, culture, and expanded accessibility through new and improved pathways and trails.

KEY HIGHLIGHTS/STRATEGIES • Managed expansion of new multi-family housing, town homes and retail. • New north-south and east-west connections in central corridor. • Open space options for golf activities and/or various open space programming.


73 I Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan

SITE PLAN

SITE PLAN LEGEND

1

Multi-family Residential

2

Office+Parking Garage

3

Retail

4

Multi-family Residential

5

Single-family Residential

5 4 1

3

2

500 FT Proposed Redevelopment Proposed New/Enhanced Street Connections


Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan I 74

BUILDING USES

Retail Multi-family Residential Single-family Residential Office Parking

Retail (sq ft) Residential along Raupp Extension Residential North of Office Park Retail east of Weidner & Office Summary

33,200 33,200

STAGE 3 BUILDING USE SUMMARY Office Civic Multi-Family (sq ft) (sq ft) (sq ft) 459,600 285,900 72,000 72,000 N/A 745,500

Multi-Family (Units) 383 238

Town homes (sq ft)

Town homes (Units)

39,100

18

621

39,100

18


75 I Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan

NEW PARK RESIDENTIAL

Single-family Residential

Multi-family Residential

Multi-family Residential

Retail

Office+Parking Garage Retail Multi-family Residential Single-family Residential Office Parking

200 FT


Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan I 76

LAND USE & DEVELOPMENT

The Vision for Stage 3 is to capture and manage future growth by expanding the Corridor’s neighborhoods and residential options but limiting their development to the far exteriors of Buffalo Grove Golf Club. As market demand continues, the multi-family development presented in Stage 2 (located in the Central Corridor just north of Church Road and Raupp Boulevard) would be expanded. In keeping with the type and scale of the existing multi-family developments, the units would be housed in similar mid-rise developments that would be well-integrated into the existing fabric. These developments would activate the edge of the open space and offer a oneof-a-kind recreational amenity to the Village. The Vision also includes additional residential development located on the outer section of the golf course just north of Weidner Road in the western section of the Corridor. The residential development would include townhomes and mid-rise multi-family developments directly north of Weidner Road. The townhomes would offer a garden-like quality with a direct overlook to the open space. The townhomes would help build the area and generally reflect the density and building typology of the nearby Lexington Glen (single-family attached development). The Vision is inclusion of multi-family development between the new townhomes and the office complexes to the south provides a necessary buffer and transition. Similar to other stages, Stage 3 also recognizes the

potential for other smaller redevelopment projects. The Vision for this stage anticipates new retail and office space to be redeveloped into more modern retail and office developments. The redeveloped office facility could be supported by an adjacent parking garage.

BLOCK TYPOLOGIES

MULTI-FAMILY RESIDENTIAL Use: Height: Parking:

Residential 2-5 Stories Surface & Structure

SINGLE-FAMILY RESIDENTIAL Use: Height: Parking:

Residential 1-3 Stories Surface & Structure


77 I Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan

ACCESSIBILITY

STREET NETWORK, SIGNALS AND BIKE/PED TRAILS

ROA D

The Vision for Stage 3 is to provide strong connectivity to the new and existing neighborhoods and development by expanding and refining the existing street network. Raupp Boulevard would be extended north to Old Checker Road to establish a viable north-south connection in the Corridor between Lake Cook Road and Old Checker Road. This connection would effectively provide necessary access to the commercial and residential developments in the Central Corridor. Moreover, it would connect Lake Cook Road and its neighborhoods to the south with the neighborhoods north of Old Checker Road and Willow Stream Park. The Vision for the Raupp Boulevard extension includes traffic calming measures to retain its character intent as a local access road and not a high volume, high-speed cut-through.

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In addition, Stage 3 includes rerouting the local access road off the office campus area from Arlington Heights Road to the extension of Church Street at the intersection of Lake Cook Road and Weidner Road. The improved reroute would help optimize development opportunities in Corridor, and enhance traffic flow.

