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August 2010

VaughanToday.ca

Life is Sweet

Celebrity chef David Rocco talks food and family Plus: Great ideas for summer dates

Street racing, Deck designs and more...


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Vice President of Finance

Doreen Iannuzzi

Vice President of New Media

EDITORIAL Eric McMillan EDITOR-in-chief

Alexis Dobranowski MANAGING EDITOR

Shadi Raoufi

EDITORIAL ART DIRECTOR

Gordon Cameron Associate EDITOR

PRODUCTION SERVICES Tony Lomuto Supervisor

Mark Winer Production

Advertising & Sales Don Bettger

Director, GROUP Sales

Jennifer Gardiner

Director, Corporate Sales

Kathy Kerluke Business Manager

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KIDS AND FAMILIES: How not to be a soccer mom

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BUSINESS: Cafe offers authentic treats Dolcini by Joseph: a Kleinburg community staple

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THINGS TO DO: 5 hot summer dates Music, food and fun for you and your sweetie

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On a more serious note, this edition also tackles two ongoing issues in the city and around. Reporter Angelo Elia explores the ongoing problem of street racing on our residential roads. Last year, a driver was clocked going 163 km/hr in a 60 km zone. Elia chats with a police officer who’s working to curb the problem and an admitted racer who says the problem isn’t that bad (“Street racing: the need for speed”). Sadly, this summer has seen an increase in tragic drowning deaths in and around the GTA. Find some tips to keep your family safe around water in “Dive into safety”. While October may seem awhile off, we all know time flies. So, stay tuned for our September issue: Eye on the Election. Vaughan voters will head to the polls — will you vote? — on Oct. 25 to elect their municipal representatives and our next edition will explore the issues that are top priority for voters and candidates. Keep an eye on www.Vaughan Today.ca for election news. Alexis Dobranowski Managing Editor

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So it would seem I was hungry when assigning feature articles for this edition of Vaughan Today. First off, we’ve got our cover story — reporter Lorianna De Giorgio had the pleasure of chatting with celebrity chef and hometown Vaughanian David Rocco. He talks food, family and his growing fame in “Life is sweet”. Kleinburg cafe Dolcini by Joseph attracted some attention when they set up televisions on their patio so passersby could enjoy a coffee, pastry and some World Cup action last month. Reporter Jessica Vitullo catches up with the cafe’s namesake owner and baker in “An authentic treat”. And if that’s not enough to make your tummy grumble, food reviewer Liz Campbell visited Grazie and shares a mouth-watering recount of her delectable meal in “It’s no secret”. For some summer entertainment ideas, check out “5 hot summer dates” — from outdoor music concerts to comedy to picnics in the park, our city has a lot to keep you and your date happy.

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AUGUST 2010 VAUGHAN ToDAY 3


News&Opinion ROAD RACETRACK: Vaughan has a long history of street racing. The once-farmland city saw race enthusiasts visit for on-street races. Now a busy urban centre, Vaughan struggles to shake its race-friendly reputation.

Street racing: the need for speed By Angelo Elia

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hey tune their souped-up vehicles, modify their engines, and personalize their rides to satisfy their creativity. Eager to demonstrate their driving skills, they meet with their peers in parking lots or on industrial parkways. Engines rev. Minds are set on winning and gaining respect. Flashing lights appear and the ongoing struggle between police officers and street racers wages on. All of this on our roads. * * * “Take it to the track; the streets are not the place.” That’s the advice Constable Jim Slykhuis of Project ERASE (Eliminate Racing Activity on Streets Everywhere) has for race enthusiasts. But one admitted racer in Vaughan has his own advice: “Don’t get caught.” Vaughan roads have long had a reputation for street racing: stories of high-speed chases and crowds watching races on the side of the highway stem from the city. The once-farmland area brought racers up from Toronto to take to the quieter streets. Just last year, York police pulled over and searched 3,000 tuned vehicles. In York Region, 249 motorists were charged with street racing — 60 drivers were charged in 60 km/hr zones, the highest clocking in at

4 VAUGHAN ToDAY AUGUST 2010

a speed of 163 km/hr. Fourteen people were charged in 100 km/hr zones, the highest flying at 200 km/hr. With Project ERASE, a joint initiative between several police forces, Slykhuis visits York Region high schools to handout brochures and DVDs. He tries to discourage street racing and promote safety among students. A major concern for Slykhuis and his colleagues happens before the cars even hit the streets: modifications made to cars to enhance their performance for racing. While Slykhuis says he enjoys checking out modified cars, he wants to make sure the vehicles are tuned properly. “My wife and children drive the roads and I want it to be safe,” he says. “You’re welcome to put money into your cars just make sure it goes by the law. “We go out and check cars to make sure they are mechanically fit and encourage you to take racing on the track opposed to the street,” he adds. “A lot of youth who modify their cars, they think they have more mechanical knowledge than they actually do and make their vehicles unsafe. They’ll increase the horsepower but not increase the brake power.” Modified vehicles must be regulated under the Highway Traffic Act, Slykhuis says. But Mike, an admitted racer who didn’t want

his name used, says police just target young drivers with tuned cars — even when they aren’t street racing. “If you drive a Honda or Acura or simply have a modified or loud car, you’re labelled a street racer in the mind of a cop,” said Mike, who recently owned a modified Honda Civic SiR. Police officers have targeted him numerous times, the street racer says. “Police always used to look at me the wrong way when I had my Civic. I once got pulled over for nothing at all, and the policeman actually labelled me a street racer because of the car I was driving.” Slykhuis says young adults do have the right to meet anywhere they want unless mall or store managers object to it. But police are on the lookout for street racers who meet before a race. “We’re targeting people who meet up in groups like that and go street race,” Slykhuis says.

‘My wife and kids drive the roads and I want them to be safe’


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Mike says there are some positive points to racing: meeting new people, testing one’s driving skills, having fun, and getting an adrenaline rush. He says open, little-travelled roads in Vaughan make the area enticing for street racers. And, while he admits there are dangers, they don’t phase him. “I’ve personally never witnessed an accident at street races,� he says. Slykhuis says those with a need for speed should be on the track. “I have talked to professional drivers. They respect the rules of the road. They have a different mind state when they race on the track,� the officer says. “If they choose to race, I suggest the track.� The police officer also recommends the BMW Group Canada Advanced Driver Training School in Toronto. He says BMW Driver Training teaches young drivers how to control vehicles at high speeds and how to avoid accidents. Another alternative to street racing is the Volkswagen Jetta TDI Continued page 7

