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1UZWSfrmCOLLEGE $ THIS N E W S L E T T E R IS PUBLISHED BY THE HOPE C O L LE GE OFFICE OF INFORMATION SE R V ICES. E D ITO R :T O M R E N N E R

N e w Academic C a l e n d a r Set For 1 9 7 2 - 7 3

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T h e B o a r d of Trustees a n d the faculty have a p p r o v e d a n e w a c a d e m i c calendar, effective with the 1 9 7 2 - 7 3 a c a d e m i c year. T h e n e w calendar will a d vance the starting date of fall classes b y several weeks, m a k i n g it possible to c o m p l e t e the first semester before Christmas a n d the s e cond semester b y early M a y . T h e starting date for classes in 1972, as a n n o u n c e d b y D e a n for A c a d e m i c Affairs Morrette Rider, will be o n Thursday, Aug. 31, preceded b y f r e s h m a n orientation a n d registration beginning o n A u g . 26. T h e fall t e r m will include t w o four d a y vacation periods, o n e in O c t o b e r a n d the second falling o n Thanksgiving holiday w e e k e n d . T h e first semester will conc l u d e Dec. 21, a n d will b e followed b y a three w e e k m i d ­ year vacation. T h e s e cond semester will b e ­ gin o n Jan. 1 5 a n d will include the tradi­ tional ten d a y spring recess, ending the semester o n Friday, M a y 1 1 , 1 9 7 3 . T h e a n ­ nual A l u m n i D a y will also fall o n M a y 11, with Baccalaureate o n Saturday, M a y 12, a n d C o m m e n c e m e n t o n S u n d a y , M a y 13. T h e s e c o n d semester will b e followed b y a special three w e e k M a y term, intend­ ed primarily for concentrated course offerings, field trips, special projects in­ cluding i n dependent study, a n d innova­ tive curricular offerings. During the M a y term, w h i c h will b e optional for all students, enrollment will consist for each' individual of a single class m a k i n g p o s ­ sible a period of intense concentration o n o n e subject area. " T h e calendar will avoid the currently existing t w o w e e k final period of the first semester following Christmas vacation a n d c o m p l e t e the full first semester w i t h ­ o u t major interruption," said Dr. Rider. " T h e early c o mp l e t i on of the second semester will m a k e it possible for students to seek s u m m e r e m p l o y m e n t at an early date, to enroll in special w o r k projects d u r ­ ing the M a y term, or to m a k e an early start o n foreign study programs," he added. T h e t w o semesters under the n e w plan will b e the s a m e length as those currently existing a n d a student will not b e re­ quired to attend a n y M a y t e r m to c o m ­ plete his p r o g r a m of study. T h e M a y t e r m does, however, e x tend the operation of the College facilities b y another three w e e k s enabling students to d o advanced study, m a k e - u p w o r k , or pursue special interests at their o w n option.

TOM LABAUGH Director of Admissions

PHILTOPPEN Assistant Director

DAVE VANDER WEL BRUCE HIMEBAUGH Assistant Director Director of Financial Aid

T h e H o p e Admissions office has e x p a n d e d its recruitment efforts. T h e m a i n thrust of the p r o g r a m is to develop a m o r e personal tie with the prospective student according to director T o m La Baugh. T h e A d mi s s i o ns office w e l c o m e s the n a m e s of potential H o p e students. D r o p t h e m a line or a telephone call (616-392-5111, ext. 2241).

ROBERT BONE Counselor

BART MERKLE Counselor

ANN MERKLE Counselor

BILL V A N D E N B E R G Eastern Representative

G r a n t S u p p o r t s S t u d e n t A id P r o g r a m s ; A s s i s t a n c e H a s Tripled in Five Y e a r s H o p e has received a $ 2 0 , 0 0 0 grant f r o m a N e w Y o r k F o u n d a t i o n in support of its student aid program. Half the total is a one-year renewal of a grant of $ 1 0 , 0 0 0 to b e used in the college's w o r k - s t u d y p r o g r a m a n d the other $ 1 0 , 0 0 0 represents a n e w grant to start a revolving student loan f u n d to help students w h o aren't able to secure funds for their education thro u g h other sources. U n d e r the w o r k - s t u d y p r o g r a m 2 0 H o p e students, selected o n the basis of need, have been able to earn m o n e y to d e ­ fray tuition a n d other college costs during each of the last t w o a c a d e m i c years. Altogether, 1,247 H o p e students — 6 2 per cent of the enrollment — received loan, scholarship, wo rk - s t u dy or other assist­ ance f r o m the College or other sources last year. T h e average a m o u n t w a s $ 1 ,0 7 4 per student. A total of $ 1 , 3 3 9 , 7 4 8 in student aid w a s coordinated b y the Financial A i d Office in 1970-71 a ccord­ ing to director Bruce H i m e b a u g h . "Private colleges m u s t effectively utilize financial aid prog r a m s if they are to c o m p e t e with public institutions a n d other private colleges," said Chancellor Dr. William V a n d e r Lugt. "Soaring costs

