Page 1

Hope College

Non-Profit

141 E. 12th St.

Organization

Holland. MI 49423

U.S.

Postage

PAID

ADDRESS CORRECTION REQUESTED

AUGUST

1993

Hope College

PUBLISHED BY THE OFFICE OF PUBLIC RELATIONS, HOPE COLLEGE, HOLLAND, MICHIGAN 49423


Campus Notes

HOPE COLLEGE Volume

Convocation

open academic year

will

the building’s second floor, and a

Hr1 he 132nd academic year at Hope Awill open on Sunday, Aug. 29, with

new

25,

I

No.

August 1993

Publishedfor Alumni, Friends and Parents of Hope College by the Office of Public Relations. Should you receive more than one copy, please pass it on to

someone in

college officials.Classes will begin at 8

computer room has been created on the second floor of Lubbers Hall. Three cottages on 13th Street between Columbia and College Avenues have been removed in conjunctionwith Western TheologicalSeminary’s construction of student housing and additional parking space, and a cottage has been added for the Knickerbocker Fraternity. Lubbers Hall received new doors and a ramp at the rear entrance, and cosmetic changes have been made to a number of dormitories. Dr. Voskuil has been a member of the Hope faculty since 1977, and is currently chairperson of the department of religion. He received the “Hope Outstanding Professor Educator” Award from the

a.m. on Tuesday, Aug.

graduating class in 1981.

during February, April, June, August,

convocationaddress by Dr. Dennis Voskuil, who is the Evert J. and Hattie E. Blekkink Professor of Religion at Hope. The convocationwill be held on Sunday at 2 p.m. in Dimnent Memorial Chapel. Dr. Voskuil will present “Hillary. Hope College and the Quest For Meaning.” The public is invited.Admission is free. Residence halls for new students will open at 10 a.m. on Friday, Aug. 27. Orientation events will begin that evening and will continue through Monday, Aug. a

30.

Returning students are not to arrive on campus before Monday, accordingto 3

1

.

He has taught courses

in

contemporary culture while serving on various campus committees,and has twice

history.

college’s Board of Trustees.

the

campus during

the

summer.

A

Editor: Thomas L. Renner '67

Managing Editor: Gregory S. Olgers Theune '92 Layout: Holland Litho Service, Inc. Printing:

Church

in the

Reformed

America (RCA), Dr. Voskuil

in

has served churches in Watertown, Mass.,

and Kalamazoo, Mich. During the 1990-91 and 1991-92 academic years he

News Web

Printing Service of

Greenville, Mich.

Contributing Photographers: Lou Schakel, Brian Watkins ’93 news from

Hope

College

is

October, and December by

published

Hope

College, 141 East 12th Street, Holland,

Michigan 49423-3698. Postmaster: Send address changes to news from Hope College, HoUand, MI

Dr. Dennis Voskuil

served as a faculty representative to the

An ordainedminister

'87

Contributing Writer: Michael

religion,church history, Bible

A variety of changes have been made to biochemistrylaboratory has been constructed in the Peale Science Center, on the site of the former science library on

makes duplication sometimes unavoidable.

American and

A freshman class of approximately620 is anticipated,according to Jon Huisken, dean for academic services and registrar. Last year’s freshman class, which had 650 students, was one of the largest in Hope’s

community. An

your

overlap of Hope College constituencies

was interim senior pastor of Third Reformed Church in Holland, Mich. He earned his undergraduatedegree at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, a B.D. at Western TheologicalSeminary and his doctorate at Harvard University.

49423-3698

Hope

College Office of Public Relations DeWitt Center, Holland, MI 49423-3698.

Thomas L. Renner

'67, Director

Gregory S. Olgers ’87, Assistant Director

introductory psychology text, this

book cover

experience in “trade book” publishing was a

clue what planet you're fi-om. For

relative breeze. I wrote it (over several

recent interview, Roy Leonard of

years).

My

editor offered helpful

expanded and revised it. And they published it. Most folks don’t know how much can go into the making of a textbook, and how little into a trade book. I was surprised at how the publisher conservedand spent money. Morrow suggestions.

Quote, unquote is an eclectic samplingof things said at and about Hope College.

invested five cents less than

The Pursuit of Happiness by Dr. David Myers of the Hope psychology faculty was

Avon

recentlypublished in softcover by

Books. In

little

more than

a year since the

Morrow,

hardcover publication by William

Dr. Myers has given nearly 90 interviews to print and broadcast media and more than

50

lectures, coast to coast. Recent publicity

includes a page on "The Pursuit of Happiness” in Newsweek (May 24) and feature articles summarizing the book in the July, 1993, issues of Better Homes

&

reflect on his experiences. or an

academic who

is

more

at

home

A1 polishing sentences on a screen than blurtinga top-of-the-headtalk-show answer to someone on a car phone in North Dallas, the last year has been a different experience. The story began as

I

became

some myths about what makes for happiness and reveals the marks of happy lives. I set out to report on this research,to illustrate it with real life stories, and to

what

it

means

for our personal

and cultural priorities. After one literary agent gave up on the book (because of “all those #%*! research studies”), to another agent, who

action on the

I

showed

it

promptly put it up for literary market.

New York

Ergo, 18 days later I had a publisher.

Compared to

the intense relationshipI

have with the editorsand reviewers of

TWO

expected to be, and was not, a best-seller). Yet they also spent $2,000 a city, I was told, for a short promotional tour. In I

was chauffeured by

New York,

the Sultan of Brunei’s

driver. In Philadelphia,someone had to

show me how

to use

my room

key to get the

elevator to go to the posh floor where I’d been put.

money

in

wished I could have spent that other ways. I

Other reflections: The media feed on themselves.

Although this book didn’t make it to national talk shows (“They want blood and guts,” explained the publicist, “and your book isn’t blood and guts”), it did illustrate how the media pick up ideas from other media. A magazine article stimulates a v newspaper report which triggersa radio interview.

On

and on

it still

rolls.

A book is a vehicle for communicating through the media. The publisher led me to see the media as a vehicle for publicizing the book. In hindsight,the book was a vehicle for talking, albeit superficially, with a million times more people than will ever read the book. • Ten minutes go quickly. A few minutes of radio time or a few inches of newspaper space require crunching the message into sound bites. But how does one convey, in 10 minutes, a critique of American materialism and individualism, and an affirmation of the significanceof •

fascinatedby news research that explodes

reflect on

nickel in

a

advertisingmy book (which was not

Gardens and Psychology Today, news from Hope College invited Dr. Myers to

T?

I

my

close relationshipsand faith? •

Some

interviewers will have read your

to cover, others won't have

a

my most

WGN

Lynne M. Powe ’86, Assistant Director Kathy Miller, Office Manager Karen Bos, Secretary

(Chicago) used his marked-up copy as the basis for 90 minutes of stimulating

Notice of Nondiscrimination

conversation (actually40 minutes, after ads, farm reports and traffic updates). I

Hope College

was

impressed. • Reportersvaiy in their willingness to mention religion. The longest chapter, “Faith, Hope, and Joy,” was conspicuously absent when the research was summarized in some newspapers,but included by others. Other reporterssquirmed. Factors that contribute to happiness include “an active faith,” noted the ClevelandPlain Dealer, “whether it be Marxism, New Age beliefs, or traditional Christianity.”The

makings of happiness include “religious faith,” summarized Newsweek, “of almost any kind.” But the research was conducted in the Christianized Western nations of Europe and North America. Nowhere does the book, or the research on which it reports,indicatesthat Marxism and New Age beliefs do (or don’t) enhance well-being as does Christian faith.

Given interview requests ranging fi-om Cosmopolitan to the 700 Club, is there anyone whom I should refuse to talk with? Does being interviewed implicitlysupport or identify myself with outlets that don’t represent my views? My response: Rather than preach only to the choir, why not (within the limits of my morality and time) use this “15 minutes of fame” as an opportunity to bring some words of Hope to a hurting world.

committed to the

is

concept of equal rights, equal opportunities and equal protection under the law. Hope College admits students of any race, color, national and ethnic origin, sex, creed or handicap to all the rights, privileges,programs and activities

generally accordedor

made

available to

students at Hope College, including the administration of

its

educational policies,

admissionpolicies, scholarship and loan programs,and athletic and other schooladministered programs. With regard to employment, the College complieswith all legal requirements prohibiting

discrimination in employment.

On

the

cover

New students get to know one another and the campus during Orientation. They are creating a banner destined to join pieces created by other groups during the weekend. The key, sayorganizers and past participants alike, is to have fun.

At lower left will be

is

the Orchestra, which

petforming during

coming semester

is

the fall.

The

so chock full of

concerts, plays, exhibitions,athletic competition, alumni events and

more

that we have expanded our traditional

Events page

to two

Please also see the

pages

this issue.

Homecoming

schedule on page 20. At lower right

is

sophomore Tomislav

Skarica of Croatia, who has been spending a lot of time at the keyboard. The gifted pianist is

making up for

lost time:

he was unable to enroll in piano lessons while growing up in his native Croatia.

NEWS FROM HOPE COLLEGE, AUGUST 1993


Campus Notes Bookstore opens TJ

AX

ope has opened the “Art Annex” in downtown Holland.

Specializing in artist’s supplies, the

Hope

Annex is an extension of the college’s Hope-Geneva Bookstore. The new store, which opened Monday, College Art

“Annex”

furniture such as drafting boards and artist’s chairs.

We’ll have

a variety of

paints and mediums, and that

would

include all watercolors, acrylics and oils.”

The Art Annex

will also sell painting,

drafting and drawing supplies, and will

Aug. 2, is at 80 East Eighth Street, between College and Columbia Avenues

emphasize the

(two doors west of the college’s

display

Knickerbocker Theatre). “I think we’ll meet the needs of the amateur as well as the professional artist,” said Bruce ten Haken ’83, manager of the Art Annex. “We will have a large paper assortment, drawing materials, and artist’s

also be available for purchase.

sale of arts supplies for

children. In addition, the store will

Hope

student artwork, which will

The “Art Annex” is open from 10 a.m. on Mondays; from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Tuesdays through Thursdays; from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Fridays; and from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturdays. to 9 p.m.

^

The choir performs at

the

350-year-old Greek Catholic church at Hajdudorog, tour of Hungary, Slovakia and the Czech Republic.

Hungary during its May 13-23

Choir trip was

memories

stuff of ft’s

little

wonder

that there is

X remember in a trip that

much

to

included a

Danube and singing church that hosted the crowning of Habsburg emperors.

twilight cruise on the in a

What

Alumni paper turns 25 T’his

X

issue marks the beginning of

news from Hope’s 25th year.

Hope College is actually this name. The paper began as The Hope Imprint, a quarterly 8.5” by 11” newsletter, in March of 1968. news from

The Hope Imprint March, 1968

publication’s third

The Hope Imprint became

Hope

Newsletter in April of 1970, and

Hope

Newsletter, in turn, became news from

Hope College in

1971.

Within a year of receiving its current name, the paper outgrew its newsletter size and

moved

Robert De Haan Heads GLCA Project “A glowing start marks Hope’s involvement in the new Great Lakes CollegesAssociation program in Philadelphia, accordingto word received recently from Dr. Robert De Haan, who is responsible for on-site administration of the program.”

up to a larger “tabloid”

newspaper format that endures to this day. news from Hope College became a bi-monthly in August of 1979. Much has happened to Hope College since 1968. The student body and campus both have grown. Hope is now on its 10th president (Dr. John H. Jacobson), not its eighth (Dr. Calvin A. VanderWerf’37). Alumni who were Hope students when The Hope Imprint debuted now have college-agechildren of their own. To see just what Hope College had to say during our publication’s first year, we did some digging at the Joint Archives of

Holland. A few excerpts from our March, 1968, issue follow. We’ll share more in the issues to come. We hope you enjoy this brief look at yesteryear.We also hope you enjoy the rest of this issue's look at today.

stand out in director Scott

Ferguson’smind, however, are the human connectionsmade during the 60-voice Hope College Chapel Choir’s May 13-23 tour of Hungary, Slovakiaand the Czech Republic. “Repeatedly we were told how special it was that we were there — what it meant to them just to have contact with the West,” he said. Dr. Ferguson noted that the group heard often that democracy and economic reform were coming only slowly to the countries they visited. The choir, thus, not only represented Hope literally, but figurativelyas well. “It

was very nice

“For the first time in

its

history,Hope

College is offering graduate credit toward a master’s degree at Michigan Universities. The courses for which such credit may be obtained will be taught during the summer in the fields of English novel, psychology,physical education, and education.” Student Center Dream Nears Reality “Another step was taken toward the realizationof a Student Center when the Executive Committee of the Hope College Board of Trustees authorized the architecturalfirm of Stade, Dolan and Emerick to proceed with final drawing and specificationsfor both the Student Center and the proposed wing to the Nykerk Hall of Music.”

NEWS FROM HOPE COLLEGE, AUGUST 1993

for

them

to

have a

vision of something else from the West,” he said. “There’sa great admirationand respect for America there.”

One stop recalled not only

the rebirth

of

today but the rebirth of an earlier time. At the Sarospatak

Graduate Credit Offered

was an extremely emotional experience for me.” “Bridging those kinds of gaps with one song was quite extraordinary,” Dr. Ferguson said. “The whole trip was made worth it even at that first little meeting." (Editor's note: news from Hope College would like to offer special appreciation to Brian Watkins '93 for providing this story's photographs.In addition, our readers may like to know that a compact disc featuring the Chapel Choir's concert program is being released. Additional information will appear in the October, 1993, issue of news from Hope College.)^

Choir's

Reformed Academy, the

members spoke with

the

Academy’s library director, who had been imprisonedin a forced labor camp during World War II. In the lean years immediatelyfollowing the war, he received food and clothing sent to Sarospatak by a

concerned Hope community. And in the Academy’s library, filled with dusty tomes written hundreds of years before either era, Sarospatak’s choir sang “Deep River.” The Hope College Chapel Choir answered with the same tune. It is a moment that remains vivid for Dr. Ferguson,and no doubt for the choir’s students as well, not only-as an event in time but for the truth it reflected.

“Musical connectionsspeak louder than any words, certainly,and transcend the boundariesof cultural context,” he said. “Just to sing back and forth in that library

Scott Ferguson, director of the

Chapel

Choir, speaks with priests of the church at

Hajdudorog, Hungary.

THREE


ACADEMIC CALENDAR

A season

Fall Semester (1993)

Aug. 27, Friday — Residence halls open for new students at 10 a.m. New student orientationbegins Aug. 29, Sunday — Convocation for new students and parents, 2 p.m. Aug. 30. Monday — Residence halls open for returning

of highlights

The Great Performance Series has

a tradition of

bringing outstanding

professional productions to campus. The 1993-94 season

is

no exception.

students; late registration

Aug. 31, Tuesday — Classes begin at 8 a.m. — Labor Day, classes in session Sept. 28-29, Tuesday-Wednesday — CriticalIssues Symposium: “Race and Social Change in America” Oct. 8, Friday — Fall Recess begins at 6 p.m. Oct. 13, Wednesday — Fall Recess ends at 8 a.m. Oct. 22-24, Friday-Sunday— Homecoming Weekend Nov. 5-7, Friday-Sunday— Parents’ Weekend Nov. 25. Thursday — Thanksgiving Recess begins at Sept. 6. Monday

Monday and Tuesday, Oct. 4-5 The Feld Ballets/NY DeWitt Center main theatre,8 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 26 Scott, concert organist Dimnent Memorial Chapel, 8 p.m.

John

8 a.m.

Friday, Nov. 12

Nov. 29, Monday — Thanksgiving Recess ends at 8 a.m. Dec. 10, Friday — Last day of classes Dec. 13-17, Monday-Friday — Semester examinations Dec. 17, Friday — Residence halls close at 5 p.m.

The Budapest Wind Ensemble

THE ARTS Great PerformanceSeries — Monday and Tuesday, Oct. 4-5: The Feld Ballets/NY. DeWitt Center main theatre, 8 p.m. Tickets cost $10 for senior citizens, $12.50 for other adults and $6 for students, and information concerningsale dates may be obtained by calling (616) 394-6996. Student Recital — Thursday, Oct. 7: Wichers Auditorium of Nykerk Hall of Music, 7 p.m. Faculty Recital Series — Sunday, Oct. 24: Wichers Auditorium of Nykerk Hall of Music, 4 p.m. Great PerformanceSeries — Tuesday, Oct. 26: John Scott, concert organist,Dimnent Memorial Chapel, 8 p.m. Tickets cost $10 for senior citizens, $12.50 for other adults and $6 for students, and information concerningsaledates may be obtained by calling (616) 394-6996. Wind Ensemble and Orchestra Concert — Friday, Nov. 5: Dimnent Memorial Chapel, 8 p.m. Student Recital— Thursday, Nov. 11: Dimnent Memorial

Dimnent Memorial Chapel, 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Jan. 21-22 Michael Bashaw and The Bridge Knickerbocker Theatre, 8 p.m.

Monday, Feb. 14 “The Belgian Chamber Orchestra” Dimnent Memorial Chapel, 8 p.m. Saturday,

March 5

Graham

Scott, pianist

The Feld Ballets/NY will appear Oct. 4-5. Season tickets are $40 for senior citizens,$50 for other adults, $20 for students and $100 for families. Tickets for individual performances are $10 for senior citizens,$1250 for other adults and $6 for students.

Dimnent Memorial Chapel, 8 p.m.

23 The Gene Bertoncini Duo

Saturday, April

For additionalinformation. please write: "Great Performance Series: PO Box 9000: Hope College; Holland,Ml 49422-9000" or call (616) 394-6996.

Dimnent Memorial Chapel, 8 p.m.

THEATRE

ADMISSIONS Campus Visits Even

Evita — Nov. 12-13; 17-20 Lyrics by the house of

Tim

Andrew Lloyd Webber bernalda alba — April 15-16; 20-23 Rice; music by

by FedericoGarcia Lorca

Chapel, 7 p.m.

Great PerformanceSeries— Friday, Nov. 12: The Budapest Wind Ensemble, Dimnent Memorial Chapel, 8 p.m. Tickets cost $10 for senior citizens, $12.50 for other adults and $6 for students, and information concerningsale dates may be obtained by calling (616) 394-6996. Faculty Recital Series— Sunday, Nov. 14: Wichers Auditorium of Nykerk Hall of Music, 4 p.m. Christmas Vespers — Saturday and Sunday, Dec. 4-5: Dimnent Memorial Chapel. Vespers will be at 8 p.m. on Saturday and at 2 p.m., 4:30 p.m. and 8 p.m. on Sunday. Tickets for those who live in the Holland-Zeeland area will go on sale on Saturday, Nov. 20. Those living farther away may call (616) 394—7860 for information on acquiring tickets by mail. Student Recital — Thursday, Dec. 9: Wichers Auditorium of Nykerk Hall of Music, 7 p.m. 19th Annual Mid-day Hope College Orchestra Christmas Concert — Friday, Dec. 10: DeWitt Center

Tickets cost $5 for regular adult admission,and $4 for senior citizensand students. Reservationsmay be

made

and additional informationmay be obtained by calling the Hope College Theatre Ticket Office at (616) 394-7890 two weeks prior to each play' s opening.

during the summer months, the Admissions Office is open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays. Tours and admissionsinterviews are available. Appointments are recommended. Visitation Days offer specific programs for prospective students, including transfers, and high school juniors and seniors. The programs show students and their parents a typical day in the life of a Hope student. This year’s Friday, Oct.

