Page 1

SECOND CLASS POSTAGE PAID AT HOLLAND, MICHIGAN 49423

PUBLISHED BY T H E H O P E C O L L E G E OFFICE OF I N F OR MA TI ON SERVICES

$8,850,000 BUILD HOPE FUND/HOPE COLLEGE

Fund Raising Program Begins

Gifts to date. Oct 13.1972 BOARD OF TRUSTEES COLLEGE FAMILY FACULTY STUDENTS STAFF

$ 2 200,000

46,000 50,000 24,000

I2Q000

PRE ANNOUNCEMENT GIFTS

403,000 *

27on 23,000 ,

31°/o O f G O A L

T o w a r d Goal Natiojjal Build H o p e F u n d chairman J a m e s M . VerMeulen (left) s h o w s pro­ gress for $8,850,000 fund-raising program to President G o r d o n J. V a n Wylen a n d B o a r d o f Trustees C h airman H u g h DePree.

Science Center Named in Honor of Dr. and Mrs. Norman Vincent Peale

/

T h e n e w Aca de mi c- Sc ie nc e Center will b e n a m e d in h o n o r of Dr. and Mrs. N o r m a n V i n c e n t Peale. Dr. Peale has bee n pastor of the M a r b l e Collegiate C h u r c h in N e w Y o r k City since 1932. Mrs. Peale is a noted author a n d lecturer. A n n o u n c e m e n t of the n a m i n g of the building w a s m a d e N o v . 2 0 b y B o a r d of Trustees C h a i r m a n H u g h D e P r e e a n d President G o r d o n J. V a n

W ylen. Dr. a n d Mrs. Peale w e r e guests of the College at a c o n v o c a ­ tion in D i m n e n t M e m o r i a l Chapel a n d w e r e later recognized at a lun­ c h e o n attended b y 3 0 0 guests. “T h e u n a n i m o u s decision of the B o a r d of Trustees to n a m e the A c a ­ demic-Science Center after Dr. a n d Mrs. N o r m a n V i n c e n t Peale w a s please turn to page two, col. one

mr P. E. Center Plans on Dr aw i n g Board page six

9 W

H o p e College has launched an $ 8 , 85 0, 00 0 fund-raising p r o g r a m for capital, e n d o w m e n t a n d aca de mi c p r o g r a m development. A n n o u n c e m e n t of the p r o g r a m w a s m a d e o n Oct. 13 b y President G o r d o n J. V a n W yl en , B o a r d of Trustees cha ir ma n H u g h D e P r e e of Zeeland, Mich, a n d J a m e s M . V e r M e u l e n of G r a n d Rapids, Mich., na­ tional cha ir ma n of the p r o g r a m that will b e k n o w n as the Build H o p e F u n d. “ T h r o u g h o u t H o p e ’s first century her liberal arts education has h a d powerful intellectual a n d spiritual effects o n her graduates, m a k i n g their careers vital a n d inspiring, m a k ­ ing their h o m e lives rich a n d happy, m a k i n g their civic lives clean and efficient. In her second century H o p e seeks, increasingly, to spread these fruits of intellectual a n d spiri­ tual g ro wt h, ” said Mr. V e r Me ul en . “T o accomplish this, the College m u s t deploy a c a d e m i c resources, physical resources a n d financial re­ sources to a degree not before d r e a m e d of. Accordingly, H o p e pro­ jects a vision— a realistic, practical, achievable vision.” Mr. V e r M e u l e n a n n o u n c e d that gifts a n d pledges to the Build H o p e F u n d already total $ 2 , 72 3, 00 0 or 31 per cent of the goal. M e m b e r s of the College’s B o a r d of Trustees hav e pledged $2.2 million while faculty, students a n d adminis­ trative staff m e m b e r s have c o n ­ tributed $120,000. M o r e than 9 5 %

IT

Fall Sports: Lots to Cheer A b o u t page seven

of the college’s 1 4 4 m e m b e r faculty gave a total of $46,000, the stu­ dents contributed $50,000, a n d the administrative staff $24,000. A n o t h e r $ 4 0 3 , 0 0 0 has b e e n received f r o m friends of the college. “ In its c o m m i t m e n t to the Build H o p e F u n d , the college family has d emonstrated clearly the spirit w h i c h m a k e s H o p e unique,” Mr. V e r M e u l e n said. “ T h e sense of c o m m u n i t y w h i c h exists o n the c a m p u s reflects the Christian tradition of H o p e w h i c h has characterized the College since its founding.” A m o n g the m a j o r goals of the Build H o p e F u n d will be the c o n ­ struction of a $2.5 million physical education center. T h e n e w facility, w h i c h w o u l d c o m p l e m e n t the 70-yearold Carnegie-Schouten g y m n a s i u m , will b e activity-oriented for m a x i m u m student participation, according to Dr. V a n Wylen. T h e building, w h i c h is in prelimi­ nary design stages, w o u l d contain a g y m n a s i u m , olympic-size s w i m m i n g pool, handball courts, wrestling area, training r o o m , lockers, classrooms a n d faculty offices. A n o t h e r $1.6 million will b e used to com pl et e financing of the n e w $3.6 million aca de mi c science center that is u n d er construction with c o m p l e ­ tion scheduled for next fall. O t h er projects to be undertaken include: conversion of the present science building for use in the social sciences a n d humanities programs, please turn to page five, col. four

Science Center Construction on Schedule page eight


Science Center Named in Honor of Dr. and Mrs., Norman Vincent Peale continued f r o m page one m a d e first of all to recognize, with dee p appreciation, the life a n d m i n ­ istry of both Dr. a n d Mrs. Peale,” said President V a n Wylen. ‘‘E a c h has m a d e very definitive a n d distinguished contributions to the church a n d to the nation, and their ministry has t o u c h e d m a n y individual lives with the Ghristian message. Further, n a m i n g this build­ ing after t w o persons w h o s e distin­ guishing activities have related to religion is also a reflection of our c o m m i t m e n t at H o p e College that faith a n d science are indeed c o m ­ patible. ‘‘H o p e College affirms that while other institutions m a y carry o n a dialogue b e t w e e n faith a n d the var­ ious fields of kno wl ed ge , H o p e must engage in such dialogue guided b y b o t h an openly a v o w e d Christian purpose a n d the rigorous d e m a n d s of aca de mi c disciplines.” T h e $3.6 million Center will be ready for the start of the 1 97 3- 74 school year a n d will h o u s e the d e ­ partments of biology, chemistry, geology a n d psychology. F e w if a n y A m e r i c a n s are betterk n o w n b y n a m e than Dr. N o r m a n V in ce nt Peale. Eve ry w e e k millions of m e n a n d w o m e n m e e t h i m through the s p o k e n a n d written w or d. His C h u r c h seats m o r e than 2,000, a n d it is filled to capacity every S u n d a y morning. His books, radio a n d television appearances, and other writings in n ew spapers a n d per­ iodicals e n c o m p a s s a congregation that is almost b e y o n d counting. H a d h e n o other a c c o m p l i s h m e n t to his credit, his b o o k ‘‘T h e P o w e r of Positive T h i n k i n g ” w o u l d have se­ cured h i m the national recognition h e enjoys. T h e “ P o w e r of Positive T h i n k i n g ” has b e e n translated into 33 languages, with a sale of m o r e than three million copies. Dr. a n d Mrs. Peale are publishers of the inspirational m o n t h l y m a g a ­ zine Guideposts, having a circulation of t w o million. Dr. P e a k ’s printed messages go m o n t h l y to 6 0 0 , 0 0 0 people a r o u n d the w o r l d f r o m T h e F o u n d a t i o n for Christian Living. Mrs. Peale is a m e m b e r of the H o p e College B o a r d of Trustees cur­ rently serving as c h a i r w o m a n of the B o a r d ’s A c a d e m i c Affairs C o m m i t -