UP RA

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ARLINGTON HTS RD

GROVE RD

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LAKE COOK RD S O AL FF

BU OV GR

24

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VD BL

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EXISTING

LAKE COOK RD

PROPOSED FOR STAGE I Road Bike/Ped Path Traffic Signal

Proposed New Roads 60' ROW Proposed New Roads 52' ROW Bike/Ped Path Bike/Ped Bridge Pedestrian Enhanced Intersection Connection to the Neighborhoods

500 FT

As uses change, the expansion of the pedestrian and bicycle trails system can occur. Key connections from the Forest Preserve to the west, Willow Stream Park to the north, and the residential pathway networks to the east and south can be woven together through the central open space of the Corridor. Improved signage and facilities will encourage the use of the trail system as an alternate means of circulation to and from the Corridor and Village Center for nearby residents. Grade separated connections should be explored to improve connectivity and safety over or under the major arterial roadways, especially Lake Cook Road to the south. Along with the general walkability of the Corridor Plan, the emphasis on a high quality recreational path network will work to improve the health of the community and attract visitors and residents alike as a regional amenity.


Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan I 78

60’ RIGHT OF WAY STREET (WEIDNER ROAD EXTENSION)

52’ RIGHT OF WAY STREET (RAUPP BLVD EXTENSION)

2 Traffic Lanes + 1 Side Parking + Pedestrian or

2 Traffic Lanes + Pedestrian

2 Traffic Lanes + On Street Dedicated Bike Lane + Pedestrian

PARKING R.O.W 52’

15’ Sidewalk

11’ Vehicle Lane

11’ Vehicle Lane

15’ Sidewalk

15’ Sidewalk

Curb to Curb 22’ 11’ Vehicle Lane

11’ Vehicle Lane

8’ Parking

15’ Sidewalk

R.O.W 60’ Curb to Curb 30’


79 I Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan

OPEN SPACE Stage 3 plans for the future demand of the Corridor by providing a balance between future development and valuable open space. Clear boundaries are set for the protection of the open space network within the Corridor while allowing necessary development and improvements to accessibility to accommodate

future growth. Flexibility in planning for the use of the open space is maintained by considering the use as a golf course in the future or the transformation to a recreational and civic park. Additional programming actives that could be considered include water landscape, floodscape,

great lawn, sensory park, sculpture garden, recreational fields, community gardens, children’s park, markets and ice skating rinks. Active programming and the encouragement of recreation and a connection with nature is an important component in the future identity and value of the Corridor. The core of this open space remains the floodplain for Buffalo Grove Creek and careful consideration has been paid to the type, amount, and intensity of development occurring within this area. Designing and developing this open space as a “floodscape” can provide meaningful and usable open space while accommodating the necessary function of flood control and create a new benchmark for the water landscapes of the region and make improvements to those impacted downstream. However, more detailed studies on impact and flood mitigation should be undertaken to determine the best approach to specific development proposals within the open space.

FLOODSCAPE STRATEGY FOR FARRINGTON DITCH

Farmer's Market

Active Floodscape

Sports Field

Passive Floodscape

Pond

Waterscape

Flood Mitigation/ Rain Gardens

Flood Mitigation/ Bioswales


Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan I 80

9-Hole Golf Course & Golf-Related Activities

9-HOLE GOLF COURSE

Golf Course Open Space Programs

500 FT

OPEN SPACE PROGRAMS

Open Space Programs

500 FT

Sensory Park

Playgrounds/Ice Rink

Sensory Park

Great Lawn


81 I Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan

STAGE METRICS & FISCAL IMPACT

33,200

72,000

Retail Space

Office Space

sqft

Ongoing improvements to retail along Lake Cook Road are anticipated during this phase. New retail space is anticipated including ground floor amenity space within residential developments as deemed necessary at the time of development.

sqft

Ongoing improvements to office space within the Corridor are anticipated during this phase. A small addition of new office space is anticipated at this stage, however anticipation of upgrades to the office properties along Lake Cook Road have been included.

639

Dwelling Units

Residential

Stage 3 is anticipated to be primarily residential, although future market demand may vary from what is currently anticipated based on market assessments. Additional multi-family residential is located along the north extension of Raupp Boulevard expanding the residential development of Stage 2. A combination of multi-family and single-family attached residential is envisioned along the south edge of the central open space (golf course area), extending the residential edge of the open space. This residential completes the expanded resident base of the Corridor and provides a critical mass of residents to sustain active commercial, recreational, and civic uses within the Corridor.


Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan I 82

$9.6 M

$50 M

350

Retail sales

Market Value

Jobs

Stage 3 proposes new development of 33,200 square feet of retail space to meet demand from the local office park and residents. Consistent with the assumptions for occupancy and demand, new retail development will generate an estimated $9.6 million in sales.

Applying comparable values from neighboring communities to the new development proposed in Stage 3 will provide an estimated $50 million in market value.

Economic models project that the new development in Stage 3 could generate approximately 350 jobs.


83 I Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan


Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan I 84

PART

4I

IMPLEMENTATION

RECOMMENDATIONS AND ACTION STEPS


85 I Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan

• •

IMPLEMENTATION RECOMMENDATIONS AND ACTION STEPS To implement the Vision set forth in the Plan, the Village should undertake the following recommendations and action steps. These recommendations and action steps can be grouped under four main categories: • Village Commitment • The Village of Buffalo Grove should provide its commitment and support to the Plan by undertaking regulatory, communication, and planning initiatives. Moreover, the Village should anticipate and support infrastructure improvements that create an enhanced multi-modal network to, from, and throughout the Corridor. • •

• •

Leverage Market Opportunities The Village of Buffalo Grove should leverage market opportunities to spur development/ redevelopment within the Corridor that aligns with the Plan. Create Corridor Identity and Brand The Village of Buffalo Grove should create an identity and brand for the Corridor that reflects the uses and environment in the Corridor. The new identity and brand would signal a new chapter for the Corridor.

Enhance Sustainability and Quality of Life The Village of Buffalo Grove should enhance sustainability and quality of life in the Corridor. These efforts focus on the Corridor’s natural resources and environment along with the health, happiness and well-being of current and future Buffalo Grove residents.

• Engage Community • Amend Comprehensive Plan • Amend Zoning Regulations • Capital Improvement Planning • Support Street Grid • Lake Cook Road Expansion • Enhance Connections

• Market the Plan • Facilitate Property Assembly • Explore Incentives • Health and Wellness District

VILLAGE COMMITMENT

LEVERAGE MARKET OPPORTUNITIES

• High-quality Open Space • Enhance Stormwater Management • Traffic Calming • Expand Walkability • Bicycle Accessibility

• Establish a Brand • Create unified streetscape • Art in Public Spaces • Update the Appearence Plan • Wayfinding and Gateway Signage

ENHANCE SUSTAINABILITY AND QUALITY OF LIFE

CREATE CORRIDOR IDENTITY AND BRAND

Recommendation 1: Continue to engage with the Buffalo Grove Community about the Plan. Buffalo Grove should continue to undergo efforts to advertise the Plan and its content. It is important for future investors, property owners, businesses, and other stakeholders in the Corridor to understand the Plan’s Vision, recommendations, and trajectory for implementation. Moreover, it is important for the community to see their input and contributions culminate in a strategy and plan that effectively incorporates their thoughts and ideas. Action Steps: A. Announce and advertise the Plan to the Village of Buffalo Grove community. The Village should utilize various communication channels to announce the Plan’s approval. B. Make the plan available online and advertise the availability and contact information of Village staff to address questions and comments. C. Meet with residents, businesses, key property owners, institutions, and others in the Corridor to review the Plan, discuss future improvements, and work together for a shared future.

VILLAGE COMMITMENT The Village of Buffalo Grove should provide its commitment and support to the Plan by undertaking regulatory, communication, and planning initiatives. Moreover, the Village should anticipate and support infrastructure improvements that create an enhanced multi-modal network throughout the Corridor.