DE FREE Japanese Ceramics: The

GALLERY

Kawashima

to the gallery is free. Prior to

Friday, Oct. Friday, Nov.

Friday, Jan. 28 Friday, Feb. 28 Friday. March 4

Friday, Dec. 3

Collection — through Sept. 24 Art as Activist: Revolutionary Posters from Central and Eastern Europe — Oct. 9-Nov. 21 Juried Student Show — Dec. 4-17

Admission

15 29 12

dates are as follows:

Monday, Sept. 6,

please call (616) 394-7500 for the gallery’s hours.

Beginning Monday, Sept. 6, the gallery's hours will be: Monday through Thursday, 9 a.m. to 10 p.m.; Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Saturday,10 a.m. to 7 p.m.; and Sunday, 1-10 p.m.

Senior Day

for admitted

the Class of 1998

is

For further information about any AdmissionsOffice event, please call (616) 394-7850, or

toll

free 1-800-968-7850 or

write: Hope College Admissions Office; 69 E. 10th St.; P.O. Box 9000; Holland, Ml 49422-9000.

WOMEN’S LEAGUE FOR HOPE Autumn

Fest

From noon

Kletz, 11:30 a.m.

members of

Saturday, April 16.

Saturday, Oct. 2

to 5 p.m. on the day of

Hope’s home game

against Trinity of Ilinois, the League wil staff a “country

SPECIAL Thursday, Oct.

7,

Community

11 a.m.

The Rev. Dr. Martin E. Marty of the University of Chicago Divinity School will be presented the Doctor of Divinity (D.D.) honorary degree.

KNICKERBOCKER

THE ATR E

86 East Eighth Street

The KnickerbockerTheatre, open Monday through Saturday, features a variety of

Day

art,

foreign and classic

home

football game

against Illinois Wesleyan University.

Homecoming

’93 — Friday-Sunday,Oct. 22-24 The classes of 1983 and 1988 will hold their 10-year and five-year reunions.For additional information, please see the schedule on page 20. Parents’ Weekend — Friday-Sunday,Nov. 5-7

For additional information concerningalumni events,please call the Office of Public Relations at (616) 394-7860.

films, and a number of live events.

Admission to the theatre’sfilms costs $4 for adults and $3 for senior citizens and Hope College students. For more information on programs and films at the Knickerbocker, call (616) 392-3195.

FOUR

INSTANT INFORMATION Hope Sports Hotline —

(616)

394—7888 394-7863

Activities Information— (616)

store” booth just outside Holland Municipal Stadium, sellingfood to be eaten at the game or taken home.

Saturday, Sept. 18

Includes a picnic on campus and a

Dimnent Memorial Chapel

Downtown Holland at

ALUMNI AND FRIENDS

CONVOCATION

Selections wil include cheese, sausage, pies and other

baked goods, produce, brats, barbeque, caramel appes, caramel com, coffee, pop and more. Grand Rapids Chapter Thursday,Oct. 21 — Fall Fashion Show at Sayfee’s, 9:30 a.m.; fashions by Steketees.

For additional information, please contact Nancy Matthews at (616) 538-0513.

Kalamazoo Chapter Friday, Sept. 10 — Delegates meeting at Hope Reformed Church, South Haven, Mich., 1 p.m. Friday, Oct. 8 — Fall Fashion Style Show For additional information, please contact Jennifer Liggett ’80 at (616) 388-3757.

NEWS FROM HOPE COLLEGE, AUGUST 1993


Events Symposium

“Race and Social Change

eyes

The annual Hope College CriticalIssues Symposium provides an opportunity for intensive examinationof an issue or set of issues. This year’s

Symposium,the

14th,

Tuesday and Wednesday, Sept. 28 and

will be held on

29, and will explore the racial and ethnic issues facing society and sample opinions on what has worked, what

TUESDAY, SEPT.

Christmas Vespers will be held Saturday and Sunday, Dec. 4-5. For ticket information, please see the listing under

"THE ARTS"

in the first

column on page four.

TRADITIONAL EVENTS

hasn't and what might. A variety of perspectives, both national and local, will be presented. The public

Speakers and locations are being finalized. Additional may be obtained by calling the Office of Public Relations at (616) 394—7860. information

“The EducationalSystem: Failed Hopes, Tarnished Dreams” “Focus West Michigan: Educational Challengesfor the Future” “EducationalImperatives for Ethnic

p.m.

Fact or Fiction?”

Opening Convocation — Sunday, Aug. 29, 2 p.m. Community Day picnic and football game — Saturday,

America” “Developing Multiculturalism

“The Inn

Is Full: Racial

1:30

p.m.

Focus Sessions “Focus West Michigan: Native American Fishing Rights” “Justice for All? Immigration Law and

Dichotomies in

Christ’s Kingdom”

The 96th annual Pull tug-of-war — Saturday, Sept. 25, 9:30

3 p.m.

p.m.

Cultural Event

Social

Homecoming

‘93 —

Friday-Sunday,Oct. 22-24.

Change”

“AffirmativeAction: A Success Story” “AffirmativeAction: Failed Social Policy” “International ‘Law’ and the Balkan Crisis” “Environmental Impact on Racial and

WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 29 9:30 a.m. Keynote Address

For additional information, please see the schedule on page 20. Parents’ Weekend — Friday-Sunday,Nov. 5-7 Nykerk Cup Competition— Saturday, Nov. 6 Christmas Vespers — Saturdayand Sunday, Dec. 4-5 For High School Students: Arts and Humanities Fair — Thursday,Oct. 14 Science Day — Thursday,Oct. 28

in the

Community” 12:30 p.m. Keynote Address “Is the Law a Force for Social Change?”; Glen Loury

“Status of the Black Family”

Sept. 18

is

invited,and admission is free.

28

Keynote Address “Racial Climate in America”; Juan Williams 8:30 p.m. Focus Sessions “Double Jeopardy: A Female Perspective on the Status of Race Relations” “The Plight of the Inner Cities” “Winners and Losers: Ethnic Competition for the American Dream” “Focus West Michigan: Ethnic Harmony, 7:30

America”

in

Education a Force for Social Change?”; Joseph Fernandez 10:30 a.m. Focus Sessions “Is Sport an Upwardly MobilizingForce?” “The EducationalSystem: Effective Ally of Racial Minorities” “Is Public

Ethnic Minorities”

“Race and the Jury System” 2:30 p.m. Keynote Debate

“Toward Racial Harmony or National Chaos: Where to From Here?"

1993 Fall Sports Schedules FOOTBALL at DePauw, Ind., 1:30 p.m. tILL. WESLEYAN, 1:30 p.m. Sept. 25 ..................... at Wabash, Ind., 1:30 p.m. Oct. 2 .................... ttTRINITY, ILL., 1:30 p.m. Oct. 9 ..................... *KALAMAZOO, 1:30 p.m. Oct. 16 ................................ *at Alma, 1:30 p.m. Oct. 23 ............................. ttt*ALBION, 2 p.m. Oct. 30 .............................. *at Adrian, :30 p.m. Nov. 6 ..................................... *at Olivet, 1 p.m.

Saturday, Sept.

1

Saturday, Sept.

18

Saturday, Saturday, Saturday, Saturday, Saturday, Saturday, Saturday,

MEN’S SOCCER

1

....................

..............

1

*MIAA Game tCommunity Day tt Youth Day ttf Homecoming Home games played at Holland Municipal Stadium

VOLLEYBALL

Wooster, Ohio Toum. Wedneday, Sept. 8.... .................. at North Park, 111., 4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 11 ..... ....................... AQUINAS, 1:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 15 ............................. * ALBION, 4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 18.... ........................ *at Calvin, 1:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 21 ..... ................................ *ALMA, 4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 25.... ........................ *OLIVET, 1:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 29 ............................. *at Adrian, 4 p.m. Fri.-Sat.,Oct. 1-2 ..... ......... at Ohio Wesleyan Tournament Wednesday, Oct. 6... .................. *KALAMAZOO, 4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 9 ................................ *at Albion, 1:30 p.m. Wednesday,Oct. 13.. ............................. *CALVIN, 4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 16 ...... ............. ................... *at Alma, noon Tuesday, Oct. 19 ....... .............................. *at Olivet, 4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 23 ...... ....................... ^ADRIAN, 1:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 27............................... at Aquinas, 3 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 30 ....................... *at Kalamazoo, 1:30 p.m. Fri.-Sat.,Sept. 3-4

... ...................

at

.

MEN’S

GOLF

Aquinas Toum., 1 p.m. Kalamazoo, 1 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 22 ............................... *at Olivet, 1 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 30 ................................. *at Albion, 1 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 2 ...................................... *at Alma, 1 a.m. Friday, Sept.

17 .......................... at

Monday, Sept. 20

*MIAA Game

............................ *at

Home games played at Buys 1

WOMEN’S SOCCER

1

Monday, Oct.

Thursday, Oct.

Monday, Oct.

............................... *at

4

1

Calvin, 12:30 p.m.

*HOPE,

1 p.m. Adrian, 1 p.m.

.........................................

7

.................................... *at

1

*MIAA Tournament Home tournament played at Winding Creek

Thursday, Sept.

Aquinas, 4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 4 ....... ...................... at Wheaton, 111. 1 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 9 ................ UNIV. OF CHICAGO, 4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 1 .... ...................... at Goshen, Ind., 8 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 15 ............................. *at Albion, 4 p.m.

Course

Tuesday, Sept.

WOMEN’S GOLF Friday, Sept.

noon

....................................... *at Adrian,

1

1

p.m. p.m. ................................... *at Calvin, 2 p.m.

Monday, Sept. 20 Saturday, Sept. 25

..................... at Univ.

..............

of Dayton,

1

CARTHAGE, W1SC., 10

a.m.

Wednesday, Sept. 29 ................................ *at Alma, 2 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 7 .................................... *at Albion, 1 p.m. Monday, Oct. ............................. *at Kalamazoo, 1 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 16 .......................................... *HOPE, noon 1

................................... at

18 21

..... ........................ .....

...................

1

at Oberlin,

p.m.

Ohio

1

*MIAA Match Home matches played at Dow Center. 13th St. & Columbia Ave.

*CALVIN, 1:30

............................... *at

CROSS COUNTRY

p.m.

Alma, 4 p.m.

Tuesday, Sept. 7 Saturday, Sept.

Thursday, Sept. 30...................... at St. Mary’s, Ind, 5 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 5 ........ .................. *KALAMAZOO, 4 p.m.

Friday, Oct.

Friday, Oct.

.............................. *at

8 .......

ALBION,

Wednesday, Oct.

13

Saturday, Oct.

...... ...........................

Tuesday, Oct.

16

4 p.m.

............................. *

.....

.

4 p.m. 1:30 p.m.

......................... v...*at Calvin,

*ALMA,

*OLIVET,

4 p.m. Saturday. Oct. 23 ...... ........................ *at Adrian, 1:30 p.m. 19

......

..............................

Wednesday, Oct. 27.............................. AQUINAS, 3 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 30 ...... .................... *at Kalamazoo, 1 a.m.

.............

18

Saturday, Sept. 25 1

HOPE INVITATIONAL,4

........................ .....

*MIAA Game Golf

Course

NEWS FROM HOPE COLLEGE, AUGUST 1993

Home games played at Buys Athletic Fields, 11th St. & Fairbanks Ave.

at Grinnell, Iowa, 1

p.m. p.m.

HOST MIAA JAMBOREE, 1 a.m. SW Michigan Inv., 4 p.m. 1

........................ at

Saturday, Oct.

9 ...... at

Univ. of Wisc.-Oshkosh Inv.,

Saturday, Oct.

16

Thursday, Oct. Saturday, Nov. Saturday, Nov.

28 ......................... 6

...............

at Univ. of

Chicago

Inv.,

noon noon

MIAA at Calvin, 4 p.m. MIAA at Albion, 1 a.m.

.........................

1

NCAA

Regionals at John Carroll, Ohio, 1 a.m. ......................... NCAA Nationals

13 ...................................

1

Saturday, Nov. 20

..........

.

1

*MIAA Tournament Home tournamentsplayed at Winding Creek

GLCA

p.m.

Tuesday, Sept. 21 .............................. *OLIVET, 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 23 ............................... *ALMA, 6:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 25 .................................. *at Adrian, 1 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 28 ........................ ST. MARY’S, 6:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. ............................. *at Kalamazoo, 6:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 2 ........... at Lake Forest, 111. Toum., 10 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 5 ................................. *at Albion, 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 7 .................. *vs. Olivet at Aquinas, 5 p.m. at Aquinas, 7 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 13 ............................ *at Alma, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 20 ......................... *ADRIAN, 6:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 22 .................................. *CALVIN, 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 26 .................... *KALAMAZOO, 6:30 p.m. Fri.-Sat.,Oct. 29-30 ...................... Midwest Inv. at Calvin

Olivet, 1:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 29 ............................ *ADRIAN, 4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 25

10 ....................................... *at Olivet, 2

Saturday, Sept.

2

Fri.-Sat.,Sept. 17-18

a.m. p.m.

1

Golf

Saturday, Sept.

Tuesday, Sept. 7

Athletic Fields,

1th St. & Fairbanks

Saturday, Sept. 4 ......... at Calvin Christian Toum., 10 Tuesday, Sept. 7 ............................... *ALBION, 6:30 Thursday, Sept. 9 ........................... at Spring Arbor, 7 Tuesday, Sept. 14 .............................. *at Calvin, 6:30

at Grinnell, Iowa,

Home meets run

at

Beechwood by

the

noon

Bay

FIVE


Three new Trustees appointed r

I

^

X

here have been three appointments

and three reappointments to the

Hope

Reflections on Oxford

College Board of Trustees.

Newly chosen to serve on the board were: Joel G. Bouwens ’74 of Zeeland, Mich.; Lauretta M. Eckman of Fullerton, Calif.; and the Rev. Louis E. Lotz ’72 of Sioux City, Iowa. Relected to the board were: Ervin Bolks ’64 of Barrington, 111.; Dr. Donald Cronkite, professor of biology at Hope; and Diana Hellenga ’64 Marsilje of Holland, Mich. In addition,three members retired from the board: the Rev. Jack Buteyn ’66 of Plano, Texas; Leonard Maas of Grandville, Mich.; and Betty Roelofs ’53 Miller of Macatawa, Mich. Bouwens is a partner in the firm of CunninghamDalman PC, Attorneys, in Holland, Mich. He is a member of Third Reformed Church in Holland, where he has served as a deacon. He is on the Steering Committee of the Hope in the Future capitalcampaign, and participated in the Hope in the Future strategicplanning process. He has been a class representative and phonathon caller, and helped establishthe Bouwens Family Scholarship Fund, which honors his parents.

He and

his wife, Marianne

Van Heest ’74

Editor's Note: Michael Theune '92 is

the

news the floodwaters in the Mississippi, the Alumni Office has wondered how members of the Hope family in the area have been faring. No doubt their Hope friends are concerned as well. Titus, those with experiences they care to

share are invited to write news from

Hope

Marshall Scholarship he received as a Hope senior, news from Hope College asked him to share his experiences from time to time, and the close of his first year seemed the right occasion for an update (the first installmentappeared in our December, 1992, issue). by Michael

She and her family have been members RCA church) in Garden Grove, Calif., since 1967, where both she and her husband serve on the church's consistory. She and her husband

have three children, Charles “Chuck” ’78, Ann-Laurette and Evan. Rev. Lotz is the senior pastor of Momingside Reformed Church in Sioux City, Iowa. He has served on a variety of denominationaland college boards, and during 1991-92 was president of the General Synod of the Reformed Church in America. He is a widely publishedauthor, and writes a regular column for the Church Herald. Hope awarded him a DistinguishedAlumni Award in 1992. He and his wife, Mary Jean Kline ’73 Lotz, have two children: Andrew and Meredith.

InvitationalIII and Alumni Opus 1994.

(ie, '42, ’69, ’78, ’86, ’91),

Bouwens, have three children: Thomas, Daniel and Martha. Eckman, a native of Kentucky, has been married for more than 40 years to Charles G. Eckman, a retired industrialist and art collector.Professionally,for the past 17 years she has served as president/CEOof her family business, Clarott Incorporated,

which owns and invests in California commercial,industrial and residentialreal estate.

of the Crystal Cathedral(an

they graduated. Current

Alumni Opus debuted in 1980, and came back in 1984 accompanied by Alumni InvitationalI under the title “Alumni Arts Competition."The event is now held every five years, and in 1989 featured 40

artworks from 33 alumni, and 20

poems

College and do so. The items will either be

and four short stories from 19 alumni.

included in a story in the paper’s October

The Alumni Arts Competition is a juried competition.The Competition is open to all women and men who have been enrolled at Hope College and identify their association with a class year

issue or as “classnotes” (or as both).

Word College-,

can be sent to: news from

Hope

Hope College Public Relations;

141 E. 12th St.; PO Box 9000; Holland,

MI

whether or not

Hope

students

are ineligible. Entries should be recent

works, ie, works executed during the last three years. Graduates of the Classes of 1991, 1992 and 1993 must submit work done after leaving Hope. Informationon how and where to submit work (the deadline is May 30, 1994) will appear in the December issue of news from Hope College.

few weeks ago, I was

x\. approached by

a small group of Oxford’sMagdalen Bridge. One of the group asked me a most peculiar question: where is Oxford? This question would not have seemed

tourists crossing

so strange if

it

had been asked in, say,

Cambridge or Wales, or Holland, Mich. I could have answered simply that Oxford was about 60 miles northwest of London. No problem. But having been asked this question at one of Oxford’s most famous sites while being dwarfed by the massive Magdalen Tower and choked in the exhaust of “Oxford Classic Tour” buses, I found myself at a bit of a loss for an answer. The question seems right-headed. Oxford is the place where a living cell was first seen under a microscopeby Robert Boyle. Oxford was the worksite for the likes of C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkein. And, yes, President Bill Clinton did spend two years in Oxford. It should be somewhere. It is, however, a misconceptionto think that Oxford is a single, easily defined — or located

entity.

Except for some

libraries and office

refers to a collectionof 36 colleges and

(See

CAMPUS NOTES

on page 14.)

six private halls. Each of the colleges is a self-governing foundation,

CONFERENCE DIRECTOR: new directorof conference services at Hope. The Office of Conference Services coordinates the scheduling, planning and is

the

operation of conferences, institutes,

workshops and special programs on the Hope campus, and works with both on-campus and off-campus organizations. The summer is particularlybusy for the office, with more than 50 groups, many requiring on-campus housing, having scheduled events between mid May through mid August. The Office of Conference Services is located in the college’s Keppel Guest House, 85 E. 10th St. In addition to

Vega named director of multi-cultural life ^/olanda DeLeon

X life at

'88 Vega has been

appointeddirector of multi-cultural Hope.

As director of multi-cultural life, Vega will work with multi-cultural students, advise the college’s Hispanic Student

multi-cultural understanding.Previously

member

Mary Lammers ’60 Kempker,

student recruitment, coordinating a

full-time facilities scheduler and student

employees,including two full-time college student interns during the

summer.

Schipper, who assumed her new duties in April, was previously office manager in the college’s Office of Public Relations.

The

retired in

April.