Continued Support Of Annual Fund Is Stressed T h e A n n u a l F u n d , with its vitally n e e d e d support for the on-going operations of the College, will c o n ­ tinue t hr oughout the Build H o p e F u n d. Build H o p e F u n d C h a i r m a n J a m e s M . V e r M e u l e n e m p h a s i z e d this recently in a letter to A n n u a l F u n d C h a i r m a n Jac k D e Witt in w h i c h he said, “ T h e C a m p a i g n Cabinet is accutely a w a re of the nee d for continu­ ing fiscal responsibility in the regular operations of the College. W e often suggest to Build H o p e F u n d d onors that gifts to the A n n u a l F u n d are like the w e e k l y offering at church — vital to the operation of the ministry — while the Build H o p e F u n d is c o m ­ parable to an extra effort for a n e w church building.” T h e A n n u a l F u n d goal for 197273 is $ 6 4 0 , 0 0 0 f r o m alumni, parents, churches, corporations, foundations a n d friends.

tee. S h e w a s c h a i r w o m a n of the Pres­ idential Search C o m m i t t e e w h i c h n o m i n a t e d candidates for the posi­ tion a s s u m e d b y Dr. V a n W y l e n earlier this year. Mrs. Peale has c o m b i n e d her tal­ ents for writing a n d public speaking with religious a n d social concerns. S h e served for 10 years as national president of the W o m e n ’s B o a r d of D o m e s t i c Missions of the R e f o r m e d C h u r c h in A m e r i c a a n d later b e c a m e the only w o m a n president of o n e of the d e n o m i n a t i o n ’s national boards, the B o a r d of N o r t h A m e r i c a n M i s ­ sions. S h e served as a m e m b e r of the General B o a r d of the National C o u n ­ cil of C h u r c h e s f r o m 1951-1966. Wit h Dr. Peale, she serves o n the board of directors of the Institutes of Religion a n d Health, of w h i c h he is co-founder. Dr. a n d Mrs. Peale each received an h o n o r a r y degree f r o m H o p e C o l ­ lege in 1962. “ This event, a n d the n a m i n g of this building for t h e m , is further recognition of the fact that t ho u g h Dr. a n d Mrs. Peale have each m a d e distinctive contributions in their o w n right, they have always operated as a team, with m a n y joint efforts and m a n y mutually supporting activ­ ities,” said Dr. V a n Wylen.

wmmmmt T h e a n n o u n c e m e n t of the Build H o p e F u n d was m a d e at a press confer­ ence o n Oct. 13 in the Presidents R o o m o f Graves Hall. National chairman J a m e s M . VerMeulen is pictured showing a preliminary rendering o f the pro­ posed Physical Education Center.

James M. VerMeulen Build Hope Chairman James M. VerMeulen, a 1926 H o p e graduate a n d National Chair­ m a n of the Build H o p e F u n d , has always b e e n a take charge m a n . His talents a n d abilities enabled h i m to rise through the ranks of the A m e r i c a n Seating C o m p a n y . O n e of his first contracts as a salesman w a s the seating for D i m n e n t M e m o r i a l C hapel o n H o p e ’s c am pu s. W h e n h e retired in 1970, he h a d attained the top office in the c o m ­

BUILD HOPE FUND OBJECTIVES 1. H o p e Heritage F u n d — to e n d o w scholar­ ships for y o u n g people f r o m the R e f o r m e d C h u r c h in A m e r i c a a n d other w o r t h y stu­ dents seeking the opportunities at H o p e 2. Faculty D e v e l o p m e n t — to e n d o w faculty salaries a n d retirement benefits

$520,000 $1,820,000

3. S tu de nt Residences — to purchase a n d renovate h o m e s o n the edge of the c a m p u s for student cottages

$210,000

4. Environmental/Ecological Sciences — to s u p p l e m e n t the w o r k of the biology, chemistry a n d geology departments in this area

$210,000

5. A c a d e m i c Science Center — to establish a sinking f u n d equal to the federal loan o n this building

$1,655,000

6. D e W i t t S tu de nt a n d Cultural Center — to retire the short t e r m indebtedness incurred o n the construction a n d equipping of this facility

$600,000

7. Creative A r t E du ca ti on Center — to com pl et e the r em odeling of the R u s k B a k e r y Building

$105,000

8. Social Sciences a n d H u m a n it ie s Center — to renovate the present science building a n d relocate several depar tm en ts n o w scattered a bo ut the c a m p u s in unsatis­ factory quarters

$415,000

9. Administrative Center — to renovate V o o r h e e s Hall for improved, adequate, organized administrative offices

news froiri Hope College Published for A l u m n i , Friends a n d Parents of H o p e College. S h o u l d y o u receive m o r e than o n e copy, please pass it o n to s o m e o n e in y o u r c o m m u n i t y . A n overlap of H o p e College constituencies m a k e s duplication s o m e t i m e s unavoidable. EDITOR: T O M R E N N E R

$485,000

10. C o m p u t i n g Center — to provide facilities a n d e q u i p m e n t for administrative and a c a d e m i c purposes; including a familiar­ ization course in data processing for area high school students

$330,000

LI. A n e w Physical E du ca ti on Center — to c o m p l e m e n t the present 66-year-old g y m

$2,500,000

POTAL

pany, C h a i r m a n of the Board. It w a s shortly after his retirement that he w a s invited to join the H o p e B o a r d of Trustees a n d to b e responsible for the Build H o p e F u n d . Utilizing his m a n a g e m e n t talents, h e directed the organization of the national n e t w o r k of volunteers w h o n o w begin w o r k to build H o p e. T h e entire business career of V e r M e u l e n w a s with the A m e r i c a n Seat­ ing C o m p a n y w h i c h is recognized as the nation’s d o m i n a n t manufacturer a n d supplier of public seating. H e joined the C o m p a n y u p o n grad­ uation f r o m H o p e College. His first job w a s that of an inspector in the upholstery department. H e m o v e d u p through the ranks a n d b e c a m e vice president in 1947, president in 1 9 5 8 a n d later chairman. V e r M e u l e n is widely k n o w n in educational circles w h e r e h e achieved p r o m i n e n c e as President of the B o a r d of E du ca ti on of the R e f o r m e d C h u r c h in America, as a delegate to the national W h i t e H o u s e Con fe re nc e o n Education, President a n d Chair­ m a n of the Michigan Legislative S t u d y C o m m i t t e e o n Higher E d u c a ­ tion a n d a trustee of the I n d e p e n ­ dent Colleges F u n d of America. His a l m a m a t er conferred u p o n h i m an h o n o r a r y D o c t o r of L a w s degree in 1951.

