Milestone 1997

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rientation Assistants form a circle to share thanks and give encouragement before the new students arrive on campus for Orientation. (PR Photo)

enior Jeremy Beard and junior Paul Ballard anxiously wait for the end of the last inning in a baseball game against Calvin. (PR Photo)

embers of the Knickerbocker Fraternity and some friends hang out on a raft in the Black River awaiting the outcome of the Pull. (PR Photo)

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in the blow-up boxing ring at Spring Fling, junior Matt Kuiper shows his excitement. Many inflatable games at the event allowed friends to challenge each other. (PR Photo)

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unior Pull Coach Kevin DeKam helps teammates and Even Year opponents carry the giant rope used in the event. The teams revived an old tradition of carrying the rope through campus on the eve of the event. (PR Photo)

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eff Amlotte watches the ball soar after a field goal kick by a fellow Dutchmen Dog Pound member. (PR Photo)

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V l ^ r k i n g the first time since its opening, the Flying Dutch take on Calvin College in an MIAA match at the beautiful new Van Andel Arena in Grand Rapids. The Dutch went on to beat the Knights in the televised Calvin home game. (PR Photo)


80 years, the Milestone een p

'erving the memories of the

students and the history of the college. First fitoove-. Students in 1914 volunteer their efforts in raking fall leaves from the ground of campus. (Joint Archives of Holland)

published as the Hope College Annual in 1905 by the junior class, the book was later known as the Milestone. Since this time the annual book has become one of the college's most important traditions as a printed collec-

anting to break away from the glow of fluorescent lights and closed-up feeling in the classroom, this class headed outside to the comfort and relaxation of the Pine Grove. (PR Photo)

tion of the events and people that define the campus community. This eightieth edition is another chapter in this long story. The year began amid many changes

^ ^ t e r the long winter months, students enjoy the sunny spring weather on a blanket in the Pine Grove. Sunny days found the lawns across campus filled with students escaping from the stress of academics. (Photo by Anthony Perez)

across campus. Haworth Center and Cook Residence Hall construction continued to change the face of 10th Street as the last cottages were moved and the new building sprang up. A fire in Crispell Cottage brought the residence to the ground and sparked a ban on candles in college buildings. As campus grew, so did the availability of technology. Upgrades improved the way students use the college computer system. With $100 allocated from each student's tuition for a campus technology fund, CIT added additional computer labs in halls without, while increasing the number of terminals in existing labs. A new mascot was also taking shape throughout the year. While the college mascot has always been known as the Flying Dutchman, there has never been an actual figure to appear at sporting events and student activities. Two students hit the drawing board to create a cartoon character image of the mascot that will be welcome at campus events.

j f e n i o r Peter Ganeff experiences weightlessness aboard NASA's Bowing KC135A, which simulates zerogravity conditions. Ganeff and four other students participated in the Reduced Gravity Student Flight Opportunities Program at Johnson Space Center in Huston, Texas. (PR Photo)

Following with other campus change, revamped general education core received final approval after three years of debate. Provost Jacob Nyenhuis described the change as good for the students. "With the new general education curriculum we are

ear Left: A new student takes a break from the Class of 2000 orientation activities on the giant anchor near Graves Hall. The long travel, busy schedule, and many new faces make orientation weekend an exciting, but exhausting experience. (PR Photo)

Rlow: Student democrats campaign in the 1920's by marching their well known mascot across campus prior to elections. (Milestone Archives)

rightly shifting from simple coverage of material to the active engagement of our students in their own learning," said Nyenhuis. Out of the classroom, controversy erupted following the 99th Pull and a letter to the editor written by a professor concerned about academic short coming and injuries surrounding the event. After a suggestion for change, student and alumni support poured in to prevent tampering

Introduction

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with the College's oldest tradition. Letters of opinion filled the Anchor, and Student Congress held a campus forum to discuss the controversy and concerns. A desire to attract more diverse students began another controversy when a new admissions video misrepresented the presence of minority students on campus. To a video viewer it appears that almost 17 percent of students represented are minorities, in reality the group makes up only five percent of the campus population. Following the admissions debate, a panel embers of the Fraternal Society in the late 1920's hang out on the lawn in front of their house on the edge of campus. Like students today, they look forward to spring and any chance to enjoy the long awaited sunshine. (Milestone Archives)

discussion held in Whichers Auditorium addressed the 'Darker Vision of Hope' as seen through the eyes of many African American students. Students spoke out about the low numbers of minority students and the problems they face each day. Members of the administration pointed out the difficulty attracting minority students to campus, while students blamed those in higher positions for not fully committing to change. Students committed to change made promises throughout the year to follow and serve Christ. Buses filled with 122 students headed to Urbana for a world wide conference focusing on Christian missions. With their commitment to Christ, many upper classmen took on the role of a "lighthouse" for freshmen and other students by providing a ministry for these students. The small group Bible study program provided guidance and friendship and was supported by Campus Ministries.

p o t h e r s in the now extinct Dickenson Society celebrate the induction of new members over a formal dinner. (Joint Archives of Holland)

Support for a visit to campus by Oliver North turned into controversy when faculty argued about the "appropriateness" of his visit. In a resolution, faculty members stated they "deeply regret that college funds will be used to support a visit of Mr. Oliver North to Hope College." North later visited campus on April 8 in the Knickerbocker Theater as planned by Student Congress. While faculty argued about paying for Oliver North, students wondered how they were going to afford the latest tuition increase. The overall cost was raised almost another $750 for the 1997-1998 school year, leaving a final price tag of $ 19,574. Students may be able to offset some of the tuition increase with money they will save due to a smoking ban in all student housing. The Campus Life Board banned the carcinogenic habit from the halls in a narrow vote on April 10.

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elow: Students fill the stands at a football game against Albion College. Students look forward to sporting events as a chance to escape from the dorms and meet new people from across campus. (Photo by Anthony Perez)

Introduction

jjfenior Eric Friedman expresses his excitement after a touch down at the Homecoming football game. Friedman and many other die hard fans joined the ranks of the 'Dutchman Dog Pound' tradition to show their spirit at the game. Members of the Dog Pound paint their chests with giant blue and orange letters spelling "Go Dutch," and faithfully lead the crowd in cheers. (PR Photo)


Proff finds a creative way to say thanks to his parents at graduation for their expensive investment in his education. The creativity of many seniors was displayed throughout the sea of graduation caps in the special display that occurs only once a year. (Photo by Anthony Perez)

econd year football coach Dean Kreps anxiously awaits the final buzzer in a 34-0 shout-out game against the team from Benedictine. The early season victory helped prepare the Dutch to finish the season second place In the MIAA. (PR Photo)


n the excitement of victory at the Holland Civic Center, basketball fans lift a fellow fan into the air above their heads. Students were celebrating a victory over the rival Knights from Calvin College. Events like basketball games, the Pull, Nykerk, annual SAC events, and off-campus activities help define the life of students across campus. These are the activities and events that help form life-long memories and friendships. (PR Photo) Below: Students line the streets of downtown Holland for the 1926 Homecoming parade. (Milestone Archives)

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Student

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JEYOND THE TEXTBOOKS AND THE CLASSROOM LAY THE EVENTS THAT MAKE THE EXPERIENCE MEMORABLE.

FROM THE TRADITIONAL EVENTS TO THE

UNPLANNED, THE LIVES OF STUDENTS OUTSIDE THE CLASSROOM HAS DEFINED EACH PERSON'S EXPERIENCE . EACH DROP OF SWEAT POURED OUT IN THE PULL, EACH NOTE SUNG IN NYKERK, EACH GOWN DONNED AT GRADUATION, AND EACH CAMPUS TOUR GIVEN AT ORIENTATION MAKES ANOTHER ENTRY IN TO THE HISTORY AND THE TRADITION OF THE COLLEGE.

THE WORDS OF THE 1949 MILESTONE

BEST DESCRIBE THE LIVES OF STUDENTS. T H E STRANDS OF HUMOR, PATHOS, AND INTRIGUE WHICH FILL OUR COLLEGE YEARS HAVE WOVEN TOGETHER TO FORM A PLOT FAR SURPASSING THAT OF ANY PLAYWRIGHT'S PEN" ^

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Leadin cl . lie Centu by A m a n d a Black

The class of 2000 becomes a part of a ISO year-old tradition. istuictive describes the class of 2000. They are the first class of the new decade, the new century, and the new millennium. This fresh start carries with it much hope as the freshmen arrived to bridge the gap between the old and the new. As afnbassadors of the old and members of the classes of this century, the Orientation Assistants arrived a week early for their week of intensive training. They became the first n r n k to this new world, providing answers and friends. "Once the Freshmen got here they really bonded quickly. It is really rewarding to see people who were in your OA group walking together and hanging out," said OA Katie Cindric. Each pair of OAs led a group of 10-12 members of the class of 2000. OA Dan McCue explained the benefits of his job. "The greatest part of Orientation was making the transition to Hope easier for the freshmen. Meeting them, and working with them, it was all fantastic." A colorful door tag and a bright summer sky awaited the new students upon their arrival. The OAs eagerly jumped in to make moving-in a quicker process for both the students and the parents. Friday evening brought meetings and games like the "human knot," or "blob water tag." The events continued for the rest of the weekend. Saturday brought an opportunity for the OAs to answer questions. Many groups took to the sand dunes or JP's for the quintessential experiences. That night came another fond memory of college ncoming students leave their life-Playfair. In a loud, mad rush the mix of the hand prints on the giant orientation banner upon arriving on campus. old and new became one as playfair participants. Each student left their " m a r k " on The parents also were eased into a new phase of the banner that hung in the pine their lives as their children headed off to their new grove throughout the weekend. home. Tours of campus and Holland, sessions with (PR Photo) college officials, and some entertainment made it a easier to say good-bye on Sunday afternoon. The weekend was an experience to remember for all involved. Megan Hicks's experience during her orientation weekend brought her back for another year, " I remember how cool it was to have such good OAs my freshman year and I wanted to duplicate that for my students as well." Freshman Renee Meyer agreed. "It was an absolute whirlwind of activity! We're glad to be here!" The class that will bring Hope into a new century, the leaders of Hope, got an brief introduction to what life would be like well into the next century. A different kind of class came to a different kind of college; Hope sprang anew.

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Orientation

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group participates in an activity to build trust and friendships during the exciting orientation weekend transition from home to college. Students were divided up Into smaller groups to better allow them to participate in the many activities throughout the weekend and quickly develop familiar relationships with other students. (PR Photo) Above: Students take a break on the grass in front of the nowdestroyed A.C. Van Raalte Hall during orientation activities in the fall of 1922. (Joint Archives Collection)


reshman Kristi Vincent and her mother locate their hometown on a map marked by new students from all over the world. A pin was left to mark where each student traveled from to come to campus and so others could see if people lived near them. (PR Photo)

Mentation Assistants on top of DeWitt Center pull as others on the ground lift the giant plywood orientation sign that hung on the building throughout the weekend. The theme of this year's event, "A Different Kind Of Class, A Different Kind Of College," reflected the uniqueness of the first class of the new century. (PR Photo)

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bright: During the 1923 Pull, he team was forced out of the pits, but remained on the rope in the Black River. The loosing team would often stay on the rope until they reached the bank of their opponents. (Milestone Archives)

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dd Year t&am Pullers remain locked down while the Morale Girls prepare them for an upcoming heave. The synchronisity of the Pullers and Moralers make the event possible and can determine the strength of the team. (PR Photo)

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n the excitement of winning the Pull, freshmen Mike Gentille and Mindy Fischer lunge into the black river for the traditional victory swim. (PR Photo)

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Freshmen and Sophomores oppose each other for 99th year

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eter Meyers es hold of the rope and prepares to push off the front of the pit as he pulls In unison with the rest of the team. Meyers' Morale Girl, freshman Laura Hahn, repeats the commands of the team coach in order to keep the team coordinated. (PR Photo)

embers of the '99 and '00 Pull teams march through campus before the Pull carrying the rope used in the event. This tradition was stopped four years ago, but these teams wanted it to again become a part of the Pull. (PR Photo)

eyond a symbol of strength and mental endurance, the stretched across the Black River means tradition and > pullers from one century to the next. The three weeks of preparation for the Pull bound each m together and allowed them to fight through the al and physical strain. Although the Pull is what pullers, moralers, and coaches prepared for, the ns they learned about themselves will never be Tirgotten. "Pull isn't about winning or losing," said Odd Year Puller Jay "Fire" Wallace. "It's about finding your limits and working past them. The best part is surviving those first three weeks and getting close with forty other people." Even Year Coach Dan "007" Shelley added, "It was difficult for me as a coach because I wanted it to mean as much for them as it had for me. The friendships gained and struggles overcome were fantastic and I want the same for this team." An old tradition of carrying the rope through campus was stopped years ago. It returned this year as a way to get everyone psyched for the Pull. A new tradition began this year when a woman pulled for the full three hours. Last year, Keri Law pulled for twenty minutes as an alternate after getting injured; this year she pulled the whole time. Law stated, "I didn't do it to be the only girl to do it. I did it for the challenge." Odd-Year Coach Zach Johnson added, "she was a really good puller and it was great to have her on the team." The Pull began shortly after 3:00 P.M. on a cool dreary day, as both teams reeled in the rope and locked in for the event. The rope "gained" during the first forty-five minutes determined the outcome of the event. During this time, six feet, nine inches, was taken by the Even Year Team. Although their opponents came out ahead at the end, the Odd Year Team enjoyed the experience. "I am proud they gave it their all," said 1999 Morale Coach Dano Hop. "We still lost, but they did all they could and 1 love them all." Wallace agreed, "By losing, that doesn't change anything that you've gained from that experience." After the Pull, in the excitement of victory, Jaime "Suave" Partridge said, "It was the most intense thing that I have done in my life and no one can know what it means to each and every one of us until they experience it for themselves." Shelley added, "I feel that the team won because they worked hard together and wanted it a lot. The team that wins is the team that wants it more, but I feel that "99 was also a great Pull Team. The crowd was fantastic, and the alumni support was awesome. Pulling the rope an inch and hearing the crowd yell makes that inch feel like a foot." He feels he speaks for all '00 Coaches in saying, "We are all proud and impressed with the 2000 team. They have a ton of heart." ^

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ophmores Kelly Martin and Michelle Chambers embrace in the excitement of the sophomore class victory. At the close of Nykerk, members of both classes rush for the traditional meeting in the middle. (PR Photo) Far Right: Nykerk as appeared in the 1954 edition of the Milestone, seventeen years after the first competition. (Milestone Archives).

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ers of the cup and Morale Guys link arms to sing the Alma Mater after the announcement of their victory. The song coach of the winning team directs the participants of Nykerk and the audience in the singing. (PR Photo)

Nykerk


Clindiino by Kimberly Richardson & Annie Jalcosz

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The beloved IMyWerlc cup finally makes •f info O d d Y e a r hands.

he farmer, played by Bonnie Nannenga, begs the witch, Beth Quimby, not to steal his child in the mixed up Odd Year fairy tale like no other. (PR Photo)

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art, a thief played by Freshman Kara Burk, explains to the emperor's wife the merits of the invisible fabric, and the emperor, Akua Ofori-Mensa, decides to purchase some. In their firstentry, the class of 2000 presented a kinetic play which elicited giggles from the audience. A pair of red longjohns replaced the invisible fabric. (PR Photo)

ailing the 61st anniversary of the annual competition between the freshmen and sophomore classes, Nykerk featured the traditional song, oration and play. This year was the last chance for the class of 1999 to bring home the IS[ykerk cup, which they did in all three categories. Throughout the three weeks leading up to Nykerk, both teams had practices five days a week. The girls H came to know each other well during this time. "Practices were frustrating but the end result was so rewarding," said '00 Song Coach Becky Ponka. A special part of Nykerk that binds Even and Odd Year is the tradition of secret pals. Their job was to decorate the door of their new friend as well as leaving candy and encouraging notes. "The support my secret pal gave me was overwhelming. It went above and beyond the call of duty. She inspired me to be a good secret pal next year," said '00 Song Girl Stacey Slad. Odd year song girl Christy Colbrunn said, "It was a lot of fun to finally meet my secret pal. It was special because the two classes were unified." On the evening of Nykerk, spirits were high as the excitement built. The Civic Center was filled to capacity, and all eyes were on the stage as the curtain lifted on Nykerk. The night began shortly after seven when the 2000 song girls performed "Puttin' On The Ritz." This Broadway style song followed the even year tradition while. Odd Year performed a catchy song entitled, 'Rock Around the Fifties'. The orations performed by sophomore Melissa Ooms and freshman Janelle Thompson were another feature of the evening. Melissa began with her oration "Connections: The Spirit of Womanhood." In her piece, connections between the spirit of Nykerk and womanhood were made. Her speech was followed by Janelle's piece titled "Make The Connection" which talked about humans need for each other. The traditionally comical plays were performed by '99 and '00. The freshmen performed a play titled "The Emperor's New Clothes," which followed the line of a traditional fable. The last performance of the evening was given by the '99 play team; thirteen sophomores were cast in "Twisted Tales". "We incorporated three stories and added our own Nykerk spirit, off the wall humor, and obvious jokes," stated '99 Play Coach Katy Murphy. The evening ended with a victory for the class of 1999. Although only one class could take the cup, both teams shared in the Nykerk spirit. Even though the cup finally rested in Odd Year hands, the most important part of Nykerk was not the winner. It was new friends and shared memories.

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ori Jackson watches for her partner freshman Ben Kapenga to make the next move in a line dance at the Homecoming Hoedown. Jackson, Kapenga, and Jill McKinnon were just a few of the several hundred that attended the Hoedown held at Tsuesink's Farm. (Photo by Anthony Perez)

ib Sorority members reach to catch an airborne field goal while riding on their float during the Homecoming parade. As part of tradition, the sororities join with their brother fraternity to build a float. (Photo by Anthony Perez)

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utchmen Dog Pound fans applaud and cheer after a touchdown at the homecoming game. The Dog Pound was started two seasons ago and has since become a football tradition. With orange faces, chests, and tshirts, the Dutchmen Dog Pound could not be missed. (PR Photo)

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Homecoming

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by Annie JaLosz

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A l u m n i traveling to campus united w i t h current students througli spirit a n d common bonds.

bove: An example of an event that ties generations, students in 1926 dressed up this car for a parade through downtown Holland. (Milestone Archives)

ophomore Adam Hudson, junior John Delcalzo, and sophomore Bill Kim carry their fraternity brother and newly-crowned homecoming king Matt Steensma off the football field during halftime of the homecoming football game. Steensma is the first king crowned under the new rules enacted for royalty. SAC set new CPA guidelines In order to have candidates who will better represent the student body. (Photo by Anthony Perez)

any traditions unite students from each generation. The annual Homecoming weekend sets time aside to bring together past and present students who share this common bond. the leaves turned from green to gold. Homecoming meshed the old and the new in a weekend filled with activities. Times for cheering, learning, playing, and reuniting kept visitors and residents busy, and gave them a to remember what Hope means to them. Homecoming began on Saturday with a favorite tradition, the parade. Students, parents, alumni, and community members lined the streets to watch the Pullers, Moralers, members of the homecoming court and many other student organizations in the parade. Floats displayed the theme "There's No Place Like Home." The Arcadian fraternity took third place in the float contest with music blasting to keep spectators entertained. The Sigma Sigma sorority and the Fraternal Society took second place. This year's float winner, Dorians and Centurians, stole the competition with their float "There's No Place Like Hope." They were awarded a cash prize donated by the Student Activities Board. The parade ended at the Holland Municipal Stadium where the Flying Dutchmen battled the Bulldogs of Adrian. During the game, the cheerleaders got the crowd on its feet and cheering, encouraging the players to victory. The Dutch defeated Adrian 38-6, making this the first Homecoming win since 1991. The Homecoming Court was presented at halftime. Seniors Alicia Fortino was crowned the queen and Matt Steensma was crowned as king. Both survived two rounds of the revamped allcampus voting and took home a pair of wooden shoes to mark the occasion. Other highlights of the weekend included a biology lecture titled "Look What We're Doing Now!," and the Chemistry Department's annual Homecoming lecture given by a 1963 graduate Bruce Roe. In the 19th annual Run-Bike-Walk-Swim, held on Saturday morning, current students, alumni, and community members ran their way across campus and through Holland. Alicia Elmore of Westmont, Illinois won the women's division and Aaron Bruininks of Holland posted the fastest time for the men. To remember the days past, the classes of 1981, 1986, and 1991 held their reunions. Activities planned for these various reunions included a Homecoming brunch and a performance by the Symphonette which consisted of both past and present members. During the weekend, the Dorian sorority celebrated their diamond anniversary, marking 50 years of Dorian sisterhood, while the Arcadians reached the 75 year milestone. Homecoming was a great experience for everyone involved. The school unity seen this weekend really proved that "There's No Place like Hope."

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•l\[ew

by S h a n n o n Gould

Spring festival malte-over provides greater f u n before finals other Nature could not have delivered greater weather for this year's Spring Fling. Students were glad to have activities outdoors, as bad weather had forced the event indoors for the past few years. "The weather was perfect. It's so much better outside," said senior Mark Byland, Giant inflatable games filled the Pine Grove and kept students entertained. Although many of the inflatable games were the same as those in years past, such as the velcro wall, others were missing, and new were added. Fencing replaced boxing, leaving some would-be sluggers disappointed. "My favorite game was the boxing," said junior Ellen Byland. "I really wanted to box against my friends again this year, but they did have some new games that were just as fun." Last year's bungee run was replaced by an inflatable version of an obstacle course. The hills, nets and holes left racing students exhausted as they reached the end. Other changes included the absence of a big name band. Blessid Union of Souls performed center stage at the event last year, but problems with availability, money, and space forced the Social Activities Committee to seek alternatives. "Groups we wanted were not available or we couldn't afford to bring them to campus," said SAC member Mary Lucas. "Even if we could hire a big name band, there is no place large enough in Holland to reserve in case of rain." The local bands paisley dAve and Curnett and Maker took stage and kept the Ping Grove grooving throughout the day. SAC hoped the appeal of rmed with their favorite t-shirts students move from bucket to well-known local bands, opposed to an unfamiliar bucket dipping into the bright tienational act, would attract students. die colors. Clothes lines strung "Local bands pull so many people to events," around the Pine Grove displayed said Lucas. "SAC tried it at other activities the psychedelic creations as they throughout the year and attendance was incredible. dried. (Photo by Anthony Perez) Students come to hear the music they like and end up staying for the entire event." Lack of big name entertainment had SAC thinking of alternatives. In addition to local bands, the group brought in comedian Eric O'Shea to take center stage in the Pine Grove. O'Shea tickled funny bones reliving the struggles and immaturity of adolescence. For some students. Spring Fling weekend offers a chance to escape from campus one last time before finals become reality. Overnight camping and canoeing trips offer yet another way to celebrate the end of another long school year. ^

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Spring

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ot sunding the top hill on a giant inflatable obstacle course, senior Mike Cranmer struggles to make it to the other side before his opponent. Many blow-up activities filled the lawn of the Pine Grove as students relieved a little year-end stress on the eve of final exams. (PR Photo) Above Left: Twelve sophomore women dance around the traditional "May Pole" in the 1954 "May Day" celebration. Currently known as Spring Fling, the event once included the crowning of a "May Queen," a evening banquet, dance, and a field competition between classes. (Milestone Photo Archives)

fter peeling herself from an upside down flip on the Velcro wall, freshman Cherrylynn Outcalt makes her way off the bouncy launch pad. SAC member, sophomore Leslie Kay keeps guard on the side to prevent springing students from crashing in the dirt. (Photo by Anthony Perez)


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unior Dave Beaver waits for freshman Pat Blake to pass him the Hacky Sack. The two kicked around the bean-filled sack while listening to the tunes of the Spring Fling band paisley dAve. The Pine Grove was filled with students enjoying the big crowd, spring weather, and great music. (Photo by Anthony Perez)

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tudents line up early for a chance to zap their friends in the lazer tag "Battle Cruiser." The inflatable space ship was filled with darkness and fog as participants took shots at each other with lazer guns. (Photo by Anthony Perez)

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Greek Orcyanizaffions re>ie>v I lie structure and traditions tliat liave come to It old back progress | | n the spring, Greek numbers were average and so was the attitude. As a whole, the organizations did little to promote Greek Life on Campus. The Greek Councils had been on the decline for several years as organizations isolated themselves from the administration and other Greeks. A serious tide of apathy swept over the seven fraternities and six sororities. I The Ad-Hoc Proposal, previously presented to the campus in ^ D e c e m b e r of 1995, decreed that the thirteen local organizations needed to "revamp the system and end hazing." The Greeks felt the ball was thrown into their court, yet they did not have the means to return it. Many lacked the motivation to research and work for a better system. But more than that, no one knew how to begin reworking the system. During the summer, student leaders took charge. Newly inducted Alicia Fortino, president of the Pan-Hellenic Council, and Joe Fritsch, president ofthe Interfratemity Council, successfully motivated and redirected the energy of the Greek System, turning Greek tragedy into triumph in what will be documented in Greek History as the "Year of Firsts." Unlike in the past, the movement to revamp the Greek System was not forced on the organizations, but spearheaded by peers. Greek leaders came to the realization that the power to change the system must come from within. That in mind, they hired speakers, gathered information and lit the flame which spread across the campus like wildfire. Pan-Hel spruced up their constitution and IFC created a new one from scratch. The two teamed up to cosponsor events and recreated a powerful council, drawing positive attention towards the Greeks and laying the foundation for a unified Greek System. The year started out strong with the resurrected tradition of Greek Week, which began with the Homecoming parade and was highlighted by the Greek Olympics. Wearing letters proudly, Greeks turned out in full force, filling the Pine Grove and striving for the first place privilege. The week was also laced with a Greek sponsored Mocktail Party, guest speakers, faculty vs. Greeks canned goods drive, and the first ever Greek/SAC sponsored band. With the positive results of Greek Week, Pan-Hel and IFC where on a roll and it felt as if the whole Greek system was on fire. This streak lead to a complete facial given to the image of Greek Life. Sororities and fraternities took negative Greek stereotypes by the horns. Positive publicity was splashed across the front page of The Anchor and Lakeshore Press. Greeks turned out in record number to community service projects like AIDS walk. Community Day, and Crop Walk. They donated food and time at local shelters, and participated in Big Brother, Big Sister programs. Greeks where out and about in their letters—and in large numbers. Continued on page 118

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Greek

Life

eff Strauts cheers on Jeff Mulholland as he competes against Ryan Spangler, and Mark Hofstee in a pie eating contest during Greek Olympics in the Pine Grove. Greek men and women consumed dozens of fruit filled pies In the feeding frenzy that left participants running for the Pepto. (IFC/ Pan-Hel Photo) Above Left: As one of the oldest Greek organizations, these Sigma Sigma women in 1919 helped define life for women on campus. (Milestone Archives)


J s a new additon to campus life, students like these t w o members of the Chi Phi Sigma Fraternity spend weekends racing on the mountain biking team. The group made an appearance in the Homecoming parade for the first time this year to promote the sport to perspective racers. (PR Photo)

eleiving the tension of final exams, Cosmopolitan brothers Dave Clausen, Chris Potter, Ryan Spangler, Pete Warburton, Dan Capps, and Ben Mills head outside for some fresh air. This photo was submitted in memory of Peter Warburton who passed away in May. (Cosmopolitan Archives)

igma Sigma women follow the lead of their sister Janeen Gipson center stage in a talent performance that helped earn the sorority first place in the Greek Olympics. The Sigmas and the Emersonian Fraternity swept the competition for the first place trophy. (IFC/Pan-Hel Photo)

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by Ann-Marie Campion

SAC brings a glittering night to Phelps, challenging students to het their ace

ver 800 students anxiously awaited to discover what Lady Luck had in store for them at SAC's annual Casino Night held on November 22. "Bet your Ace" was an evening full of games, dancing and entertainment sponsored by the Social Activities Committee. SAC members worked through the night before the event to transform Phelps Dining Hall into a see•ne straight out of the glittering Las Vegas strip. "Last year was fun, but this year was so much more enjoyable because I was involved in SAC," sophomore member Dave Rohner recollected. Masses of students crowded around the numerous blackjack and craps tables staffed by professional dealers, as well as lucky SAC members. Lining the interior of Phelps, roulette, horse racing, and money wheels occupied students unwilling to wager on cards. "Bingo!" chants filtered out of the Maas Auditorium through the wintry night air. Original hits and classic renditions performed by the student band "The Nodding Heads" provided musical entertainment for the gamblers caught up in the excitement of the evening. Lead singer Josh Schicker commented on the experience. "Casino Night was a lot of fun for us. It was our first real gig, I guess you'd say." For those who came out on top for the night, chips were cashed in for a multitude of donated prizes including restaurant gift certificates, movie passes, jewelry, t-shirts, sports equipment, tanning sessions and a television set. Local businesses and organizations such as High Wheeler, Creative Dining Services and Eastpoint Clothiers functioned as major contributors toward the event. As the tables were cleared, gamblers danced on the empty casino floor, awaiting the announcement of the grand prize. At midnight came the news; sophomore Dawn Hollidge and a guest were off on an all-expense paid, three-day trip to Walt Disney World in Florida. "I was so overwhelmed, I almost had a heart attack! It took me a while to believe I actually won," she said. Hollidge was accompanied on the trip by her friend sophomore Todd Chassee. At the stroke of one, the spell was broken and the glamorous evening came to a close. As the decorations were dismantled, sophomore Tony Olds summed up the experience. "Everyone had a great time! I can't wait to see what's in store for next year!" Although SAC's "Little Las Vegas" once again became Phelps Dining Hall, the enchantment of the evening lived on.

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unior Bryan Fix concentrates as he rolls a pair of dice in a game of Craps while sophomores Sarah Rye, Scott Anderson, Dan Mcue, and Carolyn Enos expectedly await the outcome. For any gambling fancy, many different games provided the perfect outlet for SAC's play money. If highrollers depleted their bankroll, more money could be purchased for a small of amount of the genuine article. (Photo by Josh Neucks) Above: The Social Activities Committee's Casino Night first appeared in the 1989 edition of the Milestone. (Milestone Archives)


creaming in excitement, senior Heather Bair discovers she has won a hand of Black Jack, while seniors Shannon Larsen and Travis Buth accept their losses. Casino Night is one of the most formal SAC events of the year. Similar to the strip of Vegas, dresses and suits are commonplace. (Photo by Josh Neucks)

^Ster the bets are laid down, players await the outcome of the spinning wheel. Ranges of emotions, from laughter, shouting, and nervous stares could be seen in the gamblers. SAC provided the atmosphere of Vegas with authentic signs, appetizers and games; the students provided the Vegas emotions. (Photo by Josh Neucks)

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aniel Hoag, as King Creon, dispenses advice to his niece, the beautiful Paige, played by Rachel Smith. The firstsemester play transformed an old maintenance building to an ancient Greek kingdom, complete with columns and mirrors. (Photo courtesy of the Theatre Department)

naged in various activities to pass time, the cast of Antigone goes about their daily events in the beginning of the play. The historical play told the ancient Greek story of a noble king and a defiant daughter staying loyal to her kinsmen. (Photo courtesy of the Theatre Department)

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Theatre

Productions


by IMiltelle Johnson

Horn

Theatre D e p a r t m e n t finishes another outstanding season despite move f o r theater renovations

urled in the fetal position, Rachel Smith, as Soli, seeks comfort from her natural mother, Christina Malkowski and her adoptive parents, Stephen Ralph and Collette Fouch. Professor Jean Bahle captured the audience with the life of Soli w h o encounters the "unrealism" of the "real world." (Photo courtesy of the Theatre Department) Above Right: A senior class play was a tradition in the early days of the Milestone. Each year the play was featured, as in this picture from the "Plymouth Rock" production in 1918. (Milestone Archives)

ith meager 1969 beginnings in a tiny,100-seat theater on the fourth floor of Lubbers, to the remodeled DeWitt Theater, the Theater Department has grown and changed. This year was like no other. Due to the remodeling of the DeWitt Theater, the department was forced to relocate. A move to the old physical plant required a lot of adaption but made this year's shows one of a kind. The first snow of the year was a cabaret titled "Cole." "It was the story of Cole Porter's life which told his story through pictures, monologues taken from period writers and biographies and primarily songs" said senior Nathanael Buckley, a Cole cast member. Combining the efforts of John Tammi, Linda Strouf and many talented students, the audience was able to see a glimpse of the life of Cole Porter from days in the Yale glee club, following his life through success on Broadway with hits such as "Anything Goes." "The intimate house was great for the nature of the play because, for all that work, it wanted to take the audience by surprise as an extremely well-written cabaret show," said Buckley. But the location also created challenges that had to be overcome. "It was challenging to work in the space of the Old Physical Plant," said freshman Rebecca DeVries. "There was hardly any room backstage, and this show required a lot of costume changes," Jean Anouilh's "Antigone" hit the same stage in early December. It was directed by long-time and well-loved theater professor George Ralph. It was his final directing experience. "He (Ralph) was amazing to work with and I truly believe that he gave all of the cast something that they never had before," junior Jennifer Jenkins, the nurse, recalls. Others agreed. "I think...Ralph's choice of Anhouil's adaptation of the play was a good one,...with regard to the opportunities it afforded our actors and production personal," said senior theater major, Steve Ralph about his director and father. Elements of absurdity, surrealism, and satire are major elements of an original production written by Jean Reed Bahle. "Soli's Story" told the story of Soli's encounters with this unreal "real" world. "I feel blessed to have taken part in the original production of "Soli's Story," written by Jean Bahle and directed by Daina Robins, who both made the production unique and entertaining to be a part of and produce," said sophomore Clara Everts. Combining the student and faculty efforts of junior Daniel Hoag and John Tammi, the department produced the year's final production of Shakespeare's "Comedy of Errors." The production was set in a contemporary society which made the audience receptive to the show. "From the laughs and smiles I see from people when they tell me they saw the show, I think I can feel happy about having a production people truly enjoyed," senior Janet Doughty said. ^

Theatre

Productions

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AUK

Students display musical talents on Knickerbocker stacje

again, All-College Sing brought an evening of thrilling vocals and roaring laughter to a packed house on October 26 in the Knickerbocker Theatre, The curtain rose for the first act of the evening featuring senior Heidi Bronkema. Dressed in a sequined red dress and with senior Sara DeHaan on piano, she crooned "Doij't It Make My Brown Eyes Blue" by Richard Leigh. Clad in jeans and flannel shirts with their hair in braids, junior Sara Dillbeck and sophomore Clara Everts posed for their act with somber, downcast eyes in keeping with the mood of their music. They sang in perfect harmony on an a Capella version of "Good Enough" by Sarah McLachlan. The sparkling freshman Joni Norwood changed the mood dramatically with her cheerful rendition of Leonard Bernstein's "Glitter and Be Gay," accompanied on the piano by Linda Hakken. Norwood amazed the crowd with her powerful soprano voice, proving she welldeserved the Best of Show and first place honors. Another high point of the evening was the five-member band New Covenant, which played Joanna Carlson's "Belong To Me." This soothing Christian song reflected a diversity of instruments, including a guitar, piano, and a cello, with senior Marcy Zeigler's vocals. Four members of the cross country team came together to form ND 171. With senior Jon Reeves on electric guitar, senior Dan Bannink on drums, junior Tim Franklyn on bass, and freshman Bob Rutherford on vocals, ND 171 played a hard-rock medley of Alice in Chains' music. Next on stage was junior Crystal Wright, who awed the audience with her original composition titled "Oh How I Love Jesus." Wright accompanied her melody of mellow tones on the piano. This soulful crowd-pleaser was an audience highlight of the night. Two members of the local four-member band "In the Know" described themselves as feeling "bare-naked" performing without their other half. SAC rules stipulated that all performers must be current Hope students, therefore the other two members were unable to appear. Despite this obstacle, 1/2 The Know impressed the crowd with their original composition "Sorrowful Happiness." Excess Fatty Funkus 5 then entertained the audience with a fun rendition of "Steamroller." They invited the audience to participate saying, "If you want to dance, dance. If you want to clap, clap." The final act of the evening was The Nodding Heads, a group of sophomores who had only been together for six weeks. Consisting of Ben Lappenga on guitar and vocals. Matt Youngberg on bass. Josh Schicker on vocals and guitar, and Dan Patterson on drums, they performed their original composition "Tuesday Rain/Find That Me." Although a young group, the Nodding Heads scored big with the judges, taking first place honors in the Group category.

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College

Sing

ophomores J o s h Schicker and Ben Lappenga soulfully sing as Matt Youngberg on bass and Dan Patterson on drums provide accompaniment on an original song,"Tuesday Rain/Find That Me." The newly formed band known as the Nodding Heads took home first place in the competition. (Photo by Anthony Perez) Left: Beginning with the first in 1944, All College Sing became an annual tradition as a competition between the Greek organizations. The event first appeared in the 1949 Milestone with the Arcadians and Delphis taking first place. (Milestone Archives) ophomore Sam Vail concentrates on his guitar solo during the performance of the U2 song " R u n n i n g to Stand Still." Vail joined a few of his Cosmopolitan fraternity brothers in the performance of the popular song. (Photo by Anthony Perez)


unior Sara Dillbeck and sophomore Clara Everts perform their version of "Good Enough" by Sarah McLachlan. Many students performed songs by other artists while many brought original music to the Knickerbocer stage. (Photo by Anthony Perez)

All

College

Sing

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by Annie Jakosz

U f l of the: Tradition of Cliristmas celebration uses music to licflit up the holidays around the nation

embers of the Symphonetle perform "Prelude in G Major" by Ralph Vaughan Williams during the opening of the Vespers Program. The group includes 40 talented musicians and a variety of Instruments. (PR Photo)

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eld in high regard for both the college and the community. the annual Christmas Vespers brings the sounds of Christmas to audiences around the country. The 55th annual Vespers was performed for an audience totaling 4,200 at Dimnet Chapel. "I think the amount of work the students put into Vespers was enormous. I was very pleased. The talent that students bring to Vespers make it a wonderful experiencetLsaid Chapel Choir director James Morrow. Over two-hundred musicians participated in the annual performance. The College Chorus and the Chapel Choir performed a combination of over seventeen songs, with practice starting back in September. "Practice was tough. There were a lot of songs to memorize. It also took a lot of outside work so you could be prepared to sing in practice," said Bob Rutherford, a member of the Chapel Choir. The Christmas spirit was brought alive by the music performed during Vespers. The decorations displayed around the chapel, such as Christmas trees, poinsettias and candles all added to the Christmas atmosphere. The songs of the season included both the traditional and modern. The traditional songs were the English melody "And the Child Grew," and "Oh Come All Ye Faithful." The less traditional included songs in French and German. In trying to incorporate more of the student body in the Vespers tradition, members of fraternities and sororities helped out as ushers throughout the performances. "We usher every year. It's a volunteer job that we take part in. We just do it to help out," said Megan Mulder, a member of the Delta Phi sorority. Work was put into Vespers not only by the musicians but also by the Physical Plant who organized the set up, and Technical Services who handled sound and the production of the Vespers compact disc. Steve Driesenga, the head of technicians knows how much work goes in to parts of the production that are not even visible. "The video was handled by Channel 35 but the audio you hear was provided by the College. Microphones are placed in the chapel in order to record for the compact disc. The post-production for the disc is done in Hope's recording studio." Due to the hard work and dedication displayed by all involved. Vespers was success again this year, and a magical kickoff for the Christmas season. "It took a lot of time but it was worth it. I enjoyed Vespers. It was beautiful." concluded Rutherford.

Christmas

Vespers

he Chapel Choir, College Chorus, and Symphonette perform an arrangement titled "The Many Moods of Christmas." The two days of Vespers performances require months practice and preparation. (PR Photo) Above: In the 1945 Christmas Program, the combined choirs perform Handel's "Messiah." (Milestone Photo Archives)

he Chapel Choir performs an arrangement of "Silent Night" by Sir Malcolm Sargent. The Chapel Choir Is lead by conductor and Professor of Music James Morrow. When not busy with Vespers, the group spends time throughout the year touring throughout the United States and occasionally overseas In Europe. (PR Photo)


eautiful sounds of the Handbell Choir fill the chapel with "Carol of the Bells", and arrangement by Gail Warnaar. The Handbell Choir is a newer addition to the annual Christmas Program. (PR Photo)

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Vespers

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M Ik

Trad

a n d a Black elle Johnson

DeVos H a l l concert showcases the talent a n d diversify of the music department

isplaying the talents of the Music Department, the DeVos Concert Showcase was held on March 3, in downtown Grand Rapids. The show included artists from all areas of the music department, from instrumental ensembles to choir to vocal solos. This was the ninth performance of a show that began as a one-time event. In 1989, the Music Department ided to showcase what their program had to offer. As it was again this year, the event was first held in DeVos Hall. Like the tradition of Christmas Vespers, the concert showcase has become an annual events of the department. "[The showcase is] rapidly becoming a part of the tradition as a spring counterpart to the annual Christmas Vespers," said Robert Ritsema, the director of the Orchestra. DeVos hall was the perfect locale for this concert. The traditional auditorium has many balconies and a formal feel. "It is a chance to perform in a major performing venue since we have nothing like it at the college," said Ritsema. No showcase is the same from year to year. There is a format followed, but this new tradition adapts with the different performers and audience. "This year's Showcase featured a piece for combined choirs and orchestra, something we have not done before," said Ritsema. The Chapel Choir, College Chorus, and Orchestra combined voices and violins on "Sanctus" from Gabriel Faure's Requim. Along with the new combinations, there were some unexpected performances. Sophomore pianist Gwen Veldhof, had short notice that she would be performing a piano solo, due to an unexpected injury. She played "Tribute to Roberto Garcia Morillo." President John Jacobson began the evening with a welcome to the audience. Veldhof and sophomore Sye Mishler opened the Showcase with a violin and piano piece, "Schon Rosmarin." The violin and piano began the showcase while a wide array of instruments, from the French horn to the saxophone followed. The music styles were as varied as both the performers and the instruments. The Jazz Ensemble followed Veldhof and Mishler with a more upbeat piece, "Funquiado." The second half of the program opened with a piano solo from sophomore Beth Quimby. She played Debussy's "Jardins Sous La Pluie." It ended with the Collegium Musicum performing Mack Wilberg's "Cindy." They were accompanied by Lynda Hakken and Roberta Kraft on piano. "I think DeVos is a big deal because it's the only time all musicians are brought together on the same program," said Ritsema.

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DeVos

Musical

Showcase

utting heart into the music, the Chapel Choir conveys the meaning ot the German text through their expressions. Much of the music performed by the choir is in foreign languages. (PR Photo)

illing the rafters with their sound, the Chapel Choir, College Chorus, and Chamber Orchestra engage the audience with their rendition of " S a n c t u s " from Faure's Requiem. Normally the groups perform on their own, but for the special occasion they opted to combined talents to create a grandiose effect. (PR Photo) Above Left: Confirming the commitment to a diverse education since being founded, musical programs are a part of academic history. (Milestone Archives


oothing the soul, the Jazz Ensemble engage the audience with their talent. The ensemble seeks to grow in their knowledge of Jazz music while displaying their work to the campus and the community. (PR Photo)

ith music welling from the strings, the Orchestra creates momentum as it builds to the climax. The diverse Orchestra draws its talent from both music and non-music majors. (PR Photo)

DeVos

Musical

Showcase

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by A m a n d a Black

tuOSil Oliver IMorfli delivers speech a m i d controversy

pon arriving on campus, Oliver North held a press conference in the Haworth Center for media from across the state. The event garnered extra attention because of the controversy surrounding the visit. (Photo by Josh Neucks)

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Oliver

North

tar Wars theme played as he stepped behind the podium. With the smile of a politician and the voice of a talk radio host, Oliver North delivered the speech titled, "Faith Under Fire, Conservatism on Campus." North, a former Marine lieutenant colonel, is perhaps best remembered for his role in the 1980's IranContra Affair. Soon after Student Congress announced plans to host North in February, controversy swarmed and did not end until the April 8th speech. Voting on a resolution concerning the visit, faculty stated they "deeply regret that college funds will be used to support a visit of Mr. Oliver North. The faculty [does] not believe that it is in the best interest of the college or its students to provide a forum to Mr. North." Proposed by professor Chris Barney, all but six dissented on the resolution. Jack Holmes, a Political Science professor, voted against the resolution three times. He said North's visit was "very good and raised important issues." He also felt that a vote against North was a vote against free speech. The main topic of debate was funding for the speaker. Because North was hosted by Student Congress, the group took on responsibility for finding funding for the visit. With a usual fee of $16,000. North agreed to come for only $10,000. The President s ottice provided half of the cost and Student Congress procured $4,500 in private donations. Almost 100 tickets were sold to public for $10 each, while students heard the speech for free. With an American flag as his backdrop, and brandishing a copy of the U.S. Constitution, North said the document does not give citizens rights, but keeps rights from being infringed. North challenged younger citizens to make the effort to now to participate in their government, to ensure the future. "I'm urging you when you mariculture, not to just be ornaments of the society. But actively engage in this government," he said. North also supported the idea of a smaller government. "This system of government can not replace individual accountability and personal responsibility," he said. The response to the speech was mixed. The lone protestor was freshman Holly Russcher. She stood outside of the Knickerbocker Theater holding a sign that said, "He lied before, he will do it again." Though many students protested by not attending the speech. Russcher took action. "Silence is advocacy," she said. "You shouldn't pay someone $10,000 who was convicted of a crime, even though he was later acquitted," she said. "What does North's visit say about the school?" "He was an excellent speaker," said sophomore Kerry Gross. "He did a good job. He didn t dwell on his past, but talked about his future. It is hard to argue with someone who says that you have to take responsibility for your own actions.'

ith the American flag as the backdrop, the former Marine, Oliver North, answers a question from the audience. Students, many community members and veterans supported North's speech, while many faculty and staff members were against having the speaker on campus. R.O.T.C. members from Western Michigan University, in full military dress, presented the flag and their arms in a display of military tradition. Above: Holding a copy of the United States Constitution, North explains the purpose of the document. (Photos by Anthony Perez)


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U-iCol

by Christy Colbrunn & Oiristy KaminsLas

Mew visions a n d leadership hope to b r i n g a fresh perspective to campus.

atching students walk by on their way to class, an outsider would probably notice a similarity among the mass of people. It isn't that they all carry book bags or wear wrinkled clothes, but rather, all tend to be white and from a middle class background. This lack of cultural diversity found on campus concerns many professors, administratiors, and students. One; way the College is encouraging cultural diversity is bflappointing Courtney Penn as the new Director of Multicultural Life this year. Penn worked with multicultural students, advised the cultural organizations such as Black Coalition, Hispanic Student Organization, H.A.P.A. (Hope's Asian Perspective Association), and Peer Multicultural Educators. Penn also presented programs designed to enhance multicultural understanding. "I want to promote an institutional environment that could begin to support students of color in their search for identity and belonging and to provide safe environments that would allow all students, especially Caucasion students, to gain the competencies, skills, sensitivities and appreciation for ethnic American minorities," said Penn. In addition to the American ethnic minorities on campus are numerous international students. An event that allows these students the opportunity to share their cultures is "Images." The event included over 100 students and community members displaying their country and culture in a variety of forms, including fashion shows, dances, music and songs, poetry and a bazaar. "It was just so interesting, even with us as international students, learning about others because we don't know about their cultures either. I feel that we are such a nice big family," said J. Namukana Sitati. The big family isn't always the most comfortable one though. As one student commented, "There's never been a day on campus that I haven't been made to feel I am black." Penn explains these feelings. "The students are not supported in their ethnicity because it is not thought to be important. It is assumed that there is one "norm and outside of that norm we can tolerate others, but not appreciate them. Other faculty also realize that students are not experiencing true associations with cultural diversity on campus. "Whites are at a disadvantage because we don't have a diverse campus. It will be a hard reality when they leave here," commented a professor. Penn's vision in terms of multicultural diversity is the based on his vision for our nation too. "I see an overwhelming importance put on developing crosscultural and ethnic competencies for all people," Penn said. "The students that will be successful in the future will be students who have sensitivities, competencies and appreciation tor minority cultures, ytf

Campus

Diversity

anel guests at the Black Coalition's "Darker Vision of Hope" panel discussion listen to comments from the audience. The discussion focused on diversity.

randon Hayashi, Daniza Monroy, Miluska Monroy, and Trudy Castillo perform the authentic Merengue dance along with Fabiola Monroy, Maturi Muriuki, Rob Temple, and Phung Yam. The Merengue was performed during the Images spotlight on the country of Peru. (Photo by Anthony Perez) Above Left: Although founded in 1967, the Black Coalition was not represented In the Milestone until 1973. The mission was similar to that of the group today; " w o r k i n g toward goals that improve the environment of the black students on...campus." (Milestone Archives)


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embers of the Gospel Choir team up with the Voices of Western Michigan University to perform a song at Gospel Fest '97. The Gospel Choir Invited groups from around the state to join them in a salute to Gospel music. (Photo by Katy Wing)

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Diversity

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by Kim Richardjson

Social Activities Committee provides a glamours niglit i n G r a n d Rapids

tudents danced to all kinds of music on the dance floor. The Country, Rock, Rap, and Retro played was an example of the many different tastes of students. (Photo by Anthony Perez)

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Winter

lamour, tuxedos, roses, and a luxury hotel do not be the typical college Saturday night. Winter Fantasia, hosted by the Social Activities Committee (SAC) brought students out of their sandals and into their dancing shoes. "It was w i Bone of the best nights of my life. It was good to get out of the everyday routine and have something to look forward to. Winter Fantasia was very special to me," ;eshman attendant Jamie Partridge. year over 500 people attended the dance at the Amway Grand Plaza Hotel in Grand Rapids on the day after Valentine's Day. "It was a nice change to get out of Holland and do something new. The place was amazing and I had a lot of fun," said freshman Kati Hoffman. The SAC dance committee worked to plan the dance, doing everything from securing the location, finding a caterer, decorating, and providing entertainment. This committee was headed by juniors Kristy Smith and Joy Green. When asked about the event Joy Green commented, "I think that overall everyone had a good time. It was a large success and that is very encouraging." Winter Fantasia has become a tradition. It draws eager students more than once. "This was my second year attending Winter Fantasia. I had a great time and I feel that SAC did a good job putting on the event," said sophomore Dave Rohner. Most dancers headed to Grand Rapids after a dinner out. Once at the Amway Grand, there were two ballrooms. One ballroom had a D.J. called Wild Video Dance Party with a giant video screen behind. In the other room students Josh Schicker, Ben Lappenga and Fran Anderson entertained with their own music. Desserts were offered as well. The student music was a new feature of the evening which turned out to be a large success. It was a chance to hear relaxing piano and guitar music preformed by the students. "I think the best part of the night was the desserts. It gave us a break to go sit down and socialize away from the crowd," said sophomore Lori Guse. "I thought that the place was beautiful and the ballroom was gorgeous. It was a perfect night," added freshman Carrie Tonn.