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he company that publishes Vaughan Today is helping lead a nationwide movement to bring the original constitution of Canada back to this country. While other countries like the United States have their revered documents on display for its citizens to see, the 1867 documents that founded Canada are stored behind locked doors in a London, England vault, says Lori Abittan, president of Multimedia Nova Corporation and Vaughan Today publisher. This fact came to light as the company was preparing the Canadian Experience series, which is published in over 70 print and online publications in 24 languages to engage Canadians with our history. It came as a shock to discover we don’t even have the British North America Act here, Abittan says. This discovery prompted Abittan to launch a campaign, BringBacktheAct.ca. Leading figures from government, academia and culture have joined the BringBacktheAct.ca working group to rally Canadians and to press the government to ask for the act and associated documents to be brought to Canada. “Canada needs its constitution,” says Ian Wilson, former head of Canada’s national Library and Archives. “The Brit-

ish North America Act, 1867, also known as the Constitution Act, 1867, sets out the vision and hopes of the Fathers of Confederation.” Historian Jack Granatstein says, “Having this most important icon from our history accessible here in our own country would have inestimable value in helping bring our history alive for Canadians.” Organizers are calling on Canadians to lend their voices to the chorus asking the British government to allow the original BNA Act to be given to Canada where it will be properly displayed for the country to see. A petition is online at Bring BackTheAct.ca. Canadians can also get more information about the campaign and make their own views known on the website. The campaign’s ultimate goal is to have the Act in Canada by 2014 — in time for the 150th anniversary of the Charlottetown and Quebec City constitutional conferences that set the groundwork for Confederation. The document would then become part of a cross-country exhibition on Canada’s constitutional history before finding a permanent home in Ottawa in time for Canada’s 150th birthday on July 1, 2017. “This is an important project for our country,” Abittan says.


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A sure sign someone has visited Amica. If you're considering moving from an empty TAKE IT TO THE TRACK: Police say race enthusiasts should go to the track, but interested racers argue there aren’t any nearby. Cont. from Page 5

Cup, a professional racing series that allows young adults to race legally across North American racetracks. Robert Bauly, Martin Grove Volkswagen sales manager, agrees track racing is the best idea. But since there aren’t any racetracks in Vaughan and local racers live a long distance from most racetracks, it makes it difficult for racers to do it legally, Mike says. There are tracks in Toronto, but they are far and difficult to get to when living in Vaughan. “That’s the only reason why everyone street races, because the closest track you need a whole day for the ride there and back, just for a couple runs,” he says. Bauly says if racetracks were constructed in Vaughan, it could discourage street racing. “I would set-up a closed course where they could race,” the VW dealership sales manager says. “In a closed course, it’s a different story.”

Tracks would discourage street racing

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Ask the experts Please write to our experts: If you would like to take advantage of their years of experience, send your questions to “Ask the Experts” and they will be happy to reply to you in this space. By E-mail: adsales@towncrieronline.ca, by Fax: 416-488-3671 or write: Ask the Experts, c/o Town Crier, 101 Wingold Ave., Toronto, ON, M6B 1P8. Kathleen Timmis, a partner in the personal injury law firm of Linett & Timmis, has been practicing accident and insurance litigation in Toronto for over 19 years. Her firm has established a solid reputation, representing thousands of injured victims and their families throughout Ontario

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: You may be entitled to sue for your injuries under Ontario’s Occupier’s Liability Act. If the area where you fell (such as a store, public mall, city property, private home or business) was in an unsafe condition, the owner may be responsible for the accident. Examples of accidents where victims have sued successfully include falling on walkways that have not been cleared of snow and ice, or that are in a state of disrepair, falling on dirty or slippery floors, tripping over misplaced objects or falling on steps that are not properly lighted. If your fall occurred on municipal property, such as a sidewalk, it is important to remember that there are very strict notice periods that apply. If you want to know whether you have a case, please call us for a free consultation.

More local news and views at

www. VaughanToday.ca 8 VAUGHAN ToDAY AUGUST 2010

Jessica Vitullo/Vaughan today

JOSEPH AND MARY Montinaro outside their Kleinburg bakery Dolcini by Joseph. During World Cup, they set up a television on the patio so neighbours could enjoy the sunshine and watch the game.

An authentic treat By Jessica Vitullo

J

oseph Montinaro might not be a licensed pastry chef, but that doesn’t stop him from creating decadent desserts and participating in baking competitions. “I’m not a licensed pastry chef, so it’s all passion,” said Montinaro. “I love the art and I’ve done quite a few competitions.” His most recent competition was at Humber College, where the best pastry chefs and chocolatiers were invited to participate. Although he didn’t win, Montinaro said it was a huge honour to be among such talented people. He got his start in the business with support from his family and a lot of inspiration. “When I was seven years old, my parents took me to Italy and I experienced such beautiful pastries,” he said. “I wondered how they were made and I was only a kid. “ Montinaro’s father had a pastry shop in North York, while Montinaro was in the clothing industry. In 2002, his business experienced some hardship and due to the recession, he closed the store. “My father invited me to come to his shop. I went into the retail side of things and I enjoyed it.” When Montinaro took over the family business, it was his turn to go into the production aspect of the business and make beautiful pastries for consumers. “I fell in love with the art because I didn’t go through school for the arts. You can apply so much art to pastries, so I went into production and it was very simplified pastry.” Montinaro continued to make traditional Italian desserts, but he needed a change. “I felt myself replicating what I was doing and I knew there was more,” he said. To expand his culinary career, he went to Italy and attended baking shows, which opened

up his eyes to a new world of pastry making. Montinaro began using different kinds of techniques and chocolates to create a new variety of desserts. In July 2007, he expanded the family business by opening his own pastry shop in Kleinburg called Dolcini By Joseph. “When it’s a nice day and sunny, it’s so busy,” he said. “We have line-ups at the door and it can get overwhelming.” His wife, Mary, keeps things going at the newest location. With the help of their staff, the business continues to grow. “You’re only as good as your employees are,” Montinaro said. “When your employees are good and dedicated ... you only become better and better. Our team is doing a fine job.” The team at Dolcini creates homemade desserts in the shop’s facility using only the best ingredients. “Our desserts are a little expensive, but there’s a reason for it,” he said. “We use raw materials. You can get compound or fake chocolate without real cocoa butter for less money, but I’m using real chocolate. They’re really special products and you can taste the trueness to it.” The homemade desserts include a variety of gelato flavours made with real fruit, biscotti and almond cookies, and bite-size pastry treats. Montinaro said the community has been very welcoming and always willing to try the treats, despite their price point. “The community itself has embraced us so overwhelmingly,” he said. “You’ve got this beautiful place where you can come and sit down, have a coffee and dessert. It’s where we want you to feel comfortable. While Montinaro has big plans for the business in the future, he and his family are happy with where they are now. “It’s nothing enormous, but it’s ours,” he said. “We’re very proud of it.”