$8 ,850,000

Vol. 3, No. 4 N o v e m b e r / D e c e m b e r , 1 9 72 P H O T O CREDITS: J o h n Kobus, R o b Benchley III, E d w a r d M . Mackiewicz, T o m Siderius Official publication, n e ws f r o m H o p e College is published four times a year b y H o p e College, 85 East 12th Street, Holland, Michigan 49423


Volunteers K e y to Build Hope Success CAMPAIGN CABINET J a m e s M . V e r Meulen, C h a i r m a n Clarence J. Becker William F. Beebe Ekdal J. B u y s R u t h N. C o m s t o c k S i m o n D. D e n U y l H u g h D. D eP r e e Richard A. D eW it t Titus J. H ag er G e o r g e D. Heeringa

Irwin J. L ub be rs Walter A. Reed, Jr. H o w a r d R. Sluyter L y n n S. S m i th H e n r y J. Steffens G o r d o n J. V a n W y l e n James M. Ver Meulen Willard C. Wichers Fredrick F. Y o n k m a n

TRUSTEE NUCLEUS FUND Richard A. DeWitt, C h a i r m a n COLLEGE FAMILY COMMITTEE Faculty Division F. S h e l d o n Wettack, C h a i r m a n Staff Division Robert D e Young, Chairman Student Division A n n e M . Proli, C h a i r w o m a n Vice Chairmen a n d C h a i r w o m e n Charles H. Cousineau M a r k H. D e R o o Janet M . DeVries F l o y d H. Essink M o l l y R. Gates R ob e r t W . Schellenberg, Jr. TRUSTS A N D LEGACIES COMMITTEE H e n r y J. Steffens, C h a i r m a n H e r m a n F. Laug, C o - C h a i r m a n CHURCH FUND COMMITTEE Paul J. Baker, C h a i r m a n BUSINESS A N D I N D U S T R Y C O M M I T T E E G e o r g e D. Heeringa, C h a i r m a n FOUNDATION GRANTS COMMITTEE G o r d o n J. V a n Wylen, C h a i r m a n A D V A N C E GIFTS C O M M I T T E E Ekdal J. B u y s a n d H o w a r d R. Sluyter, C o - C h a i r m e n M A J O R GIFTS C O M M I T T E E to be a n n o u n c e d SPECIAL GIFTS C O M M I T T E E H a r v e y J. Buter, C h a i r m a n NATIONAL ALUMNI, PARENTS A N D FRIENDS COMMITTEE Fredrick E. V an de nb er g, C h a i r m a n J o h n C. Schrier, V ic e- Chairman

M e m b e r s o f the Board o f Trustees: (front row) George Heeringa o f H o l ­ land, Mich., Mrs. N o r m a n Vincent Peale o f N e w York, N.Y., Willard C. Wich­ ers o f Holland, Mich. H u g h D e Free o f Zeeland, Mich., G o r d o n J. V a n W y ­ len, Mrs. Harrison Smith o f Greenwich, Conn., A. Dale Stoppels o f G r a n d Rapids, Mich, a n d K e n n e t h D e Groot o f Encinitas, Calif; (second row) Richard A. D e Witt o f Holland, Mich., G o r d o n V a n Oostenburg o f Holland, Mich., David M a r k e r o f Holland, Mich., Chester D r o o g o f Bellflower, Calif. Fritz V. L e n d o f Rensselaer, N. Y , Arthur H. Jentz Jr. o f Holland, Mich., Herbert S. V a n W y k of, Ricbboro, Pa., George H. Vanderborgh o f Sayville, L.I., N. Y., a n d J a m e s M . VerMeulen o f G r a n d Rapids, Mich. ; (back row) Robert W. H a a c k o f Potomac, Maryland, T. J a m e s H a ger o f G r a n d Rapids, Mich., L e o n Bosch o f Evanston, III. Albertus G. Bossenbroek of Hastings-onthe-Hudson, N. Y., Fredrick F. Y o n k m a n o f Marion, Mass., Russell W. VandeBunte o f Kalamazoo, Mich., Ekdal J. B u y s o f Caledonia, Mich. Bernard Brunsting o f Scarsdale, N. Y., a n d H o w a r d R. Sluyter o f Dallas, Tex. N o t pictured are Clarence J. Becker o f Holland, Mich., J o h n G. Dinkeloo ofMt. Carmel, Conn., Alton S. Miles o f Kalamazoo, Mich, a n d Irwin J. Lubbers of Des Moines, Iowa.

Trustees Contribute $2.2 Million

Pictured are s o m e o f the m e m b e r s o f the C a mp a i g n Cabinet w h o have developed the Build H o p e Fund. Pictured f r o m left to right are President Emeritus Irwin J. Lubbers o f D e s Moines, Iowa, J a m e s M . VerMeulen o f G r a n d Rapids, Mich. Willard C. Wichers o f Holland, Mich. Ekdal J. Bu ys o f Caledonia, Mich., William F. Be ebe o f H o l ­ land, Mich. George D. Heeringa o f Holland, Mich. H e n r y J. Steffens o f Holland, Mich, a n d Mrs. R u t h N. C o m ­ stock o f Holland, Mich.

M e m b e r s of the B o a r d of Trustees m a d e their c o m m i t m e n t to the Build H o p e F u n d before the p r o g r a m w a s publicly a n n o u n c e d b y contributing $ 2 , 2 0 0, 00 0 t o w a r d the “ Nucleus F u n d . ” T h e gifts of the 2 9 present, active m e m b e r s surpassed an initial challenge of $ 2 million. “T h e B o a r d of Trustees is m a d e u p of m e n a n d w o m e n f r o m m a n y professions— teachers, ministers, busi­ ness executives a n d others. E v e r y o n e joined in the p r o g r a m a n d gave ac­ cording to his or her means. W e b e ­ lieve this demonstration of our c o m ­ m i t m e n t to H o p e College will be a positive influence o n others w h o will be asked to give. I a m p r o u d to have bee n a part of this effort a n d w a n t to t h a n k publicly m y fellow board m e m b e r s for their enthusiastic sup­ port,” said Richard A. DeWitt, chair­ m a n of the Trustee N uc le us F u n d. T h e Build H o p e F u n d w a s c o n ­ ceived b y the B o a r d of Trustees in the spring of 1971. Since then m e m b e r s of a C a m p a i g n Cabinet, chaired b y Mr. V e r Me ul en , have developed a nationwide n e t w o r k of volunteers, w h o will b e seeking financial support for the College over the next t w o or three years.


Day of Hope Reprinted f r o m the October 13, 1972 issue o f the anchor. T o d a y is the inauguration of Dr. G o r d o n J. V a n W y l e n as the ninth president of H o p e College, and, as the event’s organizers w o u l d have us believe, the beginning of a “ n e w era” for the institution. T o d a y also marks, in a remarkable^isplay of perfect timing a n d public relations expertise, the official a n n o u n c e m e n t of the Build H o p e campaign. T o d a y is a d a y of optimism, a d a y of H op e. V a n W y l e n has traveled the route f r o m original consideration b y the Presidential Search C o m m i t t e e , to election b y the B o a r d of Trustees last January, to assumption of duties last s u m m e r , to the p o m p , c ircum­ stance, a n d h o n o r of t o d a y ’s inaugu­ ral ceremonies. T o d a y is his day, but the future belongs to H o p e College. T h e president’s task of providing the school with leadership a n d direc­ tion during the next f e w years is a m o n u m e n t a l one, but he is only o n e m e m b e r of the H o p e c o m m u n i t y , a n d does not exist in a v a c u u m . S t u ­ dents, faculty, administrators, and trustees, as m a n y m e m b e r s of one body, have a responsibility to c o ­ operate a n d c o m m u n i c a t e with o n e another if H o p e is to continue to prosper — if the n e w era is to b e a g o o d era. V a n W y l e n ’s election w a s m a r k e d with elements of distrust f r o m s o m e faculty a n d students, a n d with the kind of paranoia peculiar to a small institution experiencing an identity crisis. T h e r e has b e e n s o m e genuine fear that V a n W y l e n ’s evangelical Christianity w o u l d b e a step b a c k ­ w a r d for H o p e , a n d that h e m i g h t try to convert the c am pu s. If these fears have not yet b e e n dispelled, H o p e College is n ot w o r t h y of a president of V a n W y l e n ’s caliber. A w a y f r o m H o p e , o n e hears only the highest praise for the m a n — as a n administrator a n d as a person. His aca de mi c a n d professional creden­ tials are impeccable; his gentleness, personal integrity, a n d c om passion a n d concern for his fellow m a n are unquestionable. M a n y see his person­ al religious faith for w h a t it really is:

