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SECOND CLASS POSTAGE PAID AT HOLLAND, MICHIGAN 49423

news from Mike

'Sees' whenever

staclesto his playing ability.

music— for my own amazementor amusement or whatever.” When he was about 16, Mike began

“It all started in Pennsylvania

when,

while visiting a Catholic church, the organI was 18 months old at been organ for me ever since,” he explained. “When I was two or three, a friend of my grandmother brought me a toy pump organ with plastic bellows and I played with that and developed somewhat of a flair for music.” Mike’s formal training began at the age of eight when he received free lessons with the purchaseof a Hammond organ. With this beginning, he continued to study organ while growing up in Flint, Mich. “During this period I was playing basicallypop music, which I learned by ear. I practiced ist

used full organ.

the time and

It is

almost as interestingto watch an

organist play as

it is

enjoyable to listen.

Organ music is a subtle blend of art and mechanics. One must alter the steps, change the volume, play on the correct keyboard,keep one’s feet and hands at the same rhythm, and yet at the same time,' the sound created must be more than just correct notes and stops and pedals— it must be music, it must be art. Michael Bayus is an organist.Michael Bayus has been blind

since birth. To watch him play, one

is

as-

It

problem they have to work at,” the Hope junior relates. But to Mike and to the listener his lack of sight presents no ob-

it’s

I

felt the

muse,” he joked.

Dr. Michael P. Doyle, associate pro-

ing

is

one of 16 outstand-

young faculty members in the United

States named the recipient of a prestigious

Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Grant. Dr. Doyle, a

member

of the faculty

since 1968, will receive $20,000 to carry out new ideas in both teaching and research in chemistry and related sciences.A large portion of the grant will be used to

This more or less ended his “pop period”,

althoughhe does still occasionally play popular music (“but nothing later than 1935, except for Irving Berlin’sthings”). A high point in his trainingwas the opportunity to meet and study for a short while with Virgil Fox in New Jersey. Mike was a student at the community college in Flint when he heard about Hope. A friend had a tape of the 1972 Tulip Time Organ Recital.Mike was impressedand continued on page

5,

the instrument. To avoid this distraction, one must close one’s eyes and “see” the music as Mike “sees” it. Mike does not totallyunderstandsight. He therefore does not understand any commotion over his playing ability. He is a musicianand to him, his problems are no greater than those any other musician faces. “Everyone has some little technique

support students in research activities and to allow Dr. Doyle to purchaseequipment that would not otherwise be available.

The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, which was established in 1946, has directed major attention to the advance-

faculty Dr. Doyle has been the recipient of other awards including CottrellCollege Science grants from the Research Corporacontinued on page

3,

column

1

The

Christ

mas'Seasou

is

upon

I

studying the preludes and fugues of Bach.

tonished by his effortlessmanipulationof

ment of chemistry, chemicalengineering and related sciences as a means of improving human relationsand circumstances in the world. The purpose of the TeacherScholar Grant program is to give recipients maximum freedom in developing their potentials both as teachers and as scholars. Dr. Doyle, 31, was one of only two scholars selected from schools other than major universities. The award also honors Hope College since only eight of the 63 recipientssince the program was initiatedhave been from four year liberal arts colleges.Dr. Sheldon Wettack,professor of chemistryat Hope, was designated a Dreyfus Scholar in 1971. A native of Minneapolis, Minn., Dr. Doyle received a B.S. degree from the College of St. Thomas, St. Paul, Minn., and a Ph.D. in organic chemistryfrom Iowa State University in 1968. He was an instructor of chemistryat the University of Illinois at Chicago Circle prior to joining the Hope

was

had always wanted to take up classical

Chemistry Professor Honored As Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar fessor of chemistry,

“I

being geared towards nightclub work but

ns,

nud with

it

comes some of

our greatest joys -being together with family and friends; giving, receiving, and sharing; celebrating that great Gift -Jesus Christ

our

Lord. This season also brings us to the close of the year. As we reflect on the year that is passing, we are reminded not only of the many blessings we have received as a college, but also that these blessings have come because many people have contributedgenerously and sacrificiallyto the life and mission of Hope College. We are grateful for your participation and partnership, and we extend our personal appreciationfor all that you have done for Hope College. Looking ahead we realize, perhaps more than ever before, that the future is uncertainand unknown. Yet we can look ahead with confidence because of the great meaning of the Incarnation— Immanuel, God with us. Till-

VAN WYLKN FAMILY Gordon and Margaret Emily

Elizabeth, Stephen. Ruth. David.

column 3


MERGE

REIGNS OVER HOMECOMING

HIGHER HORIZONS Higher Horizons, the Hope College big-brother and big-sister pro-

The

Campus Scene

gram in the Holland community, has been merged with the Western Michigan branch of Child and Family Services of Michigan. Recognizingthe importance of family living for both the individual and community, the boards of directors of both organizations

PRESIDENT NIXON PLANNED HOPE VISIT

Kristi Knowles, a senior from Muskegon, Mich., was crowned Homecoming queen during halftime of the Hope versus Kalamazoo football game. Miss Knowles was selected by the student body from the seniors on the eight member court. Miss Knowles, 22, is a history major. She is a member of Phi Al-

each program in servicing

U.N. IS MARCH 15 The second annual Hope College model United Nations will be held March 15.

The model U.N.

will be an ex-

acting simulation game for high school students according to Dr.