1

Organizationand Black Coalition, and

previous directorof conference services,

Schipper, the office staff consists of a

She was interim multi-cultural counselor with the college’s student development office from February to May of 1990. In addition, from June of 1988 to May of 990 she was an English teacher at West Middle School in Holland, Mich, uk

present programs designed to enhance of the college’s admissions assumed her new duties in July. “Yolanda is extremely well qualified for the position and I am confident that she will serve the students and Hope College in an exemplary manner,” said Dr. Richard Frost, dean of students at Hope. Vega joined Hope’s admissions staff in June of 1990. Her major responsibilities have included directing multi-cultural a

staff, she

ALUMNI ARTS: The Alumni Arts Competitionis returning with Alumni

students.

for multi-cultural high

school

the tuition of

them with

its

its

own buildings and for students,providing

own

the experiences necessary to

pass the university-setfinals they must take to become a graduate of Oxford. The make-up of the University is very

much

like the

make-up of

its

many

cobblestone streets, numerous -

autonomous entities held together by a rough cement. This type of set-up is not always conducive to human interaction,as one may never get to know one’s colleagues in other colleges. Nor is it always in line with efficiency,as it is possible to have to search three distinct libraries to locate a particularpiece of information.The Oxford traditioncan sometimes seem to be — especially on cold, rainy afternoons with a 2,000 word essay due to a tutor in an hour a frustratingand archaic system. This is not to say that Oxford is not a fascinating place; it is — wherever it is to be found. This is only a recognition of the fact that the

program through which faculty call programs

responsible for

prospective students and visitation

SIX

A

Theune ’92

buildings,the University of Oxford

49422-9000.

Barbara B. Schipper

Oxford University in England,

studying philosophythrough a British

Campus Notes FLOODWATCH: Watching on

at

Yolanda DeLeon ’88 Vega

dreaming spires envisaged by folk like myself and the members of the tour group are, in reality, and like so much else, the products of stone and sweat. ..and dream, yk

NEWS FROM HOPE COLLEGE, AUGUST 1993


Hope

Alumni key l

in the

campaign

to

uring the years they have been

r

Hope

involved with Hope College, Fred 53 and Gretchen Yonkman ’54 Vandenberg of Grand Rapids, Mich., have worn a variety of hats. They startedas students — Gretchen the daughter of alumni (Frederick Yonkman ’25 and Janet Albers ’25 Yonkman); Fred as a transfer. Fred (whose aunt is Ruth Daane '30 Stilwill) later became president of the Alumni Association Board of Directors,and Gretchen was a member of the Board of Trustees. They were also the parents of a Hope student — Janette Vandenberg ’79 Aardema. They are currently co-chairs of Hope in the Future's National Alumni division (Fred is also a member of the Leadership Gifts committee). The diversityof their involvementin the life of the college was appropriate preparation for their work as co-chairs, since Hope in the Future has been a team effort from the beginning.

Future

in the

Future

CAMPAIGN

WATCH RAISED TO DATE S45 million

$44

million

$42

million

$40

million

$38

million

$36

million

$34

million

$32

million

$30

million

can give the value back

$28

million

later in life.”

$26

million

$24

million

$22

million

$20

million

$18

million

$16

million

$14

million

$12

million

$10

million

$8

million

$6

million

$4

million

$2

million

“Getting involved later is really an exchange of values. You get values when you start out and hopefully

you

Fred Vandenberg ’53

The campaign originated with the 1989-90 strategic planning process that involved125 members of the extended Hope community.The participants represented all constituencies of the college: the Board of Trustees, faculty, alumni, administrators,students, parents of students,pastors and friends of Hope.

Alumni have played a key role in Hope in the Future, from co-chairs Phil Miller ’65 and

Max Boersma ’46,

of the Steering

to the

Committee, to

members

the nearly

750 volunteer leaders across the country who are involved in regional events. The Vandenbergs were involved in several of the regional events in the Midwest. The result of all the involvementis that Hope’s 17,000-plusalumni are a vital part of the campaign. And, excludingthose who are members of Hope in the Future’s other divisions,alumni are being asked to contribute $13 million. The good news is that alumni have already donated $14.7 million. “I think institutionsare judged to a certain extent by the support alumni provide to their alma mater," said John Nordstrom,director of development and director of the Hope in the Future capital campaign. “The fact that half of our graduates every year make a gift to Hope College

is

a source of strength.”

“Early in the campaign

it

was the

Alumni Board who took a leadership role, right along with the Board of Trustees, and the faculty and staff," he said.

“And when

campaign concludeson June 30, 1994. our alumni will have led the way.” the

Fred '53 and Gretchen Yonkman '54 Vandenberg are national alumni co-chairsof the Hope in the Future campaign. Thus far, Hope's 17,000-plusalumni have contributed $14.7 million to the fund-raisingeffort. Fred and Gretchen Vandenberg are organizations. Fred

Board

is

chairperson of the

Davenport College and a past president of the Grand Rapids Chamber of Commerce. Gretchen is on the Board of Trustees of Opera Grand Rapids. Together they have worked on behalf of the Children’s Miracle Network, of Trustees of

including as co-chairs for two years.

They keep Hope among their many involvementsbecause they believe in what the college has to offer. “In this day and age

when

it

seems like

cynical in the sense that we don’t trust our politicians;

we don’t

trust our

government; an

trust our institutions —

institution like

Hope

is

well.” “Life has been very good to us,” Fred said. “As you get a

something that

one that

back as to why that might be.” He noted, for example, that he began his college career on a footballscholarship at Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo, Mich. An injury rendered him ineligible, and he transferredto

is steady in a time

of

Hope played an important role in preparing them well for the lives they have led since graduation. Being involved in the college is a way of giving something back. “We have been very fortunate in our

NEWS FROM HOPE COLLEGE, AUGUST 1993

that

Hope

strong academic program. He majored in economics and business administration, and is now president of Butterworth Ventures, which manages several health care-related businesses for Butterworth Health.

is

great uncertainty.”

They also feel

older you begin

to think

consistent,”Fred said. “It has values, and it is

little

because he was drawn by the college’s

people are becoming more cynical

we don’t

Gretchen said. “We both feel gratitude for what we’ve been given — not only by Hope but by our communities as lives,”

volunteers for a variety of different

Hope,” he had would probablyhave

“I had a great experience at

said. “I often think back that stayed at Western spent the rest of I

I

my

life

if I

differentlythan

if

had gone to Hope.”

“So getting involved later is really an exchange of values," he said. “You get values when you start out and hopefully you can give the value back later in life."*^

Hope in the Future $50 million fund-raising effort that has four primary components: enhancing the academicprogram, improving is

a

student financial aid, strengthening Christian life and witness, and selectively

improving facilities.

Watch

the giving

grow! SEVEN


Student Profile

Piano

man out a very cold product because they just

by Greg Olgers ’87

aren’t that connected emotionallywith

music.”

O

ome 3 years ago in Zagreb, ^Croatia, the young preschool 1

student Tomislav Skarica was restless during nap time. When his teacher left the room for a

few minutes, he saw

chance. There, standing unattended, was the piano with which she serenaded the students to sleep. Stealthilyhe crept across the darkened room, his quiet steps and his classmates’ breathing the only sounds. Reaching the now-silentinstrument he clambered aboard the bench and gently caressed the cool keys with his fingers.

And

his

then he belted out one of his

favorite tunes.

It

was one he had heard and over again: Oh

his teacher play over

Susanna! “That melody's very popular — even outside the United States,” said Skarica, now a sophomore at Hope College. Whether or not his classmates enjoyed the impromptu recital is lost to history. His teacher, however, recognized potential when she heard it and encouraged his parents to enroll him in lessons. Unfortunately, the cost was prohibitive. Skarica thus spent the next several years teaching himself to play. He listened to

songs on the radio and tapes, and played them back. He did his own composing. And he and his talent remained essentially undiscovered. That changed in the fall of 1991, however, when he came to South Haven, Mich., as an exchange student. His host family heard him play, and like his preschool teacher recognizedpotential. An audition at Hope was arranged. The timing was handy because Skarica was graduating from high school in the spring of 1992, and ultimately he was enrolled at Hope as a full-time student, including — at last!

in piano classes.

“I see a very talented

“In his case I think he’s very connected emotionallywith the music and plays in a very sensitive manner,” he said. “And that should stand him in good stead whether he is jamming, or if he’s playing piano solos or

if

he’s

composing — whatever he chooses to do ultimately. It’s going to enrich his music making.” Skarica,

who

is

also studying

computer means

science, sees in music a universal of communication, and a way of

conveying feelings that cannot be expressedadequatelyin words. “It’s understandableto everyone,”he said. “It seems like music is the soul’s own words. That’s what I’m always trying to find in music when I play: that hidden language.” Having one’s life-dreamrealized might seem enough for one year, but Skarica’s experiencesdid not end in the department of music. In the fall of 1992 he had an opportunity to ask U.S. President

George

Bush a question during a televised “townhall”meeting that included a video connectionwith an audience at Hope College. He also saw President Bush during his visit to campus in October. As a student from Croatia, Skarica is also popular with the local schools, appearing through an international students “speakersbureau” coordinated through the college’s Office of International Education. “He’s been a tremendous asset to this office,” said Dr. Neal Sobania ’68, director of internationaleducation.“He’s been in great demand because Yugoslavia is a topic that kids know about because they watch the news.” “And he’s very articulateand the word has spread

among

the teachers that this

is

young man who can explain what’s going on,” Dr. Sobania said. “He’s extremely good about doing it.” a

musician here

very gifted; very sensitive.”

Aschbrenner Professor of Music

Charles

Piano lessons were too expensive for Tomislav Skarica as he was growing up in Zagreb, Croatia, so lessons at Hope are developinga talent that lay hidden for years. Looming over all of Skarica s good experiences, however, is the tragedy that has befallen his homeland.

“I

cannot repeat enough times how

nice people,

how many

many

concerned people, I’ve met here. People I’ve never seen before and probably will never meet again.” The kindness and all the good experienceshe is having at Hope contrast starkly with the dark events taking place back home, and the good times in Holland do not erase the pain he feels as his native Croatia suffers through civil war. Many of the best aspects of living and studying in the United States, he knows, are denied his family and friends back home. At times he feels a

about

Skarica has since been working with Charles Aschbrenner,professor of music.

Skarica says that he enjoys and appreciates others’ interestin his country.

Hope

Professor Aschbrenner finds him a

And

dedicated and rapid study (Skarica taught

students, who discuss Croatia with him.

himself to read music during the

summer

it’s

“My

not only local students, or

accent and

my

English,

I

guess, is

before coming to Hope). He has also

very noticeable,” he said. “People ask

found Skarica

questions and after they hear ‘Croatia’ it

have something more. “I see a very talented musician here — very gifted; very sensitive,”he said. “And I think that’s also part of to

talent.” “A very importantpart of talent is the

emotional depth that’s brought to music. How one reacts to music; how one can project something of their own being through music,” Professor Aschbrenner said. “There are a lot of people who play the piano or play an instrument but turn

EIGHT

just rings a

bell

— ’Oh

that’s

where

all the

things are happening.’ I say ‘Yes. Exactly’ and they ask

‘Why

is

“It’s

‘Why

is

this?,’

that?’ and all those questions.”

even people

I

meet working this

summer at the Knickerbocker or at the window at the Summer Theatre Ticket Office who just ask questionsor express their concern and wish me good luck,” he said. “It’s very nice of them,” Skarica said.

immediate

from the fighting. His grandmother’s farm outside the city was bombed (she survived).The family, already fragmented with Skarica absent, recently became more so as his 6-year-old 1

brother left for Italy. In addition, Skarica’s 20-year-old brother was conscripted and spent years in the Croatianarmy.

1

.5

“The

experiencechanged him completely,from what I can tell,” Skarica said. “He used to be a very outgoing person. Now he’s things he has seen are haunting him.”

And

do things here — even when I go grocery shopping, because I can afford it myself, to go in and buy just whatever I want at the store — it’s not something my family would be able to do,” he said. “I always think about that.” “There’s this sense of guilt,”Skarica said. “I got a chance to be spared.” The war aside, his family must deal with poverty, even though his father is a professor of comparative literature (recently retired for lack of students) and his mother is a lawyer. “Here when the combination of lawyer and professor is mentioned you see BMWs and Mercedes, but back home it’s $70 a month,” Skarica said. And the war, of course, cannot be put aside. Although according to Skarica his I

is not in

so reserved and just very silent. The bit guilty

that.

“When

family in Zagreb

danger, they are only about 25 minutes

sincerely

the family fears, Skarica noted,

that his brother

may

be required to serve

again.

With so much happening

in Croatia,

sometimes considers returning home. In the end, however, he remembers the opportunity Skarica admits that he

he has been given, and ponders the reasons he

“When

may have been given it.

things are really going badly in

when I really feel alone, I maybe I should challengemy fate, destiny, whatever and Croatia, and

just sort of think

just go back,” he said. “Then I realize,‘No — rare chance.’ I don’t

I

was given a

know how

it

all

came to be a reality, but it seems to me like someone watched over me in a way.” “That’s a gift, and

gamble with

I

don’t want to

it,” he said.

NEWS FROM HOPE COLLEGE, AUGUST 1993


Alumni Profile

Making

a difference

by Greg Olgers ’87

/ hen he spoke during Holland Christian High T School’s commencement in June, Peter Hoekstra ’75 of Holland, Mich., was both messenger and message. He both addressed, and exemplified, the class’s motto: “Fill the World.” “I wanted to challenge them and get people to realize that by getting involvedthey can make a difference— and that involvement can be very rewarding personally in a non-financial way,” he said. Hoekstra ’s own difference-makingthis past year included being elected representative of Michigan’s 2nd CongressionalDistrict(territory that includes Hope College).He traded his familiar role as vice president of marketing at furniture-makerHerman Miller in Zeeland, Mich., for a new one in the Capitol in Washington, D.C. He began his new duties in January. And although the position and setting were both new, many of the faces were, if not familiar,at least from a familiar place: his staff includes six other Hope alumni. In Washington, Dr. Douglas Koopman ’79 is Hoekstra’s chief of staff; Ann Boonstra ’85 Peterson and Amy Sandgren ’87 Plaster are legislativecounsels; and John Vanden Heuvel ’92 is a legislativeassistant. In addition, Margaret Wolffensperger ’50 Kleis and Linda Hooghart ’91 Kaiser help staff his Holland office, and senior Gwen Snyder of Westerville, Ohio, is spending the summer as an intern with his Washington office. Hoekstra avows that institutionalnepotism was not a factor in his alumni-orientedhiring. “It wasn’t deliberate

T

at all,” he said.

What was

deliberate was his

commitment to

hiring staff

people familiar with West Michigan. In some cases, experiencein government in Washington was an asset, as was having participated in his campaign. Hope people were often the best-qualified candidates. Launched in May of 1992, Hoekstra’sseemed an unlikely candidacy. Hoekstra himself admits that his business experienceswere not typical pre-Congressional training. His entire career had been spent at Herman Miller, and he notes that out of the 110 new members of the House this year he was the only one from a Fortune 500 company. His opponent in the August ’92 Republican primary, moreover, was a 26-year incumbent: fellow Hope alumnus Guy Vander Jagt ’53.

“I just

hope in my own

little

way that I can get people to feel good about government Rep. Pete Hoekstra ’75

Hoekstra ran anyway. He

felt he

had something to

contribute, including both perspective as a political outsider and his experiencesin business. a “grass roots”

meet

campaign, he hiked 270 miles

the district’s voters face-to-face.

He also ran relativelyinexpensively, spending less than $90,000 in his bid, which he hopes his constituents are interpretingas a sign of frugality. Some candidates spent

more than $1 million on their campaigns. Hoekstra believes that his marketing background helped him campaign effectively,but feels that other aspects of his training are proving useful in office.

“What it takes to become a Congressmanis much different than what

“A campaign

will give less attention to evaluating their effectiveness. the success or failureof a program, and that you’d better

Running

was one of the expertises that I had in the business world. What I’m hoping is that the other thing that I developed in the business world, problem solving, is the skill that you need to be an effective Congressman.” Hoekstra, a political science major who as a Hope student even interned with his predecessorVander Jagt, recognizesthat he has had, and still has, much to learn about working in Washington — from understandinghow to vote (something he has mastered) to discoveringhow to get things done (an on-going process).Please don’t call him a “freshman” Congressman, however. “I hate the term ‘freshman,’” he said. “Because ‘freshman’implies spending most of your time just learning. I find I have as much to give as I do to get.” Hoekstra believes, for one, that Congress would benefit from applying the sorts of approaches common in the private sector. He notes that while bills are debated extensively before passing, his suspicion is that Congress that

“In business, you recognizethat it’s difficult to predict

again.”

in his effortsto

Rep. Pete Hoekstra '75 of Holland, Mich., ran for Michigan's 2nd CongressionalDistrict because he wanted make a difference. Amy Sandgren '87 Plaster, legislativecounsel, is one of many Hope alumni on his staff.

it

takes to be a Congressman,” he said.

is nothing but a

marketing program, and

NEWS FROM HOPE COLLEGE, AUGUST 1993

stay pretty flexible over the next few months to shape and modify the program as you implement it, and get feedback in terms of exactly how it is working,” he said. “And then at the end of the program you’d sit down with your boss or the other people involved with the program and you’d say, ‘What really works, what didn't and what’d we learn from it?’ to make the next one a littlebit better.” “I don’t see

much

of that here, where

I

see a lot of that

in the business world,” he said.

Something else with which Hoekstra is coping is his

new-found celebrity. Strangers back home recognize him on the streets now. Others to whom he was once "Pete” sometimes feel compelled to call him "Mr.

Hoekstra.” A host of newspaper articles have appeared, their headlines ranging from “The New-Breed Republican" to “Strangerin the House” to "Mr. Hoekstra Goes to Washington.”

And

to help

was commencement speeches in one week. “Whereas a year-and-a-halfago if somebody would have said, ‘Why don’t you get Hoekstra to speak at your commencement?’ they would have said ‘Who?,’” noted Hoekstra. He has also come back to Hope to speak to his address at Holland Christian’s graduation

one of three

classes, and has met with students in Washington through the Washington Honors Semester and

He to

May Term.

hoping the spotlight won’t change him. "You try stay the same kind of person that people elected you is

for,” he said.

One way Hoekstra stays with his roots is by keeping home in Holland. In Washington, in fact, he spends

his

his nights on the

with

Herman

couch

in his office (which he

furnished

Miller products), followinga bad

experiencewith

a flooding

apartment. Wife Diane and

children Erin, Allison and Bryan are staying in Holland,

and he flies home Thursday evenings and returns to Washington, D.C., on Tuesday mornings. Not only for family, the visits are a way he keeps in touch with his district.He is able to spend time with his constituents,and be a part of their community — they can even find him in church. Central Avenue Christian Reformed, on Sundays. He hopes the connectednesshelps the people of his district feel they have a voice in Congress that is addressing their concerns. “I just hope in my own little way that I can get people to feel good about government again. I go to town meetings and people are mad,” Hoekstra said. "They are very disappointedabout the resultsthat they perceive that they are getting from Washington and the representation they’re getting in Washington.” He is also confident he can help make things better. “I have no regrets about making the decision to leave a good job with a great company to come here,” he said. "I'm frustratedby some of the processes and by some of the things we’re doing, but overall I’m glad I’m here and believe that in the long run I can make a difference.”^

NINE


Helping make Hope by Greg Olgers ’87

very August, Hope College is pulled the slumber of summer into the purposeful bustle of a new academic year. The change occurs during a meager few days. That’s all it takes for the college’s 2,700-plus students to begin arriving, settle in, and assume Ij"1

M-J from

the routine of a

new academic year.

