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S E C O N D CLASS POSTAGE PAID A T HOLLAND, MICHIGAN 49423

April/May 1973

PUBLISHED B Y T H E H O P E C O L L E G E OFFICE O F IN F O R M A T I O N SERVICES

PlansAnnounced Plans for the s ec on d H o p e College S u m m e r Theatre season are u n d e r ­ w a y according to director J o h n T a m mi. Five productions will b e presented in the air conditioned theatre of the D e W i t t Stu de nt a n d Cultural Center b e t w e e n J u n e 1 8 a n d A u g u s t 18. T h e season will o p e n with a o n e w e e k production (June 18-23) of 2 5 Years with Kukla and Ollie featuring Burr Tillstrom a n d all the f a m o u s Kuklapolitans. T h e s h o w will c o m ­ bine music, film a n d live staging in a delightful loo k at the w on de rf ul w or ld of television. Good News, a musical a b o u t that thrill of scoring the w i n n i n g t o u c h ­ d o w n , capturing the heart of the so­ rority sweetheart a n d d oi ng “ T h e Varsity D r a g ” will run f r o m J u n e 2 7 to July 8.

BuildHope Fund Nears Halfway T h e Build H o p e F u n d , a multi­ million f u n d raising p r o g r a m that is u n d e r w a y at H o p e to support the college’s capital, e n d o w m e n t a n d a c a d e m i c programs, is nearing the h al fw ay point of its $ 8 , 8 5 0 , 0 0 0 goal. National c h a i r m a n J a m e s M . VerM e u l e n of G r a n d R a p i d s recently a n ­ n o u n c e d that $ 4 , 2 2 9 , 0 0 0 or 4 8 per cent of the goal has b e e n contributed or pledged. T h e Build H o p e c a m p a i g n recently c oncluded its Holland/Zeeland, Mich, business a n d industry drive. C o m m i t ­

tee c h a i r m a n G e o r g e D. Heeringa re­ ported gifts a n d pledges of $229,000. T h e Build H o p e F u n d w a s public­ ly launched last October. A t that time $ 2 , 7 2 3 , 0 0 0 h a d already b e e n contributed or pledged. Gifts in­ cluded $2.2 million f r o m m e m b e r s of the College’s B o a r d o f Trustees, $ 1 2 0 , 0 0 0 f r o m faculty, students a n d administrative staff m e m b e r s a n d $ 4 0 3 , 0 0 0 f r o m friends of the col­ lege. A m o n g the m a j o r goals o f the Build H o p e f u n d will b e the con-

National Honors For Forensics Team T h e H o p e forensics s q u ad gained national recognition at the Pi K a p p a Delta competition at the University of N e b r a s k a last m o n t h . H o p e w a s o n e of onl y 1 4 t e a ms a m o n g 1 5 3 c o m p e t i n g schools to gain superior sweepstakes honors. It is the first tim e that a H o p e forensics t e a m has w o n the h o n o r at the bi­ ennial competition. N o other Michi­ gan college gained sweepstakes recog­ nition this year. H o p e picked u p m o r e points than a n y other school a n d received m o r e

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individual certificates for outstand­ ing performance. H o p e ’s best s h o w i n g c a m e in e x ­ t e m p o r a n e o u s speaking w h e r e bot h Paul Bach, a junior f r o m S h e bo yg an , Wise., a n d Charles Gossett, a senior f r o m C he r r y Hill, N.J., earned supe­ rior certificates, the highest h o n o r possible. H o p e also w o n t w o certificates in interpretative reading. G a r y V an de rV e n , a junior f r o m N e w Era, Mich., w o n superior recognition while J o a n please turn to page six, column three

struction of a $2.5 million physical education center. T h e n e w facility will b e activity-oriented for m a x i ­ m u m participation. T h e building, w h i c h is in preliminary design stages, w o u l d contain a g y m n a s i u m , o l y m pic-size s w i m m i n g pool, handball courts, wrestling area, training r o o m , lockers, classrooms a n d faculty of­ fices. A n o t h e r $1.6 million will b e used to c o m p l e t e financing of the n e w $3.6 million Peale Science Center w h i c h is scheduled to b e c o m p l e t e d for the start of the 1 9 7 3 - 7 4 a c a d e m ­ ic year. Class R e p s report A n n u a l F u n d pro g ­ ress. See page 7.

T h e next t w o w e e k production (July 11-21) has not b e e n finalized, but the selection has b e e n n a r r o w e d d o w n to either Bus Stop or Night Must Fall. T h e nex t s ho w, scheduled to run f r o m July 2 5 to A u g u s t 4, will b e a m o d e r n version of the classic The Taming of the Shrew. T h e H o p e pre­ sentation will feature a different a p ­ proach to Shakespeare’s c o m e d y highlighted b y a n e w t w a n g to s o m e of the Elizabethan songs. T h e final s h o w of the season ( A u ­ gust 8-18) will probably b e o n e of t w o musicals b y A n t h o n y N e w l e y , Stop the World — / Want to Get Off or The Roar of the Greasepaint — The Smell of the Crowd. Season tickets for the s u m m e r sea­ son will g o o n sale in M a y . A season ticket will cost $ 1 5 a n d m a y b e used a n y night during each of the shows. T h e season ticket will also allow m u l ­ tiple admissions o n o n e night. Single admissions will b e $3.50 o n w e e k nights a n d $4.50 o n w eekends. Season tickets m a y b e ordered b y writing: H o p e College S u m m e r . Theatre, D e W i t t Center, Holland, MI. 49423.

Student Named to Governor’ s Commission Junior Celia Martinez has b e e n a p ­ pointed to the Michigan C o m m i s s i o n o n Higher E d u ca ti on b y G o v e r n o r William Milliken. T h e C o m m i s s i o n w a s created to c o n d u c t a n overall study of post­ secondary education in Michigan. In launching the C o m m i s s i o n Gov. Milliken said: “ B o l d n e w designs for please turn to page two, column two

O t h e r projects to b e u nd ertaken include conversion o f the present sci­ ence building for use in the social sci­ ences a n d humanities program's, c o m ­ pletion of the art education center, additional student housing, environ­ mental a n d ecological science p r o ­ g r a m s a n d retirement of a debt o n the recently c o m p l e t e d D e W i t t Stu­ dent a n d Cultural Center. T w o other m a j o r objectives in­ clude a $ 5 2 0 , 0 0 0 scholarship f u n d to allow qualified y o u n g m e n a n d w o m ­ en to attend H o p e a n d a $1.9 million f u n d for faculty d e v e l o p m e n t a n d e n d o w m e n t of faculty services.

Alumni Return M a y 12

Town-Gown Ecological Awareness

Hope Women Are M 1 A A Champs

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pages 4 & 5

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ThreeRetire With 43 YearsService E. Duffield W a d e has m a n a g e d the H o p e College bookstore since 1954. For 17 years h e m a n a g e d the Blue

T w o faculty m e m b e r s — G e r m a n professor W e r n e r H e i ne a n d c o m m u ­ nication professor M . H arold Mikle — a n d longtime bookstore m a n a g e r E. Duffield W a d e will conclude a c o m ­ bined total of 4 3 years service to H o p e College at the e n d of the cur­ rent school year. Prof. H e i ne joined the H o p e staff in 1960, after having c o m p l e t e d his bachelor’s a n d m as te r ’s degrees at Michigan State University. H e w a s b o r n in G e r m a n y w h e r e h e received his early training a n d w h e r e h e gradu-