Renze Hoeksema, professor of political science. By simulating the structure and operation of the United Nations, a model U.N. seeks to give its participants the

opportunity to realize the frustrations and rewards that the diplomats themselves experience. Secretary General and student director for the U.N. will be Broekhuis,

a

Rudy

junior majoringin

political science

from Holland,

located in facilities scattered

about the campus, a situation necessitated by the discontinued use of Van Raalte Hall as a class-

room building. The Center will contain 16 classrooms with fixed and flexibleseating,two secretarial areas, audio visual equipment storage areas, and offices for approximately35 faculty members.

Mich.

Anyone

The Build Hope Fund is also seeking to raise $300,000 for remodeling the old science building for use in the social sciences and humanitiesprograms. The building will house the Departments of Economics and Business Administration, English, History and Political Science. These departments are currently

desiring more informa-

NEW MANAGER

tion on the scheduledModel U.N.

OF BOOKSTORE

can address inquiries to Dr. Hoek-

sema

in care of the political sci-

ence department.

Mark Cook is the new manager of the Hope-Geneva bookstore in the DeWitt Cultural Center.

a multi-

the college’s capital,

endowment

and academic programs,is nearing the $5 million mark according to national chairman James M.

Ver

Meulen, ’26. Contributionsand pledges total $4,841,000 or 55 per cent of the $8,850,000 goal according to Ver Meulen. The campaign, launched in Oc-

but a firm reply was never re-

I

Letters pha Theta, national honor history

have been selected by the U.S.

fraternity;active in student gov-

InformationAgency (USIA) to be

ernment

displayed around the world as ex-

member and a member of the Young Democrats. Other members of the court

amples of the artistic skill of young American printmakers. The USIA has obtained 3,150 graphic art prints from students at 19 colleges and university art departments across the nation. Hope College and other members of the Great Lakes Colleges Association (GLCA) were asked to submit works representative of under-

as a residence hall

board

Morrone of Clawson, Mich.; Cyndy Hartman of Saline, Mich.; Mindy Spencer of Naperville, 111.; Janet Seaman of Park Forest, 111.; Claire Campbell of Grand Rapids, Mich.; Nancy Ponwere

Jill

stein of Holland, Mich.

Muyskens

;

and

of Spring Lake,

Ruth

Mich.

|

Hope College welcomes comments in the "Letters’’column. We are especiallyinterested in opinions about the College and items of general concern to alumni, parents , and friends. The Editor reserves

the right to use portions of letters

when space requirementsprevent printing their entirety.Letters not intended for publication should indicate so. Please address mail

to:

News from Hope College Editor, Office of InformationServices, Hope College, Holland, MI 49423.

^

J

graduate students according to

Robert Vickers, chairman of the Hope art department who is organizing all the material from the

Dear Reader:

GRANT SUPPORTS COMPUTER CENTER Hope

recently received a

$5,000 grant from the Eastman Kodak company under its Educational Aid Program. The grant will be applied toward funding of the college’snew computer according to President Van Wylen. Hope is one of only 35 institu-

Grosse Pt. Woods, Mich. Debra Van Tuinen, of Grand Rapids, Mich, and Mama Tellier, of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, 1973 Hope graduates, also had works selected. The print collectionswill be displayed at 82 different USIA overseas and cultural posts later

schools offering curricula of par-

this year.

ticular interestto the

tions to receive an unrestricted specialgrant from

Kodak this

year. Special grants are given, on a

nonrecurringbasis, to

In the last issue of News

Hope

from

j

College an invitationwas

extended to alumni to assist our Admissions office as student recruiters. Alumni were asked to contact Admissions director Tom La Baugh who offered to make availablethe necessary materials

answer all questions about Hope. Since that time several alumni have volunteeredto help. We have been encouraged by to help

let-

'

ters such as the following:

liberal arts

“I am more than willing to

make

company.

such materials available

adults.”

to our youth and interested

^

Class of ’67

Denver, Colorado

Cooks succeeds E. Duffield

Wade who managed the bookstore “There is a concern in my church that our students are

19 years before retiring last spring.

not being

A native of Holland, Mich., is currently completinghis degree work at Hope, majoringin American literatureand English. This past summer he taught English in the Republic of China under the auspices of a program sponsored by the Reformed Church in America.

made

well

enough

Colleges. Therefore, as a

Hope

alumnus, I have volunteered to be the person to talk with our students and encourage them to apply to one of our

three

colleges.” Class of ’71

“Please do not hesitate to call

College

on me

you your com-

as I

Published for Alumni, Friends and Parents of Hope College. Should

terested in

receive more than one copy, please pass

growth.”

it on to someone in munity. An overlap of Hope College constituencies makes duplication sometimes unavoidable.

EDITOR: TOM

am continually Hope and its

in-

Class of '70

Bronx, N.Y.

RENNER

Dedicationof the new Peale Science Center highlighted Homecoming weekend. Dr. and Mrs. Norman Vincent Peale join Stanley S. Kresge (left) in ribbon cutting ceremonies. Mr. Kresge was the recipient of an Vol. 4, No. November /December, 1973 honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree. Complete coverage of Dedicationactivities will appear in the Winter issue of the Alumni Officialpublication: news from Hope College is published four times a magazine. year by Hope College, 85 East 12th Street, Holland, Michigan 49423 Photo Credits: Holland Evening Sentinel, page Contributing Editor: Eileen Beyer

,

aware of our Reformed Church

Cook

news from Hope

two

1

aware of the President’sintention to attend until the White House, through Congressman Guy Vander Jagt’s office, announced that he

Walworth, N.Y.