Recommendation 2: Integrate the Lake Cook Market Study and Plan into the Current and Future Comprehensive Plans. The Lake Cook Corridor Plan should be considered as an amendment to Buffalo Grove’s existing 2009 Comprehensive Plan. Adopting this plan as part of Buffalo Grove’s Comprehensive Plan will ensure consistency and clarity amongst documents intended to guide long-term planning and development. As the Village looks to undergo


Lake Cook Corridor Market Study and Plan I 86

a new Comprehensive Plan in the near future, Buffalo Grove should weave the Lake Cook Corridor Plan’s Vision and recommendations into the new plan. Action Steps: A. Amend Buffalo Grove’s current Comprehensive Plan (2009) with the Lake Cook Corridor Plan. B. Integrate the Lake Cook Corridor Plan as part of the forthcoming Comprehensive Plan and establish the Lake Cook Corridor as one of the several key sub-areas in the community. Recommendation 3: Consider Amending Zoning and Associated Building and Design Regulations to Help Achieve the Vision. Buffalo Grove should explore amending various regulations to help codify the Vision for the Corridor. Action Steps: A. Consider amendments to the zoning ordinance or utilize existing zoning tools to help implement the Vision. Specific actions may include: • Exploring a form-based code or form-based elements. • Introducing overlay zones and/or creating a better defined Planned Unit of Development (PUD). B. C.

Evaluate and potentially modify parking requirements to align with the Plan. Review and potentially modify the sign code to ensure consistency with the Plan.

Recommendation 4: Plan and Budget for Capital Improvements. The Village should appropriately plan for any capital improvements associated with the Vision. Action Steps: A. Modify and update, as needed, the Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) to reflect the recommendations of the Plan. B. Perform financial analysis to determine potential options for funding improvements. Options may include but not exclusive to pay as-you go, debt financing, payment-in-kind.

Recommendation 5: Support an Interconnected Corridor Street Grid that Extends to the Adjoining Major Streets and Collectors. The Vision’s fundamental accessibility component is its new interconnected street grid network. This network includes three new roads as well as three road reconnects/extensions to provide greater accessibility to, from, and around the Corridor. As development/ redevelopment plans for the Corridor are presented for approval, Buffalo Grove should be sure to support a project that implements an improved street grid network. In doing so, the Village should explore options regarding the jurisdiction, ownership, and maintenance of the new and redesigned roads and work with partners in aligning any new or improved intersections.


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Action Steps: A. Review development and redevelopment plans for the inclusion of an improved street grid network consistent with the Plan. B. Explore jurisdictional options for the ownership. C. Ensure future development provides the necessary right-of-way (ROW) dedication needed to accommodate for future improvements. D. Ensure future development provides the necessary right-of-way (ROW) dedication needed to accommodate for future improvements. Recommendation 6. Work with Transportation Partners on the Lake Cook Road Expansion. The Lake Cook Road expansion is a Cook County transportation project. Although this project is not under Buffalo Grove’s jurisdiction, the Village should work with its partners in the preparation and implementation of the expansion. Action Steps: A. Continue to work with the County on future roadway projects and ensure the necessary right-of-way (ROW) is provided. B. Review Lake Cook Road expansion plans for the inclusion of pedestrian and bicycle accessibility to the Corridor, which could include crosswalks and traffic calming measures.

Recommendation 7: Explore Opportunities to Enhance Connections to the Corridor from Public Transit Centers. As the Corridor develops/redevelops, the Village should collaborate with transportation partners as well as businesses within the Corridor to explore providing additional accessibility from established transportation centers such as the Buffalo Grove and Prairie View Metra Stations. Action Steps: A. Work with transportation partners (Pace and the RTA) and businesses within the Corridor to assess the demand for connections to the Corridor from established Metra Stations. B. Explore modified Pace routes, utilization of Pace’s Vanpooling Programs, and/or promoting other appropriate programs to provide connections from established transportation centers such as Buffalo Grove and Prairie View Metra Stations. C. Improve pedestrian networks and infrastructure to enhance the “last mile,” or the final leg of the commute from a transit/bus stop/drop off-point to the final destination.

LEVERAGE MARKET OPPORTUNITIES The Village of Buffalo Grove should leverage market opportunities to spur development/redevelopment within the Corridor that aligns with the Plan. Recommendation 8: Engage the Development Community. The Plan should be communicated and marketed to the development community to convey Buffalo Grove’s vision and commitment to the Corridor’s future. Action Steps: A. Reach out to the development community to present and discuss the Plan. B. Create a “road show” to present the Plan at broker/development offices as well as to other interested groups. C. Showcase the Plan at developer industry events. Recommendation 9: Explore Ways to Facilitate the Assemblage of Properties, Foster Redevelopment of the Corridor, and Accommodate New Development and Connectivity Opportunities within the Existing Developed Areas. Action Steps: A. Work with key property owners to better understand their future intentions. B. Explore Public Private Partnership opportunities to encourage the development/ redevelopment of key areas of the Plan. C. Prioritize key parcels identified in Stage 1(Town Center and Chase Plaza).