Liberal Party dates back to early 1800s By Robert Bothwell

T

he Liberal Party dates back to political struggles in Great Britain’s North American colonies in the 1820s and 1830s. The term Liberal first applied to opponents of authoritarian royal government in Europe, and the opponents of the British-appointed colonial governments easily adopted it. When democratic government was finally achieved in the colonies in the 1840s, Liberals favoured measures that promoted equality of opportunity and opposed what they saw as special privileges for vested interests. In Lower Canada (later Quebec) this put them at odds with the Catholic Church, a considerable electoral handicap. Quebec apart, the Liberal issues of the 1840s became the political consensus of the 1860s, and as a result, the actual differences between Liberals and their Conservative opponents were relatively minor. Politics tended to become a contest between “ins” and “outs”, with each party searching for issues to distinguish it from the other. The Liberals enjoyed a brief period in power in the 1870s, but were regularly outclassed by the talented Conservative John A. Macdonald. Happily, the Liberals in 1887 chose an eloquent and charismatic Quebec politician, Wilfrid Laurier—a daring choice because Canada’s English-Canadian major-

ity was still inclined to fear and distrust its French citizens and their Catholic religion. The Liberals under Laurier won the election of 1896. They adopted and expanded most of the Conservatives’ financial policies, but thanks to good economic times, they embarked on a program of railway building and expanded immigration. Laurier would have preferred to stay away from foreign relations, but circumstances made him the first prime minister to send Canadian troops abroad to fight in the British cause in the South African War (1899-1902). But Laurier was not pro-British enough for many English Canadians; ironically, he was thought to be entirely too British by many French Canadians. He lost the 1911 election, heavily in English Canada, and not quite as heavily in Quebec, where he and the Liberals remained the most powerful and credible political force. Although Laurier supported Canada’s participation in the First World War, he would not support the government’s policy of conscription for the army, forcing an election in 1917. The Liberals split and lost in English Canada. But they won in Quebec, keeping both the Conservatives and FrenchCanadian nationalists at bay. When Laurier died in 1919, the Liberals chose one of his former ministers, William Lyon Mackenzie King, who had remained loyal in 1917, to succeed him.

King proved to be the most successful politician in Canadian history. Prime minister for 22 years (1921 to 1948) he survived the Great Depression and the Second World War, winning six out of seven elections in that time. King recruited strong and usually very competent ministers, and left the Liberals in good shape for his successor, Louis St. Laurent. Though not a skilled politician, St. Laurent benefited, like King, from a strong government and a prosperous economy. Eventually, in 1957, he lost, but the inability of the Conservatives to maintain a stable government brought the Liberals under Lester B. Pearson back to power in 1963. Pearson’s Liberal government relied on Canada’s prosperity to create and fund a system of social welfare, while attempting to deal with the first stages of a 30-year crisis in Canadian relations with a separatist movement in Quebec. Pearson recruited ministers from Quebec to fight separatism, like Pierre Elliott Trudeau. Trudeau won the leadership in 1968. Though relatively inexperienced as a politician, he was a charismatic leader, winning elections in 1968,’72, ’74 and ’80, losing only in ’79. When a separatist government was elected in Que-

bec in ’76, Trudeau led the federal response, defeating the separatists in a provincial referendum in ’80. He reformed the constitution, creating for the first time a method for amending it in Canada, and rammed through a Charter of Rights and Freedoms in the teeth of provincial resistance. But Trudeau’s energy policies didn’t help the Liberals in the West, and his confrontational style eventually created so many enemies that the Liberals were defeated under his successor, John Turner, in ’84. Although the Liberals opposed free trade with the United States in the ’88 election, which they lost, they accepted it when they returned to government under Jean Chrétien in 1993. Chrétien’s government was fiscally conservative and relatively unadventurous in foreign policy. He sent troops to Afghanistan, but resisted pressure to join in the unpopular war in Iraq. By the end of his time in office, Chrétien’s Liberals were bitterly divided into competing factions, and his successor, Paul Martin, lost the 2006 election. The Liberals have since experimented with two leaders, without finding the magic formula that would return them to office.

The Canadian Experience is a 52-week history series designed to tell the story of our country to all Canadians. Sponsored by Multimedia Nova Corporation and Diversity Media Services/Lingua Ads partners, the series features articles by our country’s foremost historians on a wide range of topics. Articles and author bios are available at cdnexperience.ca.

AUGUST 2010 VAUGHAN ToDAY 9


Fashion

Runway reveals talent BY Jessica Vitullo

T

he sewing kits closed, the paintbrushes were put away, and the show went on. On July 14, the Haute Couture School of Fashion, Arts and Design held its 5th Annual Runway 2010: Masquerade gala. Students at the school worked throughout the year to create pieces of artwork and clothing to be showcased at Le Jardin. Easels displaying artwork students made in their classes were placed in the hall and foyer. Throughout dinner, Haute Couture teachers took to the stage to hand out awards in garment construction, art and pattern making. After dinner, students ran backstage to change into their clothing creations for the runway part of the show. School founder and creative director Joanne Dice said the gala was a great opportunity for her students to show off their talent, especially when walking down the runway. “They model everything they make,” she said. “It’s empowering for women because people are not judging them. “It started with casual wear, went into more dressy, elegant office wear, casual evenings, and evening wear,” Dice said. The nearly 45 models walked down the runway all smiles as photographers snapped photos. Sadly, the show was Ellisha Moses’ first and last. “It was kind of a bittersweet occasion,” she said. Moses took corsetry, blouse and draping classes, which teach students the proper way of making a garment and how to work with different material. She modeled several of her own designs and took home an award. Moses said Dice got her to the next step in the industry: being

JESSICA VITULLO/VAUGHAN TODAY

Students from Haute Couture presented a runway show in July.

accepted to Ryerson’s fashion program. “I couldn’t believe I actually got in,” she said. “I couldn’t have done it without Joanne’s school and her personal help.” Danielle Manza wasn’t new to the fashion show circuit. She was enrolled in three classes at the school this year alone. “This year was my third show with the school and I was overly excited,” she said. “I began taking classes in 2007 when I was in grade 9 and have loved it ever since.” Manza said the fashion show is a great opportunity for students to take pride in their accomplishments, especially because it involves a lot of hard work. “I worked on a corset with a matching floorlength evening skirt and a knee-length semiformal dress,” she said. “I also made a casual chiffon skirt on my own time and modeled it in the show.” This was also Serena Giancola’s third show. Giancola also had two of her pieces displayed, one of which was 3-D art. “You use random objects to create a picture and I used forks in mine,” she said. “For the fashion pieces, I showed a corset with a huge overskirt, a mini skirt, plaid dress and a shirt.” It was a thrilling night for everyone, said Dice. “It’s a very exciting thing that we do,” she said. “I don’t know who inspires who because they inspire me.”

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10 VAUGHAN ToDAY AUGUST 2010

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Maple

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1380 Major Mackenzie Drive

114 Tower Hill Rd. at Yonge

905.303.9901

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June 28-August 27, 2010 Join us this summer for fun, learning and adventure! Ages: 2.5 yrs - 12 year olds.

