Page 1

Skate - Tunes - Katie Robinson

A Future in Design - Lucy’s Back - Jaded Check ‘em Out - Ladders - Your Art

The Gallery - Love Trumps - Your Photos

& y t i v i n t o i a s e s e r r C p Ex

c i t s i t Ar


Jaded Photo Shoot Pg.12

4. Skate

CONTENTS

5. Tunes

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6.

Katie Robinson

8.

A Future In Design

11. Lucy’s Back 12. Jaded 15. Check ‘em Out

EDITOR

Claudia Munro EDITORIAL TEAM

Emma Stretch Summer Sweeney Tiri Soppet CONTACT EMAIL

vaultmag1 @gmail.com ADVERTISING

vaultmagadvertising @gmail.com

16. Ladders 18. Your Painting & Design 20. The Gallery 21. Love Trumps 22. Your Photography

Nurturing Creativity


E DITOR’S

LETTER

OVER THE PAST 7 MONTHS , I have been building this little

magazine. It started with a thought while in the shower, and now, as it sits in your hands, I guess that random idea has finally made it out of my head, and onto paper. Vault Magazine has been created as a creative outlet for us students at Mahurangi College. It is a tangible copy of all our hard work on folio boards, writing portfolios, and the many hours spent on homework. As well as a way to see what life is like outside of school, for those wanting to go into the creative industries. With this in mind, we have curated issue one to suit our peers.

Claudia Munro EDITOR

Welco to Va me u Maga lt zine

This of course, would never have been possible without a million different helping hands. Although I cannot possibly thank everyone who has helped me out with this, there are some main support systems that I must! The biggest thank you ever is to Bianca Howlett from Junction Magazine, who has helped me from day one with her expertise and guidance. As well as both David Macleod and Michael Stewart, who have made this adventure a reality, and put up with my constant emails and need for advice. As for my creative peers who have slaved away with me to get this done; Emma, Summer, Lucy, Christian & Tiri (plus many more!) you are all amazing! Thank you! So welcome to Vault! May it be well distributed, successful, and continue for many issues to come. Enjoy!

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S K AT E An alternative form of art PHOTOS + WORDS Drew Janssen DESIGN Emma Stretch

WE SKATE BECAUSE

skateboarding is unlike any other sport, in fact it isn’t really a sport in general. We have no coach, no trainings and no one telling us to do. What we learn and do as skaters, is purely self motivated. Skateboarding teaches us persistence, as we’ll try a trick for hours, to months trying to land it. It teaches us to always say “one more try” and never give up. This separates skateboarding as a sport because you can’t put any routine to it, you don’t go out to practice... you go out to learn. Skateboarding also creates individuality, the style of one

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g n i d r a o b e t Ska , s s e l t i m i l is r ve e n n a c d an d e t c e f be per

person’s trick, such as a kickflip, is so different to anyone else’s, and can never be replicated. It gives us a creative outlet, as we can take what people have created in skateboarding and personalize it to suit us. We can take something the community has given us and make it our own, and then send it back out to them. This always pushes us to try new things skateboarding is limitless, and can never be perfected. Although it may seem like a piece of wood and four wheels to most, to us it is a creative outlet in which we can not only work on skating but on ourselves.


A C A R E F U L LY C U R A T E D LIST FROM OUR VERY OWN MUSO, ROSALEIGH

ROBERTS.

For an extended list, and regularly updated playlists, check out our Spotify - Vaultmagazine

Happy

Old

DANCING IN THE MOONLIGHT - Toploader

HEROES - David Bowie

ISLAND IN THE SUN - Weezer

GO YOUR OWN WAY - Fleetwood Mac

FREE - The Martini’s

HAPPY TOGETHER - The Turtles

Night

Chill

ME - The 1975

FROM EDEN - Hozier

STAR EYES - Flume

LET ME DOWN EASY - Max Frost

SUNSET - The xx

REST OF YOU - Six60

NOTION - Kings of Leon

GREENLIGHT - Lorde

COME ON EILEEN - Dexy’s Midnight Runners

RUM RAGE - Sticky Fingers

5


Meet

Katie

INTERVIEW WITH W H A N G A PA R AOA

K AT I E

ROBINSON

TELL US A BIT ABOUT YOURSELF.