Fantasia

group of students at Winter Fantasia spells " Y " in the famous YMCA jam that has become a must at any dance event. Fantasia is a yearly tradition put on by the Social Activities Committee and held at the Amway Grand Hotel in Grand Rapids. (Photo by Josh Neukes) Above Left: One of the newer student events, Fantasia has been giving students a formal night out since the event began about ten years ago. It first appeared in the 1989 Milestone. (Milestone Archives)

reshmen Charly Wyngarden and his date Erica DeYoung laugh as Sophomore Jesse Graf gets a little crazy on the dance floor. For students not involved in a fraternity or sorority. Fantasia is the only formal dance held during the school year. (Photo by Anthony Perez)


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# any fantasia goers squeeze onto the packed dance floor for a fast dance. The D.J. played a variety of songs and had a ten foot high video wall that displayed graphics or the video of a song. (Photo by Anthony Perez)

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Fantasia

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Rocki

by IMoelle

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Talent J a m entertains w i t h talent f r o m across campus, f i l l i n g the historic Knickerhocker theater

|||alent Jam '97, a rocking cousin to Ail College Sing, gave students a chance to show off their talents. The SAC-sponsored event was known in past years as Air Jam, and included only lip syncing acts. Last year's move to the Talent Jam format has allowed for a greater variety of talents to grace the stage. I This year's show opened with Hope College's own paisley dAve. The six-month-old band is comprised of four sophomores. With Josh Schicker on vocals and guitar, Ben Lappenga on electric guitar and vocals, Matt Youngberg on bass, and Dan Patterson on drums, the group played their own original music. Emcee Mike Rayburn, a musician-comedian who has been part of the SAC series for the past three years, opened the competition. He entertained the audience with his fancy finger work on the acoustic guitar. In his introduction, Rayburn described Qube, a jazz group consisting of three freshmen with Matt Baumann on drums. Josh Wheeler on saxophone, and Pat Blake on bass, as a group that "likes to funk it up." Qube, which as existed for only a month, took first place with their original jazz compilation. "I was really surprised to win with all the other good acts involved. It was a really great experience," Baumann said. Second place was captured by freshman Rebecca DeVries, who performed, "I Can't Say No!" from Rogers and Hammerstein's Oklahoma in a brown calico dress from frontier-era times. The Indescribable Awesomes took third place with their lipsyncing "Jungle Boogie" act. Seven students dressed in the jungle regalia performed a unique and humorous compilation including "Guitarzan." "We made them laugh; we made them cry; we gave them a monkey. What more could you ask for?" said freshman Rob Brandt, the Awesomes' witch doctor. Adding to the entertainment, Jenny Pierce, freshman, performed a piano solo of "If You Believe" by Jim Brickman, while sophomore Megan Hicks wandered the stage with a towel on her head, green gook on her face, and a toothbrush in her mouth during a performance of "Hello, Hello" by Menotti. Jaded Gray, with what they described as "a little luck, a little skill, and two days of rehearsal," performed "Hummer" by Smashing Pumpkins. In the style of All College Sing, freshmen Joni Norwood and Patricia Rhiew sang a classy rendition of "In His Eyes" from the musical Jekyll and Hyde. Sophomore Kristen Sitz and The Jazz Ensemble rounded out the competition's participants with a mellow and jazzy "As Time Goes By." SAC was pleased with the results of this year's Talent Jam. "We had a great turnout. A lot of good acts came out and the variety of Hope's talent was shown," said SAC member Dave Rohner.

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Talent

Jam

s junior Scott VanderWal dances, Nicki Flinn laughs at Eric Elsholz parading across the stage playing his part as the ape in their "Jungle Boogie" compilation. Several other students joined the group in the original skit of jungle fun that kept the audience laughing all the way through. (Photo by Anthony Perez) Above: Talent Jam first appeared in the 1983 edition of the Milestone. It has become a favorite event for students since this time. (Milestone Archives)

reshman Pat Blake performs a compilation along with Matt Baumann on drums and Josh Wheeler on the sax. The group, known as Cube, brought a jazz sound to the evening. (Photo by Anthony Perez)

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a face that any southern man could fall in love with, freshman Rebecca DeVries belts out Rogers and Hamerstein's "I Can't Say No," from the musical Oklahoma. Donning her best frontier dress. DeVries' song rang with power. (Photo by Anthony Perez)

att Baumann keeps the beat for the group Qube. Baumann, a freshman, along with Josh Wheeler, and Pat Blake took first place with their original jazz composition. (Photo by Anthony Perez)

Talent

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n their last moment has an undergraduate student, seniors wait patiently under the bright May sun to walk across the stage and receive their diploma. (Photo by Anthony Perez)

ean of Chapel Ben Patterson welcomes seniors as they make their way toward the graduation stage to receive their diploma. Patterson assisted President Jacobson in presenting diplomas. (Photo by Anthony Perez)

resident Jacobson welcomes the large graduation crowd at the Holland Municipal Stadium. Jacobson reminded seniors that they are a part of a long tradition that includes many generations. (Photo by Anthony Perez)

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Graduation

ulle Calabro shakes hands with President Jacobson and Dean Patterson as she is handed her diploma and congratulated for her accomplishment. (Photo by Anthony Perez)


by Amanda Black

r ewe 11 514 seniors enter the world in the classic ceremony of pomp and circumstance

r. Annie Oandavati, Associate Professor of Political Science, captures the attention of the audience with her speech titled "Be Careful What You Swallow." Chosen for the "Hope Outstanding Professor Educator" award by the graduating class, Dandavati encouraged seniors to pursue dreams out of passion, not financial rewards. (Photo by Anthony Perez) Above Right: The graduation class of 1919 gathers for one of the last times during the graduation ceremony. (Milestone Archives)

ewards tor their hard work, a showcase for friends and family, the annual Commencement Ceremony marked the accomplishments of the class of 1997. On a blustery May day, the seniors gathered at Memorial Stadium to receive their degrees. Dr. Annie Dandavati, Associate Professor of Political Science, delivered the Commencement address titled, "Be Careful What You Swallow." Her lighthearted yet poiaddress reminded seniors to remember hope one more time. "Use the power of hope for humor, open-mindedness, passion, and education," she said. "Do something not for the love of money, but because it gets your blood flowing." Dr. Jacobson welcomed the class of 1997. "You are connected to the graduates of the past," he said. "You will be joined with the future graduates, many of which could be your children." Those who had their names called to receive a diploma hailed not only from Holland, Michigan, but from many places around the world. As a backdrop to the stage, the flags of the 11 countries represented by the graduates flickered in the spring breeze. For those who had struggled with studying in a foreign country, graduation held a special meaning. It was the crowing moment to a series of accomplishments. "This was a difficult experience for me because I was originally from Croatia. This accomplishment means all to me. It is not necessarily the degree," said Tomilav Skarica who earned her degree in Music and Business. The formal ceremony of graduation connects the beginning of the college experience with the end. As the class of 1997 entered as new students, a formal convocation brought together the students and the faculty. Each professor donned academic regalia. Four years later, the seniors are ready to enter the world donned their own navy blue mortar boards and robes. A farewell speech and a remembrance of accomplishments replaced the welcoming speech that foretold of the fine points of academic life. The monumental day began with a Baccalaureate service that combined the pomp of graduation with a lesson of the Christian faith. The sermon, titled "Singing the Lord's Song in a Foreign Land," was delivered by Rev. Dr. Louis Lotz, a 1972 graduate and a member of the Board of Trustees. It urged graduates to prosper wherever their life takes them. Combining an end with a new beginning, graduation marked the accomplishment of 514 seniors. The ceremony commemorated the mark left by the class of 1997 and welcomed them to face the challenges that the world held for them. "It was an awakening experience," said newly-graduated Leslie Snellen

Graduation


shering in a new era of education, President Jacobson opens the hightech distance learning room with the assistance of representatives from Western Michigan University. The room will connect the College with campuses around the state, but will be primarily used by the Nursing Department. Along with Hope-Calvin Nursing. Western Michigan University will beam in academia not currently available to students. (PR Photo)

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ASSISTANTS NEED NOT APPL^ AS EVIDENCE OF THE LONGSTANDING COMMITMENT

TO ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE, PROFESSIONAL EDUCATORS TEACH ALL LEVELS OF CLASSES, FROM INTRODUCTORY TO ADVANCED. WHILE PROFESSORS' STYLES HAVE BECOME MORE RELAXED, THE SERIOUS NATURE OF EXCELLENCE IS THE SAME AS THE TURN-OF-CENTURY. BESIDES CLASSROOM EXPERIENCE, CHARACTER IS A STRONG PILLAR OF EDUCATION. NAMED TO THE HONOR ROLL FOP CHARACTER-BUILDING COLLEGES FOR THE SEVENTH TIME IN A ROW, THE EDUCATION IS MORE THAN THAT WHICH IS FOUND IN A TEXT BOOK. ^

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most

Furthermore, the Psychology quest for knowing how the mental processes and behav- D e p a r t m e n t faculty are active ior of people interact is what scholars who publish textbooks, motivated the 176 majors to be a m u l t i m e d i a i n s t r u c t i o n a l resources, and research in many psypart of the Psychology Department chology journals. this year. Professor David Myers has the It has become the most popular major on campus, having more stu- leading textbook in the field of Indents enrolled than any other area troduction to Psychology. His book is used by all students enof study. Students are exposed to a wide rolled in the class on campus, even variety of • „„, ' classes within the department, but f i n d the classes focused on their main interest the -Timothy Franklyn, junior most exciting. For Junior Tracy Datte, her favorite class was across the nation. The students reflect the sucDevelopmental Psychology. "1 love learning about kids. cess and standards set by the faculty, but are also themselves. DeThis was the only class that really partment chair John Shaugnessy dealt with that," said Datte. agrees, "We have high-quality stuThe department provides a strong faculty for students. The dents in the department." This is reflected by the initiaprofessors are committed teachers tion of 15 students in April to Psi and care about the students and Chi, a psychology honors society. their success. After completion of the pro"The psychology faculty is exgram, many students will be gocellent. They have an enthusiasm and willingness to go out of their ing on to graduate school. Stacey Masterson went on to way to help students," said Timothy Franklyn, a psychology major. Oklahoma State. She believes the

popular

major

department prepared her to go on to graduate school in many ways. "I had a lot of research experience," said Masterson. "The things I learned will be helpful when the time comes to write big research papers. I feel like I have a good background." Some seniors such as Sarah Fine and Mark Smith gained experience by presenting their research papers at the Midwestern Psychological Association Convention in May. Some psychology major c h a n g e s that took place this year include implementing a new 30 credit-hour major to replace the old 24-credit major. Many of the three credit courses were changed to four credit courses to allow for a lab or practicum experiences. Franklyn sees the new format as beneficial. "The increased involvement (such as labs) is good because it gives us practical knowledge in addition to the book learning." Overall, the psychology department stands even stronger with involvement of the students.

"The psychology faculty is excellent. They have an enthusiasm and willingness to go out of their way to help students/'

Academic Support Center F r o n t Row: Janet Pinkham, David James; Back Row: Jacqueline Heisler

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Psychology

Major

Art Front Row: William Mayer. Jacqueline Carey. Carol Mahsun. John Wilson; Back Ron : Michael, Steve Nelson. Judy Hlllman; Not Pictured: Kalle Boudieaux. Brace McCombs


Psychology Professor Thomas Ludwig demonstrates important but often comical developmental stages with a baby. The Developmental Psychology class studies the life span of the human from birth to death, and examples are often a part of class time. Students also spent time out of the classroom in an activity that involves one or more of the stages of life. (Photo by Jess Grevenstuck)

Biology Front Row: Paul Van Faasen. Lois Tverberg. Min-Ken Liao, Kathy Winnett-Murray, Maria Bumalowska-Hledin; Back R o w : Allen Brady, Virgina McDonough. Lori Hertel, Christopher Barney, Greg Murray. Dave Netzly; Not P i c t u r e d : Harvey Blankespoor. Donald Cronkite, James Gentile, Dan Gerbenv Mary Anne Sydlik.

Chemistry F r o n t Row: Donald Williams. Michael Seymour. Matthew Elrod, Elizabeth Sanford; Back R o w : Stephen Taylor. Graham Peaslee. James Vyvyan, Joanne Stewart, William Mungall, Nicole Bennett. Michael Silver, Maria Bumalowska-Hledin, Rodney Boyer. William Polik.

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Computer Science

Communication L e f t to R i g h t : Deirdre Johnston, Ted Nielsen. Joe MacDoniels. Jim H e n i c k . Tim Boudreau, Dawn DeWitt-Brinks. Not P i c t u r e d : Michelle Johnson

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Distance

Learning

Left to Right: Denelsbeck.

Herb Dcrshcm, Michael Jipping, Gordon Stcgink; Not P i c t u r e d : Kevin


S h a n n o n

G o u l d

m a Distance

ijfciv distance learning lab advances the nursing department

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Juniors Laura Bonnema and Brand! Whelan perform an assessment on an infant in the DeVos Children's Hospital at Butterworth Hospital in Grand Rapids. Even with a new "distance learning" classroom connecting the Hope and Calvin campuses, students will travel to many hospitals is the Grand Rapids area for clinical rotations. (Photo by Anthony Perez)

11 nursing classes for fall '97 will be held in the new listance learning" classroom located on 8th street downtown Holland. The new teaching technique stems from the 75-mile round-trip trek to Calvin that nursing students have to make each week. Hope and Calvin have had a combined nursing program for several y e a r s witrf both H o p e and Calvin students c o m m u t i n g between the two colleges. The new program brings television and computers links that will connect the two colleges. This link will reduce the time spent communing between Holland and Grand Rapids throughout the year. Nursing major Vanessa Timm is a little worried about the effects of the new teaching techniques. "It will be better not having the drive, but it might feel impersonal. 1 like having a one on one relationship with a professor." Ellen Byland shares the same concerns, but also has concerns

about the quality of class time. "Not having to make the drive will be nice, but watching a television for two hours might be tough. 1 would much rather have a professor talking to me." Nursing professor Marcia Smit says the faculty has a commitment to students on each campus, asjiifeculty will still do some com-

I'll get to see more," said Timm. The new high-tech class room is located in the basement of the NBD building which the college acquired this year. The staff from the Computing Information Technology Department (C1T) worked on setting up the room throughout the year. The Nursing staff has since been learning how to use the high tech equipm e n t . Throughout the summer, Nursing Professor C1T and the nursing prof e s s o r s will be w o r k i n g with Calvin to weed out all the glitches of the new program. The college hopes to have the classroom on-line in time for class in the fall of 1997. The college will also use the classroom for long distance learning under a new program with Western Michigan University. The use of this technology on campus will mean greater opportunities for all students. Classes and information out of reach in the past will now be possible.

'Faculty will still do some commuting because we believe that it will be important to be a real person to the opposite campus../'

Education Front Row: Nancy Cook. Jeanine Dell Olio, David Zwart, Tony Donk; M i d d l e ROM : Barb -Soholten, Cheryl Schairer, Yooyeun Hwang; Back R o w : Leslie Wessman, Ronald Wolthuis. Baars Bullman, Richard Mezeske.

-Marcia Smit,

muting because we believe it will be important to be a real person on the opposite campus and not just some face on TV." Having a distance learning classroom will take a few hours off the commute, but nursing students still must travel to clinical sites such as hospitals and agencies. Larger hospitals found in Grand Rapids often provide more experience because of the larger community population. ' T m glad we're still going to Butterworth where it is busier and

English F r o n t Row: Stephen Hemenway, Jack RidI, John Cox, John Fiedler. Reuben Elli v Back Row: Peter Schakel, Barb Mezeske. Jane Bach, Heather Sellers. Pickney Benedict, Mary Jellema. Kathy Verduin; Not P i c t u r e d : Jacqueline Bartley, Julie Fiedler. Francis Fike. David James. Nancy Nicodemus, Dianne Portfleet. William Rynolds.

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n o r m a l l y do not associate the long awaited spring break with another opportunity to study. But for students of the Geology Department, the 10 days between March 14and March 24 were a time to become one with the nature of the Bahama Islands. The Geology 341 class studied the geology of carbonate platforms by examining the most eminent modern e x a m p l e , the Bahama Islands. They provide an opportunity for understanding and interpreting the ancient carbonate platform and reef deposits. On March 14, a group of students ventured out to San Salvador Island, where the Bahamian Field Station was located. From there they could observe the modem reef, beach, dune, and estuarine environments, which they would compare to similar environments preserved in the geological record. The island also preserved a variety of land and water habitats

in the

Bahamas

over

spring

break

sedimentary and reef environments." The variety of marine life made the trip more interesting, and gave even more to learn about. "Besides looking at reefs and caves, we actually saw slime in hypersaline lakes, pre-Colombian oranges, fossil reefs, and modern sediment cementation. We got to float out to sea with the tide, and we saw W a 11 i n g ' s Castle, as well as the Death M a r c h , " said professor -Brian Bodenbender, Geology professor B r i a n Bodenbender, the trip leader. mas, however, the class met and The overall significance of the continued to do so upon returning to the mainland. An evaluation for Bahamas field trip is a hidden one, the course consisted of class ex- however, because sometimes the aminations and exercises, but most simplest lessons are the hardest importantly, a comprehensive field ones to see. In studying the various georeport. logical features of the Bahamas Although that gives the impresthe students from Geology 341 resion that the geology facet made inforced their understanding of up the bulk of the trip, Stephanie textbook concepts in a "hands-on" Jones said this was untrue. way, reminding students once "We'd go out and examine the again that everything they learn geology during the day, and have some fun at night. We went snor- can actually be used outside of the keling too, to observe the marine classroom.

with freshwater, marine, and hypersaline lakes. The trip was broader than the geology of the Bahamas. "Because biological processes influence geological features too, we looked at the biology of marine organisms," said sophomore Stephanie Jones. Prior to leaving for the Baha-

"Besides looking at reefs and caves (in the Bahamas), we actually saw slime in hypersaline lakes,... fossil reefs, and modern sediment cementation."

Combing the shores of San Salvadore Island in the Bahamas, Geology students spend time examining intertidal deposits and beach erosion. The group spent 10 sunny days studying the geologic features of the island. (Photo by Travis Williams)

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Junior Jeremy Caulkins begins to climb out of Owl's Hole, a freshwater solution pit. Caulkins was examining the bottom, the oldest formation on San Salvador at almost 800,000 years old. (Photo by Travis Williams)

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Geology Professor Jonathan Peterson measures the level as senior Peter Lepczyk pours water into the sediment tube. Lepczyk spent much of the year studying the effects of environment contaminants in ground water. (PR Photo)

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ining to Teach on Department caching others may seem like an easy task. A teacher in every classroom from kindergarten to college sets examples, but learning how to teach effectively is no easy task. The Education Department takes the j o b of equipping new teachers seriously. They teach students professional skills and the integration of theories and practical experience. x* ^ Professor L e s l i e Wessman, the c h a i r of tht 1 Education Dep a r t m e n t explains. "The department teaches theory applied in practical ways. One needs to understand that even when you are adults, you are living the theory." There are field placements in almost every class. This rare college experience gives each student 125 hours in the classroom b e f o r e graduation. Students work in with students, helping the current teachers. They observe, grade papers and help the students with what they need. "It connects students to a

prepares

the

teachers

course. It allows them to take what they are studying and use that as a set of glasses," Wessman said. The education department also takes a broad approach to teaching. Students work in groups, use current technology like computers or video tapes. The technology is infused into each class, rather than offering a specific class on educational technology.

of tomorrow

"It's challenging. There is a lot of group work. We learn how to apply the different theories." Out of 1,200 Education Departments, our department is one of 500 departments that is accredited. Wessman said they are in constant dialogue to get reaccreditation. The department is active outside of the classroom. The Association for Supervision and Curriculum Develo p m e n t (ASCD) chapter was the first chapter led by education stud e n t s in the Department chair world. This international program usually involves educators. The ASCD chapter has become a model for the 25 new student-run chapters. Once a student is accepted in the department, they take level two classes which emphasize the same ideals as the level one classes. These classes are committed to the "developmental nature of learning," and the professional abilities, such as being an effective communicator and a decision maker," Wessman said.

"Students are very active in the classroom. It allows them to experience their learning first-hand." -Leslie Wessman, Education

"Students are very active in the classroom. It allows them to experience their learning first-hand," Wessman said. In the level one classes, those students take before they are admitted to the department, a group p r e s e n t a t i o n is v i d e o t a p e d . Wessman says it is visual way of knowing about yourself and learning as a presenter because you can see immediate results. Freshman Mindy Fischer, a level one education student, said

Geology Lcf, t o Right: Ed Hansen. Jonathan Peterson, Brian Bodenbender.

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Student

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Fn.nt Row: Marc Baer. Jams Gibbs, Neal Sobania, G. Larry Penrose; Back Row: Albert Bell, William Cohen, Earl Curry.


Gathering on the floor for show and fell, sophomore Sara VanHoose encourages the students to share an object or experience. VanHoose worked with the pre-K children needing extra attention in developing skills before joining others In kindergarten. (Photo courtesy of Sara VanHoose)

Leading the class of second grade students, sophomore Gina Buwalda reads a book to during story time. Budwalda chose the field placement in the West Ottawa Schools as part of the requirements for her major in education. (Photo courtesy of Gina Buwalda)

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Departments Not Pictured Dance M a x m e De Bruyn Linda Graham Steven lannacone Julio Rivera Jimmie Ross

Getting ready for the big Dance 23 production, sophomore Anna Burns, and juniors Kirsten Heinrich and Amanda Fry practice during ballet class. Dance students find themselves spending a lot of time in the dance studios located in the Dow Center. (PR Photo)

Economics & Business Administration Sylvia Boyd Robert Gentenaar Kendrick Gibson James Heisler Lynne Hendrix William Japinga

Robin Klay John Lunn Herbert Martin Anthony Muiderman T h o m a s Smith Todd Steen

Kinesiology M ^ o t i n a Eaton Stuart Fritz Anne Irwin George Kraft Dean Kreps Mark Northuis John Patnott

Richard Ray Stein Slette Raymond Smith Steven Smith Glenn Van Wieren Karla Wolters

Music Charier Ascbbreriber Wesley Ball Joan Conway Brian Coyle Mihai Craioveanu Russell Floyd

Huw Lewis Joyce Morrison James Morrow Robert Ritsema Stuart Sharp Linda Strouf

Modern & Classical Languages F r o n t Row: Gisela Strand-Hales, Hersilia Alvarez-Ruf, Judith Motif!. Diane Mulroney, Brigitte Hamon Porter; Second R o w : Maura Reynolds. Maria Claudia Andre. Ion Agheana, Sylvia Kallemeyn, Anne Marie Brown, Karen Barber-Gibson, John Quinn; Back R o w : Kelly Osborne. Lee Foster, Sander De Haan, Anne Petit; Not P i c t u r e d : Mylene Catel. Anne Larsen, Fumihito Andy Nakajima.

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Mathematics F r o n t R o w : Todd Swanson, Elliot Tannis, Tim Pennings, Janet Andersen, David Hahn; Back Row: Leonard Van Wyk. Rick Vandervelde. John Stoughton. John Van Iwaarden, Ron Van Iwaarden; Not P i c t u r e d : Mary De Young.


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Beyond the Lectern

Actively imrolvcii, art, dance, and music students make learning physical

Filling the Kletz with beautiful holiday music, the Orchestra performs their annual Christmas Concert during lunch. The group has made a tradition of entertaining crowds in one of the most popular campus gathering spots. (PR Photo)

utstanding faculty and national accreditation in art, dance, and music, the fine arts departments draw students from around the world. The Department of Art began in 1949 and has continued to grow. The art major consists of two option of focus, a studio concentration or an art history concentration. Students are expose^ // variety of opportunities and experiences such as worlt 1 "' ing with other artists and exhibiting their work in the DePree Gallery. The Department of Dance, getting its start in 1985, is the newest of the fine arts. Before dance became part of the curriculum, it was offered by Maxine DeBruyn as a part of the physical education program. From beginnings in the gymnasium, the department has grown to national recognition. "A really big draw to Hope was that it was accredited in dance. I also liked it that you didn't have to audition," said Gretchen

Wolfanger, a junior dance major from New York. The faculty themselves are active d a n c e r s , such as Julio Rivera and his dance company called Contemporary Motions. The dance department puts on events including student choreographed recitals and an annual dance show which has become a

Symphonette traveled to Australia and New Zealand. Back on American soil, the music department hosts numerous concerts. The Music Showcase at DeVos Hall in Grand Rapids is a c u l m i n a t i o n of talent f r o m throughout the department. The music curriculum allows students four areas: vocal or instrumental music education, performance, or a general music major with focus determined by the student. Although an-Gretchen Wolfanger, junior dance major nual plays have long been a tradition in student life tradition for the past 23 years. The Department of Music is the on campus, the Department of Theoldest of the three fine arts pro- atre saw its formal beginnings in 1968. The department presents a grams. It has provided traditional events for the college and commu- variety of works each year and thenity including Christmas Vespers atre majors get many opportunities for almost 60 years. The holiday to be involved. Off or on stage, program has gained a national fol- students are active in each aspect lowing through p e r f o r m a n c e s of performances from directing and acting, to costumes, lights and broadcasted on PBS. World-wide tours by the scenery. Whether in the spotlight paintChapel Choir and Symphonette further expose the program. In ing, dancing, singing, or acting, the May the Chapel Choir toured in fine arts departments give students the N e t h e r l a n d s , w h i l e the a chance to shine.

ly big draw to Hope was that tt was accredited in dance. I also liked it that you didn't have to audition [for an opportunity to learn.]"

Nursing Front Row: Susan Mlynarczyk, Marjone Viehl. Gail Zandee, Mary Doombos. Sharon Elheridge. Patricia Leigh; Back Row: Cloe Ann Danford, Marcia Smii, Judy Baker, Cheryl Feenstra, Brenda Feikema. Sherry Knoppers; Not Pictured: Mary Flikkema, Sondra Rozendai.

Spolitical Science Left to Right: Jack Holmes, David Ryden. Annie Dandavati. Robert Elder. James Zoetewey.

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Support

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ometimes it seems like I there is no h o p e for understanding organic chemistry, or way too much red ink on the latest history paper. When class work seems too challenging, the A c a d e m i c Support C e n t e r (ASC) offers tutors and assistance to the inundated. The ASC has .served mam^ptff-' poses for students and fac-" ulty for over 25 years. Seventy tutors and three professionals have helped over 500 students. Its main purpose is to provide tutors for struggling students or those who need a little extra help. For a student's first visit, the ASC staff meets with them for 15 to 45 minutes to identify their areas of weakness. With academic challenges identified, the student is assigned an appropriate tutor in the subject. Students can contact their tutors for as many sessions as needed. Sophomore Rachel Kemink has worked at the Academic Support Center for almost two years. Be-

provides

tutoring

for

students

sides doing office work, she does some peer tutoring. "Tutors help their peers to study for tests, to go through readings or to clarify vocabulary," Kemnik said. She said that professors are very understanding and helpful in this process. The ASC is accessible to all stu-

hours, so when a students comes in, I can assign them whoever is there at the time," he said. James also does some tutoring himself. Among other subjects, he teaches study skills and helps students in the difficult task of organizing themselves. He also teaches many who were not used to studying in high school how to study in the college setting. Students can also f i n d his support in sect i o n s of the Academic Suc- S t u d e n t after visiting the Academic Support Center class cess w h i c h is run dents, and is open Monday through through the center. At then end of each semester, Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Laurie Menken, the ASC office the ASC mails each student a form manger, said that the number of to comment on his or her visits and students that come through the the contribution of the center on academics. door each day varies. "My tutor was extremely help"The fall is busier than the spring," she said, attributing the ful. I anticipate a better grade due influx to the fact that freshmen to her tutoring," said one struggling have some trouble adjusting to col- student, and others agree. "Sometimes when you feel like lege life. Professor David James has there's no hope of ever understandbeen the writing tutor coordinator ing what's going on, it's very nice to know that there's the ASC to go in the ASC for the past ten years. "Writing tutors work office to for help."

"Sometimes when you feel like there's no hope of ever understanding what's going on, it's very nice to know that there's the ASC to go to for help."

Philosophy Front Row: Caroline Simon, Andrew DelTOlio; Back Row: James Allis. Nick Perovich, Bruce Fieeberg.

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Public Safety Front Row: Kathy Ransom. Mike Lafata, Chad Wolters, Glendene Lahr: Back Row: Duane Terpstra, Chris Gesink, Don Tuuri, Mary Vanvels. Jerry Gunnink.


Departments Not Pictured -

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^ ^ Psychology VTaking advantage of a warm afternoon in the Pine Grove, students spread blankets to hit the books and bask in the sunshine. The peace of the Pine Grove presents a relaxing and quiet alternative to the dorms. (PR Photo)

Charles Green Loma Jarvis Margaret Kasimatis Thomos Ludwig Cathleen McGreal

James Motiff David Myers Patricia Roehling Darell Schregardus John Shaughnessy Steven Spencer

Van Waylen Library & Joint Archives

Final exams presents a chance for freshmen Mindy Fischer and Michelle Jones to do some studying on the lawn outside Dykstra Hall. (Photo by Anthony Perez)

Priscilla Atkins Mark Christel Colleen Conway Kelly Jacobsma

David Jensen David O'Brien Gloria Slaughter Larry Wagenaar

Spreading out on the alumni bench outside Graves Hall, students take notes on a lecture by Classics professor Kelly Osborne. Many classes gather on the semicircle seat donated by the class of 1910. (PR Photo)

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Below: Waiting for just the right moment to begin playing their part, juniors Jamie Kempke and Beth Quimby perform as part of the DeVos Showcase in Grand Rapids. (PR Photo)

Far Bottom: Senior Kirsten Singer, Jodi James, and junior Reina Vendramini dance in a piece called "Oscillations" at the American College Dance Festival at the University Of Iowa. The dance, choreographed by James, a senior dance major, earned her an invitation to perform it at the national dance festival. (PR Photo)

Religion Clockwise from boUoin left: Boyd Wilson, Jeffrey Tyler, Barry Bandstia, Steven BournaPrediger, Lynn Japinga, Phillip Munoa. Allen Verhey, Janet Everts.

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Taking center stage in Soli's Story, freshman Amy Miller, sophomore Rachel Smith, and junior Daniel Hoag perform in the play written by professor Jean Reed Bahle. The production was directed by the director of theatre, Diana Robins, which she describes as a story about the "gifts we each possess and gifts others offer us." It is also about gifts that go unrecognized too often. (Photo courtesy of the Theatre Department)

in fine

other private four-year c o l l e g e can boast a b o u t their fine arts programs like Hope College. This is the only small school in the nation to be nationally accredited in all art, dance, music and theater. This distinction makes for a very rare advantage to the College. Students from far away states are attracted to because of this accreditation. It can p r o v i d e stud e n t s a great opportunitylto take their talents to an even greater height. As Dean for the Arts and H u m a n i t i e s , Bill Reynolds explains, the four departments are encouraged to undertake the challenge of accreditation in all four areas. They are continually "encouraged to maintain and improve excellence," said Reynolds "Just because we are a small school people might think that our programs aren't as good, but this proves to the students that they get the real thing," said Reynolds. As a part of the North Central

arts

distinguishes

the

college

Association of Colleges, the National Association of Schools of Art and Design, Dance, Music, or Theatre accredit each department individually. To be accredited, the college must do a self-evaluation and follow a format to discussing details about the institution, performances and numerous other topics. Evaluators visit the college and focus on

"The purpose is to meet the national standards so that the outside world can see that the programs we offer are measuring up to other schools. It also provides the departments something to aim for— standards that are reasonable," said Reynolds. All of these departments share a common philosophy that majors and non-majors alike can participate in the departments. The classes are open to any student who has the desire to be good at what -Bill Reynolds, dean of Arts and Humanities they do, or to a wide variety of issues, from the just get involved, regardless of relationships between the depart- their major. ment and the dean, to an active facThis is a distinguishing feature ulty that is performing and publish- compared to some other schools. ing work, to the facilities that the Many have accreditation, but are departments have to use. very elite and only allow serious After a few evaluations by artists to participate. The fact that many different people in many for- any and all students at Hope can mats, the college is given accredi- participate is encouraging and weltation, given accreditation with re- coming to all, once again evidence strictions, or denied accreditation. that there is a rare advantage in the Typically, the college is given ac- fine arts. creditation for a period of 10 years.

"Just because we are a small school people might think that our programs aren't as good, but this proves to the students that they get the real thing/'

•7——

Sociology C lockwise f r o m bottom left: Donald Luidens. Deborah Sturtevant, James Piers. Barbara Wells. Roger Nemetb, Debra Swanson.

Theatre Front Row: Jean Reed Bahle, Daina Robins, John Tammi; Back Row: Michelle Bombe. Richard Smith; Not Pictured: Perry Landes, George Ralph.

Accreditation

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ithering in the DeWitt Bowl, members of the campus fraternities and sororities come together during Greek Week for the first-ever all-Greek photo. After many changes throughout the year, Greeks stand unified as the largest student organization, dominating the campus with over 500 active members. (Photo by Anthony Perez)

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Fro

THE MUDDY PITS OF THE BLACK RlVER TO THE AIRWAVES OF OTTAWA COUNTY,

FROM THE STAGE OF THE ClVIG CENTER TO THE PEWS OF DlMNENT CHAPEL, STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS PROVIDE A BREEDING GROUND FOR LEADERSHIP SKILLS,

COMMUNITY SERVICE, AND A SOCIAL OUTLET

FOR OVER 8 0 YEARS THEY HAVE

CREATED A PLACE FOR STUDENTS TO DEVELOP A VOICE WHILE GIVING THEM A PLACE TO BELONG. HOPE'S 13 LOCAL GREEK ORGANIZATIONS AND SOME 4 0 STUDENT ACTIVITIES FOSTER THE SPIRIT OF INDIVIDUALITY, YET ALLOW FOR A SAFETY ZONE WHERE MEN AND WOMEN CAN EXPLORE THEIR PLACE NOT ONLY IN THE HOPE COMMUNITY BUT ALSO THEIR PLACE IN THE WORLD. ^

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iVlaking History P H II

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haring events and traditions, the Alpha Gamma Phi Sorority and Kappa Eta Nu Fraternity were united at last in the spring. The ties binding the two organizations are mighty and natural. The joining of the black and green seemed logical due to the friendships formed between the Alpha Phis and Knicks, ties which were never built between the Alpha Gamma Phis and the Arcadian Fraternity. In three years. Arcadians had never been present at any Alpha Phi jaunts such as formals or date nights. In addition, the two groups had no traditional affairs in which to partake. After much discussion, the Alpha Gamma Phi Sorority wrote the Arkies a letter stating that because of lack of traditions, they did not feel they shared a fitting brother-sister relationship. At the insistence of the new Knickerbocker actives, an official bond between their group and the Alpha Phis was pursued. Soon after, a unanimous vote was taken by both the Knicks and Alpha Phis to finally unite as brother and sister. The small number of members for both the men and women help to allow for greater individuality and unity within the organization as a whole. Because of the closeness within these two organizations, they form an ideal brother-sister balance. The Alpha Gamma Phi Sorority takes it name Greek words Anchor, Stability, and Faith. The anchor represents the group's connection to the college, while faith and strength give meaning to the motto "Friendship, the Anchor of our Strength." The symbol of a pine tree represents strength and a ^

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golden chain represents friendship. Both give way to the sorority's colors of green and gold. The Alpha Phis were founded on eight principals which still define the character of the organization. Friendship, Caring for Body and Mind, Service, Love, Fellowship, Loyalty, and Faith. These principals are involved in and inspire each activity and event sponsored by the organization. These include a homecoming celebration and alumni brunch, a canoe trip, fall hay ride, and Christmas hospice. Since 1909, the Knickerbocker Fraternity has stood for Maturity, Fellowship and Intellectualization. These traditions have continued throughout the good times and bad, and the bond between these men prevail over all. Originally, Kappa Eta Nu was founded by a number of freshmen to provide brotherhood for pre-seminary students and because of the inability of the other societies to take care of their differing needs. But due to changing times, the Knicks saw decreasing numbers of pledges, accounting for their small organization today. Headed by president, Peter Poel, the Knicks held on through rough waters and low numbers. Under excellent support from administration and alumni, the Knicks were able to hold the traditions of the past and maintain the guidelines of the future. The men in black have been a small organization in the past few years, but were honored by five New Members who will lead the Knicks into the future. These young members are taking the places of those men who have found their calling outside of Michigan.

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A l p h a ( > a m m a Phi S o r o r i t y — F r o n t R o w : Blythc Siddall, Sara Coke. A m y Jarchow, Dana Horner, Katherine Krusc. S e c o n d R o w : AnnMarie Murphy, Elizabeth Baker. Amanda Merrill. Eryn Foley; T h i r d R o w : Amy-Lynn Halverson, Melissa O o m s , Cari Yingling. Kelly Barton, Jess Grevenstuk, Michelle Johnson; Back R o w : Jessica Guest, Mary Jane Smith, Mandy Creighton, Megan M a d d o x . Kamila Datema. Amy Austin. Kristin Burke.

5 8

Alpha

Phi

Sorority

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Knickerbocker

K a p p a E t a N u F r a t e r n i t y — L e f t to R i g h t : Fred Is; Not P i c t u r e d : Ben C o o p e r and Nick Jewell.

Fraternity

, John Donnely, Craig Tommola. Mark Stubbs. Fete Fool.


pending a night with the books for a big exam, Ben Cooper heads to living room of the Knick House In his study grubs. (Knickerbocker Archives) II dressed up for a Alpha Gamma Phi Rush photo, the women have some fun in the DePree Art Center. The group grabbed a pile of spinning sunflowers for a bight addition to the portrait. (Alpha Phi Archives)

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fter a long day helping the fraternity move to a new house, freshman Nick Jewell takes a break in the living room. (Knickerbocker Archives)

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elebrating the return of alumni at Homecoming, the Alpha Gamma Phi Sorority shows off their float before the start of the parade. The actives welcome many alumni back to campus for the weekend activities. (Alpha Phi Archives)

Ipha Gamma Phi women Jess Grevenstuk, Amy-Lynn Halverson, Melissa Ooms, and Eryn Poley display their Greek Week spirit in 50's "Leaders of the Pack" garb. (Alpha Phi Archives)

Alpha

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elebrating activation night after a long New Member Education, Dave Beaver, Jason Kooistra, Matt Van Dam, Nate Hoekzema, Jeremy Beard, Mike Gentile, Mike Travor, and Chris Cappaz spend time with their new brothers. (Cosmo Archives)

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fficially united as sister and brother, the Delphi Sorority and Cosmopolitan Fraternity plan many traditional and social events together and with other Greek organizations. A long history, inner tubes, and crate paper tighten the bonds of brother and sisterhood. The men in green and the women in navy take to the pool in a successful run at intramural water polo each year. The fun of playing in the water has led the way for two consecutive championship wins for these brother and sister Greeks. Aligning forces on land, these organizations enter the annual homecoming float building contest in an original way. The Delphis and Cosmos have made a tradition of stretching out on the bed of a semi-truck covered with banners, crate paper, and couches. In the other traditional events, the paths diverge. Delta Phi, founded on October 10, 1910, developed as a literary and cultural organization to foster friendship, establish unity, and provide an opportunity for the cultural and social development of its members. While many faces have come and gone, traditions, activities, and the purpose of the sorority remain unchanged. Sixty-seven well-rounded individuals represent the Delphis. Showcasing this variety, the actives participate in many organizations on campus such as Baker Scholars, Mortar Board, Pull, and Student Congress. Outside the college confines, Delphi's can be seen volunteering at community hospitals, involved with Young Life, serving at Christ Memorial Church, working car washes and bake sales. As relief for some exam stress, the Delphis fruit basket sale for students during exam week was

6 0

C O S M O P O L

also again a huge success across campus. Annually, the Delphis join with the Fraternal Society for Halloween bonding. In addition, every year the women have a Christmas party, and enjoy a night on the town for their formats. This year the spring formal was held in Chicago and the fall formal was held at Crystal Mountain Ski Resort. For nearly nine decades, the sorority has believed that friendship is a horizon that expands when approached. It becomes evident by showing how they work together for the better of their sisterhood on campus as well as off campus. Founded in 1890 and oldest homegrown fraternity, proud Phi Kappa Alpha members have exemplified the group's spirit through a diverse active body and the many activities they pursue. This year, the Cosmos were able to welcome thirty new members. A doubling in size brought a new class of men into the tradition. Each year two of the Cosmo's favorite events are the crazy fall and spring canoe trips. The Cosmos also host an elaborate Homecoming formal, Christmas tea and overnight spring formal. Making traditions with other organizations, the Cosmos join the Sigma Sorority for a Red n' Green party. St. Patty's Day is spent with the SIB's. Each year the men are excited to be involved with many service projects and campus groups. Earth Jam, Team Hope, Young Life, Partners in Promise, Habitat for Humanity, beach sweeps and park clean-ups to name just a few in service. Athletically, Cosmos are involved in swimming, baseball, lacrosse, hockey and the Pull. The men are involved in other organizations on campus including the Anchor, ski club. Student Congress, theatrical and dance productions.

Cosmopolitan

Fraternity


elta Phi women gather for the annual Fall Treat Scavenger Hunt and Skit Night. The night is a favorite bonding event for the women. (Delphi Archives)

; II

oping to catch the eye of independent students, Delphi women participate in the activities fair on the DeWitt Patio. The event gives the group and opportunity to attract new members. (Delta Phi Archives)

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Delta P h i S o r o r i t y — F r o n t R o w : Tara Ackerman, Mimi Do. Amanda Schuid, Sara Looman, Shannon Graff, Courtney Welton. Susan Looman, Nicole Pryor, Betsy Van Faasen, Melinda Ratdavong, Allison Elheridge, Megan Mulder, Leah McAplpine, Erin Chatelain, Bekki Spencer; S e c o n d R o w A m y Romin, Abby Nienhuis, Becky Maimer, Jen Hendricks, Erin Daly, Beth Hopma, Lisa KnotI, Lindsay Matheny, Kathryn Whitfield, Becky Blom, Christa Murphy, Tonya Rouse, Heather Weyrick, Kara Richter; T h i r d Row; Sage Bolte, Gina Buwalda, Kristin Chatelain, Kate Gritter, Heather Lovern, Danielle Mannes, Arika Weckwert, Kelli Draeger, Sara Grant. Heather Knowles, Krista Brewer, Sarah Hoolsema, Laura Carlson; B a c k Row Kelly Morgan. Carrie Gilligan. Lesley Sheldon. Jennifer Yonker. Rebekah Brown. Heather Morgan. Julie Lausch, Lindsay Ethridge, Jamie Riekse. Rebecca Potts. Dana Vanderplow; Not P i c t u r e d : Lara Plewka. Jessica Mixer. Sarah Keay, Kelli Teerman. Arlene Torrence, Karlye Schmidt, Beth Volkers, Lieschen Verwys, Tenille VanEck, Kristen Theilen, Julie Torrence.