4

I

ceived. College officials were not

tober, 1972, represents the largest

amount of money contributed to a Hope College fund drive. The primary emphasis of the Build Hope campaign this fall has been to raise $1 million toward the proposed $2.5 million Physical Education Center from among the 1,225 alumni who earned athletic letters while at Hope. Harvey J. Buter, ’48, chairman of the H-Club campaign, announced pledges and contributions of $304,825 through December 1.

the

trip was apparently cancelled be-

The President was invited last

Art works by two Hope stu-

Lois Hoogstra, a senior from

gram that is underway to support

1

to long-time friends Dr. and Mrs.

Norman Vincent Peale, but

Spring to attend the dedication,

dents and two recent graduates

Hope students who had works selected were Edwin Redder, a junior from Holland, Mich, and

The Build Hope Fund,

President Nixon had planned to attend the ceremony in tribute

WatergateProsecutor ArchibaldCox.

ART WORKS TO BE SHOWN OVERSEAS

GLCA members.

million dollar fund raising pro-

before the event.

had cancelled the trip.

NEAR

MILLION

was cancelled less than 48 hours

ing of

Higher Horizons will retain its office on campus under the supervision of Bruce Struik. At the present time there are nearly 200 children and a similar number of college students participating in Higher Horizons.

BUILD HOPE FUND $5

i

tion of the Peale Science Center

the controversy caused by the fir-

troubled families.

MODEL

Presi-

cause of the Middle East war and

agreed that a merger would benefit

A highly secret visit by

dent Nixon to the Oct. 26 dedica-

4.

news

The Admissions Office welcomes both names of potential students and alumni recruiters.If you are willing please write the Admissions Office, Hope College, Holland MI 49423.

e College—

November /December^

i


SIGMA 6 Is

Here Most people have accepted “the computer age” as part of 20th century

life.

We

are vaguely aware of strange,blocky numbers at the bottom of our bank checks,

we

almost used to being asked for our numbers instead of our names, Playskool urges us to buy a toy computer for the children in our lives this Christmas, and some readers may have even discovered romance through computer dating. More immediately,Hope students know they register by selectingpunched cards, and parents and alumni need only look at the hodgepodge of numbers on the mailing label of this newsletter. These are small signs that a computer is indeed operating at Hope College. As of this semester, it is a new computer that has made its home in new quarters in the Physics-Mathbuilding. Hope recently purchaseda Xerox Sigma 6, a $328,000 computer which was funded entirely by gifts and grants. Purchaseof Sigma 6 was the result of three years of are

investigation,and college officials are ex-

tremely enthusiastic about the possibilities

expanded

and implications the purchase

will bring to the college.

One is its

of the strong points of the

time-sharing capability.This feature

Foundation grants,

and support from the Petroleum Research

Fund. The grant will allow Dr. Doyle to widen programs in the areas of instruction and research. He is completingthe writing of a new introductory organic chemistrytextbook in cooperation with Dr. Douglas his

Neckers, formerly a

member

of the

faculty now at the University of

Hope

New Mex-

ico.

“We

felt that organic

should be an

chemistrycan and

interesting, vital, and essential

subject for students interested in biology

and the medical science,as well

in

chem-

istry. Although the instructor plays a role in developing this course, for

students the textbook is the

major

many

medium

through which organic chemistryis learned,” said Dr. Doyle. Dr. Doyle plans to modify severalexisting experimentsoffered Hope students taking organic chemistrycourses and to design alternate realistic experiments. “For most students the laboratory provides the reality of participationin chemistry. Numerous students comment yearly that their first ‘real understanding’ of chemistry occurred in running a chemical reaction or performinga chemical analysis,” he observes.

"The

excitementof personal discovery, and the frustrationsin mastering reality and

campus—

in the

dorms, in the

student center, in the library, etc.,” Dr.

Marker explains. “In addition, we are looking into the possibilityof locating termi-

the computer from different terminal sta-

nals in schools and other institutionsand

tions at the same time), responsiveness and immediacy (the computer can be selfoperatedin a “conversational mode” rather than submitting a program to an operator), and speed (most responses are almost instant; complicatedprograms formerly taking many days can be done in hours). The time-sharing capability of Sigma 6 will enable the campus community to use the computer with greater ease and frequency for research and instruction.Dr. David Marker, associate dean for academic affairs and director of the Computer Center, emphasizes that the computer is available to anyone on campus and because of the Sigma 6’s efficiency and immediacy, many more students and faculty members

businesses in the Holland community,” he

the techniques and knowledge of chem-

tion, National Science

directly use the machine. “We

affords convenience(severalpeople can use

Michael Doyle Honored As Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar l

now

all over the

Sigma 6

Dr.

continuedfrom page

can

look forward to having terminals located

istry, blend to give an experience that can enhance interestand provide the stimulus for continued studies.” The Dreyfus grant will allow Dr. Doyle to further develop program offerings for the nonsciencemajor, a student who typically does not take a chemistrycourse. “The goal of this course has been to inform the layman about the existing and constantly expanding role of chemistryand chemical in their own lives, and to increase their ability to make informed judgments concerningmatters of personal, community-wide and national interest,”he added. The grant will also allow Dr. Doyle to

provide opportunities to students for research involvementincluding support for an exchange of students with foreign universities.

“The classroomalone cannot bring about either a meaningfulunderstandingof chemistryor the full development of a capable scientist,” observes Dr. Doyle. “Personal involvementis necessary for the kind of understandingthat stimulates continued interest, dedication and competence. The involvementof undergraduates in research has allowed that personal contact with an exchange of techniques, philosophyand ideas that completes a chemical educationand initiates a sense of professionalism.”

adds.