an asset rather than a handicap for H op e. It is an asset because of the free­ d o m w h i c h results f r o m a personal relationship with Jesus Christ. This is a f r e e d o m o n e w a n ts to share with others; it can never be forced u p o n them. It is a f r e e d o m w h i c h allows others their beliefs a n d w h i c h al­ low s — even encourages— t h e m to seek the truth. It is in an a t m o s p h e r e of such f r e e d o m that V a n W y l e n h o p es to lead the college. In his inaugural address the Presi­ dent s po ke of a crisis in higher education. T h e issues of values a n d relevance are crucially related to this crisis, because higher education wit h ­ out values a n d relevance will soon degenerate into a perpetuation of all that appears to b e absurd in life. W i t h o u t values a n d relevance H o p e too could flounder. H e n c e the president’s concern with goals a n d purposes. O n a super­ ficial level it w o u l d s e e m to be m e r e ­ ly an ill-concealed a tt em pt to delay a n y constructive action. A s a longrange tactic, however, formulation of a statement of H o p e ’s goals is essen­ tial if values a n d relevance are to be retained at this institution, if stu­ dents are to leave here with m o r e than a f e w facts a n d diploma. V a n W y l e n is a m a n with foresight. His foresight is evidenced in another w a y b y his enthusiasm for the Build H o p e c a m p a i g n a n d the i m p r o v e m e n t s it will help bring a b o ut o n c a m p u s . “ Y e t m y e n t h u ­ siasm is not to m a k e the c a m p a i g n a success per se,” h e told the anchor, “ but to enable us to better fulfill our goals.” I m p or ta nt as it is, the Build H o p e c a m p a i g n m u s t b e kept in per­ spective: the physical plant is not all of H o p e . Perhaps it is appropriate that both the Build H o p e kickoff a n d inaguration coincide. B o t h point to­ w a r d H o p e ’s future. B o t h focus the c o m m u n i t y ’s attention o n w h a t the institution is a n d o n w h a t it can a n d will be. In that sense, t o d ay is the beginning of a n e w era.

Leaders o f the Build H o p e student drive are: standing, B o b Schellenberg, A n n e Proli a n d Jan DeVries; seated, F l o y d Essink a n d Mo ll y Gates.

College Family Pledges $120,000 to Build Hope T h e H o p e College F a m i l y — facul­ ty, students a n d m e m b e r s of the administrative staff — have pledged $ 1 2 0 , 0 0 0 t o w a r d the Build H o p e Fund. Contributions a n d pledges sur­ passed the original goal of $ 1 0 0 , 0 0 0 b y 2 0 per cent. “ T h e w o r k of students, faculty a n d staff is o n e of the m o s t i m p o r ­ tant aspects of the Build H o p e c a m ­ paign, for it demonstrates to all other d onors o n e of H o p e ’s greatest strengths — its spirit,” said National C h a i r m a n J a m e s M . V e r M e ul en . D e a n of Students R o b e r t D e ­ Y o u n g , cha ir ma n of the administra­ tive division, t e r m e d the o u t c o m e of the c a m p a i g n “ heartwarming.” D o n at io ns f r o m the administrative division, w h i c h includes staff m e m ­

Build Hope Aids Environmental & Ecological Research Programs W i t h a geographic location ideal for conducting ecological a n d environ­ mental studies, H o p e plans for valu­ able research involving its depart­ m e n t s of biology, chemistry, a n d geology in pro gr am s that will train students for w o r k of g r o w i n g n a ­ tional import. T h e College’s 80-acre Biology Field Station e nc om pa ss es w o o d e d area, sand dunes, a n d a virtually u n ­ t o u c h e d marsh. W i t h a research vessel available for exploration in L a k e Michigan a n d in the Black River Basin, a n d with a recent gift of land a n d buildings o n L a k e M ac atawa, the College has a fine start in developing an Environmental and Ecological Science Center. T h e Build H o p e F u n d includes $ 2 1 0 , 0 0 0 for property i m p r o v e ­ m e n t s a n d for underwriting research a n d environmental studies.

bers, secretaries, m a i n t e n a n c e a n d housekeeping, a n d the health a n d f o o d services, reached $24,000, e x ­ ceeding the projected total b y $14,000. S h e l d o n Wettack, professor of chemistry, reported that faculty c o m m i t m e n t a n d participation wer e also good. “ T h e y realized the conse­ q ue nc es of the overall drive a n d re­ s p o n d e d extremely well,” h e said. O n e h u n d r e d thirty-seven faculty m e m b e r s pledged nearly $ 4 6 , 0 0 0 for the cause. A student division fund-raising organization paralleled that of the faculty. T o carry out the student f u n d raising campaign, a large a n d c o m p l e x organization w a s estab­ lished, involving approximately 4 5 0 students. Students pledged m o r e than $ 5 0 , 0 0 0 for the campaign. General c h a i r m a n of the Student Division w a s A n n e Proli o f N o r t h Plainfield, N.J. C o - c h a i r m e n w e r e M o l l y Gates of Litchfield, Mich., C h u c k C o u si ne au of M u s k e g o n , Mich., F l o y d Essink of Zeeland, Mich., Jan DeVries of Holland, Mich., M a r k D e R o o of G a h a n n a , O h i o a n d B o b Schellenberg of W y o ­ ming, Mich. E a c h of the co-chairmen w a s hea d of a corps of “ captains” , each of w h o m in turn w a s responsible for the fund-raising efforts in o n e d o r m sec­ tion or in o n e or t w o cottages. T h e captains led t e a ms of four or five students w h o did the actual w o r k of soliciting pledges f r o m their fellow students. ’ C o- ch ai rm en of the faculty divi­ sion w e r e Dr. D. Ivan Dykstra, pro­ fessor of philosophy, a n d Dr. J o h n Hopkins, cha ir ma n of the depart­ m e n t of c o m m u n i c a t i o n . Serving as co-chairmen of the a d ­ ministrative staff division w e r e L e r oy Lebbin, director of libraries; C h a r ­ lotte Mulder, secretary to the Presi­ dent; J o n Huisken, registrar; a n d T o m Renner, director of information services.