: — — —

njoying the warmth of the fire and the closeness of friends, the Cosmopolitan Fraternity and Delta Phi Sorority hang out after a long day on the river. The annual canoe trip is a yearly tradition for the groups. (Cosmopolitan Archives)

n their way to East Lansing, the Delphis board the charter bus for a traditional weekend party with the Sigma Alpha Epsilon Fraternity at Michigan State. (Delta Phi Archives)

Delta

C o s m o p o l i t a n F r a t e r n i t y — F r o n t Row Rob Meyer. Ali Awadullah. Nate Hoekzcma. Mike Zolnierowic/. Roy Pereira. Luis Leguizamon. Ben Lane. Josh Kooistra, Aaron Smith. Joel Brandt. Dan Capps, Josh Strand, Ben Mills, Matt Brunson, Kip VanDam, Chris Cappa, Jason Johnson, Chris Collins. Marc Hes; S e c o n d R o w : Doug Richter. Chip Korstarge. Craig VandenBerg. Mike Gentile. Marty Meir. Sam Vail. Dave Clausen. Chris Ritton. Jason Doublestein. J.D. Kensinger. Paul VanderHeide; Back Row Andy Sill. Jason VanDellen. Matt VanDam. Marc Humbarger, Chris VanDeven. Jeremy Stoner. Chris Potter, Clint Smith, Chris VanTimmeran. Brent R o w e . Ryan Spangler, Derek VanderHeide, Mike Traver. Peter Warburton, Jason Kooistra. Dave White. Dan Potter. Mike Adamski. Steve Tobias. Drew Storer. Scott Hes. Ryan Harrell, Eric Sevensma.

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haring a special bond, the Centunan Fraternity and Dorian Sorority joined as brother and sister in 1992. Before unifying, each was united with another organization. Originally founded in 1921 as a literary society. Kappa Beta Phi were sisters with the Emersonian Fraternity until the women were forced to disband in 1971 due to changing needs, financial problems and difference of opinion over the Vietnam War. Hoping to add a missing piece to Greek Life on campus. Kappa Beta Phi's traditional purple sweatshirts appeared again in 1988. Like the Dorian Sorority, the Centurians were also disbanded. In 1980 the group tried to pledge a woman into their fraternity. At the time, the Cents were sisters with the Kappa Delta Chi Sorority, a relationship that ended at the time of their disbandment. Because of the need for a sixth fraternity, the Cents were brought back onto campus in 1986. Ironically enough, the Centurian Fraternity opted to share their ideals and invited the Kappa Beta Phi Sorority to pledge their commitment to be unified. But because of the need to obtain better stability after their reestablishment, the Dorians refused the Centurians invitation to join as brother and sister in 1989. Reapproached in the spring of 1992, the Dorians felt confident enough in their sorority's position to happily accept the offer. The Dorians apply their motto Simplicity of Manner, Strength of Purpose, Beauty of Character to their daily lives on campus. Dorians can be seen involved in activities such as Student Congress, the Anchor, the Milestone, Spanish Club, leading as ^

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Nykerk coaches and Orientation Directors, participating in mission trips, and ripping rope on the shores of the Black River. Annual Dorian events include date nights, formals in Cadillac and Chicago and spending free time at Holland Bowl assisting disabled children. In addition, five seniors showed their smarts by getting elected to Phi Beta Kappa. After a successful spring Rush, the Dorians welcomed twenty-two new women for a total of sixty-seven active members. The Centurian Fraternity, founded in 1966, is based upon the principles of Brotherhood, Service, and Character. A goal of the fraternity is to uplift members as well as other people. The members also feel that individual identity is important while working to come together as a whole. Celebrating their 30th anniversary, the fortyfive active Centurian members made themselves known across campus. Getting involved with activities such as Alpha Phi Omega, SAC, the Anchor, Chapel Choir, CAARE. Habitat For Humanity, Nykerk, and the Pull. They were involved with service projects such as the 8th Annual Sclerosis Dance, beach cleanups and helping disabled citizens move into new housing. Since the refinement of the pledging process in 1995, and in the hopes of establishing tighter relations right from the start, interaction was seen between Centurian and Dorian actives and their new members during New Member Education. In addition, tricking for treats, kissing the Blarney Stone and roasting a pig help to enhance their relations and keep with traditions.

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£ K a p p i i B e t a P h i S o r o r i t y — F r o n t R o w : Laurie Keisling, Holly Pelon. Meg Morgan, Roehelle Tedesco; Row Pwo: Kristen Zimdahl, Kara MeGillicuddy, Leah Jones, Jodi Frens, Sarah Calros, Brandi Whelan, Lindsey Bolo, Valkyrie Sakshau^.'. Row T h r e e : Jaime Weidner, Vicki Cade, Allyson Pickens, Becky Ponka, Jen Wilson; Row h o u r : Carrie Langstraat, Rachel Haveman, Lisa Shenk, Jo Ellyn Manning, Dana Maroll, Roxanne Pascente, Mary Scribner, Beth Raihhan. Row Five: Carley Bos, Nicole Dangremond, Myra Velasco, Jenny Passchier, Anna D e m s h u k , Jill Donehoo, Bonnie N a m e n / a , Lisa K r a n / ; Row Six: Jamie Partridge, Krisia Brewer, Ann Zeneberg; R o w S e v e n : Lisa Bartletl, Jen Esterline, Kris West; R o w F i g h t Anne Marie Campion, Karie Ergang; Row N i n e : Ellen Colenbrander, Stacy Hoglun, Tanya Lasley, Ashley Tanner, Jenelle Or/.echowski, Kristen Hess, Anne Jakosz.

6 2

Dorian

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Centurian

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A l p h a T h e t a C h i — F r o n t R o w : Greg Folkert, John C h a m i n . Brian Dykuis. Bill Kim, Rob Henry. Tyler Jansen. Bannink, Peter Martin; R o w T w o : Adam Wesslink. Rob Andrei/. Dan Kubacki, Brian Grazan, John Delcal/o; Three: Peter Emery, Joe Fritsch. Seth Bniggers, Scott Voshel; Row F o u r : Chris M c K e e , Mark Vanderbeek. Schrier, Dave Rohner, Tim Scott; R o w Five: Phil Leete, Ryan Sterk, Chris Danopolis, Mark Tenhor, Matt Fret/. Rutherford, Matt Williams; R o w Six: John Williams, Matt Steensma. J e f f T r y t k e , John Fairchild, Scott Hui/cnga.C Moore, Adam Hudson,


enturian brothers discuss life's questions and challenges at a fall literary meeting in Lubbers Hall. The meetings allow the group to engage in intellectual kinship. (Centurian Archives)

nee overflowing pans of brownies and cookies left only a sugar buzz for members of the Dorian Sorority and Centurian Fraternity at their "Bake Sale" datenight. Greeks munched on the homemade goodies in a night of brother-sister bonding. (Centurian Archives)

orian seniors Ami Smith, Becky Lucas, Dawn Kleinheksel, Shannon Lawrsen, Rochelle Tedesco, Holly Pelon, and Meg Morgan hang out with the Cosmopolitans. (Dorian Archives)

r ressed in holiday colors, Kappa Beta Phi women attend the group's annual Christmas party before the long winter break. Friends exchange gifts after dinner and spend time together before heading home to families for the holidays. (Dorian Archives)

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efore a game of flag football in the field behind the Centurian Cottage, the brothers meet in their living room. The group planned many extra events and activities to strengthen friendships during Brotherhood Week in the fall. (Centurian Archives)

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arren Geuss, Jesse Graf, and John Early jam to the music, while Peter Lichty sings the lyrics in a talent act at Greek Olympics. (Arcadian Archives)

hi Phi Sigma brothers Jesse Graf, Tyler White, Evan Llewelyn, Jim Langer, and Shane Hanson find ways to procrastinate at the Arcadian cottage. Goofing around is a student tradition when faced with Monday morning homework. (Arcadian Archives)

appa Delta Chi members welcome women interested in rushing a sorority to their stop in the Round Robin. The event allows the actives to introduce themselves and let perspective members get to know the sorority. (Kappa Chi Archives)

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ophomore Darren Geuss, senior Mark Montipetit, and junior Dennis Ahmad wait for their dates to freshen up at the Arcadian spring formal. The Fraternity holds formals and date nights each year as a chance to get off from campus. (Arcadian Archives) Inal Tea at the Kappa Chi cottage gave the active women a chance to spend time with perspective members before bids were given and New Member Education began. (Kappa Chi Archives)

6 4

Kappa

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ingle organizations yet still sharing a common bond, the Kappa Delta Chi Sorority and the Arcadian Fraternity both emerged during turbulent times. Since being founded in the spring of 1962, as political tensions began to heighten and the need for a sixth sorority became evident, the Kappa Delta Chi Sorority has continued to grow while Pledging Honor and Giving Friendship. The Kappa Chis, whose original home was in the Gilmore Hall basement, began the year refinishing of the basement of their recently relocated cottage. During the year, the sorority cheered on their sisters on the banks of the Black River, coaching Odd Year and pulling for Even Year. In the fall, the women put together a float titled "There's No Place like Hope," and later participated in the eighth annual M.S. Dance co-hosted by the Centurians. Time was spent painting faces at the Civic Center, walking for hunger in the annual Crop Walk, and volunteering at the City Mission. The Kappa Chis were also seen taking a stand for women in WIO, singing in Nykcrk, educating the campus in C.A.A.R.E., attending seminars for ASCD and working at a women's shelter. Activities such us pumpkin carvings, attending formals in Kalamazoo and Mount Pleasant, and literary meetings added to the year. World War II formed the political foundation for the Arcadian Fraternity. While most men from campus left to fight in World War 11, several men remained. These few men were members of different organizations, yet each did not have A

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JW: Hcaihcr C o v e r d a l e , lirin Fuulk, Krisicn Eluholz, A n n a ( urucucl. A m y e n s a . J o a n n e R a n d i n i l i s , C a s e y S a g g e r s ; Middk- R o w : Ashli S i m p s o n , Jenm •rvenne. A m y Austin, Karen Kandinilis, Teresa M u s s e l m a n . Buck R o w : A n n e arriger, A n n e H o r t o n , S u s a n Po/./.anghera, Bobbie S i r e e i m a n , Jessica Parrish.

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enough members to stay alive. To combat low numbers, these men came together and founded a new Greek organization called Tri Beta. This new fraternity thrived on campus and even brought in a new pledge class, but a problem arose as soldiers returned from over seas. Men returned to their original fraternities, causing Tri Beta to disband. This left the pledge class without an organization in which to belong. These men came together and formed a new fraternity which they called Arcadian. Chi Phi Sigma was created out of the need for brotherhood in the context of the Christian faith. The fraternity's Icllcrs stand for Service, Love, and Wisdom. With actives as leaders on campus and in the community, the goal for all members is to leave a better organization than when inducted. This year's activities proved to be especially fruitful. The Arcadians held a fiftieth anniversary dinner enjoyed by alumni and active members. Fellowships with other sororities and fraternities and the annual Kommonwanna Dance were also highlights. The Arcadians completed various service projects in the community, including working with the Salvation Army Church and doing groundwork at the Ottawa County Fairground. Though the Arcadians and (he Kappa Chis do not share a common brother-sister bond, they share an interest in service and in furthering their own organizations. Their foundations were created out of a need for unity. The navy and maroon share Greek pride as they both celebrated multiple decades of existence,

C h i P h i S i g m a F r a t e r n i t y — F r o n t R o w : C o l l i n Conrmire, Josh M c A l p i n e S w o n d R o w : A I U I I T I U H I H - . Jrlf Kt-miia B r a d D e K u i p e r . Brad B o l i o n , D a r r e n ( i e u s v l o m S c h n p n e m a , J P. B u c k i n g h a m , ( i r c g R e m . Jay Wulltttr, B r a d Van Z o c r e n , l . u k c S m i t h ; Buck R o w : Ryan Vanderwall. Todd T u i g c s t k r Brent W d l i a m s , Chris K c m n s Steve Sand cfs, Matt Hund/.o, Pete H o u l i h a n , Paul Slater, D e n n i s A h m a d , Pete Kellepourey, John l a i l y , Brad Mixer, Shane H a n s e n Kyle S c h a u b , C h a d Storey, S i e v e B u s h o u s e , Mark Montpetii

Kappa

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Arcadian

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6 5


ot dogs in hand, members of the Sigma lota Beta Sorority celebrate May Day with their brother fraternity, the Emersonians. (SIB Archives)

eading to dinner at the fall Emersonian Literary College Formal, Tony Petkus, Mark Hofstee, and Mike Farmer wait for their dates to freshen up. The Fraternity headed to Traverse City for the event. (Emersonian Archives)

A P h i T a u N u F r a t e r n i t y — U p s i d e D o w n : Jay L e i t / : F r o n t R o w ; A d a m Taylor. Greg Vanghan, Mike Brye, Adam Labbe; S e c o n d R o w ; Dan Wegner, Matt Kline. Nick Andrews, Denny Fuller, Eric Nichols, D a v e Rodtie, Andy Fate; T h i r d R o w : Greg Frens, Andy Gohl, Aaron Smith, Matt Anderson, Brock Isonhart, Joe Fitzommons, Marty Gravilyn, Todd Cooper; B a c k R o w : Jared Hicks. Ted Patric, Skipp Yowler, Z a c h Young, Mark O z i n g a , Jeff W h i t m o r e , Jeremy Gasper.

pring formal gave the Emersonians a chance to escape across the border to Windsor, Canada for the weekend. The men and their dates danced in the clubs and gambled in the casinos throughout the night. (Emersonian Archives)

.4 S i g m a loin B e t a — F r o n t R o w : Mindy Fischer, Knslcn Busch, Cathlecn King. 1 rudy Castillo, Rcbecca Karrow, H o a n g Phain. Trena Hedley, Anne Schroek. S e c o n d Row : Kerri Bouws, Kendra Maloni, Amy Perkins, Mandy Fry, Andrea Johnson, Katie Kahler, Emily LaLonde, Connie Balmsen, Nicole Giovanardi; Third Row : Gina Rowe, Melissa Atobclli, Stephanie Freriks. Hillary Reyenga, Sara Rye, Vanessa T i m m . Alissa Blaising, Suzy Verazquez; F o u r t h R o w : Betsy Card, A m y Strassburger, Carrie Koop, Kathy Riley. Rachael Wagner, Jessica Joynl, Sara VanHoose, Sara Bledsoe, Elizabeth Stroh, Molly Billedeau. Stephanie Stieglar, Kori G r a b o w ; F i f t h R o w : Kirsten Heinrich, Hillary Failh. Sarah Bylsma, Katy Waara, Sarah Stielstra, Julie Holwerda, Holly Retlewski, Lisa Goodin, Meredith Akins; Back R o w : Manca Cross, Cindy Achterhot, Jen Bechtcl; Not P i c t u r e d ; Trisin Heimen, Heather Maas, Jill Beck. Jessica Joynt, Mollie Shodort. Angie Kilpatric, Melissa Hall, Kelly Oilroy, Beth Perry, Cynthia Holland, Kelly M o x . Sarah Lubbers, Rachel Hall, Carrie Carley, Jennifer Mancini. Julie Moes. Lisa Goodin, Beth Heneveld. Jessica O w e n s , Allyson Gerds, Debbie Burr, Lisa Larzelere, Elizabeth Collins, Abby Pochert, Sara Warber,

6 6

Sibylline

Sorority

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Emersonian

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aming with the Omicron Kappa Epsilon Fraternity, the Sigma lota Beta women fill the dance floor at the annual 80's party. The SIBs plan many events throughout the year with other Greek organizations. (SIB Archives)


eeping in the Homecoming spirit, SIB women put the finishing touches on their float with the help of the Emersonian Fraternity. The two groups often build floats together for the annual parade. (SIB Archives)

Building Bonds T

1

eamwork for the Sigma Iota Beta Sorority and Emersonian Fraternity draws each of the members together. For the Sibs, teamwork is a tradition and a historical foundation. The Emmies have used teamwork to build larger membership and greater success. The Sigma Iota Beta Sorority was founded in 1919 for the purpose of intellectual, moral and social development of its members. The Sibyline women strive to uphold the values and beliefs set fourth by their founders by setting a good example through service to the college and community. Many changes have taken place since the founding of the group. Changes brought about in 1977 had a significant impact on the sorority. With the small numbers, the SIBs spent Rush trying to recruit new pledges. Knowing the sorority wanted to expand, twenty-seven pledges wrote a letter to the sorority saying that all twenty-seven women would be activated or none at all. When all the girls were given bids, it qualified as a Block Rush and spring 1977 was a turning point for the Sigma Iota Sorority. At this time, the pledging program was revamped, getting rid of hazing and redirecting the women's focus on Friendship and Service for which the group was founded. Today the focus remains the same for the women of the Sibyline Sorority. Through participating in the Walk For Warmth and a food drive for the City Mission, the group worked to put others before themselves. Taking time to have fun, the SIBs flashed back to the 80's with the Arcadians, held the annual St. Patty's Day party with the Cosmos and celebrated May Day with their brothers, the Emersonians. The H

Sibylline

SIBs also danced the night away at their spring formal held in Chicago. Adopted from the Greek alphabet, the letter Nu stands for "success." And the men of the Phi Tau Nu Fraternity are just that: successful. Their action packed season started off right, as they dominated Greek Week, having almost total group participation. Coming together as a unified team these highly motivated men threw fun noodles the farthest, stuffed mixed fruit pie in their face the quickest, and peddled tricycles the fastest. They blind sided the competition, and took first place in Greek Olympics, winning first place in all the events but one. But with that prize in hand the season wasn't over. They created a killer game plan for Rush and gained a record breaking new member class of 28, almost doubling their membership and assuming the role as the largest fraternity on campus. Throughout the year, actives led by example instilling a successful spirit in perspective members. During Rush, perspectives saw the actives working together and hanging out; the love for the fraternity was obvious. This positive attitude during New Member Education and the foundation of Love, Honor, and Success channeled abilities and gave the men a year round winning streak. Both groups of men came together and learned to honor the fraternity as a team. Campus isn't the only place where the Emmies work hard. During Thanksgiving season, they collected donated food from local business and packaged it for Thanksgiving Day dinners. The meal baskets were given to families in the Holland area through the City Mission.

Sorority

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ut promoting the annual Fraternal Homecoming raffle, Paul Stult, P.J. Huizenga, Chip George, and Steve Kraseman sell tickets before the big football game. (Fraternal Archives)

he Sigmas show their spirit with a float called "There's No Place Like Homestead." The reference is to an off-campus house once famous for Frater and Sigma gatherings. (Sigma Archives)

^ma Sigma sisters gather at the cottage before leaving for a night out. The women plan many group activities that help build the relationships that keep the group strong. (Sigma Archives)

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en Howk, Steve Kraseman, Paul Stuit, Joel Petersen, Zac Vandenberg, and Kevin Lewis welcome alumni back to campus for the Homecoming game and weekend activities. The Fraternal Society plans numerous activities with past generations of Fraters in order to keep close ties. (Fraternal Archives)

unior Amanda Klapp, and seniors Kim Eckert, Alicia Fortino, and Sara Nicies hit the waves and sun on a boat off Fort Myers Beach, Florida on spring break. Many sisters went south while others headed out on mission trips or home for break. (Sigma Archives)

6 8

Sigma

Sigma

Sorority

and

Fraternal

Society

J


History Umtes S LI G M A

S LI G M A

" a ^ E T Y

H S I O

or over ninety years the bond between the Sororsis Sorority and the Fraternal Society has grown to make the tie tough and unyielding. Founded in 1834 at Union College in Schnectady, New York, the Fraternal Society was later germanized to campus by President Philip Phelps in 1864. Ten brave men with virtuous and worthy ideals founded what has become the college's oldest Greek organization. Today, fiftyone men are striving to uphold the Friendship, Love and Truth of their heritage. Nearly half a century later, the campus felt the need for a female organization which could come together in a social setting. It was then, with the help of the Fraternal Society, an initiation process was formed for the Greek organization now known as the Sigma Sigma Sorority. Ninety-two years after their establishment, the red Sigma Sigma letters favor the tradition of Honor and Strength within Sisterhood. This year the Sigmas held date nights with fellow fraternities and traditional formals. Aside from inter-Greek social events, they can be found around campus involved in dance productions, the Pull, and as participants on sports teams. The women are also involved in the community with service projects such as "At Risk" children from Lincoln Elementary School, volunteering at Evergreen Commons, and the Fletch Home for Handicapped People. •

ki

A F R A T E R N A L

^

L l i F E

The Sigma Homecoming float built with the Fraters, titled "There's No Place Like HomeStead," received a second place award. During Greek Week, the women were crowned sorority champions. The Sigma's advisor, Hersila Ruf, received the Honorary Professor of the Year Award. Like their sisters, Omicron Kappa Epsilon was founded in order to provide a strong relationship between members. The constitution is based around the fact that the Love of Frater is undying, the Friendship is enduring and the Strength is unchallengable. This year, the Fraters solicited funds from students for their annual Homecoming raffle, of which part of the proceeds went to Holland Youth for Christ. The Fraters also had an opportunity to reminisce with their much appreciated alumni at the annual Homecoming Literary Meeting. They felt it was an excellent chance to learn about the past, talk about the present, and plan for future members. OKE also paired with their sister sorority to throw a Christmas party for neighborhood children. In addition, they participated in Habitat for Humanity and the Crop Walk. One of the talked about Fraternal traditions is affectionately known as "Frater Frolics". This event, involving new actives performing "spoofs" for all the students across campus, dates back to before World War II. This tradition, as well as an annual literary meeting with their sister sorority, helps to pass another year in Frater history.

m

j Sinma Si lima S o r o r i t y — F r o n t Row: Kim Hinzie, Tiffany Lange, Slefany Nicodemus. Teresa Cupp. Kim Eckert, Pilar Moreno. Olivia Welch, Sara Slaugh. Mican Botke, Amie Hinderer, Megan Thompson, Alicia Fortino. Sara Nicies, Camie Hoeksma; Second R o w : Libby Folkert, Mary Hoyt, Erin Barrone, Amanda Klapp. Shannon Powell, Rachel Padilla, Jessica Leutch, Julie Beglin, Karen Bahl, Nicole Travis, Geanne Hays, Jessica T h o m a s , Kelly Rogers, Krista Meden, Emily Neuisma; T h i r d R o w : Megan Clapp, Kelcee Kostner. Lara Wagner, Christine Orejuela, Maryellen Ward, Stephanie Gebhardt. Andrea Rossi, Robyn Disslkoen, Karen Pirich, Laura Gibson, Kate MacDomels. Jen Woodhams, Andrea Spears, Shana DeAvilla, Janeen Gipson. Beth Artman; Back R o w : Jessica West, Heidi Leinesh. Julie Hoving, Kim Weiss, Wendy Ross, Megan Beatty, Gina Pellerito, Abby Kuiper, Beth Timmer, Emily Hollebeek, Becky Edema.

O m i c r o n K a p p a Kpsilon F r a t e r n i t y — F r o n t Row Jeff R e n / . Andy Thompson, John Chrysler. Kevin Van Timmeren Hans Weinburger. Brian Dykstra, Eric Nickels. Matt Jung. Corey Monsma. Kevin Lewis. John Mark Oudersluys. Jeff Boucher. Ken Howk. Chip George. Tyler VanLonkhuyzen. B J Damstra. Michael Van Wieren. Breti K a n s . Ben Klimek. Tony A u r i e m m a . Ryan Maher, Back R o w Steve Mugg. Gary Heyns. Joel Petersen. Matt Vnesenga. Phil Haan. Mark Boss, Aaron Wong, Kevin Mulder. E n c h VanRavenswaay. Jeff Strauss. Steve Kraseman. Chad Joldersma. Ben Collman. Shaun Bredeweg, D a m o n Mikoy, Matt Vandemaald.

Sigma

Sigma

Sorority

and

Fraternal

Society

6 9


ur jniors Gretchen Conrad, Sarah Richardson, and Kate Reed share a seat on a porch swing, waiting for pizza to arrive at an Alpha Phi Omega Rush event. (APO Archives)

Original View AL P HA

rrr

KAPPA

wo campus fraternities have challenged • the traditional notion of the social fraternity. Each has a different focus, but is not that of the other campus Greek organizations. Alpha Phi Omega, a national fraternity, focuses on service while Alpha Kappa Pi concentrates on academic excellence. The primary goal of Alpha Phi Omega, a co-ed national service fraternity, is to offer a program of service projects in order to give members a chance to volunteer. Although Service is their first function, the other two cardinal principles. Leadership and Friendship, are an important part of the organization as well. The national organization of Alpha Phi Omega was founded on December 16, 1925 in order for opportunity in leadership experience and for service to others. Originally, the organization was limited to men, but the rules were changed to allow all college students to join. The Nu Beta Chapter at was formed on May 13, 1960. The thirty-nine members of Alpha Phi Omega participated in various service projects such as volunteering at Camp Gerber, a Boy Scout camp, trick-or-treating for UNICEF, organizing the campus blood drives and helping a local Cub Scout pack at their meetings. For helping to develop friendship within the group, they share a night on the town for their datenights and annual formal. The group also headed to Windsor, Canada for a weekend away from campus. Since Alpha Kappa Pi became the seventh

7 0

Alpha

Phi

Omega

and

P H LL

AND)

fraternity on campus in the Spring of 1996, the group has grown, endured and matured. Alpha Kappa Pi was founded to provide a positive social atmosphere where academic excellence, brotherhood and open-mindedness can flourish. As a part of this commitment, fall saw the opening of the Alpha Kappa Pi house, Schuppert Cottage. Thanks to the efforts of the college and the actives, the house proved to be a cornerstone of Promethean Rush and New Member Education, as the members were welcomed into a vital environment to help forge traditions for the years to come. The purpose of the fraternity is threefold. First, Alpha Kappa Pi is dedicated to providing a challenging intellectual life-style for students. Second, the men are dedicated to the free sharing of ideas across disciplines with members and with the college community. Lastly, the Prometheans provide social activities for its members that are intellectually stimulating and do not interfere with academic ideals. Many efforts this year focused on making the organization and its ideals familiar to the rest ot the Greek community and campus as a whole. During the year. Alpha Kappa Pi hosted open study sessions, the April Opus Jam, an open house, and socials with sororities. The Prometheans provided volunteer services to Holland City Mission, Crop Walk and Project Pride. The fraternity also kept itself invigorated with events to foster community by holding a camping trip. Thanksgiving dinner, and a finalsweek barbecue.

Promethean

Fraternities


ew Actives of the Promethean Fraternity gather for their first business meeting at the Alpha Kappa Pi Cottage. The men experienced the revamped New Member Education program. (Promethean Archives)

rad Andresen, Karen Kowal, Derk Zwart, Mary Scribner, and Anne Bartuszevige stain cottages at Camp Gerber. The annual service event allows Alpha Phi Omega to spend time helping in the community. (APO Archives)

/ A l p h a P h i O m e g a F r a t e r n i t y — F i r s t R o w : Erin Kurek, Brooke Budde. Sarah Kaetterhenry. M e l i n d a T u i n s t r a . Debbi Emery; S e c o n d R o w : Lisa Moua, Shannon Kenny, Erica Dianis; T h i r d R o w : Shannon Lewis. J.J. Ekkens, Mary Scribner, Marcy Cohen, Karen Olsen, Alex Parker, Andrea Kelly. Anthony Perez, Sarah Richards, Ivy Shen; F o u r t h R o w : J e n n y LaBell. Natalie W i l l i a m s o n . S o n j a R a w i e , A m y Honeysett, Tasha G u i l d . G r e t c h e n C o n r a d . Stacy VanLangevelde. Loureal Parent, Michelle Balcherski, Kate Reed. Conrad Zapanta; Back R o w : Jon Brockmeier, Christy Witte, Brad Andresen, Stephen Curtis, Nate Bair, Missy Powel, A n n e Bartuszevige. Derk Zwart. Arin Neucks. Rachael Williams.

A l p h a K a p p a Pi F r a t e r n i t y — F i r s t R o w : Steve Sunbeck. Matthew Barton, James Vanderhyde, Andrew Wyatt; S e c o n d R o w : Muturi Muriuki, Peter Ganef, Ben Messer, Theppanya Keolasy, Eric Westhus, Jeff Oegama; T h i r d R o w : Tony Bull. Scott Slezak. Afshin Afarin, Micheal Krukowski. John Dupron. Ryan Janus. Not P i c t u r e d : T h o m a s Springer-Tiggleman. Eric Elsholz, James Sitati, Scott Anderson, Howard Fitzgerald. Jedediah Leachman, Bassam Atallah.

•a

f

j} ( f V Kappa Pi actives sign bids for perspective members during spring rush. This is the first year the group formally welcomed men through Rush and New Member Education. (Promethean Archives)

Alpha

Phi

1

aiting for others to arrive, Alpha Phi Omega members wait outside the beach house used for a fall Rush event. Actives and perspective members get a chance to meet at the event. (APO Archives)

Omega

and

Promethean

Fraternities

7 1


Fresh Start WELCOME

T • M

nterfratemity Council started off the year with a bang by co-hosting the resurrected tradition of Greek Week with their counterpart, Pan-Hellenic Council. With that positive spirit strapped to their belts, the Greek men and women, headed by the strong presidential leadership of Joe Fritsch and Alicia Fortino, started down the road of what would become a monumental year for both IFC and Pan-Hel. Originally IFC and Pan-Hel were created as the governing body over the seven fraternities and six sororities. The goal was to promote a positive relationship between Greeks and the administrations and act as a liaison to the Hope community. Unfortunately, over the years the councils grew unorganized, powerless, and lacked involvement. Because of the demands of the Ad-Hoc Proposal and strict guidelines imposed on New Member Education, the councils was force to step up to bat: either Greeks shaped up or they where going to be shipped out. Now, one year after Greek Life went under major reconstruction, Pan-Hel and IFC continue down a strong and powerful road. Both councils successfully created new constitutions which promoted year round recruitment as opposed to the traditional limited rush period. IFC became a new council with a new purpose. Somewhere along the road, IFC simply fell apart.

A

Interfraternity Council president Todd Hornsby looks on, Omicron Kappa Epsilon Fraternity members Ken Howk and Tyler Vanlonkhyzen light candles in the IFC induction ceremony. Current Council members passed down the duty at the year-end banquet. (IFC Archives)

7 2

Pan-Hel

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IFC

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CHANGE S

Attendance was scarce and the men lacked vision. This year for the first time, the men promoted a completely dry rush, pushing for more brotherhood bonding. An attendance policy was enforced and agendas and minuets were revived. Throughout the year, IFC was reforming and asserting themselves as a powerful council. Pan-Hel was also reborn this year, changing from a social organization to a tightly run group of women who attempted to foster the spirit of sisterhood. They started a campus wide all sorority newsletter entitled the Masses covering hot topics and updating the campus on Rush. The group also hosted a communication workshop which opened the issues of sexual assault and how to combat it. Both Council's rebirths where a success and the changes spread like wild fire. Rush numbers doubled for men and women increasing the total number of Greeks on campus. Twelve reps attended the MGCA all Greek conference in Chicago, in contrast to last year's four. For the first time IFC and Pan-Hel hosted a scholarship reception honoring the scholastic achievement of Greeks. The two held joint inductions to show that they are truly a team. For the first time in a many years, sororities and fraternities are coming together as a unit working to promote Greek Life and educating the community on the school's largest social system.


embers of the fall Pan-Hel Executive Board, Holly Pelon, Kellie Mox, Karl Snyder, and Alicia Fortino introduce themselves at a luncheon. (Pan-Hel Archives)

N w members of the IPC Council stand up to be recognized at an initiation ceremony held with the Pan-Hellenic Council at the Alpen Rose. (IPC Archives)

ogether for one last time, old and new Pan-Hellenic Council members share memories before the year ends. Freshmen are elected every year from each sorority to represent their group on the council. (Pan-Hel Archives)

assing on the " l i g h t " of the PanHellenic Council, Sigma Sigma senior Alicia Fortino turns over the president's position to junior AmyLynn Halverson of the Alpha Gamma Phi Sorority. Fortino and Halverson initiated many changes that swept over the Greek system during the year. (Pan-Hel Archives)

Pan-Hel

and

IFC

Councils

7 3


eeting to discuss details, junior Ann Barry, sophomores Meredith Herbst and Jon Brickner discuss plans for an upcoming Union of Catholic Students meeting. (UCS Archives)

reparing breakfast, Debbie Paterik flips some pancakes while Sarah Kievit and Renee Saar get ready to take the finished product. Each person people on the FCS fall retreat took turns making the meals. (Photo by Amanda Black)

attllng each other and a tray of Jello, sophomores Dan McCue and Matt Simons race in a slimy eating contest. Jen Harvey, Ryan Atwell, Hazel Lawson, and Lee Ann Cuny watch the action at the FCS fall retreat. (Photo by A. Black)

4

l

reating with marshmallows, paper plates and toothpicks, sophomores Josh Metzler and Jill Bostelaar attempt to build the highest tower while Aimee Williams and Amanda Black offer ideas. The off-beat contest was one of the FCS winter retreat events which also featured such indoor activities as toe-painting and story telling. (Photo by Nikelle Johnson)

Br mP 4

ffering a hand of support, Meredith Herbst prays with Peter Kim while Matt McPherson and Melyssa Lenon join in prayer. The support during the UCS small group prayer meetings continued the bonding started in the large group meetings. (UCS Archives)

4

Fellowship

of

Christian

Students

M

lir

and

Union

of

Catholic


Faith and Fun F C S

A N D)

y e s

M A K E

S P E N P

W UG

TT H H [ 1

ellowship of Christian Students is an organization which provides students with an opportunity to grow in their relationship with Jesus Christ through music, prayer, retreats and mission opportunities. It gave students a time and place for Christian fellowship and fun as well as spiritual growth. FCS held weekly Monday night meetings which consisted of worship, music, speakers and fellowship through sharing. Throughout the year, FCS hosted a number of other activities such as movie nights, a luau. football games, work projects and Euchre tournaments. Two retreats were held, one at Cran-Hill Ranch and the other at Camp Brethen Heights. At CranHill in the fall, FCS members went horseback riding, held small group discussions, climbed a wall, made campfires and heard from speaker Tim Rotman. In the spring, retreat-goers listened to speaker Trig Johnson in addition to playing snow football. Ultimate Frisbee and going hiking. During Christmas break, students had the opportunity to participate in mission trips. Work included carpentry, painting, child care, leading Bible studies and working in soup kitchens. Like FCS, the members of UCS are committed to

Ann s'^h''' ^ ^ ' l r ' s ' ' a n Nooord- Th' 1 LoriSi Iawso ' p r

— F r o n t Row:

Megan Hicks, Nikelle Johnson; Second R o w :

R e n e e Sarr, L e i g h

• ' a n e l M o o r e , Peter D e Y o u n g , R e n e e M e y e r , J e n H a r v e y M e l i s s a F e e n s t r a , J a m e s Van R0VV: J a n i e S V a n d e r H y d e . C h r i s i t y C o l b m n n , K a t i e H i b r e c h t , Kerry G r o s s , Kelly Yager, K a r e n Elliot, enn ^ ^ a i * ' C a t h > ' S t e a d m a n , B e v e r l y Katts, K a r e n H a s s i e ; F o u r t h R o w : S a r a h Flegel, Erin Shiel. Hazel

the spiritual growth of members and their active role in the overall Christian family. The group works toward their goals during large group meetings held on Thursday evenings. The Union of Catholic Students also provides opportunities for students to fellowship and worship while expanding their relationship with Jesus. Their mission concentrate on four areas; spiritual, educational, service and social interaction. The members are committed to the spiritual growth and work toward goals during Thursday evening meetings. UCS members were involved with such activities as off-campus fall and spring retreats, cosponsored events with Women's Issue Organization and FCS, and a spaghetti fund raiser luncheon. "Our biggest goal is to get our name out there. UCS is a wonderful organization that has faded from the Hope scene for a few years," explained UCS co-president Jon Brickner. "We want everyone to know that we are here for them and that we're constantly working to explain differences and misconceptions about Catholicism." UCS strives to incorporate the traditional ideals of its mission and faith into a modern setting that inspires and encourages its members.

U n i o n of C a t h o l i c S t u d e n t s — F r o n t R o «

J e f f T r y t k o , A n n - M a r i e C a m p i o n , A n n Barry. M e l i s s a M a n c h e s i e r

S e c o n d R o w : R e i n a V e n d r a m i n i . Jeff A m l o t t e . Peter K i m ; B a c k R o «

Jon Brickner. M i k e M c C u n e , M e l y s s a L c n o n

and M e r e d i t h Herbst.

D e B o e r C h n s Poes Cunv A ' t - -I'll Bostelaar. S a r a h H o s s i n k ; F i f t h R o w : A m a n d a Black, Jen P y s z o r a . Lee Ann Minii v i , n r ? a n n e , l c ® a u e ^ • Lindsay Alberts, J e r e m y B u e g e , A l l i s o n V a n L o n k h u y z e n , J u l i a H o f f m a n , NVario H u i s e n . D a m h u i s ; B a c k Shaw A v R o w : K e v i n De Y o u n g . M a r k S l a y b o u g h , C u r t i s B r i n k s , M i s t e n W e e l d r y e r . Ryan Josh k T " a n d e W e g e , J a m e s Palmer. R o b D o e r i n g , D i n a B a i l e y , A n n a R e s e l e , T o m G o o d h a r t , A n g e l l a H u d d l e s t o n , ' Anna Bums, and Sarah Kievit.

Fellowship

of

Christian

Students

and

Union

of

Catholic

Students

75


eading outside for a break in the cold to make angels and snow man helps build bonds at a Lighthouse training weekend. (Photo by Cherith Caldwell)

Filled rrr

SPREAD)

hrough the diversity of the College and the dynamics of the surrounding community, students have been able to establish new and innovative ways to express their religious beliefs in an ever-changing society. Two such groups have emerged that allow students to grow in their faith through an open and free expression of worship. The birth of the Lighthouse Ministries and Gospel Choir have shown to be an extension of the mission of the College. The cornerstone of the Lighthouse Ministries can be found in the words written in the book of Matthew 5:14, 16. The organization was founded by the chaplain staff in the spring of 1996 due to the increased interest in Bible studies and small group fellowship. The steadily growing numbers necessitated the demand to train and equip leaders in order to accommodate the students' needs. The chaplains began by training select students to lead groups in Durfee and Gilmore Halls. In the Autumn of 1996, the number of the Lighthouse Ministries continued to grow and spread throughout the dorms, cottages, apartments, and athletic teams on campus to include around 45 small group members and over 200 participants. The leaders of the ministry met with the chaplains weekly for support, encouragement, and prayer. Together they hold the belief this is God's ministry and pray for His will to be done on the campus in and through each of their lives. In this year alone, through their teachings, they have witnessed many come to know Jesus Christ as their personal Savior for the first time. "This has brought us great joy to see them experience the love of God in their hearts as they follow Jesus," said Dolores Nasrallah. •

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Gospel

Choir

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Lighthouse

THE

T R U T HI

Many others have found the Ministry as a place of acceptance and support, where they can express their faith freely, feel understood and strengthened. "Jesus never meant for us to live the Christian life alone. We cannot. We need each other to experience the fullness of God's love and power in our lives, said Nasrallah. "Our staff continues to be amazed as we watch students lives be changed through small groups." Similarly on the spiritual dimension, the Gospel Choir has shown itself to be a rising entity. Not only on campus, but also throughout the community. The choir's influence has been used to bring the body and mind closer for increased spiritual development. With the motto, "Worship God through black gospel music," the choir has grown to include over 75 members. In the early years of gospel choir, it was seen as an extension of Black Coalition, but since 1995, the Choir has been an independent organization. Recently under the Direction of Darnisha Taylor and Assistant Director Vanessa Allen, the Gospel Choir became an official program of the Campus Ministries. The Choir congregated and performed at several venues throughout western Michigan. They appeared on the docket of several churches, schools and retirement homes in order to spread their purpose through both contemporary and traditional black gospel music. The goals of the Gospel Choir are clear: To grow in expression of worship to the Lord; to encourage others to experience worship in a way they may have never known; and to break down the barriers between denomination, races, and ethnic groups. The group believes that music is a tool God uses to minister His word to others.


B nj m e Lighthouse women let loose at a Thursday night meeting. Laughing is one of the many lessons learned by the leaders, who discovered that God is fun and like to share In it. (Photo by Cherith Caldwell)

ighthouse leaders plan small group activities during a weekend retreat at advisor Paul Boersma's cottage. (Photo by Cherith Caldwell)

L i g h t h o u s e L e a d e r s — F r o n t R o w : Joy Green; S e c o n d R o w : Jill Bostelaar, Chris DeBoer, Tim Su, Greg Kobylak; T h i r d R o w : Michelle Rhodes, Laurie Ellison, Brien Hills, A m y Rife, Cherith Caldwell, Jaclyn O m e e ; Back R o w : Christy Kaminskas, Christy Colbrunn, Amie Clifton, Kelly Howard, .Shannon Land, advisor Delores Nasrallah.

r

aising their hands in praise to the Father, women of the Gospel Choir sing for joy. The group believes that music is a tool that God uses to minister His Word to others. (Photo courtesy of the Gospel Choir) ospel Choir participants rehearse for a recording on the chapel CD. The choir performs on campus and at churches around the community. (Photo courtesy of the Gospel Choir)

G o s p e l C h o i r — T . J . Achate, Jennifer Alexander, Jenny B o n g i o m o . Michael Brinks, Krista Brewer, Knsten Busch. Cherith Caldwell, Ann-Marie C a m p i o n . Emily Cassell, Miguel Cruz, Tracy Datte, Jill DeBoer. Melanie DeFeyeter, Julie DeVisser. January Estes, Michelle Fawley, C.J. Frazer. Betsy Gibbs, Eric G o o d m a n . Dan Griggs. A m y Hall. Ashley Hall, Todd Haulenbeek. Christine Herman, Stacy Hogund, Lisa Hughes, Lori Jean Irvine, Jenny James. Sabrina Kamphuis. Quinn Kelley. Erin Kocourek, Temple Lovelace. Kelly Martin. Ann Mast, Kari M c C a w , Ami Moldenhauer, Lisa Moua, Jennifer Morris, Matthew Mahaffey, Peter Myers. Laura N u e w m a n . C h e n y L y n n Outcait. Jaime Partridge, Shonda Perdue. Emily R a t e n n g . Jennifer Richardson. Essy Sakala. Kathryn Schmidt, Katie Shelley. Jennifer Smith. Stacy Smith. Julie Spence. Theresa Spencer. Rita Spires, Kayrl Stead. Ashley Tanner. Michelle Taylor. Becky Timmer. Lara Wagner. Kris West, Sarah Wiechertjes. Jamie Williams, Crystal Wright; Directors; Damisha Taylor and Vanessa Allen; Bass Guitar: Matt Youngberg; Drums: Dan Patterson.

Gospel

Choir

and

Lighthouse

7 7


howing off their creativity, junior Dave Schrier and senior Jodi McFarland do some procrastinating on the eve of a deadline. (Anchor Archives)

m pending the weekend in Minneapolis. Minnesota for some training, Glyn Williams, Mike Zuidema, Noelle Wood, Stacey Bogard and the rest of the Anchor staff has a little fun around town. (Anchor Archives)

athering for the weekly Sunday night meeting. Anchor staff members start planning for the next issue. Paper contents were planned almost a week in advance with last minute news stealing space. (Anchor Archives)

topping work for a break, Stacey Bogard, Zach Johnson and Dave Schrier catch up on life outside of the office. Each Tuesday night the Anchor staff put in late nights to meet their deadline. (Anchor Archives)

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The

Anchor


> % Zach J o h n s o n works diligently behind, Anchor Editor Jodi McFarland discusses a story with Arin Neucks. On production night, writers, photo, layout, and section editors bring together all the different elements to create the paper. (Anchor Archives)

T h e A n c h o r s t a f f : F r o n t r o w : Z a c h Johnson. Josh Neucks; S e c o n d R o w : Carrie T e n n a n t . Jodi M c F a r l a n d . Kim Powell. D a v e C l a u s e n . G l y n Williams; B a c k R o w : D a v e Schrier. Becky Hollenbeck. Michelle Piel. Arin Neucks, A m y - L y n n Halverson and Matt M o r g a n .

News Source C O v M N i y M ll T Y

Tf___

II Ml F O R M E 速

on a student newspaper. Or you ought to be. The 26-meniber Anchor staff logged countless hours staring onto their computers, skipped sleep to put the paper to bed on Tuesday nights, and occasionally skipped a class to chase a story during the year. Not one of their efforts or sacrifices were wasted. The paper hit the stands each Wednesday filled with the stories students on campus could find no where else. For the first time it featured a Religion page, focusing on campus religious life. Christian and non-Christian. Photos were digitally scanned, improving quality, and the writers, story after story, kept getting better throughout the year. The Anchor followed the controversy of the

E A C H

W E E K

Student Congress-sponsored visit by Oliver North, and the faculty resolution that protested the decision. It told smokers on campus that they had finally been smoked out by the Campus Life Board, following concerns over the fire hazard of smokers in residence halls. It also kept students posted on organizations and classmates in features and sports stories about their favorite teams. The Anchor also broke the story on student organization budgets for the year to come, including cuts to the Opus budget that threaten the Visiting Writers Series. No matter what the issue or subject. The Anchor staff had the diversity and talent to keep the campus informed. Week after week, the men and women gave their best in reporting news, and writing the history of the College.

The

Anchor

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0 A \ S S ® 0

II A \ T II O N

A D D;

not known for its diverse students or ideas, the Black Coalition, and the new Hope Asian Perspective Association strive to bring new ideas to campus. Each organization came together during different times in response to the moods of campus. The Black Coalition is the oldest, being formed in 1968 Its founders created a group open for support for African-American students during the turbulent times in the late sixties. The newest member on the scene is H.A.P.A. This year 25 members joined to respond to the needs of Asian students. A long tradition of Asian students dates backs to the 1800's when exchange students studied as some of the earliest students. Times have changed between the founding of each group. The Black Collation has adapted its focus. Even though the issues are still the same, BC is not solely a support group. Their focus has expanded to promoting African-American culture on campus. The group wants students to have the opportunity of understanding the history and culture in a safe environment before they step out into the real world. Bringing unity to these groups, each is open to students of all races. HSO encourages members, regardless or race, nationality, sex or religion, community or student to join them in sharing the interest. H.A.P.A. offers a warm invitation to

Oil V E R S

students of any culture and nationality. "I have been a part of Black Coalition ever since my freshman year, said Sheyrl Gabriel, the secretary of B.C. who has felt the open atmosphere firsthand. "Even though I'm not black, I have always felt accepted and loved while being in this organization and I have made a lot of lasting friendships. I have never felt, as well as seen, that BC is an organization just for African Americans." The activities of these groups are products of their focus to bring diversity. To be diverse it to serve. Each of these groups feel that serving the community is an important aspect of their makeup. Black Collation was involved with the community by doing a fashion show with local high school students. This allowed college students to support and friend high school students. It also allowed the high school students to understand college students and their responsibilities. Another highlight was giving $250 of food to the City Mission after Soul Food Night. Students, community members, and faculty rolled up their sleeves and got greasy as they cooked a hearty menu of chicken and beans. Remembering the past is also important tor the groups. BC hosted a street march after the Martin Luther King Jr. service. Because Martin Luther King's birthday is not acknowledged as a holiday on campus, BC and other community members try to promote the significance by singing songs such as "We Shall Overcome".