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Jump into safety

READ YOUR LOCAL NEWS

ONLINE

Jim Humphrey/Vaughan Today

HAPPY SWIMMERS: The Kent kids and their friends have a blast swimming in the family’s backyard pool in Kleinburg. Mom Tracey, though not pictured, keeps a watchful eye on the fun from nearby.

www. vaughantoday.ca

BY Jessica Vitullo

G

o jump in the pool. But, please, be careful. And stick close to your kids. “On average, 400 people drown per year and that’s in Canada,” said Shane Eickmann, injury prevention coordinator for the Canadian Red Cross. “There are probably more than are publicized.” A lack of swim safety leads to these incidents. Ninety-five percent of drownings occur because someone wasn’t wearing a life jacket and didn’t plan on going under water, said Eickmann. “Men are four times more likely to drown than women because they take more risks,” said Barbara Byers of the Lifesaving Society, adding men 18 to 50 are at greatest risk. “They are more likely to go boating without a life jacket, drink before and during the time they’re boating, and to take risks and boat when the water is rough.” To reduce the threat of drowning, Eickmann says don’t be overconfident in your swimming ability, don’t drink alcohol while in the water, and wear safety equipment. Children are also at high risk. “Children are fearless around water,” Byers said. “There’s a magnet attraction and they want to be around it.”

The best way to protect young children is to stay very close, she says. “We say to parents, if they’re not within arms reach, you’ve gone too far,” Byers said. “Put toddlers in life jackets. It’s really important when they’re around water.” And swimming lessons are key, Byers said. “Enroll kids in … lessons because learning how to swim is an important way to be safe around water,” Byers said. Mother of three Tracey Kent didn’t waste any time in getting her children enrolled in lessons. “I put them in swimming as soon as they hit about four because I didn’t want them to drown,” Kent said. “I didn’t want them to have problems around water.” Learning about water safety is important, Kent says, and there is some fun to be had while learning. “They enjoy it very much so, that we put a pool in our backyard,” she said. “They use it all the time.” Kent’s oldest child is entering the lifeguarding program, while her second oldest will follow suit as soon as he is of age. Her youngest is swimming through the levels. They are all trained in emergency situations. Continued page 25

Check out these three Child Care Centre’s near you.

Teston Village Children’s Centre Located inTeston Village Public School, 80 Murray Farm Lane, Maple. Call Teston Village at 905 417 4920

St. Padre Pio Children’s Centre

Located at 770 Napa Valley Ave. in Woodbridge. Call St. Padre Pio at 905 893 2623

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St. Veronica Children’s Centre

Located at 171 Maria Antonia Rd., in Woodbridge. Call St. Veronica at 905-653-4859

Preschool • Nursery School • Before & After School • Summer Camp •

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AUGUST 2010 VAUGHAN ToDAY 11


How not to be a

soccer mom

By Nicole Miller

I

t’s a beautiful evening at St. Gregory the Great Catholic Academy in Vaughan. A cool breeze sweeps across the field where two Tim Horton’s Timbit soccer teams are getting set to square off. The whistle blows and the game begins. Kids run in a frenzied mass after the ball, kicking, passing and shooting. Four-year old Gianfranco Schirripa runs along with all of them looking to get a foot on the ball. Ten minutes into the game, Gianfranco seeks out his coach. “I’m hungry,” the young soccer players says. A quick substitution and Gianfranco is free to jog off the field to enjoy some water and Spiderman fruit snacks before rejoining the game. And no one even bats an eye. So it’s not quite the FIFA World Cup. But the little ones are all enjoying themselves. For parents looking to get their children involved in organized sports, there are a few things to be mindful of. Follow these five steps and your child’s sport’s debut will get off to a smooth start.

Don’t pick and push Sue Grutta, 42, got her son involved in soccer when he was just three years old. “Soccer was an easy sport to start him off in and he agreed to do it,” she says. When looking to get your child started in sport, he or she should be brought into the discussion, says Carl Corter, chair of the Atkinson Centre for Society and Child Development. “We have to make sure it’s what they want and not just what the parents want.” Corter says opening up a line of communication with your children is one of the best ways to ensure they are enjoying themselves. Deciding when to continue in a sport or quit should also be left up to the child, Corter says. “We have to be sensitive of our own goals as parents, but also about what the kids want as well . . .you can’t push back if it’s not what the child wants.” Grutta’s son decided to quit soccer at age 14 when, after playing for 11 years, he got bored of the sport. “It should always be left up to the child,

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and if they’re not enjoying it anymore you shouldn’t force them to do it,” she says. Gretchen Kerr, associate dean of the University of Toronto’s faculty of physical education and health, says letting kids experiment with different sports can be a good thing. However, she says when the child wants out, “it is important for the parent to be confident that the disinterest is not a result of a negative sport experience.” Don’t be a Crazy Coach from the Sidelines Though some parents may feel obliged to coach from the sidelines, Corter says that’s better left to the coaches. “Parents should show them their support and be enthusiastic, but the actual comments and criticisms are best left to coaches,” he says. Giving too much feedback defeats the purpose of why parents have their children enrolled in team activities, which is to gain confidence and independence, Corter adds. Parents should consider what they are hoping to get out of enrolling their child in sports. “If the goal is the child’s development in general, then they want to give the message … about enjoying the game not about winning. It’s about developing skills and feeling good about it.” When parents take on an overtly vocal role, Corter says it adds unnecessary pressure and can lead to the child wanting to drop out. “I think in many instances it gets out of hand and adds pressure to kids’ lives when maybe the sport is their chance to feel good about themselves and develop some feelings of confidence.” Kerr agrees, saying that parents should avoid sideline coaching at all costs. “Children appreciate hearing encouraging statements from the sidelines but become confused when hearing instructions from both the coach and the parents.”

er t s i Reg ow N

Expect Road Blocks Parents should be aware of a few speed bumps they may hit along the way as they decide to get their little ones involved in group sports, Kerr says. She points to commitment of time, finances and energy, emotional ups and downs as well as the physical and psychological demands placed on the child as potential challenges. Remember What Winning Means While challenges may arise on the way to your child’s success in organized sports, Kerr says it’s important to remember what winning means to kids. She says for kids, physical improvements, learning how to work on a team, acquiring new skills and being the best you can be defines winning. To keep kids going in a positive direction Kerr says parents should: • Be unconditionally supportive and encouraging • Recognize and reward the child’s personal progress • Respect the uniqueness of one’s own child Watch Your Child Grow After talking with your kids and settling on an activity, the next step is to watch your child blossom. Grutta says getting her son involved in sports taught him independence, confidence, teamwork and gave him a new circle of friends. Most importantly though, she says it teaches kids that it’s not all about winning. “There are worse upsets in life than losing a soccer game.”

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AUGUST 2010 VAUGHAN ToDAY 13


Arts&Entertainment

life is sweet BY Lorianna De Giorgio

L

ife is pretty dolce these days for TV chef and cookbook author David Rocco. His series David Rocco’s Dolce Vita is an international hit with it being broadcast into 65 million homes each week. The self-produced show, which is in its fifth season on Canada’s Food Network, was picked up in May by American TV heavyweight The Cooking Channel. And it has spurred the widely successful 2008 David Rocco’s Dolce Vita cookbook. Plus Rocco’s young family — wife Nina and 2 1/2 year old twins Giorgia and Emma — are by his side every step of the way.