M. Harold Mikle E. Duffield Wade

Werner Heine

ated f r o m College for Colonial A f ­ fairs in Witzenhausen. H e spent m a n y years in T a n g a n y i k a Territory in A f ­ rica in the business world, a n d later returned to that continent for re­ search through a grant f r o m the Great L a k es Colleges Association. In addition to his active role as a m e m b e r of the G e r m a n a n d G e o g ­ r a p h y d ep ar tm en ts at H o p e , h e has c o a c h e d a n d directed G e r m a n lan­ g u a ge theatre productions, served for m a n y years as director o f the Inter­ national S u m m e r Session for J a p ­ anese students o n H o p e ’s c a m p u s , directed the e x p e r i m e n t in inter­ national living with Iranian students, a n d has continually played an active role in the international dimensions o f the College. U p o n retirement, P r o ­ fessor a n d Mrs. H e i n e plan to reside in Spain. M . H ar ol d Mikle joined the faculty in 1962, c o m i n g to Holland f r o m A l ­ m a College, w h e r e h e served as hea d o f the d e p a r t m e n t o f speech f r o m

news from Hope College Published for A l u m n i , Friends a n d Parents of H o p e College. S h o u l d y o u receive m o r e than o n e copy, please pass it o n to s o m e o n e in y o u r c o m m u n i t y . A n overlap of H o p e College constituencies m a k e s duplication s o m e t i m e s unavoidable. EDITOR: T O M R E N N E R Vol. 4, No. 2 April/May, 1973 P H O T O CREDITS: P hotography: T o m Siderius, J o h n K o b u s a n d E d w a r d Mackiewicz. Official publication, news from Hope College is published four times a year b y H o p e College, 85 East 12th Street, Holland, Michigan 49423_____________________ _

1 9 5 3 to 1961. D ur in g other parts of his career, h e taught in the Michigan public schools of Ionia, Jackson, Climax, a n d W a y l a n d , a n d w a s o n the faculty of R i p o n College a n d B o w l ­ ing G r e e n State University. Prof. Mikle is a graduate o f W e s t ­ ern Michigan University a n d c o m ­ pleted his master’s degree at the U n i ­ versity of Michigan. While at H o p e College, M i k l e ’s d e ­ bate a n d oratory t e a m s have c o m ­ piled a spectacularly successful rec­ ord, receiving national recognition o n n u m e r o u s occasions. Prof. M i k le has filled a n active role as adjudicator a n d consultant in the various areas of speech a n d has b e e n active in the S p e e c h Association of America, C e n ­ tral States S p e e c h Association, M i c h i ­ g a n S p e e c h Association, Pi K a p p a Delta, (National Forensics H o n ­ orary), a n d the Mic hi ga n Intercolle­ giate S p e e c h League. H e is currently serving as President o f the Michigan Intercollegiate S p e e c h League.

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Delivery Soon T h e 1 9 7 1 Milestone, delayed near­ ly t w o years b y a series of snafus, will b e off the press in early June. A c o p y of the Milestone will be mailed to all m e m b e r s of the class of ’71. M e m b e r s of the class of ’7 2 w h o res­ erved a c o p y are asked to send their n a m e a n d current address to: Office of Information Services, H o p e C o l ­ lege, Holland, M I 4 9 4 2 3 .

Celia Martinez Named to Governor’sHigher Ed. Commission continued from page one ordering a n d delivering higher e d u c a ­ tion services are n e e d e d in Michigan a n d I a m charging the C o m m i s s i o n o n Higher E du ca ti on with the re­ sponsibility of charting the course for the state’s future in this i m p o r ­ tant regard.” T h e C o m m i s s i o n will give special emp ha si s to three m a j o r aspects: T h e goals, purposes a n d functions of all post-secondary education; gover­ nance, coordination a n d planning of a s ys te m of higher education; a n d future financial requirements a n d i m ­ pacts of post-secondary education. Miss Martinez is o n e of t w o u n d e r ­ graduate student representatives o n the 3 0 m e m b e r C o m m i s s i o n . Miss Martinez is the daughter of Mr. a n d Mrs. R a m o n J. Martinez of Holland, Mich. A t H o p e she is majoring in S p a n ­ ish a n d h o p e s to pursue a career as an elementary education teacher. S h e has b e e n active in Higher H o ­ rizons, the college’s big brother/big sister program. S h e has also assisted with the college’s U p w a r d B o u n d program, an education project d e ­ signed to assist disadvantaged high school students in a s u m m e r experi­ mental course a i m e d at preparing t h e m for college. Miss Martinez parti-

Summer Study Sessions H o p e will offer three different o p ­ portunities for persons to take col­ lege credit courses this s u m m e r . T h e first t w o sessions will each last three w e e k s a n d will allow a stu­ den t to earn u p to three credit hours. T h e courses m a y also b e taken o n a n audit basis. T h e first session, k n o w n as the M a y term, will run f r o m M a y 1 4 to J u n e 1 while the second, called the J u n e Session, will b e f r o m J u n e 4 to 22. T h e traditional six w e e k s u m ­ m e r school is scheduled for J u n e 25 to A u g u s t 4. A p p r o x i m a t e l y 5 0 different o n a n d off c a m p u s courses a n d i n d e p e n ­ dent w o r k projects will b e available during the s u m m e r sessions. Tuition will b e $ 4 5 per h o u r for credit a n d $ 2 5 per h o u r o n an audit basis. Information a b o u t the s u m m e r sessions a n d course descriptions m a y be obtained b y writing: Dr. D o n a l d

K e y B ookstore in the b a s e m e n t of V a n Raalte Hall. T h e o pe ni ng of the D e W i t t S tu de nt a n d Cultural Center in the fall of 1 9 7 1 also s a w the relo­ cation of the bookstore. T h e n e w H o p e - G e n e v a Bookstore is o n e of the m o s t m o d e r n of its kind a n d c o n ­ tains 5,000 square feet of space. Mr. W a d e has sold an estimated 3 5 0 , 0 0 0 textbooks to Hopeites d u r ­ ing his career. H e has also b e e n in­ volved in countless special projects such as the preparation of the H o p e Centennial medallion, the designing of thousands o f H o p e sweatshirts a n d jackets w h i c h have bee n sent to all parts of the U.S. a n d m a n y for­ eign countries a n d assisting in the publication of several special collegeinterest b o o k s including Century of Hope b y the late W y n a n d Wichers.

Williams, Director of S u m m e r Ses­ sions, H o p e College, Holland, M I 49423. *

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cipated in the U p w a r d B o u n d pro­ g r a m prior to enrolling as a student at H o p e . Miss Martinez w a s n o m i n a t e d to the C o m m i s s i o n b y d e a n o f students Robert D e Y o u n g . “ Miss Martinez possesses the spe­ cial qualities w h i c h will allow her to m a k e a significant contribution to the C o m m i s s i o n , ” said D e a n D e ­ Young.

Letters Hope College welcomes comments in the “Letters” column. We are especially inter­ ested in opinions about the College and items ofgeneral concern to alumni, parents and friends. The Editor reserves the right to use portions of letters when space re­ quirements prevent printing their entirety. Letters not intended for publication should indicate so. Please address mail to: News from Hope College Editor, Office of Infor­ mation Services, Hope College, Holland, MI 49423. Iwish to compliment you on the News from Hope College. Although Igraduated from Hope way back in 1919, I find the News very interesting and stimulating. In the past, 1was connected for many years with the music department of Manchester College. Iwas so interested in the article about Jose Ferrer and the premier of Cyra­ no. Ifyou have a couple copies left, would you mind sending them to me. Iwould like to pass them on to our music department. The photography is also very good. Keep up the good work. Martina De Jong No. Manchester, Ind.

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H o p e has again b e e n selected b y the National Science F o u n d a t i o n to host s u m m e r institutes for high school teachers of a d v a n c e d place­ m e n t chemistry a n d mathematics. T h e chemistry institute, u n d e r the direction of Dr. E u g e n e C. Jekel, a n d the m a t h e m a t i c s institute, directed b y Dr. Jay E. Folkert, will each be held at H o p e for the 10th year. E a c h institute will have 4 0 participants. T h e N S F s u m m e r institutes are designed to assist secondary level teachers to i m p r o v e their effective­ ness of instruction. H o p e is o n e of only t w o n o n ­ public Michigan colleges or universi­ ties to receive an institute.

I like your News from Hope College. It invites reading and has a generally clean and light and modern look about it — in spite of some unfortunate photos such as Prof. Myers and the Gregorys et al. But I know editors don’t always have a choice in these matters. The shots in the “Speaking for God” article were super as was the Peale shot. Keep up the good work and I’lllook forward to seeing future issues. Terry Vande Water Director of Internal Communications Herman Miller Company Zeeland, Michigan E D I T O R ’S NOTE: Mr. Vande Water also offered several excellent technical sugges­ tions for improving the News.