Data processing was introducedto Hope in the fall of 1964,

when

the first compu-

terized class registrationwas attempted before the college had its own computer. According to Ken Vink, director of data processing and institutionalresearch, the registrationwas put together in a hurry and was "not too successful.” As many as 30,000 punched cards had to be driven to Kellogg Community College in Batde Creek, Mich, to be processed and then driven back again to Holland. Finally, in late 1965, it was decided, that a computer located on campus would be a necessary aspect in the college’saca-

demic program. Hope received a National Science Foundation grant for the purchase of equipment and in December, 1966 an IBM 1130 began operating. Its first project was a food service menu popularity poll. Vink wryly relates that strawberry shortcake was the favorite menu item, while liver was voted least desirable. In the next few years the computer enjoyed increased usage. Students started using the 1130 for class work, discovering that solutions to complex problems in areas such as business, mathematics,social sciences, and physical sciences could be accomplished through the use of the computer. According to Vink, “The computer makes it possible for the student to involve himself with higher level, more creative tasks while allowing the computer to perform the more routine aspects of the problem solution with great speed and accuracy. Another area of increasing interest,” he continues, “has been computer simulation studies. For example the operation of a supermarket was modeled. The effects of changingcustomer demands, wholesale prices, and overhead among other things can be quickly observedin the profit of the supermarket.”

times the 1130 ran 24 hours a day to keep up with its work load. Investigationbegan in 1970 to find a

computer that could accomplishthe jobs the college had created for it, and one that could also handle a steadily increasing workload. The Sigma 6 was selected after investigating the capabilitiesof approximately50 computers.“The Sigma 6 was chosen because we felt it gave the most performance for the money expended,” Vink relates. Dr. Marker explained further: “Our most important criteria was: what will be the best computer for our academic program and administrative needs over the next 10 years?— and the Sigma 6 best met these needs.” The fact that four other Michigan collegesselected the Sigma 6 in 1973 reenforcedthe Hope staffs prevailingpreference for the computer. According to Vink, the Sigma 6 will allow for an expanded computer-science program within the curriculum. “Life in general is affected by computing. We believe that students going into

many

areas

can benefit by understandingand learning to use

computers,”he explains.The college

presently offers a special mathematics

major with “a computing emphasis,”according to Dr. Herbert L. Dershem, associate professor mathematics.Vink and Dr. Marker reveal that a computer-science major is being discussed for the future. Vink and Dr. Marker both grin when asked if the contentionis ever made that the widespreaduse of a computer on Hope’s campus poses a threat to the college’s liberal arts “tradition.”

“There are always those who are skepabout ‘computer power’,” Dr. Marker explains. “However, faced with the problems of our cities and environment,we must learn to use a tool to help us with these complex situations.The computer is an indispensable tool to solving problems that face us collectively.”Vink adds: “We must get into the mode of anticipating tical

problems.This

is

especially true of private

colleges with ever increasing financial pressures.

The computer

is

of great help. Like

anything else, however, it must be used with reason, intelligence,and

common

Soon, because of student interest, noncredit seminars in computer programming were offered. Later, formal course work in computing was added to the curriculum. The administration has also made extensive use of the computer, gathering and man-

sense.”

aging financial and student records. The

ating presented a host of

Development Office has found the com-

problems.However, the machine is finally startingto hum and Hope College greets 1974 with a computer adequate to meet its

puter an effectivefund-raising tool, allowing it to better manage the nearly 26,000 names on the college’smailing lists. Many

With the arrival of the Sigma 6, the Computer Center has moved from the basement of the Physics-Mathbuilding to remodeled quarters on the first floor. Getting the Sigma 6 installed and oper-

“uncomputable”

needs.

three


A Great Senior captain Mark Dargene of

Rock-

ford, 111. was elected to the all-MIAA team and was voted by his teammates as

most

valuable. Wojcicki and junior Kurt Pugh of

Grand

Junction, Mich, were elected co-captains of the 1974 team.

Fall !|

more Glenn Swier of Grand Haven, Mich, were elected to the all-MIAA team. A highlightof the season came in the final game as the Dutchmen battled perennial soccer power Michigan State University to a 2-2 draw. Swier and junior Bob Luidens of Teaneck, N.J. were elected co-captains of the

SOCCER

1974 team.

CROSS COUNTRY

New coach Glenn Van Wieren faced the ’73 schedule with a rebuilding task and despite a 3-8-2 record the season had its high-

Hope enjoyed one of

its

most successful

two

teams won 22 of 36 contests as both the football and cross country teams won the MIAA crown behind unbeaten records.

10 small colleges.

Michigan IntercollegiateAthletic Association (MIAA) championships while winning nearly two-thirds of

all

its contests.

Fall sports

its

second MIAA cham-

pionship in three years in impressive style.

The Dutchmen were unseatedas MIAA champion by Calvin, finishingfoqrth with a 1-4-1 record, but two players, senior Kurt Avery of Schenectady,N.Y. and sopho-

Coach

Bill Vanderbilt’s harriers

breezed

past league opponents in dual meet competition and had three runners among the top five finishers in the conference meet.

record, the team’s best performance in

more than a decade. Hope dominated its league opponents statistically as well as on the scoreboard outscoring their foes 133-31 while leading the MIAA in both defense and offense. The team’s rushing performance (258 yards a game) was ranked among the nation’s top

fall sports seasons in history capturing

Hope captured

lights.