The Vaughan native enjoys success for a reason. Rocco’s approach to cooking is pretty simple. His show and its predecessor Avventura teaches people that the ability to cook a good meal doesn’t require a certificate from a top culinary school. He shows you how to take the simplest of ingredients, for example, tomatoes, basil and garlic, and bam— you’ve got a delicious sauce. All you need is quality ingredients and the desire to create something. Afterall, Italian food isn’t about the fanfare but more about the food itself. The sharing of that food with loved ones and the conversations and relationships that are

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14 VAUGHAN ToDAY AUGUST 2010

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built around the dinner table is what Italian cooking and la dolce vita is all about, Rocco says. But Rocco admits his loved for all things Italian sometimes wavered. Growing up in the early 1970s, Rocco would be embarrassed to bring his giant mortadella sandwiches to school. Instead he’d go home for lunch and eat his food in peace — safe from the taunts of his classmates who had more Canadian lunch fare. Think peanut butter and grape jelly slathered on white bread. “I felt like the poor immigrant family,” Rocco says. Times have, however, changed. Sandwiches Rocco’s mom used to make for him


Be Entertained now sell for over $10 a pop at high-end grocery stores like Whole Foods and Pusateri’s. Italian is in, and Rocco knows it. And if you’ve ever doubted that, look at that amount of Italian restaurants there are in the city. “What is there not to like about Italy,” says Rocco, back in Toronto after spending the better part of his early summer travelling. “The food is exceptional. The people are exceptional. Italy is a magical place.” His shows have taken Rocco and his crew, including his wife Nina who is Dolce Vita’s producer, to cities and regions throughout la bella paese. He spends four to five months a year there shooting the series. “Last year we were in Tuscany. Season three we are in Sicily and the Amalfi coast,” he says. “Next season... in the south.” Rocco says good food is to be had no matter where you are in Italy: Fresh fish in Sicily. Lemon pasta on the Amalfi coast. Small, brownish black olives from San Remo, Imperia. Italy’s got it all. “You can travel around for two weeks... It’s hard to have a bad meal. You can eat well even at the autogrill (restaurant on the side of the highway).” And does Rocco have a favourite Italian recipe? “I’m amazed how the food gets better and better each time I go there,” he says. But he can’t pick a favourite. “It’s tough. It’s like picking a favourite kid.” Rocco grew up in a family who loved to cook. At age six, his parents took him to Italy where the food and culture impressed him. Rocco turned to acting and producing and had originally intended to make a movie about Italy while on vacation with Nina. The movie never materialized but in the late 1990s, his work lead to the creation of the pilot for the eventual series Avventura, a travelogue/cooking show set in Italy. “I always thought I would be a performer on some level,” says Rocco, who is now represented by U.S. talent agency

Concerts in the Park 905-832-8585 ext. 8200 16th annual series of professional summer concerts presented by TD Canada Trust Music. • Tues., August 10: Coldplayers – International Tribute to Coldplay at Mackenzie Glen District Park, Maple. Kingstock Music Festival www.kingstockmusicfestival.com • Sat., Aug. 28. All day music festival featuring rock, reggae, soca, latin and hip-hop. Tickets $25 from www.kingstockmusifestival.com. Call Rory 416-873-9801. PHOTOS COURTESY Francesco Lastrucci

FAMILY MAN: David Rocco says he loves letting toddler twin daughters, Giorgia and Emma, help in the kitchen.

William Morris. Rocco’s life is sweet thanks to his loving family. Nina has been with him right from the get go, acting as his business partner while being his partner in life for 15 years and counting. The birth of their twin daughters in 2008 is also pretty sweet. When he’s at home, Rocco brings the girls into the kitchen, getting them to help him whether it’s watching daddy or helping to stir the risotto. “I love to cook. It brings me pleasure,” Rocco says. “It’s a good way of connecting with the kids.” All the success still amazes Rocco. His show is set to hook 85 million viewers come September. “It has been an amazing ride. Anything else I get now is gravy.”

McMichael Canadian Art Collection 10365 Islington Ave. 905-893-1121 • Following in the Footsteps of the Group of Seven exhibit. Until Sept. 6 • Dorothy Knowles: Land Marks. Until Sept. 12. Yuk Yuk’s North 70 Interchange Way, near Hwy. 400 and Hwy. 7, 416-967-6425, www. yukyuks.com Thursdays, 8 p.m., $12; Fridays and Saturdays, 7:30 and 10:30 p.m., $19. • Aug. 6 and 7, Tracy Smith; Aug. 13 and 14, Mark Forward; Aug. 20 and 21, Rob Ross; Aug. 27 and 28, Dana Alexander.

AUGUST 2010 VAUGHAN ToDAY 15


Dining

It’s no secret By Liz Campbell

I

’m wondering why we’re reviewing Grazie restaurant. Everyone already seems to know about this place. It’s busy. And it doesn’t take long to figure out why. We sit on the patio in warm sun-

16 VAUGHAN ToDAY AUGUST 2010

shine while we nibble crusty ciabatta and sip our drinks — Okanagan Springs draft ($6) for my guest, and for me, Chilean J. Buchon Sauvignon Blanc ($6) served in a water glass, European style. Reidel would be horrified! From the antipasto menu, my guest chooses Insalata del Mercato

($6.50) — mixed greens in a balsamic dressing. The mesclun greens are very fresh and crisp with none of the wilted bits one often finds. The vinaigrette is a little tart. My fat phyllo package of goat cheese, grilled eggplant and roasted peppers is served atop a salad of arugula in crisp, slightly sweet sherry vinaigrette ($12). Garnished with olives and slices of tomato, I love the contrast of the spicy rocket greens with creamy cheese and roasted vegetables. The menu seems to specialize in pizza and pasta with a few main veal and fish dishes thrown in for good measure. It should be noted that this spot is a member of the Endangered Fish Alliance so any fish served is sustainably caught. Everyone around us is tucking into either pasta or pizza, so we decide to see why. From a vast selection, my guest chooses Firenze pizza — topped with pesto, grilled chicken and eggplant, shredded potatoes, chopped tomatoes and mozzarella ($15). To me, this combination sounds bland. Despite its enormous popularity in Italy, I find potatoes on a pizza a bit of an oxymoron. But I am patently in the minority on this — my guest gives it the thumbs up and two leftover slices are later packaged to take home. It’s the pesto, he explains, that brings it all together. The pasta menu divides the choices by sauces — tomato, creamy tomato, cream sauces, and extra-virgin olive oil and garlic. Delighted to eschew the usual red sauces or cream, I choose from the last list. The olive oil and garlic on my Teramo pasta ($15) have been tossed with generous helpings of artichoke hearts, sun-dried tomatoes, green

onions and parsley with a dollop of goat cheese on top (which I initially mistook for whipped cream!) I’ve asked to substitute the spaghetti with spelt penne – my mistake as this dish would patently be better with a finer pasta. And there’s too much water at the bottom of the plate from the hollow penne. But it’s delicious nonetheless — the salty sweetness of long strips of sun-dried tomatoes, the crunch of the greens and the tang of the artichokes. A generous sprinkling of ground parmiggiano and fresh pepper add their own zest to complete the dish. For dessert, we share Torta di Nonna — expecting grandmother’s homemade recipe of lemon tart topped with pine nuts and almonds ($7.50). Sadly, this Tuscan classic is not homemade but it is imported from Italy. While it’s nicely lemony and rich, I can’t find the pine nuts at all. My decaf Americano comes with hot milk! Imagine — someone who understands that cold milk cools the brew. My guest — a coffee connoisseur — pronounces the java “Very good.” High praise indeed! This is a busy spot with no reservations. Get there early and despite the traffic as a backdrop, enjoy the summer evening outside on the patio. It feels very Italian and, after all, that’s what Grazie is all about. Grazie Ristorante, 9100 Jane (at Rutherford). 905-738-9960.