Alumni Day FeaturesEleven Reunions A l u m n i D a y will be celebrated Saturday, M a y 12. T h e early date is d u e to the n e w college calendar plac­ ing C o m m e n c e m e n t o n M o n d a y , M a y 14. C o n g r e s s m a n G u y V a n d e r Jagt ’53 will b e the speaker at the annual din­ ner in Phelps Hall at 6 : 3 0 p.m. A l u m n i President J o h n C. Schrier of M u s k e g o n , Mich, will preside at the dinner a n d present the Distin­ guished A l u m n u s / A l u m n a A wa rd s. T h e w in ne r of the H.O.P.E. A w a r d ( H o p e ’s Outstanding ProfessorEducator) will speak briefly a n d

President V a n W y l e n will give his a n ­ nual “ State of the College” report. T e n classes a n d the Fifty-Year Cir­ cle will hold reunions o n A l u m n i Day . All reunions with the exception of the Class of 1 9 3 3 will b e held at Marigold L o d g e o n L a k e M a c a t a w a . T h e Fifty-Year Circle will m e e t in the Frances Phelps Otte R o o m in Phelps Hall in late afternoon. Bruce a n d M y r a V a n L e u w e n will entertain the Class of 1 9 3 3 at their h o m e , 1 2 8 8 W a u k a z o o Drive. A t Marigold L o d g e tables for each class will be m a r k e d a n d a b o x lunch

Alumni Day Dinner M a k e Reservations N o w

M A I L THIS F O R M T O D A Y A l u m n i Secretary H o p e College Holland, Michigan 4 9 4 2 3

I a m enclosing $_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ($3.75 per plate) f o r ______ reservations

Class of 1923 Tunis & Janet Baker Bill & Marjorie Rottschafer A1 & Esther Timmer

Class of 1943 Paul & Florence Van Eenenaam Gordon & Mildred Van Oostenburg Harvey & Mary Lou Koop

Class of 1933 Bruce / Myra Van Leuwen Ed & Mildred Klow Damson Harold & Mary Fairbanks Class of 1938 Gleon & Henrietta Bonnette Jack & Thelma Leenhouts Don & Martha Thomas

Jeff & Kathy Christensen Jim & Martha Bultman John & Sharon Blom Class of 1968

Class of 1928 Ray & Mabel Smith Lee & Ruth Kleis

Class of 1963

Class of 1948 Lucile Yonkman Holland Ann Van Eck Wierenga Arthur Van Eck Alfred Pennings Class of 1953 Shirley Hungerink Piersma Rosemarie Tardiff Albers Nella Pyle Burton Class of 1958 Don & Lois Schreur Ruth & Roger Borr

Bruce White Rick Appleton Neal Sobania Bemace Brunsting De Young FIFTY Y E A R CIRCLE OFFICERS Bernard Hakken '20, President Edward Wolters ’20, Vice President Irene Van Zoeren T9, Secretary Clara Reeverts T9, Historian

Congressman Guy Vander Jagt

for the 1 9 7 3 A l u m n i D a y Dinner,

6 : 3 0 P.M., Saturday, M a y 12, in will b e prepared b y the College foo d Phelps Hall dining r o o m . service at a cost of $1.95 per person, payable at the Lodge. T h e seven acre estate will provide a beautiful setting N a m e _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ for a casual picnic for the nine classes. Street & N u m b e r _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ T o repeat a popular feature of the picnics of the last t w o years, Dr. C o t ­ ter Tharin o f the geology d e p a r t m e n t C i t y _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ will be o n h a n d with the H o p e I, the college’s research vessel, to give mini State_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ cruises o n L a k e M a c a t a w a . R e u ni on er s are requested to use the shuttle b us f r o m the A l u m n i Zip _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ House. T h e b u s will leave the A l u m n i H o u s e b e t w e e n 11 a.m. a n d 1 p.m., I M P O R T A N T : Please help b y m a k ­ returning f r o m 3:30 to 5 p.m. Park­ ing is extremely limited at Marigold. ing y o u r reservation b y M a y 4.

White House Is A Real Education It’s a long w a y f r o m Hope^College to 1 6 0 0 Pennsylvania A v e n u e a n d for T h o m a s P. DeCair it started with a n eight-cent stamp. DeCair, a staff assistant in the W h i t e H o u s e press office, used a n o v ­ el a p p r o a c h to land the job. H e w r o t e Presidential Press Secretary R o n a l d L. Ziegler a n d asked if there w a s a n opening. “ I w a s lucky,” D e C a i r recalled. “ It w a s b e t w e e n President N i x o n ’s C h i na a n d Russia trips a n d the y h a d a bo ut decided they n e e d e d another h a n d. ” After interviews a n d the c u s t o m ­ ary security checks, D eC a i r w a s hired w i t h o u t so m u c h as a n o d f r o m a R e ­ publican official. D eC ai r t od ay is part of the infor­ m at i o n pipeline that links President N i x o n a n d t op W h i t e H o u s e advisers with the A m e r i c a n people, via the W h i t e H o u s e press corps. H e w o r k s 1 4 hours a day, six days a w ee k, eats lunch a n d s o m e t i m e s dinner at his desk, takes n o vacations a n d is o n 24-hour call. B u t h e has n o regrets. Absolutely none. “ I k n o w I have obligations to m y family a n d m y health but it w o u l d be very difficult to leave,” DeCair said. “ W o r k i n g here is great, a real education.” DeCair, 27, g r e w u p in K a l a m a z o o a n d w a s graduated in 1 9 6 3 f r o m U n i ­ versity Hig h School. After t w o so-so years at K a l a m a z o o College, he d r o p p e d o ut a n d joined the Holland Evening Sentinel as a reporter a n d later sports editor. In 1 9 6 7 h e m o v e d to the K a l a m a ­ z o o Gazette a n d w o r k e d there 11

This article was written by Robert Lewis, writer at the Washington bureau of the Booth newspaper chain.

m o n t h s before the A r m y drafted him. H e spent his enlistment at Ft. K n o x , Ky., w o r k i n g o n the base newspaper. After his discharge h e entered H o p e College a n d graduated at m i d ­ t e r m a year agq with a m a j o r in polit­ ical science a n d a desire to get in­ volved in the presidential or congres­ sional elections. “ S o I started writing letters,” D e ­ Cair said. “ I got a n offer f r o m a sena­ tor a n d w r o t e to Ziegler not thinking anything w o u l d c o m e of it.” Rep . G a r r y B r o w n of Schoolcraft, Mich., D e C a i r ’s congressman, w a s o n the verge of hiring h i m but before he could D e Cair w a s at w o r k o n the o p ­ posite e n d of Pennsylvania A v e n u e .

O n a typical d a y h e arrives at the W h i t e H o u s e at 7 a.m., scans the m o r n i n g newspapers, monitors the Associated Press a n d United Press International wire services a n d begins preparing for Ziegler’s 11 a.m. brief­ ing. “ O u r days are geared t o w a r d the briefing,” D eC ai r said. “ W e prepare a reading transcript for R o n a n d try to anticipate questions that will be asked. “ S o m e t i m e s it’s mechanical, like stenciling an a n n o u n c e m e n t . O th er times w e start f r o m scratch, racing a r o u n d to get b a c k g r o u n d material o n an a p p o i n t m e n t or a n a n n o u n c e ­ ment. “ R o n is an a m a z i n g person. H e ’s very m u c h in tune with the Presi­ dent, a n d of course h e has a lot of contact with Mr. Nixon. E v e r y d a y I write h i m a script a n d h e s o m e t i m e s follows it a n d other times not. H e is criticized for not giving the press e n o u g h information b ut h e does everything he can.” W h e n N i x o n leaves the W hi te House, if there is press coverage, D e ­ Cair a n d other press aides a c c o m ­ p a n y n e w s m e n a n d Ziegler is usually with Nixon. O n Inauguration D a y w h e n N i x o n visited seven balls, D eCair escorted the press pool. H e has b e e n to H a ­ waii once, the W es te rn W h i t e H o u s e three or four times a n d N i x o n ’s Flor­ ida retreat m o r e times than h e can r e m e m b e r . D ur in g the election he traveled in 2 0 states. “ I m o v e with the press wherever they go,” DeCair said. “ It’s not a very intellectual activity but it’s tre­ m e n d o u s l y important. M u c h of it is mechanical. Writing press releases, copyreading stencils of the briefings, alerting the press to ‘p h o t o o p p o r ­ tunities’ (a W h i t e H o u s e e u p h e m i s m