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Recommendation 10: Explore Economic Development Incentives. Development/redevelopment sites may have challenges that require economic development incentives to encourage development based upon fiscal impact and return on investment analyses. If appropriate, Buffalo Grove should explore such opportunities and size them appropriately. A list of common economic development incentive tools includes: Common Economic Development Incentives • Tax-Increment Financing (TIF) District • Special Service Area (SSA) • Business District (BD) • Property Tax Abatement • Sales-Tax Sharing Action Steps: A. Evaluate the need and potential for economic development incentives to facilitate projects that implement the Vision and ensure market competitiveness. B. Consider conducting feasibility studies for specific economic development tools including but not limited to Tax-Increment Financing (TIF) District and/or Business District. C. Establish a team that would include legal, financial, and development specializations to carry out the evaluation and development (if needed) of incentives.


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Recommendation 11. Consider Leveraging the Existing Healthcare Base to Create a Health and Wellness District. The Corridor currently has an existing base of healthcare and medical users, however the Village should explore the creating of a more defined district. This health and wellness district could include a wide range of retail healthcare including fitness, nutrition, as well as basic and specialized healthcare and regional facilities. Action Steps: A. Reach out to brokers and other representatives in the health and wellness field to explore interest and market depth for such a district.

CREATE CORRIDOR IDENTITY AND BRAND The Village of Buffalo Grove should create an identity and brand for the Corridor that reflects the uses and environment in the Corridor. The new identity and brand would signal a new chapter for the Corridor. Recommendation 12: Establish a Brand for the Lake Cook Corridor. Create a brand for the Lake Cook Corridor that would help establish identity and be used in the Corridor’s physical features as well as marketing materials. Action Steps: A. Work to develop a brand for the Corridor that would represent its uses and importance to the Village. B. Integrate this brand throughout the Corridor especially in signage and other gateway

features as well as in marketing materials.

Recommendation 13. Create a Prominent Unified Streetscape Design. The Corridor could benefit from a consistent streetscape design that is provides vibrancy as well as identity to the area. This streetscape would focus on the appearance of buildings and their architecture as well as associated streetscape elements such as gateway signage, landscaping, and lighting. Action Steps: A. Explore developing unified design criteria for the Corridor and incorporating the recommendations into Buffalo Grove’s Appearance Plan. B. Review the future plans for the inclusion of landscaping, lighting, benches, gateway signage, and wayfinding signage that provide a unified design. Recommendation 14. Consider Incorporating Art in Public Spaces. Visual Arts can Provide Identity, Local Culture, and Color to the Open Spaces in the Corridor. The Village should work with local partners to utilize these open spaces as a platform for public arts, which can include but are not limited to sculptures, murals, and mosaics. Action Steps: A. Explore opportunities to display public art to help activate public spaces through collaboration with local partners.


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ENHANCE SUSTAINABILITY AND QUALITY OF LIFE The Village of Buffalo Grove should enhance sustainability and quality of life in the Corridor. These efforts focus on the Corridor’s natural resources and environment along with the health, happiness, and well-being of current and future Buffalo Grove residents. Recommendation 15: Maintain Flexibility in Planning, Design and Development of Open Spaces. A key component of the Corridor’s Vision is maintaining flexibility with the existing golf course. The Village should continue its discussion regarding this space and proceed accordingly. Action Steps: A. Continue with analyses regarding the future operations and use of the golf course. B. Align future development and programming of the Corridor with the outcomes of golf course analyses. C. Collaborate with the Park District and Lake County Forest Preserve District regarding ownership, programming, and connections for existing and potential open spaces in and around the Corridor.