have caused m a n y families to exclude private colleges as a realistic alternative to the lower-priced, public-financed state universities. This is m o s t unfortunate a n d I feel that their decision has frequently b e e n reached w i t h o u t a clear understand­ ing of the m e a n i n g of financial assistance programs. " A t H o p e . " Dr. V a n d e r Lugt contin­ ued, "financial assistance is the rule, not the exception. T h e generous foundation grants m a k e it possible for us to continue to m e e t o u r obligations to provide funds for those w h o n e e d t h e m . " Hope's financial aid o u t p u t has tripled in the last five years, as the college strived to m a k e a H o p e College education avail­ able, regardless of a family's financial situation. Executive Vice President Clarence Ha nd l o g t en stated, " T h e support given to H o p e has been d o u b l y helpful. It has helped the student p a y for his education a n d it has assisted H o p e b y providing funds with w h i c h to hire students to d o significant a n d meaningful w o r k w h i c h is not only educationally beneficial to the students, but also of direct benefit to others in the college c o m m u n i t y . "


M e m b e r s of the A l p h a G a m m a Phi sorority a n d Chi Phi S i g m a fraternity sponsored a Christmas party for tw en ty- tw o mentally handicapped children. Acting as Santa Claus w a s M a r t y Snoap, a senior f r o m W y o m i n g , Mich.

Gr eg Daniels, a junior f r o m M u s k e g o n , Mich., w a s selected the m o s t valuable cross country runner in the M I A A after H o p e captured the t e a m c h am pio ns hi p with an unbeaten record.

T e d Rycenga, a senior f r o m Spring Lake, Mich., w a s ch osen the m o s t valuable football player in the M I A A . H e spearheaded Hope's league leading defense f r o m the middle guard position.

History did not prevail as the Class of 1 9 7 5 w o n the annual Pull, a traditional tug-of-war b e t w e e n the m e n of the freshman a n d s o p h o m o r e classes. It w a s only the fifth time in 7 3 years that the fr es hme n w o n . This year's Classic lasted t w o hours, t w o minutes.


eceives assistance fr om er during the annual ponsored b y the educa. The purpose of the j the college student :t mutual relationship age boys a n d girls.

M e m b e r s of the s o p h o m o r e class proudly display their prize after winn ing the annual N y k e r k Cu p. T h e annual event features the w o m e n of the fr es hma n a n d s o p h o m o r e classes in musical, oratorical and theatrical competition.

T h e h u b of activity o n c a m p u s is the n e w DeWitt Student a n d Cultural Center. T h e $2.9 million facility features a snackbar, g a m e rooms, b o o k store, lounges, classrooms art gallery a n d a m o d e r n educational theatre.

G r eg V o s s (30), a s o p h o m o r e f r o m M u s k e g o n , Mich., e n d e d sixth in the nation a m o n g small college football rushers gaining a school record 1,284 yards. A s a t e a m H o p e w a s ranked eight nationally in pass defense.


N e w s in brief . . . A s w e w e n t to press construction w a s getting u n d e r w a y o n Hope's n e w $ 4 million Academic-Science Center. T h e n e w building, scheduled for completion b y the start of the 1 9 7 3 - 7 4 ac ad emi c year, will house the departments of chemistry, biology, geology a n d psychology. •

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Student enrollmentis at an all-time high according to Registrar Jon Huisken. The student body totals 2,101 including 1,969 full-time and 132 part-time enrollees. Forty-nine of the full-time students are partici­ pating in off-campus study programs. The breakdown by classes show 581 freshmen, 563 sophomores, 560 juniors, 304 seniors and 93 special students. o