m e a n i n g photographers can take N i x ­ o n ’s picture in the Oval Office but d o n ’t stay too long), keeping track of the President’s schedule, w h i c h can change hourly, a n d answering reporters’ questions. T h e questions are a h e a d a c h e for the press office. “ S o m e o n e thinks of a n e w question every m i n u t e a n d it takes time to get the answer,” D e ­ Cair said. T h e adversary relation b e t w e e n n e w s m e n a n d the administration is not w h a t D eC ai r t h o u g h t it w o u l d be. “ I expected it to b e a r m e d c o n ­ flict b u t the relationship is not as bit­ ter as I thought,” h e said. “ M a n y staff m e m b e r s a n d reporters are g o o d friends a n d our attitude is o n e of ser­ vice.” W o r k i n g at the W h i t e H o u s e is an a w e s o m e experience. “ W a l k i n g into the W h i t e H o u s e for the first time is b e y o n d belief,” DeCair said. “ O n m y first interview, I w a s waiting in the lobby, a n d H e n r y Kissinger w a l k e d by. T h e n w h e n I w a s in D e p u t y Press Secretary Jerry W a r r e n ’s office, the President w a l k e d b y the door. N o w here 1 a m , w o r k i n g hard a n d putting in these long days a n d I never have time to think a b o u t w h e r e it is I a m a n d h o w important this place is.” T e n m o n t h s at the W h i t e H o u s e has h o o k e d DeCair o n politics but he thinks he w o u l d rather teach it than run for office. H e is the son of Mr. a n d Mrs. T h e ­ odore F. DeCair w h o recently retired to Florida. His father w a s a vice pres­ ident of K a l a m a z o o Pant Co. H e is married to the f ormer Diane Taylor of East Lansing a n d they are expect­ ing their first child this spring. W h a t does D i a ne think of the hours? “ S h e w o u l d prefer different hours but she understands.”


T h e p r o b l e m of restoration is o n e of resources. L a k e M a c a t a w a is a rich lake, m a d e richer b y the slow, steady w a s h of silt d o w n its m a i n estuary, the Black River. A s a life supporter, the lake t o d a y is m o r e a b u n d a n t than w h e n it w a s a p ri me h a u n t of Bass a n d N o r t h e r n Pike. B u t the life today is the life of plankton a n d al­ gae. T h e fish t od ay are carp. R e c e n t years have seen the lake m is us ed as a kind of civic a n d indus­ trial storage d u m p . F o r years a n out­ m o d e d primary disposal unit deliv-

findings f r o m various points in the lake with other lakes b e y o n d the M a ­ catawa watershed. T o businesses a n d industries of Holland, restoration of the lake will m e a n increased sport a n d recrea­ tional spending, as well as an attrac­ tive incentive to encourage greater Holland d e v e l o p m e n t programs. T h e college’s role in saving the lake has bee n largely twofold. O p e r ­ ating u nd er a three year, $ 2 0 , 0 0 0 W . K. Kellogg F o u n d a t i o n grant entitled “ C o m m u n i t y — College R a p p o r t I m ­ p r o v e m e n t as w e focus o n a c o m m o n p r o b l e m — our watershed,” H o p e fa­ culty a n d students have b e e n m o n i ­ toring chemical a n d biological p a ­ rameters in the lake as well as e d u ­ cating the local c o m m u n i t y in the ecological p r o b l e m s of the water­ shed. Williams, o n e of the authors of the proposal w h i c h p r o d u c e d the grant, stated, “ This concern with the e n ­ v i r o n m e n t of the watershed, like all our education, is value centered. It has a basis in values a n d attitudes. T h a t ’s part of w h a t m a k e s H o p e C o l ­ lege different. “ T h e other thing that m a k e s us different is research— good, publish­ able research. W e are studying this watershed f r o m that perspective.” T h e research b e g an with a n at­ t e m p t to isolate the various polluting materials w h i c h enter the lake. Dr. D a v id Klein, professor of chemistry at H o p e a n d a respected specialist in the study of m e r c u r y pollution, notes that 2 2 p o u n d s of m e r c u r y a year entered the lake f r o m the old Holland s ew ag e treatment plant. A c ­ cording to a study just completed, Klein reports m e r c u r y levels to be stabilized b y the n e w secondary treatment plant just c o m p l e t e d in the city.

ered H o l l a n d ’s sewage to the lake. Industries d u m p e d r a w a n d semitreated wastes to m i x with the silt a n d sludge that covered M a c a t a w a ’s b o t t o m . T h e result w a s a lake w h o s e Bass bed s b e c a m e bed s of thick green algae, w h o s e oxidated water b e c a m e b r o w n with s u s pe nd ed solids. N o w a third life has b e g u n for the lake, a life in w h i c h M a c a t a w a has b e c o m e a t w o a n d a half square mile laboratory. T o students a n d faculty of H o p e , the lake represents a chal­ lenge in field study. Small e n o u g h to m a k e detailed chemical a n d biologi­ cal analyses, the lake is yet large e n o u g h to c o m p a r e a n d correlate

T h e r m a l pollution, a discharge of w a r m water into the lake, has appre­ ciably raised the lake temperature in the Eastern half of the basin accord­ ing to Dr. Cotter Tharin, professor of geology. Organic pollution enters the lake f r o m m a n y sources, including faulty septic tanks, the chemical plants along the lake shore, a n d animal wastes w h i c h enter the basin f r o m the Black river estuary. W i t h such diverse pollution sources, only a highly coordinated effort could h o p e to restore the lake, a n d the interaction with the city a n d the college began.

Ecological A wareness: A ‘Town-Gown ’ Concern In 1847, fifteen h u n d r e d O t t a w a Indians living along the shores of L a k e M a c a t a w a decided not to listen to their evil spirit. It w a s in that year that the W h i t e m a n arrived f r o m the Netherlands to h o m e s t e a d the col­ o n y that is n o w Holland, Michigan. A c c o r d i n g to a report in the July 30, Macatawa Mirror, “ T h e In­ dians resented the W h i t e m a n c o m ­ ing, building n e w h o m e s a n d cutting d o w n their beautiful trees. T h e In­ dians told the Hollanders, ‘B a d Spirit says kill every D u t c h m a n ’ — ‘G o o d Spirit says leave D u t c h m a n a n d go a w a y . ’ — this they did, a n d in a b o ut 1 0 years all of the Indians h a d m o v e d to Traverse City a n d Petoskey. O n departing the Indians said, ‘B o o z o ’ to the D u t c h m a n , this m e a n s Good-Bye.” In saying “ G o o d - B y e ” to the D u t c h m a n , the Indians also said “ G o o d - B y e ” to their lake. It w a s a lake they called “ U M K - A T A - W A S E P E E , ” or Black Lake. S o n a m e d because of its dar k silt w a s h f r o m in­ land m ar sh es a n d the rich drainage f r o m the H e m l o c k forests along its shores, Black L a k e fell prey to the D u t c h m a n a n d his creeping indus­ trialization. A century a n d a quarter later, a coalition of college students, their professors, a n d civic a n d industrial leaders f r o m Holland b eg an the task of restoring the lake, n o w called M a ­ catawa, to its p r e - D u t c h m a n state. While the p r o b l e m of restoring a lake is not a unique one, the a p ­ proach taken to solving that p r o b l e m b y the c o m m u n i t y of Holland a n d the students a n d faculty of H o p e College is unique. N o w h e r e in the state of Michigan is there a p r o g r a m so c om pr eh en si ve involving the joint resources of a college a n d a c o m m u ­ nity in the study of a watershed, ac­ cording to Dr. D o n a l d Williams, asso­ ciate professor of chemistry at H op e. Williams states, “ I k n o w pretty m u c h w h a t the other schools (in Michigan) are u p to, a n d w e ’re lead­ ing t h e m. W e ’re the only school to have a local B o a r d of Public W o r k s ask us to d o stuff for t he m, a n d sup­ ply us with the e q u i p m e n t to d o it.”