Senior tailback Ed Sanders of Brewton,

FOOTBALL

Ala. was voted the

MIAA’s most

valuable

player as he led the league in rushing and

Coach Ray Smith’s football squad capits first league crown in 10 years and ended the MIAA schedule undefeated for the first time since Hope joined the conference in 1926. The Flying Dutchmen won their last six games, in- a-row enroute to a 7-2 overall tured

was nationally ranked throughout the season. Sanders became the third Hope player to rush for more than 1,000 yards in a season gaining 1,111 yards in nine games. Hope’s dominance of the league was evident in the results of the coaches’

all-

conferenceballoting as 10 Flying Dutchmen were named to the first offensive and defensive teams. Offensive players named

Coed Named to Hockey Team Anne Dimitre, a sophomore from Bar was elected to the all-Michigan women’s intercollegiatefield hockey team for her performance as a member on the Hope squad. Miss Dimitre played center-forward on the Hope team which ended with a 2-2-3 Mills, Me.,

record. Players on the honor squad were chosen

from seven Michigan colleges and universities who sponsor

women’s field hockey

teams. Miss Dimitre is a biology major at Hope.

were freshman end Dave Teater of Columbus, Ohio, senior guard Gerrit Crandall of Princeton, N.J., Sanders and senior fullback Chuck Brooks of Glen Burnie, Md. Defensive choices were sophomore tackle Craig Van Tuinen of Grand Rapids, Mich., senior tackle Ron Posthuma of Grand Rapids, Mich., sophomore end Bob Lees of Pompton Lake, N.J., sophomore middle guard Dave Yeiter of Lowell, Mich, and senior safety Bob Lamer of Zeeland, Mich. Lamer was voted the recipient of the Allen Kinney Award which is presented annually to the senior player

who

in the

judgment of the coaching staff made the “maximum overallcontribution”to the team. Juniors Bob Carlson of Muskegon, Mich, and Bruce Martin of Royal Oak, Mich, were elected co-captains of the 1974 team.

GOLF Hope enjoyed one of

its

most successful

golf seasons in recent years finishingsec-

ond in the league. Coach Ric Scott’s linkstersended with a 6-2 dual meet record and were just nine strokes behind champion Kalamazoo in the season-ending36-hole tournament. Junior Jim Wojcicki of Chelsea, Mich, tied for first place individual honors in the tournament, but lost the medalist distinction on the first hole of sudden death to Rick Lacy of Kalamazoo.

four

All-leaguersPhil Ceeley, Stu Scholl and Glenn Powers lead

Dutchmen to MIAA

championship.


ports Season! | I

Junior Phil Ceeley of Royal Oak, Mich. ner after being named to the all-conference

* •'

i< j

ALL-SPORTS

was voted the MlAA’s most valuable run-

team for the third straight year. He set a new course record in winning the league meet. Teammates Glenn Powers, a junior from Scotia, N.Y., and Stu Scholl, a sophomore from Montague, Mich., were also elected to the all-MlAA honor team. The Dutchmen opened the season winning their own invitationalmeet, finished second in the Great Lakes Colleges Association meet and climaxedthe year by placing

Hope leads the MIAA all-sports race Each year the conference awards an all-sports trophy to the after fall competition.

member with formance in

the best cumulative per-

all

of the conference’s 10

sports.

Hope has 40 points after fall competiahead of defending all-sports winner Kalamazoo. Next is Albion with 32, Calvin 21, Alma 16, Olivet 11 and Adrian tion, three

5.

15 th in the National CollegiateAthletic

Association

.

(NCAA)

Division III meet at

STANDINGS

FALL

Wheaton, 111. Ceeley and Powers were elected co-

FOOTBALL w

captains of the 1974 team.

L

T

0

0

3

2

3

2

Alma Kalamazoo

2

3

2

3

Adrian

0

5

0 0 0 0 0

HOPE

5

Albion Olivet

Music As Mike 'Sees'

CROSS COUNTRY

W

L

T

HOPE

6

0

0

Kalamazoo Alma

5

1

1

4

2

Albion

3

3

Adrian

1

5

0 0 0 0

Olivet

0

6

0

Calvin

2

4

GOLF w

L

T

Kalamazoo

5

1

0

continuedfrom page

l

has hundreds of records and tapes, but can

Hope’s campus and talking with Roger Davis, associate professor of after visiting

always find the one he wants.”

music, he enrolled.

ist.

Mike plans a career as a concert organHe is especiallyfond of music written

Mike studies with Professor Davis and

in the 1890’s and early 1900’s, often

learns music with the use of instructional tape recordings especiallyprepared for

him

by Davis. He first learns the pedals, then the left and right hands and then puts all together.

HOPE

4

2

0_

a time. Fingering is explained. Mike’s ear is

4

2

Alma

3

3

Olivet

3

3

Calvin

2

4

keen and Davis only names notes “if there’s something unusual in the piece or if there are large chords.” It can take Davis up to several hours to put a page of music

Adrian

0

6

0 0 0 0 0

on to tape.

Calvin

work and then prac-

a

tices until he is playing it correctly.“He is

w

L

T

5

0

1

eager and enthusiasticand desires to do things exactly right,” Davis noted.

all

The He

Kalamazoo

3

3

0

tapes then become Mike’s property.

Albion

1

3

2

HOPE

1

4

1

them by folding back the label, punching a few holes in the box or “in some unusual way”, Davis explained. “He identifies

variety in music. Organ recitals should be claims. After graduation, Mike hopes to go to England to study further.“Who knows, I may just find a nice English soprano,”he speculated.

He was recently appointed organist for the Sunday morning worship service in

Dimnent Memorial Chapel. Mike will perform in a student recital this coming spring. He performed in the ’73 Tulip Time recitals and hopes to do so again. Mike enjoys playing to an audience because he believes organ music can and should be enjoyed by everyone. “Everytime I hear a baby reacting during a concert, I think-ooops, maybe another one is getting started the same way I did!”