For more than 700 of those students, however, the routine is anything but. For all ot those 700-plus, Hope is an entirely new experience. And for most of them — those who haven’t transferred in from elsewhere— so is college in general. That’s where Orientationcomes in. Orientationat the most basic introducesthe new students and their parents to Hope College. In addition, however. Orientationhelps the new studentsand parents alike feel good about being at the college — and helping the students

become part of the Hope community. “I would encourage [new students] to go to all of the events,” said Tim Hamilton, a junior from New Buffalo, Mich. “They’re really, really fun and they’re an excellentway to meet people.” “It’s easy sometimes to hang back and not get to know a lot of people. Orientationgives you an opportunity to meet lots of people — that’s one of the best advantages of it,” Hamilton said. “I had friends who went to lots of other colleges, and the orientation experience here was so much better as far as meeting people was concerned.” The emphasis is deliberate. “Orientation is obviously a chance for new studentsto get information about what they need in order to function at Hope — those types of things,” said

Anne Bakker-Gras ’85,

director of student activities and Orientation’s

“But I think what it really does is help them begin developing relationshipswith other people and to feel good about being here.” Dr. Richard Frost, dean of students at Hope,

staff director.

TEN

Orientation includes group-buildingactivities such as this one, which required passing a

member

of the

group through a string triangle without breakingthe string.

agrees.

“We

see that four-day period as one of

the most important times, because

we believe it

sets a tone and perception of what

Hope

College is, what it represents, and what students and their parents can come to expect from the institution,”he said. “President Jacobson has talked about Hope College as a family,” Dr. Frost said. “Through the Orientationprocess, we try to develop that sense of family and community for all involved.” Recognizinghow important the college experience is for not only the studentsbut their parents as well, Hope runs Orientation activities for both groups. “Parents are a very

home

important part of this community, and they need attention as well,” Bakker-Gras said. "We probably spend as much time planning and implementingtheir program as we do with the new students’events,” she said. “I think it’s pretty unique, from what I’ve heard of other schools.” Parents receive information about the place to which they are entrustingtheir progeny. They’re given tours of campus and Holland; introduced to members of the faculty and staff; have chances to ask questions;and can attend seminars on topics such as “Now That I Am a Parent of a Hope Student,” “Christian Growth” and “Career Choices, Internships, Off Campus and Abroad Semester Opportunities.” In contrast, the students’itinerary is more social in nature. The college’sfeeling is that there’s plenty of time for the students to learn the rules of campus life, and that meeting others and belonging are the most important considerations. After moving in on the Friday (August 27 this year) before classes begin, the new students begin attending some informational sessions and many social activities. They’re assigned to one of 60 12-member groups, which meet daily. Events and activities include popular films, a picnic, a "new student banquet” and an “activity fair” that allows the students to discover the campus groups and activities in which they can become involved. One major highlightof the weekend is “Playfair.” At the request of Orientation’s organizers,news from Hope College won't reveal what exactly “Playfair”is. We can note, however, that it’s avowed to be an enjoyable, memorable, non-threatening way to meet many of one’s new classmates. Much of Orientation’scharacterstems from the fact that it is student-run. Bakker-Gras is the staff member responsible,but the activities are organized by two students who spend the entire summer working on the project full-time. They are joined during Orientation's four-day run by 13 student “Assistant Directors” and 100 student “Orientation Assistants,”all of whom train for the weekend in advance. The two student coordinators— this year Kendra Grate and Sheilia Hendrick, both seniors from Sturgis. Mich. — work with the “Assistant Directors.” The “Assistant Directors,”in turn, train the "Orientation Assistants." The “Orientation Assistants”have the most direct contact with the new students, leading the small groups to which the incoming students are assigned. Grate and Hendrick believe the student touch makes the weekend more effective.They diplomaticallynote that the college’sfaculty and staff, as well meaning as they are, are perhaps not best able to relate to the new students as they settle into their new surroundings. “I think it’s good for students to run it and to train each other,” Grate said. "It not only helps us build leadershipand stuff like that, but it also helps the new students more.” “We were just through it three years ago, so we can help with all the feelings they're going through,” Hendrick said. Much of the time, the Orientation workers are dealing with new student questions. “A lot of them want to know what is availableon campus,” Grate said. “They want to know about whether college is all studying or not." So a lot of time the O.A.’s perspective

For each new student,On car to dorm. For these sm

of, 'It’s a lot of studying other things’ helps.”

There are other times,

new

students’ needs

not a ready answer

are

but

a

empathy. "The other thing that v O.A.s should be aware o Hendrick said. “Alotol

“I would

etu

students to

the event

really, reai they9 re an e to

meet

and they don’t know an male or female, and the hard for them to try' ‘and of times they feel as tit felt,

going

to

some old

NEWS FROM HOPE

COL


Director feels activities are educational, too nentation

is

meant

to be a solid

introduction to Hope, but

Anne

Bakker-Gras ’85 hopes it's not the only time that students find value in organizedstudent activities.

As director of student activities, Bakker-Gras not only coordinates Orientation but advises

many

of the organizations with which students can

become involved.The groups range from Student Congress,to the Social ActivitiesCommittee (which organizes a film series, plans Homecoming and many other events), to fraternities and sororities, to the campus media and a variety of others.

The view at Hope is that such activities are in ways as important a part of college as the learning that takes place in the classroom. “It’s a strong complementto the academic program because it provides experiences that students don’t necessarily get in the classroom,” Bakker-Gras said. “It allows students to spend social time together. It allows them to develop leadership skills. It is, to me, all the ‘extras'in addition to the academic side of Hope College.” Bakker-Gras was herself an active Hope student. As general manager of the college’s radio station, WTHS, she played a leading role in the station’ssuccessful effort to go FM. She was also a member of the residence life staff, involved in theatre and regularly participated in the

college’s “Air Jam” competition.That last

prompted her and two classmates, Kathy Kaehler ’85 and Chayris Burd '85 Launders to submit an audition tape to the national television show Puttin' on the Hits, on which the three appeared in 1985. Bakker-Gras has been a member of the Hope staff since 1987 and director of student activities since 1989. She admits that the two directors with whom she worked as a Hope student, Dave Vanderwel ’67 and Susan Ward ’81 Cooper continue to have a strong influence on how she approaches her job. “The responsibilitiesthat Dave allowed me to have as a student always amazed me. That at age 18 and 19 (while working with WTHS) that I was calling the FCC. I was dealing with the communications lawyer in Washington,” she said. "I was given experiencesthat I don’t think I would have had at a lot of other schools.” interest

tuient,

or

f

OrientationWeekend begins with the hustle and bustle of

thesf students,

studying but

the activity

is

just beginning.

there’s time for

lelps.” her times,

however, when the

needs

unspoken, requiring

are

swer

but a

hing

that

discerningeye.

.

And

we emphasize that the

K aware of is

homesickness,” here

"A lotof studentscome in

Id

new

encourage

nts to

go to all

of

events. They’re

and an excellent way

% really •

meet

fun

people.”

"Tim Hamilton ’95

loiowiiiyorie; and ifey’re |0 try

eel as

hud 11

whether they be

scared. It’s really

adjust, and I think a lot

'^y

onieof'1'6

re alone. I

know I was

activities, like I

,PE COLLEGE,

moving belongings from

ACIGUST 1993

the only person

who

didn’t

know anyone.”

The new students, however, are not alone. They’ll be guided, and understood, in their journey of discovery by the 100-plus volunteers of Orientation. And the concern does not end with the volunteers working the weekend. Bakker-Gras observed, for example, that more than 200 students applied for the 100 openings for "Orientation Assistants.” “It’s an opportunity for them to give back to those new students the kinds of experiences that they had.” she said. “You hear the returningstudents say how much fun they had during Orientation — how much they like to help those new students move in, and carry those boxes up the stairs (which the parents love) — just to help make those studentsa part of the community that they care about so

Active on campus during her student days, director of student activities

Anne Bakker-Gras ’85 hopes to

help today's students have the sorts of experiences she enjoyed.

good

“Sue taught me that it is important to care about people when you're planningactivities and to think about who to include and how to include them,” she said. Correspondingly,Bakker-Gras stands back far enough to allow the student groups’ members to learn while offering support and encouragement. “I try make sure that it’s clear to the students that I really work for them — that I am here for them and to help them; to help them succeed,” she said. “Hopefully they can benefit from some of the experiencesthat I’ve had, but at the same time are allowed to leam from their own mistakes.” “I also try to teach them about creativity,”she said. “To see what a wonderful or grand event that we can make anythingthat we do.” “For me something that’s really importantis teaching students— especially students think they’re creative

that they

who

don’t

have good ideas

and that they can see their ideas come to fruition,”

“And making them feel good about what they’ve accomplished."^

she said.

much.” Bakker-Gras ’s assessment matches Hamilton’s experience. An Orientation veteran,he had such a good experience as a freshman in 1991 that he volunteered as an “Orientation Assistant”last year and this year will be an "Assistant Director." “I had a good time with it my freshman year. It was a lot of fun,” Hamilton said. "The adjustment from high school and home to college life is tough for a lot of people, and it’s good to try to help people through that."

ELEVEN


cm

Alumni News by

Tom

Renner ’67

Director of Public Relations

_

last year. It

/ remember reading a copy of the Alumni News as a student and thinking, ‘What propaganda! All it really does is give "warm fuzzies” to get people to give money to Hope.’ As an alumni, I've never been able to give much, so I just enjoy the warm

This

fuzzies!

are

r

|

^

is

made

probably due to some decisions we

after the 1988 survey. This page

now

appears in the same place every issue and better organized.

is

However, some

respondents from distant places feel events don’t receive adequate advance notice.

We

working on that. The quality of writing was also

his thought

Xby

appears that one of the biggest

increases in readership is the events page.

recognized, receiving a 4.47 rating on a five

provokingcomment

a 1977 alumnus from Illinois was

point scale. I would like to take this

commend Greg

one of many offered by respondents to a

occasion to

We were attempting to get opinions about the way Hope College communicates and more

our staff who

from Hope College and

specificallyhow alumni feel about this

cadre of free lance and student writers, in

publication,news from Hope College.

addition to being the author of

survey we conductedthis spring.

I’d like to thank the respondents

who

is

Olgers ’87 of

managing editor of news

for its editorial content.

as such responsible

He supervises a

many

of the

articles himself.

were part of a group of 800 alumni selected

randomly to participatein the survey. This survey was especiallytimely as this editionmarks the 25th anniversary of news from Hope College. Its findings will form the nucleus of our planning for future

Our 28-year-oldeditor was bemused by comment that news from Hope College “appears to be targeted to the over 50 age the

bracket.” (I’m not even 50 yet myself!)

We

asked

issues.

We conducteda similar survey in 1988. The results of both surveys tell us that news from Hope College is considered by alumni to be a highly effectivecommunication medium. For example, only two of this year’s 262

if

they agreed with the statement

“news from Hope College doesn’t

tell

me

On

disagreed with that statement

compared

(

.99)

1

to a 1988 finding of 2.28. It

Hope College

was

felt

strongly that news

isn’t telling

from

them what’s

The written responses were

a very

this issue the births, marriages

recycled, not that we want you to throw

it

and

advanced degrees are listed by class year. They previously were listed alphabetically, but several of you suggested the new order. We’d appreciate knowing how you feel about that change. You told us what you’d like to see

more

news, regional meeting updates, bookstore

remain the most frequently read section (2.94). Not one of the respondents

on the high achievers, spectacular.

indicated they “never read” class notes.

about the “quiet people” “Joe Blow” — the

fine publication and thank

Officers John Abe '79, President,Naperville,111. Janet Lawrence’80, Vice President,Albany, N.Y. Cal Bruins '6J, Secretary,Paradise Valley,Ariz.

Board Janette

Members VandenBerg'79 Aardema, Grand Rapids,Mich.

John Broadbent ’79, Livonia, Mich. Bryan Bush '84, Anaheim,Calif. Gatrett E.

DeGraff ’71, Averill Park, N.Y.

Ken Dulow ’64, Old Bridge,N.J. Marianne Dykema '81 Griffin, Fort Worth, Texas Marianne Hageman ’58, De Pere, Wis. Betty Whitaker '62 Jackson, West Melbourne, Fla. JenniferLiggett’80, Kalamazoo, Mich. Michael Percy '86, Columbus,Ohio Jane Terpstra'82, Minneapolis, Minn. Chris Turkstra ’93, Upper Saddle River,N.J.

Anne Walvoord '73 VanderByl. Williamson, N.Y. Kay Moores ’76 Walker, Traverse City, Mich. Richard Webster ’84, Sterling, Va. Barbara Woodruff’94, Northville,Mich. Michael Yantis '95, Portage,Mich.

TWELVE

40s Eloise Boynton ’41 Bosch and husbandDonald are

enjoying their cabin in New York State. They'll

pastoraland teaching responsibilities and became ministerto seniorsfor the congregation. Harriethad retired as a

Synod of Mid-America in 1985. Del Vander Haar ’44 is assistant ministerof pastoralcare at Hope Church in Holland, Mich. Calvin Malefyt ’46 is senior scholar-inresidence with the C.S. Lewis Institute in Washington,D.C. Preston ’47 and Marcia DeYoung ’48 Stegenga reportthat they continue to be inspiredby “Beginningis half done," a classroom expression of their former Hope historyprofessor,the late Milton Hinga. They referredto Professor Hinga’s philosophy in an article they wrote for a “SeniorNet" publicationconcerning their (successful)efforts to

leam how of

Septemberbefore remming

the

to

Muscat, Oman, in

October.

John ’42 and Harriet Muyskens ’47 Maassen recentlymoved to Holland, Mich., after finishing

public school kindergarten teacher in

1984, and John as synod executive for the Regional

returnto their home in Lake Wylie. S.C., in

use their new computer.“SeniorNet”

to

Carmichael, Calif, offers classesin ways to use computer.

Harvey Buter ’48 has retired as vice president-businessdevelopmentat Old Kent Bank of

Holland (Mich.).

Tell Us All

you. The

How

95 percent of us who can’t wow anyone

If

with our achievements.We live strongly for

ALUMNI BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Detroit,

took the positionalone while John assumed broader

writings,more art-relatedtopics, the

profileson alumni and students are always

than 5,000 class notes in our six editions

in

full-timepositionas directorsof the

Adult Education Program. Harrietsubsequently

“struggles and conflicts”of today’s students. Noted one respondent, “It’s a

more

Dorothy Beach ’39 Bell is living Mich.

CrystalCathedral in Garden Grove, Calif. They

promotions, student-written creative

read). As with the 1988 survey, class notes

That’s good because we published

deadline for which is Tuesday, Sept. 14.

30s

suggestions. For example,beginning with

We were interestedin knowing the readership of specificsections. Alumni to rank their interests on a scale

the

already implemented some of those

away.

of one (usually don’t read) to three (usually

issue. Becauseof the lead time required by this

people offered comments and we’ve

of in future issues — fraternity and sorority

were asked

this

obituary notices)have been held for the next issue,

read any of it. The acceptance of the newspaper format

easily

Office by Wednesday, July 7, have been included in

received after that date (with the exception of

mentioned fund raisingmailings. A full 96 percent said they read all or some of news from Hope College compared to less than one percent who said they never

it is

All submissions received by the Public Relations

publication’sproduction schedule, submissions

really going on.

important part of this survey. Eight-one

newsprint paper because

the

first shared a

News and information for class notes, marriages, advanceddegrees and deaths are compiledfor news from Hope College by Greg Olgers '87.

interesting to note that only eight of all the

communicate often enough and just 17 said communication is too often. Some of the

from Hope College was broad (96.5 percent). In addition to economic considerations,we have stayed with the

class notes

a scale of one-to-five, respondents

respondents

of news

nearly eight years of post-retirementservicewith

what’s really going on at Hope College."

respondents said the college doesn’t

“too often” respondents specifically

Brad Williams 73 and the Crocodile (Stewart Leniger '93 of Holland,Mich.) of Hope Summer Repertory Theatre's Peter Pan. The crocodile was one of the creatures that puppeteer Williams created for the June 11 -July 3 production. '

wanted to know our believabilityamong readers. Alumni were also

Our Lord, teach Sunday School, hold

Your Hope friends and the college want to hear from you. there’s an event in your life you feel is newsworthy, please let us know. In the interest of timeliness,please try to notify us within six months of whenever the event took place.

the babies in the nursery, bring food to the elderly, etc.”

news from Hope College is welcomed by alumni close to and far from Holland. “news from Hope College is one of the few mailings that I receive which I usually read from cover to cover. I love catching up on news...” said a 1983 alumnus from Massachusetts.“Seeing I’m only 10 minutes away, I’ve got a real sincere interest in the campus because of relatives and friends attending Hope,” noted a 1967

it’s

changes in

up to us. You will see

more

the future. We are in the process

changes in our “looks” and introduce them in our October

of considering

hope

to

will print only your first

Births:

class year for the sake

class year, your spouse’sname, whether or

of consistencyin our publication.If you are a

married alumna, please

tell

us your

maiden

name. a

If you go by a different name, such as middle name or nickname, we will print it

instead of your first name if you prefer.

We

cannot print informationabout your spouse if he or she is not a

Please tell us your name, your

Hope graduate, and your name and birthdate.

not your spouse is a child’s

Advanced Degrees:

Please tell us your

name, your class year, the name of your degree, the

name

month and

year your degree was awarded.

of the university, and the

Hope graduate.

Marriages: We

DEATHS: Any cannot publish

announcementuntil after

a

marriage

the wedding has

taken place, so please write us after you are

graduate.

Now

CLASS NOTES: We name, last name and

married. Tell us your name, your class year,

informationyou have

concerninganother’s death will be appreciated.If possible, please send us a dated copy of the local newspaper’s obituary notice.

your spouse’sname, whether or not your spouse is a Hope graduate, the date of your

SYMPATHY To:

marriage,and the city and state in which

death of a loved one in your immediate

your wedding took place.

family will be publishedupon your request.

Informationabout the

issue.

We

value your opinions and

comments

we strive to be the communication link between members of the Hope family. Let us know what you think.

as

Please send your information to: Alumni News; Hope College Public Relations;

Ml

E. 12th St.; P.O. Box 9000; Holland. Ml 49422-9000

NEWS FROM HOPE COLLEGE, AUGUST 1993


Lavina Hoogeveen '52 of Allegan, Mich., retired

50s

this

countries. She has traveledto 66 countries. “I don't want to pack a suitcasefor a long time." she writes.

Mary Louise Kooyers 'SO Adams and husband Lawrence of Midland. Mich., are enjoying

“I

retirementand celebrating38 years of marriage.

bought a rocker and will rock slowly after six

months of sitting still!” Marilyn Veldman ’52 Van Der Velde performed during the college'sTulip Time Organ Recitalsin May. George Hoekstra ’53 of Parchment, Mich.,

Howard Bruggers '50 of on May 3 1 Dentistry.

year after 41 years of teaching in nine foreign

Carriere.Miss.,retired as associatedean of the LSU School of

Ann Woiters '50 Fredricksonand Phil Frederickson'SO repon that they have “moved to the Cincinnati,Ohio, area to watch our grandchildren grow up." Abe Moerland ’50 owns the Bin-An-Oan Orchard and market in Byron Township,Mich. A former biology teacher,he noted in the Byron! Dorr Advance on April 3 that the orchard provides great science field lessonsfor his grandchildren when they help with the work. LaVerne ’50 and LorraineVanFarowe ’51 Sikkema of Holland, Mich., retired on Oct. 1, 1992, from mission work in Kenya, but returned for three months this summer to assist Mission Aviation

retired

from his medical practiceat the end of June.