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Highlight of the 17th annual Vienna S u m ­ m e r School will be a 1 9 d a y study tour in the Soviet U n i o n according to Dr. Paul Fried, tlifcCfcOr of international education. T h e Vi enna S u m m e r School is o p e n to qualified s o p h o m o r e s a n d juniors enrolled in g o o d standing at all accredited ac ad emi c insti­ tutions of higher learning. Students participat­ ing in the full p r o g r a m will leave f r o m N e w Y o r k o n J u ne 1 2 a n d return A u g u s t 25. A brochure is available b y writing to Dr. Fried. •

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Dr. Charles A. Huttar, chairman of the English department, has published a collection of 2 0 original essays o n literature a n d the Christian faith entitled "Imagination a n d the Spirit." •

A brochure containing the n a m e s a n d areas of interest of H o p e seniors w h o will b e quali­ fied as elementary a n d secondary teachers next fall is available f r o m the Teacher Placement Center in V o o r h e e s Hall. Please let us k n o w if y o u are aw ar e of a n y teaching positions that will be open ing next year in y o u r area. •

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Hope posted the best record of all colleges and universities entered in the Michigan Ex­ temporaneous Speech tournament. Joan Lautenschleger, a sophomore from Wayland, Mich., was the winner in the women's competi­ tion, and Paul Bach, a sophomore from Che­ boygan, Wis., was runnerup in the men's divi­ sion. •

Colleges Association study program at Waseda University in Tokyo, Japan during the 1972-73 academic year. The program makes possible study and travel in Japan for students from Hope and the eleven other colleges in the Great Lakes Col­ leges Association.

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Dr. David Clark of history faculty has been appointed resident director for a Great Lakes

Hope has again been selected to host sum­ mer institutes for high school teachers of second year and advanced placement chemistry and mathematics. The institutes are supported by the National Science Foundation. •

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Robert Ritsema, ch ai rma n of the depart­ m e n t of music, has b e en elected vice president of the Michigan Orchestra Association. •

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The Hope College student newspaper, the anchor, has been presented an All-American award by the Associated Collegiate Press. The editor of the weekly newspaper was Gerald Swierenga, a senior from Holland, Mich. The award is the highest given to a college newspaper and was made after a criticalevalua­ tion by a pane! of professionaljournalists.

H o p e has acquired a 35-foot long steel hulled boat for use in its interdisciplinary marine studies program. T h e vessel will be used as a floating research laboratory for the College's science depart­ m e n t s a n d the H o p e College Institute for Environmental Quality. •

Two administrative promotions has been announced by executive vice president Clarence J. Handlogten. Lee H. Wenke has been promoted to Direc­ tor of Development. Since 1967, he has served as director of Hope's foundation, corporate and governmental relation program. Barry L. Werkman has been named Business Manager. He has served as assistant business manager since June, 1969 and prior to that was a faculty member in the department of eco­ nomics and business administration. •

Rich Lopez, a s o p h o m o r e f r o m T o m s River, N.J., a n d T o m Grundvig, a junior f r o m Bronxville, N.Y., w e r e n a m e d to the Michigan Inter­ collegiate Athletic Association ( M I A A ) all­ league soccer team. N a m e d to the al l- MIA A football t e a m were offensive guard Jeff Wi nne, a junior f r o m Kinelon, N.J., tailback G r eg Voss, a s o p h o m o r e f r o m M u s k e g o n , Mich.; defensive end T e d Albrecht, a junior f r o m G r a n d Rapids, Mich.; defensive middle guard T e d Rycenga, a senior f r o m Spring Lake, Mich.; a n d defensive back D o u g Smith, a junior f r o m G r a n d Rapids. G r e g Daniels, a junior f r o m M u sk ego n, Mich., a n d Phil Ceeley, a fr es hma n f r o m Royal Oa k, Mich., w e r e al l- MIA A cross country picks.

S E C O N D CLASS P O S T A G E Paid at Holland, Mich.

Published for Alum ni, Friends, a n d Parents of H o p e College. Sh o u l d y o u receive m o r e than o n e copy, please pass it o n to s o m e o n e in yo ur c o m m u n i t y . A n overlap of H o p e College c o n ­ stituents m a k e s duplication possible. Editor: T o m Re n n e r

Vol. 2, N o . 6 D e c e m b e r , 1 9 7 1 Official publication. T h e H o p e Newsletter is published in January, March, April, June, September and December by Hope College, Alumni House, 112 E. 12th St., Holland, Michigan 49423.


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