I enjoy discussing the fine and not so fine aspects of life, coffee, UFC, listening to podcasts (TDTFH + TJRE), meeting people and following my creative drive. WHAT ARE YOU CURRENTLY WORKING ON, HOW HAS IT EVOLVED FROM YOUR EARLY PIECES OF WORK?

Commissions take up most of my creative time. I am really getting into screen printing, it is still essentially stencils but in an entirely different medium. I already know how to create a painting with paint and a stencil, so it’s nice challenge to learn something quite different but along the same line. HOW HAVE YOU FOUND THE ART COMMUNITY TO WORK IN? IS IT A TOUGH INDUSTRY TO BREAK INTO?

To be thoroughly honest I really have just done my own thing and the right parts of the industry have welcomed me. If you are doing what you love for the right reasons, you

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A R T I S T,

will succeed. You have to walk before you can run, you can’t just decide you want to be a proper artist and you need to have your work shown in a gallery tomorrow, that is the hard way. If you continue with your work, always develop your skill, people will notice. You really need to have a long term mindset i.e. I would like to be recognised by the art community in xyz way and know that if every day you create something and learn more and continue to do this wholeheartedly you will get to where you want to be.

WHY DO YOU THINK IT’S IMPORTANT FOR THE WORLD TO HAVE CREATIVITY?

We are all creative in some form or another, if we are unable to show it or explore it I think we can really stunt ourselves. Following one’s creativity produces wonderful and interesting things in our worlds, which can inspire other people to do the same. It’s about keeping healthy and that is super important! WHAT WOULD BE YOUR ADVICE TO YOUNG ARTISTS WANTING TO TURN THEIR HOBBY INTO A CAREER?

Do it. Make it. Share it. Talk about it. Do it every single day. Make it ‘what you do’. If you create, you get better at it, and sales and exposure and experience happen. Be known as the person that makes art. Learn that if you create you are by definition an artist. Own that and celebrate it. Do anything that involves you getting lost in your creativity and thoughts. The whole thing is a very long, fun, sometimes hard,


DID YOU STUDY THE ARTS AT UNIVERSITY? IF SO DO YOU FIND THIS BENEFICIAL TO YOUR WORK NOW? IF NOT, HOW DID YOU LEARN THE THINGS YOU NOW KNOW?

KATIE’S STENCIL STYLE AND UNIQUE SUBJECTS MAKE FOR SOME GROOVY ARTWORK. SOLD IN MARKETS AROUND THE AUCKLAND REGION.

sometimes lonely story. If you have that spark, then you have enough to make it your career but it’s not going to fall into your lap. Seek business advice, being a professional artist is by a long shot mostly about promotion and admin. You need to first embrace the notion that you are in fact ‘an artist’ and second, learn how to be a business person. Find someone that is passionate about it and listen to their advice. They often don’t even have to be in a creative field, you need to make money from it and business advice is sometimes across the board. You are your product, learn how to market it and ultimately sell it. Going from hobby to career requires a shift in the creative process also, leave creating only when you are ‘inspired’ to hobbyists; you need to work every day, it is your job, so treat it like one. CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR CREATIVE PROCESS?

First step. Coffee. I spend a fair amount of time working out

which image will suit, I either take the photo myself or one that has been sent to me. I set that up in Photoshop, print it out and then cut the stencil. Sometimes it takes months to cut a large one. The painting always happens all at once. Sometimes I have to go back and do minor touch ups but most of it is done all in one go. As for coming up with ideas I get inspired by a myriad of things, even just going for a drive and seeing a certain light on trees can get stuck in my head until it gets out of my brain and into paint.

I have never formally studied. I just very organically started learning how to do what I do. I didn’t set out to do it, it was just what interested me so I followed it. I tapped into my drive and passion and it really just threw me into it all. I had the flexibility to learn whatever I wanted and I sincerely have learnt every single thing I know just by going ahead and doing it. With the internet there is an open-ended amount of material available if you need it. I think formal education would suit someone if they have a hard time with routine or maybe if they are finding it hard to work out the right medium to express their creative intent though.

WHO OR WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR BIGGEST INSPIRATION/ INFLUENCE THROUGHOUT YOUR PORTFOLIO OF WORK?

My Dad was always my number one fan. He bought me paints and brushes and canvases 9 years ago when I decided I wanted to ‘be an artist’ and actually paid me money for pieces that he liked. He was definitely the one person that supported my entire artistic career and liked every single thing I did, even when it was terrible.