Dr. Van Wylen Sees Hope Committed to Truth

T h e a d d e d d imension of a Chris­ tian liberal arts education is neces­ sary today m o r e than ever so that y o u n g m e n a n d w o m e n can w o r k in this w or ld with a heightened sense of responsibility a n d c o m pa ss io n said Dr. G o r d o n J. V a n W y l e n u p o n his inauguration as the n e w president of H o p e College. Dr. V a n W y l e n w a s inaugurated the ninth president o f H o p e College o n O c t o b e r 13 during a c e r e m o n y attended b y 1,200 persons in D i m nent M e m o r i a l Chapel. “ T h e basic characteristic of H o p e College is our c o m m i t m e n t to truth - its discovery, its transmission, and its application,” Dr. V a n W y l e n said. T h e claim is in itself neither unique nor profound, for every insti­ tution of higher learning w o u l d s u b ­ scribe to it w it ho ut hesitation, the n e w president admitted. “ T h e important question is h o w w e at H o p e College, c o m m i t t e d as w e are to Christianity a n d to the liberal arts, perceive the truth. In­ deed, in answering this question, w e define our essential being.” President V a n W y l e n expressed a conviction “ that at H o p e College, our basic character a n d c o m m i t m e n t gives us an invaluable opportunity to contribute to t w o of the m o s t pres­ sing p r o b l e m s in high education to­ d a y . . . value a n d relevance.” “ F o o d a n d possession c an n o t be dismissed as m e r e bourgeois obses­ sions; yet they m u s t b e placed in the larger context of life — the context of life as v iewed f r o m G o d ’s perspec-

tive . . . That, 1 submit, m a k e s for genuine relevance in a liberal arts education. “ In all of this, w e m u s t be realis­ tic, admitting that the w or ld harbors evil a n d sin that w o u l d lead us to degrade a n d misuse our e n d o w m e n t s .

The H o p e Col­ lege Music D e pa r t m e nt will present its traditional p r o ­ g r a m o f choral, organ a n d instrumental music, Sunday, Dec. 3 in Dimnent M e m ­ orial Chapel. Services will be held at 4 p.m. a n d 8:30 p.m. T h e annual ser­ vice will m a r k the 31st per­ f o r m a n c e b y the Music department o f this festive occasion, first presented on D e c e m b e r 1, 1941. Admission will be b y ticket only. C o m p l i ­ mentary tickets will be available f r o m the music department of­ fice in the N y k e r k Hall of Music.

Culture is an integral part of the re­ d e m p t i v e w o r k of G o d in Jesus Christ a n d this provides a powerful incentive to ensure that o ur cultural activities p r o m o t e that w h i c h is h o n ­ orable a n d just a n d pure.” T h e president urged the continued

Vicki T e n H a k e n , a senior f r o m B i r n a m w o o d , Wise., w a s c r o w n e d h o m e c o m i n g q u e e n during halftime ceremonies of the Hope-Olivet foot­ ball game. Miss T e n H a k e n is a c o m ­ m u n i c a t i o n / G e r m a n major. S h e is active in the International Relations club, G e r m a n club, Pi K a p p a Delta forensic h o n o r society, the y e a r b o o k staff a n d debate team. Selected b y their classmates to be m e m b e r s of the h o m e c o m i n g court

d e v e l o p m e n t of H o p e College as a c o m m u n i t y “ p e r m e a t e d with integ­ rity a nd c o m pa ss io n . . .” ‘ A t H o p e College w e have the privilege of reappraising these re­ sponsibilities, not only in terms of ensuring survival for the h u m a n race, but as part of our calling to m a k e this planet, like our lives, a source of joy a n d peace a n d love.” H e encouraged the college c o m ­ m u n i t y to maintain its academic pro gr am s at a level that “ enable us to achieve a sense of self-fulfillment in our relationship to G o d , to our fel­ l o w m a n , a n d to the w or ld a ro un d us.” H o p e College has a unique o p p o r ­ tunity, according to Dr. V a n Wylen, to prepare students to a s s u m e major responsibilities in specific areas and to “ function compassionately within these areas, striving to m e e t h u m a n needs a n d to i m p r o v e the quality of life for all persons w h o m they e n ­ counter.” “ T h e great thing is that in this c o m m u n i t y w e can not only share these experiences, b ut through t h e m w e can w o r k together to achieve our purpose a n d goals for H o p e College, a n d at the s a m e time develop and m a t u r e as individuals. This is m y vision for H o p e College as a c o m m u ­ nity of learners a n d teachers and friends.”

The text o f Dr. V a n Wylen s inaugu­ ral address as well as other speeches appears in the Fall edition o f the A l u m n i Magazine.

w e r e Rita H a y d e n , a senior f r o m Mundelein, 111.; C y n d y H a r t m a n , a junior f r o m Saline, Mich.; Margie B a r r o w m a n , a junior f r o m O c e a n City, N.Y.; Claire Campbell, a s o p h o ­ m o r e f r o m G r a n d Rapids, Mich.; P a m Fisher, a s o p h o m o r e f r o m Spring Lake, Mich. D e b b i e Weiss, a fre sh ma n f r o m Holland, Mich.; a n d Gail Vogel, a fre sh ma n f r o m Dolton,

111

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Pull/Nykerk Ends inaDraw

E v e r y o n e w a s a “ w i n n e r ” this fall as the s o p h o m o r e s w o n the annual Pull tug-of-war a n d the fre sh me n w e r e victorious in N y k e r k C u p c o m ­ petition. A s always, there w a s a b u n d a n t c a m p u s a n d c o m m u n i t y enthusiasm for the events. H u n d r e d s of persons lined the Black River for the 74th Pull while the Holland Civic Center w a s filled to capacity for the 36th N yk er k. T h e s o p h o m o r e s w o n the Pull in a short 5 4 m in ut es for the second straight t r i u m p h for the Class of 1975. It w a s o n e of the shortest Pulls

in m e m o r y . T h e shortest o n record lasted only t w o minutes, 4 0 seconds in 1956. T h e longest w e n t a n e n d u r ­ ing t w o hours a n d 2 7 m in ut es in 1965. In N y k e r k competition the s o p h o ­ m o r e chorus sang an arran ge me nt of “ All the Things Y o u Are.” T h e y w e r e directed b y senior M a r i a n n e M e y e r s of Franklin Lakes, N.J., as­ sisted b y senior Sheila Schuller of Santa A n a , Calif. P a m L e e t s m a of Cypress, Calif, w a s the s o p h o m o r e assistant director. M a r y Jan e M y e r s of T o n a w a n d a , N.Y-. a c c o m p a n i e d her class o n the piano.

T h e f r e s h m a n chorus sang “ N e w W o r l d C o m i n g . ” T h e y w e r e directed b y junior K a t h y V a n d e r M o l e n of Spring Lake, Mich., assisted b y j u n ­ ior Esther J o h n s o n of Lafayette, Ind. F r e s h m a n L y d ia Huttar o f Holland, Mich, served her class as assistant director. M a r a R e i t s m a of Holland, Mich, w a s the f r e s h m a n accompanist T h e s o p h o m o r e play w a s “ Pollya n n a ” u n d e r the direction of senior Loree Schuster of Southfield, Mich. T h e f r e s h m e n presented a n a dapta­ tion f r o m “ Peter Pan.” It w a s direct­ ed b y juniors Margie B a r r o w m a n of O c e a n City, N.J. a n d Patti R o s s of S o u t h Holland, 111.