PLAN AHEAD Attend Alumni Day On Saturday, May

• •

1

7

The classes of 924, 929, 934, 939, 944, 949, 954, 959, 964 and 969 as well as the Fifty Year Circle will hold reunions. 1

1

All

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

alumni

are

encouraged

to attend the

annual dinner

in the

evening.

d a nationallyranked

ground gainer. 73

is

kinds of

for the public and not for the organist,” he

According to Davis, he divides the music into small segments on the tapes, playing through and describing severalmeasures at

Mike memorizes

labeled the late Romantic period. “This orchestral type music with

interestingsequences. The public likes this

them

Albion

SOCCER

It

MORE DETAILS AS THE DATE DRAWS NEARER


Glory to

the

Sophs! Class

All glory went to the sophomores this fall as the won both the Pull and Nykerk competition. The sophomore men pulled the freshmen into the Black River in a swift 55 minutes while the sophomore women were judged the winners of the theatrical, oratoricaland musical competition before another capacity audience in the Holland Civic Center.


Factory Gift American Aerosols, Inc. of Holland has its former manufacturingplant near the campus to assist in completingthe site acquisition program for a proposed Physical Education Center. given Hope

Announcementof

made Herman Dirkse,

the gift was

jointly by Joe Knoll and

president and vice-presidentrespectivelyof American Aerosols. Hope is in the midst of a $2.5 million fund raising campaign for the construction of a new Physical Education Center. The existingCarnegie-Schouten gymnasium was constructed in 1906 when the college had an enrollmentof 400 students. The 18,000 square foot building is between 12th and 3th streets and west of the Chesapeake and Ohio railroad. The 1

College has also acquired all property east of Columbia avenue to the C & O tracks and between 13th and 14th for the center. American Aerosols, Inc., a subsidiary of Guardsman Chemical Coatings, Inc., is one of the largest custom fillersof non-food aerosols in the nation. Founded in 954 in an old brick utility warehouse by Knoll and Dirkse, the firm has grown to a capability of packaging productsat a rate of 20 1

million cans per year.

The firm moved to the site near the Hope campus in 1958. In 1968 the company relocated in a new 85,000 square foot plant in the Holland industrialpark.

Named

Alumni Drive Class Representatives Jack DeWitt, national chairman of the Hope College Annual Fund, has announced the alunmi who_will represent their classes in the Alumni category of the 73-74 campaign. A number of classes showed outstanding percentages of participation during the 72-73 drive. The class of 1913, under the leadership of Dr. C. P. Dame, had 79% class participationwhile the class of ’24 had 56%, Mrs. Cornelia Oosting, class representative-, Dr. Roy Mooi’s class of ’32 had 48%; and Congressman Guy Vanderjagt’sclass of ’53 had 39% participation. DeWitt stressed the importance of unrestricted annual gifts to Hope College. “It was

from alumni, friends,churches and other organizations which enabled Hope is through unrestrictedcontributions to the Annual Fund that alumni and friends can eloquently express confidencein the College administration and their faith in the Hope tradition. The annual fund goal is $644,000, up nearly $73,000 from the $571,412 contributed last year. Goals by division with 72-73 giving in parentheses are: Alumni $170,000 ($139,297),Churches $269,000 ($258,351),Individuals $35,000 ($44,395), Industrial$80,000 ($46,115) and Foundations $90,000 ($83,254). this support

College to operate with a balancedbudget last year,” said DeWitt. “It

CLASS REPRESENTATIVES 1890- Dr. Zachary Veldhuis

1909

Hamilton,Michigan

1910

Mr. August R. Veenker

1924

Mrs. A.

J .

1934

Durham, North Carolina

1925

Santa Monica, California

1911

Mrs. Cornelia Oosting

Dr. Fredrick F.

Yonkman

1935

Mrs. H. V. E.

1936

Stegeman

Dr. Clarence P.

1937

Dame

1938 1939

Miss Charlotte De Pree

Mrs. James E.

Whitwam

1940

Miss Janet B. Mulder

1926

Mrs. John Vander Broek

Mr. & Mrs.

J .

1927

A. Stegeman

1928

Muskegon, Michigan

1919

Mrs. Irene Van Zoeren

1929

Dr. George H. Vanderborgh

1930

Mrs. Myra M. Weaver

1923

1942

Mrs. Dorothy P.

Luyendyk

Mr. George F. Ziegler

New

Mrs. Martha M.

Mr. John E.

Workman

1952

Mr. Richard Caldwell

1961

The Hon. Guy Vander Jagt

1962 1963

Zeeland, Michigan

Thomas

Mr. Frank Moser

1943

Dr. Dirk

Mouw

Mr. Jac H. Tigelaar

1945

1931

Dr. Paul J. Brouwer

Miss Marion L. Hoekstra

1966

Mrs. Margaret D.

1932

York

Mr. William O. Rottschafer

Grand Rapids, Michigan

Mr. Russell Klaasen

Mrs. John Wolf Des Moines, Iowa

U£2iiLfl222Llio£e_Colleze—November/December.1973

'THE PRESIDENT THINKS ITS IMPORTANT TO BE OPTIMISTICWHEN OPENING ANNUAL

Mrs. Myra K. Berry

1955

Max

D.

Boersma

1947

Miss Martha H. Felton

Dr. James P.

Yuk

Richmond, Virginia

1969

Mrs. Mary P. George

Mr. John C. Schrier

1970

Muskegon, Michigan

1956

Mrs. John P. Van

Mr. Warren W.