TOP BANDS ON YOUR PLAYLIST?

Bikini Kill Wu Tang Clan Arsonists Get All The Girls Courtney Barnett

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g n i k l Ta n i th i w k r o w ve i t a e r c e th y r t s indu A

FUTURE

IN

DESIGN

From design degrees to virtual reality, James Smith and Dr Peter Gilderdale at AUT have got the news on it all. In this two part interview, I sat down with the teachers to talk work within the creative industry and all things design.

BOTH EXPERTS are advocates

for the pursual of design as a career. “Design is fun,” James says. “It can be viewed as lightweight, but actually, the stuff that you’re learning can be applied to really hard, serious things as well. Plus creativity really is fun. It should be introduced into all kinds of areas, it’s a really important thing for humans and society. We have a lot of ‘wicked problems’ in the world, they’re impossible to dissect, but if you have a creative mindset, you can challenge these. Climate change is the obvious one that comes to mind, these are the kinds of things that can only be solved with innovation and a new ways of thinking.”

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So now you’re sold on the idea of design, can anybody do it? “People who are creative are open minded; they take in new or disruptive ideas. Disruption is really important in design; you want to go against the status quo and shake it up a bit. So in that way, I feel like anyone can do it - but you’ve got to get comfortable in doing so. Some people don’t like to have their world view disrupted. Designers do. It’s kind of a thrill.” It’s about being open to the world around you and then translating that into your work. Dr Gilderdale explains, “I think the ma jor thing for incoming

designers to have is curiosity. It’s not how good you are on Photoshop that defines whether or not you’re going to be a good designer. What matters is: ‘are you interested in the world around you?’. Are you interested in expanding your knowledge base, and are you up for a challenge? Those are the type of things that we are looking for within students - not a set of skills. It is more important how they think, rather than what they do.” So how to expand that curiosity level? “It’s about throwing a lot of stuff, and seeing what sticks. Everybody is born curious, it is a natural


human capacity. Somewhere in their teens, people learn to become cynical - but the best creative process is when you are operating at your most childlike. What we have to do is to make people feel safe, in order for them to let go of that cynical surface and let the inner child out.” Design is usually associated with commercial use, however James explains how diverse the industry is, “Lecturers are bringing in a new ethos into the communication design department that centres around empathy and community, rather than material goods and advertising. It’s good because it’s a big money earner and there are a lot of opportunities, but there’s so much more out there you can do. You can be working for nonprofit

organizations, or making your own start up. It doesn’t have to be designing a flat piece of paper, it could be some user experience like a tour. Basically anything you can imagine involves an aspect of design!” So design is a good career to get into? “There’s work, and having creative skills is going to be so important going into the new market. People are going to stop having one job their whole life and start doing a whole lot of different jobs, so being adaptable and creative is going to be really important.” When setting yourself up for a career in design, there is no wrong influences you can bring into your work, according to James. “The more you’re interested in other things, the better designer you’ll be.

If you’re into science, there’s so much imagery that you can bring into your design work. Maths? With coding and mathematical equations, bringing it into design makes sense. Design can be a tool for challenging and changing the world with. It’s not just advertising, it can really be an innovative tool for change.” While it can be hard to brainstorm ideas, James explains how to get over ‘artists block’: “Designing is problem solving, everyone has a different way of doing it. There may be some processes that work for some, and not for others. Maybe going out for a run, or cleaning your room, and getting into it after you’ve cleared your mind; that’s where your inspiration comes from. Everything we see influences our work, even

g n i w o r th t u o b a s ’ t I d n a , f f u t s a lot of t sticks a h w g n i e se

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e th f o t r a p It is , good e r u t l o u s c t s u j s i n desig ed in things d d e b em if you don’t mean it to. At uni’ we don’t use the idea of an artist model, but rather look at the world around you to get inspiration. Definitely look at other artist’s, but try to develop your own style, or take in a lot of influences, rather than just a few.”