It doesn’t take long to see why it’s busy


— Liz Campbell

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Gilda means lollipop. The traditional Gilda is a simple arrangement of a guindilla (hot chilli pepper), an anchovy and an olive on a stick. The blending of flavours from the anchovies (choose high quality marinated anchovies) with crisp, spicy chillies and a freshly pitted olive produces a salty and wonderfully zesty bite. 3 1/2 oz marinated achovies in olive oil 10 oz hot chillies, like jalapeno, cut into inch-long pieces 8 oz pitted green olives Thread an anchovy onto a cocktail stick, interspersing pieces of and an olive along its length. Arrange on a plate and serve.

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n a warm summer’s evening, what could be nicer than tapas and a glass of Sangria? Sangria is the most democratic of beverages. It usually starts with inexpensive — even mediocre — wine, whose mediocrity is happily masked with citrus fruits and berries. Their flavours are allowed to steep into the wine overnight if possible, and the drink is then served chilled. Vermouth or brandy may be added to fortify the Sangria. “It’s an open-ended concoction,” says Cesar Valente, fine wine specialist at Magnotta Winery. “The point is to take something mediocre and turn it into something intense and lively. And Sangria plays perfectly off the saltiness of tapas.” There’s little point in using $25 wine for Sangria, he adds. “We’re at the stage in the wine industry where there are very few really mediocre wines, so almost any wine will do the job.” Or, he points

out, you can buy their own red or white sangria in a 3-litre box — one of Magnotta’s newest offerings ($24.95). For those who prefer not to “adulterate” their wine — as one connoisseur disdained — Valente suggests a good summer wine should not burden the palate. “Choose a wine that isn’t completely dry. For example, we have a new white Merlot — a rosé that I think is a notch above California Zinfandel.” Often overlooked, Riesling and Gewürztraminer are also satisfying and thirst-quenching wines, he adds. “They do a dance on the palate like no other grapes. Zesty and zingy and ideal in the summer.” Whether you choose wine or sangria for your summer tipple, try the Spanish custom of tapas — small savoury snacks. A plate of all kinds of olives, roasted almonds or other nuts, pieces of hard, tangy cheese, thin slices of Serrano ham or Proscuitto, marinated octopus, artichoke hearts, and of course, crusty bread are typical tapas offerings in Spain. And below is a simple and delicious tapas dish you can create easily.

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AUGUST 2010 VAUGHAN ToDAY 17


Thingstodo

5 dates hot summer

Mark Your Calendar Saturdays Woodbridge Village Farmers’ Market. Come out and indulge in our own fresh, local fruits and vegetables, herbs, breads and baked goods, eggs, honey, gourmet spreads, maple syrup, cured meats, hot sandwiches, and coffee. Children’s activities, and an artisan market on special days. Contact Martha Bell at martha_bell@yahoo.com or Jamie Maynard at maynard.insurance@on.aibn. com. Market runs June 12 to Oct. 9 at Market Lane in Woodbridge. 9 a.m.­–1:30 p.m. Sat., July 31­–Sun., Aug. 1 Woodbridge Italian Festival at the Ontario Soccer Centre, 7601 Martin Grove Rd. in Woodbridge. 2010 Miss Wooodbridge Italia Pageant, vendors and entertainment. For info contact: 905-856-2823 or woodbridgeitalianfestival@gmail.com. Fri., Aug. 6–Sun., Aug 8 The succulent and saucy 4th annual Woodbridge Rib Fest, with lots of finger-lickin’ food and great entertainment. Brought to you by the Woodbridge Rotary Club. Friday and Saturday noon–11 p.m. Sunday noon- 9 p.m. Woodbridge Fairgrounds, just north of Highway 7 on Kipling Avenue. Admission: $2 donation. Call 905-851-9690 or visit woodbridgeribfest.com. Wed., Aug. 11 and Aug. 23 Blood Donor Clinic at Woodbridge Pool and Memorial Arena, 50200 Hwy. 7, Aug. 11. In the community hall 3 to 8 p.m. Aug. 23 at Vellore Village, 1 Villa Royal Ave. In Activity Room 1 from 3:30­–8 p.m. Call 1-888-2DONATE (1-888-236-6283) to book your appointment. Sat., August 14 Butterfly Kisses Memorial Release. Join in this special event of releasing a beautiful live butterfly in memory of your cherished loved one. Program includes inspirational readings, live music, poems, and the announcement of each loved one’s name before the group releases the butterflies. $30 per butterfly. Rain or shine. Register by 10 a.m. on the day of the event. Bring your lawn chairs and carpooling is recommended due to limited parking. Doctors MacLean District Park, 8100 Islington Ave. www.butterflykissesmemorial.com or 905-833-3836. Info about public events to be held in this area may be sent by email 18 VAUGHAN ToDAY AUGUST 2010

W

hat’s better than spending time with someone you love (or at least like!) on a warm summer’s evening? Whether with your spouse, boyfriend, girlfriend or best friend, try something a little different for date night this month. For the love of the arts There’s a ton of date-worthy stuff going on at the Richmond Hill Performing Arts Centre, just a stone’s throw north of Thornhill. Every Tuesday (until Aug. 25) romancing couples can enjoy Outdoor Jazz in the Plaza Courtyard at 7:30 p.m. Talk about a cheap date: it’s free. And so are Acoustic Wednesdays, when jazz musicians unplug and take it outside. 7:30 p.m. For movie buffs, Night and the Movies Monday present the summer season of Film Circuit, a division of the Toronto International Film Festival. The screenings promote Canadian artists and films. Mondays until Aug. 23, 7 p.m. 10268 Yonge St., Richmond Hill. For more info call 905-787-8811. If you are willing to drive a little farther, Resurgence Theatre presents Hamlet at Fairy Lake in Newmarket Aug. 9–29 (Tickets are $27/person and can be purchased online, by phone or in person at the Newmarket Theatre Box Office 905-953-5122). Gelato and a sunset For an easy and delicious date, tantalize your taste buds and indulge in some gelato. There’s no shortage of gelaterias in our city. A staple in Corsa Italia on St. Clair West in Toronto, La Paloma (voted Best Spot for Ice Cream in Vaughan Today’s Secret Vaughan contest in 2008) now has three locations in Vaughan, including 200 Windflower Gate in Woodbridge (near Highway 7 and Weston Road). From there, gelato in hand, head to the Pioneer Cemetery at Keele Street and Teston Road to catch the sunset. While houses have been going up around the area, there’s still nice views from atop the hill.