Connie Ferguson ’53 Klaasen and Don Klaasen ’53

reportthat they are

together,

poem

Ellsworth Rolfs '57 of Albuquerque. N.M.. Programs, and

is

active in Scouts and Toastmasters.

Marlin Vander Wilt ’57 has become pastorof Church of the Cross in Sarasota,Fla. Eugene TeHennepe '58 on Sept. 1 will begin early retirementfrom Connecticut College. He and Anita Van Lente ’57 have moved to Franklin, Maine, “and love it." he notes.

Wayne Vriesman

despite

’59

has been electedJoint

reunion booklet. The booklet gave them separate

Broadcasters,the highestelectedpositionof the

addresses in Tucson. Ariz., and Ann Arbor, Mich.,

industry’smajor trade association. He is vice presidentof Tribune Broadcasting Company and

own homes

in

both those

cities.

head of

Norman Gysbers ’54 is professorof

its

radio group.

counseling

psychology at the University of Missouri, Columbia.

He conducted

two-day seminars on career counseling for secondary teachers and guidance officers in the Republic of Singapore from May 21

law-

and procurement to nine East Coast Marine

Lorenzo Howard '72 is regionaldirector of human resources with Northeast Division.BASF. Fonda Van Sloten '72 and husband Rod Kirchmeyerare employed by the Albuquerque (N.M.) Public Schools. Fonda is a counselor at the mid-schoollevel. David Whitehouse ’72 performed during the college'sTulip Time Organ Recitalsin May. William Woiters "72. a commander in the U.S. Navy, is in the Adriatic Sea on the aircraft carrier

Board Chairman of the National Association of

jointly

the

Air Force Nuclear Engineer

lead project officer for

advice on environmental law. land use. labor

legal

Corps commands. is

indicationsto the contrary in the Class of '53

when actuallythey

1

still

chapbookcompetition by Pearl Inc. of Long Beach. Calif. The published book. Steubenville,is a sequence.

60s

four

USS TheodoreRoosevelt panicipating in Operation "Deny Flight," the NATO operationenforcing a United Nations "no-fly zone" over Bosnia and Herzegovina.His squadron flies the E-2C "Hawkeye" airborneearly warning aircraft and is conducting surveillancemissions in support of U.N. resolutionsto protect citizensin the former Yugoslavia.

John Bryson ’60 recentlyretired from teaching

John Zevalkink’72

is

presidentof Columbian

vocal music and social studiesfor 33 years at Spring

DistributionServices Inc., which offers specialized

Fellowship.

until

Lake (Mich.) Junior/SeniorHigh School. He

servicesin contractingwith clients to truck their

Warren Burgess ’51 of Traverse City, Mich., was electedthe 1993-94General Synod president during the June 7-1 1 General Synod of the Reformed Church in America. He recentlyretired as pastorof Faith Reformed Church in Traverse City, and was vice-presidentof General Synod during 1992-93.

professorat the University of Nevada, Reno, for a

continues to be organistand directorof music and

shipments. The company was featuredin the

three-week session.

fine arts at

June 2, and in July he served as a visiting

Mary Hospers ’56 Kopp to a

on April 23 was elected

two-year term as presidentof Church Women

United in units

New York State, serving 90-some local

throughout the state.

Julie Herrick ’56 White was the winner of a

all

about

PhyllisKleder ’73 Hooyman, director of

Clyde LeTarte ’60 was electedto the Michigan House of Representativesin a special electionon Tuesday, June 29. He is presidentof Jackson Community College. Judith Van Leeuwen ’61 Cook of Bradenton. Fla., retired from teaching seventh grade English on June . She is now doing volunteer work at her 1

Presbyterianchurch library, and in the fall will begin

it!

hospitalvolunteer work. L. William Kuyper ’61, a French homist, and

New York Philharmonic

colleagues were in

Budapest, Hungary, on a concert tour during Easter. Seeking a congregation with an English language servicewith which some of them could worship. Bill contacted Edwin Mulder at the

RCA

offices

and

financial aid at

the

Glenda Tenclay ’73 McKinley of the

Ron Bultema ’74 is a divisionalmerchandise manager with Rose's Stores Inc. in Raleigh, N.C. Erik Lower ’74 received on June 18 an award for his work as 1992-93chairperson of the Economic DevelopmentCommittee of Rockpon, Texas. He is also a directorof the Chamber of Commerce. He is presentlydeveloping his own waterfrontGulf Coast properties,owns/managesan oceanfront motel, and recentlysold his 139-siteR.V. Park. He is also activein the Resolution Trust and F.D.I.C.property dispersalmarket as the assets of bankrupt S&Ls are

and contributed their talents to the serviceas a brass

sold,

been professor of philosophy, ethics and logic at the

Denver, Colo., to pursue relaxationand perhaps a

college for 22 years.

second career.

doctor. Naturopathic doctors are primary care physicians licensed in severalstates and Canada who use alternativetherapies.

Jane Goeman

submissionsis May 30, 1994 — but don’t send your you to get ready. Information on how submit work will appear in the December issue of

for

entries yet! We’re just inviting

and where to

news from Hope College.

NEWS FROM HOPE COLLEGE, AC1GC1ST 1993

has retired and relocatedto

Jan Weitz ’75 Kent has served as interim directorof Christianeducation at Christ Church

Run"

(Episcopal) in Shrewsbury. N.J., for the past year.

in

May. As noted

in a

Grand Rapids (Mich.)

May

10,

he operates his

Bob Klein '75 of Aliso Viejo, Calif., is finishing M.Div. at FullerSeminary, expecting to graduate

his

March of 1994, and is workingat a PCA church Dana Point. Glenn Pfeiffer'75 is living in Chicago. III., where he is a professorat the Graduate School of in

service.

Business, University of Chicago.

Terry Sheffield ’67 is a captain in the U.S. Navy, and was aboard the aircraft carrier USS Kittyhawk during a six-month deploymentto the Western

Ronald (see "marriages") were married in Grand

command ship of

the

in

Carol Sue Nykerk ’76 Abel and new husband Rapids, Mich., and took a "honeymoon drive" to their

new home

in

Portland,Ore., along with their

seven-year-old Whippet (English racing dog).

William ’68 and Peggy Dean ’69 De Boer 1, completing mission servicein Palenque, Chiapas, Mexico. William is taking a nine-monthprofessional improvementprogramat WesternTheological Seminaryto complete work for an M.Div. degree,

Bernace Brunsting’68 De Young, an attorney in Miami, Fla., has emerged as one of the top tournament Bridge players in the United States.At the 1993 North American Bridge Championships,

Cynthia Clark ’76 was promotedto assistant universitylibrarian for technicalservicesat the Universityof California,Irvine.

Susan VanDis ’77 Campbell won

the

72nd

annual Spring Lake (Mich.) invitational Golf

Tournament. Greg Caskey ’77 received his firstpatent in January. He is completing three-year terms on Consistory at Third Reformed Church and as a member of the board of directors of the Holland. Mich., Rotary Club.

Kim Zimmer ’77 returned to West Michiganto

held in Kansas City, she was the highest finishing

play "Lizzy Curry,” one of the lead roles of The

woman player in

North American Open Pairs.

regionaltitlesand numerous top-10 National

Rainmaker at the Bam Theatre at Augusta, Mich., this summer. Carol Donohue ’78 Gephart won her third consecutive Lake Macatawa Triathlon on Saturday. June 26. She won the women's championshipwith a

finishes.

personal best time of one hour. 44 minutes, 21

William Wilson ’69 recentlyreceived his master of divinity(see "advanced degrees") and has been assigned to the Southwest MinnesotaSynod, Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA).

seconds. The triathlon consisted of a half-mile

She

The deadline

’75

consecutive.25-kilometer “Old Kent River Bank

mission work following the program's completion.

The Alumni Arts Competition is a juried competition. The Competition is open to all women and men who have been enrolled at Hope College and identify their association with a class year (ie, ’42, ’69, ’78, ’86, ’91), whether or not they graduated. Current Hope students are ineligible. Entries should be recent works, ie, works executed during the last three years. Graduates of the Classes of 1991, 1992 and 1993 must submit work done after leaving Hope.

Wash., has completed

her third of four years in training as a naturopathic

and they anticipatereturningto cross-cultural

1980, and came back in 1984 accompanied by Alumni Invitational I under the title “Alumni Arts Competition.” The event is now held every five years, and in 1989 featured 40 artworks from 33 alumni, and 20 poems and four short stories from 19 alumni.

of Seattle,

Marie Blauwkamp ’62 performed during the college'sTulip Time Organ Recitalsin May. Ekdal Buys Jr. ’62 on May 15 received the 1993 President'sAward for Outstanding Contribution to Learning from Central Arizona College. He has

returned to the United States on June

Alumni Opus debuted in

developing and remarketing several each year.

Kate Nelson '74

Pacificand Persian Gulf as the battle group.

Dust off your brushes and quills! The Alumni Arts Competition is returning with Alumni Invitational III and Alumni Opus 1994.

coordinator

Philharmonic guestsjoined the church in worship,

own lawn care service. Philip Harmelink ’66 was chosen Louisiana’s 1993 Outstanding AccountingEducator by the Society of Louisiana CPAs in recognitionof contributionsin the areas of teaching,research and

and authors

the

is

Voluntary Action Center in Holland. Mich.

learned of the ScottishMission Budapest. The

Press featureabout him on

artists

National Association of Student Financial Aid

Administrators (NASFAA) in Washington,D.C.

William Vandenberg '63 ran his sixth

Alumni

Hope College, has been electedto

serve a three-year term on the Board of Directorsof

quintet.

“The Fisherman ” by John Killmaster '67, from 1989’s Alumni Invitational II.

Grand

Rapids (Mich.) Business Journal on April 26, 1993.

Lake.

1

Read

Christ Community Church in Spring

is

the

one of the few players in North America with

6,000 Master Points (300 qualifiesa player for the privilegedrank of Life Master), and holds 25

swim. 25 miles of biking and a five-mile run.

Nancy MacKinnon ’78 Van Ark Mich., is teaching at

New

of

Heights Tae

Holland,

Kwon Do

Studio in Zeeland, Mich. In October of 1991 she was tested and received the rank of second degree

70s

Kwon Do. Lynne Bulthouse’79 Caskey of Holland. Mich., is workingpart-time as assistant secretaryat Hope Reformed Church. Susan Gray '79 attended the international Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro,Brazil, in June of 1992 as a representative of the United Methodist Church. Leah Sunderlin'79 Haugneland of Lake Blackbelt from Western MichiganTae

Susan Wierda '70 Bolton is pursuing a doctorate at MichiganState University. Jim Roodvoets '70 is general manager of the Grand Rapids, Mich., area'sDan Pfeiffer Plainfield Lincoln-Mercurydealership. Linda Draft ’72 is athletic directorat the University of Wisconsin-Parkside.

Thomas Gouwens ’72 performed

during the

Charles, La.,

is

active in the Lake Charles Christian

college’sTulip Time Organ Recitalsin May.

Women's Club. She

Rick Hine ’72 and family live in Wilmington, N.C. He is head of the Eastern Area Counsel Office locatedat Camp Lejeune, N.C. The office provides

past

is

currentlytreasurer, and in the

was contact advisor,promoting friendshipBible

coffees and serving in the chairperson'sabsence.

THIRTEEN


Campus Notes (Continued from page

receive the award for the

GRANT TO MARCH:

The Youth

Advisory Council of the Muskegon County Community Foundation has awarded a grant to Hope for the “March to Hope” program. “March to Hope,” now in its 19th year, pairs Hope students and area volunteers one-on-onewith at-risk children from the Muskegon community during a seven-day hiking and camping trip. By presenting challengesthe children will overcome, the program is designed to build their self esteem and confidence in their abilityto succeed. The “March” takes place on Beaver Island, with the participants hiking about five to eight miles a day, with backpacks. In addition to hiking, the

participants— working together — are also responsible for

making and breaking

camp each day, meals and

other duties.

This year, 30 adult volunteers and 25 children of age 10 to 13 will be participating. The 1993 “March to Hope” will run Sunday through Saturday, August 15-21. Steve Smith, assistantprofessor of physical education and athleticsat Hope, is the program director. He is assisted by Glenn Hayden, a social worker from the Muskegon Public Schools. The Youth Advisory Council is an advisorycommittee to the Board of Trusteesof the Muskegon County Community Foundation. The Council was formed in 1989 with gifts from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation and local donors. The Council consists of 14 area young people and their adult advisors, and focuses its grant making on youth issues.

ORAL HISTORY: The

1993 Hope College Oral History Project is focusing on the history of the Hispanic community in the Holland, Mich., area. Each year the Joint Archives of Holland coordinatesthe Oral History Project, which is designed to record and transcribe spoken memories of the past. This year’s student coordinatoris Andrea Peschiera, a senior from Kalamazoo, Mich. The project is being supervisedby Larry J. Wagenaar ’87, director of the Joint Archives of Holland. Peschierais a sociology and Spanish major. In addition to working for the Hope College Academic Support Center and the Kalamazoo Nature Center, she has been an apprentice teacher of Spanish and involved in a number of interview situations.

Fluency in Spanish is enabling Peschierato interview a wide variety of Hispanic residents in both English and Spanish. The final transcriptsfrom her interviews will become part of the community history documented in

Astin which shows, he said, “that

other than basketball and football to

six.)

students

1992-93

academic year. The $5,000 scholarship is awarded to student-athletes who maintain at least a 3.0 cumulative grade-pointaverage (4.0 scale) and perform with distinction in varsity competition. In June Bannink was named a GTE Academic All-American for a second consecutiveyear. He graduated in May with a 3.8 grade point average and a double major in engineeringphysics and business administration.

He plans to continuehis studies at Purdue Universityin the fall, pursuing the master of science degree in industrial operations

management.

Bannink earned NCAA All-American swimming honors 14 times in his career. As a senior he was the Division III silver medalistin the 200-yard individual medley, 200-yard freestyle and as a member of the 800-yard freestyle relay team. In 1991 he was on Hope's national champion 800-yard freestyle relay team.

FINANCIAL AID BOARD:

Phyllis

Kleder ’73 Hooyman, director of financial aid at Hope, has been elected to serve a three-yearterm on the Board of Directors of the National Associationof Student Financial Aid Administrators (NASFAA) in Washington, D.C. NASFAA is comprised of approximately 7,000 financial aid professionals from across the country. The organizationrepresents the concerns of the financial aid profession

and

students to both the Administrationand

Congress. In addition, it trains and

important intellectualtasks with faculty and fellow students show markedly greater cognitive development than do students who do not enjoy such opportunities.”

Collaborativeresearch between professors and undergraduate students has taken place in the natural sciences at

Hope for decades,and many students have been co-authors of papers and presentations with their professors.In recent years, Hope has supported and encouraged similar programs in the humanities and social sciences, through a program of summer grants and the establishmentof the Carl Frost Center for Social Science Research. Dr. Nyenhuis has been active in the promotion of collaborative student-faculty research at

undergraduate institutions.He was recently elected a councillor at-large by the Council on Undergraduate Research

(CUR), a professional organization which believes that a discovery-oriented approach to learning should permeate science education throughout the undergraduatescience curriculum.

A member of the Hope College staff since 1974 and director of financial aid since 1984, Hooyman has been active on regional and national levels. She is a past president of the Michigan Student Financial Aid Associationand has served

Committee Midwest Associationof Student

as chair of the Federal Issues for the

(MASFAA). In 1991 she received MASFAA’s MeritoriousService Award.

FACULTY KUDOS:

His first column was in the

May, 1993,

issue. In writing the

monthly column

for the

ANS News, Dr. Williams draws upon his many years of experienceas a teacher and a public

of the

speaker. He has been

Hope

a

member

faculty since 1969, and while

on sabbatical leave in 1989 worked at the U.S. Department of Energy’s headquartersoffice in Washington, D.C. He has conducted and worked in numerous teacher workshops on energy and nuclear issues, and his public speaking has taken him to many locations in the Midwest and Southwest. His special area of interestis helping the federal government find a deep geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel,

Alumni can help Hope first

job by telling the college

about openings within their organizations.

Dr. Nyenhuis was invited to deliver the

among

faculty at

liberalarts colleges across the country

movement.

«

is revealing the

organization.

benefits of collaborative learning,” he

Bannink is one of 12 Division III male athletes from across the country in sports

was

_

_

Position Title:

__ -

Qualifications:

_

-

Organization/Company: Contact Person:

_

Contact Address:

_

What Candidates Should Do To Apply: Deadline:

_

_

_

Please fax (616) 394-7683 or send to:

developing into a national

“Study after study

_

Job Opening Information:

keynote address during a May 14 conference that examined collaborative efforts in undergraduate research and creative activity in the arts and sciences. Titled “A Meeting of Minds,” the conference was held at the Universityof Michigan-Flint. Faculty, students and administrators from both the University of Michigan-Flint and the Universityof

it

_ -__ _ _ _ _ _ _

Your Name:

Jacob E. Nyenhuis, provost and professor of classics,delivered the

and sees

__ __

By providing the information requested below, you will help Hope share your employment opportunities with our soon-tobe-graduates.If your deadline is tight, we can even fax the resumes to you.

Your Telephone:

collaborative learning

The All-American swimmer has been awarded an NCAA Postgraduate Scholarship, the highest honor presented to a student-athlete by the national

public speakers.

Wanted

Financial Aid Administrators

Bannink ’93

of Holland, Mich.

American Nuclear Society’s monthly newspaper, the ANS News. He is writing and reviewing a monthly column called “The Speaker’sComer,” which is a resource for public speakers who address nuclear issues. Dr. Williams presents questions that the speakers might be asked and gives likely answers. He also providesa “Hint of the Month” for for the

college financial aid issues at the state,

of awards continuesto grow for Jeffery

The number

Donald H. Williams, professor of become a feature writer

chemistry, has

Help seniors seeking their

supports financial aid professionals.

keynote address because of Hope’s history of collaborative student-faculty research and creative activity. He has observed increasing interestin

FOCIRTEEN

are actively engaged in

Michigan-Dearbom attended. the

Joint Archives.

GRADUATE HONOR:

who

Employment Opportunity Program

for

Hope Seniors; Hope College Career Planning and Placement; Holland, MI 49422-9000. If you have questions, please contact Dale Austin or Kelly Carrigan, Hope College Career Planning and Placement, at (616) 394-7950.

told the conferees. One example cited a

major national study by Alexander

NEWS FROM HOPE COLLEGE, AUGUST 1993


model for GlenvilleHigh School-Hospitalityand Charm Club because of her news anchor presence on

80s Mary VanDis

’80

Bauman has become a

in

WJW-TV8 in Cleveland.Ohio.

Joy Huttar ’84 performed during the college's Tulip Time Organ Recitalsin May.

partner

with the law firm of Miller, Johnson. Snell &

Barbara Veurink ’82 performed during the college'sTulip Time Organ Recitalsin May.