Black C o a l i t i o n — F r o n t R o w : Stephen Curtis; B a c k R o w : Jackie Williams, Tattenai H a m p t o n . Kim Bohnwagner. and Sherry Bamady.

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Black

II T Y

H o p e A s i a n P e r s p e c t i v e A s s o c i a t i o n — F r o n t R o w : Ivy Shen. Courtney Olis; S e c o n d R o w : Le Ho. Charlie Vu. Brandon Hayashi. Tricia Rheiw. O h m . Phi Tran and M a y u m i Ueda.

Coalition

and

Hope

Asian

Perspective

Association


hirsty Black Coalition members take a break for a drink while making signs to promote an event. The group seeks to share the culture of African Americans with a traditionally non-diverse campus. (Black Coalition archives)

ddressing issues raised by students on campus, Dean Richard Frost, Zahra Ismaeli, Marcus Robinson and Steven Spencer speak at "A Darker Vision of Hope," a Black Coalition event. (Black Coalition Archives)

elebrating their new offices, Tattenai Hampton and Steven McBride take on roles as Public Relations and Social Chairs of the Black Coalition. The group nominates leaders each semester. (Black Coalition Archives)

ker VisionOf Hope: ick Student Experience Panel Discussion

Mr. Mar*

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*4 . alking home from a meeting, the Hope Asian Perspective Association gathers by the giant Anchor. The new group was formed to serve the many Asian students on campus and bring awareness of Asian culture. (HAPA archives)

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ou! food night was celebrated by the Black Coalition and members of the community. Together they donated S250 worth of food to the Holland City Mission. (Black Coalition archives)

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.

Coalition

,•

and

Hope

Asian

Perspective

Association

8 1


howing off SAC publicity materials at the NACA Conference, Mary Lucas, Aaron Smith, Dave Rohner, and Joy Green answer the questions of students from other colleges. (SAC Archives)

unning the board during her radio show, sophomore Amie Evans prepares for her next set. Disk Jockeys generally followed the station format, but occasionally used their own format. (Photo by Zach Johnson)

reparing for the annual Casino Night, Kristi Steketee and Beth Wezeman paint signs for promotion of the event. SAC divides staff into different committees and each handles different aspects of an event. (SAC Archives)

uniors Amy Hall and Katy Balcer do some mixing work at the WTHS studios. The women prepared before each of their u p c o m i n g live shows. (Photo by Zach Johnson)

elebrating friends and the end of the NACA conference, Erin Overmeyer, Mary Lucas, and Jen Trask hang out over Coke and pizza. (SAC Archives)

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WTHS

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or laughing at a comedian, students keep busy on the weekends thanks to the Social Activities Committee (SAC). The group is the main programming board for the social events at the College. Many dedicated students comprise the committee in which to provide a structured way for administering entertainment to students. Why? "Jest for the Fun of it!" Since the formation of SAC in 1973, this was by far the biggest and most creative in all the 24 years. The size of the committee, the budget and the amount of entertainment have all drastically increased. Many of SAC's events allow students to get involved and benefit from the experience. For example. Sibling's Weekend, Casino Night, All College Sing, the traditional formal Winter Fantasia, Talent Jam and Spring Fling all add to Hope College tradition, not to mention the Kletz comedians, musicians, and the annual Halloween hoedown at Teusink's Farm. All this work has earned SAC many different awards. The Comprehensive Programming Award and numerous national and regional graphic awards were won by the group for their hard work. Wining a one-of-kind award, Anne Bakker-Grass '85 earned a spot in the limelight for receiving the Patsy Morley Outstanding Programmer Award.

AN0

ENTERTA (I NMENT

Each year the Social Activities Committee continues to reevaluate and improve events in order to make them the best possible. SAC's tradition of quality entertainment without "ripping" students off will continue to benefit campus for years. "Life is too short to not have fun, remarked Aaron Smith, the director of SAC. "We love what we do and do what we love. I hope that students continue to take advantage of all that we have to offer far beyond my years at Hope." From its humble beginnings the campus radio station has become Holland's home for alternative music. Founded in 1956 by Richard Brockmeirer and using a one-watt transmitter in Kollen Hall, WTAS changed its call letters to WTHS in 1986. Now the station reaches a potential audience of over 100,000 people using 1000 watts. WTHS exists on campus to give students opportunity to gain experience in the field of radio. Approximately 60 D.J.'s are on staff per semester. Volunteering their time, the students handle remote broadcasts and promotion in a set time slot ranging from 9 a.m. to 2 a.m. throughout the week. The station also lifts the spirits of students with concert and giveaways throughout the year. Not only does the station play the most diverse alternative music, it also has specialty shows including contemporary Christian and many more.

Social Activities C o m m i t t e e — L e f t to R i g h t : Tyler Smith. Anne Bakker-Gras, Greg Foikert. Mary Lucas. Lexi Linscheid. Erin Overmeyer. Jeremy Monty. Joy Green. Aaron Smith. Shelly Hendrick. Beth Wezeman. Dave Rohner. Jen Trask. Kristi Smith, and Teresa Musselman.

SAC

and

WTHS

8 3


a

's Theresa Musselman, Melissa Manchester, Cathy Stedman, and Dan McCue get insightful advice from Paul Boersma. Faculty and staff were around orientation weekend to advise the new freshmen. (PR Photo)

cveral OA's relax outside of Scott Hall before the class of 2000 arrives on campus to move in. OA's went through days of training before the freshmen class arrived. (PR Photo)

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Orientation Assistants—Alphabetical: Geoff Abbas, Andrew Adamson, Rachel Anson, Connie Bahnsen. Beau Button, Jill Beck. Christina Blrkhead. Jessica Black, Katie Boes, Stacy Bogard, Kimberly Bos, Angela Brown, Anna B u m s , Ann Byland, Julie Calabro, Laura Carlson, Katie Cindric, Christy Colbrunn, Corrine Cravotta, Katie Crispin. S u m m e r Crosby, Nicole D a n g r c m o n d . Tracy Datte. Elizabeth Davidson, Nicole Dechelbor. Debra DeVries. Brian Diaz, R o b y n Dissclkoen. Rob Docring. Kelli Dracger. Kevin Edlefson. Brian Field. G r e g Folkert, Stephanie Freriks. Andy Frushour. Stephanie Gebhardt, Jennifer George, Melisa Gibson, Andrew G o o k i n , Katie Gritter, Jennifer H a w k i n s o n , Shelly Hendrick, Meredith Herbst, Kelly Herremans, Megan Hicks, Becky Holienbeck, Kale Horjus, Adam Hudson. Lisa Hughes. Marc Humbarger, Amy Hyatt. Michele Jastr/.ebski. Kathryn Kahler. Carine K a u f f m a n n . Sarah Keay. Kristin Kelley. Kim Kent. Matthew Kern. Katie Keyes. William Kim. Cathleen King. Carrie Koop. Jennifer LaBell. Christine LaBclle. Ben Lasky. Kerri Law. Michael Lemorie. Mary Lucas. Lori Madaus. Melissa Manchester. Jodie Manning, A m a n d a Matthews, Hollie Maxfield, Tracy McArthur. Laura McCraine, D a n M c C u e , N o r m M c C u n e , Paul M c K e e , Krista Meden, Renata Meixner, Jeremy Monty, Christa Murphy, Teresa M u s s e l m a n . Sara N a u m a n n . Emily N i e u w s m a . Melissa O o m s . James Palmer. Greg Paplawsky. Debbie Paterik, Julie Patout. Allyson Pickens. Jill Pohlman. Missy Powell. Emily Ratering. Kate Reed. Anna Resele. Michelle Rhoades, Sarah Richards. Stacie Richards, Amy Rile, D e b Rimbo, David Rohner, Amy Romin, Brent Rowe, Gina Rowe, Tania Sale, Josh Schicker, David Schrier, C aryl Scott. T i m Scott, Mary Scribner, Aaron Smith. Tyler Smith. Kara Sporer. Cathy Stedman. Kristi Steketee. Karin Stevens. Lori Strehler, Steven Sundbeck. Mark Tenhor. Peter TeWinkle. Dean Thayer. Michael Thelen. Vanessa Timm. Alicia Tomicich. Erin Troxtel. Marc Van Soest. Marc Vanderbeek. Kari Vandrese. Lara Wagner. Bethany Wezeman, Jonathan Wienengo. Glyn Williams. Matt Williams. Noelle Wood. Carrie Working. Brian Yarch, Melissa Zeko. Kristin Zimdahl

8 4

Orientation

Assistants

. A crew of OA's practicing fun orientation games, show off their snazzy t-shirts. The OA's had matching shirts so the freshmen could pick them out of the masses of new and returning students. (PR Photo)

elly Herreman and Christy Kaminskas unload a gigantic box of dorm-type paraphernalia from the van of a new student. The OA's unloaded and transported countless numbers of boxes and possessions the day freshmen arrived. (PR Photo)


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elping carry a loft into Lichty Hall, Katie Kahler and Mary Scrlbner trek across 13th street. The Orientation Assistants helped freshmen move into their new rooms. (PR Photo)

Ice Breakers N T R0 DU CE

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Wm • • man come back to school a week • W early just spend the last days of summer with freshmen on their orientation weekend? Just read the back of an Orientation Assistant's shirt: "I guess you have to go to Hope to understand." This year's Orientation theme was "A Different Kind of College. A Different Kind of Class. 2000." While this certainly applies to the first class of the new millennium, the same can be said of the OA's. They are a different kind of student. Arriving a full week before the first day of class, they had an afternoon to unpack before heading to the first of many meetings. Most of the three days before the Freshmen arrived were spent with a small group of eight to twelve other OA's and an Assistant Director (AD). These small group meetings ranged from discussing the content of the four team meetings during orientation weekend to playing wacky icebreakers. The full Orientation staff also met several times a day to let OA's know of any changes in the weekend schedule, freshmen housing, or activities. Of course, the activities were not all work and no play. AD's lightened up large group meetings with "energizers," short skits meant to make the OA's laugh. There was "Riding the Meijer Penny Pony," "Doctor's Office," and "Slow Motion." Even though the bits were throwbacks to summer camp entertainment, they still got plenty of laughs. The OA Olympics offered another outlet for energy.

10

COLLEGE

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The 12 small groups competed in demanding events like the toilet paper relay which culminated in a "group cheer." Most groups used the cheer as a chance to flex some creative muscle and create a funny skit of their own, occasionally satirizing some aspects of orientation. Ric Kelley arrived a day early to entertain OA's and resident assistants the night before the freshmen arrived. On Friday morning, the OA's gathered at 9 a.m. for the Wonderful Circle. The name was appropriate: everyone shuffles around a circle until someone yells, "Stop!" giving a compliment, put-up, or some other wonderful statement. With this last boost of encouragement, the OA's ran to meet the mayhem of the 10 a.m. moving melee. The new students' packed station wagons, pick-ups, and trailers were unloaded with enthusiasm, as belongings are carried from the car to the third floor in minutes. However, this energy was long gone by the time 5 p.m. rolled around. Sore and exhausted from carrying countless crates, suitcases, and refrigerators to innumerable rooms, OA's took two hours to eat, shower, and revive before meeting the freshmen known only by name and address. All the hard work and effort finally paid off. Although the freshmen were a different kind of class, it was no longer because they did not know their way around campus. As orientation wound down and upperclassmen return to campus, orientation assistants returned to their roles as regular students. How? I guess you have be one to understand.

Orientation

Assistants

8 5


Mackowiak, Kelly Barton, and Sye Mishler enjoy fine cuisine at a banquet to celebrate the end of Resident Assistant training. (Student Development Photo)

Next Door rrr

EASE

H 速 III S II Ni G

ransition from the comforts of home to a residence hall can seem intimidating. The base of college life, along with dorms and cottages, each living space has a resident assistant (RA) living nearby. RA's serve many purposes in their jobs. Assisting with organizational aspects of college life, RA's make maintenance requests, take care of beginning and end of the year paperwork. If a light bulb flickers and bums out, the versatile leaders know just how to fix that. Resident Assistants also keep the peace among their residents. The first step in the judicial process, RA's watch for rule infractions. The judicial process carries on through the Resident Directors and the campus government. The most important part of their job lies beyond the care of incidentals. RA's provide emotional support, listening to problems ranging from bouts of homesickness to issues of sexual assault. Each is trained to listen and in action, spending the first week before classes learning skills and demands of their job. This week of training includes seminars and bonding time. Returning RA's bring their experiences to the new trainees during the week. The Residents Assistants then faced their next challenge: a group of residents for the year. Meetings during the first week acquainted the residents with both their new surroundings and new RA. For the first-year students the RA's continue the orientation process begun by the orientation assistants during the first weekend of school. As the year progresses, training continues for the RA's with a series of inservices on subjects ranging from multiculturalism to assault awareness. OnI

8 6

Residential

Life

Staff

C M C i R N J)

the-job-training provides much of the experience for the leaders. It is the hope of all RA's that throughout the year, residents find there is a friend down the hall. When the RA needs somebody to turn to the resident director offers support, advice, and training. Each residence hall has a director who lives in the building, making their home as the RA's do. The apartments each have an RD, while another covers the cottages. According to Holly McKee, resident director of Dykstra Hall and 1993 graduate, the job of RD requires professional training. McKee and Kollen Hall resident director, Ellen Awad, hold a master's degree for their positions. Other positions require bachelor's degree. McKee is involved in all steps of the RA's world, from hiring, to training and judicial hearings. She finds some blurred boundaries between personal life and work, but would not trade her leadership of 13 RA's and 264 residents. She does keep some personal space of her own. She holds weekly meetings in her office and has an office number there. "I like watching the girls grow and I like freshmen women," McKee said. "I get energy from the students." Living in a residence hall, campus apartment or cottage is not the same as living under the same roof one did as a child. College life carries with it different rules and a different style. The questions, concerns and fears are different. The approximately 130 Resident Assistants use their training and natural concern to make college life more comfortable.


ara Rye, Jen Hurley and Misten Weeldreyer anxiously await the arrival of residents in Gilmore Hall. The women passed out room keys and hall access cards as residents checked in. (PR Photo)

Her a grueling day of Resident Assistant training. Michelle Haduic and Stacy Mackowiak head to Phelps for some dinner. RA's had training for a week prior to the arrival of students. (Student Development Photo)

R e s i d e n t a n d S t u d e n t R e s i d e n t D i r e c t o r s — F r o n t R o w : Christine Kleinheksel. Holly McKee, Jennifer Heyerman, Kalene Laar. S e c o n d Row : Nancy Shrode, Michelle Schoon, Julie Gobel, Ntsiki Sisulu, Stacy Masterson; T h i r d R o w : Mary Anne Permasang, Kim Mendels, Angela Tracy. Ellen Awad, Shelly Spencer. Anissa Mihalik. Wendy Sturrus; B a c k R o w : Lisa Knapp. C h a d Gimenez. Nate Mihalik. Seth Kaper-Dale. Eric Friedman.

D kstra Hall RA's Roxanne Pascente, Jessica Nelson, Kim Vliestra, Michelle Hadric, Kerri Langerak, Gretchen Wolfanger, Jill Dunehoo, Shannon Slawson, Heatehr Wesp and Stacy Borden do some staff bonding. (PR Photo)

lien Awad gives junior Laura Bonnema some words of advice during training. RD's gave valuable insight prior to the arrival of the residents. (PR Photo)

Residential Life S t a f f — C e n t e n n i a l P a r k ; James Knapp. Ryan Pa/dur. Elayne Provost. Sherri Meyer; College East A p a r t m e n t s Nikki Flinn, Scott VanderWal. Simone Scher; D u r f e e : Matt McPherson. Todd Chassee. Chad Barton. D y k s t r a : Becky Timmer. Jannah Thompson. Jill Bostelaar. Gretchen Wolfanger, Jessica Nelson. Heather Wesp. Michclle Haiduc. Kim Vlietstra. Stacy Borden, Shannon Slawson. Kerri Langerak. Jill Donehoo. Roxanne Pascente; G i l m o r e Sara Rye, Misten Weeldreyer, Amy Perkins, Jennifer Hurley, Megan Gray; Kollen West Elizabeth Stroh, Jennifer Smith, Sara VanHoose, Andrea Johnson, Erin Barronne; Kollen East Travis Halliwill, Paul Loodeen, Craig Kopas, Nathan Gambino, Matthew Putnam; Lichty Hall: Fabiola Monroy, Kelly Martin; Phelps Hall: Sye Mishler, Matt Youngberg, Anthony Olds. Kelly Barton. Stacey Mackowiak. Alexia Wysozan. Scott Hall: Zach Young. Matt Fretz. Dwayne Pabisz. Michael Farmer. Jeremy Luhman; V a n Vleck Hall: Lori Guse. Jessica Robinson; Voorhees Hall: Erin Chapla, Laurie Ellison, Keiko Morse, Eric Westhus, Matt Steren; WyckoflVCosmopolitan Hall: Chris Carlson, Ryan Miller. Chris Potter. Jason Kooistra. Brian Kirkpatrick; C o t t a g e s : Amy-Lyn Halverson. Matt Barton. Carrie Tennant. Stephanie Richardson. Rachel Wagner. Jon DeWitte. Katy Murphy. Kevin Joldersma. Becky Gerhardstein. Paul Ferri, Jon Chamin. Mike Krukowski. Sarah Kievit, Lara Plewka, Ann Marie Barry, Amy Lodenstein, Karen Kowal, Jenny Wilson, Arin Neucks, Steve Jurgens, Audra Martin, Scott DeKuiper. Amy Austin, Julie Tracy, Laura Bonnema. Allison VanLonkhuyzen, Kathy Reese, Steve Hairston, Melissa Berends, Rick Frens, Jodi Royer, Reina Vendramini, Amy Fischer, Chris Michels, Chuck Conway, Jason Henderson, Susan VanderVeen, Mark LaChonce, Brian Wolthuis, Anthony Perez. LeighAnn Goodin. Julie Grahmann. Miluska Monroy. Melissa Altobelli. Amanda Klapp. Kiersten Krause. Shannon Ellis, Dan Banmnk. Eve Ricketts. Jackie Chapman. Stacy Brown. Chris Dombrowski. Pete DeYoung. Jennifer Jenkins. Tom Goodhart. Kathy Bames. Greg Kern. Susan Checklick. Amy Van Auken. Resident Directors: Anissa Mihalek, Michele Schoon. Shelley Spencer. Mary Ann Permesang. Holly McKee, Jennifer Heyerman, Ellen Awad. Wendy Sturrus, Nancy Shrode, Lisa Knapp, Kim Mendels, Angela Tracy, Christine Kleinheksel. S t u d e n t Resident D i r e c t o r s : Seth Dale. Kalene Larr, Eric Friedman, Ntsiki Sisulu. Nate Mihalek, Chad Gimenez, Stacey Masterson. D i r e c t o r of Residential Life: Julie Goebel

Residential

Life

Staff

8 7


inlng the pits, Odd Year Morale signal calls to their Pullers. Despite lost voices and strain, the women do not keep quiet during the grueling three hour-event. (PR Photo) traddling the 648 pound rope, anchor Luke Smith agonizes over his hold while Heather Hotfman watches the Pullers around her. The 600 foot long rope stretched across the Black River was made of Manilla Hemp. (PR Photo)

Ingers and knees in the dirt. Even Year Morale Lori Jean Irvine barks commands to her Puller Adam Wessellnk. Pullers dig their own pit in the muddy shores of the Black River. (PR Photo)

8 8

Pull

xpressing one range of the Pull's many emotions, Jon Kopchink widens his eyes as he heaves. During this endurance event, emotions range from exertion to elation. (PR Photo)


rapped around the watersoaked rope, Adam Hudson tightens his grip while Stephanie Frericks kneels beside him and offers her support. Pullers devised their own methods of protection from the rope, usually employing duct tape. (PR Photo)

Lasting Pride py

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fter three hours of straining and pushing themselves to the limit. Pullers and Moralers have either a win or a loss under their belt to show for their tremendous effort. But win or loose, under the surface you find a network of friends, much like a family, who have bonded together towards one common goal: gaining the rope. Three weeks of practice and three hours on the rope results in relationships and pride that last much longer. "The three weeks of Pull were long and hard but through enduring all the hardships we were able to grow closer as a team and also as friends. The Pull was our common bond," stated '00 Moraler Jaime Partridge. Both even and odd year team members dedicated themselves to three hour practices for three weeks before the actual event. The teams started off high in numbers, with the count dwindling daily. The eighteen pullers and eighteen moralers

Pull T e a m — F r o n t R o w : Nicole Clements. Kim Echert. Dano Hopp, Bill Dreyer. Zach Johnson, Ross Vrieze, JetT Holwerda, Eric VanRavenswaay. Chris Collins; S e c o n d R o w : Alicia Timichi, Erin Shiel, Andrea Johnson, Christina Birkhead. Stephanie Frericks. Ann Byland. Gina Rowe, Je.ssica T h o m a s . Staphanie Stiegler, Wendy Ross; T h i r d R o w : Drew Roeloffs, Kerri Law. Kevin D e K a m m . Mike Stapleton. Ryan Devries. Steve Kraseman. Mike Adamski, Mike Z o l n i e r o w c / . Tony LaSora; F o u r t h R o w : Melissa VanRavenswaay. Lisa Larzeleve, Vicki Folkerts. Melissa Hall, Cathlecn King, Kelly Barton. Heather Weyrick. Jill Davis, C a m e Koop. Missy Powell. F i f t h R o w : Tim B e c k e n n g . Jed Leachman. Scott Anderson. Jay Wallace. Adam Hudson. Bill Kim. Brian Grzan, Jesse Graff, Brent Rowe, Matt DeYoung.

who made up the '00 and '99 teams, were committed to their cause, bonding as a team by struggling through the pain of their ordeal together. "The weeks spent together really united us as a team," said Peter Myers, a Puller for the 2000 team. "All of our workouts were geared towards 'team.* We did all of our push-ups, sit-ups and other conditioning exercises as a team. You went through nothing by yourself. You could rely on your team members through it all, which made it easier." Below the surface of each Pull team, it is made known that the members are not just a team, but also a family which is based upon a common goal. Family is developed during practices where team members are forced to rely on each other for support. By sharing a passion for mud, pits and the ultimate conquest of inching rope to their side, a family is created out of circumstance. It is the quality of family found within the members that brings them back for another year.

2000 Pull T e a m — F r o n t R o w : Dan Shelley, Lara Plewka. Dan Kapps, Drew W n g h t . Cory Freudenberg. Andy Sill. Megan Boss, Dave Scrier, A m y Straussberger. Jon C h a m i n ; S e c o n d R o w : Mandy Creigthon. Laura Hahn. Amy Otis, Valorie Vance, Emily Fuqua, Rebecca Brown. Laura Parsons, Shonda Perdue, L o n Jean Irvine; T h i r d R o w : Miguel Cruz, Luke Smith. Peter Myers, Chris C a p p a , Carl Rasche, Tim Hoebke, Charlie Wyngarden, Dave Sticlstra. Craig Tommola, Adam Wesselmk; F o u r t h R o w : Heather H o f f m a n , Heidi Heuebner. Anne Schrock, Angela Visscr, A m y Champaigne, Jamie Partrdige. January Estes, E n n Selmer, Mindy Fisher. Alison Ash, Katie Shelley ; F i f t h R o w : Ale* Rucht, Jeff Mulder, Brian Boersma, Chad Mixer, Josh Strand, Jon Kopchick, Josh Brugger, Matt VanDamme. Mike Gentil and Matt Smittley.

Pun

89


he 2000 Song Girls display one of their glittering props during the intense competition. Weeks of practice were needed to perfect the motions choreographed to the song. (PR Photo)

elebrating victory, Odd Year Morale coaches Steve Spitters and Henry Chen "meet in the middle" to share their excitement. It was the first time in three years that odd year captured the historical Nykerk Cup. (PR Photo)

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iW ff! 1999 N y k e r k S o n g — E m i l y A t w o o d , M a g g i e B a b c o c k , D i n a Bailey, Erin B e c k m a n , A n g e l a B e n s o n , Kelli B i t t e r b u r g , A m a n d a B l a c k , R o b i n Bolt, K i m b e r l y B o s , C a r e l y B o s s . R a c h e l B r e e n , A n n a B u r n s . E m i l y C a s s e l l , D i a n a C h a m o t , A d r i e n n e C h r i s t o p h e r . K a t i e C i n d r i c . C h r i s t y C o l b r u n n , N i c o l e D a n g r e m o n d , M e l a n i e D e F e y t e r , Jill D o n e h o o , C h r i s t i n e D y k s t r a , L a u r i e E l l i s o n , C a r o l i n e E n o s , Kate F o l k e r t . Vickie F o l k e r t s , Erin C . J . F r a z e r , Mar)' G e h l . M e g a n G r a y , Kerry Gross, Joy H a n k a m p , Karen Hasse, Rachel H a v e m a n , Shelly Hendrick, M e g a n Hicks, Katie Hillbrecht, Heather H u f f s t u t l e r , N i k e l l e J o h n s o n , S t e p h a n i e J o n e s , K a t h r y n K a h l e r , C h r i s t y K a m i n s k a s , S a b r i n a K a m p h u i s , J e n n i e Karr, C a r i n e K a u f f m a n n , K i m K e n t , S a r a h K l a s s e n , T a m m y K o l k , K i m b e r l y L a k e , Kcrri L a n g e r a k . K e n Law, M e g a n L o g i c , M e l i s s a M a n c h e s t e r , M i c h e l l e P a r k h u r s t , R o x a n n e P a s c e n t e , D e b b i e P a t e r i k . C h r i s t y Pratt, N i c o l e P u t z k e . S o n j a R a w i e , A m y R i f e , K a t h y Riley, N i k k i R o d g e r s , M a r y R o u s h , A m y S a n d e r s . N i k k e S c h n e i d e r , M a r y S c r i b n e r , S a r a h S e x t o n , L i s a S h e n k , A s h l i S i m p s o n , K a r e n S m a l l e g a n , B e t h St. Clair, Karin S t e v e n s , S t e p h a n i e Stiegler, M a r y S u l l i v a n , G a y l e Sutter, K a t e T i g e l a a r , A l i c i a T o m i c i c h , B e c k y Tran, A m a n d a Vanderhil, G w e n V e l d h o f , J e n n i W a r r e n , M i s t e n W e e l d r e y e r , H e a t h e r W e s p , Kelly Z w e e r i n g .

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2 0 0 0 N y k e r k S o n g — L . A l h c r v E, A n d e r s o n . A. Apol, B Artm.in B. Bailey, M B a m e l t , L Baitlett. A. Bauer, J Belgm. K. B e l l g r a p h . S, Bishop, G, B o u w e r . K. B o u w s . L. B o w l i n g . T. Brinson, R. B r o w n , A Burd. A. C a m p i o n , E. ColenbramW, R C o o k . II C o v e r d a l e , E, C u n n i n g h a m , L. C u n y , Ti. D a m h u i s . J D e B o c r , J DeVisser, S. D i x o n , J Dukes, S. Dykhuis, A E i c h m a n n . J- E i s e n g a , K. E l s h o l z . K, E r g a n g . E. Faulk, M . Feenslra. J Fink, L Folkert, C Gaulhier, B Gibbs, L Goitol. P G o u l d , N, G o v a n a r d i , L. H a g e n . L. H a h n , A Hall, J. H a r v e y , A. H a y s , K Holder, K. Hess, B H o f f m a n . K H o f f m a n , H H o f f m a n , S H o g l u n d . 11 H u e b n e r . S. H y m a . L, J a c k s o n , A, J o k o s t J l a m e s , M Jones, J K a m p h u i s , B. Kan. S K e n n y , ) Kiesl, C Night. K, Kooikre, J. Kosroris, B. L a a n g e l a n d , T. Lasley, S, L e m k e , G L e m m e n , M. L e n o n . S Lewis. J. LibnW. K I ick, I , Loris, K, M a l o n i , R, M a r k e r , D, M o n r o y . K. M a c D o n i e l s , M M a r e h i o n d a , D M a u p i n . K M c D o M H - j M o n e t t e , K, M o o r e , J M u l d e r , B. Mull. A N a b e r , M Neinhuis, K O l d h a n , C Oulcalt, A. Otteson, 1 Oraechowslo. Padilla. J Pelt, J. P i e r c e , B . Potts, A. Pries, M. Provost, J, P y s / o r a , J. Randintis, L. R o b i n s o n , C , R o t t e n b u r g , C S a g g e r s . S c h m i d t , I Schmidt, A S c h r o c k , L. Scorlino, M. S h e a f f e r , I . S h e l d o n . L. S i m m e r , S. Slad, J, Smith, S Smith. S Spires, K Stead, A. Stojic. K Sutton, J. T e n H a r m s e l , S. Tillema, B. T i m m e r , N. Travis. C Trinh, V. V a n c e , B V a n d e r l a M D V a n d e r p l o w , K V a n d e r W e g e , T, V a n E c k , K VanVliet, H. V a u g h , A Vincent. E. W a h l s t o m . M, W a s h b u r n , B W a l t loo, K West, S, Weslfall, K White, S. W i e c h e r t j e s , K Williams, C. Witle, J. Y o n k e r . B. Z w a n .


Spirit Lives .*

S P

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B E T W E E N

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talking, Nykerk blends iradilion with innovation, and long hours of preparation with flawless perFormance. Continuing the paradox, Nykerk brings unity Irom competition. It was the last class of the century pitted against the first class of the new. It was experience versus newness. The final week during the competition, 1999 and 2000 Morale, Coaches, Song Girls, Play (iirls and Play Boys, and Orators gathered in Dimnent Chapel for a candlelight tribute to unity. The experienced members of the Nykerk class of l l ) l J9 trekked across campus to lead their secret pals, the novice 2000 Nykerk performers, to Dimnent. In the building older than the ages of three or four Nykerk members added together, skits and cheers held a nineties flair, A walk around campus in the changing fall weather carried on an old Nykerk tradition. As the candles were lit and the Alma Matter sung, the paradox blended into one voice, Paradox continues as each class leaves its mark on the competition, continuing in the 61 year tradition. It is the march of trends versus the timeless college experience, li is remembering the original plan of Dr. John B. Nykerk for friendly allfemale performance while searching for the cuttingedge iu entertainment. Even Year follows in the footsteps of the

predecessors by performing a high-energy play, singing a Broadway medley, and presenting a thoughtlul oration. 2000 Song closed theii perfoi mance with a ribbon of metallic streamers, Keeping in step wilh tradition. Odd Year again bends the mold, Play coaches penned their own "Twisted Tale," intertwining the lives of fairly-tale characters ranging from Cinderella to Kapun/el and spicing the relationships with humor. Oration celebrated the timeless connection ol women through sisterhood. Finally, hidden props, such as scarves and red gloves and a final burst ol confetti were revealed during the medley of 50's tunes. The Nykerk paradox molds three frenzied weeks ot preparations into a night of seamless perfoi mances. Twenty-one days before Nykerk night. Song Girls first see their music. Play Girls first make the images in their imagination a reality, and the Orator meshes word images into a twenty minute creative performance. The bond grows as the unprepared spend a couple hours each evening to make the performance perfect. In only three weeks, a myriad of voices becomes one, an ensemble ol actors sees the same vision, and the sum of thoughts becomes greater than the whole. It is an experience held dear by the hundreds of women prepared for their night on ihe Civic Centei stage. Over 310 students defined and conlinued Ihe paradox in one night of performance.

I

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Nykerk Cup Competition

91


akmg a break after their busy Beach Sweep, EIG members display the fruits of their labor. The annual event helps keep Holland's beaches looking clean year after year. (EIG Archives)

j r r o w i n g into the sandy soil to plant trees and dune Grass, Environmental Issues Group members, Beth Wezeman, Adriann Knepshield and Misten Weeldreyer, leave their mark on the beach. The tree planting excursion was part of the Earth Jam activities. (EIG Archives)

E n v i r o n m e n t a l Issues G r o u p — F r o n t R o w : Ben Gibney, Shannon Kenny. Leslie Robinson. Steven Curtis, Back R o w : Jesse Koskey. Stephen H e m m e n w a y . Kevin Menken, Jayce Roberts. Erica Borgeson. Beth W e e z e m a n . Adriann Knepshield.

Ith new community friends met through Habitat for Humanity activities, students let loose their inner child at the neighborhood sledding party. The group holds events for children and builds homes as an outreach to the community. (HHFH Archives)

i this volunteer demonstrates by cleaning bluebird houses, EIG takes time to take care of the smallest of God's creatures. The Group headed to the Consumers Power plant to help reverse the harmful influence of man in nature. (HHFH Archives) H o p e H a b i t a t f o r H u m a n i t y S p r i n g B r e a k M i s s i o n T r i p — F r o n t R o w : Sheryl Gabriel; M i d d l e R o w : Karen Elliot, Brian Yarch, Lori Simmer, Heidi Hubner; B a c k R o w : Russell Karsten. Jack Mulder. Steven McBride, Barb Elliot and Melissa Manchester.

9 2

EIG

and

Habitat

For

Humanity


uddling to keep warm on a brisk April day, Habitat for Humanity members Sheryl Gabriel, Karen Elliot, Melissa Manchester, and Jack Mulders end the year of hard work at a beach picnic. (HHFH Archives)

Helping Out E , ll , G;,

T

AUD

WORK

10

H 4 B II T A T MAKE

• n 1989. Dr. Hemenway started the EnviM ronmental Issues Group as a follow-up to v B b his senior seminar for Vienna Summer School. American students were challenged to become more active environmentalists. Since then, the group has welcomed all student participation. EIG is a catalyst for environmental action on campus and within the Holland community. After being educated by guest speakers, the group seeks to motivate individuals to care for nature and animals in everyday life. The twelve members of the group made an effort to save the planet by promoting recycling around campus, participating in the annual Beach Sweep, selling posters sporting environmental slogans, planting trees in the Holland area and sponsoring the annual Earth Jam. Members of EIG also took a trip to Pandos Recycling Center, went hiking at Saugatuck Dunes and helped out Holland Area Arts Council Education when they aided children who made art out of recycled material. Also helping out in the community, Habitat for Humanity is an ecumenical Christian housing ministry that seeks to provide adequate housing through the collaborative effort of the future home owner and the help of volunteers. Habitat held the traditional sleep out in the Pine Grove, where students sleep in cardboard boxes or just underneath the stars and reliably dreadful weather. Dwight Beal started the night off with worship as students stood in a circle and sang songs of worship for God's protection over those who were faced everyday with inadequate housing.

FOR t (IVES

HU M A N ll T Y BETTER

The Habitat family dinner produced a great turnout. Students donated their guest pass in order for Habitat families to come and enjoy fellowship and the breaking of the bread with other Habitat families and students. Fall Clean-Up was a big fund-raiser for Habitat this year. The group did yard work at over twentyfive faculty and community member's homes to help raise funds. The fall semester saw the completion of the Hernandez home on 18th and Columbia, also known as the "Building Hope" project. This project began in the 1996 academic year. A new event this year called the Neighborhood Sledding Party, brought together Habit members and children from Central Wesleyan Lighthouse After School Outreach program and the Neighborhood Power Plant Learning Center. Though there was not much snow, there were plenty of laughter and hugs. The annual spring break trip was a huge success. A group of ten volunteers traveled to Meridian, Mississippi. Habitat put together a week's worth of hard, yet very rewarding work, helping to build a home for Alma Sims. The relationships built among the volunteers and the families have a special bond beyond words. Habitat is committed to helping people succeed in life, and making a difference in the lives of those who work with Habitat, whether it be the family or volunteer. The chapter is dedicated to making a difference in the Holland Community and in lives of students by bridging the gap between the two diverse communities.

EIG

and

Habitat

For

Humanity

9 3


epubllcan supporters Jessica Nelson and Kelli Bltterburg spend the afternoon with the highest profile Republican In Michigan, Governor John Engler, campaigning for Bob Dole. (Photo by Jessica Nelson)

Political Rival rv OEWOCRAMS

"X r |

• I

A\NiD)

R E P U B l li C A N S

CAMPAIiGN arking a resurgence ol interest in politics, the 1996 election season saw a rebirth of the classic iwo party

W f competition. The Republicans, spurred by a membership Uhvc which resulted in 150 new activcs, grew to record numbers under the leadership ol seniors Jell Crouch and Kric Friedman. A highlight of the Republican's election campaign involvement was an evening spent riding in the Bob Dole for President motorcade, a trip which took group members to rallies throughout the slate of Michigan. Several Republicans even had the opportunity to meet Senator Dole, his wile lili/abeth, and Dole's running mate. Jack Kemp. Much of the group's lime was spent working with the Ottawa County Republicans. Together, they planned debates and rallies, registered students to vote, informed area interns with major campaigns, and contributed to the landslide reelection victories of Slate Represenlalives Jessie Dalman and U.S. Representative and Peter Hoekslra, a graduate of I lope. For the Democrats, the election year also brought more members to the group. Weekly meetings ran upwards of 15 members and drew more volunteers for work related to the election. In the fall. Democrats campaigned door-to-door and hosted a community fair. Keeping with the theme of healthy competition, the Democrats hosted sci ious debates with national and local candidates.

9 4

Hope

Democrats

and

ACROSS

CAMPUS

President Ivy Shen said the Democrat's purpose is to encourage involvement in the political system through educating and informing the student body and community of current issues. Attending a conference wilii Democrats from Michigan's colleges was a highlight for the group. The DMC conference featured Hillary Clinton as a keynote speaker. Some members of the group also made a trip to Washington D.C. to participate in the election campaign. Fostering diversity among campus, the Democrats exist for three types of students, those who are hoping to involve themselves with the two-party system, those interested in learning more about the Democrats, and finally, those who identify with the Democratic party. Current issues also play an important role in the existence ol the Hope Democrats. The 1996 election provided hands-on experience for this learning. Members of both groups developed exceptional leadership and organizational skills, and gained invaluable hands on political experience. Fhese abilities will serve them throughout their lives, whether they choose to become public representatives, or simply remain politically active citizens. After Clinton and Gore claimed the elections ol 1996, the work for both parties was not over. The job of educating the campus and offering political diversity is a long process which reaches the Irenzy point in election years, but continues long after the oath of office,

Republicans


aty Whitfield, Jessica Mixer, Alicia Fortino and Robyn Disselkaen sport Dole/Kemp paraphernalia on the campaign trail in early fall. Many Republicans travelled around western Michigan rallying up Dole support. (PR Photo)

elcoming Oliver North to campus at the Hayworth Conference Center, Eric Friendman, Jessica Nelson, Katie Cindric, and Ryan T. Cook meet the speaker for the first time. (PR Photo)

peaking with Oliver North at a press conference before his speech in the Knickerbocker Theater, Greg Vliestra and Jessica Nelson learn a little more him. North's history as a Republican and candidate for Congress provided a valuable resource for the Republican students on campus. (PR Photo) emocrats Heidi Giddy, Beth Darr, Tara Stollenmor, Jen Philaja, and Carmen Rottenberg show their support as they sell pins to passing motorists. The Democrats made a trek to Washington D.C. to show their support for the Clinton and Gore reelection campaign. (Photo by Ivy Shen)

Hope

Democrats

and

Republicans

9 5


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A W A R E M E S S

S

tumbling through college, a friend is a welcome sight. Textbook lessons and sermons provide valuable information, but peer education is also a powerful tool. Two campus organizations work to help peers through education and example. Alcohol Issues Matters (AIM) sought to educate the campus about the dangers of alcohol abuse. Women's Issue Organization (WIO) serves to increase awareness of women and their rights AIM is a social and educational organization that seeks to empower its members and the student body to make responsible choices about alcohol use. Promoting responsible choices about drinking and supporting those who choose to abstain, AIM is not an "anti-party organization," but supports those who will choose to drink responsibility. WIO sought to enhance campus awareness of women's issues by acknowledging the accomplishments and contributions of women locally as well as globally. This organization questions the social, political and economical barriers which inhibit women. The approximately ten members of this group are dedicated to educating the college community by means of women's literary materials and lectures. Other special events held throughout the year included AIDS Awareness Night, the Clothesline Project, an exhibit to raise awareness of rape and violence against women, and the Take Back the Night march.

P R O M O T E A C R O S S

"I was very impressed with the attendance at Take Back the Night despite the fact that we had to postpone it due to inclement weather. I think it really shows how many caring, active people there are at Hope College," said Jerry Kassuba. AIM's goals are to educate the campus about a widely-used, but also misunderstand drug. The group also wants to provide alternative entertainment to the party environments. Founded in 1987 as a BACCHUS chapter, it became AIM in 1994 to concentrate on alcohol education. The group has expanded from 8 members to current size of 26 Peer-Educators. Activities include programs in the halls about "enabling." In October, National Collegiate Awareness Week included Mocktails in Phelps Dining Hall and a speaker on alcohol abuse. In March, there was the Safe Spring Break Campaign, again with Mocktails, Cocoa in the Grove, and a cross placed in the Pine Grove for the three people who die each day of alcohol abuse. In November, members retreated to their advisor's cabin to become Certified Peer Educators, demonstrating they have had training in teaching and listening to peers and problems. Training in the spring certified more members. These two groups are trained and ready to tackle important issues and be friends to those who are themselves facing tough issues ot life in and out of college.

A l o c h o l I s s u e s M a t t e r — F r o n t R o w ; M a r y B e i h M a r c h i o n d a , Kim Bos. Ashley Pries; .Second R o w : Kristen Gray. Christy Colburnn. Katie " H o p " Drop. Jill Harkins, T h i r d R o w : Mike T h e l e n . Shannon Lewis. Kevin Burgun. S h o n d a Perdue. A m a n d a Black. Matt Simons; B a c k R o w : Faculty Advisor Darell Schregardus. Mark L a C h o n c e . Cherith Caldwell. Casey C a r n e y . Karri Kronemeyer.

9 6

AIM

and

WIO

C A M P U S

W o m e n ' s I s s u e s O r g a n i z a t i o n — F r o n t R o w : Tracy Be A n n e Horton. Crystal Sprague. Jill Pierson; S e c o n d R o w :


IM advisor Darell Schregardus converses with Shonda Perdue and Cherith Caldwell in the rustic setting of his cabin. Schregadus provided his northern home for the group's fall retreat where training occurred. (AIM Archives)

ary Ellen Walter, Jill Pierson and Crystal Sprouse help protest violence against women by passing out purple ribbons. The women caught the busy Phelps Hall lunch crowd with their message. (WIO Archives)

3

i' MRHi i

•• assing out informative pamphlets and red ribbons, junior Erin Capla helps reduce ignorance during AIDS Awareness Night in the Kletz. WIO embraces many issues. including those regarding women's health. (WIO Archives)

ark Lachonce and Matt Simons serve hot chocolate to students in the Pine Grove as rush to class. AIM provides cocoa to students on many cold days throughout the school year. (Photo by A. Black) oping to complete their Certified Peer Educator training, these AIM members gather together for reviewing material. (AIM Archives)

AIM

and

WIO

97


aking some noise in the Homecoming parade, Mutuin Maruiuki carries his native flag as does James Sitati, Miluska Monroy and Anne Barry. (International Education Archives) mages participants gather on stage for applause and pictures after the performance. Hosted by the IRC, the night featured a variety of poetry, song, dance and videos from around the world. (International Education Archives)

on Rumohr escorts his two young friends from the Dow pool after a refreshing swim. Rumohr donated his time to be a Partners In Promise role model for the Castillo brothers. (Partners In Promise Archives)

Wclcowcto

howcasing the flags of countries represented, James Sitati of Kenya and Lisa Manhart welcome students to the International Food Fair. The night featured international beverages, dishes and deserts. (Int'l Education Archives)

9 8

International

Relations

and

tk

ngella Huddelston, a freshman, hugs her Partner In Promise child after a meeting on a spring day. The program reaches out to children who will become the future of the community. (Partners In Promise Archives)

Partners

In

Promise


L2^

/

•V

Reaching Out N T ' L PROMIlSE

R E L A T (1 0 N S LEND)

SUPPORT

C I

AND

< ommunity; it comes from around the world and right at home. The Internay tional Relations Club seeks to inform the campus about life around the world while Partners In Promise makes a link from college students to Holland's children. As one of the few opportunities for students from different countries to interact. International Relations Club (IRC) continued to thrive. Over 60 members got together for such events as birthday celebrations and to plan the major events of the year. The annual picnic early in the fall semester was well attended and gave the new international students a chance to meet upperclassmen and forge the friendships that are a part of college life. Activity is an important aspect of both groups. International Relations held the Fall Food Fair, where food from different countries was dished out for the college and community to sample. This year the event was even bigger and better than last, keeping up the tradition of building on previous years. Those who forked out a minimal amount of money for tickets enjoyed food from Russia, India, Japan, Palestine and a multitude of other places. Proceeds from the Food Fair went to support a sponsor child in Mozambique. Second semester for IRC was part and parcel of Images, a reflection of cultures. The vast majority of the participants on and off stage were IRC

PARTNERS ON

[IN

CAMPUS

members. The Knickerbocker Theatre was packed to the rafters for the second year running. The program was expanded this year to include 35 different presentations. This year sees the end of the wise and extremely helpful advice obtained from Laurie Engle. IRC advisor who relocated to California. The members of IRC enjoyed her last year with the group and enjoyed another successful year with her invaluable support. Partners in Promise also serve the purpose of forging friendships by taking an active interest in tomorrow's youth. The program began as a resident assistant program in 1994 with a goal of creating partnerships between Hope role models an children in the community. The impact of this program is easily seen in the relationships developed between the sixty mentors and each of the children with which they are paired. Partners In Promise participants found it was rewarding to see children from the community become comfortable in the college setting. Spending several hours a week together, these relationships developed into strong friendships. Leadership makes an impacts for Partners in Promise members who make a difference in children's lives by taking an active interest in their future. It takes dedicated people to make an impact on a child and all benefit when a child succeeds. ressed in traditional Indian clothing, Alina Boyadjieva and Sheryl Gabriel watch as Beta Bajiva performs in Images. Participants in Images wore clothing from their home countries. (International Relations Club Archives)

International

Relations

and

Partners

In

Promise

9 9


igning over his leadership position as Katy Whitfield, Tyler Smith, and Jessica Nelson look on, Ryan Cook hands over the Student Congress gavel to the new leaders. (Student Congress Archives)

KJIV VNhmwd

Grand Ideas

MORTAR

BOARD)

ASSUME

AMD)

CAMPUS

T H •

eadership comes from many sources 4 on campus including elected officials and seniors. Student Congress and Mortar Board take steps to lead the campus. The 32 students who serve on Student Congress are elected representatives of the student community and have the opportunity to serve the student body and represent its needs. The group hears complaints at its meetings and Student Congress representatives serve on the various college boards and committees. In addition, the Appropriation Committee of the Congress is responsible for the allocation of the student activities fee to student-run organizations. One of the largest jobs of Student Congress, the budgeting procedure, occurs each winter and takes weeks of thought and preparation. The activities fee paid by each student supports the entire student activities program by providing for the various budgets. Each organization presents a budget proposal to the committee to use part of this money. Some of the fee funds forums to air students opinions, provide a liaison between students and administration, and to bring speakers series to campus. The spring of 1997 will be remembered as a time of immense controversy. With their name splashed across headlines and discussed on national radio. Student Congress brought Oliver North to campus. The national Mortar Board began in 1918 as the first organization honoring senior college women. Hope founded its Mortar Board chapter in 1961 and

1 0 0

Mortar

Board

and

Student

STUDENT

CONGRESS

L E A D E R S H II P

ROLES

named it the Alcor Chapter. In 1975, the national organization voted to admit men and the chapter soon followed. Phi Sigma Alpha, the Greek name for Mortar Board, recognizes college seniors for their distinguished ability and achievement in Scholarship, Leadership and Service. On April 6, 1997 new member initiation welcomed 40 members in the Alcor Chapter. Dr. Robin Klay and Todd Stem from the Business and Economics Department, and Dr. Richard Mezeske from the Education Department help guide and influence the members throughout the entire year. Like Student Congress, the members of Mortar Board are elected. Chosen as juniors, the members are elected by the current senior class on the basis of leadership, scholarship and service. Forty juniors became the newest members of this service organization. The men and women of the board are traditionally responsible for organizing the "Wearing of the Blue Breakfast," a brunch held for the freshmen and sophomore students on the Dean's List for fall semester. The group is also responsible for counting the ballots for the Hope Award, designating the Professor of the Year. Serving and volunteering their time, the members lead and educate throughout the community, city and campus-wide. Mortar Board chapter President Laura Listenberger sums up her membership saying, "The best part of being in Mortar Board is the opportunity to work with such incredibly talented people."