Influences can come from a number of places, but both agreed that a big one came from travelling. Dr Peter Gilderdale speaks of his four years in Denmark very highly “It was where I became interested in design. When you go to Denmark, everything is well designed. It is part of the culture, good design is just so embedded in things.” Europe seems to be a huge influence on designers, as James says “I did a semester abroad in Austria. As a designer, I had a few classes that just weren’t on offer here, and they blew my mind in terms of the methods and approaches. Different culture is going to improve your design, as you’re drawing from so much more inspiration, and life experience.” As for the future of design itself, Dr Gilderdale says “As long as we have the current type of economy, design is going to be central to it. Increasingly, designers are having to become strategists and use creative thinking to help businesses to cope with extreme amounts of change. Communication designers have to understand an audience, and put those in interesting ways. Under the current system there is a bright future for design.”

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As for how digital the creative world will become, there were some contradictory opinions between the two; “What we’ve been noticing is that what students get excited about is getting off the computer and doing something different. There has been a kind of renaissance of the hand-done. Digital will take us forward, but it is just a tool. Just as much as a brush or pencil.” says Peter. James agrees with this resurgence of hand-made, “There’s a tactile desire for paper. Even if you have a kindle or phone, it’s not quite the same experience.”

However he goes on to say that “Digital would be a smart move for anyone, because although the print industry still exists, it’s definitely becoming smaller. Would you recommend taking a digital subject in preparation for this? “It would be really helpful. Even if you have a really minimal understanding of coding, it’s gonna help. And anything to do with the media! I really recommend taking that, as it ties in really nicely with the design world. There’s a big crossover between the design world and media.”

 Watch out for our second issue for all about life at university.

t h g i r b a s there i n g i s e d r future fo A HUGE THANK YOU TO

Claudio Aguayo, James Smith & Peter Gilderdale INTERVIEW + DESIGN Claudia Munro


Lucy’s Back

Jaded Photo Shoot Pg.12

PHOTOGRAPHER FOR OUR ISSUE ONE SHOOT, AND CURRENT AUT FIRST YEAR,

LU C Y T W H I G G TELL US A BIT ABOUT YOURSELF

I’ve just started a Design degree at AUT! I’m super excited to see where that will take me - I literally have no idea at this stage. Outside of the arty stuff I’m quite interested in social/political issues. The number one place I want to travel to is Iceland. WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE OTHERS GOING INTO THEIR SENIOR YEARS, ESPECIALLY CREATIVE SUBJECTS?

I’m probably not the most qualified person to give advice - but probably experiment more. Take a risk and don’t worry too much... DO YOU THINK YOU HAVE DEVELOPED A STYLE OVER THE FEW YEARS YOU HAVE BEEN DESIGNING? OR ARE YOU STILL DISCOVERING IT?

Definitely still discovering it! CAN YOU DESCRIBE YOUR CREATIVE PROCESS?

“Wing it” WHO OR WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR BIGGEST INSPIRATION/ INFLUENCE THROUGHOUT YOUR WORK?

I can’t pinpoint anything specific, its’s more just a mash-up of all my interests. E.g. I’m very into the NZ up-and-coming fashion scene so naturally that influences what I do to a degree. Also trends. As much as we all hate to admit it, they are hard to ignore. TOP 5 SONGS ON YOUR PLAYLIST RIGHT NOW?

Heartlines Broods, Shark Oh wonder, Ladywood Tove Lo 10,000 Emerald Pools BØRNS, Bus Stop Jazz Lunice and the Jealous Guys

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JADED

The result of some talented girls and a bit of trespassing.

PHOTOGRAPHY + STYLING Lucy Twhigg CLOTHES

Pamelinhia + Stylist’s Own

MAKEUP

Molly Hutchinson

MODELS

Jade Matheson & Sasha Curin

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t n e m i r e p x E more. Take a risk and y rr o w t ’ n o d . . . h c u m o o t

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Look for: Commentary on the worlds social politics & culture, plus incredibly cool design.

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Look for: Tech, photography and design, all encased in one brilliantly designed platform.

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The feet of small children tremble... ... as they muster the strength to pull themselves from the floor. Up from their hands and knees they come, as they take a few fleeting steps forward. A seemingly monumental task for a child, mere months old. Unbeknownst to them, another challenge is yet to come. Now, it is time to run.