Cummiskey. which has offices in Grand Rapids, Kalamazoo, Lansing and Ann Arbor, Mich. Her practice is in employeebenefitsand executive compensation.

David Hammar

’80 of

Gladstone, Mich., has been

promoted from labor relations managerto

human

resourcesmanager/operations with Mead Publishing Paper Division. Elizabeth Hoisington ’81

is

a

’81 of

III.

DouglasLehman '84 recentlyreceivedhis

Kentwood High School string orchestrareceivedFirst Place at the National Gateway Music Festival Competition in the orchestradivision, held in Orlando. Fla. In addition, Ingrid has a cello studio

the

most creative and imaginativeuse of

media in social work practice.He was also given the

and guest conducts. Recently,she has become the

honor of “Mental Health Worker of the Year” on the

assistant

Homecoming Weekend October 22-24

Child and Adolescent Recovery Treatment Services

High School EquestrianTeam/Club.She and her

Team

purebread Arabian. Uhera. are competing at shows

at

Cedar Springs PsychiatricHospitalin

Colorado Springs,Colo., on May 25, 1993.

Byl ’83 of Nashville,Tenn., is the Tennessee U.S. Geological Suvey,

resident-division of oral and maxillofacial surgery at Detroit Receiving Hospital.

Bethany Cook ’84 Pluymers is living on a

daughter,four cats and an assortment of cows. She

is

includebiologicalrisk assessment,biological

the assistant

monitoring of environmental degredation and

navigationand water resources,and government contractinglaw.

UniversitySchool of Medicine Department of

bioremediationof contaminated groundwater.

Pediatrics at St. Louis

Linda Ernst ’83 Hughey of Muskegon,Mich., is manager of Howmet EmployeesCredit Union in Whitehall,Mich. Richard Kennedy ’83 of Orlando, Fla., has been named director of relocationfor Coldwell Banker.

Linda Strouf ’84 performed during the college's Tulip Time Organ Recitalsin May.

Hygenists after

He continues as an industrial hygiene senior chemist CNA Insurance in Chicago, HI.

at

LeslieBethards’82 Friedrich of Cary, N.C., is

employedat Ciba-Geigy’s Agricultural Biotechnology Unit in North Carolina,and chair of the

is

also

has tlireestepchildren.

Daborah Lockhart '82 Kern was honored

as

a

is

a

’85

has accepted a positionas

counsel at Fannie Mae's (FederalNational

Mongage Association)Midwestern Regional Office Chicago, 111.

in

Jonathon Homeister’85

Children'sHospital.

Janet Sterk ’84 Van Wieren

Debbie Gezon

physical

is

pursuing a careerin

academic pathology. He graduated with "Distinction in Research" from the Universityof Michigan Medical Scientist Training Program.At the Honors Convocation preceding the graduationceremony, he

therapist at

receivedthe Dean’s Award for Excellence in Research.

Rich specializesin obtainingan experienced

Sparrow Hospitalin Lansing, Mich. Robert Tod Van Wieren ’84 is a healthphysicist employedby the Michigan Department of Public

REALTOR(R) for customers nationwide.

Health.

dance in

Bruce ten Haken ’83 has been named managerof Hope College Art Annex, the college’snew art supply store in downtown Holland, Mich. Greg Hondorp ’84 is a board-certified anesthesiologist at Blodgett MemorialMedial Center the

Diaconate at her church in Raleigh. She

businessmanager for Washington

has been promoted to senior

’85

representative of SunAmericaFinancialof

Los Angeles, Calif., and was named employeeof the year for 1993. senior

and deals primarilywith the areas of environmental,

of Industrial

Ann Farley financial

10-acre farm in the East Metropolitan St. Louis area, with her husband David Pluymers ’85, their

Engineers,Charleston District, since January of 1992,

American Board

coach for the newly-formedEast Kentwood

throughout West Michigan this summer.

Department of the Interior. His responsibilities

meeting extensivecertification and testing standards.

Orchestra Festival.

Award" for

been assistant districtcounsel for the Corps of

the

District 10

under Ingrid's direction, the East

10-Year Reunion

Julia Huttar Bailey ’83 performed during the

Tom

MSBOA

Class of 1983

District biologist for the

Neil Knutsen ’81 was awarded CIH status from

rating at

degrees") and received the “Tommi Frank Memorial

college'sTulip Time Organ Recitalsin May.

Charleston,S.C.. has

I

Last year,

Keith Nalley ’84 of Royal Oak, Mich., is the chief

professorof religion at Hope College.

Jonathan Jellema

orchestraand Pinewoodorchestrareceiveda Division

master’s degree in social work (see "advanced

sociology instructor

Heartland Community College in Bloomington, Lynn Winkels ’81 Japingais an assistant

at

Grand Rapids, Mich.

role

Susan Blaine ’85 of Bellingham, Wash., family/childtherapist. at

is

a

Ingrid Dykeman-Rop ’85 is director of orchestras East Kentwood (Mich.) High School and Pinewood

Middle School. This year both the high school full

Kimberly Karpanty ’85 teachesjazz and

New

STEPS Studios,where she is of a

also the artisticdirector

pre-professionalperforming company of

teenagers. In the summer months she

modem dance

the

modem

York City at The Spence School and at

is

of

director

program at BelvoirTerrace Fine

and Performing Arts Center in Lenox, Mass. Kim teaches and performs nationaland internationally both independentlyand with severalmodem dance and performance companies.

You'd be surprised at how far some people come just to do their Christmas shopping

David Kraay assistant

’85 of

West Lafayette,Ind„ is an

professorof management information

systems at Purdue University.

David Pluymers ’85

is

renovating a 100-year-old

farmhouse in the Metro-East St. Louis area, where he resideswith his wife Bethany Cook ’84 Pluymers and daughter. He

is

an environmental scientist with a

firm called Environmental Excavators,where he primarilyoversees leakingunderground storagetank removals and cleanups.

at the

Hope-Qeneva

Bookstore...

Tracey Taylor ’85

is

program director for Central

United Methodist Church in Muskegon,Mich. She also

is

an on-callchaplain at Mercy Hospitalin

Muskegon, and

is

the district directorfor

leadership

trainingfor the Grand Rapids (Mich.) District of the United Methodist Church. Natalie Thompson ’85 since July of 1992 has been with the Peace Corps teaching English at a universityin Agadir, Morocco,North Africa. In earning her master of arts (see "advanced degrees") she made the nationaldean's

list.

Patricia Visser ’85 received the Arthur Andersen Outstanding Teacher award at Albion College's Spring Honors Convocation.She

is

an assistant

professor in Albion's biology depanment,teaching microbiology, immunology and introductory genetics. Jennifer

TenHave ’85 Van Arendonk

performed in the song-and-dance"Tulip Time FestivalMusicale '93" in May as one of 10 of the

members

Holland Chorale's Show Choir.

Jane Abe

’86

has been electedto the Board of

Directorsfor the Naperville,III., Jaycees (Junior

Chamber

of

Commerce) and chairperson for the

organization’sPublicityCommittee. Julie Ann Bubolz '86 of Alexandria, Va.. traveledthe United States doing advance on the Clinton-Gore '92 campaign, has since coordinated an Inaugural dinner,and

is

currentlyadvancing for

Presidentand Vice President.

the

Randy De Vries

’86

of Kentwood,Mich.,

is

an

account executive at the Grand Rapids. Mich., terminalof

TNT

Holland Motor Express Inc.

He

and wife Tracy "are proud parents of a seven month Siberian Husky named 'Timber.'" Sue Hendrickson ’86 is in private practicein pediatricsin Bay City, Mich. Karen Gingras ’86 Hoekstra is a teacherin geographyand physicaleducation at Pattengill old

But

if

you

can't

make

it

person, please write for

copy

of

our

1

in

a

t

4

993 Qift catalog.

Middle School and

a

junior varsity girls’ basketball

coach at Lansing Eastern High.

Mike Reisterer ’86 is on a leave of absence from Milwaukee law firm to play quanerbackfor the Birmingham (England) Bulls in a European his

professionalfootball league.

Shawn Tilstra ’86

Name

_

_

Eagan, Minn.,

is

a

senior

Rosemount Aerospace Inc. Paul Deck ’87 was recentlyawardeda National Science Foundation (NSF) PostdoctoralResearch Fellowship in Chemistry. The NSF provides fiscal support for two years of advancedstudy, and Paul at

Address City

of

engineer working on fiber optic sensor development

State

Zip

will

Send to: Catalog Request; Hope-Geneva Bookstore: PO Box 9000; Holland, MI 49422-9000

continue his research with Professor Tobin

Marks at Northwestern University through

(Catalogs will be mailed mid October)

J.

his

Fellowship. Lori Turkstra '87 Hahn of Holland. Mich., is an adjunct professor in the mathematics depanment of

Grand Valley State University.

NEWS FROM HOPE COLLEGE. AUGUST 1993

FIFTEEN


McDonald’srestaurantin St. Louis, Mo. Miho Jansen '91 is an RCA missionary with her husband. Wayne, in Japan. She teaches English at Keiseu Girls' School in Tokyo. Kristen Lambrides ’91 of Ann Arbor, Mich., is completing a master's in deaf education at Michigan

Class of 1988 Five-Year Reunion

Homecoming Weekend October 22-24

State

Rachelle DaFoe '88

is

a

in

New York

Tom DeGraaf ’88 teaches sixth grade in Ionia, Mich. Mari Douma ’88 is in a one-year rotating internshipat SparrowHospital in Lansing, Mich. She

is

will

consultingfirm in Lincolnshire.III.

be teaching in Seoul.

Karol VanWulfen ’93

South Korea, during 1993-94.

Jamie Lee

'92

and family serviceworker for the Kids in

is

David MacIntyre ’92

is

Eileen Verduin ‘70 and Christopher Raphael,

March 13, 1993, Holland, Mich. Marcia-AnneBeard ’75 and Earl

locomotion studies, at Penn State.

teaching special

Rob Rickse

education in the Ankeny, Iowa, school system.

ChristopherAllman ’92 will be attendingWayne UniversityLaw School beginning in the fall of

College of

’92

is

taking summer classesat

Human Medicine, between

MSU

Bob Klein

Leonard Fries Award from Michigan State

department at the Universityof North Carolina

the

University.

Hospitals in June of 1992. In August of 1992 she sat

Helpline at Cornerstone Community Mental Health.

director of

American Society of ClinicalPathologists (ASCP) Board of Registrycertification exam, and in October of 1992 she was notified that she was

Wilson Inn Residence in Richmond,Va., helping

U.S. Air Force and is serving with the coalition forces

certified as a

volunteercoordinator,and also volunteerson the Katherine Singer ’92

a

missionary working at

in

Southern Watch and Cease Fire.

July. She is involved in a teacher/training program

Amy Braun ’89 is exhibitionscoordinatorat The Grand Rapids (Mich) Art Museum. She is

that

responsiblefor planning and directingall phases of

teaching English. She

exhibitiondesign and installation for both temporary

Universityin Yemen.

includesteaching English as a foreign language

and assisting future secondary high school teachersin

Weston Thompson ’92 will begin work toward

a

Universityof Michigan this fall.

Deb Vashaw ’92 of Holland, Mich., is program director of the

teaching at Sana'a

YMCA

in

’75

and Karen Oerter.

Carol Sue Nykerk '76 and Ronald Abel, July 31, Kenneth Lobb '77 and Wonza Kim, April 3, 1993. New York City. Carol Powers '79 and Steven Obendorf, May 8, 1993, McGuire AFB, N.J. Nicholas Marcelletti'81 and Michele Martin,

master's degree in library and information science at the

Dunbar, June

1993, Grand Rapids, Mich.

residentsto grow spiritually through group and individualcounseling.

medical technologist.

is

is

E.

1992. Cynthia Clark '76 and John Walker, Jan. 10, 1993.

Ann Rubin '92 of Kentood, Mich., is working at The Dwelling Place Inc. in Grand Rapids, Mich., as

for the

6.

his firstand

1993. Patricia Duell ’92 took a job in the microbiology

Suzanne Greicar’92 joined the Peace Corps

marriages

studying for an M.S.

degree in exerciseand sport science,specializingin

recentlyreceived the Department of Pediatrics

Arabian Gulf region in support of Desert Storm

an A.I.M. worker at

New

second years of medical school.

in the

is

ProjectHospitalityin New York.

has accepted a positionas a youth

State

Yolanda DeLeon '88 Vega has been appointed multi-culturallife at Hope College. Blake Zandbergen ’88 is a firstlieutenantin the

Kayla Dubbink ’93 of Wheeling, 111., is working Hewitt Associates,a world-widebenefits

between teachers, parentsand children.

months — until March of 1994.

Heather Van Diepen ’91

Manhattan.

Candy Kalman ’92

for

working to help createbetter lines of communication

positionin Yokohama. Japan for seven extra

criminaldefense

analystat ComericaBank in Ann Arbor, Mich.

Directions(KIND) programin Lapeer. Mich. She

Universityand working for the State of

Michigan as a sign language interpreter. Susan Tenhor ’91 is extending her teaching invesligator with the Legal Aid Society of

Shelly Comfort ’92 Grill was promotedto senior credit

corporatesports challenge at the

Grand Rapids, Mich.

March 27, 1993, Novi, Mich. DaborahLockhart '82 and Donald Kem 22,

IB,

Aug.

1992. Barbara Cochran '83 and John Ellis '86, Nov. 14,

1992, Holland. Mich. Liz Braham '86 and Sean Spencer, May Oak Brook, 111.

22,

1993,

and permanent collectionexhibitions. Jef Getzinger ’89 on July

1

started a

three-year

residency in family practiceat William Beaumont Hospitalin Troy, Mich. Ben Johnson ’89 lives in Lewisburg, Pa., with

TOP TEN REASONS

wife Debbie and sons Spencer and Tyler. Ben works in Williamsport as the CommunicationsManager for The Brodart Company. He is responsiblefor

to

advertising,literature,promotions and public

Books Division. David Kraska ’89 of Los Angeles, Calif., is an associateat the international law firm of Latham & relations for the

Alumni Fund

Watkins, at the firm'sLos Angeles office. Kathi

McGookey ’89

of

contribute to the 1993-94

NOW

Kalamazoo,Mich.,

recentlyspent a month in Sao Paulo, Brazil, as a

member

of a

Rotary Club Group Study Exchange,

studying theatre and disability. She director of

is

the

assistant

The Mad HattersEducational Theatre,and

recentlyreceived a grant from the Arts Fund of

Kalamazoo County to complete a chapbookof poems. Timothy Nieuwenhuis '89 is an associatechemist with Hoffmann-LaRoche Inc. in Nutley. N.J. He is in the

drug metabolism department, where potential

•ft

’wifthelp

ivlv

to

^

vmj

a

.

drug products are tested in pre-clinicaltrials. His responsibilities

Cteod8start®*iS

include developing methods to

quantitatethe amount of drug in biologicalmatrices by mass spectrometry.

Mami Ogawa equity, is

a

’89

is

assistant vice

^’scampa^

president,

with Nikko Securitiesin New York City, and

financemajor at Leonard Stem School of

Business, NYU.

Brenda Laninga ’89 Schloff and John SchlofT ’89 are

both beginning a family practiceresidency at

Hinsdale (111.) Hospital. Lisa Winkels '89 of Wyoming, Mich., is an

<\A°

yt^faV

accounting supervisorat Prince Corporation.

90s Paul Bianco ’90 left the Saginaw(Mich.) Police Department after two years as a patrol officer to

become a public safety officer (police, fire and EMS) with the City of Kalamazoo,Mich. During Operation Desert Shield he was promotedto staff sergeant and currentlyserves as a drill instructor in the U.S.

\W9e

«v^e-

lon.

Army

Reserve in Waterford, Mich. Victoria Derr ’90

is

attendingthe Yale University

vS^

School of Forestryand Environmental Studiesto work on a master's in international conservation and

^\6e'0°

education.

and athletic trainer at Healthsouth Sports Medicine and RehabilitationCenter in Birmingham,Ala. Akihiro Kano ’90 in the fall will start working Julie Fritz ’90

staff physical therapist

is

g° support students

toward a doctoratein foreignlanguage education at

Ohio State University. Art Keith ’90

is

a therapist

Jg ,

with the Center for

Children’s Services in Danville,111.

of whom need" financial aid than

ever before.

v"eVvet

^

MS-"

hpgiliP

Kurt Oosterhouse’90 is working in corporateand commerciallaw in the Milwaukee,Wis., office of Michael, Best & Friedrich. Martha Sharp ’90 was in South Africa from July to December of 1992, working as a communications department intern with African Enterprise.She

is

now an M.Div. studentat Princeton Theological Seminary.

Robert VanOrder ’90 recentlymoved to Orlando, positionas vice presidentof

To save the college the time and expense ot

On July 1993-94

1,

fiscal year...its 127th.

Fla., to take a

me m the

manufacturing at Tapis Royale Inc.

calling

Marnie Dolphin ’90 Wittenbach is employed at Blodgett Memorial Medical Center in Grand Rapids, Mich. David Chappie ’91 of Marshall,Mich., was among 60 artists exhibitingtheir works at the second

phonathon or sending

me

letters.

in

Hope College began the

making

Take

a lead

this year a successful one.

Please send in your 1993-94 Alumni Fund contribution TODAY!

annual Art Fair at the Creek on June 12, 1993.

Automobilesare

the

focus of most of his work, and in

February he designed original art for a 1950s-style

SIXTEEN

NEWS FROM HOPE COLLEGE, AUGUST 1993


Randy De Vries '86 and Tracy

Bull,

Nov. 21.

Benjamin James. March 25, 1993.

1992. TerrieVan Belois '86 and Neill McCrimmon. July 21. 1991. Lori

Turkslra '87 and Nick Hahn. May 29. 1993.

Tom DeGraaf '88 and Kelley Beaman. Nov., 1991. Lon McCollum '88 and Rachel Rodrigues. Feb. 6. 1993. Singapore.

Robert Bieri '83 and JenniferVanDuyne '84 Bieri.

Brenda Laninga ’89 and John Schloff ’89. 1993. Wyoming, Mich.

May

15.

April Moore ’89 and Bruce Leutscher.Sept. 26. 1992. Jeffrey

Thoman. Dec.

19.

1992. ElizabethCromie '90 and Steven Rochow, Jan. 9, 1993. Kalamazoo.Mich. 1993, Las Vegas, N.M.

Amy Cadillac,

Bogard '91 and Ramon Gadea. April 3. 1993,

Mich.

Lynn Candela '91 and Keith Schuring '91, Nov. 1992, Dearborn, Mich,

26. 1993. Holland, Mich. Kimberly Back '92 and Eric Hass ’92, April 24. 1993, Grand Rapids, Mich. 1993. Michelle Comfort '92 and JeffreyGrill'92. March 1993, Saline, Mich.

Shawna Maciejewski '93 and Craig Wilder. June 20, 1992. Muskegon,Mich.

births 6,

1992.

Patricia

'85.

14,

AlleiaBethany. March 10, 1993.

Janet Sterk '84 Van Wieren and Robert Tod Van Wieren '84, Annika Janae.April 5, 1993.

Wood

'84

and ElizabethBryson '86

Wood.

Douglas Staley '75 and Margie Staley,

Amy

Beth.

Nicholas Robert, April 26, 1993.

Lisa

Shawn Tilstra '86 and Dawn Tilstra, Andrea Michelle, Sept. 18, 1992.