Recommendation 16: Future Development Should Mitigate Impact on Floodplains, improve Stormwater Capacity, and Minimize Flooding Risk to the Surrounding Residential and Commercial Development. Action Steps: A. Ensure that all new development complies with stormwater regulations and provide the necessary infrastructure to improve stromwater capacity and reduce flooding risk. B. Encourage new development in the Corridor that could reduce downstream flood impacts. C. Encourage new developments to feature green infrastructure and natural stormwater filtration strategies. D. Incorporate floodscape strategies to accommodate stormwater control strategies in public spaces while accommodating usable open space and recreation.

Recommendation 17: Consider incorporating Traffic Calming Measures along New and Redesigned Roads. To help minimize volume, speed, and potential use as a cut-through, traffic calming measures should be explored where appropriate. Such measures also have the added benefit of creating a more pedestrian and bicycle-friendly environment. Action Steps: A. Work with developers and traffic engineers to integrate a right-of-way (ROW) consistent with this Plan. B. Collaborate with transportation partners to install additional traffic lights and potential stop signs and other measures as warranted and/or as identified in this Plan. C. Explore strategically placing traffic calming measures such as chicane or roadway narrowing as future development occurs.


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Recommendation 18: Enhance the Corridor’s Walkability. Walkability is a key component of the Vision for the new Village Plaza as well as with the rest of the Corridor. Enhancing the walkability of the Corridor will result in an economic benefit as well as an enhancement to accessibility. Action Steps: A. Review all future plans for an inclusion of a comprehensive sidewalk/pedestrian path system that connects to the surrounding neighborhoods and the Village’s larger sidewalk network. B. Develop a unified streetscape treatment within the Corridor consisting of evenly spaced right-of-way trees, pedestrian scale lighting, shrubbery and hedges, flower beds, way-finding signage, and other pedestrian- oriented improvements. C. Strengthen and enhance crosswalks throughout the Corridor to improve pedestrian orientation and safety. Primary crosswalks should be constructed with different materials and colors than the street, such as stamped and painted concrete, to enhance their visibility and improve the streetscape. Recommendation 19: Improve Bicycle Accessibility within the Corridor. To complement walkability, the Corridor should also be a bicycle-friendly environment. Action Steps: A. Ensure all proposed plans complete the existing bicycle network in the Corridor and

connect with larger existing bicycle networks and infrastructure. Special attention should be paid to providing access to adjoining forest preserves, public parks, neighborhoods, employment centers, retail areas, and community/civic facilities. B. Provide appropriate signage and maps to for trail connections and networks. C. Consider grade-separated (bridge or tunnel) connections for the pedestrian and bicycle pathway system across major arterial roadways with a primary focus on Lake Cook Road. D. Collaborate with the Lake County Forest Preserve District regarding the possibility of establishing a trailhead within the Corridor that would connect to the Forest Preserve. Recommendation 20: Continue to Collaborate with Park District to Optimize Open Space Opportunities as they Arise. The redevelopment/ development of the Corridor could result in opportunities to maximize the quantity and/ or quality of open space in Buffalo Grove. The Park District has been involved in the Lake Cook Corridor Plan and has provided valuable input in its development. The Village should continue to work with the Park District as opportunities for open space optimization arise. Action Steps: A. As opportunities arise, discuss programming and space utilization for East Emrich Park, connections and programming with Willow Stream Park, and programming and trail connections in new pocket parks or plazas, as

well as larger open spaces.

Recommendation 21. Explore Fostering Recreational Use and Community Health in the Design and Development of Open Spaces. As open space opportunities arise during the course of the Corridor’s development/redevelopment, the Village should consider potential designs and uses that promote community health and recreational uses. Such uses could include edible gardens, fitness trails, and open-air markets. Action Steps: A. Explore fostering recreational use and community health in the design and development of open spaces through partnerships with the Buffalo Grove Park District and other partners. Recommendation 22. Encourage Civic and Other Community Uses Within the Corridor. Civic and other community uses can enhance Corridor’s identity and vitality. Action Steps: A. Continue with the Buffalo Grove Facilities Plan evaluation process. B. Explore opportunities for library, public arts, recreation or other civic uses within the Corridor to activate public spaces and provide community use of the district.


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L AKE -C OOK C ORRIDOR

Lake Cook Corridor Adopted Report  
Lake Cook Corridor Adopted Report