Eenenaam 1971

Kane

_

Mr. Kenneth M. Faber

Grand Rapids, Michigan

Mrs. Lois Sterenberg Illinois

Mr. Marshall

Anstandig

,

Oak Park, Michigan

1972

Mrs. Johanna W. Gentel

1973

Mrs. Lynn W.

Montague, Michigan

Arlington, Virginia

1958

VandenBerg

Mrs. Mary B.

Oak Lawn,

Grand Haven, Michigan

1957

Arbor, Michigan

Arlington Heights, Illinois

GIVINGMAIL'

Grand Rapids, Michigan

1948

Mrs. Susan S. Neckers

Ann

Grand Rapids, Michigan

Holland, Michigan

1933

1968

Kalamazoo, Michigan

Mr.

Mackay

Grand Rapids, Michigan

Fairfax, Virginia

1946

Mr. & Mrs. Chas Christensen

1965

1967

Koop

Dame

Cooper

Stevensville,Michigan

Miss Beth E. Marcus

Mr. Paul W.

Rev. Jack D.

Sterling Heights, Michigan

Hamilton,Michigan

1944

Brink ^

Dr. Bruce A.

Laurel, Maryland

Dr. Laurence Bruggers

Mr. Harvey

G. Bos

Glenmont, New York

1964

Mr. Jack Miller

Thomas

Brighton, Michigan

Great Falls, Virginia

1954

Mr.

Holland, Michigan

Ann Arbor, Michigan

1953

Mr. Roger L. De Vries Jenison, Michigan

Holland, Michigan

Jersey

Mr. Willard G. De Groot

1960

Holland, Michigan

1951

Mr. Vern Kortering

Muskegon, Michigan

New York, New York

Cleveland, Ohio

Dr. Winfield Burggraaff Staten Island,New

Mr. Clyde H. Geerlings Tucson, Arizona

Birmingham, Michigan

Holland, Michigan

1922

Myron Kollen

Don De Witt

Saginaw,Michigan

Grand Rapids, Michigan

Lakeland,Florida 1921

1941

Holland, Michigan

Kalamazoo, Michigan

1920

Mr. John J. Ver Beek Holland, Michigan

Holland, Michigan

1918

Dr.

1959

Holland, Michigan

Holland, Michigan

1917

1950

Los Angeles, California

Detroit, Michigan

1916

Mr.

Franklin,

Zeeland, Michigan

1915

Mrs. John Piet

Muskegon, Michigan

Kalamazoo, Michigan

1914

Mr. Ernest J. Meeusen Jackson, Michigan

Vicksburg, Michigan

Orange City, Iowa

1913

1949

Holland, Michigan

Morrison, Illinois

1912

Hoor

Holland, Michigan

Marion, Massachusetts

Te Paske

Mrs. Beatrice V. ten

Hendricks

^

Grandville, Michigan

seven


Hope myth As admissions representatives of

Hope

church to church, and state to state, we find ourselves confronted with a number of misconceptionsabout Hope which lend themselves to the term “mythology”. Too many people have misconceptionsabout who we are, what we are, what we do and don’t do and we find these misconceptions

Hope

because of these misconceptions,will

not give us an opportunityto talk with

them. Therein they may short, as well as

themselves the college,on what could

groups as well as one-to-one

programs such as Higher Horizons or the Community Action House. Opportunitiesare voluntary and students must make up their own minds to determine whether or not they will become

are available,

not be impressive, but the fact that

may

Hope

committed to attractingand enbroad range of students with varying academic potentials probably means that most high school graduates are likely

College

is

We

do have a

which he

financialassistance for

qualifies. It is at this

that the true cost of attending

Representatives of Hope College will be

junction

Hope

is

de-

termined. Most families,indeed two-thirds of our total enrollment, are not paying the published cost of $3,100 per year but are subsidized by state, federal and local programs at an average amount of $1,260. On Hope’s campus we have students who pay nothing as well as those who pay the entire amount. Whether a family falls into one of these extremes or somewhere in between is difficult to assess until the family has pro-

-

vided a PCS from which we determine the parent’s ability to pay. With so

many of

800 high schools during the 1973-74 academic year. In addition, we will visit numerous church consistoriesand youth groups. To supplement our program we have had, for the last seven years, a representative on duty for nine months of

visiting over

each year in the

New

with questions from Jersey

who do

Jersey area.

New York and New

not see a representative can

address questions to William

cate with any student

assistance,it seems unfair that any student

in the college.

IS

HOPE COLLEGE TOO TOUGH ACADEMICALLY. Again our

travels

students rule out

show that

Hope

a

number of

College as they are

C or C+ students. Hope has incoming fresh-

men ranging from a 2.0 (C average) all the way to a 4.0 (A average).We are normally looking for students with a C+ or better

Vandenberg

431 East Saddle River Rd., Upper Saddle River, N.J. 07458. By writing or calling, any of our staff would be delighted to answer any particularquestions that you might have and will constantly communi-

111,

our students already receiving substantial

should rule out Hope for their college because of cost until the determinationof financialassistance is made. Students should evaluate the academic program, the spiritual climate, environment,the locality, the student body and their own particular interestin making an initial decision to apply to a school. Finances should not be considered when making application but rather after a determinationof the net cost, after financial aid, is determined.

Those

who

has an interest

seling.