Congress


aughing and relaxing at the annual Dinner with the provost, Mark Byland and Mortar Board advisor Robin Klay meet with Jack Nyenhuis. The Dinner, held at 'Til Midnight Restaurant, celebrated senior accomplishment. (Mortar Board Archives)

onsidering new applicants. Mortar Board members meet in Lubbers Hall for a discussion. The group carefully studies the application of each potential member before making a decision on acceptance. (Mortar Board Archives)

ntroducing the guest speaker. Matt Barton opened the "Wearing of the Blue Breakfast." The breakfast, held for freshman and sophomores Dean's List students, typically contains future Mortar Board members. (Mortar Board Archives)

tudent Congress members Chad Joldersma, Paul Loodeen and Jessica Nelson accept their newlyelected leadership roles on the cabinet. They carry on the tradition of these important leadership roles. (Student Congress Archives)

abulating votes, senior Mortar Board members Laura Listenberger and Kirsten Krause name the H.O.P.E. outstanding professor award winner Annie Dandavati. (Mortar Board Archives)

S t u d e n t C o n g r e s s M e m b e r s — F i r s t R o w : Robyn Disselcon, Chad Jolderson, Paul Loodeen, Jessica Nelson; S e c o n d R o w : Katie Cindric. Simon Cher. Dana Marlot, Lisa Jutte; T h r i d R o w : C a m e Koop, Chad N y k a m p , Steve Knusman. Dan C w i k , Greg Villestra, Ryan T. C o o k , Tyler Smith, Brent Bash, and Matt Fretz.

Mortar

Board

and

Student

Congress

1 0 1


athering ideas for the next book on a trip through the printing plant also provided bonding time for the staff. This was the first trip the staff took to the publishing company. (Milestone Archives)

Making History Mi II t E S T Š M E

rp

liSTQ<RY

STAFF QF

S T luJ D E N T S

he book nobody wanted became the book that everybody wanted. Evolving from an after-thought to a respected publication, 1997 marked a year of change in the Milestone. The biggest change was the growth of a staff. Early in the year, the returning members recruited both an editorial and working staff. The 1996 book won numerous awards, gaining national respect. It was an obstacle for the staff to build a new book which would continue in the path set by the previous award-winning book, while also being distinctive. The new staff in place worked to improve the edition. Training began with CD-rom software while sessions with editors taught new staffers the ways of the PageMaker and yearbook writing. The next big training session for the staff was the National College Media Convention in Orlando, Florida. College journalists from around the country gathered in sessions to learn about writing, layout, and photography. The trip was a time to learn as well as a time to relax. The 1996 book garnered the second-place Best of Show award from the College Media Association. H

1 0 2

Milestone

RECORDS

THE 0 N

CAMP y S

Work continued as the editors and staff members found out what was involved in creating a book. A true team effort created each page. For the beginning of the pages, story ideas, photographs, writing, computer work and editing duties fell on different shoulders. The staff worked on a book that progressed with the school year. Different events drew to a close as did the work on those pages. Another highlight of the year was the trip to the publishing company, Walsworth, in Marceline, Missouri. A cold road trip brought 11 members the opportunity to see what happens to their book after it is mailed to Missouri. Besides the time to bond and get to know each other. Milestone people took a tour of both of the plants where the books are produced. Names got put with faces and reasons put behind rules. One of the highlights of this trip was the tour of the production plant. After they returned to Holland, the production of the book continued. Late nights, busy weekends and full days aided in finishing the work. The first year with a staff, the Milestone had some growing to do, but the work was a group effort. Improvement became the major goal.

1i

"M

vJfc.

.]


andering the production plants of Walsworth Publishing Company allowed the staff to see the process of printing the yearbook. Knowledge gained helped the staff produce a better book. (Photo by Amanda Black)

fi ditor-in-Chief Anthony Perez fits in perfectly with Goofy, Donald, and friends. Perez and three other staffers headed to Orlando for some early-year training. (Milestone Archives

u

SDlJLi

rowding to see the press, the Milestone staff learns how their book is printed. The trip provided the staff with the opportunity to see the final stages of production and meet the people that help to make the book become a reality. (Milestone Archives)

inding Mickey was the major goal of the fearsome Florida foursome. Attending the National College Media Convention in Orlando gave the staff a chance to learn and a little time to play at all the favorite tourist spots. (Milestone Archives)

ynrr ith a slight detour into the ditch in middle Missouri, the Milestone staff piles back in to the college van. Unexpected weather made for unique memories during the staff road trip. (Photo by N. Johnson)

Milestone

1 0 3 i


Extreme Sports o LACROSSg,

TEAMS

SaililMS

AMD

CHALLENGE

tudent activities provide outlets for all 'W types of students. For those inclined to try the non-traditional sports, the clubs of Volleyball, Lacrosse, and Sailing provided that opportunity. The Sailing Club gives the students a chance to sail competitively at the collegiate level as well as a chance to actively participate in friendly competition with one another. The club could be seen sailing on Lake Macatawa and at the Macatawa Bay Yacht Club. The students single handedly hosted the, Michigan Collegiate Sailing Association, MSCA, championship Regatta in October. The MSCA includes forty teams throughout Midwest from Ontario to Iowa. All division schools compete against each other. The Sailing Club still continues to grow in talent and competition since its reactivation in 1992. The club is most grateful to Than and Greta Dykstra for bringing the club up to snuff. They did all the planning and preparation needed for the club to be successful and enjoyable. Also helping was the commodore Jessica Thomas, Vice Commondore Ryan Harrell, and Secretary Julie Eckold, under the direction of Lynn Hendrix. For another opportunity. The men's Club Volleyball team exists so that those who love the game can continue to play competitively against other men's college teams. There is no men's varsity volleyball team, so this is the only option for those still wishing organized volleyball. Their season runs from October to March during

VOL! FYRA I (

STUDENTS

Spring Break. These 16 men gather three times a week for practicing jump shots, serving and volleying. The majority of the competition comes from weekend tournaments with other college club teams. Some of the avenues travelled by the men include Michigan State, Calvin College, Grand Rapids Community College and out of state to Indiana and Ohio Northern. Some of the members gathered together in Panama City during Spring Break to play in a few beach tournaments. This year seemed to be a successful year for the men. The had a strong finish at the MDVAC local "conference" championship, losing a tight match to the eventful champions of Illinois. Despite having to play with a skeleton crew, Hope managed another Division II quarter final finish at the fifty team Hoosier Invitational. Losing Senior setter Chad Storey and outside hitter Nick Slayer, much of the team will be returning for the next years season. The men look to continue on its improvement from the previous year and looks to have a strong season. President Casey Carney sums up the season and passes encouragement for the next year by saying, " Cook it up" to all his teammates. Starting the season with a Spring Break trip to Florida the Lacrosse team has been in and out of existence at Hope for over twenty-three years, with a total win-loss record of 124-95. Unable to wait for the snow to melt and ready to get off to another great season, the core members of the team would engage in late night practices in the Dow after the regular operating hours.

ingledhandedly, senior Than Dykstra, traveled to Clarkston, South Carolina to represent the sailing club at Nationals in November. (Photo courtesy of the Sailing Club) A

^ e game begins, Mark Mealey stops at nothing to have first " d i b s " on the ball. Although the team had late night practices, they always played hard and practiced well as a team. (Volleyball Club)

1 0 4

Volleyball,

Lacrosse

and

Sailing

Clubs


on Voyage! Members of the sailing club prepare their sails the day before they head to the water at the Cedarfest Regatta at Michigan State University in East Lansing. (Photo courtesy of the Sailing Club)

en Cook does his celebratory dance after yet another point was scored in favor of the men's club volleyball team. Chad Storey shows he is all business by calling the next play to the men. ( Photo courtesy of the Volleyball Club)

t\

22

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et for defense, captain Mark Proff watches intently for a chance to block the ball from the goal against a Calvin opponent. (Photo courtesy of the Lacrosse Club)

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21

;mbers of the Volleyball Club, Nick Slager, Casey Carney, Chad Storey, Brian Giere, Ben Cook, and Matt DeJong break away from a time-out at the Hope College Classic Tournament. (Photo courtesy of the Volleyball Club)

Volleyball,

Lacrosse

and

Sailing

Clubs

1 0 5 J


xploring the rock features on the shores of the Bahamas' San Salvador Island, Geology Club members took the ultimate Caribbean spring break trip. (Geology Department Archives)

njoying the surf, geology club members saw first hand what they usually only read about. The group spent warm, sunny days digging and exploring the geological features of the island. (Geology Department Archives)

hris Cappa explains the results of his experiment to Dr. Polik and sophomore Kevin Paulisse at a Chemistry Club event. The group held activities aimed at helping students prepare for careers in chemistry. (Chem Club Archives)

he invertebrate room was a big attraction for many area third through eighth-graders on Science Day. Senior Andrew Wyatt explained the numerous creatures to the young students as they examined the different aspects of science. (Tri-Beta Archives)

elping themselves to pizza and pop, members of Tri-Beta enjoy an evening with faculty. The Fun with Faculty Pizza and Game Night featured Biology Outburst for educational entertainment. (TriBeta Archives) iology is fun was the message Tri-Beta members tried to share with local elementary students. Young explorers attended the annual Science Day in Peale Science Center. (Tri-Beta Archives)

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Beta

Beta

Beta,

Geology

Club

and

Chemistry

Club


The Elements

B ll 0 1 0 ยง Y ,

CHEMIlSTRY

EXPLORE

S

BjEYONDJ

rp

he Biology, Chemistry, and Geology clubs are organizations that help students further their knowledge of the natural sciences. Rocks, scissors, paper? No, dirt, rocks, fossils! These are three words which describe the Geology Club. The group of Geology majors and other students share a common interest that gives them an opportunity to learn about and preserve the Earth. The group participated in many geology seminars throughout the year and even attended a Grand Rapids Griffins hockey game. Several members of the club took a spring break research trip to the Bahamas', San Salvador Island. The living sciences are examined by the Alpha Eta Chapter of Beta Beta Beta. Tri Beta defines itself as a professional and biological honor society for undergraduates. It exists is to recognize those undergraduates who excel academically and promote excellence in the biological sciences. The requirements for joining Tri Beta include a 3.0 overall GPA. and at least a 3.0 in biology. In addition, three semesters of biology class work must be completed. This year, Tri Beta combined with the Biology Club and met as one group. Members did not have to belong to both organizations, only have an interest in biology. Members of the combined group bonded over pizza at Village Inn and became one with nature while horseback riding and sledding. Tri Beta attended a regional conference at Sienna Heights H

GEOLOGY THE

GtyBS

CLASSROOM

College, coordinated Science Day for area third through eighth graders, and cleaned out bird houses at the Consumers Power plant. Studying the elements of geology and biology, the Chemistry Club had an active program this year. During the summer, the club sponsored several picnics with the Physics/Engineering and Biology Departments research students. A softball "showdown" followed the picnic in which the Chemistry Department beat the Biology Department by more runs than is polite to mention. The club presented two very useful information sessions for students on campus. The first covered reasons for attending graduate school, what it is like, and how to get in. The second workshop tackled the questions of degree types available and what can be done with them. Speakers from local industry, including many alumni, joined in the discussion. Throughout the year, the Chemistry Club arranged for students to have lunch with visiting seminar guests. This provided an opportunity to meet with both industrial and academic chemists and learn what a career in chemistry is all about. The club also assisted with the annual Science Day Chemistry Magic Show in the Knickerbocker Theater and independently hosted a chemistry magic show as part of the Western Michigan Science Festival. Social activities included a movie night in Peale and an apple picking and pie eating expedition at Crane's Orchard.

imilar to the molecules they study, Chem Club members bond. Carrie Langstraat and Angela Perkins discuss studies with Dave Barnett and Becky Timmer while Irina Arzumanora listens in. (Chemistry Club Archives)

Beta

Beta

Beta,

Geology

Club

and

Chemistry

Club

1 0 7


rudy Castillo and Nathanael Buckley participate in the "Strictly Fantasia" dance class in the Dow Center. The two-hour event helped prepare clumsy couples for the formal Fantasia dance. (Sigma Omicron Archives)

ew Sigma Omicron members celebrate on the beach at the induction ceremony. The group headed off campus to a beach house for the event. (Sigma Omicron Archives)

S i g m a O m i c r o n S e n i o r s — F r o n t R o w : Niki Fiinn, Jenn Mancini. Rebecca Partenheimer, Jodi James, Nathanael Buckley; B a c k R o w : Shaylynn Krueger, Vicki Van Wagnen. Jonathon Fly, Ellen Tomer.

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eliving memories and enjoying friendships, co-president Nicki Flinn, secretary Nathanael Buckley, VP Vicki Van Wagnen and copresident Jodi James meet for some snacks at the Sigma Omicron banquet. (Sigma Omicron Archives)

J® t7

Delta O m i c r o n M u s i c S o c i e t y — F r o n t R o w : Kristina Eden, Alison Beukelman, Kari Vandrese, Erika Dianis, Miriam Garcellano, S e c o n d Row Lori Madaus, Mike Lemorie, Frances Anderson. Tammy Kamphuis. David Verry, Belh Hunt; T h i r d Row G w e n Veldhof, Robin Bolt, C h i k a k o Katsuyama, Holly Vaughn, Derek Walvoord; B a c k Row Sarah Wentzloff, Julie Butts, Seth Gardner, Jessica Loomis, Nick Knebl, Mami Kato.

1 0 8

Delta

Omicron

and

Sigma

Omicron

ore than music is important to Delta Omicron members like Julie Butts, feeding a lamb on a trip to New Zeeland. Members are involved in all the musical groups on campus. (Photo by M. Lemorie)


elta Omicron members Miriam Garcellano, Mami Kato and Carrie Maines finish-up after a senior recital. Delta Omicron also gives time to usher at the many different music department recitals. (Delta Omicron Archives)

Art- Honors B R I N G

P E R F Q R M A M r* g

A

F

m s

rp

he Delta Omicron and Sigma Omicron Fraternities are two organizations who are demonstrating and their artistic talent across campus. Delta Omicron is an international music fraternity whose activities focus on service. The group was originally founded in 1909 at the Cincinnati Conservatory for the purpose of establishing a professional music fraternity for undergraduate students, providing students with various opportunities to further their skills. In 1972, the Alpha chapter was founded on campus. The Alpha chapter extends service to the Department of Music, college events and greater Holland community. Their goal is to serve the community through their musical talents. Ushering for Music Department events, playing the prelude for the Mortar Board inductions and giving recitals at retirement homes were a few ways Delta Omicron displayed their musical talent. In addition, members of Delta Omicron held Friday morning doughnut sales, an instrumental presentation for a local charter school, and participated in Secret Santa with the Music Department faculty. A highlight for the Delta Omicron Fraternity was being named 'Chapter of the Year' at the 1996 Triennial National Conference. An arts honors group with a different focus, Sigma Omicron was founded in 1919 as an honorary dance fraternity. The motivation came from a group of artists who shared a particular art form and felt the need for a common bond. The goals of

Delta

T 0

CAM

PUS

the group are few and simple, but lay the foundation for a growing organization. Two of the most important include providing opportunities to educate the community about the world of dance while providing a social group with similar interests. Members of Sigma Omicron stayed involved with the Dance department all year. The group offered a dance class to students in February called 'Strictly Fantasia.' The event introduced students to dances such as the foxtrot, merengue and swing so they could impress dates at Fantasia. Students display their work in the Student Dance Concert each semester. This show is not only a showcase for the artists but is also student choreographed. Sigma Omicron helps to coordinate various activities involved with this event such as designing posters, programs and reserving rehearsal space for the participants. This year several Sigma Omicron members attended the American College Dance Festival in February. The five day festival offered various dance classes, informal concerts and workshops. Jodi James submitted choreography to be adjudicated in which Reina Vendramini and Kristen Singer performed at the adjudication concert. This was the first time in the College's history that submitted work was adjudicated at the festival. Both the Sigma Omicron and the Delta Omicron Fraternities had successful years when trying to display talent and provide service for the campus and community.

Omicron

and

Sigma

Omicron

1 0 9


Extra Effort

BAKiR

T>....

SCHOLARS DELTA

A M D)

EXPLORE

majors. It is the truly passionate majors who spend their time outside of the classroom continuing in the same academic pursuits. The George F. Baker Scholars and Alpha Epsilon Delta both pursue their material beyond the classroom. As a premedical honor society, AED has roots outside of campus, founded in 1926 at the University of Alabama. It became local as the Michigan Beta chapter, in 1960. Because it is an honor society, membership is based on overall and science CPA and members must demonstrate a high intellect and deep commitment for helping others. These members represent all health professions, including dentistry, veterinary medicine and physical therapy. This year was a time to rebuild AED. With a new e-mail system in order, members explored the medical world. Shadowing local physicians, these future medical workers saw them working in familiar settings. Speakers and seminars also provided insight. Travelling to the AED national convention brought the group back ti its roots in Alabama. President Rebecca Olds and V.P Joy Sundsmo were able to work on an amendment to the national bylaws. In the spring AED said good-bye to their graduating seniors and welcomed 21 new members. The Baker Scholars experience the world of business first hand. Originally, George Baker designed a trust specifically for liberal arts colleges

1 1 0

Baker

Scholars

and

Alpha

A\L P H A\

E P S ll t QM

EXCELLENCE

around the country. In this form, it was a scholarship. The limited fund dissolved, but reappeared in 70's with a new focus. More active, the Baker Scholars became local as the college petitioned to use the name and continue without scholarship money. Membership in the Baker Scholars is also exclusive. Each year, six local business leaders select junior and senior economics and business majors who show potential, academic strength, leadership, and quality of character. The group's goal is to learn about business in manner quite different from the classroom. They have the opportunity to see the business world firsthand and recognize importance of values and ethics. Showcasing the Baker Scholars, travel became a popular activity. With one of the world's business centers less than a day away, Chicago provided an great opportunity to learn. They visited a consulting firm and a health care office, and there was still time to see "Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dream Coat." Winter Break found them in an ever bigger business center窶年ew York. They visited the American Stock Exchange, other top business firms, and talked to a chief economist at NYNEX, Contsantine Soras. Skating at Rockefeller Center and a Broadway show rounded out the trip. Baker Scholars and Alpha Epsilon Delta celebrated outstanding members in their fields and brought education outside the classroom and beyond the state of Michigan. ^

Epsilon

Delta


embers celebrate AED's first banquet and initiation ceremony excitement. The group seeks to provide students pursuing health profession with opportunities for experience. (Photo by J. Sundsmo)

popping for a snack, the Baker Scholar members enjoy night life in New York City. The group plans many field trips to places like Chicago, New York City and even downtown Holland. (Photo by Cindy Buonopane)

B a k e r S c h o l a r s — F r o n t R o w : Mami Kate, Susan Schroeder. Cindy Buonopane. Erin Chatelain. Rebecca Maimer, Anya Guski. B a c k R o w : Clinton Moore, Tony Muiderman, Steven DeVrieze and Arin Neucks.

elebrating freedom, Arin Neucks, Anya Gurski, Erin Chatelain, Susan Schroeder, Rebecca Maitner and Steven DeVrieze check out the Statue of Liberty's crown. The Baker Scholars experienced New York City first-hand over winter break. (AED Archives)

A l p h a E p s i l o n Delta O f f i c e r s — F r o n t R o w : Joy Sundsmo, Becky Olds and Kiersten Krause, S e c o n d R o w : Mark Byland, Dan Styf, Nate H o e k z e m a and Saum Rahimi

rs. Eugene and Elaine Jekel, Becky Olds and Joy Sundsmo attend the '96 National Convention for AED held in Birmingham, Alabama. (AED Archives)

Baker

Scholars

and

Alpha

Epsilon

Delta

1 1 1


Niit

'IW

MEMORIES

"This year was better than my freshmen year. It was great to know the system, but at the same time 1 appreciated new classes and new activities. 1 hope the next two years are as good." —Dan McCue, sophomore

ust as the Olympic Games were turning Atlanta into a metropolis overflowing with tourists, a blackpowdered pipe bomb packed with nails exploded in the crowded Centennial Olympic Park. One person died instantly and another died of a heart attack. More than 100 people were injured. (RM Photo)

o b Dole, age 73, retired after 35 years in Congress to devote himself to running for President. He picked Jack Kemp as his running mate, an active Republican and former cabinet member. Dole and Kemp attacked the President's character and ethics while promoting the Republican 15 percent tax cut. (RM Photo)

.

"SAC provided me with goals so I wasn't stuck in the monotony of classes. It's a wonderful way to get involved on campus and a great way to meet people." —Shelly Hendrick, sophomore "I met a lot of cool people and got involved in lots of activities. I also figured out what I want to major in. I learned from my mistakes during the year and am a better person." —Steve Curtis, freshman "When I look at the year, it was busy and hectic but also exciting and rewarding because I was involved in cheerleading, Nykerk and New Member Education." —Bonnie Nannenga, sophomore "Last was an alright year for Student Congress. We had some problems with communication, but next year things are going to better. " —Paul Loodeen, sophomore

1 1 2

Current

Events

aseball's New York Yankees brought a world championship back to the Bronx by edging the defending champion Atlanta Braves 3-2 in Game 6 of the World Series. This was the first championship for the Yankees since 1978, and their 23rd overall. (RM Photo)

n country music, "The Woman In Me" was Shania Twain's biggest album. It was the second album released by the Canadian singer, but it was by far produced some of the biggest hits. It went platinum and stayed on the Billboard Top 200 for more than a year. She won the new country artist of the year award at the American Music Awards show. As one critic said: "Shania has changed the face of country music for women everywhere." (RM Photo)


The Best Selling linton and Gore maintained a strong and consistent lead in the polls in their campaign for the White House. Their platform featured a strong economy and a lower crime rate. (RM Photo)

onths after TWA 800 exploded in midair, investigators were still searching for a cause. The Boeing 747 plunged into the Atlantic ocean off Long Island, N.Y., just minutes after taking off. All 230 people on board were killed. (RM Photo)

1. The Green Mile Stephen King 2. Melody V.C. Andrews 3. The Runaway Jury John Grisham 4. The Last Don Mario Puzo 5. Jack And Jill James Patterson 6. Cause of Death Patricia Comwell 7. Falling Up Shel Silverstein 8. The Celestine Prophecy James Redtleld 9. The Tenth Insight Pat Conroy 10. How Stella Got Her Groove Back ..Terry McMillan 11. The Burning Man Phillip Margolin 12. Out Of Sight Elmore Leonard 13. Harvest Tess Gerritsen 14. The Deep End of The Ocean ... Jacquelyn Mitchard 15. Lily White Susan Isaacs The Best Selling

even members of the U.S. women's gymnastic team won the unlikeiiest of the gold medals in the unlikeiiest of fashions. Team member Kerri Strug made the clinching vault on a bad ankle and became an Olympic heroine the instant she landed. Her coach, Bela Karoiyi, carried to the stand to be awarded the medal. (RM Photo)

Books-Fiction

Paperbacks-Fiction

1. The Green Mile:Coffey On The Mile.. Stephen King 2. Melodyby V.C. Andrews 3. Morning, Noon & Night Sidney Sheldon 4. The Green Mile: Night Journey Stephen King 5. The Lost World Michael Crichton 6. "L" Is For Lawless Sue Grafton 7. Snow Falling on Cedars David Guterson 8. The First Wives Club Olivia Goldsmith 9. Cry Wolf Tami Hoag 10. The Hair Catherine Coulter 11. Trial By Fire Nancy Taylor Rosenberg 12. The Green Mile; Two Dead Girls Stephen King 13. The Green Mile: The Bad Death Of Eduard Delacroix Stephen King 14. The Green Mile: Coffey's Hands Stephen King 15. The Green Mile: The Mouse On The Mile Stephen King Best Selling

Books-No nf let Ion

1. Reviving Ophelia Mary Pipher 2. The Liars' Club Mary Karr 3. All Too Human Edward Klein 4. Undaunted Courage Stephen E. Ambrose 5. Midnight In The Garden Of Good & E v i l J . Berendt 6. Dominique Moceanu: An American Champion Doninique Moceanu 7. Bad As I Wanna Be Dennis Rodman 8. Bare Knuckles and Back Rooms Ed Rollins 9. Emotional Intelligence Daniel Goleman 10. Outrage Vincent Bugliosi 11. How Could You Do That Laura Schlessinger 12. The Choice Bob Woodward 13. It Takes A Village Hillary Rodham Clinton 14. Between Hope and History Bill Clinton 15. Angela's Ashes Frank McCourt Best Selling

Paperbacks-Nonflctlon

1. Reviving Ophelia Mary Pipher 2. The Liars' Club Mary Karr 3. How The Irish Saved Civilization Thomas Cahill 4. Mindhunt John Douglas 6. A Civil Action Jonathan Harr 7. New Passages Gail Sheehy 8. My Point And I Do Have One Ellen DeGeneres 9. All I Know About Animal Behavior I Learned In Loehmann's Dressing Room Erma Bombeck 10. Spontaneous Healing Andrew Weil 11. We're Right. They're Wrong James Carville 12. My American Journey Colin L. Powell 13. The Road Less Traveled M. Scott Peck 14. Care of the Soul Thomas Moore 15. Paula Isabel Allende

Current

Events

1 1 3


yped as the most popular British band since the Beatles, Oasis Is a millionselling rock band about to begin work on their third album. After abruptly canceling a U.S. tour, they denied reports that the group w o u l d split up. The group's first t w o albums have sold 20 million copies. (RM Photo)

5 hannon Lucid, the 53-year-old shuttle astronaut, set the women's record for consecutive days In orbit — 188. She also amassed 223 days in orbit since 1995, making her Americals most experienced astronaut. (RM Photo) he House of Representatives voted to reprimand its speaker. The House Ethics Committee ruled that House Speaker Newt Gingrich was involved in using tax-exempt foundation money for his political ends. (RM Photo)

1 1 4

Current

Events


esmond Howard returned his first kick-off for a touchdown as a pro and it was big. The 99-yard return was the longest kick-off in Super Bowl history. The Packers beat the New England Patriots 3521 in Super Bowl XXXI. (RM Photo)

Memories

illiam Clinton began his second term in January as the 42nd President of the United States He placed his left hand on a family Bible held by his wife, Hillary, and took the 35-word oath of office administered by Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist. (RM Photo)

*

"What a year last year was spiritually; a big spiritual growth time. Talking to the chaplains was amazing. The Bible studies were also a major part of my spiritual growth." —T.J. Achatz, sophomore

oss Perot launched a campaign as the 1996 nominee of the Reform Party. The 66-year old Texas billionaire, lacing his speeches with inspirational anecdotes from American history and his own life, lambasted budget deficits and big government. (RM Photo)

"There were tons of changes around Hope. Some of them that greatly affected students were the ban on smoking, the change in pledging traditions and the crack down on student life." —Brent Rowe, junior

»V CHOICE

REFORM PARTY ave Matthews, a South African who settled in Virginia as a teenager, put together a quintet that continues to be one of the biggest draws on the concert circuit. (RM Photo)

"Many things changed this year. My life became my life and not other people's. I learned my limits and I also learned to tell the difference between what I need and what I want." —Temple Lovelace, freshman "The highlight of the year was working on the Orientation staff because it was fun and I met a lot of people. It gave me a positive outlook on Hope and made me really want to be a part of things." —Mary Lucas, junior

Current

Events

1 1 5


Top 10 Singles-September

1996

I. Macarena Los Del Rio 2.1 Love You Always Forever Donna Lewis 3. Twisted Keith Sweat 4. It's All Coming Back To Me Celine Dion 5. Too Much Dave Matthews Band 6. Change The World Eric Clapton 7. Loungin LL Cool J 8. You're Makin' Me High Toni Braxton 9. You Learn Alanis Morissette 10.1 Can't Sleep Baby R, Kelly II. Give Me One Reason Tracy Chapman 12. Where Do You Go No Mercy 13. Only You 112 14. Who Will Save Your Soul Jewel 15. Hit Me Off New Edition 16. Counting Blue Cars Dishwalla 2Pac 17. How Do U Want It 18. If Your Girl Only Knew Aaliyah 19. Last Night Az Yet 20. Elevators Outkast

Top 20 Albums-September

ori: ris Yeltsin was re-elected President of Russia and pledged to continue the reforms he began five years ago. However, the 65yearold president began Immediately to show the signs of severe beart problems. It was announced open-heart surgery was the only solution to his lifethreatening disease. (RM Photo)

1996

1. No Code Pearl Jam 2. Falling Into You Celine Dion 3. Alliens Outkast 4. Jagged Little Pill Alanis Morissette 5. Blue Leann Rimes 6. Tragic Kingdon No Doubt 7. Keith Sweat Keith Sweat 8. E. 1999 Eternal Bone Thugs-N-Harmony 9. It Was Written Nas 10. Secrets Toni Braxton 11. The Score Fugees 12. 311 311 13. Load Metallica 14. The Crow: City of Angels Soundtrack 15. New Beginning Tracy Chapman 16. Jock Jams Vol. 2 Various Artists 17. Unplugged Alice in Chains 18. Crash Dave Matthews Band 19. The Woman in Me Shania Twain 20. Signs of Life Steven Curtis Chapman

Top tO Video Rentals-Sept.

sng Kong was a British colony on the brink of great change in 1997. The lease on Hong Kong expired on July 1,1997 and the Chinese were poised to reclaim the island after 100 years of British rule. (RM Photo) ^ n j a m i n Netanyahu, 47, was elected Prime Minister of Israel. He declared that bis government would honor the existing agreements on peace and would continue to negotiate toward a final peace agreement in the Middle East. (RM Photo)

1996

1. Executive Decision . Kurt Russell/Steven Seagal 2. 12 Monkeys Bruce Willis/Brad Pitt 3. From Dusk Till Dawn George Cloney 4. Mr. Holland's Opus Richard Dreyfuss 5. City Hall A1 Pacino/John Cusack 6. Broken Arrow John Travolta/Christian Slater 7. Heat Robert De Niro/Al Pacino 8. Happy Gilmore Adam Sandler 9. The Juror Demi Moore/Alec Baldwin 10. Dead Man Walking . Susan Sarandon/Sean Penn

Top 10 Box Office 1. First Wives Club 2. Last Man Standing 3. Fly Away Home 4. Maximum Risk 5. Bulletproof

1 1 6

Current

Mov les-Sept.

1996

6. First Kid 7. Tin Cup 8. A Time To Kill 9. Rich Man's Wife 10. Independence Day

Events

ewel, the 22-year-old performer from Alaska is a smashing success. Her debut album of bittersweet folk songs, "Pieces of You," went platinum. (RM Photo)


F

he stock market continued surges to record highs in one of the greatest bull markets in history. The Dow Jones average hit a record 8,000 in mid-1997. Keeping markets moving upward was news suggesting the economy was slowing down, thus keeping interest rates low. (RM Photo)

eace in the Middle East remained unstable as suspicions arose among Muslims the Israelis were seeking to change the delicate religious balance in Jerusalem's Old City. The incident proved the breaking point as demonstrations followed where nearly 100 people were killed. (RM Photo)

EMORIES "I thought the Oliver North stuff was fascinating even though it was rather pointless in the all together retrospect of life. I also enjoyed being Captain Eufeugo for the year." —Glyn Willams, junior "My freshman year was a nonstop adrenaline rush. I found a family of great friends I will never forget. 1 learned a lot about myself, about people in general and about the effects of Great Lakes stromboli on my lower intestines." —Drew McCulley, freshman "In just one year, I made the closest friends I have ever had. I have also grown so much and for once, I'm looking forward to coming back to school." —Shannon Kenny, freshman

ince George Strait began recording hit songs, each one of his 20 albums went at least gold. His latest hit, "Blue Clear Sky," is well on its way. One critic said: "Blue Clear Sky carries on the tradition of excellence in country music with a collection of performances that continue to make George Strait the definition of country music." (RM Photo)

lanis Morissette has talent that seems to know no limit. Her debut album, "Jagged Little Pill, attracted considerable attention thanks to the hit singles such as "You Oughta Know." As one critic put it: "She lashes out at her targets with a fury that makes her music is both invigorating and frightening." (RM Photo)

"Living offcampus was a very different experience than I had anticipated. You only see ten people, but see them more often. Your social life consists of playing trivia at Calypsos and getting free food during happy hour." —Dan Styf senior

Current

Events

1 1 7


ressed to impress, Centurians John Charnin, Matt William, Kris McKee and Dan Bannik showcase their live performance abilities for other Greek organizations during Greek Week. (IFC/Pan-Hel Photo)

ersonal space gave way to friendly balloon smashing as Fraternal brothers Hans WeinBurger and Erich Van Ravenswaay compete for the title of best balloon busting team with the assistance of Steve Kraseman. (IFC/ Pan-Hel Photo)

n the lawn in the "DeWitt Bowl," John Stull entertains Jared Buono's puppy. Seniors Stull and Buono, members of the Knickerbocker Fraternity, pass time while waiting for other students to arrive for an all-Greek photo to be taken. (Photo by Anthony Perez)

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Greek

Life


f<

apping a half-barrel keg, Greek and Independent students gather at the Centurian's Kremlin for foamy root beer floats and sober fun. The nonalcoholic party set a trend for dry events sponsored by many different organizations. (Photo by Katie Wing)

ower

5^iP

c o n after classes were released for Spring Fling, sophomore Emily LaLonde and freshman Trena Hedley enjoy a few laughs from a comedian brought in by the Social Activities Committee. Hundreds of students attended the event celebrating the end of classes for the year. (Photo by Anthony Perez)

Continued from page 18 Pan-Hel and IPC attempted to throw open the doors of Greek Life and make it accessible to the entire campus. Open Houses where hosted at all Greek cottages. A "Go Greek" period was established so students could get to know the Greek system on a general level. Rather than limiting Rush to early second semester, certain rules were abolished allowing recruitment to go on year round. Por the first time, men's Rush was dry and women combated sexual assault by hosting a communication workshop open to the entire campus. The first sorority newsletter. The Masses, was distributed to women across campus, filling everyone in on the happenings of Greek women. With the shift to a dry rush, fraternities had to reevaluate their activities. Many planned radical alternative events during New Member Education and several pushed the boundaries of group bonding. Cutting edge events like the Centurian Praternity Root Beer Kegger where a smashing success. Because recruitment had been going on year round, both men and women realized many of the old pledging traditions were obsolete. Actives and supportive faculty members took a serious look at hazing and the devastating effects it has on unity and trust. The name change of Fledging to New Member Education, which was adopted by most organizations, was one of many ways Greeks showed their support of the changes. Greeks where looking to other Greeks for ideas, support and friendship. The results paid off. Men's bid numbers doubled from barely fifty in 1996 to well over one hundred in the spring. More female bids where handed out then ever before as sororities continued to grow. In the late spring, Pan-Hel and IPC honored academic achievement with the first biannual Scholarship Reception. Greeks gathered to munch on muffins and honor the Sigma Iota Beta Sorority and the Alpha Kappa Pi Praternity for receiving the highest group GPA award. As a public statement of their unity with each other, IPC and Pan-Hel hosted a joint induction for their new officers and representatives at the Alpen Rose restaurant. As a result of the hard work many Greek leaders and actives gave, Greek Life has turned itself around and risen out of chaos to proudly present itself to the campus. Despite serious internal threats and uncontrollable setbacks, the largest social organization continues to grow, thrive and flourish like never before.

Greek

Life

1 1 9


F

lying Dutchmen proudly run onto the field for the kick-off of the Homecoming football game. The team beat Adrian 38-6, and went on to finish the season second in the MIAA. Fall football is one of the College's oldest sporting traditions. It is an event that pulls students from dorms to the stadium and keeps alumni coming home. (PR Photo)

12 0

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AND AMUSEMENT ARE B E N E F I T ^ D F S P O F ^ J EACH STUDENTS THAT STEPS ON THE DIAMOND, PALMS A BASKETBALL, SETS UP A SPIKE OR TOSSES A FRISBEE IN INTRAMURAL GOLF ENTERS THE LONG TRADITION OF COLLEGE SPORTS. PART OF THE OLDEST CONTINUOUS ATHLETIC CONFERENCE IN THE NATION, HISTORY BINDS EACH ATHLETE FROM EVERY GENERATION.

TIMES HAVE CHANGED.

ONCE, THE

ACCOMPLISHMENTS OF WOMEN WERE RECORDED ON ONE PAGE. NOW, THEIR ACCOLADES SIT NEXT TO THE MENS, THE ATHLETES OF TODAY CONTINUE THE LONG LINE OF TRADITION THAT IS COLLEGE SPORTS, V K

Sports

1 2 ' i

A


Team Standings Valparaiso 22-23 Benedictine, IL. 340 DePauw 7-35 Wabash 10-13 Adrian 38-6 Albion 13-49 Alma 38-41 Kalamazoo 42-40 Olivet 20-19 urther adding to his record breaking statistics, junior running back Brandon Graham carries the ball for another touchdown against Albion. Graham went on to finish the season with a record breaking 1,525 yards rushed and 21 touchdowns. He was placed on the AllMIAA First Offensive Team and voted Ail-American for his contributions to the team. (PR Photo)

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W A Front row: Scott D e K u i p e r . T o d Kolster, Brant B u c k i n g h a m . S t e v e S a n d e r s , S e a n T a l s m a , T r a v o r Starnes, R o n Friel, S t e v e O u r s l e r , R a n d y A m e s . K y l e D e H o r n . K e v i n N a s h . R y a n O ' C o n n e l l . Pat C o l l i n s . T r a v i s B u t h ; Second row: T r a v i s Halliwill, T o n y P e t k u s , G r e g V a u g h a n , D e a n E s t e v e s , J P B u c k i n g h a m . R y a n R e d i n g e r . J i m S h i e l d s . A d a m P a a r l b e r g , A d a m O s m u n . C a s e M c C a l l a , A a r o n O t i s . T o d d V a s i c e k , M a l t L u h m a n n . J a r e d V i c k e r s ; Third r o w : T i m D y k s i r a , B r a n d o n G r a h a m , J o s h B r u w e r , T r a v i s W i l l i a m s , J a s o n H e s t e r . M a r k H i d d e m a , Marty G r a v e l y n . Leif Rotloff, Steve P a p l a w s k y , J e r e m y Heavilin. A d a m L a b b e . T i m Alles. Rick Frens. T o d d Hornsby. Justin Albertson. Brad Bolton; Fourth row: David B e l m o r e . J e f f H i d d e m a , S t e v e J u r g e n s . C h a d B a r c h e s k i . Jeff H o n d o r p . Brett K o h l e r , C h r i s Vanlluis, Justin W o r m m e e s t e r , D.J. R e y b u r n , J e r e m y Rice, C o r e y M o n s m a , D a v e D e H o m m e l , K e l l y S m i t h , F r e d H a c k e t t , M a r k H o f s t e e , S t e v e B u y z e , B r y a n B o o d t ; Fifth row: J e f f K e m n e r . D a v e U y l . T o n y O l d s , M a t t L u h m a n n , R y a n G o n z a l e s . M a l t M a n d z o , A a r o n T o b i a s , C r a i g M o r t o n , B r e n t M e r c h a n t , P e t e K e l l e p o u r e y , T o d d T e s t e r , B r e t B a c h e r t , J o h n S o l t i s , S c o t t L a n g l o i s . R y a n L u u r t s e m a , B r o c k S c h r a d e r , J a s o n S e l k i r k ; Sixth r o w : Lou Raj, Ross Baldwin, T o d d Cooper, Jason Main, Ted Patrick, Paul Bisson, T o d d Tulgestke, Eric Nichols. Scott Elsbrie. Joe Fitzsimmons. Nathan W h i t m y e r . Aaron Jubar. Jeremy G a s p e r , J a s o n R e d o u t e y , K y l e S c h a u b , M a t t R u s s i c k , Jared H i c k s , Seventh row: G r e g F r e n s , S h a y P r o v e n z a n o , R o b e r t Strittmatter, E d J e w e t t , B r i a n G r a b i n s k i , B r a d D e K u i p e r , D a n R e n n e r , M a t t A n d e r s o n , A a r o n S m i t h , N i c k B i a g i n i , S t e v e M c B r i d e , N i c k M o r r i s , A n d y G o b i . Josh G o o d k n e c h t , D a n W e g n e r , B e n K a p e n g a , R y a n V a n d e r W a l l . B r y a n V o l k ; Back Row: Dr. J a m e s L e m i r e , t e a m p h y s i c i a n ; Dr. R i c h a r d R a y , t e a m trainer; R o b R o y e r , assistant c o a c h ; S t u F r i t / , assistant c o a c h ; D o u g S m i t h , assistant c o a c h ; J i m V a n d e r M e e r , assistant coach; Dean Kreps, head coach; Michael Ricketts, assistant coach; T o m Cassell, assistant coach; G e o r g e Kraft, assistant coach; Mike Farmer, team manager; G o r d o n VanderYacht. equipment manager.

1 2 2

Football


In h i s s e c o n d year, c o a c h Kreps l e a d s h i s tx ee aa m m ithrough n r o u g n a a

strongyear When

uarterback Dean Estevez carries the ball for a touchdown against Albion, while junior Tim Dykstra blocks from behind. Estevez, a sophomore, was a leader in the MIAA for passing with a total of 433 yards. (PR Photo) Above, the 1921 football team captures the comical side of the sport In their unique team photo. (Joint Archives Collection)

en lor quarterback Justin Wormmeester prepares a pass to sophomore Steve Oursler In a game against the Brittons. Wormmeester and Oursler contributed to the effort that saw the Flying Dutch climb from second to last to second to best this season. (PR Photo)

all is said and done, the only thing that really matters in a season is how you fair against your league opponents. Despite opening the season with a one-point loss on Community Day against Valparaiso, and entering the MIAA season with a 1-3 record, the Flying Dutchmen tied for second place in the MIAA. They ended the year with a 4-5 overall record, 3-2 in the league. Nearly all season long, the Dutch were faced with games that quite possibly could have gone either way, including three games lost by a field goal or less. The only real blowouts won were against Illinois Benedictine, 340, and Adrian, 38-6. The 32-point win over Adrian was in the Homecoming game, the first time the Dutch have won the Fall Classic since 1990. However, the Homecoming win and second-place tie wasn't nearly the big story of the year when it comes to the football team. The big story was the legs of junior Brandon Graham, as he broke nearly every rushing record imaginable in only his third season playing college football. One of the records he broke was his own, as he rushed for 302 yards on a wet and muddy day in Kalamazoo. The old

record was set in the last game of his sophomore season, when he ran for 293 yards against Olivet. "He's special," said head football coach Dean Kreps, "He is an amazing runner. He breaks holes open, you look at him and you don't think he is that big of a guy, but he can just take hit and keep on running." Graham finished the season with 1,525 rushing yards and 21 touchdowns. The recordbreaking season upped his career totals to 2,710 yards and 29 touchdowns. The quarterback position was up in the air for much of the season, as Justin Wormmeester started the first few games, but was replaced at about mid-season by Dean Esteves. Both quarterbacks were sophomores and were equally inconsistent. However, Esteves's record as a starter was slightly better. The competition for the quarterbacking job caused some to speculate that a controversy existed, but Esteves was the first person in line to dispel that belief. "Wormmeester and I are always rooting for each other, so I don't see how there can be any problems between us," Esteves said. A solid group of players returns for the 1997-98 season, including a more experienced Esteves and Graham, and most of the defensive leaders. A more experienced Graham is almost a scary thought. J *

by Glyn Willams

Football

1 2 3


Bringing e n t h u s i a s m t o both f a n s and players, c h e e r l e a d e r s work • mm mm to k e e p

spintahve The Flying Dutch cheerleading squad spent the season entertaining fans at football and basketball games on the road and at home. With the formation of the Dew Crew and the Dutchmen Dog Pound over the past few years, and as the attendance of home football and basketball games have rapidly increased, and the importance of cheerleaders has grown exponentially. "I think we have really become more and more visible at games and around campus," said Co-Captain Chris Danapilis. "It's hard to see that we are important because the Dew Crew and Dog Pound do their own thing but we get the crowd going a lot of times." For many members of the team the biggest thrill of their collegiate career was to cheer for the men's basketball team at the Final Four Championships in Salem, Virginia in 1996. However, the squad got to relive some of those emotions when the Flying Dutchmen played Calvin College in VanAndel Arena on January 29. "That was probably the greatest feeling of the year," Danapilis said. "To perform in front of all those people at the VanAndel Arena was great."