Entertain this idea Interchange Way — aka Entertainment Central — is a one-stop date locale. Restaurants, amusements, pubs, movies, shows…should I go on? Why not feel like a kid again at Dave and Buster’s? Race each other on the motorbike games, square off on Guitar Hero or go head-to-head on the snowboard or downhill skiing game. There’s a large resto-bar inside if you need refueling. 905-760-7600. (Psst…If you are watching your wallet, games are half price on Wednesdays.) Across the parking lot, Wendel Clark’s namesake restaurant serves up some fine fare, Duelling Pianos is tuned to impress and Yuk Yuk’s welcomes a different funny person each weekend. www.entertainmentcentralinc.com and www.yukyuks.com. There’s also an AMC theatre and some pub-style patios in the complex as well. Get your body’s movin’ From scavenger hunts to cooking classes to Viking rowing to canoe trips around the Toronto Island, Urban Adventures has plenty of great, active date ideas for lovebirds of all ages. Full- and half-day events range in price from $15 to $85 a person. Spots fill up fast, so talk to your date and plan ahead. www.yorkssc.com/urbanadventures. Getting too hot ’n heavy? Warm temperatures got you seeking A/C? Talk a walk at “Yorkville North” — the new Disera Drive shopping district near Bathurst and Centre. There’s plenty of shops and cafes for you to pop in to cool off with an iced frappacino, some air conditioning and some great conversation with your date. Still too warm? Check out one of Thornhill’s bestkept secrets: the Thornhill Outdoor Pool. You and your date can cool off in the large pool at Yonge and Centre and then picnic in nearby Thornhill Park. (P.S. This spot is great for families if your date night has the kids coming along!)


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www.CompleteHOMEconcepts.ca AUGUST 2010 VAUGHAN ToDAY 19


Home&Garden

Outdoor dilemmas By Mary Fran Mcquade

S

ummer’s winding down but there’s plenty of time yet to enjoy it. In fact, this is a great time to step back and polish up your outdoor living area. Patio furniture and accessories are all very well, but you really need a good setting for your backyard living room. That means a beautiful, functional deck or patio. Many people automatically think decks are the answer for outdoor living, but patios have a place, too. The decision depends on your personal preference, budget and outdoor accessibility to your house.

Deck or patio? On the practical side, cost for a decent deck or patio is roughly the same, though special conditions and materials add up. Decks may need a bit more care, and you may have to make a special effort to provide privacy. As well, you should know that decks often need building permits, but patios do not. However, if your kitchen door is way up in the air—8 feet or more—a deck is the only realistic solution. That’s just some of what we learned when we spoke with Adam Gracey, of D.A. Gracey and Associates landscape designers in Concord. Gracey and his team have included hundreds of decks and patios in the landscapes they’ve constructed for homes across the GTA. Their work has won awards from industry group Landscape Ontario the past three years. Homework first Do your homework when planning a deck or patio, Gracey says. “How will you use the space? How do you entertain? Do you like formal or casual living? How many people will use it? What age are your kids?” All these things go into designing a successful outdoor living area. In terms of style, anything goes. You may have heard outdoor spaces should match a house’s style. That’s true in front, Gracey says, but not in private backyards. You can have anything from an Old English garden with random flagstones or clay brick patio, to a modern deck with tempered glass and metal railings. Furniture, container plantings and flower beds/ borders can all reflect your chosen style. Unless a kitchen door far off the ground limits your choice to a deck, you can choose a deck, a patio, or even both. (Though if your kitchen is at ground level, installing a raised deck doesn’t really serve any purpose.) For example, you could combine cooking and conversation areas on a deck with a ground-level dining patio surrounded by a garden. “You have a more private and intimate feeling sitting in the garden, as opposed to sitting above the garden.” 20 VAUGHAN ToDAY AUGUST 2010

A steppeddown deck approach is attractive

Or the top section might be just a small barbecue area, dropping down a couple of feet to a larger lounging area, then two more steps down to the dining area at the lowest level. This stepped-down approach is more attractive than one long series of steps, easier for toting food and more manageable for older people.

from going grey. Privacy on a high, exposed deck can be an issue—no one wants to relax up on a stage. Gracey suggests adding a 6- or 7-foot high privacy screen made of wood, perhaps with decorative inserts. “Sometimes we build in planters or benches with storage,” he adds.

Go big or go home One thing that bugs Gracey is decks that are too small. He suggests a minimum size of 12 feet by 12 feet, which allows dining for six people. Go larger if you can. “You can fill it with furniture—a serving table or a couple more chairs.” There are limits to deck size, though; check with city regulations. A ground-level patio should extend 14 feet from the house’s back wall, to allow for overhanging plants at the edge. Gracey is big on composite wood for decking, because it’s easy care—no staining necessary to keep it looking new. Rot-resistant treated wood is fine for structural parts that don’t show. Natural cedar is lovely, but needs yearly upkeep to keep

Range of choices For patios, there’s a wide range of choices: clay brick, interlocking concrete pavers, natural flagstones and granite slabs. Patio stones these days come in a dazzling array of shapes, colours and patterns. (Beware of paving that’s too rough for small children to play on, and porous stones that show every stain.) Research availability, warranty, and cost to find the best choice—stoneyards can be fun! Outdoor living today means anything from simple barbecues and pretty patios to complete outdoor kitchens with granite counters and built-in fridges, sinks and cooking areas. A well-designed deck or patio can mean years of enjoyment for your family and be a smart investment in your home.


WOODBRIDGE TOYOTA CELEBRATING

40 Years serving the community

7685 Martin Grove Rd. 905-851-3993 • 416-743-1211 www.woodbridgetoyota.ca AUGUST 2010 VAUGHAN ToDAY 21


Automotive

Mini celebrates 50 years By Mathieu Yuill

I

t’s hard to believe the Mini turned 50 this year. It certainly doesn’t look a half-century old, but that’s thanks to the high priority BMW places on design for its pint-sized car brand. To celebrate the semi-centennial, Mini has released two new editions named after a couple of swanky neighbourhoods in London: the Mayfair and the Camden, both only available for 2010. The original Mini had a Mayfair package available back in 1982, at the time it added comfort and aesthetic options. Today’s Mayfair edition adds the same comfort and style improvements while taking advantage of today’s available technology to justify the $5,000 upgrade package. The package is available on both the base and S trim levels and features an available “Hot Chocolate” paint finish with turquoise accents along with leather toffee-coloured seats, toffee interior and (you guessed it) toffee steering wheel and gearshift knob all with turquoise stitching. It’s a fantastic look but probably not for everyone. It’s easier to imagine someone who appreciates high fashion, like say, Tim Gunn, behind the wheel than the likes of Jeff Probst. There are a handful of other features thrown in for good measure but some of the beefier “wow”

factors include the glass sunroof, heated front seats, rain sensor with automatic headlights and the impressive Media Connect that allows for wireless Bluetooth connectivity to your phone and USB audio integration that supports the iPod format. The iPod support is worth noting because so few manufacturers do this right. Nissan does it the best but a close second is the system found in the Mini. What makes it excellent is the similarity to the actual iPod navigation system and the quick response from the system. A lot of other integration attempts seem slow to respond to clicks and turns of the dial — a significant delay while the display screen refreshes the name of the playlist is all too