Author Gerald Swieringa is a 1912 Hope graduate and a former editor of the anchor.

A c c o r d i n g to R o g e r Stroh, hea d of the city of H ol la nd Environmental Health D ep ar tm en t, the college and the city have b e e n assisting o n e a n ­ other with chemical a n d a bacteriol­ ogical analyses. Stroh explained, “ W e have for s o m e time h a d a water s a m ­ pling program, testing f r o m s o m e seventy stations throughout the b a ­ sin. Formerly, w e ran these samples into a laboratory in G r a n d Rapids for analysis, but with the college’s resources w e are n o w in the process of transition. Hopefully, w e ’ll soon be able to have all our analyses d o n e at the college.” Before the college is able to h a n ­ dle all the city’s samplings, a reliabil­ ity m u s t b e d et ermined w h i c h w o u l d m a k e the college’s analyses at least as credible as the state’s. Stroh sees that possibility as b e c o m i n g a reality within the next f e w months. In the educational arena, associate professor of biology E l d o n Greij states, “ In studies within the lake a n d marsh, w e ’ve b e e n trying to w o r k with the city fathers, s h o w i n g t h e m w h a t w e ’re d o i ng a n d w h a t w e ’re finding. W e ask t h e m ques­ tions, a n d they ask us s o m e. W e ’ve b r o k e n d o w n s o m e of the trust barriers that existed before this w o r k i n g relationship began.” Perhaps the educational impact of the college o n the c o m m u n i t y in en­ vironmental activities is m o s t dra­ matically represented b y the person of Larry Martin, superintendent of H o l l a n d ’s s ew ag e treatment plant. Martin has just c oncluded several courses in H o p e ’s biology a n d c h e m ­ istry departments. Because of his u ni q u e position as b o t h student a n d c o m m u n i t y health agent, Martin is especially qualified to c o m m e n t o n the Hop e- Ho ll an d relationship. H e states, “ Before the recent surge of ecological awareness, there existed very little c o m m u n i c a ­ tion b e t w e e n the city a n d the college o n environmental matters. T oday, however, there exists a very g o o d rapport b e t w e e n the people at H o p e a n d the people of Holland.” A s evidence of that rapport Martin cites Klein’s recent study of current


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m e r c u r y levels in the influent a n d effluent of H o l l a n d ’s n e w secondary waste treatment plant. Klein shared these findings with Martin i m m e d i ­ ately u p o n their release. Martin w e n t o n to c o m m e n t that h e is frequently consulted b y H o p e students studying p r o b l e m s in waste disposal, a n d seve­ ral classes of students taking m i c r o ­ biology have visited the Holland plant. In other educational programs, Greij has w o r k e d with the Holland G a r d e n Club, a n organization w h i c h he states is unusually strong in e n ­ vironmental interests. Greij notes that it w a s the G a r d e n C l u b w h i c h first financed H o p e monitoring p r o ­ jects b a c k in 1 9 6 2 with the purchase of a boa t for the college a n d a grant to cover the salaries of t w o H o p e stu­ dents d o i ng the monitoring work. W h e n the college received the Kellogg grant in 1972, an e x p a n d e d rela­ tionship ensued. T h e grant enables six H o p e students to w o r k with five faculty m e m b e r s a n d the city in the p r o b l e m s of the lake’s restoration. T h e first year of the grant’s threeyear t e r m b r o u g h t a b o u t s o m e highly significant a n d publishable results. Williams, serving as coordinator of H o p e ’s Institute for E n v ir on me nt al Quality, outlined the achievements of that first year’s study. “ T w o different biology teams, o n e for b en th os a n d o n e for algae, a d d e d to the ever increasing store of physi­ cal data. It w a s s u p p l e m e n t e d with a tho ro ug h chemical analysis of lake water samples as gathered b y v o l un ­ teer boaters f r o m a local yacht club. W h e n c o m p a r e d with similar data ac­ c u m u l a t e d over the past three s u m ­ mer s a n d a d d e d to the city’s lake­ wid e surveys ( n o w d o n e at the col­ lege) a c o m p l e t e understanding of the physical parameters of the lake is evolving.” Williams a d d e d that all this data is n o w being fed into the college’s c o m ­ puters to p r o d u c e a graphic presenta­ tion to aid in determining correla­ tions b e t w e e n L a k e M a c a t a w a a n d other watersheds a n d correlations b e t w e e n various parameters within M a c a t a w a itself.

Williams emphasizes that “ All our data a n d d r e a m s are shared with the c o m m u n i t y . ” Joint meetings with those involved u n d e r the Kellogg grant a n d city councilmen, c o u n t y commissioners, a n d industrial leaders are held regularly. G r a n t recipients give speeches concerning their w o r k t h r ou gh ou t the area, a n d guest speakers in the area feature the w o r k d o n e b y H o p e people. B e y o n d that w o r k w h i c h is c ov­ ered b y the grant, H o p e professors a n d students are w o r k i n g indirectly with such a r m s of local g o v e r n m e n t as the Office of E nv ir onmental Health, the B o a r d o f C o u n t y C o m ­ missioners a n d in particular the W a ­ tershed Adv is or y C o m m i t t e e , a n d the citizenry at large. Dr. Klein is o n e H o p e professor w h o believes his involvement with science is not confined to the class­

r o o m . While at the Scripps Institute in California, Klein b e c a m e profi­ cient in the particular p r o b l e m of m e r c u r y pollution. His proficiency received nationwide attention w h e n the “ m e r c u r y scare” s h o o k the n a ­ tion in the early 1 9 7 0 ’s. Klein w a s called u p before a special United States Senate s u b c o m m i t t e e hearing as an expert witness, a n d later he appeared twice o n the N B C HuntleyBrinkley television n e w s s h o w to e x ­ plain the complexities of m e r c u r y pollution. M o s t recently Klein has received a sabbatical f r o m the college to study p r o b l e m s in air pollution at the O a k Ridge Tennessee nuclear p o w e r facil­ ity. In the c o m m u n i t y , Klein is m u c h in d e m a n d as a speaker b y bot h lay­ m e n a n d his professional peers. It is Williams’ goal to be able to present to the city fathers a categori­ cal s u m m a t i o n of everything w r o n g with the lake, everything the lake needs to b e c o m e clean again, the to­ tal cost for every part of the project, the value of such a project, a n d the rewards in financial a n d aesthetic terms to b e gained b y such rejuvena­ tion. A s the college m o v e s into its sec­ o n d year u n d e r the Kellogg grant, m u c h of the first goal is already well o n the w a y to achievement. Williams states, “ W e k n o w this w a t e r s h e d inside a n d out, everything a b o u t it.” B u t to present to the city at this time such a detailed explanation of w h a t ’s w r o n g w o u l d only serve to h a m p e r the g r o w i n g cooperation w h i c h is the overall design of the grant. M u c h needs to b e d o n e there­ fore in the remaining t w o years to outline m e t h o d s w h e r e b y the lake m a y b e cooperatively saved. T h e city council has already a d o p t e d o n e such m e a s u r e in the f o r m of a long range plan to restock the lake with g a m e fish, particularly Bass a n d Walleyed Pike. In addition, it is p r o p o s e d to kill-off the u n w a n t e d carp w h i c h n o w d o m i n a t e the lake’s piscatorial habitat. T h e r e m o v a l of the carp will have another benefit, in that the sediments o n the lake’s bot­ t o m will r e m a i n in a considerably less agitated state. “ H o p e for the Earth,” a student group, has b e e n involved in several projects of glass a n d paper recycling t h r ou gh ou t the c o m m u n i t y . E v e n

The Lake Macatawa bottom has become covered with silt and sludge.