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PAGE DESIGN TIRI SOPPET

SAMUEL CHITTY WRITTEN BY

LADDERS

Even from childhood, we are pushed to ascend. To drag ourselves up. From our humblest beginnings in the battle of literally raising ourselves higher, life is about trying to climb - up one of the many ladders put in front of you by life itself. Perhaps with a calculated precision, or maybe just bumbling luck, we move up one rung at a time. Inch by inch, step by step. Hardly different than the movement of a child’s feet. Whether or not we realise it, each of us is always striving for ascension. The only variable becomes the ladder which we seek to mount. None of us remain children forever, so it is inevitable that new ladders appear. Be it study, social or anything in between, everything we do brings change on one ladder or another. Small acts of friendship, kudos from superiors, achieving above the standard. All these imbue the sense of success, the feeling of having inched up a rung. This is where the ladder takes form. There’s an old entertaining trick known as ‘working the

room’. It details “interacting enthusiastically with the attendees of an event, by moving among them, greeting them, and engaging them in conversation.” That common dictionary definition takes on a whole new meaning across different terrain. For a campaigning politician, that mean shaking the right hands and signing the right legislature, so that they can move up the political spectrum. But for a school student, trying to move up the ladder? Something different entirely. This biggest of ladders, the insurmountable obstacle is the one society throws at us. It is the one of ultimate human interaction, the dominant force behind school life. Both at the forefront, and behindthe-scenes. So hard to even get a foothold on, let alone climb. Dare you even have hope toward being able to evaluate yourself against it. These schoolyard politics are a veritable war-zone. So all you can do is walk headfirst into it, and ‘work the room’. For us, that means to hold the right conversations, sit with the right groups, give the right compliments and hold the right attitude. But who governs ‘right’? Behind every blossoming conversation there’s an illicit one. For every compliment paid to the face there’s a knife in the back. For each act of acceptance there’s a lack of respect, or vice versa. No clear governing force of “right” can ever be identified, it’s just the way the school micro-climate


has formed before us and that we have now moved into. As a result of this, we really can’t let the social ladder define our existence. Or any other ladder, for that matter. To this point, this talk has been almost exclusively about the social ladder. Now, while it may be the most everpresent, that doesn’t mean it’s alone. Enter the second ladder that appears when you come of age: career. For example, when you land your first part time job. Across many, there’s a euphoric state of elation. At last, you’ve succeeded a little. A foot on a new ladder. Unknown to a new recruit, a job can soon turn traumatic as worry manifests over doing it perfectly. The intense, oftenmisplaced dedication has all the potential to cloud your better judgement and harm job

performance. Don’t let it. Dread surrounding making mistakes in your job is not a constant, by any means. Teenagers tell tales of slow, never-ending weekend shifts where you rarely see sight nor sound of another human. The only real thing challenging

being in place. “How did they come about?” and “why do they matter?”, we ask. Or rather, “why do we follow this invisible presence like sheep to their shepherd?” Answers vary from person-toperson. I believe it stems from society needing leaders, at least one person above the others. Be it even as informal as it comes. Someone must be above the rest to keep the populace content. A way of ensuring natural order in any given climate, if you will. Along the way, though, the problem begins when each of us imagines that we should be that “one” above the rest. Drunk on our own grandeur? Perhaps. Yet that hardly stops us from wanting to be the puppet-master, pulling the strings of an elaborate show on a public stage.

why do we follow this invisible presence, like sheep to their shepherd? becomes stifling your dismay over the realisation that the job you so coveted is, in reality, painfully dull. Shock! Horror! Little room for advancement on the ladder presents itself at all. In this case, working the room becomes just a case of biding your time. At some point we must ask the how, and why, of these ladders

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Your Art

A GALLERY OF S T U D E N T C R E AT I O N S

Molly Hutchinson

Sander Stam

Carrie Wooler

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Megan Kilmister

Kelsey Broughton-Johnson

Eva Rebenschied


Carrie Wooler

Shara Waugh

Carrie Wooler

Tiri Soppet

Katy North

Eva Rebenschied

Eva Rebenschied

Claudia Munro

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The

Gallery C R E AT I V E WRITING

Isabel Hobson

BITTER WARMTH slides down

my throat and into my body, I welcome the caffeine hit as a feeble attempt to fight back against the chill and somnolence of the early hours. Burrowing my free hand down as deep as my pocket will allow, I continue next to the rushed strides beside me. “How much further?” “We’re getting close.” she breathes. 5 minutes and one tall mochachino later, we arrive at the near empty gallery. Our strained breaths stain the air in front of our faces as we exchange grins. The main entrance stands at the top of the stairs we ascend towards the minimalistic glass doors. When we reach the top I stare back down the road. A smattering of yellow flecks peek through half drawn curtains in adjacent apartment blocks. I shiver before pushing through the door behind my friend. The gallery is bright and airy, quite a contrast to the dismal morning outside. We are