Meri Shima '76 Morse and Peter Morse '77, John Sloan 'll and Feb.

Amy

Alison Rae. April 17, 1993.

UniversityMedical School, June 3. 1993.

David Kaska '89, Universityof Michigan

Law

Donna deForest '86 Worssam and Richard Worssam, Christopher James, June 7. 1993. M. KristinaWolf-Summers '87 and John Summers, Matthew Brandon, March 31, 1993. Sarah Rynbrandt '88 Elzinga and Timothy Elzinga ’88, Jane Elizabeth,March 2, 1993. Tammy Boulter '88 Nieuwenhuisand Rob

School, May, 1992.

Nicuwenhuis, Colt Alexander, Jan. 28, 1993.

UniversitySchool of Medicine. June 3, 1993.

Lay. doctor of optometry.

University,May, 1993.

TimothyNieuwenhuis’89, master of science degree in chemistry,MichiganState University,Sept.,

Sloan. Jada McKenzie,

23, 1993.

John Schloff ’89, M.D.. Wayne State University School of Medicine, June 3, 1993. Julie Fritz '90, of

Stephanie Michealle,Feb. 10, 1993. Ted Boleman '82 and Sally Boleman. Christina Marie, June 17, 1993. Harvey Koedyker '82 and Karen Heikema '82 Koedyker, Kassandra (Kassie)Lynn; bom March 23, 993; adopted April 29, 993.

M.S., physical therapy,University

Western Theological Seminary, May, 1993. Kurt Oosterhouse ’90, J.D., Universityof

JudithMulder '59 Vander Wilt, Ed.D.. educational

Ruth, May 16, 1993.

Mamie Dolphin

'90

Wittenbach, master’s of

University,Allendale,Mich., May 1, 1993.

Powell '67. doctor of ministry,San Francisco

Kimber Wooten

William Wilson '69, master of divinity, Luther

Lawrence Hagberg ’74, doctoratein 1

’91,

degree of chiropractic,

Palmer College of Chiropractic,Davenpon, Iowa. Feb., 1993.

She taught for 20 years at Mack, Bach and

Bums

Park schools,and reJcivedawards and recognitionfor excellencein teaching. She

is

survived by her husband. F. Huston "Tex”

Colvin; two sons, Fred (Gail) Colvin and Bill (Bonnie) Colvin; one daughter.Map' Colvin Buss Robeson, Melissa Colvin. Scott Colvin. Brian Colvin.

Mark Colvin. Brad Buss, Sarah Buss and Jennifer Buss; one brother, Henry Grooters;two sisters, Marie DeVries; and her twin, Margaret Kloote.

Word has been receivedof

the

death of Alice

Pascall '42 Cox of East Brunswick, N.J., who died on Tuesday, July 13. 1993. Additional informationwill appear in the October issue of news from Hope College.

Word has been receivedof the death of Florence Dalenberg '21 Dean of Elmhurst. 111., who died on Monday. June 21, 1993. Additional infomiation will appear in the October issue of news from Hope College.

Word Iws been receivedof the death of Robert De Bruyn '31 of Zeeland, Mich., who died on Saturday, July 31, 1993. Additional information will appear in October issue of news from Hope College.

the

linguistics.

993.

deaths

Lynn Winkels’81 Japinga,doctorate,Union Theological Seminary. May, 1992. Rhonda Hermance ‘84, master’s of science in elementary education,College of Saint Rose, Albany,

Word has been receivedof the death of Henry Burggraaff’27 of Holland, Mich., who died on

N.Y., 1992.

Friday,July 16, 1993. Additional information will

Douglas Lehman '84, master's degree of social

Kenneth Hartgerink'63 died on Sunday, April 25, 1993, at his home in Lincoln. Neb. He was 67.

He served RCA congregations at

appear in the October issue of news from Hope

Platte, S.D.;

Willmar, Minn.; Firth, Neb.; Volga. S.D.; Hawarden. Iowa; Doster,Mich.; and Allison,Iowa. He

is

survived by his wife, Angeline; and by four

children: Gary, Wayne, Marcia and Gloria.

College.

Laura Bultman '84 Medellin, master’s of arts in

Margaret Hondelink '28

classroom teaching,Michigan State University,May,

Debra Umbach '82 Tronrud and Robert Tronrud,

years and graduated from the Universityof Chicago.

science in physical therapy.Grand Valley State

work, Universityof Denver. June 5. 1993.

1

Sheryl Wildeboer '82 Keur and John Keur, Karli

PresbyterianChurch. She attended Hope for two

Indianapolis, Dec., 1992. Diane Konynenbelt ’90, master of divinity.

Universityof Arizona, August,

Joan Dykema '81 Stover and Michael Stover,

Women's

City Club and the Board of Deaconsat First

Brenda Laninga ’89 Schloff,M.D.. Wayne State

Northwestern Theological Seminary, May 23, 1993.

George David. April 19, 1993.

daughter of William and Cornelia (Versteeg)

Grooters. On Aug. 1. 1934, she married F. Huston (Tex) Colvin in Iowa.

1992.

Matt Haverdink '91 and Jodie Haverdink ’93,

Jeff

She was bom on Dec. 1. 1904. in Boyden. Iowa, the

(Chuck); eight grandchildren.JenniferColvin

Amy McQuillan'89 Ferris State

Mercy Hospitalon Wednesday,

April 28, 1993, after a brief illness. She was 88.

Getzinger ’89, doctoratein medicine, Wayne

Jef State

Theological Seminary. May 22. 1993.

Carol Patterson'78 Gonzalez and Jim Gonzalez.

1

Saporito ’88, J.D., Golden Gate University

School of Law, San Francisco,Calif, May, 1993.

psychology.

Meredith Lauren, Dec. 12, 1992.

Jeane Grooters ’29 Colvin of Ann Arbor, Mich.,

She was a member of the Ann Arbor

Matthew Tenhuisen '87, doctorate,mathematical sciences, Clemson University,1993. Mari Douma '88. doctor of osteopathy,Michigan State University,East Lansing. Mich.. May 7, 1993.

Karen Smith-Hosner'85 and Terry Hosner, Conner Lee. April 16. 1993.

Arthur Pennings of Minneota, Minn.; and niecesand nephews.

brother. Dr.

Tech University,May 15, 1993.

Minnesota School of Law.

April 3, 1993.

Daniel P. and Mary Colenbrander of Holland. Paula and Hugh Wassinkof Holland, and Jeane and Steve

died at St. Joseph

Kurt Holzhausen '87, doctor of philosophy.Texas

1

ShirleyGagnon '85 Allen and Scott Allen,Jordan Daniel.May 9, 1993.

advanced degrees

E.

1992.

Minnesota, April,1993.

Charles Bryson Wood, Aug. 20. 992.

Sam Quiring '74 and Martha Quiring.Zachary Earl

Maplewood ReformedChurch.

Visser '85. doctorate,microbiology, UT

Shawn Tilstra '86, MBA. the Universityof St. Thomas, St. Paul, Minn. Paul Deck ’87, Ph.D.. chemistry.Universityof

Luke. March, 1992.

Marcia-AnneBeard Dunbar '75 and

of

Surviving are her husband. Paul; her children,

Southwestern Graduate School, Dallas. Texas, Dec.

Joseph Scott, April 22, 1993:

Dunbar, Jonathan Volk Dunbar. May 30, 1993.

22 years before her retirementin 1986. She was a

member

Greg Hondorp '84 and Marilyn Kuntzman '84 Hondorp. Jonathan Zachary. Nov. 20. 1992.'

'90,

DuPont Martin and Thomas Michael Martin. Dec.

MichiganMedical Scientist Training Program. David Kraay ’85, doctorate,decisionsciences

She was a teacherin the Holland Public Schools

several

Rhonda Bohannon '90 Meyers and Mark Meyers Tyler Jacob, Nov. 18, 1992.

Leigh Martin '71 and Elise Martin, William

for

Hoekstra, DeborahJane Hoekstra, May 13. 1993.

Karyn Kortering '86 Verge and Steven Verge,

Susan Bosch '92 and Kevin Schierbeck. March 25,

Polytechnic State Universityat San Luis Obispo. Spring. 1993.

Holmes of Plymouth; seven grandchildren;one

Robert Huisingh ’86 and Deborah Huisingh.

Lissa Nienhuis '91 and Mark Gilmore‘92, June

Orange City. Iowa, she graduated from

NatalieThompson '85, master of arts. Eastern Michigan University,April,1991.

David

Daniel Benes '91 and Tara Hansen '92, March 6,

in

(operationsresearch).Universityof Pennsylvania. May, 1993.

Bethany Cook '84 Pluymers and David Pluymers

Lynne Carter '90 and

Bom

specializingin counseling and guidance. California

1993.

14,

following a lengthy illness. She was 69. Northwestern JuniorCollege and Hope. She married Paul Colenbrander in 1946.

of

Dick Hoekstra '84 and Karen Gingras '86

May

Randy Warren ’84, master'sof education,

Jonathon Homeister '85, M.D.. Ph.D.. University

Linda Ernst '83 Hughey and Randy Hughey, Eric James. May 18. 1992.

Kristin Kuhn '89 and Terry Simmons. April 3, 1993. Holland, Mich.

Irene Wang ’84. J.D., Fordham UniversitySchool of.Law, New York, May 23. 1993.

Lindsey MacAnhur Bieri, March 10. 1993. Fanthorpe, Simon James,

1992, San Francisco,Calif.

13,

Colleen VanderHill '83 Banker! and Mark Bankert, Joel William. May 7, 1993.

John Fanthorpe '83 and Mary Wikstrom '86

David Kraska '89 and Laura Bremer. Aug. 22,

21.

Rick Avra '83 and LaNae Tilstra '84 Avra, Tamsin Grace, Feb. 24. 1993.

Vera Pennings’45 Colenbranderof Holland, Mich., died at her home on Tuesday, June 8, 1993,

1993.

of

Dansville,N.Y., died

on Friday,Nov. 13, 1992.

Kathryn Ives '31 this

of

Philmont, N.Y., died earlier

year. She was 83.

She was bom on April 8, 1910, in Brooklyn. She

Keep

in

touch through

news from

Ahope college Does the alumni office have your current name and address? Has there been a recent change in your marital status? Would you prefer Hope used a different form of your name (Jane Van Doe vs. Mrs. John Van Doe, for instance)? Note the number of spaces per line available.

was a registerednurse and an Amiy lieutenant during

World War

II.

servingin the Battle of the Bulge.

She was presented to the Court of St. James. She was a member of the Order of the Eastern Star and the Second Reformed Church of Claverack in Philmont. Survivors includea cousin,Evelyn Lord Renne of Canaan.

RichardJaarsma

'61 of

Glen Rock, N.J., died

unexpectedly at the family summer home in Green Pond, N.J., on Saturday,July 3, 1993. He was 53.

Bom States

in

Amsterdam,he immigrated

to the

United

with his family in 1949. In additionto Hope he

was a graduate of Holland ChristianHigh School, and he continued his studies at Rutgers University,

name

He was

a

professorof English at William Paterson

College in New Jersey for 25 years, and was president of the

street

_

state

want to keep

Notes

in

Mahwah, N.J.

Ridgewood,and served as an elder and deacon. He was a former presidentof Glen Rock Soccer Club and

city

We

Young World Day School

He was a member of First Refonned Church in

in

Northwest Berger Soccer League. Surviving are his wife, Janet De Noble '60 Jaarsma; his children, John and Valerie;his sister,

class of

Irene

Jaarsma of Niwot, Colo.;and his father. Harry

Jaarsma of Holland, Mich.

touch, so please use this form to inform and update us.

We

look forward to hearing from you.

Fern Corteville ’38 Joeckel of Wayne. N.J.. died of

cancer on Thursday, June 3, 993. She was 76. 1

She had been a teacherin the state of New York, and had been a substitute teacher in Wayne. Her husband was Stanley Joeckel '36. Paula Lemley '94 of Allegan. Mich., died on Thursday, June 24, 1993. Her death, a result of an

Send

to:

Alumni News; Hope College Public Relations; 14

1 E.

1

2th St.; P.O.

Box 9000, Holland, Ml 49422-9000

industrial accident,

occurred at her place of

summer

employment — Menasha Corporation'spaper mill in Otsego. Mich.

NEWS FROM HOPE COLLEGE, AUGUST 1993

SEVENTEEN


He was on

She was bom on Sept. 13, 1972, in Allegan, the daughter of Harold and Terri Lynn (Hitt) Lemley. A

member

of the First Congregational Church,

Air

Paula

was baptizedand confirmed on March 27, 1988. In

in the

II

China,

India

first

met their spouses,and

Grand Rapids; one grandchild;stepchildren, Gregory

Rapids, Mich., area.

Arnold '49. Jacqueline Van Heest ’52 De Young and

achieve her goal of becominga physicianand her

Vander Woude of Burnsville,Minn., and Paul and

will

appear in the October issue of news from Hope

dream of helping others. In addition. Paula was a

Carolyn Vander Woude of Tofti, Minn.; a

College.

member

brother-in-law,Admiral BenjaminSarver of Norfolk.

society

and a performer in the Nykerk Cup

Va.; his

classmates,the faculty and the administration.

The Paula Ann Lemley Scholarship Fund has been establishedat Hope in her honor. Contributionscan be sent to the Hope College AdvancementOffice.

died on Tuesday, June 22, 1993, at her home of

Competition. She will be extremely missed by her

Mary Ann De Vries

2,

Visser of Holland, Mich.,

of her

1

.

Olive Esther Boland '21 Nagel died on Friday,

Gladys (Moeke)De Vries in Zeeland. Mich. She was graduate of Holland High School, and attended Hope

She was bom at Greenleafton,Minn., on Sept. 12, 1897, the daughter of Henry and Alice VanderBie Boland. The family lived at Cherry Grove and Spring Valley,Minn., before moving to Orange City. Iowa, where Olive attendedthe RefomiedChurch Academy from which she graduated in 1917. She then attended

Momingside College for one year and subsequently Hope.

Visser and Vickie L. Visser,

years on which she discussed the English

language and spelling.She continued to live in Lake

when she moved to the EpworthVilla LifecareCenter in Oklahoma City. On Oct. 20, 1928, she married Paul Nagel of Carrington,N.D.. where they made their first home. The couple moved to Iowa two years later. Olive joined the Methodist Church after marriage and dedicatedmany years of serviceas organistand choir member. She was an ardentflower lover and

and Robert King

Spencer Clef Club and Federated Women's Club, and held offices in the AmericanLegion Auxiliary and United Methodist

Women.

12,

Mark

1

992, due to throat cancer. She was 84.

L.

Fisher,

Holland; a sister,

of Atlanta.

all

Seattle,

his

5

1

Holland, and Janet Wells of Florida.

The family of Pauline Ver Hulst of Sunnyvale, died on Wednesday,May 5. 1993,

Calif., who

following a long illness.

and Jeff Naumann '94. Other survivorsinclude

Her husband was Jack Ver Hulst '58. She grandchildren.

The family of John James Van Heest. who died

San Antonio in 1985.

May, 1993, graduation honors Dawn M. Luchies,Fremont, Mich.

Karri S. Evers,Martin,Mich.

Richard A.

Lumsden,Barrington, Til,

Libbie J. Freed,East Lansing, Mich.

Kathryn M.

Markwood,Ottawa, Kan.

Gavin

Gregory C.

C. Lob, Holland,Mich.

T.

Love, Holland, Mich.

I

Bibart,

Kalamazoo, Mich.

Pamela

J.

Bush, Wyoming, Mich.

Kathlene K. O’Brien, Olivet, Mich.

ElizabethA. Bymjj West Lafayette,Ind.

Kelly L,

O’Dowd, Marshall,Mich.

Matthew

Mark R:

Olivier,

J. Chalmers, Grand

Rapids, Mich.

Sheryl L. Chamberlin, Helena. Mont,

Gwen

Ryan

Douglas B.Mesecar, Caledonia,Mich.

Ericka L. Lyszak, Alpena, Mich.

Stacy L.

Nancy B. Naumann,Wyckoff, N.J.

JudithL. Murray, Houston, Texas

Karen

Kenneth

Michelle E. Nainys, Galena, 111.

Jason J. Elmore, Cadillac,Mich.

Robert R. Ryzenga, Holland,Mich.

M. ScottEppinga, Diamondale, Mich.

Shannon A.

Jason D.

Alison L. Schaap. Barrington,111.

KristenV.

Ovenvay, Holland, Mich. Siegel,

_

Holly,Mich.

L.

Karl F.

Muhlenkamp,St. Joseph, Mich.

Nicies,

North

Muskegon,Mich.

Diane C. Julie

A.

Dame, Elk Rapids, Mich.

DeMond, Lansing,Mich. de Nicola,Albion, Mich.

S.

Evert,

Grand

'Mich.

Rapids,

Nicholas J. Palomaki, Perry,

Marcy L. Rottman, Fremont, Mich.

where she had been a Sunday School teacherand a

Derek C. Voskuil,Holland,Mich.

Holly C.

Carla D. Everts,Zeeland, Mich.

Wendy

member of the Ladies Guild. She was a member of the Women's SocialClub of Martin, and was a feature columnist for the Wayland Globe and former Marlin Messenger. Surviving are her sister,Julia Mae Tandy of Martin,four niecesand nephews and their spouses, Georgia and LeRoy Young, of Martin,Alice and John

Mary B. Wahmhoff,Fennville,Mich.

Donald A. Pelerson,LeRoy, Mich.

Norma J. Gelderloos,Muskegon, Mich.

PeterH.

Heidi J. Praamsma, Holland,Mich.

Amy

Gretchen G.

ChristinaL. Rulgers,Holland, Mich.

ElizabethA. Haag, Morrison, 111.

Michael

Ruth A.

Kalamazoo,and Mr. several great

Gail

all

of

Tandy of Gun Lake; and

and great-greatniecesand nephews. She

Patterson. Alan Stavcr ’46 died on Tuesday. April 27, 1993. Paramus, N.J. He was 69. He had served the following RCA congregations:

Community,North Brunswick, N.J.; Feasterville, First, Pompton Plains, N.J.; and Old Paramus, Ridgewood,N.J.

M. Bachelder,Grand Rapids, Mich.

Laura

Pa.;

Woude

’48 of

Holland. Mich.,

EIGHTEEN

Swinehart,ComstockPark,Mich.

L.

JenniferE. Hand, Hastings,Mich.

Andrew J. Toering,Plymouth, Minn.

Mary

John A. Skinner,Holland, Mich.

Kari L. Harmsen, Hamilton, Mich.

Derek

Linda Smith, West Olive,Mich.

Deborah

Meghan M. Tuynman,Detroit. Mich.

J. Bosker, Mattawan,

Mich.

Timothy M. Christensen,East Lansing,Mich. Linda R. Coney, Medina, Forest,

Ohio Hawk, KY

Gray

Cara

S.

Sonnemann,Traverse City, Mich.

Amy M. Spangler,Kalamazoo, Mich. R. Stallwood,Indianapolis, Ind.

J. Havens, Jonesville,

Mich.

Todd Helmus, Grand Rapids, Mich. Julie

A. Jaehnig,Holland,Mich.

Chad A, Johnson, Warsaw,

C.

Thomas,Holland.Mich.

Triesenberg,Kalamazoo, Mich.

J.

VanDahm, Oak Lawn,

Michelle L.

Craig P. Vandenberg. Wyckoff,

111.