TOO RELIGIOUS— NOT RELIGIOUS ENOUGH. Hope

College holds that a vital faith is

central to educationor to life— that faith provides both the incentive and

dynamic

for learning and living. We view our opportunitiesfor a student’s spiritual growth in a

melieu of openness, where a student is continually exposed to varying Christian life styles and opportunities for involvement. The exposure comes in sharing in the lifestyles of faculty, staff and other students and by bringing speakers of varying Christian backgrounds to the campus. Visitors last year included U.S. Senator Mark Hatfield, a dedicated Christian statesman; a

representative of

Tom

Skinner, a black lib-

eral Christian; and Father Benedictine, a

monk. The author of this article is Tom LaBaugh, Director of Admissions. eight

In terms of involvement,we provide opportunities in four main areas which are:

a difficult time

is

nationwidein

providing openings for new graduates, last year placed

85%

of those

quality of the college to prepare students to serve in a

number of

capacities in the

job market. In terms of getting our students enrolled

we note that over the 75% of our pre-med graduates have been acceptedinto medical school as opposed to the national average of 35%. We are also placing 75% of our pre-

in graduate school last ten years

BECAUSE HOPE SO SMALL IT HAS

LIMITED SUPPORTIVE SERVICES. We now

have 2,100 students evenly div-

ided between is a

men and women. Although

larger universitieswe have

made

law graduates; again an excellent record.

We

it

small student body compared to the a deliber-

feel that these statistics are indic-

ative of our preparation of students for

the

job market even though our main objective not to educate students solely for secur-

expand our servicesfor students in a number of ways. We have a counseling center with two full time professional counselors. They provide oppor-

is

tunitiesfor testing, to help students learn

and the brain for creating but to also de-

more about themselves, and offer personal counseling to help students determine who they are and where they want to go. We have a placement office which provides an opportunityto learn about writing resumes, developing a permanent file for em-

velop the heart for sharing.

ate effort to

ployers to request information, a library with informationon various career opportunities,

and interview sessions where stu-

dents can talk to industrialrepresentatives college chaplain provides counseling ser-

IS

now having

Hope College

about employment in various firms. Our

HOPE COLLEGE

dents. In the field of education, which

wanting jobs. This we feel reflects on the

IS

THE HOPE COLLEGE

however, we believe we are

doing an admirablejob in placing our stu-

two religioncourses during their stay at Hope College. The chaplain also supplements our student life On the campus and gives leadership to the spiritual life and services on campus as well as providing coun-

tion and transcript.

REPRESENTATIVE NEVER COMES TO MY SCHOOL OR CHURCH.

been kept concerning

involved. In addition, students enroll in

in our travels is our cost

amount of

of Hope’s graduates

others plunge into the job market. Specific

rela-

the admissions office reviews the applica-

the

50%

go on to graduate school. Many of the

our job placement success.Where statistics

extremely proud, however, students should not rule us out because they think they cannot get in, but they should make application and find if their concern is valid as

and the frequent phrase “I can’t afford Hope College”. We reply that the student should make application, turn in a Parent’s ConfidentialStatement (PCS), and determine

true that

GO?

statistics have not

rigorous academic program of which we are

Perhaps the greatest misconceptionthat

It is

I

students work with the disadvantagedin

a B average.

both.

we face

WHY SHOULD

A JOB SO

in small

than

candidates for enrollment.

HOPE COLLEGE TOO EXPENSIVE.

participate in Bible studies and sharing

EDUCATION

AT HOPE WON’T GET ME

tionships;d) social ministries,in which

a littlebetter

be an exciting, beneficialexperience for

IS

may

A LIBERAL ARTS

freshman class averaged

rolling a

sell

where students plan the worship services; b) evangelism where students may get involved in spreading the good news both on and off-campus; c) personal and inter-personalgrowth where students a) worship,

interestsin outside activities. Last year’s

These are all numbers that may or

College

story. Too frequently, students and parents,

who show academic potential by improving grades in the last two years of their high school work. Other factors considered are test scores, recommendations from counselors, and dents between a C and C+

College move from school to school,

detrimental to telling the

even though we accept a number of stu-

vices, as well as helping in

and

spiritual guidance.

We

their first

students with a bachelors degree majoring

enough equipped to major impact on their employer during the first year or two on the job. It is the fact that the student is well rounded, has had a number of exposuresto a number of academic areas, knows about the humanities, sciences and social sciences and the arts, and appreciates others who dedi-

in any area are well

make

a

creases ones potential to make major con-

our students. Currently we have over

60

clubs or organizations on the campus in

which students can become involved. We have a director of housing who is committed to helping students solve their housing problems,provide supportive help in matching roommatesand settlingproblems students might have in meeting their have a health clinic

which is staffed by several fulltime nurses supported by five local physicians. Our food service provides three choices of a main course at each meal with steak served on a regular basis. You can see we continually strive to provide a large

number of

servicesto support the students during

_ _

their involvementin our excellent aca-

program.

Studentstoday are hired on

job usually based on their potential.Few

cate their lives to these disciplinesthat in-

oping new ones which have an interestto

demic

only skills in working the hand for labor

have a director

various activities to the campus and devel-

We

employment. We are interested in de-

veloping the whole person. To develop not

worship services

of student life who is involved in bringing

housing needs.

ing

tributions.It

is

this potential for

which

employers are looking and that, combined with specificskills that will either be learned on the job or in graduate school, make the student more valuable to those with whom he is employed. It is our hope that we have cut away some of the tares that crop up among the wheat which we are sowing at Hope College. In directing our attention to these

myths, and perhaps presenting a more realistic picture of Hope, may result in more students, parents, alumni and churchmen taking a second look at us. Our goal is to help others to grow and unless we are able to accurately communicate what we are and how we might help we will never have the opportunityto share our offerings with them nor will we have the opportunityto grow ourself through that sharing.

_

Profile for Hope College Library

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