20

WRITING

greeted through a toothy smile from a security guard sitting in a booth just through the door. “Good morning ladies,” his smile widens “enjoy your visit at the gallery today!” I smile back at the man before a tight grip is established around my arm and I’m tugged past the booth. “Thank you,” she yells out “we will!” Setting off at haste I’m dragged deeper into the gallery before we break out into a jog. “Hey! No runni-” The security guard’s voice fades out under the echoes of our boots hitting the hardwood floor while we snigger as the oil-stained canvases flash past. The cloud is beginning to give a little, allowing some of the early sun to settle on the cool floors. I pick out a worn leather bench that sits in a spotlight of sun and perch on

the edge. Dust dances in the light in front of my face as I let my eyes wonder. None of the paintings particularly grab my attention. Apart from one painting. Her painting. The colours are luxurious and exotic, almost oozing out of the canvas. It almost puts the others to shame, making them look bland and monotonous in comparison. It’s kind of what she’s like as a person too. I swivel around on the bench and allow myself to observe her. She stands in front of a landscape of oil absently thumbing her bracelets, lost in thought. Her ripped jeans come up a little too short, exposing bright socks that never seem to be matching. She breaks out of her trance and suddenly turns to me, loose strands of dark hair falling around her cheeks. “You got a favourite yet?” “Your’s of course.” “Ugh, you always say that.” she chuckles as she wanders over towards the bench before settling down beside me. Always looking so at home in art galleries, she almost blends in with the pictures themselves. “They’re the only reason I come.” I say. She flashes me her sharp teeth and squeezes my hand before we both focus back on her painting. We sit in silence taking in the little details, letting the sunlight creep further across the room before the influx of art enthusiasts spoil the quiet.

we snigger as the oil-stained canvases flash past


W

ITH THE ELECTION OF

Mr Donald J Trump, so has followed the division of the world. It has created conflict between countries and governments, friends and family alike. It has brought out the true colours of people, and the often shocking nature and inner workings of those around us. It has taught me a thing or two about the people of our world.

The election has shown me that there are many people worldwide who are not very nice. Though no opinion can be “right”, nice opinions could be considered as those that respect all groups of people, regardless of economic influence or stereotype.

LOVE

Whilst Trump supporters have come out in droves to preach his words, the strength in others have also come out. The issues of injustice have brought out the fight in people. Worldwide, people are standing up and speaking against things affecting people from all walks of life, be it on social media, or in protests such as the women’s march or Black Lives Matter marches. They help to unite people in their views and bring attention to these important issues. It’s a truly powerful sense of togetherness which has helped in educating people, educating me and helping us learn about the issue that people face and how we can help.

TRUMPS

WRITING Ella Martin

DESIGN Claudia Munro

y l u r t a rful e w po of s se s n e se n r e th e g to

So the moral of it all, I suppose, could be as simple as this: be nice. Respect people, whoever they are, from all races, classes and walks of life, as they probably deserve it. (Probably). Do not judge people on their appearance or culture, but on their character. And being nice is fun! It’s rewarding! You’ll get the same treatment in return! And if you don’t, you get the pride of having known you are a better person. Do not be afraid to learn something new! Be open to new opinions, hear the other side of the argument. It’s the only way you can make yours strong, or it could even change your view and make you a better person. Because I firmly believe there are very few bad people, just miseducated ones. Dedicate yourself to being respectful, just and educated, educating others and standing up for what you believe in. Because being nice is fun.

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Your Photos

A GALLERY OF PHOTOGRAPHY

Elliot Snedden

Rosaleigh Roberts

Liberty Staddon-Ward

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STUDENT WORK

Ella Martin

Gabby Bissett

Anna Reiff


Sam Warner

, e g a m i n a g Takin t n e m o freezing a m h c i r w o h s l a reve . s i y l u r t reality Thomas McLaren

Skye Collins-Maginley

Rosaleigh Roberts

Tui Collier

,

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TO B E F E AT U R E D , O R TO A DV E R T I S E IN VAULT MAGAZINE, CONTACT US AT

vaultmag1@gmail.com

Celebrating Our Local Creative Arts

Vault Magazine - Issue 1