NJ.

Bradley S. Vander Veen, Allendale.Mich.

Ind.

Dawn M. De Groodi, Richlon Park, 111.

Patricia

Kayla

KirstenL. Stoesser,Midland, Mich.

Jodi L. Jooslbems, Hamilton, Mich.

Julie E.

KirstenA. Sullivan,Marlette,Mich.

Todd P. Jungling,Waupun,Wise.

William

Kathryn M. Kerous, Wood Dale. III.

Michelle L. Visser,Kalamazoo, Mich. Rebecca K, Vomastek, McBain, Mich.

Dubbink, Hamilton, Mich.

S.

Pamela G. Dykstra,Kentwood,Mich. Lisa R. Edmiston, Akron,

Ohio

Laura

L.

_

Thompson,Naperville,111.

Vicki L. Freeman, Rockford, Mich.

Barbara J. VandenBrink, Traverse City, Mich.

KristinM. Knapp,

Amy

Margaret A. VerMeulen, Grand Rapids, Mich.

JulianaM. Lamont, Columbus,

B.

Geurink, Holland,Mich.

Wilson, Sylvania,Ohio

Joanne Graf,Waukesha, Wis.

Laura

YvonneN. Grassl,Stevensville, Mich.

Timothy T. Work, Portage,Mich.

F.

E.

Houdek, Covert, Mich.

ScottR. Johnson, Wyoming, Mich. J. Johnston,Okemos,Mich. Jonlry,

Colfax,111.

Doug K. Kleinheksel,Hamilton, Mich.

Theological Seminary, and served churches including

Disabilities for 12 years, retiring in

Laura

KristinB. Sikkenga, Muskegon, Mich.

Angela D.

Ada (Mich.) Reformed Church, Second Reformed Church in Marion, N.Y.. and Olivet Refomied Church in Muskegon,Mich. He served as chaplain of the Muskegon Regional Center for Developmental

Holland,Mich.

Andrew G. Spencer, Sheridan,Mich.

Melissa L. Black, Indianapolis, Ind.

Timothy

graduate of Hope and Western

Hamming,McBain, Mich.

Trenton,Mich.

Sligh,

Apama

69. a

Groothuis,Grandville,Mich.

Sheill,

ChristineL. Hamtak, Grand Rapids,Mich.

died on Sunday, June 20, 1993, at his home. He was

He was

Ryan, Holland.Mich.

L.

Schroeder,Barrington.III.

L.

Foley J. Schuler,North Muskegon, Mich.

Marie

Cornelius Vander

S.

Ohio

Dl.

Nancy E. Bischer,Ruth, Mich.

Nathaniel H. de

was preceded in death by her brother. Thomas A.

at

MAGNA CUM LAUDE

Columbus,

Woodstock.

Sather,

Katrina L. Oxender, Sturgis, Mich. Patrick,

Mich.

Steven J. Ray, Kalamazoo, Mich.

Leanne K. VandeBunte, Byron Cenier,Mich.

Washtoak, and Charles and ElaineTandy,

Caledonia,Mich.

Palmer, Cedar Springs,Mich.

L.

Stephen L. Kline,Gaylord, Mich.

S.

McFall, Holland,Mich.

Norman,Zeeland,Mich.

Julie R.

Mike A. Nowlin, Harrison.Ohio

Nicole M. Buono, Glasco,N.Y.

Joseph A. Kuiper, Kalamazoo, Mich.

She was bom on Aug. 15, 1909, in Martin, the

She was a member of the Martin Reformed Church,

is

survived by her husband, two daughters and three

vocal perfomtance from the Universityof Texas at

Robert R. Cross,Kalamazoo, Mich.

Elementary School as a fourth grade teacher.

Van Slooten of West Olive, Margaret Veldheer of

daughter, Sara, and both of his parents.

one sister.ClariceMuilenburg, of East Lansing, Mich.

Grand Rapids, Mich., and retired from Martin

Nelson and Patsy Bakker of Holland; and

.

Palricia L.

and was a lifelong Martin resident.

great-grandchildren; three great-great-grandchildren; a brother.

Jamie D. Crooks, Grand Rapids, Mich

She was a teacherat Straight Street School in

and Richard Jones of Douglas, Mich., and Elsie

McCallum of Hesperia;a son-in-law, Paul Raggl of Grand Haven, Mich.; 54 grandchildren;107

Ga.; a brother, Cecil and Margie

Wyckoff, N.J., and the father of Nancy Naumann

'93

West Olive. Joyce Van Slooten.and Jack and

Sharia Van Slooten,all of Holland, Mich.. Barbara

He was the husband of Susan (Rose) Naumann '66 of

Stanley and Kim Van Slooten,and Betty Mills,

of

sisters-in-law, HarrietBakker of Grand Haven, Helen

SUMMA CIM LAUDE

Patterson,

all

Wash.; three grandchildren;and severalnieces

and eight great-grandchildren, all of California; and

daughter of the late Thomas C. and Georgia (Hooper)

Sas,

The family of Walter H. Naumann. who died on

Michigan State Universityin 1971 and a master’sin

Survivors includeone daughter,Beth Peck, and her

Friday,May 14. 1993. She was 83.

Carol Van Slooten.Vivian Slager, Peggy and Arthur

and nephews.

He was

De

Weerd, Robert and Dolores Van Slooten.Glen and

Fisherof Florida; a sister.Mrs. FrancisO'Neil of

husband Andy of Edmond. Okla.;three grandchildren

Martin,Mich., died on

McCallum.

'87.

Surviving are his wife, Eno "Marie"; his children,

Gene Wabeke ’63 of San Antonio, Texas, died on Friday,March 19. 1993, in San Antonio. He was bom in Hudsonville,Mich., on Dec. 27. 1941. He earned a master in music education from

Milton Boland; and a sister,Emily Hertz.

’36 of

1972; a daughter,Nellie Raggl; and three

grandsons, William Mills, and Dean and Brian

Sunday, June 20, 1993, following a battle with cancer.

She was preceded in death by her husband; a

Agnes Patterson

She was preceded in death by her husband, Christian, in

Surviving are her children, Vila Talsma. Muriel

Holland; a brother,

_

West Olive,Mich., who died on Tuesday. May 25,

she had worked for more than 10 years.

The family of Paul D. Fisher of Walhalla.Mich., who died on Thursday, July 8, 1993. He was 75. He had been employed in the maintenance

James H. DeVries of Holland; a sister-in-law. Mrs. Don (Virginia)Visser of Grand Rapids, Mich.; and a brother-in-law.Bob and Lois Visser of Grand Rapids.

r

David Schroeder '78, Cynthia Schroeder '81

1993. at her home. She was a former custodian of the college, where

Survivors includeher daughter.M. Kristina

,

enjoyed providing altar flowers. She was active in the

brother,

of

all

of

III

De

Kevin De Young '80, Bonnie De Young

The family of Anna (Annie Bakker) Van Slooten of

Gregory and Sandy Fisher, and James and Kathy

Sally

After she retired she had a weekly radio program for

March

L.V. Visser,in 1988.

J.

her

The family of Marilyn Ann Eleveld. who died on

department at Hope, retiring in 1970.

lastly Lake

Park until 1991

De

enjoyed fishing. She was preceded in death by her husband. John

Orange City, Lime Springs,Ridgeway. Harrisand Park, from which she retired in 1964.

Jr.;

Simon Smith, Edith Jackson and Winifred

Wolf-Summers

Visser,

'78,

Bechtel '94.

Wolf and McVickar Consulting Engineers,and most recentlyfor Anchor Party Store. She was a member of Beechwood Reformed Church, a past member of the Margaret P. Hummer Hospital Guild and Holland Audubon Club. She also

J.

Gregory Van Heest '78,

Bechtel ’82, Linda Bechtel '84 Schwanderand Leslie

brother-in-law;sisters-in-law; and niecesand

Ottawa Middle School Music Lab. She worked for

Surviving are her children, Derk

She taughtEnglish and Latin in Cresco, Alton.

'82.

nephews.

Chicago, III. She was a secretaryfor Conrad Inc. and H.G.

’76,

Rodriguez, Catherine Schroeder '84 Hall. Ronald

Joseph; grandchildren;great-grandchildren; an aunt; a

Vries M.D. She was also a teacher'saide for the West

April 30, 1993, in Oklahoma City, Okla.

Young

son. She was 73.

children.

and the Katherine Gibbs Secretarial School in

October issue of news from Hope College.

several

933. to Dr. H.G. and

1

TimothyVan Heest

Jocelyn Van Heest '81, Mary Arnold '86, Donald

She was a retired cook of the college. Surviving are her husband, Leonard

She was bom on Dec. a

1993. Additional informationwill appear in the

Grandchildren who attendedHope are: James Van

sympathy to

cancer. She was 59.

Word has been receivedof the death of Lori A. Lowe '88 of Avon, Colo.,who dieci on Monday, Aug.

Heest '62 Needham and John Needham '59.

The family of Loubertha De Waard of Detroit, Mich., who died on Sunday. May 9, 1993, at the home ’55

Bechtel and Owen Bechtel '57, and Wilma Van

'60

'85,

sister-in-law, Jean DeWitt

a

Schroeder and Carl Schroeder '53, HarrietVan Heest

Heest '80, Paul Van Heest '82. Thomas Van Heest

stepmother,Conney Vander Woude of

Edmonton.Alberta;and of Muskegon, Mich.

and Mary Lou Richards Van Heest;

Donald De Young '52, LucilleVan Heest ’55

on Sunday, July 4, 1993. Additional information

Alpha Epsilon Delta pre-medical

’52

daughters,Rhea Van Heest ’47 Arnold and John

five

died

of the

of their spouses).

and EloiseHinkamp '51 Van Heest,and Cornelius

stepgrandchildren; brothers, Berend and Nelvie

By majoring in biology and chemistry she hoped to

many

Van Heest

Gull Lake, and Bryan Ritterbyof Holland; five

academically as well as socially.

pastors.In

and Charles Vander Woude and Diane Alexander of

Surviving besideshis wife are his children,

Ritterbyof Grand Rapids, James and Kristi Durant of

year at Hope College. She was a very active

student,

RCA

Survivors includetwo sons, Gerard Van Heest '49

Word has been receivedof the death of Sadie Grace Masselink ’31 Winter of Holland, Mich., who

third

sons and

addition,16 of his grandchildrenalso attendedHope

and RoseannRitterbyof Phoenix, Phillip and Mary

Paula,at the age of 20, had just completed her

of his

all

sons-in-laws became (as he had)

additionto being tenor soloist with numerouschoral

(as did

1990 he married Arlyne Ritterby.

Elizabethand John Connell of Grand Rapids. Mich.,

Gaylord; and severalaunts, uncles and cousins.

Kenneth Jewell Chorale and Michigan Opera Theatre

He is survivedby his parents. Justin and Alice Wabeke; his children. Todd A. Wabeke and Tammie W. Maximiliano; granddaughters,Jessica and GabriellaMaximiliano; and his brothers, Kelvin and Jack Wabeke and their families, all of the Grand

Allegan. Rosemary McKinnon of Dowagiac,Mich., Paula is her fiance, Fred Vance '94 of

on Thursday, May 27, 1993. All seven of his childrenattended Hope, where they

groups.

wife, Betty

Brinkman, in 1989. In

and Ed Hitt of Hopkins, Mich. Also mourningthe

He taught in Michigan and Texas public schools. He was also a semi-professionalsinger with the in

Theatre. He was preceded in death by his

and Leanne: grandparents.Caroline Lemley of

loss of

Force,serving in World War

Bumia and

1990, she graduated from Allegan High School. Survivors includeher parents;two sisters,Nancy

ReformedChurch,

the staff at Trinity

working in pastoral care. He was a veteranof the U.S.

Carol E. Krafvc, Lake

City,

Mich.

CUM LAUDE Julie L.

Akin, Indianapolis, Ind.

Ypsilanti,

Mich.

Ohio

April S. Lee, Midland, Mich. Marion

E Leech, Sarasota,Fla.

Van Riper,Grandville,Mich. C.

VanZandt, Marshall,Mich.

Karen

J. Walker, Flushing,Mich.

Adam

L.

Warber, Grand Haven, Mich.

JenniferR. Wesky, Van Wert, Ohio

ChristopherA. Lepczyk, Traverse City, Mich.

Merry

Martha

Mary A. Westrale,Holland,Mich.

R.

Lutz, Holland,Mich.

L.

Westenbroek, Zeeland,Mich.

JenniferL, Mallen, Kentwood, Mich.

Vicki M. Andrews, Midland, Mich.

Theresa A. Malone, Mason, Mich.

NOTE:

Krislin J. Bauss, Rochester Hills,

ScollA. May, Holland,Mich.

met their graduationrequirementsprior

Douglas

Mich.

J. Bazuin, Holland,Mich.

Brandon

L,

McKinney,Portage,Mich.

Gregory D. Laman, Holland,Mich.

Renee D. Beach, Twin Lake, Mich.

KristenN. Montpetit,Midland, Mich.

James W. Lee, III, BerrienSprings,Mich.

Melissa J. Bennink, Holland,Mich.

Paul

R.

Mushemre,Ann Arbor, Mich.

to

Includes only graduates who

Commencement Day. A

the

listing of

July graduates will appear in the

next issue

ofim

from Hope College.'

1988.

NEWS FROM HOPE COLLEGE, AUGUST 1993


To

alumni who invested

all

in the lives of

Hope students

the building blocks of our future

*

A special thanks

Ralph

Meima ’24 DuMez ’26

to

our 1992-93 Class Representatives

Daniel and Winifred Rameau Fylstra’43

Suzanna Edwards

Roger and Norma Lemmer Koeppe ’44

Ronald and Marjery Kempers Wiegerink ‘61

Gregory Van Heest ’78

CeciliaVerHage ’27

Maurice Laug ’45

Karl Overbeek ’62

Jan Vandenberg ’79

Harvey Kollen ’28

Lucille

Donald Mitchell ’63

Beth Visscher ’79 Nielsen

Laveme VanderHill '29

Gertrude Maasen ’47 Vander Haar

Ralph Jackson ’64

Steve and Kathy Warn Bratschie ’80

Bemadine Siebers ’30 DeValois

Betty Visscher ’48 Rycenga

Marti Lootens ’65 Sligh

Scott and

LucilleWalvoord ’31 Busker

Richard Hoebeke ’49

Martha Campbell ’66 Costos

Kathy Lawrence '82 Melody Meyer '83 Boersma Mary Lynn McNally '84 Buck

Mabelle

Frei

Teninga ’46 Toren

’60 Paarlberg

Watson Spoelstra ’32

Gordon Beld ’50

Barbara Granberg ’67 Joldersma

Anne Jackson ’34 Notier

Albert Boers

Sharon Dykstra

’5

1

’68

Teusink

Wilma Rottschafer ’35 Van Wieren

Richard Huff ’52

Kenneth Eriks ’69

John E. Buteyn, Sr. ’36

Betty Roelofs Miller ’53

Cindy Sonneveldt

William A. Poppink '37

Ross and Patricia MachielaMack ’71

Herman Luben ’38

Donald and Nancie Carpenter Lubbers ’54 Alice Klepper ’55 Jansma

William and Kathryn

Harold and Lois Voorhorst Leestma ’39

Mary Jane Adams ’56 Dykema

A. JefferyWinne ’73

Thomas Houtman ’40

Suzanne Underwood

T. Philip

Waalkes ’41

Nancy Boynton

’42 Prindle

’57

Ten Hoeve

Joel and

Elizabeth Boersma 'll Jasperse

Nancy Dirkse DeWitt '81

Greg Heeres '85 ’70

Powers

Roman Nicholson’72

Marianne Van Heest Bouwens ’74

Kimberly Waldorf ’86 Mercer J.

Lindsey

Dood

'87

Janilyn Brouwer '88 Catherine Morrison ’89 Lane Heidi Sunderhaft '90

Henry J. Doele ’58

William and Claire Campbell Boersma ’75

David Veldink

Albert Bursma, Jr. '59

Keith and Becky Norden Derrick '76

JenniferPayette ’92

NEWS FROM HOPE COLLEGE, AUGUST 1993

Aardema

’91

NINETEEN


Homecoming Activitiesinclude a

Friday, Oct. 22 a.m.-7 p.m. “Art as Activist: Revolutionary Posters from Central and Eastern Europe” 4 p.m. Department of Chemistry Seminar — Dr. Sylvia Ceyer ’74, who is the W.M. Keck Foundation Professor of Energy at MassachusettsInstitute of Technology and received a 1993 Distinguished Alumni Award from Hope College. Room B50, Peale Science Center. 5-7 p.m. Department of Chemistry Open House, second floor Peale 6:30 p.m. Volleyball hosts Calvin, Dow Center 7 p.m. Chemistry Alumni Banquet. Please call the department of chemistryat (616) 394— 7630 for the price of admission and other information. Class of 1983 10- Year Class Reunion Party

1988

5- Year Class

Reunion Party

Saturday, Oct. 23 8:30-10:30 a.m. 16th Annual ODL College Run-Bike-Swim-Wdlk.

TWENTY

run;

5.6K and

8K

800-meter swims; and a prediction 3,200meter walk. Scheduled starting times vary.

9

Class of

5K

criterium bicycling events; 400-meter and

Inc.

— Hope

’93 1:30

p.m. Men’s

Soccer hosts Adrian,

Buys

Athletic Fields 1:30 p.m. Pre-game show, Holland Municipal

Stadium

For registrationinformation please call the

2 p.m. Football hosts Albion. Holland

Dow

Municipal Stadium. Half-time activities include music by a high school band (with an opportunity to sing the alma mater), the introduction of the Homecoming Court, and the crowning of the king and queen. Post-game Reception on the field featuring

Center at (616) 394-7690.

9-11 a.m. Health Fair,

Dow Center

Gymnasium. This

event

participantsof the

Run-Bike-Swim-Walkand

non-participants alike

Morning Reunion

is

open to

of all ages.

registrationfor the Classes

of 1983 and 1988

a.m. Reunion brunches 10 a.m.-7 p.m. “Art as Activist: RevolutionaryPosters from Central and 10

Eastern Europe” 10:30 a.m. Alumni Chapel Choir rehearsal,

refreshments.

_

Company performance, Knickerbocker Theatre. Tickets are $4 and

8 p.m. Aerial Dance

will be available at the door.

Sunday, Oct.

Dimnent Memorial Chapel

24

11 a.m.

10:15 a.m. Alumni Chapel Choir rehearsal,

11:30

Dimnent Memorial Chapel Homecoming Worship Service. Dimnent Memorial Chapel 1-10 p.m. “Art as Activist: Revolutionary Posters from Central and Eastern Europe" 4 p.m. Hope College Faculty Recital Series, Wichers Auditorium of Nykerk Hall of Music.

H-Club registration, Maas Center a.m. H-Club luncheon, honoring the

1972-73 MIAA Championship Men’s Soccer Team, the 1973-74 MIAA Championship Men’s Cross Country and Football Teams, and the Hope for Humanity award recipient, Maas Center auditorium Noon Sorority luncheons and fraternity open houses 1 p.m. Homecoming parade leaves campus for Holland Municipal Stadium

11 a.m.

For further information,please call the

Alumni

Office at (616) 394-7860.

NEWS FROM HOPE COLLEGE, AUGUST 1993

Reduced nfhc 1993 08  
Reduced nfhc 1993 08