T h e s o p h o m o r e oration w a s given b y K a r e n N o g g l e of K a l a m a z o o , Mich. S h e w a s c o a c h e d b y Vicki T e n H a k e n of B i r n a m w o o d , Wis. T h e f r e s h m a n orator w a s Katie S o l m s of Grosse He, Mich, a n d her coach w a s Marcia D yk st ra of Clinton, 111. General C h a i r m a n of N y k e r k w a s L y n n e W a l c h e n b a c h , a senior f r o m G r a n d Rapids, Mich. Assisting her w e r e J e a n n e Afton, a f r e s h m a n f r o m Fruitport, Mich., Janet K o o p , a s o p h o m o r e f r o m Hamilton, Mich., S h a r o n M ee ng s, a junior f r o m Zeeland, Mich., a n d S u s a n Bruggink, a senior f r o m B y r o n Center, Mich.


news f r o m H o p e College— N o v e m b e r / D e c e m b e r


A Personal Look atHope’s Educational Policy E D I T O R ’S N O T E : A c a d e m i c D e a n Morrette Rider authored this personal statement o f H o p e ’s educational philosophy for the a n ­ chor, the college’s student n e ws ­ paper. Dr. Rider joined the H o p e faculty in 1 9 4 7 as professor o f in­ strumental music. H e was appointed D e a n for A c a d e m i c Affairs in 1967. Frequently uniqueness in an e d u ­ cational institution is characterized b y an o v e r w h e l m i n g emphasis o n a specific educational program, an unusual professional or preprofes­ sional major, or s o m e u n o r t h o d o x system of grading, granting credits, or process of administration. T h e uniqueness of H o p e College is not as apparent to the casual observer as a n y of the aforeme nt io ne d ideas, but it exists with a clarity of purpose a n d a demonstrable m e a s u r e of success apparent to all w h o k n o w the institu­ tion. T h e core of our philosophy exists in the feeling of c o m m u n i t y w h i c h is the college. This c o m m u n i t y i m m e d i ­ ately involves the students, faculty, a n d administration, but also extends, with only slightly decreased e m p h a ­ sis, to the trustees of the college and to our alumni. Liberal education within the Christian tradition provides a focus for this c o m m u n i t y and supports the belief that this c o m m u n i t y aims at a sustained disciplined inquiry in an a t m o s p h e r e of f r e e d o m with a goal that m o v e s towards inf or me d critical understanding of h u m a n existence a n d activity. T h e educational pro­ g r a m seeks to create an appreciative awareness of h u m a n achievements: intellectual, social, a n d artistic. It seeks to evaluate conceptions of h u ­ m a n existence a n d to provide those intellectual skills bot h professional a n d general that will prepare the student for his responsbilities as an inf or me d citizen. In our intent to assist each indi­ vidual student to b e c o m e w h a t he is capable of b ecoming, w e speak to a diversity of approaches in education, treating the individual according to his o w n abilities, interests, attitudes a n d beliefs. It is not our p ur po se to design a h u m a n product, n o r to force

the student into a predetermined intellectual mold. It is our task to p r o d u c e the free individual w h o s e fully developed attitudes, abilities, a n d beliefs will contribute m o s t fully a n d with the m o s t value to a d e m o ­ cratic society. T h e multiplication of individual strengths, the joining to­ gether of diverse opinions, leads to m ut ua l fulfillment. T h e c o m m u n i t y that is H o p e C o l ­ lege exists in m a n y tangible ways. F o r example, our c o m m i t t e e and board structure w h i c h assigns a d ­ ministrators, students, a n d faculty to k e y responsible decision-making roles in almost every area of the col­ lege planning a n d operation. In less tangible but perhaps even m o r e important ways, the c o m m u ­ nity exists in a m a n n e r w h i c h enables each student to retain his u ni qu e ­ ness, a uniqueness that m u s t n o t be lost to a n y system, gover nm en t, or institution if it is to contribute its full m e a s u r e of w o r t h to the indivi­ dual a n d his society. It is our belief that a God-given talent is a capability to b e used for the benefit of the w o r l d a n d c an no t be brought to m a ­ turity in a setting insulated f r o m other conceptions, other attitudes, a n d other beliefs. H o p e College is a place to provide k n o w l e d g e a n d skills, a n d through t h e m develop abilities, attitudes and beliefs w h e r e b y the individual brings with greater understanding a n d s y m ­ p a t hy all that h e can contribute to the greater g o o d of his society while retaining his unique ability a n d m a k i n g his unique contribution. While secular education m u s t ac­ cept current mores, the churchrelatedness of H o p e provides a free­ d o m to bring u n d e r critical scrutiny a n d j u d g m e n t events a n d actions in terms of values derived f r o m a f ra me ­ w o r k of belief a n d meaning. It is our purpose to transform m e n a n d their perceptions through the m e d i u m of h u m a n learning. T h e c hurch aims to transform m e n t hr ou gh the m e d i u m of transcendence a b o ve a n d b e y o n d the h u m a n , but H o p e College, through its c hurch relationship, transforms the p o w e r of learning itself in the service of an even higher power.

While the learning o f skills, the acquaintance with facts, a n d the various other specific goals of e d u c a ­ tion are important, the H o p e student is challenged to seek deeper m e a n ­ ings, values, a n d goals in order to provide a firm basis for his philoso­ p h y of life in the belief that our prime purpose is to seek eternal m e a n i n g a n d thereby enter m e a n i n g ­ fully into the historic continuity of faith. N o a m o u n t of scholarly achieve­ m e n t alone m e e t s the requisites of H o p e College education while, at the s a m e time, religious piety is not an acceptable substitute for sustained

scholarship. In our life of increasing complexity, w e are faced with the pressing needs for persons of c o m p e ­ tence. N o a m o u n t of g o o d thoughts, or g o o d intentions, or g o o d will can accomplish the n ee d e d result unless they are i m p l e m e n t e d through c o m ­ petence. H o p e College seeks to provide c o m p e t e n c y w h e r e b y the beliefs and talents of the individual can be trans­ f o r m e d into abilities a n d attitudes to serve the greater g o o d of his society with understanding, s y m p a t h y and competence. It is our task to develop a c o m m u n i t y of scholars through w h i c h Christ is witness to the world b y their continual pursuit of further truth, n o matter h o w discomforting, b y the spiritual emphasis w h i c h they share, a n d b y their determination to offer whatever w i s d o m they attain to their fellow m a n in this period of service. It is our belief that at H o p e C o l ­ lege Christian c o m m i t m e n t is c o n s o ­ nant with personal freedom, that the theological foundation for h u m a n self awareness leads to a responsive concern for o n e ’s f e l l o w m a n a n d society, a n d that an inf or me d u nd er ­ standing of the Christian faith pro­ vides a viable foundation for aca­ d e m i c excellence a n d the fulfillment of h u m a n potential.