The tiny Mini doesn’t look a half-century old

22 VAUGHAN ToDAY AUGUST 2010

common. Media Connect does an excellent job and gets extra kudos for assimilating the menu navigation into the look and feel of the Mini. As additional packages go, the $5,000 price tag gives the buyer quite a few additions compared to what can sometimes (not) be found in other addons. But the guts of the Mini stay the same. The Mini Cooper S is of particular joy to drive so if it’s just the thrill of commanding a tiny auto you’re after, you probably won’t find much value in the Mayfair or Camden editions. But if you’re smitten with the Mini brand then it’s a no-brainer to opt for one of the two special editions given their limited availability.


AUTO - EDGE RUSTPROOFING Serving Woodbridge Since 1987

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CSL SOCCER PYRAMID IS NOW COMPLETE The Canadian Soccer League (CSL) will commence a youth academy competitive division in 2010-2011 indoor season. The indoor season will allow the CSL Youth Division to get ready to play in their inaugural 2011 outdoor season. The CSL Academy age divisions are: U3-U9 Competitive Youth Academy U10-U11 U12-U13 U14-U15 U16-U17 CSL Reserve Division to U21 This structure will allow the youth soccer player to be part of a professional program from ages 3 right up to men’s - the way it is done in big soccer countries like Germany, England, Spain, Italy, Brazil, Argentina, Chile, etc.

Home Game Schedule Kick-off @ 6pm St Joan of Arc Stadium, Maple Sunday July 25 Sunday Aug 1 Sunday Aug 8 Sunday Aug 15 Sunday Sept 5

vs Toronto Croatia vs Brantford Galaxy vs Milltown FC vs Serbia W Eagles vs North York Astros

COMPARE THE CSL ADVANTAGES The CSL Youth Academy offers soccer players the best opportunity of reaching their goals in one of the highest professional soccer environments in Canada. 1. There will only be five age divisions. 2. There will be a nationally licensed technical director overseeing all the youth players 3. Each player will “belong to the club” and not “to a team” or to a “coach.” This will prevent the best players from being held back. The best players get promoted ASAP. 4. The majority of games will be on weekends thus assuring at least four or five practice nights per game played. 5. A certified athletic therapist will be on staff at each practice night and at each game.

FOR CSL YOUTH TRYOUT & More Information please call JORDAN 905 303 9241 or Email vaughanshooters@hotmail.com

24 VAUGHAN ToDAY AUGUST 2010


Sports

Baseball’s back By Jim Humphrey

T

he bantam boys National Baseball Championships are coming back. The chance for national bragging rights will be played from Aug. 26-29 at Vaughan Grove. Last year, the city hosted the same championships, with Vaughan Vikings coming away with a bronze medal after beating New Brunswick 8-3. “In 2008 we were two outs away from going to the gold-medal game and ended up losing to Quebec,” says Dirk Drieberg, president of the City of Vaughan Baseball and Softball Association. “Last year we lost a one-run game to Ontario for a chance to play for the gold medal, so this year we are definitely looking to ... get into that gold-medal game.” This is the second of a three-year commitment by Baseball Canada and the City of Vaughan to host the National Championship for bantam, ages 14 and 15. “Everything was about creating a real positive experience for the kids,” says Drieberg. “We were a little hesitant given the amount of work it takes to put on an event of this magnitude. But we had over 100 volunteers help us out over the weekend — from players in our organization to parents to grandparents, you name it. So, given the fact we had a model already in place, we told them the only way we would do it is if they were prepared to give us a multi-year commitment.” Acting as host city focuses national attention on the area for three days, and will do a lot for the city in terms of attracting larger events. “It gives incredible exposure,” he says. “You have teams from across the country coming to Vaughan that is covered extensively from the media from the different provinces. Last year, we got a little more coverage than we expected due to the tornado that hit our city. So we had the national media converge on our event because we saw (the tornado) coming right in the middle of our opening ceremonies.” There’s economic rewards, Drieberg says. “A lot of the families who come to the event have never been to the GTA before and make it a vacation, so you have all of the economic spinoffs that come with hosting an even of this magnitude. It happens right at the end of summer, so they stay on here and spend their tourist dollars and economic development dollars here.” But getting sponsorship has been tough, he adds. “The City of Vaughan has been excellent in terms of helping us put on a first-class event. The volunteers from our organization have been there to step up and take on any and all jobs to help us make this event a success.”

Cont. from Page 11

“The most important thing is the shock of falling into the water and how to react,” Kent said. “They are trained to protect themselves.” Kent’s children take lessons at Swim Time in Woodbridge, where there are programs to suit anyone’s needs. “We go from infants to adults,” said administrator Leslie Berry. “We take roughly 800 registered within a session.” Swim Time offers lifeguarding and swimming instructor programs for those who have successfully completed the swimming levels. Boating safety is also part of course instruction. Being trained to swim is important because individuals are responsible for themselves, Eickmann said. There may not always be a lifeguard on duty to protect you wherever you are.

“Condo pools and apartment pools don’t have lifeguard and that’s normal throughout Ontario,” he said. The Ministry of Health is currently reviewing pool safety regulations as a result of the high number of drownings in Ontario this past month. “When it comes to matters of public safety and public health, we regularly view those types of policies,” said Andrew Morrison, ministry spokesperson. It is important for individuals to recognize the importance of water safety and be aware of potential dangers, such as not wearing a lifejacket, being reckless in the water, or getting too close to the water if you do not know how to swim. The City of Vaughan website has information on which community centre pools are open for leisure swimming, if a lifeguard is on duty, as well as where swimming lessons are offered.

AUGUST 2010 VAUGHAN ToDAY 25


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AUGUST 2010 VAUGHAN TODAY 1 26 VAUGHAN ToDAY AUGUST 2010


EAT IN OR TAKE-OUT.

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The Dance Zone • Acro • Ballet • Jazz • Hip Hop • Tap • Lyrical • Musical Theatre Recreational and Competitive Classes Starting At Age 2 to Professional

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• Free registration for all students • Free Student Price Card for All Students save hundreds of dollars at nation-wide stores* Go to spccard.ca for details • Register for 1 class, don’t pay the HST • Register for 2 classes, get the 3rd class FREE • Register one child, get your second child at 50% off • All students eligible for Child Tax Credit • All students receive $50.00 off Birthday Parties Regular Price $199.00 Student Price $149.00

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VAUGHAN TODAY VaughanToday.ca

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539 Jevlan, Unit B Southeast corner of Weston/Langstaff (Right Behind Longo’s)

905-856-8877


Vaughan Today - August 2010