Before the school year began the team participated in a fourday cheerleading camp sponsored by the Universal Cheerleading Association, which included over 800 cheerleaders from around the Midwest. The squad earned a fourth place trophy at the camp, despite competing against some larger Division II teams. Members of the team also received blue ribbons in some individual category evaluations. "That weekend served as a great bonding experience for the team all together as a whole," said Clint Moore. "We definitely came out of that camp a better squad and ready for the football season to begin and for awhile there we even got antsy we were so pumped for football to start." Overall, members of the Dutch cheerleading squad had an excellent time throughout the school year at competitions and cheering loudly at basketball and football games. "I am satisfied with how the year went and I had a great time with it," Danapilis said. "The great part about it is that for some of us we are going to coach it and teach it to high school kids and college kids. It has been a great learning experience and we get to continue the Dutchmen spirit throughout the rest of our lives." ^

by Glyn Williams

1 2 4

Cheerleading

haring the spirit of the Dutch with the crowd, junior Valkyrie Sakshaug raises her hand to all of VanAndel Arena. The Cheerleaders provided Dutch spirit at all the football and basketball games. (PR Photo) Above Left: Bow ties and sweaters was the uniform of choice for the men of the 1940 cheerleading team. (Milestone Archives)

eamwork is what makes the squad as strong as it is. The 16 member squad spent many hours preparing at practices and before every game. (PR Photo)


ho uting an energy filled "Let's Go Hope," Kelly Klein, Kristy Deer, Tim Hoebeke and Greg Kern lead the crowd in spirit. The squad's enthusiasm keeps the fans engaged during slow or exciting portions of the games. (PR Photo)

Front row: Emily LaLonde, Casey Slayton. Jennifer Smith. Kristy Deer, Laura McKee, Valkyrie Sakshaug; Second Row: assistant coach Kris Ritton. Chris Danapilis, Clinton Moore, Greg Kem, and coach Wes Wooley.

Cheerleading

1 2 5


For t h e first t i m e in nine y e a r s , t h e Lady Dutch finish t h e MIAA s e a s o n

numberone For

the

first time in almost a decade the women's volleyball team won the MIAA with a record of 26-6, 11-1 in the league. However, the championship was slightly tainted, as the Dutch did not receive a bid into postseason play due to an unfavorable record against Calvin College. The Flying Dutch beat Calvin only once in the four times they met during the season. Another reason for the lack of post-season play was the strength of the schedule being as it was. "We came very close to receiving a bid, but that's just the way things go sometimes and we aren't really down about it," said head coach Karla Wolters. "We look forward to an even better season next year. This one wasn't bad though, I mean we won GLCA tournament and we won the league for the first time in nine years. 1 am very happy with our season." The Flying Dutch improved tenfold on their play within the MIAA from the 1995 season. That season Hope finished fourth with a league record of 7-5. The spikers started this season by winning the Great Lakes

Colleges Association Tournament, beating all four of their opponents in the tournament hands-down. Juniors Becky Scmidt and Christie Eding were named the tournament MVP's and senior Emily Bakker was named to the all-tournament team. Schmidt, a captain of the team, was pleased with the way the team played as a team all season. "Volleyball is a game of momentum and team togetherness and we had that to win all season," Schmidt said. Momentum is key in volleyball and it was in the Flying Dutch's favor most of the season, as they won ten in a row at one point mid-season. The A11-M1AA Volleyball Team was riddled with Flying Dutch this season. Bakker, Eding, and sophomore Heather Velting all made the First-Team A11-M1AA, while Schmidt made the Second-Team A11-M1AA. The other captain of the team, junior Elizabeth de Haan, received an honorable mention. The 1997-98 volleyball crew could prove to be even better than last year's, as the Flying Dutch lose only two players to graduation.

by Giyn Wiiiiams

1 2 6

Volleyball

umping up to block, junior Becky Schmidt and sophomore Heather Velting take the defensive to keep Calvin scoreless. Schmidt, a member of the All-MIAA Second Team, and Velting, a member of the First Team, helped with a victory over the Knights in this first MIAA match-up of the season. (PR Photo)

^ ^ B n i o r Emily Bakker spikes the ball and completes a play set up by junior Christine Eding and senior Jenny Petscher. Eding and Bakker were both named to the First Team All-MIAA for their great team play. (PR Photo). Above left: Volleyball first appeared in the 1954 Milestone as part of the "Women's Sports" page.


4

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Team Standings Houghton, NY Goshen, Indiana Calvin Bethel, Indiana Albion Adrian Albion Wooster DePauw Ohio Wesleyan St. Mary's, Indiana John Carrol Hanover, Indiana Calvin Thomas More, Ky. Calvin Alma Olivet Adrian Judson Maranatha, Wise. Bethel, Indiana Kalamazoo Albion Calvin Alma Albion Thomas More, Ky. Bluffton, Ohio Kalamazoo Olivet

3-0 3-1 1-3 0-3 3-0 3-1 3-0 3-0 3-0 3-1 3-1 3-2 3-0 1-3 3-1 3-1 3-1 3-0 3-0 3-0 3-0 0-3 3-2 3-0 1-3 3-0 3-0 3-0 2-3 3-2 3-0

Front Row: Tara Blacquiere. Sarah Wiersema, Kendra Maloni, Lexie Oosting, Nicole Ciovanardi, Rachel Comegys. Jill Frednckson; Middle Row: coach Karla Wolters, assistant coach Suzanne Haverdink, Kuria Van Wieren. Christie Eding, Jean Kegerreis. Jenny Petscher, Kristi Langland. Amy Petty, assistant coach Becky Skull; Back Row: volunteer assistant coach Trung Phan, Emily Bakker, Sara Brown, Heather Veiling, Elizabeth de Haan, Becky Schmidt, manager Kim Morgan,

Volleyball

1 2 7


J

hn Conlon maneuvers the ball past his opponents from Kalamazoo College to score early in the game. The Dutch went on to defeat the Hornets in this game and each time on the field together. Conlon, a senior, was voted to the First Team All-MIAA for a third time at the conclusion of the season. (PR Photo)

Team Standings Southwestern, Texas Trinity, Texas Trinity Christian, Illinois Wooster, Ohio DePauw, Indiana Anderson, Indiana Kalamazoo Albion Adrian Olivet Alma Calvin Kalamazoo Albion Adrian Olivet Alma Calvin Wilmington (NCAA)

1 2 8

Soccer

3-1 4-1 7-0 3-2 1-1 7-0 S-0 4-1 4-0 7-0 2-1 4-1 1-0 7-0 44) 7-0 0-1 3-0 0-2

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Front Row: Greg Kilby, Lance Pellow, Matt Hassenrik, Todd Rosenbrook. Steve Coy, Mike Labb, Rob Allison; Second Row: Dave Dobb, Kevin Lewis, manager Elizabeth Dickinson, assistant coach Lee Schopp, head coach Steve Smith, assistant coach Paul Rosenbrook, Darren Toohey, Joseph Glendinning; Third Row: Clayton Bergsma, Andrew Dressier, Aaron Dean, Josh Meersma, Sean Toohey, Zach Jonker, Matt Vandcr Naald, Aaron Van Zetten; Back Row: Geoff Rodocker, John Conlon, Josh Sheldon, Blair Richards, Chris Riker, Jim Becher. Ben Klimek, Chris Dombrowski.


Talented players, strong coaching, and united u n n e a spirit spirn l e a d a s txeam e a m txo o

newi coi s There

eaping to receive a pass from teammate Andy Dressier, freshman Sean Toohey attempts to prevent his opponent from gaining possession. Dressier and Toohey were both named to the All-MIAA First Team for their dedication to the success of the team. (PR Photo)

Josh Meersma, John Conlon, and Chris Dombrowski congratulate sophomore Zach Jonker on a gamedeciding goal in the second half. Jonker received honorable mention for his success as a second-year team member. Above right: The first soccer team, or "British Style Football" as it was called then, was united In 1965. (Milestone Photo Archives)

were only three games that the soccer team didn't win all season. One was a nonconference tie to DePauw, one was a one-goal loss to Alma College, and the final was a 2-0 loss in the opening round of the playoffs to Wilmington College of Ohio. "I'm mind-boggled because we deserved to win," said head coach Steve Smith. "We once again pounded the other team's goal, and the only goals they had were off counter-attacks." Shortly before the loss to Alma on October 30, the Dutchmen were ranked second in the nation, but a loss to the lowly Scots dropped them down a few notches going into the Regional playoffs. One of the biggest highlights of the season past was the introduction of Australian sensation freshman Sean Toohey. The 22-year old forward from Canberra, Australia attended high school in Lansing, but spent the last four years managing a fitness center Down Under. He spent his years there saving money for the chance to come and play for who recruited him four years ago. "1 just wanted something different," Toohey said. "I wanted to see the world without joining the Navy. You don't really have a cultural experience when you just visit a place or just

live there for a year. You really have to live and be a part of something big to truly know what it is like to live there." He definitely made his impression felt early, as he scored all the goals in the first game of the season, a win over Southwestern, Texas. He later went on to score six more goals over the next five games. The Dutchmen smacked Olivet with a pair 7-0 losses this past season, seven of those goals coming off the foot of Toohey himself. He finished the season 23 goals, tying a Hope record, seven assists, and 53 total points. The team set three records, including most goals in a season with 73, fewest goals allowed with eight, and most victories in a season with 16. Added to Toohey's school records, senior Josh Sheldon set a couple records of his own, dishing off 12 assists. Senior John Conlon also shined bright as he garnered AllRegion honors and served as an outstanding leader on and off the field. "This is the best and the unluckiest team 1 have ever coached," commented Smith late in the season. Only a handful of players will be lost from their outstanding season. Judging by the quality of players who are returning, the team will most certainly produce even better records in years to come.

by Glyn Williams Soccer

1 2 9


fter being tripped by her opponent from Kalamazoo College, ment fro freshman Amanda Ackerson passes the ball to teammate Lisa Knott. Knott, a junior, attempts to keep the Hornets from gaining control at the end of the match. (PR Photo)

m

\ Team Standings Grand Valley Aquinas Wheaton Washington, Mo. SUNY-Binghamton Kalamazoo Albion Adrian St. Mary's, Indiana Olivet Alma Calvin Kalamazoo Albion Adrian Olivet Wooster Alma

1 3 0

Soccer

2-3 5-5 0-3 1-5 0-4 4-1 2-0 6-0 1-0 2-0 4-1 0-2 1-5 5-1 5M) 5-2 0-5 6-2

a Front Row: Gretchen Schoon, Libby Folkerl, Meredith Arwady, Krista Brewer, Cherrylynn Outcalt, Annalise Van Wyngarden, Amanda Ackerson, Trystin Kleiman; Middle Row: coach Stein Slette, Hillary Rycenga, Kathryn Nichols, Lisa Knott, Lindsay Mathelly, Bctllanie Hopma, Tracy Phelps, assistant coach Anne Irwin; Back Row: Lauren O'Dowd, Natalie Rejc, Mimi Waker, Melody Morscheck, Tina Gill, Debbie Burr, manager Kate Berghorst.


Although beginning on t h e wrong f o o t , players work for a

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J s Tina Gill looks behind, Melody Morscheck prepares to pass the ball to her teammate. Gill and Morscheck, both sophomores, lead the team in scoring number two and three respectively. (PR Photo)

racy Phelps kicks the ball through the legs of her opponent from Aquinas College to sophomore teammate Gretchen Schoon. Phelps set a single season goal scoring record with 19 points in her fourth year of play on the team. (PR Photo) Above Right: The 1989 season marked the beginning of the women's soccer team. (Milestone Photo Archives)

The <*women's soccer

team finished above .500 for the seventh consecutive season. In fact, the team has not had a final season record below .500 since the sport was introduced in 1989. However, the season ended with a slightly marred outcome, as coach Stein Slette, who started the program, resigned due to personal reasons. "We all came into the season knowing that a good chance of my resignation existed," Slette said. "I did a lot of praying and it turned out this is what God told me is best for my family to do." The thought of spending the off-season sans-coach might have affected the play of the Flying Dutch early on in the season, as they went winless in their first four games, and didn't celebrate a win until they began the MIAA play. "Some of our preseason opponents were really good, solid, nationally ranked teams," said assistant head coach Anne Irwin. "Also, what we have is a mixture of older and younger players, a lot of whom did not play together last year at all." Outside of the MIAA, the Lady Dutch went 1-5-1 for the season, including an opening season loss to Grand Valley State University in their inaugural year. They also suffered a loss to Wooster of Ohio, who was one the top ranked teams in the nation at the time.

The season witnessed senior Tracy Phelps becoming the most prolific scorer in the team's history. She broke the record early in the season, but didn't stop as she later went on to break her own records for goals and points in a season. "Tracy has been a scorer for us ever since she came here," Slette said. "She couldn't have had the goals unless she had a fabulous assist. The rest of the team makes her look good." Most those assists Slette referred to came via the feet of sophomores Melody Morscheck and Tina Gill who both broke the school record for assists in a season with 11 dishes. Gill also broke Phelps' record for assists in an MIAA season with nine on her way to become the MIAA MVP. She is the first Flying Dutchman to ever be awarded the prestigious honor. Gill and Phelps were the only players to be named to the First Team All-MIAA. Morscheck and senior Lauren O'Dowd made the Second Team All-MIAA, and freshman Debbie Burr was given an Honorable Mention from the coaches. Gill also received All-Region honors, only the second Hope player to be given that kind of recognition since Kara VanderKamp in 1994, The Flying Dutch might have a tough time in the year to come adjusting to the loss of their most prolific goal-scorer plus a new coach thrown into the mix.

by Glyn Williams Soccer

1 3 1


Team Standings Albion 4(396.5) Aima 2 (396.3) Olivet 4 (411.4) Adrian 4 (417.5) Hope 2 (397.3) Calvin 2 (413.3) Kalamazoo 4 (401.5)

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fter studying the angle of his putt, Shaun Murle taps the ball toward the hole for par. For the second year in a row without the valuable experience of seniors, team leadership came from young players. (PR Photo)

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Left to Right: Mark Piersma, Bryan Fix, Kevin Freng, Josh Wheeler, Greg Nienhouse, Pete TeWinkle, Jay Prasad, Ben Fellows, Shaun Murie, and coach Bob Ebels.

1 3 2 Goif


Young t e a m s t r u g g l e s but DUX players piayers promise t10 o

stayfocused Never

fter a strong swing, freshman Greg Nienhouse watches the ball travel toward the green. As a new member of the team, Nienhouse gained valuable experience he will use in upcoming years on the team. Above Right: The men's golf team hit the greens of Holland in the 1930's as has since been a sporting tradition on campus. (Milestone Archives)

quite grasping a winning season, the men's golf team finished placing no higher than second. The Dutchmen were out played all season by Olivet and Albion, who finished one-two in the league. While the Dutch finished with a total of 2,831 strokes, that was a good 110 strokes behind the first place team. In the tournaments, the Flying Dutchmen finished as high as second, just four shots off Olivet at one point, but as low as fourth when their team score was around 411. Had just a few tournaments been played even slightly differently, Ebels's team would have been right up there high in the league standings. "There were basically three tournaments (Olivet, Adrian, and Calvin) in which we could have done better and it would have made a world of difference," coach Bob Ebels said. Despite the fairly low finish, Ebels was generally satisfied with the season. "I was very pleased," Ebels said. "From the start we knew we were going to have a tough time with Olivet. Our goal was second, but all in all we did good." The squad consisted of no seniors, so all of the golfers should very well be back for the fall, 1997 season. Ebels, for one,

is looking forward to the upcoming season. "It should be very exciting," he said. "Hopefully they will be able to improve and move up the ladder as a group, and we'll be in solid position to challenge Olivet." The Dutchmen consisted of three members of the All-MIAA second team. They were junior Kevin Freng, freshman Ben Fellows, and sophomore Mark Fiersma. Freng averaged 79 strokes a tournament, which was sixth best in the MIAA, while Piersma layers tee off at the home tournament held at Wuskowhan shot just .6 Player's Club near Holland. The strokes team finished second in the match poorer than against Olivet, Albion, Alma, his DutchCalvin, Kalamazoo, and Adrian. men (PR Photo) teammate. Freng was tenth in the league, averaging 80.3 strokes. "I though the season went fairly well," Freng said. "I was quite pleased with the performance of all our golfers and I am definitely looking forward to next year. We are getting better and better every day, every week, every month. It should be pretty exciting.'

by Glyn Williams coif

1 3 3


A combination of e x p e r i e n c e and youth landed t h e Lady Dutch on;

These ladies had it rough this past season. They were forced out everyday to play golf, and won all but one of their tournaments. It's a rough life. The women's golf team won the M1AA and practically everything else along the way, continuing their dominance that has existed ever since coach Jane Holman arrived in 1991. To end the season, the Lady Dutch were polled as high as fifth in the nation among Division 111 schools. The one tournament the lady golfers did lose was to a rambunctious Alma team that was hot on Hope's heels all season. The Scots edged past the team at their home course on September 11, by a mere two strokes, 345347. They won the league soundly however, by 92 strokes. The six wins were by an average of nearly 16 strokes. The Dutch were led throughout the year by a poignant combination of age and youth, as senior Nancy Kennedy and freshman Ellen Colenbrander

switched back and forth as leading golfers. Colenbrander finished the season first in the MIAA, averaging 83.9 strokes, while Kennedy finished second in the league with an average of 85.1 strokes. Kennedy set the course record at Olivet when she led a with a 75. Colenbrander holds the course record at Alma, where she shot an 80 and Adrian, where she shot an 81. Because she is a freshman, those course records are not expected to hold fast. Both Kennedy and Colenbrander made the AllM1AA first team, as did Gina Pellerito in her sophomore season of collegiate athletics. Anne Colenbrander was named to the second team All-MIAA in her fourth year. The odd number of golfers on the team made Holman struggle to rearrange the roster constantly. "We had seven players and played seven tournaments, Holman said. "We have to play six in each, so seven times one person had to sit out. If we could play all each time all of them would have probably made the league. It just show how good our team was.

by Glyn Williams reparing her final shot, Gina Pellerito studies the course. The sophomore was part of the young Dutch trio honored by making the AllMIAA team for the second year in a row. (PR Photo)

1 3 4

Golf

'ing the angle on the green, Mindy Shilts lines up her putt. The junior consistently placed near the top, propelling the Dutch to lead the MIAA throughout the season. (PR Photo)

eplaclng the flag on the green, Nancy Kennedy finishes the 18th hole against Calvin College. The senior team captain won letters each of her four years in collegiate golf. (PR Photo) Above Left; Women's golf first appeared in the 1991 Milestone, replacing the field hockey team. Since that time, the team has enjoyed three MIAA championships. (Milestone Archives)


olfers meet with their coaches to match up with opponents before heading to the course. The women dominated MIAA play, taking first in meets against teams from around the league. (PR Photo)

Team Standings Olivet Alma Calvin Albion Kalamazoo Adrian Hope

Left to Right: Gina Pellerito, Nancy Kennedy, Mindy Shllts, Anne Colenbrander, Ellen Colenbrander, Elizabeth Yared, Melody Oonk, and coach Jane Holman.

Golf 1 3 5


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The Flying Dutchmen cross country team had a tough time this season dealing with the formidable Kalamazoo College and as a result finished third in the MIAA. The team managed to tie Kalamazoo in the first league jamboree on September 21, at the home course, Beechwood by the Bay. They then fell far behind the Hornets in the Calvin league jamboree and then again at the league championship meet on November 2. "I was not satisfied with our performance (at the league championship) at all," coach Mark Northuis said. "It was a really off race by us due in part to many runners just getting over illness. Kalamzoo had a really good race and I think that surprised us a little bit." The men's team failed to finish first in any of the nine invitationals or jamborees they competed in all season. The closest they came was a distant second at both the Hope Invitational and the Athletics North

Invitational in Osh Kosh, Wise. "We probably could have done better but I think that it is not something that we got really down on ourselves about, said senior Mike Cranmer. "We did our best and I guess the other guys' best was better than ours. We ran as hard as we could and that is all that it boils down to." Senior Dan Bannink, one of the team's four captains, and junior Jeremy Bogard made the first team All-MIAA. Cranmer, another captain of the team, qualified for the second team AllMIAA. Seniors Matt Lapenga and Joe Fritsch were also captains of the team and excelled at leaders despite just barely missing the cut-offs to the AllMIAA team. "All my captains were outstanding runners," Northuis said. "They excelled in practice, in meets, in life. They will all be sorely missed." The team struggled with experience, as there was only six seniors and four juniors on the team of 26. But while this was bad news for this group, the youth of the team bodes well for the years to come.

by Glyn Wlllams a

front in the lead position, Brian Van Haitsma sets the pace while Josh Metlzer and Rob Struck follow. The y o u n g team struggled in the MIAA ranks, but captured a solid middle finish. (PR Photo)

1 3 6

Cross

Country

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ing their pace for the long race, Jase Roberts, Scott Derby, Bob Rutherford and Aaron VandeWege, give it their all. Hard work paid off as he men finished their season third in the MIAA. (PR Photo) Above Left: Competing against teams from across the state in the 1920's, Flying Dutchmen runners appeared early in the athletic history of the College. (Joint Archives Collection)

aking a position in the leading pack of runners, returning letter winner Tim Franklin follows the pace of his teammate, Jeff Kaufman. (PR Photo)

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Team Standings Hope Invitational 2 (38) Athletics North invlt. 2 ( 4 3 ) MIAA Jamboree 2 (75) Augustana invlt. 9 (228) Roadrunner Invit. 5 (141) MIAA Jamboree 3 (77) Wisc.-Parkslde invit. 11th League Championship 3 (70) Great Lks Regional 14 (359)

F r o n t R o w : J e r e m y Stoner, Paul Berke, Jeff K a u f f m a n , B o b Rutherford, Chris Kerrins, R o b Struck, R o b H e n r y ; M i d d l e R o w : M i k e C r a n m e r , T i m Franklyn, W e s Prescott, Jesse Graf, Matt L a p p e n g a , Josh Metzler, Jase Roberts, Joe Fritsch; Back R o w : coach M a r k Northuis, Dale Furst, Scott Derby, Bryan Van Haitsma, Jeremy Bogard, Jon Reeves, Dan B a n n i n k , R y a n E. S h a w , Aaron V a n d e W e g e , and assistant coach Nick Kramer.

Cross

Country

1 3 7


ophomore Jill Bostelaar and junior Angela de Forest lead a pack of runners at the League Jamboree. Their finish helped the team finish second overall at the event hosted by Hope. (PR Photo)

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Dutch women's cross country team fared slightly better than their male counterparts and ended the season second, just barely ahead of Kalamazoo College. Led by captain Marie Matchett, one of only three seniors on the team, the Dutch won the season opening Hope Invitational and then smoked the competition at the Roadrunner Invitational in October. The Dutch also then finished ninth in a field of 29 at the Wisconsin-Parkside Invitational and eighth in a field of 24 held at Otterbein College in November. Only one runner got to personally feel the pride of winning a race first. Matchett smelled the victory at the Hope Invitational when she crossed the finish line with a time of 19:31. Matchett was close again at the first M1AA lamboree held on Hope's home course, but lost the race by forty-five seconds to a ^

Calvin runner who later went on to become the league's most valuable runner. Matchett headed Hope's list of athletes on the All-MIAA team, as she was named to the top squad for the third time in her career. Sophomore Becky Timmer also received first team honors. Sophomore Cindy Bannink and freshman Jennifer Ernst were named to the second team All-MIAA. Going into the M1AA championship Ernst was running well and on pace to make the AllMIAA first team, but her performance in the final meet was hindered immensely by illness. "I was on the first team AllMIAA but I didn't have a real good race, so that bumped me down to the second team," Ernst said. Similar to the men's team, the Flying Dutch have more freshmen and sophomores than they really know what to do with, and will be stocked with talent for the next couple years.

by Glyn Williams

1 3 8

Cross

Country

eading the pack. Vanessa Timm keeps pace with junior Angie de Forest. On a team with few seniors, younger members stepped up to fill leadership roles. (PR Photo) Above Left: In 1931, before cross country was an official sport, women competed in a race through campus. (Milestone Archives)

eeping pace, sophomore Megan Powers and Cynthia Bannick outstep their Calvin College opponent. They helped Hope to finish second to Calvin in the MIAA Jamboree. (PR Photo)


^ H d g i n g her o p p o n e n t , f r e s h m a n S u s a n K i n g m a n takes the lead. K i n g m a n w a s o n e o f 12 f r e s h m a n w h o made their athletic debut on t h e t e a m . (PR P h o t o )

Team Standings Hope Invitational 1 (19.2) Athletics North Inv. 4 (74) 2 (38.3) MIAA Jamboree 4 (127.5) Augastana Inv 1 (33.2) RoadrunnerInv 2 (46.3) MIAA Jamboree 9 (279) Parkslde Inv. 3 (68.4) MIAA Finals NCAA Great Lakes 8(229) Championships

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aking their position for the gun, t h e t e a m g e a r s u p f o r t h e start of t h e i r r a c e at t h e M I A A J a m b o r e e . T h e p a c k of n o v i c e r u n n e r s surprised the league with their s o l i d s e c o n d p l a c e f i n i s h . (PR Photo)

Front R o w : T a m m y B o u w e n s , Mary M a c D e r m a i d , Hazel Lawson, Jenny Ernst, Susan Miller. Ann Zeneberg. Carrie Ketcher, Suzie West; Middle Row: Angela Kidder, A m a n d a H e y d o n , Elizabeth A l v e s t e f f e r . Audra Martin, Stacy B r o w n , Susan Palleschi, Becky T i m m e r , Cynthia Bannink. Janel M o o r e , Susan V a n d e r W e i d e , Janelle T h o m p s o n ; Back Row: coach Mark Northuis. Megan Powers, M a n e Matchett, Susan Kingma, Vanessa T i m m . R e b e c c a Karrow, Katie Stanger, Carrie Langstraat, Molly Griebe, A n g l e de Forest, Sarah Carpenter. Jenny Passchier, Kris Stafiej, Jill Bostelaar, and assistant coach Nick Kramer.

C r o s s

C o u n t r y

1 3 9


restling f o r t h e b a l l , Pat Stegeman secures his position against an o p p o n e n t from Adrian College. As a sophomore team member, Stegeman had the opportunity t o a p p e a r in h i s secondconsecutive NCAA tournament. (PR P h o t o )

Team Standings Cornerstone Classic First Concordia 94-60 Trinity Christian 67-80 Russ Devette Classic First Treasure island Classic First Lipscomb 88-72 Alma 89-86 Albion 85-69 Olivet 82-69 Kalamazoo 69-62 Adrian 77-63 Calvin 70-56 Alma 89-63 Albion 90-87 Olivet 85-71 Kalamazoo 72-67 Adrian 88-64 Calvin 81-71 MIAA Tournament Alma 87-57 Calvin 63-62

1 4 0

B a s k e t b a l l

Front Row: Mark Bray, Brandon G o o d y k e , Marc Whilford, Jon Vertalka, T o m Gortsema, Chris V a n d e r Slice, David M u h l e n b e r g , Pat S t e g e m a n , and Joel Holstege; B a c k R o w : student assistant coach Jay Leitz, assistant coach Matt Neil, head coach Glenn Van Wieren, Josh C a n a n , Jason V a n d e r W o u d e , Kris Merritt, Dan Van H e k k e n , J o e D a v e l a a r , assistant coach T o m D a v e l a a r , j u n i o r varsity coach T i m S c h o o n v e l d , and student assistant coach Paul M c K e e .


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beneath his feet, Joel Holstege launches a shot as the dumbfounded Knights watch in awe. As heated rivals, the match-ups draw more fans than any other opponent. (PR Photo) Above Right: Part of College tradition, this small 1923 team is much different from the larger teams of today. (Joint Archives Collection)

aunting his opponent from Cornerstone College, junior David Mewenberg leaps for a near-perfect lay-up and two points in the fourth quarter. Mewenberg led the league in overall field goal shooting and was voted as a player of the week during the season. (PR Photo)

The

men's basket^ ball team spent the season trying to live up to high expectations they found difficult to do. The team dashed through the season, defeating nearly everyone that got in their way, Kalamazoo, everyone, with the exception of the surprise team of the season, Nebraska Wesleyan University. The Plainsmen handed the Flying Dutchmen their third and final loss of the season, 92-75, in the Sweet 16 on Friday, March 14. "I was disappointed in the last game of the season. 1 thought we were mentally stronger than how we played," said head coach Glenn Van Wieren. " 1 think we had an excellent season and the last game will not be the lasting memory. People will remember that we were 14-0 in the league, including the tournament, and not many people can say that." The men finished their season at 26-3, after winning the Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association title. Junior Joel Holstege led the team throughout the season, as he took home numerous accolades. He had a spectacular year, placing in the top five in four statistical categories, including scoring (fifth), three-point field goal shooting (second), assists (first), and steals (first). His 71 three-point baskets set a college record as he is now the school's all-time leader in three-pointers. He also currently ranks 19th on the all-time career scoring list with 1,051 points. The leader is

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currently Floyd Brady '68 with 2,004 points, with Duane Bosma '96 close behind with 1,937. Along with winning the league's Most Valuable Player trophy, Holstege also was named to the Basketball Times first team All-America and the National Basketball Coaches Association first team All-Region. Holstege, Kris Merritt, and David Meulenberg were all named to the AllMIAA first team, while senior Marc Whitford was named to the second team A11-M1AA. Dan Van Hekken was also named to the Honorable mention team off the bench. Merritt's season was partially overlooked due to Holstege's outstanding performance, but is quite impressive itself. The 6'6" forward-center was a starter all season and averaged 10.2 points, 7.6 rebounds, and a record 3.3 blocks per game. He was tied for first in the league in both rebounds and blocked shots. Next year's team looks to be successful as well, as they graduate only three players. "We are going to lose a lot of personalities that meshed real well, but we have a lot of good players that will step up to fill their shoes next year," said Van Wieren.

lowing past his Cornerstone College opponent, freshman Mark Bray drives to the basket for a score. Because of his success with the jayvee team. Bray was invited to play on the championship team. (PR Photo)

by Glyn Williams

Basketball

1 4 1


Hi

A streaky start and a strong finish lead t o a

victoryrun After a tremendously streaky start, the varsity women's basketball team pulled themselves together and made a surprising run at the MIAA championship. The team finished fourth in the league in the regular season, but battled hard to win in the tournament only to lose in the championship game against Alma College, 65-56. The Flying Dutch used an upset over Calvin College, 50-47 in the second round of the tournament to propel them into the championship game. Finishing with a record of 15-12 overall, 7-5 in the league, first-year head coach Brian Morehouse was extremely proud of his girls and the improvement they made over the course of the season. "We cut down on our turnover down the stretch, improved our shooting, and just got better," he said. "I am very proud of my kids and they have had a great year. They just care so much." After starting the season with two blowouts to Division 11 teams Ferris State and Grand Valley, the Flying Dutch won their next four games in a row. After losing a few more, they took control of their own destiny and won three straight MIAA games, before once again letting themselves slip behind and losing three straight. Their roughest game of the season was a loss to MIAAmember-to-be Defiance, 92-51.

That game was a big turning point in the season, as they went on to win six of their next nine games to close out the season. Going into the game against Defiance, Morehouse felt a switch was needed in his starting lineup of they were to become more successful in the second half of the league season. That switch was to bump junior Tara Hosford and freshman sensation Lisa Hoekstra up from the bench. The move must have jarred something lose in Hosford's shooting hand, as in her second game as a starter she lit up Alma for 17 points on Feb. 5. Hope won that game, 65-61. Her numbers were good enough to make her a member of the second team A1I-M1AA. but she will have to replace the departing A1I-M1AA first team captain Timmer. "It will be a big step for me," she said. "I know I have a lot to learn and I know that I will never be like Timmer, but she has taught me a lot and has been a very good role model for me," said Hosford. The combination of the coaching talents of Morehouse and the fact that the '96-'97 team graduated only two seniors makes the Flying Dutch look like a formidable foe for next year. "If there were a coach of the year award in this league, Brian Morehouse should get it without question," said Alma head coach Charles Goffnet. "He has done some phenomenal things with his team and they have improved so much since the beginning of the year. They are going to be a very good team next year for sure.'

by Glyn Williams

1 4 2

Basketball

irborne, Renee Carlson launches a shot towards the basket against Kalamazoo College. The team rolled over the Hornets, defeating them in each of their meetings. (PR Photo) Above Left: Women's basketball began as the "Basquet Club" in 1905, but not until 1979 did the team compete in the MIAA. (Milestone Archives)

urrounded by her teammates, junior Renee Carlson voices her pleasure with her team's victory Carlson led the team with a season-high 21 points. (PR Photo)


ending off her opponent from Trinity Christian College, junior Tara Hosford maintains her position. The successful defense continued throughout the game, giving the team a three-point win. (PR Photo)

KS etermined despite the hand extended to deter her, junior Christine Eding forges on towards the basket. Eding's determination and team-high assists boosted her teammate's performance. (PR Photo)

Front Row: J o h a n n a LaGore, Danielle M a n n e s , Lisa Hoekstra. Rachel P o s t m u s , Lisa T i m m e r . Danielle Hop, J e n n i f e r Oosting. Mistine L o w r y . Darcy Zeh; S e c o n d R o w : head coach Brian M o r e h o u s e , assistant coach M i c h e l e S c h o o n , j u n i o r varsity coach W a y n e Tanis, Kristen Hosford, Tara Hosford, Christine Eding, Tara Porter, Renee Carlson, stu-

Team Standings Olivet Nazrene 59-49 Cornerstone 62-49 Alma 51-54 Albion 65-57 Olivet 83-47 Kalamazoo 5844 Adrian 72-78 Calvin 49-57 Defiance 51-92 Alma 65-61 Albion 63-38 Olivet 71-47 Kalamazoo 59-53 Adrian 47-54 Calvin 56-59 MIAA Tournament 60-57 MIAA Tournament 50-47 MIAA Tournament 56-65

dent assistant Daruis Randall, student assistant Jodi Royer. and assistant A n n Neucks.

Basketball

1 4 3


n near-perfect form, Bill Malpass springs off the starting block ahead of his Calvin opponent. Hope finished two places ahead of Calvin at the MIAA Championships. (PR Photo)

With f e w r e t u r n i n g s e n i o r s t o iead t h e s u c c e s s f u i t e a m , young • swimmers are m m

steppmgup With only three f seniors on the men's swimming and diving teams, head coach John Patnott knew he would have to rely on some young swimmers for his team to succeed. "We have lots of new people and the new people can step up but they need to learn what college swimming is all about," Patnott said. "Some growth has to take place and for that we need leadership from the upperclassmen." For that leadership Patnott turned to a trio of captains: seniors Bill Malpass, Luke Pinkerton and Derek VandeHeide, in addition to returning thirteen letterwinners. The team finished in second place behind league powerhouse Kalamazoo and finished with an overall dual meet record of 4-2. The season began with the team taking a triangular meet from Alma College and Grand Valley State University with scores of 143-93 and 170-68 respectively. They also placed second in the University of Indianapolis Invitational. The team also scored victories over Calvin and Albion before

finishing second in the conference tournament. "We were a definite, solid second place," Patnott said. "Kalamazoo is very strong and we are a stronger than the third place team, so it was pretty much a given where we were going to finish." Qualifying for nationals were VanderHeide, freshman Jarod Lippert, and juniors Brandon Nyboer and Dan Shelley. VanderHeide qualified for Ail-American status by finishing sixth in the 100-yard freestyle and winning the consolation finals in the 50-yard freestyle, at the Division III Swimming and Diving Championships. Patnott was pleased with the progress of his younger swimmers as the season continued. "We have a lot of potential that needs to be developed and realized," Patnott said. "They're handling the work load well and learning the difference between high school and college swimming." "You always worry and hope we get better," Patnott said. "And we usually do." "I was pleased with how they did, but they're young and still have a long way to go," he said.

by Mike Z u i d e m a

1 4 4

Swimming

ith arms recovering for another pull, Dan Shelly breathes in rhythm with his stroke. Shelley swam on the 200 Freestyle Relay team that conditionally qualified for the NCAA Division III Championship. (PR Photo)

aving just finished a long race, Derek VanderHeide relaxes and catches his breath. VanderHeide earned AllAmerican distinction by finishing sixth in 100-yard freestyle at NCAA Championships. (PR Photo) Above Left: Swimming first appeared in the new Kresge Natatorium in 1979. (Milestone Archives)

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Team Standings Alma 143-93 Grand Valley 140-88 Calvin 127-79 Kalamazoo 80-160 Albion 103-83 Oakland 67-173 Wheaten Invlt. 4 (361.5) University of Indianapolis Invitational 2 (184) MIAA Championships 2 (442)

o l l o w i n g his 100-yard Butterfly race, Mike Porter tells C o a c h Patriot h o w he e d g e d out Calvin's s w i m m e r . C o a c h Patriot led his teams to MIAA Championships f o u r y e a r s i n a r o w . (PR P h o t o )

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[ rnnt R o w : Dan Daly. Mike Porter. Jon N e e b . Dave C l a n c y . Eric Bishop. Chris Prenlz. Kevin Kirkpatrick. Jason Harris, A d a m W e s s e i n g . Jarod Lippert. T o m B o w e n s ; Back Row: assistant coach Dave Bekker. Steve Breewer. Brandon Nyboer. Joe Z u p a n c i c . Jon W i e r e n g o . Troy A u m a u g n e r . L u k e Pinkerton. Derek V a n d e r h e i d e . Bill Malpass. Dan Shelley, student assistant A m y C h a m p a g n e , assistant coach Jim Mitchell, and head coach J o h n Patnott.

S w i m m i n g

1 4 5


ennifer Morford breathes, pulls, and kicks with her full effort trying to set a new personal best in the butterfly. The women's swimming team captured eighth place in the NCAA Division III Championships. (PR Photo)

Senior leadership and experience w a s essentiai, but t h e t e a m w a s e n h a n c e d by

A mixture of seasoned veterans and fresh faces dominated this year's women's swimming and diving teams. For the sixteenth time in eighteen years the Flying Dutch captured the conference title. Head coach John Patnott had plenty to smile about as seven members qualified for nationals. The team finished in eighth place overall at the NCAA Division III Swimming and Diving Championships. The fresh faced 200-yard freestyle relay team of freshmen Amy Bos, Adrienne Prince, Llena Durante, and Erinn Van Auken placed fifth overall at Nationals, qualifying for AilAmerican status. Van Auken also placed fifth in the 100-yard freestyle and third in the 200-yard medley relay with Durante and seniors Lindy Chelf and Melissa Theil. Van Auken completed her grand slam for the day by also finishing fifth in the 400-yard relay with Chelf, Durante, and Megan Hunter. "I was very pleased," Patnott

said. "You look at a young team with the women and they had the ability to handle the national meet and I was impressed with that. Most had lifetime bests, and you can't ask for any more than that." "The seniors did a terrific job of preparing the freshmen for national meet, and they should only get better," he said. The team began the season by defeating Alma and Grand Valley in a triangular meet. The team then finished second in the University of Indianapolis Invitational and defeated Olivet and Albion on their way to 6-1 overall record. Looking ahead to next season, Patnott is both pleased with the prospect of having such young talent and equally wary of losing the seniors. "Next year's seniors will have a big load to pick up," Patnott said. "The upperclassmen need to teach the underclassmen what college swimming is about and they have to be willing to do that. You can always replace points, but the quality of leadership is learned over four years. Coaches really depend upon upperclassmen leadership.'

by Mike Z u i d e m a

1 46

Swimming

rom the 3meter board. Laura Mihailoff impresses onlookers with a graceful back layout. Mihailoff and teammate Kari Jackson qualified for the 1-meter NCAA finals. (PR Photo) Above Left: Despite the lack of a team the women of the 1950's still found time to enjoy the water. (Milestone Archives)


Team Standings Alma 170-68 Grand Valley 139-103 Calvin 131-91 Olivet 94-67 Kalamazoo 136.5-106.5 Albion 111-92 Oakland 94-144 Dual Meet First MIAA 1 (594pts.)

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l o n e in the pool, Megan Thompson puts s o m e extra time in p r a c t i c i n g her breaststroke. The team c a p t u r e d f o u r of the t o p six f i n i s h e s in t h e 100-yard b r e a s t s t r o k e at the MIAA Championships. (PR P h o t o )

Front Row:

L a u r a Mihailoff, Emily Saalfeld, Jen M o r f o r d , Ilena Durante, A m y Bos,

M o n i c a S t u b b s , Erica G r a y , C o l l e n D o y l e , Jen G l i e s m a n , Emily S c h m i d t , M i c h e l l e Fangmeier, A d r i e n n e Prince; S e c o n d R o w ; assistant coach D a v e Bekker, Becca Potts, Meredith A r d w a y , M e g a n Clapp, Cindi Bannink, M e g a n Hunter, Melissa Theil, Lindy Chelf, Kari J a c k s o n , Michelle K r a m e r . Erinn Najar, student assistant A m y C h a m p a i g n e , assistant coach Jim Mitchell, and head coach John Patnott.

S w i m m i n g

1 4 7


unior Jeff MacDoniels returns a serve from his Calvin College opponent. The Dutch bested their rival Calvin in the regular season, but finished 1.5 points behind in the MIAA tournament. (PR Photo)

Making a run a t K a l a m a z o o ' s l e g a c y a l o n g with rival Calvin, t h e Dutch f i n i s h a

cl< ennis first appeared in the 1930 edition of the Milestone. That year a coach said "I think tennis will, within the next couple years, take the place of baseball as a major sport." While tennis has not actually replaced baseball, it is no less an important part of collegiate athletics. (Milestone Archives)

second

The men's tennis team continued its climb to the top of the conference and finally ending Kalamazoo's 60 plus years stronghold in NCAA Division III. Although Kalamazoo claimed its 59th consecutive MIAA championship, the Dutch turned in their best season performance ever in finishing tied for second place with rival Calvin College. The team finished the season with a school record fifteen victories and had double-digit victories for the third year in a row, a first under head coach Steve Gorno. The team ended with an overall 15-9 record and 4-1 in conference play. "From a coaches perspective we had more talent than in the five years that I have been here," Gorno said. Although the team finished tied for second with Calvin, the Flying Dutch did manage to defeat the Knights in their regular season meet on April 17, by a score of 8-1. "The Calvin match was the best match 1 have been involved

with in the five years I've been here," Gorno said. "They were put in a press, press situation and came through." The team was once again led by top ranked and returning AllMIAA selection junior Jeff MacDoniels, and co-captain, number two singles Saum Rahimi. MacDoniels and Rahimi combined for a 25-14 single record. Gorno also had praise for freshman Paul Lillie, who compiled a 15-5 singles mark. "He played incredibly tough. Normally as a freshman there is a learning curve, but he has really come through," he said. The team also posted victories against national foes, like the University of WisconsinOshkosh and Tufts, Mass. Despite a strong showing in conference and overall play, the team was denied a bid for the second straight year into the national tournament. "The way the schedule was set up, we played a lot of national and regional teams, and we really controlled our own destiny for nationals," Gorno said.

by Mike Z u i d e m a

1 4 8

Tennis

•

oncentrating on an incoming serve, Jeff MacDoniels readies his stance. As a junior, MacDoniels garnered AllMIAA honors for the second year in a row. (PR Photo)


s his partner Saum Rahimi serves the ball, Steve DeVrieze watches for his opponent's return. Rahimi received the Allen B. Stowe Sportsmanship award and was nominated to the first team All-MIAA for his outstanding season play. (PR Photo)

Western Michigan Ripen, Wise. Wabash, ind. Unv. Chicage Nerthweed N. Kentuckey Lew Ceuntry Univ. e f Seuth iii. Wesieyan Wise. Oshkesh Principia Tufts, Mass Wheaten DePauw, ind Weester, Oh Ohie Wesieyan Biufften Cernerstene Aquinas Calvin Kaiamazee Adrian Aima MiAA Teurnament Third

0-7 3-4 7-2 1-6 5-2 3-4 1-6 34 4-3 7-0 4-3 4-3 2-5 3-4 7-0 7-0 8-1 S-l 8-1 9-0 0-9 8-1 (67)

Front R o w : Eric Berg, C h a d Bollinger, Robert Brandt, S a u m R a h i m i . Jens Miloblinski, Steve DeVrieze; B a c k R o w : coach Steve G o m o , Jason G r i m m , Jeff M a c D o n i e l s , Paul S c h m u d e , Paul Lillie, E v v a n Llewellyn, Joe Van Fossan, and A n d r e w O h m ; Not Pictured: Bret C o o k .

Tennis

1 4 9


Stellar seniors close their c o l l e g e c a r e e r s while rr caicCkKiin ng g u u pp w w ii nn ss a a n n d a

newi

Three of the biggest names in women's tennis history finished on a high note during the 1997 season. Head coach Kathy Van Tubbergen ended her tenyear coaching reign with the team's second straight conference title and 17-5 overall record, undefeated in MIAA action. Senior Audrey Coates ended her four year hold on first singles by capturing her fourth straight conference title and advancing into the NCAA tournament for the fourth straight year. Coates ended the season with a 20-2 singles record and will leave with the career singles record of 87-17. She advanced to the second round of the NCAA's before being defeated. Becky Lucas also ended her career and hold on the number two singles position. She finished the year with a 16-7 singles record, and graduated with a career 68-24 record, good for third on the all-time list. Coates and Lucas qualified

01 s

for the NCAA tournament as a doubles team for the third year in a row. The pair advanced to the quarterfinals before losing. They left the team with a combined 7323 record playing together, good for the top spot on the College's record list. If Coates and Lucas represented what was, then freshman Jennifer Smith may represent what will be. "We had a lot of experience, but even the freshman had a lot of experience, not only from high school but from United States Tennis Association action," Van Tubbergen said. Smith ended the year with a 17-7 record and claimed the second doubles conference title with junior Erin Sowerby. Both were named to the All-League second team. "They were very enthusiastic and motivated. They looked to improve as a team and that made it fun," Van Tubbergen said. The team posted victories against St. Mary's, Ind. and Northwood, in addition to claiming the title at the Great Lakes Colleges Tournament.

by Mike Z u i d e m a iscussing a previous match, sophomore Joy Green works out an improved strategy with coach Van Tubbergen. Marking her tenth season as coach, Van Tubbergen led her ladies to the top. (PR Photo)

1 5 0

Tennis

etting ready for blistering serve, Becky Lucas sets the match in motion. Lucas, along with Audrey Coats, made three consecutive appearances in the NCAA tournament. (PR Photo)

unning for a save on the back court, Jenny Esterline returns to her Calvin College opponent. Esterline was one of the trio of freshman that look hopeful as the future of the team. (PR Photo) Above Left: Long a favorite recreational activity for women on campus, tennis was one of the first organized into an official collegiate sport. (Milestone Archives)


xecuting a backhand stroke, sophomore Joy Green attempts to seal her match in the MIAA tournament. The team captured first place and sent two players on to NCAA play. (PR Photo)

L e f t t o R i g h t : C o a c h Cathy VanTubbergan, A u d r e y Coates, Becky Lucas, Erin Sowerby, J e n n y Esterline, Jen Smith, Jessica Mulder, and Joy G r e e n .