Tuition Increased 4.7% Tuition, r o o m a n d b oa rd fees at H o p e College for the 1 9 7 3 - 7 4 aca­ d e m i c year will b e increased $ 1 4 0 to $3,100, President G o r d o n J. V a n W y l e n has a n n ou nc ed . Tuition will be increased $ 9 5 to $1,990, r o o m fees will g o u p $ 2 0 to $ 4 5 0 a n d board will increase $ 2 5 to $585. A n activities fee will r emain at $75. T h e increases w e r e a p p r o v e d b y the college’s B o a r d of Trustees dur­ ing their Fall meeting. T h e $ 3 , 1 0 0 figure represents a 4.7 percent hike over present fees and “ is just equal to anticipated cost of living increases” according to Presi­ dent V a n Wylen. Dr. V a n W yl en , in a letter to par­ ents of present students, wrote: “A s

a private college, w e are heavily de­ p e n d e n t u p o n tuition for our aca­ d e m i c budget. W e are c o m m i t t e d to a c a d e m i c excellence, a n d our first concern is to have the necessary re­ sources to achieve this goal. W e are also deeply c oncerned for our stu­ dents a n d their families, a n d our desire is to insure that every student w h o so desires has the opportunity to study at H o p e College.” President V a n W y l e n noted that the college’s financial aid p r o g r a m for students will increase in p r o p o r ­ tion to the fees hike. Presently, H o p e students p a y 8 0 per cent of the college’s annual oper­ ating costs. T h e college has an enroll­ m e n t of 2 , 1 2 4 m e n a n d w o m e n a n d an operational b u d g e t of $6,570,500.

Pre-election Survey Reveals Nixon’s Strength with Hope Students A pre-election survey of a crosssection of H o p e College students s h o w e d they favored the re-election of President Richard Nixon. T h e survey, taken b y students in a political science intern class, r a n d o m ­ ly s am pl ed 8 8 of the college’s 2,124 students. Eighty-seven per cent of the s a m ­ pled students said they w e r e regis­ tered for the election. Sixty-three per cent of those regis­ tered said they supported the reelection of President N ix o n , 19 per cent favored G e o r g e M c G o v e r n , 16 per cent w e r e u ndecided a n d 3 per cent indicated a preference for other candidates.

Representatives o f the R e f o r m e d Church in Am er i c a a n d m e m b e r s o f the H o p e College B o ard o f Trustees exchanged dialogue o n the role o f the church related institution o f higher learning during the trustee's fall meeting. Pictured above (left to right) are the Rev. R a y m o n d Rezverts, President o f the Particular S y n o d o f Michigan; the Rev. Marion D e Velder, general secre­ tary o f the General Synod; Harry D e Bruyn, president o f the General Synod; H u g h D e Pree, chairman o f the H o p e College B o ard o f Trustees; a n d Presi­ dent V a n Wylen.


Holland Businessman Paul Baker Heads Build Hope Church Fund M e m b e r s of the Build H o p e F u n d church c o m m i t t e e have already m a d e m a n y contacts with R e f o r m e d C h u r c h consistories enlisting their support. C h a i r m a n of the church c o m m i t ­ tee is Paul B ak er of Holland, Mich. Captains o n the c o m m i t t e e are H a r v e y J. Buter, Holland Classis; H e r m a n Kruizenga, M u s k e g o n Classis; G e n e C. Campbell, N o r t h G r a n d R ap id s Classis; Richard Machiele, Zeeland Classis; L a V e r n e H. Boss, S o u t h G r a n d Rapids Classis; a n d Garrett H. D e Haan, K a l a m a z o o Classis. T h e H o p e Heritage F u n d of the Build H o p e c a m p a i g n will e n d o w

Build H o p e F u n d church committee chairman Paid Baker (left) of Holland, Mich, reviews campaign strategy with Holland Classis captain Harvey J. Enter, national Build H o p e chairman J a m e s M . VerMeulen, a n d M u s k e g o n Classis captain H e r m a n Kruizenga.

Planned Giving for Hope College E D I T O R 'S N O T E : This is the first in a series o f articles b y William K. Stone, Director o f Planned Giving. A n e w era has b e g u n at H o p e C o l ­ lege with the arrival of President G o r d o n J. V a n Wylen. His leadership is r ecommitting H o p e to the ideals of Christian higher education — to aca­ d e m i c excellence a n d f r e e d o m per­ v a d ed with Christian ethics a n d val­ ues. T h e n e w Build H o p e c a m p a i g n will provide the n e e d e d buildings and e n d o w m e n t funds to m a k e H o p e financially sound, essential to contin­ uing the vitality, integrity a n d pur­ pose of the College. S o m e people can m a k e substantial gifts outright to H o p e College. Others w o u l d like to, but are pre­ vented f r o m doing so because of the necessity to continue receiving in­ c o m e presently earned b y the pro­ p o s ed gift, or because part of the gift m a y b e n e e d e d in s o m e future e m e r ­ gency. F o r those w h o w o u l d like to m a k e

a gift, but n e e d to retain i n c o m e or the principal during life, H o p e C o l ­ lege has established a Planned Giving Program. A planned gift is o n e in w h i c h the d o n o r retains lifetime rights to the i n c o m e (such as a Gift Annuity, the Pooled Life I n c o m e F u n d or Charita­ ble R e m a i n d e r Unitrust), or a gift w h i c h the d o n o r plans to m a k e in the future, such as a provision (be­ quest) for H o p e College in his or her will. T h e s e are the p ri ma ry f o r ms of Planned Giving, but there are others, such as the gift of an insurance poli­ cy, or a h o m e with retained lifetime residency rights. M o s t f o r m s of planned gifts will result in an i m m e d i a t e charitable contribution deduction for the d o ­ nor for part of the value of the gift. A gift to the Build H o p e F u n d can be m a d e in the f o r m of a Gift A n n u ­ ity, P ooled Life I n c o m e F u n d , or a Charitable R e m a i n d e r Unitrust. In succeeding issues, this c o l u m n will present m o r e detail a n d e x a m ­ ples of P la nn ed Giving opportunities.

scholarships for y o u n g people fro m the R e f o r m e d C h u r c h in A m e r i c a a n d other w o r t h y students seeking opportunities at H o p e . C o n g r e g a ­ tions of the R e f o r m e d C h u r c h in A m e r i c a are also being urged to c o n ­ tribute to other phases of the Build H o p e F u n d to help enrich H o p e ’s outreach to its C h u r c h constituency.

Drive Will Support Capital, Endowment, and Academics continued f r o m page one completion of the art education c e n ­ ter, additional student housing, e n ­ vironmental a n d ecological science pro gr am s a n d retirement of a debt o n the recently c o m pl et ed D eW i t t Student a n d Cultural Center. T w o other m a j or objectives in­ clude a $ 5 2 0 , 0 0 0 scholarship fun d to allow qualified y o u n g m e n a n d w o m e n to attend H o p e a n d a $1.9 million f u n d for faculty develop­ m e n t a n d e n d o w m e n t of faculty salaries. T h e Build H o p e F u n d is the third m a j or f u n d raising c a m p a i g n u nd er ­ taken b y H o p e since the e n d of W o r l d W a r II. T h e “ L o o k i n g A h e a d with H o p e ” campaign, u n d er the leadership of President Emeritus Irwin J. Lubbers, raised funds to­ w a r d the construction of the V a n Z oe r e n library, the N y k e r k Hall of Music, the physics-mathematics building a n d several residence halls. O n its 1 0 0 th birthday in 1 9 6 6 H o p e launched the Centennial D e c a d e Master Plan u n d er former President Calvin A. V a n d e r Werf. T h a t c a m p a i g n realized the construc­ tion of the D e W i t t S tu de nt a n d C u l ­ tural Center, the start of funding for the n e w aca de mi c science center, the W y n a n d Wichers addition to the N y ­ kerk Hall of M u s i c a n d t w o residence halls.