the H o p e College Opus, the c a m p u s literary magazine, has responded to the call for environmental awareness b y publishing its last three issues o n 1 0 0 per cent recycled paper. Politically, the college exercises n o active voice in H ol la nd ’s environ­ mental activities. Several professors a n d students are active, however, o n their o w n behalf a n d through an or­ ganization k n o w n as the Holland A r e a E nv ir onmental A ction Council. T h o s e o n the council are quick to e mphasize that their participation is as concerned citizenery, rather than as m e n a n d w o m e n of the college. “T h e college,” says Williams, “ m u s t maintain a very l o w political pro­ file.” O th er measures w h i c h Williams foresees include the implementation of laws to restrict the input of silt f r o m the u p p er Black River water­ shed. Enf or ce d contour plowing could effectively control the high sediment content of the river’s efflu­ ent. In a m o r e revolutionary vein, Wil­ liams h o p es to explore the possibili­ ties of using the rich sediment al­ ready in the lake b o t t o m as a source of prime soil for the area’s sandier f a r m lands. B y dredging the lake a n d depositing the sediment over i m ­ poverished, nutrition deficient fields, the a m o u n t of farmable land in the area m a y b e sizeably increased. T h e L a k e M a c a t a w a watershed w a s a natural focus for beginning ef­ forts at improving' H o l l a n d ’s environ­ ment. B u t the p r o b l e m s of pollution go b e y o n d those p o s ed b y the lake. T h e college a n d the city are current­ ly involved in a joint p r o g r a m a i m e d at monitoring sulfur dioxide in the city’s air. T o that end, the B o a r d of Public W o r k s has furnished the col­ lege with sampling e qu ipment, a n d the college feeds b a c k its analyses to the c o m m u n i t y . It w o u l d b e unfair to a s s u m e that H o p e College, with a student p op u l a ­ tion of over 2,000, does not contrib­ ute to H o l l a n d ’s pollution problem. T h a t contribution is m o s t clearly d em on s t r a t e d o n still days a bo ve the college’s dormitories a n d fraternity houses. Their incinerators s p e w s m o k e a n d ashes across the roofs of the college. Greij a ck no wl ed ge s that it is not yet k n o w n just h o w m u c h pollution the incinerators discharge b u t h e believes it to b e at least the equal of s o m e of H o l l a n d ’s smaller businesses. Greij also expressed s o m e concern over the disposal of chemicals b y the science depar tm en ts into the Holland s ewage system. H e believes, however, that these chemicals b e c o m e so di­ lute as to pose n o threat to the effec­ tiveness of the city’s system. F r o m its beginning in 1962, a fra­ gile but mutually beneficial relation­ ship b e t w e e n the college a n d the c o m m u n i t y has b e e n evolving. B o t h sides have offered u nique a n d lasting contributions t o w a r d the solution of a c o m m o n problem. T h e c o m m u n i t y has offered the w i s d o m of its years, the college its sophisticated k n o w l ­ edge. While the c o m m u n i t y has slow­ ly reappropriated its financial re­ sources, the college has bee n correspondently patient with its d e m a n d s . Perhaps the real rewards of such a p r o g r a m are not f o u n d in the land­ scape of a lake, but in the trust that is developing b e t w e e n a n institution of learning a n d a pragmaticallym i n d e d c o m m u n i t y . If such an ex­ periment of trust survives, then the e xp eriment of saving a lake m a y suritwnll Kf* ror greater than just another death of just another watershed. five


Lee Brandsma Leads MIAA Point Race Senior L e e B r a n d s m a led the Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic A s ­ sociation ( M I A A ) basketball scoring race with 18.5 points per game. T h e S o u t h Holland, 111. guard w a s n a m e d to the M I A A ’s all-conference team. T e a m m a t e Brian Vriesman, a s o p h o m o r e forward f r o m K a l a m a ­ zoo, Mich., w a s n a m e d to the second t e a m while senior guard D a v e H a r m e link of G r a n d Rapids, Mich., a n d sen­ ior center T o m Wolters of Fennville, Mich, w e r e honorable m e n t i o n choices. H o p e e n d e d the basketball season with a 9-13 record a n d 5-7 in the MIAA.

W o m e n Are M I A A Champs T h e H o p e w o m e n ’s basketball t e a m c o n c l u d e d o n e of the college’s m o s t successful seasons ever, w in ni ng the Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association c h a m p i o n s h i p a n d finish­ ing with a 10-6 overall record. “ W e w e r e helped along b y having a well-rounded shooting t e a m , ” o b ­ served n e w c oa ch C y n t h i a B e a n at season’s end. “ While several t ea ms w e played h a d only o n e or t w o g o o d shooters w e w e r e able to score f r o m every position. W e w e r e also able to c o m p e n s a t e for a height disadvantage with g o o d ball handling.” Senior M a r y D y k e m a of Zeeland, Mich., led the t e a m in scoring with nearly a 1 0 point per g a m e average. H e r single g a m e high w a s 2 2 points. H o p e e dg ed Adrian 54-52 for the league c ha mp ionship. In the state t o u r n a m e n t the H o p e cagers upset

the University of Mic hi ga n 50-45 b e ­ fore b o w i n g to Central Michigan U n i ­ versity 52-27 a n d Eastern Michigan University 52-35. A disappointment of the season w a s a 4 4- 37 loss to ri­ val Calvin. M e m b e r s of the t e a m included seniors Carol B r a a k s m a of Holland, Mich., M a r y D y k e m a of Zeeland, Mich., S u e H a n e y of Guiderland, N.Y., Karla H o e s c h of Naperville, 111. a n d M a r y Zaleta o f B e r w y n , 111.; jun­

iors Linda V a n Bergen of Montclair, N.J., D e b o r a h K o n i n g of Holland, Mich, a n d S ha ro n S u t p h e n of Scotia, N.Y.; s o p h o m o r e s M a r y A n n G e b o t t of Pentwater, Mich., a n d Laurie L a n e of W a y n e , N.J.; a n d f r e s h m e n D e b o ­ rah C o x of Detroit, Mich., Barbara B r o w n of Slingerlands, N.Y., Jeanne L a m b e r t of Waterford, Mich., Belin­ d a G r u n d v i g of Bronxville, N.Y., Pat M u y s k e n s of T e m p e , Ariz., a n d Lisa R a l ey of M c L e a n , Va.

Hope Is Holding Fourth in MIAA After Winter Sports H o p e is fourth in the Mic hi ga n In­ tercollegiate Athletic Association ( M I A A ) all-sports race after winter competition. T h e all-sports t ro p h y is a w a r d e d annually to the M I A A m e m b e r with the best cumulative finish in 1 0 league sports.

’73 Grid Menu Set Athletic director G o r d o n B re we r has a n n o u n c e d the 1 9 7 3 football schedule w h i c h will include four h o m e games. H o m e c o m i n g will be O c t o b e r 27 against K a l a m a z o o College while the Parents’ W e e k e n d g a m e will b e N o ­ v e m b e r 1 0 against the University of Illinois/Chicago Circle. T h e first h o m e g a m e will b e C o m m u n i t y D a y featuring the annual O x Roast. 1973 F O O T B A L L S C H E D U L E Sept. Sept. Sept. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Nov. Nov.

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20 27 3 10

— — — — — — — — —

at Manchester, Ind. Concordia, 111. at Denison, O h i o Alma at Adrian at Albion Kalamazoo at Olivet C hi ca go Circle.

After winter competition K a l a m a ­ z o o is the leader wit h 5 0 points fol­ l o w e d b y A lb io n with 46, Olivet 39, H o p e a n d Calvin 37, A l m a 3 2 a n d A drian 23. T h e D u t c h m e n w e r e c h a m p i o n s in soccer, finished s ec on d in cross c o u n ­ try, third in football, sixth in golf a n d fifth in b o t h basketball a n d wrestling. H o p e has w o n the all-sports tro­ p h y eight times since the a w a r d w a s initiated in 1934-3 5. T h e last w a s in 1966-67.