Team Standings Aquinas 9-0 Oakland S-l Alma 9-0 Ferris 4-5 Albion 8-1 Kalamazoo 6-3 Calvin 6-3 St. Mary's, Ind. 5-4 Olivet 9-0 Adrian 9-0 Oberlin 8-1 Denison 6-3 DePauw 5-3 DePauw 1-8 Carleton 6-3 MIAA First Place

Tennis

1 5 1


Ittf Team Standings Maryville, Tenn. Maryvilie, Tenn. Wooster, Ohio Ripen, Wise. Ripen, Wise. Ripen, Wise. Aurora, Hi. Aurora, iil. Berea Aquinas Adrian Adrian Adrian Cernerstene Aibien Elmhurst, Hi. Caivin Calvin Calvin Aibien Aibien Kaiamazee Kaiamazee Kaiamazee Aquinas Judsen, Mi. Cencerdia, ill. Cenderdia, ill. Olivet Olivet Olivet Grand Valley Alma Alma Alma

hrowing high fives to teammates, the excited players celebrate a victory over the Knights. The team t r o u n c e d C a l v i n in t h r e e v i c t o r i e s , o u t - s c o r i n g t h e m b y 7 r u n s in t h e s e r i e s . (PR P h o t o )

F r o n t Row: Dave Miller, Beau Batten, Paul Cotts, Brock Isanhart, Mike Brya, Matt Klein, D.J R e y b u m , Jeremy Beard, Josh M c M a n i s , RyanTanis; Second Row: coach Tryg Johnson, m a n a g e r Matt Garvelink. Todd Lucas, Joe Fitzsimmons, Jeremy Gasper, Ben Fellows, Jim Dobbins, Matt McMurray, Justin Krupsky, Curl Kesler, Todd Harb; T h i r d R o w : coach Ron Boeve, coach Chris G r e i m a n , coach Steve Miller, Dave Uyl, Dean Esteves, A d a m Lubbe, Frank Quealy, M i k e M e e v w s e n , Matt Vriesenga, C h a d Ruby, and coach Stu Fritz.

1 5 2

B a s e b a l l

4^.


A f t e r a rough s t a r t t o t h e s e a s o n , spring b r e a k ttraining r a i n i n g led iea t10 o a quick quicK

turn ro nd The

a mpting to strike out the batter, senior Josh McManus launches a fastball toward home plate. McManus' low ERA sparked a perfect win-loss record in the MIAA. (PR Photo)

lanning his sprint home, junior Todd Lucas focuses on the ball. Extra effort in base running lead the team to a nearly-perfect league record (PR photo). Above right: A member of the 1919 team heads to the field for some action in one of the oldest campus sports. (Joint Archives Collection)

Flying Dutchmen baseball team took the Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association by storm, losing only one game throughout the duration of league play. The team finished the regular season 19-12 overall, 11-1 in the MIAA. Behind a starting pitching rotation that lost only two games all season, including non-league play, the team played defense to beat their opponents, but mustered out quite a bit of offense along the way. "Our whole pitching staff was great all season, but we couldn't have won any games without our hitting," said senior Josh McMannis. "There were games where I struggled and the bats were swinging well, so we won the game and that's baseball." The Dutchmen started the season slow, winning their first game but then losing their next five in a row during their spring trip to Panama City. After flipping back and forth from win to loss throughout the preseason, they finally got on a roll once league play started in early April. In fact, at that point the Dutch won their next ten straight game to improve their overall record to 14-9, a big turn around from being 1-5 at one point in the season. The team reached .500 with a 5-1 victory over Albion on Friday, April 4, and they never

looked back from there. "This year was the fastest we have reached .500 after spring break since I've been a coach here," said head coach Stu Fritz. Fritz led the Dutchmen to the MIAA championship in 1994, his first year with the team. The most amazing thing about the Dutchmen was the fact that they were such a young team. In fact, there were only five seniors on the squad, none of whom were starters. The team even started one freshman, Ben Fellows, and relied s the umpire calls him safe, heavily on sophomore Mike Brya crosses closer home plate after a double by Curtis teammate Chad Ruby. Brya and Kesler all Ruby helped their team play into season. the league's top spot. (PR Photo) Kesler responded well to the challenges he faced in his first season as he had four saves in 15 games. Through his first ten innings pitching in league games, Kesler had given up no earned runs. "Kesler is heck of a ball player and he is only going to get better as time goes by," Fritz said. "We have a lot of young, talented guys on this team and we should be a solid contender in the league for another couple years."

by Glyn Williams

Baseball

1 5 3


Team Standings Montclair State, N.J. S t o c k t o n State, N J . Illinois Wesieyan Grinneli, Iowa Ripen, Wise. Wisc.-Platteville Springfield, Mass. Alma Alma Grand Valley Grand Valley Ferris Ferris Adrian Adrian Saint Mary's Ind. Saint Mary's Ind. Kalamazoo Kalamazoo Calvin Calvin Albion Albion Olivet Olivet MIAA Tournament

JI

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f ••• <•

rying to elude the catcher's

-

t a g , Tara

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Blackquiere slides forcefully into h o m e to beat the ball. Blackquiere's

i r,

run helped the team defeat the B r i t o n s . (PR Photo)

Front R o w ; Heather Ozinga, Cory D o w n i n g , L i s a T i m m e r ; S e c o n d Row: Wendy Kooiker, Christa Murphy, Kim M o r g a n , Renee Carlson, Angie Barnes, G i n a Zanin, Sarah Warber, Sara Frego, Tara Blackquiere; Third Row: coach Karla Wolters, Kathryn Ncihols, Erin B e c k m a n , Heather Roy, Melissa Surian, Sarah Paccioni, Lisa Larzelere, Kristi Langland, Tasha Guild, and assistant coach Barb Grass.

1 5

4

S o f t b a l l

M

24 0' M


espite the catcher's objections, sophomore Gina Zanin crosses home for the run. Run production never was a problem for the team and a 14run match against Albion in the MIAA tournament marked the biggest output for the season. (PR Photo)

A dedicated team found t h a t , in t h e e n d winning c o nmi e s rrom from

work

After

8 aining as she delivers her pitch, sophomore Lisa Larzelere works for a shut-out. The outstanding player finished the season with more than twice the wins of the next pitcher. (PR photo) Above right: Making its first appearance in the 1979 Milestone, Softball continued the expansion of women's sports (Milestone Archives).

high rankings and even higher hopes going into the 1997 season, the softball team had trouble with tougher league opponents. Early in the season head coach Karla Wolters felt comfortable with her team's performance despite the tough losses they suffered in the early goings. "We're a young, enthusiastic, hard working team that enjoys being together," she said. "And those things will start to pay off." Pay off they did, in fact as the team finished the regular season with a 20-11 overall record, 8-4 in the Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association. The Lady Dutch started the season with smoothly, winning six of their first eight games and seemed destined to do well all throughout the year. However, tragedy struck when they faced tough Alma to open the league, as the Scots took two from the Dutch by a combined score of 21-5. Grand Valley followed suit in sweeping the Dutch and before they knew it their record had dropped to 6-6 overall. Then the women caught fire, winning eight of their next nine and jumping back out to a 14-7 record. After trading losses with

wins, the Dutch ended the season with four straight wins over Albion and Olivet respectively. The pitching was mainly placed in the hands of sophomore Lisa Larzelere, who played well all season, ending her sophomore season with a 14-7 record. Her earned run average was a low 2.18 entering the MIAA tournament, having pitched 18 complete games in 19 starts. Sophomore Erin Beckman also pitched for the Dutch, finishing the season with a 6-4 record and a 3.28 ERA. At the plate the team was led by senior stand-out Lisa Timmer, a co-captain of the team. She batted .400 for the season, with 18 runs batted in, six doubles, and struck out only seven times in 85 at bats. Her .448 batting average in league games was seventh best and she was one of just five players who hit a home run in the league season. Timmer also led her team defensively, with only one error and three assists in the outfield for a fielding percentage of .97. Senior Heather Ozinga, the other team captain had an excellent season at the plate as well, batting .337 with 13 RBI and five doubles. The senior shortstop led the Dutch in assists with 67 and scored a fielding percentage of .91.

by Giyn Wiiiiams

Softball

1 5

5


e a d i n g t h e field of r u n n e r s in t h e 3,000 Meter Run, s e n i o r Dan Bannick claims another win. Bannlck was the year's best o u t d o o r p e r f o r m e r In t h e o n e m i l e , 3,000, 5,000 a n d 10,000 Meter R u n s . (PR P h o t o )

Team Standings Hope Invitational Third Washington University Invitational Sixth MIAA H e l d Day Sixth Alma 58-98 Olivet 10840 Calvin 49-105 Adrian 73-81 Albion 46-106

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F r o n t R o w : J e r e m y Stoner, Jeff K a u f m a n , Joel Smith, Dan B a n n i c k , M i k e C r a m n e r , Matt Anderson, Scott Morehouse, Matt Putman; S e c o n d R o w : Joel Nemeth, Chris Kerrins, Paul Berke, Tim B e n s o n , Matt H a n d z o , Alex R u c h . B o b R u t h e r f o r d . J a s o n Haid. D a v e D e H o m m e h T h i r d R o w : c o a c h M i k e Ricketts, J e r e m y Rice, Kevin Fitton, Luke Smith. Paul B a l l a r d , A a r o n V a n d e W e g e . J o n R e e v e s , S c o t t D e r b y . J e r e m y B o g a r d , S h a y P r o v e n z a n o , c o a c h M a r k Northuis, asst. c o a c h M e l i s s a M o d e r m a n , c o a c h D o n n a Eaton.

earing gloves to protect his hands from the cold spring weather, junior Tim Franklyn leads r u n n e r s In t h e 5 , 0 0 0 M e t e r R u n . (PR P h o t o )

1 5 6

T r a c k


The only t e a m with a n a p p e a r a n c e a t t h e NCAA s p r i n g tournament^ s e n i o r Dan Bannick m a k e s a

careerrun

assing his opponent from Alma College, sophomore Matt Putnam glides over a hurdle in the 110 Meter Hurdles. Putnam's performance helped the team finish ahead of the Scots at the Hope Invitational. (PR Photo) Above Right: Taking their place in College history as the fastest men in Holland, members of the track team in the mid-1920's left classmates in dust of the trails around campus. (Milestone Archives)

T o spend the better part of the spring semester outside is not as fun as it sounds, especially if you are running most of the day. Such is the life of a member of the track team, a highly underappreciated sport that produced the only NCAA Division III qualifier of all spring sports. Senior Dan Bannink ran the 5,000 meter run in an unprecedented time of 14:53.70, the best in the MIAA and a College record. "It was a good time being a senior this year and one of the captains," Bannink said. "The season didn't necessarily go as well as we had all hoped, but that's the way it goes sometimes, I suppose." The highest the Dutchmen finished in any invitational was the one they hosted at the Ekdal J. Buys Athletic Field. The team finished third with 80.5 points, behind Calvin College and Grand Valley State, who scored 116 and 103 respectively. However, the men flew past Olivet and Adrian at dual meets during the season. The team blew out Olivet 108-40. and slid past the Bulldogs 81-73. To start their season, the Dutchmen traveled down to the Springtime Invitational at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia. The team finished 16th in a field of 20 teams that featured Auburn University, Emory, and Georgia, to name a few. The Washington University Invitational went smoother for the Flying Dutchmen, who

finished sixth in a field of 17 teams. "There were some tough teams competing there," coach Mark Northuis said. "There were some NAIA and Division II teams there and we (were) working through some injuries and we had some people miss the meet with research reports." At the MIAA Field Day, which the team hosted this year, the men finished fifth, eaping through the air above the beating sand pit, junior Scott Morehouse only Olivet, tries for a personal best and first with 45 place at the Hope Invitational meet. points, to (PR Photo) Calvin's league-leading 191 points. Throughout the season Calvin served as the team's biggest competitor, beating the team in the dual meet as well as winning both invitationals the two teams competed in together. "Calvin (was) well-balanced and very strong in the throws and jumps," Northuis said. "We make up for it in our sprints and relays and we could hold up to them in the distances.'

by Glyn Williams

Track 1 5 7


D e s p i t e imury a n d illness, t h e Lady Dutch post a

solldeff" "ft The women's track team had a more successful season than their male counterparts. There were three Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association individual champions to come out of the squad in 1997. They were sophomore Amy Cook, who won in the long jump, freshman Amanda Heydon, who won the 400 meter dash with a time of :59.58 and junior Ellen Schultz in the 5,000 meter run with a time of 18:40.0. Senior Rebecca Spencer was the sole captain of the team and found her season to be satisfying, in the end, "It was pretty cool being on this team with these women," she said. "I had a good time and we won a couple dual meets and finished high in a couple Invitationals. You know, we didn't do great, but it was a good season all the way." At the MIAA Field Day near the end of the season, the team finished third with 88 points, behind Calvin and Alma, who scored 231 points and 158 points

respectively. Calvin and Alma both beat the Flying Dutch in dual meets during the season as well, and the team also lost to Albion during the season in a dual meet. However, the Dutch flew past Olivet 121-18 in a dual meet and beat Adrian 98-43. The Washington University Invitational in St. Louis, Missouri was also a bright spot for the Lady Dutch, who finished fourth in a field of 16 teams. Head coach Donna Eaton was pleased with her team's performance at the Invitational, considering that many people on the team were suffering through an exceptionally long flu season at the time. "We were hurting at the time, both mentally and physically," she said in retrospect. "1 was surprised and proud that we did so well after all that the team had been through during the previous couple of weeks." The team looks forward to next year when experience will be on their side. The lessons learned throughout the year will allow the team to focus on areas needing improvement.

by Glyn Williams iking the hurdles, Erica Perez catches her challenger from Alma College. Perez was one of the many freshmen that made up the young team. (PR Photo)

1 5 8

Track

and

Field

triving to beat her best time of 15.20 in the 100 meters. Amy Cook battles for the lead. Cook was the year's best not only in the 100 and 400 meter hurdles, but also in the long j u m p and triple jump. (PR Photo) Above Left: Although not an official team, women compete in track and field events in the early 1930's. (Milestone Archives)

attling for a position, Megan Powers and Jenny Ernst, set a pace in the race. Ernst, a freshman, was the year's best outdoor performer in the mile and 500 meter run. (PR Photo)


Team Standings Hope Invitational Fourth MIAA Field Day Third Alma 48-97 Olivet 121-18 Adrian 98-43 Calvin 32.5-112.5 Albion 64-81 Alma 143-93 Grand Valley 140-88 Calvin 127-79 Kalamazoo 80-160 Albion 103-83 Oakland 67-173 4(361.5) Wheaton invitl. University of Indianapolis Invitational 2(184) MIAA Championships 2(442)

Front R o w : Hazel Lauson, A m a n d a H e y d o n , G r e t c h e n S c h o o n , A s h l e y Pries, Kimberly Richar dson. Hilary R e y e n g a ; S e c o n d R o w : Katie Elverson. J e n n i f e r Ernst, Becky T i m m e r , Susan Miller, Sarah Carpenter, A m y C o o k , Ellen Schultz, Erin Shiel, Susan K i n g m a ; B a c k Row; Mike Richets, Mark Northuis, M e g a n Powers, Jaclyn O m e e , Molly Griebe, Carrie Langstraat, Bekki Spencer, Sarah Kuipers, Jen Kasperski, Erica Perez. Melissa M o d e r m a n . and coach D o n n a Eaton; Not Pictured: Erin K ocour ek. Elena Durante, and Erin Barrone.

Track

and

Field

1 5 9


small disagreement and a big rivalry find sophomore Cory Curtis and his Calvin College opponent face to face. The addition of the hockey team to Dutch athletics began a new chapter in the Hope-Calvin rivalry. (Photo by Anthony Perez)

tudents, faculty and community members cheer is support of the team's first ever goal on the ice against the University of Michigan. The newest group of fans turned out by the hundreds in support of the long awaited hockey team. (Photo by Anthony Perez)

1 6 0

Hockey


S t u d e n t s hit t h e ice f o r t h e f i r s t t i m e in t h e s t a r t of a

newtradition ophomore Paul Loodeen chases after the puck in attempt to regain control of the game. The Dutch gained much needed experience in their first match against the club team from the University of Michigan. Above, junior goaltender Dean Thayer plays great defense against the well rehearsed U of Wl team. (Photos by Anthony Perez)

egammg possession of the puck, sophomore Cory Curtis races to the opposite end of the rink to attempt a goal. The new hockey team fared well throughout the season, especially against teams from the larger state universities. The experience these teams provided the Dutch forced them to grow as a team and prepare them for the upcoming year. (Photo by Anthony Perez)

F o r the first time in history, students, faculty, staff and community members were able to see themselves represented on the ice. Lack of a team was the only problem when Alan Thorpe, Ryan Cook, and Troy Davis, decided they wanted to hit the ice, especially for their school. In early 1995, they began to go through the college hierarchy to become a club sport. "Eons," Cook said. "It took us forever. We had to find out everything and write a constitution," he said. They found an ice rink in Grand Rapids, put up $500 each for equipment, and raised $13,000 from alumni before approaching the boards and committees. After approval, 23 players whose hockey experience ranged from Junior A hockey to beginners joined the team. "Our team is large by high school standards," Cook said. "But it worked out well. We were starting up a team with some old guys who haven't played in four or five years. People couldn't play due to injury. We had people to rotate in constantly." The team was guided by volunteer coaches Jerri Corretti and Chad Rowe. "The coaches did an excellent job. We hope that they can both come back next year," Cook said. The team played and eleven game schedule which include club teams from bigger schools like the University of Michigan, and Grand Valley University. The founding of the team began a new chapter in the historic rivalry began between

•

the Flying Dutch and the Knights of Calvin, this time recorded with the blades of ice skates. In two games this season against Calvin, there was no lack of intense, hard hitting action. The crowds came to watch the new Dutch and the more experienced Knights. "They were an established team and we entered the scene. They were anxious to scuttle with us. When we played our first game there were 1,500 people packed three deep around the rink," Cook said. Highlights of the season included the first goal in Hope College hockey history. It was scored in the first period of the game against the University of Michigan by sophothe first face-off of the game, sophomore Alan Thorpe knocks more Paul the puck from the University of Loodeen, Michigan toward his teammates. unassisted. The Dutch went on to score the The first first point of the game. (Photo by win came Anthony Perez) on the road against Lawrence Tech, 8-2. The winning goal tender was freshman Paul Cusack. For the season, the leader in scoring was sophomore Cory Curtis, with 7 goals, 4 assists, in 10 games. Other crowd favorites throughout the season included Alan Thorpe. Mike Stapleton, Tony LaSorsa, Matt Tailford, Shane Hansen. Jeremy Dobos, and Kevin Lewis.

by Troy Davis a n d Amanda Black Hockey

1 6 1


A

a football game early In the season against Valparaiso, Jeff "Spanky" Amlotte leads students and other football fans in cheers supporting the success of the team. Amlotte, a junior, is well known around the campus and community for his energetic, faithful support of many sports teams throughout the year. (PR Photo)

It 1 6 2

People


J

C

e

i

a o v ^ i T

EVENTS OF EACH YEAR.

ESTONE HAS CHRONICLED BOTH THE UNIQUE AND TRADITIONAL

SENIORS FACED THE CHALLENGE AND EXCITEMENT OF

ENDING THEIR COLLEGE CAREERS. WHILE THE FRESHMEN FACED THE BEGINNING OF THEIRS. FROM THE FIRST DAY OF ORIENTATION TO GRADUATION DAY THESE TIMELESS COLLEGE EXPERIENCES TAUGHT STUDENTS HOW TO WORK, STUDY AND EXPERIENCE LIFE WITH A BROADER VISION.

WHILE THE STUDENT BODY OF 1997 HAD

EXPERIENCES LIKE NO OTHER, THEY ALSO EXPERIENCED WHAT CONNECTS ONE GENERATION OF STUDENTS TO THE NEXT THE TIMELESS EVENTS IN THE LIVES OF ALL STUDENTS, FROM SENIORS TO FRESHMEN, BRING TOGETHER THE STUDENT BODIES FROM 1917 TO 1997 ^

People

1 6 3


h o p e

c o l l e g e

seniors—

Abbott

Alexander

1

Robert J. Abbott Waterford

Music & English

J a l a a Abdelwahab Al-Bireh, P a l e s t i n e

Biology

Cynthia E. Achterhof F a i r f a x , VA .... P o l i t i c a l Science

Tara L. Ackerman St. Joseph

Nursing

L. Scott A. Ackerson Mason

Geology

A f s h l n K. A f a r l n F o r t Wayne, IN

Biochemistry

Thomas R. Akland Niskayuna, NY

Biology

J e n n i f e r M. Alexander Ortonville

Psychology

Are you not sure what to major in? Did you not get the classes you wanted or needed? These could be a couple of the reasons that finishing college in five years is becoming more common. Would having an idea about what to major in help a student finish in only four years? Some would say yes and others would say finishing in four years accounts for individuals motivation and promptness. For many majors it is helpful to have an

idea of a career path. For example, if a student were interested in the nursing program there are prerequisite biology and anatomy classes that should be started freshman year. This is not only true of this major but also many other majors. As one student states, his motivation during his freshman is what kept him from graduating in four years. "I wish 1 didn't clown around so much my freshman year and didn't come in undecided," stated Mark Proff. He says that limited class choices and when he did take a certain class, another one was needed once he declared his major. Proff also states that it is not only coming in undecided that makes being a fifth year senior difficult. He feels awkward because most of his friends have already graduated and he is still here. Besides changing a major, time is lessened when a student transfers from another college, as did Jen Hawkinson. Hawkinson transferred here her junior year. "Being a nursing major, living

timing . it. just right by erica perez

1 6 4

Senior

Class

off campus and being a fifth year senior will be more beneficial and easier to make the transition into the 'real world,"' says Hawkinson. "That the whole 'college' atmosphere gets old real fast." She hopes that future students will take their time and not worry about changing their minds just to finish in four years. Another junior year transfer student transfer feels the same way. "I wish I wouldn't have done it," stated Marianna Kissinger. "Don't get me wrong, 1 like it here, but at the end of last year 1 was just ready to get outta here and on with my life." Whether it is not getting a good start with classes, changing majors, transferring, or simply lacking motivation that keeps a student longer than four years, it is not uncommon. More students are struggling to fit every class needed in four years. Hawkinson's advice to students is to take their time and do not be afraid to change their mind. "There is plenty of time to finish what you are really interested i n . " ^


h o p e

c o l l e g e

seniors

Allison 1 9

9

Bovenkerk

7

Amy E. Allison Lisle, IL

I

Art

Megan E. Anderson Bradenton, FL ... Business Admin.

Robert James Andretz St. James ... Biology & Psychology

Emily J. Appleby Middlesex, NJ

Music

Heather D. Balr Zeeland

Biology

Daniel E. Bannlnk Holland

Religion

Matthew A. Barton S t e r l i n g Heights

Physics

Anne M. Bartuszevlge Howell

Biology

L

John R. Bateman Kanana, HI

Special Education

Jeremy D. Beard Grand Rapids

Business Admin.

Jaml S. Becksvoort Holland

Religion

Mlndy L. Beetham Middleville

Education

Bruce W. Bennett Jr. Tawas City

Language Arts

Melissa J. Berends Jension

Business & Economics

Chad E. Betz Portage

Chemistry & Biology

Lelanne J. Blehl South Holland, IL .... Social Work

Rachel N. Blerllng Ada

Chemistry & Spanish

Krlstlna R. Blauser Brunswick, OH

Education

Lisa M. Bos Zeeland

P o l i t i c a l Science

Stephen D. Bovenkerk South Holland, IL

Senior

Class

Biology

1 6 5


h o p e

c o l l e g e

seniors—-

Bowman

1

9

Checkllck

'9

Joanna J. Bowman Portage

Biology

Allna B. Boyadjieva Sofia, B u l g a r i a Business A d m i n i s t r a t i o n & German

Joel A. Brandt Grand Rapids Economics & Business A d m i n i s t r a t i o n

Heidi J. Bronkema Niles

Vocal Performance

Heather E. Brown Grosse Point Farms Arts Composite

Language

Jeffery D. Brown Grand Rapids

Art

Jason M. Bucata Dexter

Computer Science

Nathanel F. Buckley Westerville, OH

Dance

Brooke E. Budde Bloomfield H i l l s

Biology

Cindy A. Buonopane Lincoln, MA & Mathematics

Economics

Elizabeth A. Burton Portage

French

Julie L. Butts Music Education

Grand Haven

James R. Butz Ottawa Lake Education & Spanish

Mark S. By land Fremont

Chemistry

Carrie L. Car ley Brighton

Communications

Matthew D. Carr Portage P o l i t i c a l Science

Chemistry &

Christopher J. Casey Fremont

Computer Science

Trudy A. Cavanagh Midland

Biology

Erin L. Chatelaln Portage

Accounting

Susan C. Checkllck Poughkeepsie, NY . Theatre Design

1 6 6

Senior

Class

?!


h o p e

c o l l e g e

seniors

Cohen

Lindy M. Chelf Wooster, OH Elementary Education & Psychology

Michael S. Chesser Grand Rapids

Accounting

Hasan S. Choudhry Algonquin, IL

Psychology

Peter K. Chrlstensen Grand Rapids

Biology

Kristin A. Clark Port Huron

History & French

Nicole R. Clements Alma

Psychology

Audrey D. Coates Holland

Engineering Physics

Marcy R. Cohen Newport Rlchey, FL... Sociology & I n t e r n a t i o n a l Studies

The engineering and dance departments have one thing in common, and now NASA knows what it is. Senior Jodi James is the first student here to possess this unusual marriage of majors. Now, her love of the two has helped James to catch the attention NASA. It all started last fall when James was taking an engineering design class and decided to investigate the effects of weightlessness on the body's psychomotor skills for a research project. When the human body is weightless, it naturally wants to curl up in a fetal position, she said. "This has been a problem since the dawn of the space age," James said, especially with improving technology that allows astronauts larger quarters in space. The lack of gravity makes movement awkward and physically taxing for astronauts. James' ideas spread further than Peale Science Center when she entered them in the Texas Space Grant Consortium's competition last semester. She

was chosen as one of 25 winners for the 1997 NASA Reduced Gravity Students Flight Opportunities Program. Dr. John Krupczak Jr., the group's faculty advisor, believes the exposure is a good thing for the college's reputation. "You could say it will rocket us into national recognition," Krupczak said. This accomplishment is particularly noteworthy considering that James' group was up against institutions that already have research relationships with NASA. Upon completing their flight training, they will fly aboard NASA's Bowing KC-135A, which simulates zero-gravity conditions. Instead of focusing on the entire body, NASA recommended that James isolate one body part, and she has chosen the knee. "We'll study how the knee flexes throughout the points of the gravitational field that you experience in the KC-135A airplane," said James. The dancer is not alone in her pursuits — her accompanying

research team is hard at work as well. The six students involved are seniors Chris Bigler, Peter Ganeff, Audrey Coates, Luke Pinkerton, Rich Sturmfels, and freshman Phil Leete. Three students are currently designing and building the system that will be used to collect the data, while the other three will create the knee brace to be used in the actual experiment with NASA.

walk in the clouds by amy strassburger

Senior

Class

1 6 7


h o p e

c o l l e g e

seniors

Colonbrander

1 9

Anne M. Colenbrander Holland

Psychology

Patrick E. Collins Montague

Special Education

William C. Convay III Fremont

Chemistry

Ryan T. Cook Grand Rapids Economics & Business A d m i n i s t r a t i o n

Michael J.Cranmer Spring Lake

Business Admin.

Lauren R. Crawley Oxford

Spanish

Marka Jo Cross Hamilton Music Performance

Chemistry &

Jeffery P. Crouch Niles

P o l i t i c a l Science

d

edicated soccer fans raise a flag in salute of the team's Australian members at a game early in the season. Brothers Darren and Sean Toohey came from down under to play for the championship team and helped lead them to yet another MIAA title. (PR Photo)

1 6 8

Senior

Class

Crouch 9

7


h o p e

c o l l e g e

seniors

Cupp 1 9

9

Duff

7

Teresa C. Cupp Mendon Sociology

Communications &

Daniel G. Cwlk Barrington, IL

History

William J. Day VI Fremont

Engineering Physics

Sarah C. De Haan Jenison

Education

Kyle J. DeHorn A l l e n d a l e . . . Biology & Education

Scott T. DeKupler Grand Haven

Accounting

Rebecca J. Denlson Milwaukee, WI

Art

Debra R. DeVrles Elgin, IL ... Nursing & Psychology

Peter M. DeYoung Jenison

Chemistry

Christopher J. DeYoung Kentwood

Elizabeth M. Dickinson Kirkwood, MO

Kinesiology

Heather A. Dlllabough Glenview, I I

Business Admin.

Daniel J. Dlllbeck Holland

P o l i t i c a l Science

James L. Dobbins Marshall

Business Education

Jeremy Russell Dobos Valley View, OH . Business Admin.

Thomas P. Doran Mason... Business Administration

Jason C. Doublesteln Petoskey

Biology

Janet S. Doughty Portage

English

Corrlne M. Downing Ludington

Special Education

Victoria R. Duff Montage

Senior

Business Admin.

Class

1 6 9


Duperon

John J. Duperon Cedar

Computer Science

Klmberly B. Eckert Berea, OH

Communications

J.J. Ekkens Grand Rapids

Chemistry

Eric R. Elsholz Dundee

Chemistry & Biology

Jason J. Eshuls Kalamazoo

Business Admin.

Allison B. Etherldge Grand Rapids

Katharine A. Fansler Macomb

English & Music

David C. Feldmeler Portage

Accounting

Paul J. Ferrl Ortonvllle

Biology

Amy A. Fischer Flint

Psychology

Daniel F. Fischer Rochester, NY

Music

Nicole Kaye Fllnn Ionia Language Arts & Dance Education

Rebecca K. Flory Decator

Art

Amanda L. Flowers Canal Winchst, OH Communication

Gregory D. Folkert Mount P l e a s a n t Religion

Chemistry &

Alicia M. Fortlno Swartz Creek .... Communication & P o l i t i c a l Science

Tlfflnl L. Friday Acme

Math

Eric J. Friedman Niles

P o l i t i c a l Science

J. Matthew Frltsch Normal, IL

Biology

Naoya Fujlmoto Tokyo, Japan

1 7 0

Senior

Communication

Class


h o p e

c o l l e g e

—seniors

Gabriel

9

Gortsema

7

Sheryl S. Gabriel Burr Ridge, IL

Psychology

Peter W. Ganeff Chicago, IL . Chemistry & English

D. Chip George Holland

Geology & Business

Allison J. Gerds Royal Oak

Social Science

Kelly M. Gllroy Lansing

Exercise Science

LelghAnn Goodln Napervllle, IL

Nursing

Amy M. Goorhouse Otsego

Accounting

Thomas J. Gortsema Jr. Grand Rapids

A head start in the real world is a major concern for most college students. Many seniors are receiving this experience through internships which offer opportunities ranging from business to marketing and medical fields. Approximately 85 internships are offered each year, but many of these jobs go unfilled. This may be due to the fact that not all offer pay or the company may be small and can not give the student the type or experience or advantage they want. Senior Jill Mulder had an internship at the Holland Area Chamber of Commerce. "I feel that internships are useful," commented Mulder. "I had a vague business background, but this job has allowed me to increase my business knowledge and it has helped me get a foot in the door." There are not a lot of requirements to receive an internship. The applicant usually has to have completed their sophomore year in order to ensure they have completed course work in the field. It is also necessary to have the good writing skills.

dependability, and an ability to interact well with others that comes from the college classroom experience. "I recommend that all students take advantage of the opportunity they are given to explore an internship," said senior Benjamin Krombeen, who currently holds an internship as a credit assistant at Old Kent Bank. " My internship has created many opportunities for me. 1 think that it can help you get experience in what you want to do. But, also they can be used as a tool to help explore opportunities you were unsure of." For many students it takes a long time to find an internship and apply, however, the time is worth the experience. Krombeen added, "I would definitely use the opportunity, you get credit and a paycheck, it is hard to beat that."

Business

by kimberly richardson

credit nfor class, experience for life Senior

Class

1 7 1


h o p e

c o l l e g e

seniors—

Graff

1

9

9

Habedank 7

Shannon E. Graff Traverse City

Business

Julie R. Grahmann Verona, WI

German

Patience J. Graybill Edmore

English & German

Brooke Groendyke Kentwood

Business Admin.

Nathan A. Greenwood Dovaglac

Art

Marissa A. Greydanus Portage

Special Education

Anya E. Gurski Northvllle

Accounting

Denise E. Habedank Traverse City

t

Social Work

This year's Homecoming featured a hoedown at Tuesink's, float-building, and football, but the king and queen were forced for the first time to flash not only charm and good looks, but also their CPAs. "We wanted to ensure that the people nominated for the king and queen are a good representation of the school. It shouldn't be just anyone," said junior Kevin Randall. Associate Director of Social Activities Committee.

Criteria for king and queen candidates were hammered out in a controversial meeting of SAC. "This was not designed to exclude people," said senior Tyler Smith, Associate Chair of Traditional Activities. "But you want to put in people who are well-rounded, and these requirements allow for that." According to Smith, the homecoming court is not only an expression of student preferences. "[The court] represents Hope College for the alumni and faculty also," he said. "It is bigger than just the students. By putting in the requirements, we are lessening the chances of someone who shouldn't represent the College being on court." Any student or faculty member could nominate candidates, and after the first round of voting, the list was narrowed

sac sets rules on royalty by carrie tennant

1 7 2

Senior

Class

down to fourteen women and fourteen men. At that time. Student Development checked the list to see that all candidates met the requirements. Another round of voting cut the field to seven women and seven men, which formed the court. The king and queen were chosen from those candidates in a third round of voting. According to Tyler Smith, the idea of reforming the voting system really took off after last year's homecoming. "[The requirements] came about since it's such a small campus and you didn't need many votes to get through on the first round, so the larger organizations could just nominate their seniors, excluding maybe a more deserving person," Smith said. According to Anne BakkerGras, Director of Student Activities, many other area schools place even more stringent requirements on their Homecoming courts. "Last year, we talked about it, and looked at what other schools had done," she said. "SAC talked this summer at their retreat and decided it made some sense." ^


h o p e

c o l l e g e

seniors

Hadden 1 9

9

Hunter

7

Lydla C Hadden Oak Ridge, TN

Mathematics

Rachel B. Hall Sarasota, FL Learning Disabled

Education &

Melissa E. Harrlger Empire . Business Administration

Todd M. Hart Buchanan

Nicole M. Hauck Lockport, IL Sociology

Psychology &

Brandon J. Hayoshi Kanehohe, H I . I n t e r n a t l . Studies

Scott D. Hazard Muskegon Communication

Religion &

Zachary C. Hegg Holland

Communication

Jason R. Henderson Detroit ... Religion & Philosophy

Matthew G. Herriman Mason

Education

Sara J. Hewitt Baldwlnsvllle, NY.... Social Work

Matthew J. Hierholzer Spring Lake

Business Admin.

Kimberly J. Hinze Shelby ...Chemistry & Psychology

Rebecca A. Hoekstra Kalamazoo

Psychology

Joan M. Hoekstra Holland

Education

Nathan A. Hoekzema Grand Rapids

Biology

Dana Christine Horner

fi

Y p s l l a n t i . German & Mathematics

Annette R. Horton Wilmette, IL Psychology

Biology &

Scott M. Huizinga Holland

Exercise Science

Megan R. Hunter Oak Ridge, TN Elementary Education & Psychology

Senior

Class

1 7 3


h o p e

c o l l e g e

seniors

Hyatt

•

| 9 - 9

Amy M. Hyatt Davison Psychology

Communication &

Jodl H. James Harrington, XL Engineering Physics

Dance &

Kelly A. Jansen Delton P o l i t i c a l Science & Women's Studies

Amy L. Jarchow Birmingham Psychology

Biology &

Christine A. Jarvis Chicago, IL

Biology

Dana A. Jensen Muskegon

Biology

Jason T. Johnson Glen Lake

Psychology

Jennifer J. Johnson Grand Ledge

Matthew P. Jung Sturgis

Accounting

Stephanie Lynn Kaper-Dale Hamilton Social Work

Religion &

Seth Travis Kaper-Dale Montpeller, VT Religion

English &

Russell J. Karsten Grand Rapids Chemistry

Biology &

Mami Kato Mishima, Japan Piano Performance

Economics &

Laurie B. Keisling Troy

Biology & Art

Donald J. Keller III Plymouth

Biochemistry

Theppanya K. Keolasy F o r t Wayne, IN

Chemistry

Nancy T. Kennedy Marshall

Business Admin.

Kimberly A. Kidder Grand Rapids

Psychology

William J. Kintz Delaware, OH ... Computer Science

Dawn M. Kleinheksel Hamilton

1 7 4

I

Biology

Special Education

Senior

Class

r *

i

Klelnheksel


h o p e

c o l l e g e

seniors

Klopp

Krukowski

Jullane A. Klopp Hopewell, VA

Music Education

Joshua S. Koolstra Grand Rapids Psychology

Biology &

Tori D. Kootstra Wendell, ID

Social Work

Karen E. Kowal Elmhurst, IL

Business Admin.

Klersten A. Krause Farmington

Psychology

Jennifer E. Krbez Muskegon

Biology

Jennifer A. Krueger Flushing French & I n t e r n a t i o n a l Relations

Michael L. Krukowski Grand Rapids P o l i t i c a l Science

Jim Dobbins, a senior, womes that there won't be somebody there to take up where he leaves oil. Dobbins joined Higher Horizons, a "Little Brother, Little Sister" program, because he wanted to do something nice for somebody who didn't have the same opportunities he had. "A lot of bad things are out there for kids to get involved in," Dobbins said. Dobbins does not understand why so few men are willing to take a little time out to help a child. "I think some people are lazy. They think it is a good idea but don't want to do it," he said. The need for Bigs is tremendous, especially for male Bigs. Currently 75 boys are on a waiting list for a Big Brother. Higher Horizons is a program designed to establish long term friendships with children between five and 15 years old and a caring adult. The program was founded by Hope in 1964. In 1974 it came under Child and Family Services and is now

J

funded by the United Way. Higher Horizons has given senior Corine Widi the opportunity to see firsthand what a little time, effort and caring can do. Widi has volunteered a couple of hours each week to spend one-onone time with ten-year-old April. It took about a month for her to go through the interview process. After Widi told Higher Horizons her interests, she was matched up with two children. From there Widi picked April, the child she wanted to mentor. Widi recognizes that being a Big Sister has changed her own life. "It's shown me the importance of commitment and helped me see how important you are to kids. Higher Horizons is a great way for students to get involved because you get into the community, and build a long term relationship, she said. "Volunteers get to experience childhood again," said Amy Shepard, Higher Horizon's Program Coordinator. "It takes you back to the zoo and back to nature." The activities Bigs do with

Chemistry &

their Little Brother or Sister range from coloring to going to the beach, to taking a walk or making cookies. The program requires that Bigs meet with their child at least once a week. The meeting takes the child outside of the home and consists of an activity the child enjoys. "Kids need to know they can fulfill their dreams," Widi said. "They are important people."

big

ri^ed to fill by kirn powell

Senior

Class

1 7 5


h o p e

c o l l e g e

seniors

Kwlatkowskl

1 9

Lav 9

7

Jocelyn A. Kwlatkowskl P l a l n f l e l d , NJ

English

Laura A. Lange Belleville Psychology

Business &

Tiffany A. Lange St. Joesph

Psychology

Matthew J. Lappenga Holland

Biology

Kalene M. Larr Hopkins

Nursing

Valerie A. LaSorsa Kentwood Elementary Education & Language Arts Comp.

Shannon R. Laursen Howell

Nursing

Jason D. Law Niles

Biology

Never ending is what the barrage of tests may fee! like to seniors who plan to attend graduate school. These tests are required for admission to all graduate schools from medical school to law school. While most students head for the sun or the job at home for spring break, these graduate school-bound seniors spent time preparing for their exams. The tests are usually taken in April of junior year. Peter DeYoung took the MCAT for admission to medical school and spent much time

studying for this test. "Spring break was devoted solely to preparing for the MCAT I also set aside about 5 hours every week both semesters. The key for me was starting early." Preparation is vital for these tests. Both the academic atmosphere of classes and a lot of studying is needed to prepare for these tests. "I bought a huge review book and slowly worked my way through it. I used my textbooks to fill in the holes in my knowledge and supplement the study guide," stated De Young. Senior Rich Strumfels, who took the GRE for admission to graduate school said that a practice test was as an important component of preparation. "It helped me to get acquainted with the GRE process and testing style, which made me more relaxed for the real thing." For Senior Steven Sundbeck, his classes prepared him well for both the GRE and GRE Physics

by amanda black

1 7 6

Senior

Class

exam for graduate work in physics. "The physics department did an excellent job of preparing me for the exam by offering an outstanding curriculum." He was also prepared by the college's style of learning. "Class experience helps on the GRE because of the academic environment, the stimulus to thought and encouragement to learn and succeed," he said. The preparation comes into question when the test day arrives. De Young calls it "one of the most stressful days of my life. 1 only slept two hours the night before because I was so nervous." After the test ends, one can see the benefits of the preparation pays off. For De Young, Strumfels, Sundbeck, and the many other students who spent hours preparing for the exams, their reward came with the returns of the scores in the mail, acceptance to graduate schools, and the satisfaction of working very hard for something.


h o p e

Lepard

c o l l e g e

seniors

McFarland

Sarah R. Lepard Grand Haven Psychology

English &

Kevin J. Lewis Portage

Laura L. Listenberger Nlles

Biochemistry

Evan C. Llewellyn Fremont

Business

Sara J. Looman Holland

Education

Susan M. Looman Holland

Exercise Science

Nicholas J. LoPrestl Holland

Business & Economics

Sarah A. Lubbers S a l t l a k e City, UT , Science

, Political

Rebecca A. Lucas Kalamazoo .... Piano Performance

Anna M. Lull Portage

Spanish & German

Danielle L. Machan Scotts

Psychology & Sociology

Jennifer L. Manclnl P i t t s f o r d , NY

Dance

Rebecca Lynn Martin Richland

English

Jonathon T. Martlnek Downers Grove, XL

Biology

Stacey R. Masterson Kenosha, WI

Psychology

Marie K. Matchett Elk Rapids Secondary Education

Spanish &

Leah B. McAlplne Durand

Biology

Michael B. McCammon Lemont, XL

Accounting

David R. McDonald Roseville, MM Business Administration & Chemistry

Jodl L. McFarland Willlamston Spanish

Senior

Communication &

Class

1 7 7


h o p e

c o l l e g e

seniors

McGraw

i

Klmberly A. McGraw Wyoming

English & Education

Brian M. McKanna Holland

Biology

Laura E. McKee Kettering, OH

Communication

Karen J. McLouth Shelby

Special Education

Joshua L. McManls Madison, XL

Biology

Brian A. McNamara Cedar Grove, NJ Computer Science

Business &

Ismaria M. Medel Sherwood Forest

Psychology

Laura M. Mlhalloff Bloomfleld H i l l s

Communication

Nathaniel L. Mlhalek Hartland Education

Science Composite &

Danielle S. Miller Traverse City

Sociology

Stephanie A. Miller Albion

Biology

Mlchele R. Mollne Del ton

Psychology & Dance

Marc C. Montpetlt Midland Business A d m i n i s t r a t i o n

Robert V. Morford Grand Haven

Chemistry

Margaret M. Morgan Interlochen Social Work

Psychology &

Sandra L. Mouser Waterford

P o l i t i c a l Science

Jill R. Mulder Zeeland

German & English

Megan E. Mulder Mollne, I L . . . . Education & French

Muturl G. Murlukl Nairobi, Kenya Physics

Engineering

Tyler L. Murphy Coldwater

1 7 8

Senior

Chemistry

Class

Murphy


h o p e

c o l l e g e

seniors

Neucks

Katharine A. Murphy Northvllle Composite

Humanities

Hyan T. Nace Poughquag, NY

Religion

Kevin C. Nash Colon

Accounting

Mona J. Naslr Jerusalem

Special Education

Heather Nelson Rockford

Nursing

Joel C. Nemes Jenlson

Chemistry

Holly J. Netzloff Davison... I n t e r n a t i o n a l Studies

Arln S. Neucks I n d i a n a p o l i s , IN Accounting

To be planning a wedding amid the happenings of everyday life is no easy task. Seniors who went that route were not only busy but happy. "Not only do you have to go to class, but you have to plan a wedding also. Planning a wedding is an incredible amount of work," explained Cindy Achterhof, who plans to be married in June after graduation. It is important for the engaged couple to have support from family and friends during this time. "We have a supportive family, but they are far away from us right now," said Achterhof. "Because of this, we did most of the planning ourselves." Katy Murphy and Marc VanSoest plan to be married in June of 1998 so they have more time to get organized for the ceremony. The service will take place in Dimnet Chapel. "Dimnet was a really special place for us. We hope to stay very close to here," said Murphy. Although futures may seem

Economics &

uncertain, the couples had an idea where life will take them. "We are both Poly Sci majors so we're moving to Washington D.C. and trying to get jobs there," said Achterhof. Instead of moving away from the area. Murphy and VanSoest plan to stay in the area. "I hope to get a teaching job in Western Michigan while Marc finishes school. We plan on staying in the area for awhile," stated Murphy. Taking the next step towards the future is an exciting and scary time and the decision to get married is a major one. Seniors need feel sure about their decision. "It's nice knowing that we will graduate and move on with life. I think you know when you're ready for marriage. God lets you know," said Achterhof. ^

start m life together by annie jakosz

Senior

Class

1 7 9


h o p e

c o l l e g e

seniors

Nicies

1 9

9

7

Sara M. Nicies North Muskegon Sociology

Psychology &

Jeremy J. Notman Zeeland

Engineering Physics

Chad N. Nykamp Zeeland

P o l i t i c a l Science

Ryan J. O'Connell , Education

Montague

Daniel M. Oderklrk Coloma . Business A d m i n i s t r a t i o n

Jeffrey P. Oegema F r i d l e y , MN

Computer Science

Rebecca S. Olds Kalamazoo ... Chemistry & French

Yvonne M. Ollpant Schoolcraft

Music Education

For approximately 30 students, deciding what to do after graduation is not an issue. The call has already been made. Ministry has always been an important part of senior Adam Barr's life, who grew up in a family devoted to ministry. Barr said, "The most important thing in my life has been my love for the Lord and for the church. It wasn't just something I inherited and borrowed from my parents, but they instilled a desire in my own heart to pursue the Lord for myself." Barr is not the only one that is looking to God for direction. According to professor Allen Verhey, about half of the 45

by

r y a n

p a z d u r

S

t

religion majors are headed to seminary after graduation, whether that is immediately or after they have had a chance to explore areas of ministry. Some students get ministry experience first to check their sense of calling, Verhey said. Senior Scott Hazard began to hear God's call when he left home. "When 1 got here, I realized 1 didn't have to get out of bed Sunday morning unless 1 wanted to," said Hazard. "I decided that this was a something 1 had to change." During his sophomore year. Hazard turned his Chemical Engineering major to Religion to pursue a career in ministry. Barr first became aware of the scholastic study of religion after transferring to Hope his sophomore year. He soon changed his major from English to religion. "I didn't want to get to a point in my life where 1 was more a thinker about things than a doer of things," stated Barr. Though Barr and Hazard both seek to enter "the ministry," they have decided to follow different roads to get there.