Campus Focal Point T h e D e W i t t S tu de nt a n d Cultural Center continues to be the center of activity o n the H o p e c am pu s, w h e t h ­ er it be b ow li ng in the recreation area or participating in the theatre d e p a r t m e n t production of Beggar’s Opera. A portion of the Build H o p e F u n d will retire the short ter m indebted­ ness incurred in the construction a n d equipping of the D e W i t t Center.

Pictured above (from left to right) are Vicki Weidman, a s o p h o m o r e f r o m N e w Holland, Pa.; David Bast, a senior f r o m G r a n d Rapids, Mich, a n d Phyllis Acocello, a senior f r o m Colonia, N.J.


P. E. Center Plans on Drawing Board A n e w Physical E d u c a t i o n Center is a critical n e e d at H o p e College. Since 1906, w h e n enrollment w a s less than 4 0 0 students, the CarnegieS c h o u t e n G y m n a s i u m has rendered y e o m a n service. T o d a y , with m o r e than 2 ,1 00 students enrolled a n d a recently established curriculum at­ tracting an increasing n u m b e r of physical education majors, the old g y m simply is n o longer adequate. Plans for a functional, no-frills, n e w building have b e e n drawn. A n d a site is being secured o n the edg e of the c am pu s. T h e planned $ 2 , 5 0 0 , 0 0 0 center will provide e c o no mi ca l space for instruction, recreation, intra­ mural sports a n d s o m e intercollegiate contests — but not basketball, w h i c h

will continue in the Holland Civic Center. Flexibility a n d e c o n o m y have b e e n p ri ma ry concerns of the plan­ ners. T h e y hav e succeeded in c o m ­ bining versatile spaces so that there will be several g y m n a s i u m s , an in­ d o o r track, squash a n d handball courts, several locker r oo ms , offices, classrooms a n d a u ni q u e pool w h i c h will allow competitive s w i m m i n g in either yards or meters. T h e m a n y facets of the H o p e p h y ­ sical education p r o g r a m provide: (1) an a c a d e m i c p r o g r a m leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree, (2) informal recreation opportunities for all stu­ dents, (3) organized physical fitness a n d sports activities for individuals

Camegie-Schouten has provided y e o m a n service.

f

S w i m m i n g pool is part o f proposed center. a n d groups, (4) intramurals, a n d (5) intercollegiate athletic competition in fourteen sports — nine for m e n a n d five for w o m e n . E m p h a s i s in intercollegiate competition is o n the participants, not o n the College, its standings in the league or its reputa­ tion. Nevertheless, H o p e has fielded c ha m p i o n s h i p t ea ms in all sports at various times in its history. A s in all H o p e a c a d e m i c programs, physical education courses require rigorous study. T h e curriculum for students pursuing a degree in physi­ cal education consists of basic liberal arts courses coupled with required courses in biology, mathematics, psychology, physics or chemistry a n d a m i n i m u m of twenty-seven hours of physical education course requirements. Typical required courses are: hum a n physiology, a n a t o m y a n d kinesi­

ology, p sy chology of m o t o r activity, techniques of coaching, sports socio­ logy, biomechanics, a n d independent study designed to provide a first re­ search experience. T h e aca de mi c p r o g r a m prepares graduates for ca­ reers in physical education teaching at elementary, secondary a n d college levels; d a n ce education; coaching; sports journalism; physical therapy; a n d recreation p r o g r a m s in social agencies, industry a n d communities. Organized a r o u n d dormitory units, fraternities a n d sororities, in­ tramural t ea ms offer the vigor a nd fun of competition to all interested students in eleven different sports. In addition, students m a y partici­ pate in twenty-three diverse recrea­ tion activities providing varying d e ­ grees of physical exercise ranging f r o m ping p o n g a n d b ow li ng to g y m nastics a n d fencing._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _


FallSports:Lots To CheerAbout The Flying D u t c h m e n enjoyed o n e of their m o s t successful fall sport seasons ever w i n n i n g 2 2 of 34 contests. C o a c h G e n e B r o w n ’s soccer tea m w o n H o p e ’s first outright Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association ( M I A A ) c ha m p i o n s h i p a n d e n d ­ ed the season with a 9-4 record. T h e football t e a m w a s in the M I A A race until the final w e e k e n d before dropping a heartbreaker to Adrian. Their 6-2-1 record w a s the best for a H o p e football s qu ad in m o r e than a decade. T h e cross country s qu ad w a s second in the M I A A b o w i n g to Kala­ m a z o o b y three points, 36-39, in the closest finish in league history. G o l f b e c a m e a fall sport for the first time with the D u t c h m e n ending sixth in the M I A A with a 2-4 dual m e e t record.

H o p e a n d K a l a m a z o o colleges lead the Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association ( M I A A ) all-sports race after fall competition with 32 points each. A n all-sports t ro p h y is a w a r d e d each year to the M I A A college with the best cumulative p e r f o r m a n c e in the league’s 10 sports. H o p e w a s c h a m p i o n in soccer, finished second in cross country,

Senior football standout T e d Albrecht claims another o p p o n e n t f r o m d e ­ fensive e n d position. H e w a s selected H o p e ’s m o s t valuable player b y his teammates.

T w o H o p e runners, s o p h o m o r e Phil Ceeley a n d freshman Stuart Scholl, were n a m e d to the all-MIAA cross country team.

third in football a n d sixth in cross country. H o p e has w o n the M I A A all­ sports trophy eight times since joining the seven school confer­ ence in 1926. T h e all-sports standings after fall competition are: H o p e 32, K a l a m a z o o 32, A lb io n 28, A l m a 24, Calvin 17, Olivet 16, a n d Adrian 13.

F r es h m a n J o h n Bedell o f Elmira, N. Y. boots one o f t w o goals in 4-1 victory over K a l a m a z o o College in post-season tournament. This win clinched H o p e ’s first outright M I A A soccer championship.

Junior tailback B o b L a m e r (43) set a H o p e single season rushing record gaining 1,310 yards in nine games.


The symbol of the Build Hope F u n d is an anchorone of the traditional emblems of Hope Collegeenclosed in a triangle emblematic of the Trinity of Father, Son, and Holy Spirit and reflecting H o p e ’s Christian heritage. The anchor was drawn from the one that rests on the lawn in front of Graves Hall.

BUILD H O P E Acofkm'k-Science Center on Schedule T h e n e w Academic-Science Center is rapidly b e c o m i n g a reality. T h e building will b e ready for o c c u p a n c y b y the start of the 1 9 7 3 - 7 4 school year a n d will h o u se the depar tm en ts of biology, chemistry, geology a n d psychology. A significant share of the Build H o p e F u n d ($1,655,000) will be

used to establish a sinking fun d equal to the federal loan a w a r d e d the College for construction of the building, A n o t h e r $ 4 1 5 , 0 0 0 f r o m the Build H o p e F u n d will b e used to renovate the present 30-year-old science building into a Social Sciences a n d H u manities Center.

Mr. a n d Mrs. Stanley Kresge were introduced to the guests at the Oct. 13 inaugural luncheon in Phelps Hall. Mr. Kresge is Chairman o f the Kresge Foundation w h o s e $ 5 00 , 0 0 0 challenge grant launched the f u n d drive for the Academic-Science Center.

Academic-Science Center (right foreground) joins Physics-Math building a n d V a n Zoeren Library o n growing H o p e campus._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ .— — — ~ n e w s f r o m H o p e College— N o v e m b e r / D e c e m b e r

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