Wrestler Is All-MIAA Third Time Senior Ric k V a n d e r L i n d of G r a n d Rapids, Mich, w a s n a m e d to the Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic A s ­ sociation all-conference wrestling t e a m for the third straight year. Captain o f the D u t c h m e n this past season, V a n d e r L i n d com pi le d a 168-1 record in the 1 4 2 p o u n d division. H e w a s elected the t e a m ’s m o s t valu­ able wrestler b y his teammates. S o p h o m o r e Paul Cornell of D e a r ­ born, Mich, w o n the t e a m ’s out­ standing wrestler a w a r d as h e c o m ­ piled a 16-2-2 record in the h e a v y ­ weight division. H e w a s elected c a p ­ tain of the 1 9 7 3 - 7 4 team.

Instrumental in H o p e ’ s forensics success have been Joan Navarra, Molly Gates, Vicki TenHaken, Prof. Peter Schakel, Mike Cooper, Paul Bach, Charles Gossett, Gary VanderVen, Jim Hern, Rudy Broekhuis and Prof M. Harold Mikle.

Forensics Team Receives National Debate Recognition continued from page one Navarra, a s o p h o m o r e f r o m N e w Cas­ tle, Pa., received a certificate of excellence. J i m Hearn, a junior f r o m Franklin, Wise, a n d V a n d e r V e n each received certificates of excellence in oratory as did M i k e C oo pe r, a junior f r o m Hersey, Mich., a n d Vicki T e n H a k e n , a senior f r o m B i r n a m w o o d , Wise., in debate. M ol ly Gates, a senior f r o m Litchfield, Mich., received a certifi­ cate of excellence in discussion.

T e a m points w e r e also garnered b y R u d y Broekhuis, a s o p h o m o r e f r o m Hamilton, Mich., a n d Gossett in d e ­ bate a n d B a c h in discussion a n d in­ formative speaking. T h e H o p e team was accompanied to the t o u r n a m e n t b y Prof. M . H a r ­ old Mikle, director of forensics, and Dr. Jack Hopkins, cha ir ma n of the d e p a r t m e n t of c o m m u n i c a t i o n . Bot h professors served as judges during the competition.


New Science Library Honors Professors

Class Representatives Report Annual Fund Progress Contributions to the 1972-73 A n ­ nual F u n d campaign total 5 8 % of the $170,000 goal according to National Chairman Jack 11. DeWitt. Gifts totaling $98,703 have been received fro m 2,229 alums according to Mr. DeWitt. T h e 72-73 Annual F u n d closes Jun e 30. There are 11,134 grads and former students on the rolls. T h e Class Representative system w a s initiated this year. T h e class of 1911 has the highest percentage of participation (67%) while the classes of 1 9 5 0 and 196 5 each have the largest n u m b e r of donors (89). T h e

Class Representative 18901909 1910 1911 1912 1913 1914 1915 1916 1917 1918 1919 1920 % 1921 1922 1923 1924 1925

1 1

| 1926 1927 1928 p 1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972

1 1 1 1

Dr. Zachary Veldhuis Mr. August R. Veenker Mrs. A. J. Te Paske Mr. Earnest Brooks Dr. Clarence P. Dame Miss Charlotte De Pree Mrs. James E. Whitwam Mr. Harris M. Meyer Mrs. John C. Van Wyk Mr. Harvey J. Ramaker Dr. Simon D. Den Uyl Dr. George H. Vanderborgh Miss Nella K. Meyer Mrs. Carlton B. Failor Dr. Jerry DeVries Mrs. Cornelia Costing Dr. Fredrick F. Yonkman Miss Adelaide Dykhuizen & Miss Geraldine Dykhuizen Mr. Clyde H. Geerlings Mr. Howard R. Sluyter Mr. Dirk M o u w Mr. Jack H. Tigelaar Mr. Paul J. Brouwer Dr. H. Roy Mooi Mrs. John Wolf Miss Gertrude Van Zee Mr. Guy Kleis Mr. Myron H. Kollen Mr. Willard J. Rens, Sr. Rear Admiral Mayo A. Hadden Mrs. William E. Welmers Mr. John G. Dinkeloo Dr. Laurence Bruggers Miss Beth E. Marcus Dr. Everett Kleinjans Mr. Paul W. Dame Mrs. Roy E. Berry Mr. Max D. Boersma Judge A. Dale Stoppels Dr. James P. Yuk Mr. Ernest J. Meeusen Dr. Robert J. Westerhoff Dr. Robert D. Visscher Mr. Richard C. Caldwell The Hon. Guy A. Vander Jagt Mrs. Gretchen Y. Vandenberg Mr. John C. Schrier Mr. G. Robert Cook Mrs. Lois A. Van Lare Mr. Kenneth M. Faber Dr. John C. Krauss Mr. David E. White Dr. Gary Vandenberg, Jr. Mrs. Silvia Nelson Reverend Jack D. Cooper Mr. Ronald L. Hartgerink Miss Marion L. Hoekstra Mrs. Mary Mulder Mr. David C. Bergner Mrs. Frances M. Bruggers Mr. Bruce A. Ronda Mrs. Lois Sterenberg Mr. Marshall W. Anstandig Mrs. Jose Willems Gentel

T h e library a n d instructional re­ sources center in the n e w Peale Sci­ ence Center will be memorialized in h o n o r of Drs. J. H a r v e y Kleinheksel a n d Gerrit V a n Zyl, t w o teacherscholars w h o m e a n t so m u c h to g e n ­ erations of H o p e students. T h e Center will h o u se reference w o r k s a n d periodicals in the fields of biology, chemistry, geology a n d psy­ chology, along with auxiliary m a t e ­ rials a n d e q u i p m e n t designed to sup­ p l e m e n t the m o r e traditional m a t e ­ rials that are f o u n d in libraries. T h e Center will include a large central reading r o o m with smaller adjacent m o d u l e s providing space for the use

class of 1927 has given the largest cumulative gift ($5,556). Mr. DeWitt reminded alumni that unrestricted gifts are the lifeblood of all independent colleges. Tuition and fees d o not cover the day-to-day cost of operating the College. Contri­ butions m a k e u p the difference. B e ­ cause of loyal alumni, churches, par­ ents, friends, business leaders and foundations, H o p e has been able to operate within a deficit-free budget during recent years. Approximately one-fifth of H o p e ’s $6 million annual operating budget is contributed in­ come.

Annual % of Fund Partici- Alumni pation Gifts

Class Roll

Donors

21 10 6 9 14 16 14 31 24 36 36 47 40 38 58 57 101

4 3 4 5 7 4 5 17 10 14 15 20 15 16 24 25 31

19% 30% 67% 55% 50% 25% 36% 55% 42% 39% 42% 43% 38% 42% 41% 44% 31%

$

92 101 102 106 117 112 88 91 108 111 111 113 139 127 135 118 148 120 118 113 136 137 167 281 413 255 260 228 201 196 211 240 240 280 316 305 320 428 477 392 391 423 439 397 370 376 427

30 30 29 38 38 35' 27 27 39 26 25 24 41 28 27 24 26 27 21 23 37 36 44 68 89 45 60 53 49 48 41 54 57 45 60 27 59 54 76 89 52 53 58 64 45 35 27

33% 30% 28% 36% 32% 31% 31% 30% 36% 23% 23% 21% 29% 22% 20% 20% 18% 23% 18% 20% 27% 26% 26% 24% 22% 18% 23% 23% 24% 24% 19% 23% 24% 16% 19% 9% 18% 13% 16% 23% 13% 13% 13% 16% 12% 9% 6%

4,594 5,556 3,796 2,848 2,413 2,061 3,640 817 2,072 2,051 1,371 1,323 2,510 2,243 1,681 1,201 888 705 1,610 1,378 1,875 1,688 1,783 2,166 3,784 1,466 2,793 1,843 1,787 1,596 2,318 1,120 1,670 1,215 1,376 537 1,082 745 1,812 1,130 1,253 1,120 665 975 515 436 500

88 50 73 260 900 230 265 983 300 498 905

457

1,600 443 4,850 1,295 2,488

J. Harvey Kleinheksel

i | |

| | 3 1

|

of tapes, film loops, video tapes, slides, p r o g r a m m e d instructional m a ­ terials a n d overhead projector equip­ ment. H o p e science alumni have contrib­ uted or pledged $ 7 5 , 2 2 5 to the Kleinheksel-Van Zyl M e m o r i a l F u n d Drive. T h e nationwide c a m p a i g n is h e a d e d b y Dr. Fredrick F. Y o n k m a n ’25, formerly vice president of Ciba Pharmaceutical C o m p a n y . T h e n e w Peale Science Center will be ready for the start of classes next fall. Dedication ceremonies have b e e n tentatively scheduled for h o m e ­ c o m i n g w e e k e n d , Oct. 26-27.

Unitrust: For the Person Able T o M a k e A Substantial Gift F o r the person in a position to d o ­ trust. T h u s the d o n o r could have the Unitrust invested for g r o w t h or for nate to H o p e College a n asset valued high i n c o m e yield. at $ 5 0 , 0 0 0 or m o r e , the Charitable T h e U ’.itrust is a trust w h i c h ir­ R e m a i n d e r Unitrust is uniquely suited to m a k i n g the gift a n d contin­ revocably n a m e s H o p e College as the r e ma ind er beneficiary o f the assets. uing to receive i n c o m e f r o m it for A t the inception o f the Trust, y o u life. n a m e yourself, a n d at y o u r option a F o r the person o w n i n g a n asset successor beneficiary, as the lifetime (securities or property) w i t h a l o w cost base a n d returning a l o w i n c o m e i n c o m e beneficiary o f the Unitrust. yield, the Unitrust is ideally suited to U p o n the death of the last i n c o m e beneficiary, the assets of the U n i ­ avoiding capital gains tax while at trust are transferred to the H o p e e n ­ the s a m e t i m e increasing yield a n d d o w m e n t , to forever benefit the C o l ­ diversifying holdings. B y donating those securities into the Unitrust, the lege. Also, at the inception, y o u select Unitrust c a n sell t h e m wi t h o u t incur­ the percentage of the annual asset ring capital gains tax, a n d reinvest the fu nd s in other securities, thus di­ value w h i c h y o u w o u l d like paid to y o u each year. T h e percentage m u s t versifying holdings. b e at least 5 %, a n d the College rec­ Also, the d o n o r can influence the o m m e n d s that it n ot exceed 7%. Sev­ investment philosophy of the Unieral options with respect to the actu­ al i n c o m e paid each year are avail­ able. If the d o n o r is married the value of the Unitrust is included in his gross estate, thus increasing the taxfree marital deduction, b ut r e m o v e d f r o m the estate prior to determining A $ 3 0 , 0 0 0 unrestricted grant has b e e n a w a r d e d to H o p e College b y the estate tax. T h e Unitrust is flexible with re­ the Loutit F o u n d a t i o n of G r a n d spect to i n c o m e p a y m e n t s a n d in­ Haven, Mich. ves tm en t philosophy. All capital It is the fourth grant a w a r d e d gains tax is avoided o n a gift of an H o p e b y the Loutit Foundation. appreciated asset. A charitable c o n ­ Grants of $ 2 5 , 0 0 0 w e r e a w a r d e d in tribution deduction for part of the 1963, 1 9 6 7 a n d 1970. asset’s total value m a y b e taken b y T h e a n n o u n c e m e n t f r o m the the d o n o r o n his or her federal in­ F o u n d a t i o n to the College said, c o m e tax return. “ This represents a non-designated T h e Unitrust is especially attrac­ gift to the college f r o m the f o u n d a ­ tion w h i c h m a y be used in the discre­ tive to the person o w n i n g highly a p ­ preciated securities w h i c h are gener­ tion of y o u r governing b o d y in a n y w a y w h i c h it feels will further its e d ­ ating a l o w yield. W h y not d on at e t h e m to H o p e ucational p r o g r a m . ” through a Unitrust. Y o u r generosity T h e Loutit Foundation, a private, non-profit corporation established in will benefit y o u n o w , a n d eventually increase H o p e ’s e n d o w m e n t to pro­ 1 9 5 7 b y William R. Loutit, serves vide enduring support for the C ol­ the public welfare b y providing fi­ nancial impetus a n d stimulus to pro­ lege. g r a m s of other non-profit organiza­ E D I T O R ’S NOTE: This is third in tions. It is primarily c oncerned with a series of articles by William K. p r o g r a m s a n d projects related to the Stone, Director of Planned Giving. welfare of Michigan residents.

Hope Receives $30,000 Grant

j

Gerrit Van Zyl


Highway and Neon

Opus ’73

Four A.M. It is late, or, maybe early on this two lane stretch of winding pavement that curls and snakes its way through a rural, wooded strip of Brown county under a regiment of overhanging black trees that shadow the road deep and give a sense of darkness blacker than the night itself

Selections f r o m Stud ent Literary Publication Edited b y Davi d Beattie A r t w o r k b y B r a d Williams

Night Dance

You take m y hand and pull m e to your side, A n d singing, we dance the October night Away, flying in orange circles wide A n d wild, creating arcs of throbbing light. We dance down over yellow grass and weeds, A n d damp with dew of night we fling our cries Beyond the m oon and glist’ning, race on, freed This autumn eve. There’sfire within your eyes. The grasses, wet and thin, entwine around Our legs and slow us, pulling me, with you, Down, tumbling to the earth. Pale stars surround Us, lacing us with fires hot and blue. Together all the night, the stars and moon A n d wind now blaze in us: we are their own.

The clear air gusting off the windshield plays on the ear as itslips through the cracks where the molding and glass cannot quite come to agreement.

Claudia T e b b e n Senior f r o m R i d g e w o o d , N.J.

A deer in the distance ahead that stands frozen in the far glint of the high beams, upon approach, turns, almost magically, into a cement retaining wall of a small bridge, set firm as if to protect the even smaller, underlying stream from the overhead confusion of asphalt and su rging steel.

To The Dying Woman Mother, Every answer I learned was in your smile; you have not smiled in days. Who is this moaning spirit that takes your body for its disguise? Surely you are not so easily broken. Where is she that could calm every fear with a touch? Away, dead without the grave: she pleads for rest and fears its coming. Mother, this cannot be. Take back yourself and die alive.

The hiss of the bound and neatly grooved rubber waits its turn to crowd back into the wearied mind, like a tea kettle, left simmering over a slow fire, as another bridge, which, too, could have been a deer, glides by, recedes into the diminishing past, recorded in the reflection of a crooked rear-view mirror. A n d the white stripes that slide and slide past in eternal, premeditated intervals, to remind one of place and position, are so constant that a Brahmin could attain Nirvana ifnot distracted by the scattered billboards of cracked and faded paint that bear long forgotten messages, or the occasional, blaring, late night neon that shouts into the eye and gathers the vision toward solitary, wooden-framed taverns where stragglers still lean over the elbow-worn bars wishing that this day’s milk could flow freely into the pail without having to be drawn by the squeeze of a human hand or the suction of a machine. A n d the trees crowd back over the road as the neon, too, fades silent and disappears. Still, there is some comfort in the thought that there are others who will not know the warming embrace of a bed this dwindling night, nor find escape into the continual world of dreams as the road crawls on in the distance. D a v id Beattie Senior f r o m L a k e Forest, 111.

M y love, D o you tremble for the fear of passing? It will come without your waiting. Stay noiv, be not early taken from me. We are here; let tomorrow rest where it will. We are here. Daughter, It is come most quickly upon you: the sum of your days should not noiv allow an ending. Then, shall I call it strange, child? If we name Death unnatural, surely all else isfolly. It is the time we have numbered and counted that amounts, I fear, to nothing.

7JL

Woman, Woman it will be done. K n o w that, it will be done. Carol Y ec ke l S o p h o m o r e from Rochester, N . Y .

The Exiles Stumbling along like a feather blown by currents of a capricious wind The Exiles were silent passengers aboard a train disappearing into the abyss of an unknown night Exiled by the threat of bullets and a blood-red death Now, all that is left of them is silence A silence roaring in one’s ears where justice once had roared. Scott Lenheiser Junior f r o m Northville, Mich.


Nfhc 1973 04 05