-call from above 1 8 0

Senior

Class

Barr applied to Western Theological Seminary to pursue a Master of Divinity degree. He feels a strong call to someday pastor a church. The primary motivation behind his desire to minister is a deep, personal desire to know Jesus Christ. "When it comes down to the subjective reality of your existence, who you are as a person, they mean nothing apart from knowing Christ," Barr said. "The religion department is a good training ground for seminary students," Verhey said. "It gives you an introduction to scripture, theology, religious experience, and church history. It sets you up to deal with seminary and ministry." Hazard hopes to spend time in short term ministry to have a clearer understanding of his call and to see if seminary is in his future. "Even without seminary there is always an opportunity to minister. We need doctors, lawyers, teachers, journalists, but in the same way they can be ministers. You don't have to be a reverend behind a pulpit to be a minister," Hazard said.


h o p e

c o l l e g e

seniors

Oostveen 1 9

9

Petscher

7

Krlsten L. Oostveen Galesburg

Nursing

John Mark Oudersluys Portage

Business & Spanish

Steven D. Oursler B a t t l e Creek

Business Admin.

Heather L. Ozinga Palos Heights, IL

English

Heather J. Papanek Wllmette, IL

French

Gregory J. Paplawsky Grand Rapids

Biology

Alexandria K. Parker Coldwater

Psychology

Danielle M. Parker Sturgls

Social Work

Jessica L. Parrlsh St. C l a i r Shores Education

Elementary

Katherlne J. Pauls St. Joseph

Business & French

Sally C. Pavllk W a t e r f o r d . . Psychology & Spanish

Ryan J. Pazdur L i b e r t y v l l l e , IL Engineering Physics

English &

Holly A. Pelon Caledonia

Spanish Education

Roy E. Perelra Singapore Computer Science & P o l i t i c a l Science

Meghan E. Perry Novi

I

Education

Beth L. Perry Greenville

1

Psychology

Brian E. Peterson Holland Business Administration

Mark R. Peterson Grand Rapids

English

Jennifer L. Peterson Naperville, IL Education & Math & Science Composite

Jennifer D. Petscher Madison

Senior

Biochemistry

Class

1 8 1


h o p e

c o l l e g e

seniors—

Pfau

1

9

Rlcketts 9

7

Heidi M. Pfau Holland Elementary Education & Language Arts

Craig A. Philips Grandville

h

Chemistry

Jennifer L. Pihiaja Bessemer Science

English & P o l i t i c a l

Luke R. Pinkerton G r a n d v i l l e , OH Physics

Engineering

James M. Polak Coopersvllle Physics

Engineering

Victor A. Polites Lake Zurich, IL Computer Science

Shannon J. Polk Ortonville

P o l i t i c a l Science

Jonathan E. Pott Hamilton

Communication

Susan K. Pozzanghera Toledo, OH Economics & I n t e r n a t i o n a l Studies

Mark A. Proff Egan, MN

Biology

Nicole M. Pryor Grand Rapids

Accounting

Stephen A. Ralph Holland

Theatre

Deepa Ramakrishna India

Biology

Traci L. Reber Three Rivers Elementary Education & Language Arts

Jeanmarie P. Redente Ypsllantl Sociology

Psychology &

Kathy S. Reese J a c k s o n . . . . Elementary Education & Language Arts Composite

Jonathan T. Reeves Richmond

Chemistry

Michelle A. Rhoades Grand Rapids Administration

Business

Stephanie Richardson Bloomfleld H i l l s Composite

Science

Eve Ricketts India Religion

1 8 2

Senior

Mathematics &

Class

ri


h o p e

c o l l e g e

— - seniors

Rlekse

1 9

9

Hewlett

7

James M. Rlekse

•y

Grand Rapids ... P o l i t i c a l Science

Douglas B. Roberts Jr. East Lansing ... P o l i t i c a l Science & Business Administration

Rebecca Rodriguez F e n n v i l l e . . Nursing & Psychology

Jacob J. Roesch I n d i a n a p o l i s , IN ... Biology & Art

Jorlta E. Resales Mason Accounting & Business Administration

Nicole M. Rottenborg Walden, NY

Special Education

Derek D. Rowe Plainwell

Business Admin.

Winston Rowlett Traverse City

se

Senior Tyler Murphy describes his little brother Matt as his personal inspiration. "He is dedicated and very active. He never lets A-T be an excuse to get in the way of living," Murphy said. Nineteen-year-old Matt has AT or Ataxia Telangiectasia, a very rare genetic disease that is progressive and degenerative, meaning that symptoms last throughout life and many body systems deteriorate. Now, with the help of the biology department, Murphy has the chance to perhaps find a cure that can save his little brother. A-T's progressive deterioration leads to loss of muscle control and eventually confines a patient to a wheelchair. A-T also suppresses the immune system, which puts its victims at greater risk for respiratory infections like pneumonia. Children with A-T are 1,000 times more likely to develop cancer. They are also extremely sensitive to radiation, so they cannot receive radiation treatment for cancer or ever get X-rays. "At this point Matt is in great shape. He was a runner as a child

before the wheelchair. He wrestled in high school for a couple years. He has lifted weights every day for the past six to seven years and he can bench press more than I can," Murphy said. When Murphy took Genetics with Dr. Virginia McDonough last year, she asked why he was taking the class. He told her about his brother and that he was interested in researching A-T. "She said that she was interested in working with me if 1 could get a copy of the ATM gene that was cloned in 1995," said Murphy. Because A-T is so rare, only about 150 people in the U.S. have it at any one time. There were very few researchers of the disease before its gene was cloned. Murphy managed to obtain a copy of the cloned gene and his research began. "A-T is a classic genetic disease that I use in my classes when teaching DNA repair. The gene is somehow involved in signalling DNA repair after damage to cells in the body," McDonough said. Muiphy's work with

Religion

McDonough involves searching for the ATM gene's normal function that allows it to repair DNA. Using yeast cells as a model for human cells. Murphy is investigating what happens when a lot of the ATM gene is added to damaged cells. ' i f we can find the normal functions of the gene, we can work to find ways to better manage the symptoms of A-T or even find a cure," Murphy said. After graduating this spring. Murphy plans get married to his fiance Colleen Parrett, who graduated two years ago, and continue researching A-T, at Case Western Reserve in Cleveland. Ohio.

search for cure Cm

by noelle wood

Senior

CI a s s

1 8 3


h o p e

c o l l e g e

seniors

Rubel

1 9

Schmidt 9

7

Jason H. Rubel Huntington Woods, WI .. History & Kinesiology

Joshua E. Ruhrup Kalamazoo

Psychology

Gretchen Rumohr-Voskull Mason

English

Mlsca Lynne Rynsburger H o l l a n d . . . . Humanities Composite

Tanla J. Sale Holland

English & Art

Stephen E. Sanders G r a n d v l l l e . Engineering Physics

Anne C. Schalrbaum Charlevoix

Social Work

Emily A. Schmidt Sociology & Holland I n t e r n a t i o n a l Studies

the many paths of life by nikelle johnson

1 8

4

Senior

Class

Life for many seniors is just beginning after graduation, but not all follow the traditional path of getting a job right away. any decide to go in different directions all over the world. Senior Christopher Udell is one of these students. After previously studying in Japan, he would like to go back there and teach English in the Japanese junior high schools. Senior Gretchen RumohrVoskuil also plans to travel beyond the states. "I am going to Scotland with my husband this summer. We are going to travel because now's the time to do it窶馬o kids, no 'real' responsibilities, and we both have a large block of time to spend traveling." Because the education department requires students to have a major in addition to their education concentration, many seniors like Amanda Schuld and Patrick Collins plan to stay at here for another semester after graduation to finish their student teaching. Others plan to finish their student teaching beyond the city limits of Holland.

Heather Ozinga plans to student teach in Chicago. "I want to student teach there because I want to experience city life," she said. Numerous seniors find themselves taking the next step by going back to school. Senior Paul Ferri is headed to dental school after graduation, while Peter DeYoung is headed to Wayne State Medical School. He wants to pursue a medical degree and a career in Family Practice. "I feel this is where God is calling me." Others, like Adam Barr, find themselves headed to seminary to answer God's call. Many seniors are beginning life together. Marriage is another thing that many seniors are busy planning. "I cannot wait to graduate and marry the man of my dreams," says Hollie Maxfield about her finance Andrew J. Adamson. There are of course some taking a more traditional path and looking for a job right away. "Gotta pay those student loans off you know," says senior Heidi Pfau of why she must find a job.


h o p e

c o l l e g e

seniors

Scholten 1 9

9

Smith

7

Rebekah E. Scholten Holland

English

James D. Schreuder Montague

Special Education

Nathan T. Schuch S t e r l i n g Heights

Psychology

Acacia L. Schut Portage

Sociology

Andy Brady Sharp East Grand Rapids ... Economics & Business Administration

Rebecca L. Shearer Schoncraf t

Biochemistry

Shannon Ronna See Grandvllle

Mathematics

Amanda L. Sheehan Scotia, NY

Special Education

Melissa M. Sheldon Portage

Psychology

Brooke E. Sherrod Kalamazoo

English & Theatre

Nobuyuki Shimizu Japan

Math & Psychology

Kimberly A. Shull Mason

Geology

Blythe K. Siddall Bloomf i e l d I n t e r n a t i o n a l Studies

French &

Ashley E. Singer Westefleld, IN

German

Nontsikelelo Sisulu Johannesburg, South A f r i c a Psychology

Casey K. Slayton Elgin, IL

Dance & Psychology

Scott A. Slezak Grand Rapids

Physics & Math

Aaron Jon Smith Charlotte

Psychology

Ami L. Smith Kentwood

Psychology

Elizabeth C. Smith Grand Blanc

Senior

Business Admin.

Class

1 8 5


h o p e

c o l l e g e

seniors

Smith

> 1 9

Jennifer L. Smith Kalamazoo

P o l i t i c a l Science

Joel R. Smith Montague ... Engineering Physics

Sarah J. Smith Portage

Spanish

Tyler L. Smith Okemos . Business A d m i n i s t r a t i o n

Megan-Kathleen Smltley Rochester, NY

History

Leslie Anne Sneller H o l l a n d . . . Social Work & Spanish

Jason M. Sommer OÂŤosso

Language Arts

Rebecca M. Spencer Petoskey... Biology & Kinesiology

Steven B. Spltters Kalamazoo

Religion

Michael R. Spradllng Ottawa Lake,

Business Admin.

Katie L. Stanger Grand Rapids ... Science Composite

Trevor T. Starnes Shelby Township Chemistry

Biology &

Matthew R. Steensma Grand Rapids

Chemistry

Almee J. Sterk Jenlson

Psychology

Wendy L. Stlmer Jackson

Biology

Jennifer L. Strauss Port Huron English & Communications Composite

Roberta Ann Streelman Flint

Psychology

Michael P. Struck Orland Park, IL

Chemistry

Richard G. Sturmfels P a c i f i c , MO . Engineering Physics

Timothy Su Elmhurst, NY Sociology

1 8 6

Senior

Psychology &

Class

Su 9

7


h o p e

c o l l e g e

seniors

Sugden

Thatcher

Karen L. Sugden Charlotte

P o l i t i c a l Science

Ryan A. Sullivan Manistee

Chemistry

Steve D. Sundbeck Manistee

Physics

Joy L. Sundsmo Grand Rapids

Chemistry

W. Matthew Tallford S y l v a n i a , OH

Art

Robert M. Taylor III Rogers City

Biology

Rochelle M. Tedesco

*

m

Most people head to college with the goal of earning a degree. They believe that once the diploma is in their hands, they are all set. In reality, the little piece of paper with John Jacobson's signature only is the start to the adventure of getting a job in the "real world." As seniors prepared to look for jobs, they found that their education in a particular field was not the most influential part. The liberal arts education here provides students with experience and information that "is valuable in almost any field of work," commented senior Mark Peterson. As senior Michelle Rhoades explains, "[The experience here] ties everything together. I am a well-rounded person." By second semester, most seniors began thinking about sending off resumes and getting

interviews with potential employers. Some, like senior Danielle Parker, already have a connection with getting a job. "I've been offered a job from where I ' m interning at, but I'm not sure if I'll take it." Yet others, like senior Kalene Larr, had jobs lined up for the summer and intend to do their job search later. Kalene planned to work at a camp during the summer as a nurse. She believes it will be a good experience since it is in her field, yet it is not a permanent position. Michelle Rhoades, also in a similar situation found it a little intimidating saying, "I have no clue what God has in store for me. There are mixed emotions for seniors as they think about graduation. "It's exciting to go to a new city, meet new people, and start a

by christy colbrunn

Lapeer P o l i t i c a l Science

French &

Kerry K. Thatcher Bloomington, IN .. Elementary Ed. <5: Humanities Composite

new job!" stated Danielle Parker. But at the same time, they find it sad to leave all the familiar places, activities and friends they have called home for the past four years. Their experiences here will be ones remembered for the rest of their lives. As Mark Peterson agrees, "I consider the past four years as a growing-up period as well as an education, and that is the most important thing I will take with me from college."

the , search for success Senior

Class

1 8 7


h o p e

c o l l e g e

seniors kX

Thlel

1 . 9

9

7

Melissa J. Thlel Chelsea

Chemistry

Megan E. Thompson Lansing

Business Admin.

Beth Ann Thorrez Ann Arbor

Spanish & Nursing

Lisa M. Tlmmer Math

Zeeland

Ellen C. Tomer Hilton, NY

Dance

Aaron L. Tracy Muskegon .. Elementary Education

Charlene Tyke Grand Rapids

Business Admin.

Christopher J. Udell Grand Rapids Psychology & Japanese

Business,

Long after the memories of the college experience have faded, the financial burden will remain for many students. With the rising cost of tuition and die number of students in need of financial support not decreasing, the need for student loans and financial aid is ever present. Many students originate from a middle-class background and money is an issue for most. Consequently, students look toward the college for the financial help they need.

the burden of wisdom by annie jakosz

1 8 8

Senior

Class

As of the 1995-1996 school year, 88 percent of students received some form of aid. This was a five percent increase from the year before. Almost 73 percent of these students received Hope scholarships or grants which are not repaid. This was an increase of 10 percent from the previous year. For students who have received aid in some way throughout their college career, senior year can be a stressful time. Soon after graduation, they lace the problem of paying these loans off. Senior Jodi McFarland realizes how important aid was in her experience. "I'm grateful that I've had the chance to get the education I've gotten here. It [didn't| come without its price but 1 knew that coming in," said McFarland. Having accepted a loan, seniors must learn about their financial aid and (he responsibilities that accompany it. It is the job of Connie Ramirez in Financial Aid to educated students about this, "Seniors who have borrowed under the Federal Direct Loan,

Federal Stafford Loan, or Federal Perkins Loan are required to attend a loan exit counseling session to receive information regarding their rights and responsibilities as student loan borrowers," stated Ramirez. Federal Direct Loan and Stafford Loan borrowers have a six month grace period before their loans go into repayment and Perkins Loan borrowers have a nine month grace period before repayment begins. McFarland has been thinking about how quickly this time is approaching. "Thankfully I've chosen a lucrative career in journalism so loan repayment won't be a worry. Just kidding," says McFarland "Really, 1 know that the road to being student loan debt fee will be a lengthy one. 1 only hope that I can bear Ramen noodles for that long!" Student aid is a crucial factor in the lives of college students here and around the country. Without aid, whether it be college of federal based, many students would not have the opportunity to better themselves through education.


h o p e

c o l l e g e

seniors

Udea 9

9

Vos

7

Mayuml Ueda Shiga, Japan . I n t e r n a t l . Studies

Sara L. Van Antwerp Lansing

English

Brian D. Van Dyken Glenvlew IL

Biology

Andrew W. Van Eden Holland Social Studies Composite & Education

Kelly Jo Van Valkenburg Psychology

Holland

Brent A. Vander Kolk Grandvllle Communications

English &

Pearce J, Vander Meeden Grand Haven

Exercise Science

Clarence N. Vanderborgh Saginaw

Business & Spanish

Derek W. VanderHelde Grand Rapids ... Business Admin. & Chemistry

Ryan J. VanderZwart Comstock Park

Theatre

Tyler A. VanLonkhuyzen Dovners Grove, IL P o l i t i c a l Science

English &

James N. VanNoord Sparta

Computer Science

Klmberly A. VanOstran Lansing

Nursing

Victoria A. VanWagnen Alpena

Dance & Psychology

Andrea R. Vega Clarkston

Business Admin.

Gary A. Veldhof Holland

Accounting

Dave S. Verry Grand Haven P o l i t i c a l Science

Music &

Thomas J. Ver Beek Holland

Engineering Physics

Sara R. Vlzlthum Big Rapids ... & P o l i t i c a l Science Ancient C i v i l i z a t i o n

Kathleen S. Vos Hastings

Senior

Social Work

Class

1 8 9


Voss

Trisha A. Voss Okemos Psychology & Business A d m i n i s t r a t i o n

Ross T. Vrleze I n v e r s Grove Hts., MN . Physical & Special Education

Shane E. Wagner Buchanan

Business

Courtney E. Ward Albion

Psychology

Sarah E. Watkln Hamilton, NY Education

Spanish &

Kent C. Wattleworth Canton .... Vocal Music Education

Valerlee N. Webb Crete, IL

Psychology

Olivia J. Welch Plymouth

Psychology

Stephen L. Welsh Jackson

Philosophy

Courtney E. Welton Holland

Psychology

Sarah J. Wentzlof f Grand Haven

Music Education

Sara L. Wilson Brentwood, IN

Chemistry

Brian T. Wolthuls Holland

Art

Krlstle L. Wolven Rockford Biochemistry & Biology

Mlndy M. Woolard Munice, IN Language Arts Composite & Education

Phung Yam H o l l a n d . I n t e r n a t i o n a l Studies & Business A d m i n i s t r a t i o n

Jason S. Young Portage P o l i t i c a l Science

History &

Marcla M. Zlegler Traverse City P o l i t i c a l Science

Biology &

Derk E. Zwart Wyoming

Engineering Physics

Julie L. Zwlesler Northville Biochemistry

1 9 0

Senior

Biology &

Class


h o p e

c o l l e g e

seniors

k

eniors make their way to the seating area at the graduation ceremony. For many seniors graduation is just the beginning of further education. Many will begin school again in the fall at graduate schools all over the United States and world. (PR Photo)

The growing pains of liege; rising tuition, allnighters, organic lab, senior seminars, loans, Phelps, and term papers are hard to bear. At the end of four hard working years, most students cannot wait to leave the life of books, papers, and exams to pursue a career. "1 have been here for four years and I am getting tired of tests and school. I am ready to graduate and start my life," said senior James Van Noord. Other students find the collegiate life exhilarating, and are ready to enter a new phase of higher education, including graduate school, medical school, seminary, and other schools. "I am planning to go on to graduate school for counseling. I am excited to be in school longer! I enjoy school and am grateful for the opportunity to further extend my education. 1 feel that now is the time for me to go while I don't have any commitments holding me back," commented Aaron Smith, a senior Psychology major. While other seniors plan to interview at corporations, businesses and hospitals, seniors who plan to further their education must anticipate a load of extra work. Robert Morford, a senior chemistry major described the juggling of preparations and school: "In September, when I started studying for the GRE's and filling out applications, I was overwhelmed with all the work that I had to do. \ had to study for classes, the GRE's, fill out applications, and have some free time." Heather Papanek, a French major planning to go on to law school agreed, but pointed out a different aspect of the application

JU

process: "The most difficult part of the process for me was the personal statement. This had to describe me and explain why I was a good choice for the school to accept in two pages or under. Basically, it's a shortened version of the life view paper we have to write in senior seminar." An added dimension to the change the seniors make from leaving college to enter grad school or further education is the realization that many of their classmates will be directly entering the work force while they begin school again. "I actually don't think about the additional years of school versus my friends making money. Since I know that this is a path I want to take, I am willing to go to school a little longer," said Papanek. Senior Julie Zwiesler, a Biology and Biochemistry major, also does not feel any pressure from classmates going into the work force: "So many of my peers are not going into the work force but are going on to more schooling, be it graduate school or medical school. 1 don't feel like I'm avoiding the real world, because I am thinking of becoming a college professor and I would then always be in academia." Upon looking back at their years in college, most seniors saw them as playing a major role in shaping them for this new pathway in their life and in preparing them well. "I feel very confident that I have been given me a very well-rounded background. Even in my field of biology, I have had to take a broad variety of classes which have broadened my point of view," said Zwiesler.

Morford strongly agreed, "I feel that college has prepared me very well for graduate school. I feel that I am well taught in chemistry and other aspects of life (thanks to the liberal arts education). I feel that I am ready to move on and make my dreams a reality.'

only

hWnn

by christy kaminskas

Senior

Class

1 9 1


reshman "Lt." Anne Schrock prepares Bryan "Forest Gump Boersma for an upcoming heave by repeating the command of the team's coach, junior Dan "007" Shelley. Morale Girls consider themselves "the brains of the operation" and undoubetly control the pace of the three hour tug-ofwar. They are vital to the success of the Pullers on the rope and work as hard outside the pits as the men work on the rope. (PR Photo)

otner

On Seplember 21, 40 men donned red and black shirts and faced oft' at the Black River with a mission. At the same time, an equal number of women knelt in support of their purpose. At the end of a grueling three hour battle, another episode of the 99 year old Pull tradition came to a close. The physical prowess of the puller has always been admired, but the significance of the Morale Girl has often been overlooked. The attraction of being part of a team and people is what initially persuaded many of the freshman and sophomore women to become part of the Pull team. They practiced right along with the pullers for the three week preparation prior to the event. During the first week, the girls worked with as many of the pullers as possible before each chose his own moraler. The physical duties of the morale girl included, learning signals, yelling calls, and providing their Puller with water. During the actual event, it was the Morale Girls' job to keep their pullers sane by singing songs and offering praise. Their duties stretched far beyond the physical aspects.

tradition by Anne-Marie Campion

2

Junior

Class

however. For three weeks, each morale girl served as an emotional backbone for her puller. They provided words of encouragement by decorating signs or just comforting pullers whenever a listening ear was needed. Being a morale girl was not only an investment of time, but also money. The average morale girl spent about $50 on various items such as duct tape, candy and markers for her puller. The enormous time commitment of three hours each weekday and all day on Saturdays did not appear to have a negative impact on other facets of the morale girls' life. The majority agreed that the commitment improved their social life and had little effect on their academic performance. On a whole, the morale girls did not regret their decision to be a part of this event, but rather look at it as one of the best experiences of their lives. The girls recalled forming a special bond with their team that lasted far beyond the three week journey. As they worked closely together for a common goal, many preferred calling fellow team members their 'Pull family'. The best aspect of the Pull for sophomore Kelly Barton was "learning to come together as a family." The Pull plays a significant role in the tradition of the college, and it is unique to only this school. Freshman Amanda Creighton found it "amazingly hard to believe" that she was part of the 99 year tradition. Being part of the tradition is what originally encouraged her to be part of the pull team. The eternal spirit and tradition of the Pull is perhaps summed up best by freshman Morale Girl Amy Otteson. "It felt wonderful, 1 can't wait to do it again next year!'


h o p e Achatz

c o l l e g e

juniors

Byland

Thomas Achatz

Hlllman

Kollen Hall

J e f f r e y Amlotte

Alpena

Columbia Apartments

Frances Anderson

Staten I s l a n d , NY

Beck Cottage

NJord Andrews

Saginaw

Cosmopolltlan Hall

K a t h r y n Auer

Traverse City

Brumler Apartments

Dina Bailey

Omaha, NE

Wllmers Cottage

Joseph Baker

Troy

Mast Cottage

Emily Bakker

Holland

C e n t e n n i a l Park Apartments

K r i s t i n a Bakker

Hamilton

Zwemer Cottage

K a t h e r i n e Barnes

Tucson, AZ

Welmers Cottage

Ann Barry

Midland

Deutsches Haus

J e f f Bates

Holland

Holland

Chad Bays

Montague

Kuyper Cottage

Rebecca Beals

Holland

Holland

Eric Becker

Bloomf ield H i l l s

Columbia Apartments

K r i s t e n Beckner

Litchfield

DeGraaf Cottage

Tracy Bednarick

Cadillac

C e n t e n n i a l Park Apartments

A l l i s o n Beukelman

E l l e n v i l l e , NY

Brumler Apartments

Jessie B i c k n e l l

F r a n k l i n , VT

Bergen Cottage

Kimberly Boersma

Jenison

Vandreezer Cottage

Jeremy Bogard

Kalamazoo

Brumler Apartments

Kimberly Bohnwagner

Westland

Avlson Cottage

Laura Bonnema

Kentwood

Klaasen Apartments

Bryan Boodt

Gobies

Kollen Hall

Calvin Bosman

Grand Haven

Holland

Matt Bredeweg

Grand Rapids

Holland

Lara Bremer

Grand Rapids

Voorhees Hall

Sara Bremer

Wyoming

Holland

Steve Brenner

Sturgis

Belt Cottage

Stacy Brown

Laingsburg

Van Dreeser Cottage

Tonia Bruins

Zeeland

College East Apartments

David Brzesinski

Hudsonville

Scott Hall

Kevin Burgun

Kirkwood, MO

Brumler Apartments

Kelly Bush

Holt

Brumler Apartments

E l l e n Byland

Fremont

College East Apartments

Junior

Class

1 9 3


h o p e

c o l l e g e

juniors

Caldwell

i

Cherlth CaldveU

Naperville, IL

Gllmore H a l l

Christopher Caldwell

Columbus, OH

Columbia Apartments

Casey Carney

Brookf ield, WI

Brumler Apartments

Sarah Catvos

Tipton

Brumler Apartments

Henry Chen

New York City, NY

Voorhees H a l l

Matthew Clarke

Arbor Springs, MI

College East Apartments

Klmberly C o l l i n s

Dearborn Heights, MI

Vanderborg Apartments

Kalamzoo, MI

Scott Conway Mulder Cottage

Ben Cook

Grand Rapids

Wykoff Hall

Dale Cor lew

Harrison

Parkview Apartments

Andy Cove

Hastings, MI

Holland

Tracy Datte

Auburn

Venema Apartments

J i l l Davis

Phoenix, AZ

Welmers Cottage

J a n e t Day

Holland

Holland

Christopher Deboer

Kalamazoo

P a t t e r s o n Cottage

Angela deForest

Gray Hawk, KY

Brumler Apartments

E l i z a b e t h deHaan

Holland, MI

Kraker Apartments

Renae DeHaan

Kalamazoo

Klelnheksel Cottage

Scott Derby

Cadillac

Brumler Apartments

Robert DeVries

Grand Rapids

College East Apartments

Steve DeVrieze

Midland

College East Apartments

Brent Demas

Barre, VT

College East Apartments

R a f a e l Diaz

Fenton

Holland

Sara Dillbeck

Holland

Holland

Brandon Doroh

St. Joseph

Mandevllle Cottage

Nicole Doucette

I n d i a n a p o l i s , IN

Klaasen Apartments

K a t h e r i n e Drake

Rochester H i l l s

Brownstone Apartments

Karen Dunkelberger

Holland

Centennial Park Apartments

Gana Ebert

Standish

C e n t e n n i a l Park Apartments

K r i s t i n a Eden

Kalamazoo

College East Apartments

C h r i s t i e Eding

Hamilton

Lampen Cottage

Kevin Edlefson

St. Joseph

Vanderborgh Apts

Daane Etheridge

Grand Rapids

College East Apartments

Corey E v e r t s

Zeeland

Holland

Wendy F e s t e r l i n g

Midland

Verbeek Cottage

ft

1 9 4

Junior

Class

Festerling


h o p e Fischer

c o l l e g e

juniors

Germain

J i l l Fischer

Pinckney

Zuverlnk Cottage

K i r s t l n Foss

Elburn, II

Columbia A partm ents

C o l l e t t e Fouch

Livonia

Doesberg Cottage

Dori Freeland

Gaylord

K r a k e r A partm ents

Kevin Freng

Kalamazoo

Columbia A p a r t m e n t s

Cori Freudenburg

St. Louis, MO

Lam pen C o t t a g e

Nathan Gambino

Wy ndotyr

Kollen H a l l

Miriam G a r c e l l a n o

Canton

Bledler Apartments

Suzie Geerlings

Zeeland

Holland

Heidi Geib

Birmingham

College East A p a r t m e n t s

Rebecca Gerhardstein

Beverly H i l l s

Cavanaugh Duplex

Susan Germain

Carmel, NY

C e n t e n n i a l Park Apar tments

The second largest student body came to campus this year, topping 2.800 students for the third year in a row and only the fourth time in the college's history. Attendance topped 2,849 students in the 1996-97 academic year, down from the 2,919 student body in 1995. Jon Huisken, Dean for Academic Services and Registrar, attributed the decline to a downturn in the number of transfer students, numbering 64. In 1995, there were 84 transfer students. James Bekkering, Vice President of Admissions, said there are two factors which affect the reasons students transfer. One reason may be even though they visited campus, students simply decided to go somewhere else. Or, some students found the experience here to be all that it was built up to be. Another factor is the different quality of life offered to students. "Hope offers a liberal arts education of which some come for the diversity," said Bekkering. Some may also come for the Reformed Church of America (RCA) environment on campus. Twenty percent of students reported that they were affiliated with the RCA. Nonetheless, students transfer-

ring have found something which sparked their interest, landing many students on campus. If there is so much offered, why then do students choose to leave the campus? The number one reason students leave is because of the cost of tuition. "Financial awards were not enough to carry the burden of high tuition," said sophomore Jennifer Hurley, who transferred to Western Michigan University after the end of the year. High tuition is not the only reason why students leave campus and transfer to other schools. Family, friends, and boyfriends or girlfriends left at home are the second reason for transferring. Some students feel they need to be with those people at this time in their life rather than later or more than infrequent visits home. Another aspect of the decision to change schools is the ethnic makeup of the student

body. Approximately 92% of the students are Caucasian. Many minority students find this a factor in their enrollment decisions. "It is a real struggle to recruit African Americans and Hispanics to because of the historically black colleges," said Bekkering. Many African Americans are more likely to go to a university which is related to their heritage more than one with a predominately white setting. Many minority students state their reason for choosing another school is they would like to have a date at least once in the four years they are in college. Bekkering said the best way to attract and keep more minority students is for everybody to have an open mind, which will change hearts to accept the different races and backgrounds of students.

. , the student snuffle by

e r i c a

p e r e z

Junior

Class

1 9 5


h o p e

c o l l e g e

Juniors

Glbney

Ben Glbney

Ann Arbor

Oggel Apartments

Brian Glere

Napervllle, IL

Brumler Apartments

Carlos Gomez

Holland

Holland

Shannon Gould

Grand Haven

Centennial Park Apartments

Joy Green

B a t a n i a , IL

College East Apartments

Amy G r e v e l l

Holland

Holland

lo

by

s t a c y

Louise Shumaker knows that you can't forget about sexual assault. A survivor of two assaults. Shumaker told an estimated 150 attenders of the "Take Back the Night" march that the "anniversaries of such events are always on your mind." Shumaker, Director of Disabled Student Services, gave a very emotional personal testimony of her encounters with assault. She encouraged all women to take self-defense courses and to always have a plan of how they will protect themselves. "It isn't fair that we always have to think about our safety," Shumaker said. Sponsored by the Women's Issues Organization, the annual "Take Back the Night" march brings together people to unify in protesting violence against women, and violence in general. "The people who come to the march realize that it is not all about violence against women, but about promoting awareness of the problem," said sophomore Crystal Sprouse, a WIO member. Other students were also impressed. "It's good to see people drop what they are doing for an hour and show up," said senior Ross Vrieze.

b o g a r d

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"I'm impressed that so many people have shown up to show that they care," said junior Mary Lucas. The march began in the Pine Grove, where candles were distributed. People heard the keynote speech delivered by Kama Jongerius Zuidema, a minister at Christ Memorial Church. She spoke of human rights and for what Christ stood. She explained how He aligned Himself with those who have been alienated and exposed the evil of others. "If Jesus were walking on Earth today. He would be leading this march," said Jongerius Zuidema. The march then moved on to various areas of campus where women have reportedly been attacked. The first stop was near Kollen Hall. Kathy Ransom, a Public Safety officer and C.A.A.R.E. educator, spoke of people's ignorance of the law involving sexual assault, and how many do not even realize what they have done because they are intoxicated at the time. Ransom said this should not be used as an excuse. "Let's not tolerate any violence at all," she said. At Voorhees Hall, the marchers linked arms and sang, "We Are a Gentle Angry People." Senior Anne Horton, a WIO member and C.A.A.R.E educator, emphasized that rape does not discriminate. She used the linking of arms to illustrate that there are people out there to lend

march moves. . emotions

1 9 6

Junior

Class

support to rape victims. The stop between the Chapel and Graves was also very emotional. Senior Larry Mann, a C.A.A.R.E. educator, spoke of seeing abuse in his own family, and how violence contributes to the breakdown in our homes and families. He concluded by challenging the crowd with the question, "how are you going to raise your sons and daughters?" The final marker was the emergency phone behind Durfee where Caroline Simon, the Chairperson of Women's Studies at Hope gave the final words and thoughts of the march. She spoke of how being at the march can make participants feel as if they have done something, but that is not enough. "We are not going to get safety now, but we have started working towards it tonight," said Simon. All candles were extinguished at the conclusion of the march and left to serve as a reminder of those who had been assaulted on campus and elsewhere. WIO co-presidents and march organizers, seniors Mary Ellen Walter and Heidi Giddy, were both satisfied with the turnout of the march. "We are very proud of the turnout and the speakers," Giddy said. "Take Back the Night" is a national march which made its debut on campus in 1993. WIO took over for the City of Holland's Center for Women in Transition (CWIT) who had held the march in previous years before for the entire city of Holland,


h o p e

Hall

c o l l e g e

juniors

Jastrzebskl

Amy H a l l

F r a n k f o r t , IN

Brownstone Apartments

Jessie Hancock

Albion

C e n t e n n i a l Park Apartments

Daniel Hansen

Madison, WI

Parkvlev Apartments

Theresa Hansen

Big Rapids

College East Apartments

J i l l Harklns

St. Louis, MO

Brownstone Apartments

Ron Haveman

Zeeland

Mast Cottage

Shawna Hendrlckson

Loveland, CO

Holland

Tim Heneveld

Holland

Vlsscher Cottage

J i l l Hlckey

Grand Rapids

Klelnheksel Cottage

Amanda H i l l

Rochester

Brumler Apartments

Mark Hoekstra

Kalamazoo

Kraker Apartments

J u l i a Hoffman

Harbor Springs

Klelnheksel Cottage

K e r r l Hoffman

Kalamazoo

Reeverts Cottage

J o e l Holstege

Grandvllle

Holland

J u l i e Holverda

Wheaton,IL

Holland

Lisa Hoogenboom

B u f f a l o Grove, IL

C e n t e n l a l Park Apartments

Tara Hosford

Grand Rapids

College East Apartments

Aubrey Hove

Burkley

Voorhees Hall

Lisa Hughes

Chelsea

Vennema Apartments

Eddie Hwang

Kalamazoo

Columbia Apartments

Mlllca I v a n o v l c

Belgrave, Yugoslavia

Champion Apartments

Mlchele J a s t r z e b s k l

Rochester, NY

College East Apartments

tudents carry candles as they p a r t i c i p a t e in the annual "Take Back the Night" march on campus. The event s p o n s o r e d , by the Women's Issues O r g a n i z a t i o n , is held to raise a w a r e n e s s of violence against w o m e n around the w o r l d a n d as c l o s e as campus. Over 150 s t u d e n t s , faculty, and staff p a r t i c i p a t e d In the gathering. (Photo by Zach Johnson)

J u n i o r

C l a s s

1

9 7


h o p e

juniors

Johnson

Joe Johnson

Zeeland

Mast Cottage

Zach Johnson

Dublin, OH

C e n t e n n i a l Park Apartments

Kevin Joldersma

Hillsdale

Oggel Apartments

Lisa J u t t e

Clayton, OH

C e n t e n n i a l Park Apartments

Tammy Kamphuls

West Olive

College East Apartments

E l l e n Kassls

Palestine

Oggel Apartments

Chlkako Katsuyama

Yokohama, Japan

C e n t e n n i a l Park Apartments

J e a n Kegerrels

Ypsllantl

Kraker Apartments

Marie Keunlng

Holland

Holland

Chul Kim

Zuwom, Korea

Holland

V a l e r i e Klelnheksel

Holland

Lampin Cottage

Chris K l i n e

Kalamazoo

Kraker Apartments

Tammy Klok

Kalamazoo

Lichty H a l l

James Knapp

Grant

C e n t e n n i a l Park Apartments

Michelle Knauff

Charlotte

Holland

E r i n Knecht

Lapeer

Diekema Cottage

Wendy Koolker

Jenlson

College East Apartments

Melissa K r o l i k

Lansing

Klaaren Cottage

Matthev Kuiper

Lansing

Durfee H a l l

Kim Kuite

Holland

Holland

C h r i s t i n e LaBelle

Sand Lake

C e n t e n n i a l Park Apartments

Mark Lachonce

McBain

P a t t e r s o n Cottage

Shannon Land

Saline

Zwemer Cottage

Kimberly Laverty

Allegan

Holland

Alexis Lindscheid

Annandale, VA

College East Apartments

Todd Lingbeek

Kalamazoo

Kraker Apartments

Keith Louverse

Holland

Holland

Mistine Lowry

Pinckney

Van Dreezer Cottage

Mary Lucas

Hillsdale

Beck Cottage

Ryan Maas

Grandvllle

Holland

Rachael Mack

Valparaiso, IN

Voorhees H a l l

C a r r i e Maines

Wyoming

Klaaren Cottage

Pamela Marz

Commerce

Brumler Apartments

Derek Mazurek

Spring Lake

Holland

Laura McCralne Welmers Cottage

1 9 8

c o l l e g e

Junior

Class

F a i r f i e l d , IA

McCralne


h o p e McCrackln

c o l l e g e

juniors

Pallaschl

Ann McCrakln

Dewltt

College East Apartments

Llndsey McDonald

Sacramento, CA

Zwemer Cottage

Mike McMahon

Fennvllle

Holland

Sara Meengs

Muskegon

C e n t e n n i a l Park Apartments

Michael Meeuvsen

Hockford

College East Apartments

Kris M e r r l t t

Jennlson

Holland

Meghan Meyer

Cadillac

Kollen H a l l

S h e r r l Meyer

Byron Center

Centennial Park Apartments

Kent M i l l e r

Nottingham, NH

Columbia Apartments

Mlndy Moffat

B r i s t o l , WI

Hlndkamp Cottage

Mlluska Monroy

Lima, Peru

S c h r l e r Cottage

David Muma

Jenlson

Holland

E l i z a b e t h Neuman

Chicago, 1L

Holland

Natasha Norrls

Plnckney

Vennema Apartments

Amorora O'Brate

Barcelona, Spain

College East Apartments

Lisa Ogden

Holland

Holland

Ryan Ondersma

Holland

Holland

Matthew Oselka

iSr}

|

New B u f f a l o

College East Apartments

Aaron Otis

East Jordan

C e n t e n n i a l Park Apartments

Susan P a l l e s c h l

Schoolcraft

C e n t e n n i a l Park Apartments

eredith Akins puts the finishing touches on her make-up while Anna Wynbeek completes her costume before heading to stage in the annual Nykerk play competition. Akins and Wynbeek experienced Nykerk for the first time this year as part of the class of 2000 play team in "The Emperor's New Clothes." Members of the freshman class competed against the class of 1999 in song, oration, and the play category. (Photo by Josh Neucks)

Junior

Class

1 9 9


h o p e

c o l l e g e

juniors

Palmer

1 9

James Palmer

Redell

9

7

Traverse City

Vanderborg Apartments

Jack Parks

Whitehall

Kollen H a l l

John Pater

Jamestown

Kollen H a l l

Holly Peterson

Holland

Holland

Brian P e t r o e l j e

Zeeland

Poll Cottage

J e n n i f e r Peuler

Grandville

Zwemer Cottage

Andy Ponstein

West Olive

College East Apartments

Tara P o r t e r

Stockbridge

C e n t e n n i a l Park Apartments

Kimberly Powell

Montrose

Brumler Apartments

Elayne Provost

Allen Park

C e n t e n n i a l Park Apartments

Louis Raj

Taylor

Kollen Hall

Sarah Redell

Holland

Holland

Despite of the frigid weekend. students, faculty, and community members met on Jan 10-11 for the first Veritas Forum. This gathering primarily focused on investigating the questions: Does "Truth" exist and does Christianity have any merit as actual "Truth?" The forum began in 1992 at Harvard University with the belief that "Truth is not exhausted, but discovered, by hard questions and thoughtful answers." It has been held at various universities. This time, however, was the first time it was held at a private liberal arts college. After meeting Kelly Monroe, a graduate chaplain who organized the first forum, history

"thŠ. quest by

2 0 0

.for, truth c h r i s t y

Junior

Class

k a m i n s k a s

professor Marc Baer knew that tbis was an "idea whose time had come," he said. "I saw it as an opportunity to help students sort through truth claims and provide a chance for students to ask questions that matter to them personally, but never have the chance to ask or discuss in class, even senior seminars." The planning became reality with the first keynote speech, "New Scientific Evidences for God," given by Dr. Hugh Ross. About 900 people gathered to hear Ross explain discoveries that point toward God as Creator of the universe and supported by Biblical scripture. Following the keynote address was a two-hour panel including Dr. Ross, students, alumni, and members of the community ranging in professions from art to biochemistry. Workshops focused on topics such as faith, politics, evolution, and medical ethics. Participants engaged in the workshops by hearing the testimonies of sacred dancers, questioning speakers about evidence for the resurrection, and discussing actual case studies involving moral and ethical decisions encountered in an OB/GYN office. Saturday night completed the

forum with a drama performance titled, "C.S. Lewis on Stage," featuring actor Tom Key, who embodied Lewis with a brown suit, pipe in hand, perfectly combed hair, and English accent. Key's realistic portrayal gave audience members a sampling of many of Lewis's books. Overall, the turnout was very strong, totaling about 2000 in attendance at the programs. Students" reactions varied from those frustrated with the lack of representation of other religions, to those enthusiastic at the questions brought up and discussed throughout the forum. Committee member Kevin Edlefson was confident in the success of the forum. "1 think that we accomplished what we wanted to accomplish with the forum. Some people would have preferred a different forum, in which there would be more of an argument, complete with opposing views, but that is not what we were aiming for. We see the Truth of Christ to be a unifying thing, not something that should be drowned in controversy and argument," said Edlefson. "We are trying to explore these truth claims, not the entire spectrum of religious belief." ^


h o p e Resele

c o l l e g e

juniors

Strangvays

Anna Resele

Mount Prospect, IL

Vennema Apartments

Chris Rlker

Kalamazoo

Kraker Apartments

Robert Rodstrom

Mt. Vernon, OH

Durfee Hall

Jane Roeters

Hudsonvllle

S c h r i e r Cottage

Heidi Ross

H a r r i n g t o n , IL

College East Apartments

Chad Ruby

Humboldt, IA

Holland

Betsle Rypma

Holland

Holland

Renee Saar

Macomb

Klaaren Cottege

Karen Salomon

Annandale, VA

C e n t e n n i a l Park Apartments

Davn Samsell

Marysvllle

Brumler Apartments

Erin Schiller

Chelsea

Avlson Cottage

Paul Schmude

Traverse City

College East Apartments

Matthew Scholtens

Stlckney, IL

Patterson Cottage

Susan Schroeder

S t e r l i n g Heights

Brumler Apartments

Ellen Schultz

Maple City

Van Drezer Cottage

Joseph Schvelss

Holland

Holland

Brian Scordlnsky

North P l a l n f l e l d , NJ

C e n t e n n i a l Park Apartments

Caryl Scott

Northbrook, IL

S c h r i e r Cottage

Maria Seaman

Charlevoix

Hollland

Jason S h a t t u c k y

Holland

Poll Cottage

Brent Sheehan

Clark Lake

College East Apartments

Dan Shelley

Saginaw

College East Apartments

Jim Shields

Lunapler

Parkview Apartments

Mellnda S h l l t s

Kalamazoo

Brownstone Apartments

Lloyd Simons

Bailey

College East Apartments

J a m i e Slpsma

Matt a v a n

Poll Cottage

Mlunglsl S l s u l u Johannesburg, South A f r i c a Centennial Cottage

Shannon Slavson

Fennvllle

Dykstra Hall

B r i a n Slenk

Holland

Bledler Apartments

J u l i e Spence

Gainesville, FL

Centennial Park Apartments

Theresa Spencer

Plallnwell

Centennial Park Apartments

Ben Staples

Lawrence

Centennial Park Apartments

Matthew Sterenberg

Hlllsboro, OR

Voorhees H a l l

Jon Stlmson

Auburn H i l l s

P a t t e r s o n Cottage

B r l t t a n Strangways

Jenlson

Scott Hall

Junior

Class

2 0 1


h o p e

c o l l e g e

juniors

Strehler

Lorl S t r e h l e r

Grosse Polnte

S c h r l e r Cottage

Daniel Sveetser

Lombard, IL

Vlsscher Cottage

Dan Taylor

Holland

Parkview Apartments

Darren T l g e l a a r

Hudsonville

Holland

J u l i e Tracy

Albany, NY

Klaaren Cottage

Kim Trezenberg

Palos Park, IL

Brumler Apartments

Amy Van Auken

Holland

Zwemer Cottage

Dave VanDenBerg

Grandvllle

Holland

Michael Vander Elzen

Waterford

C e n t e n n i a l Park Apartments

Kara VanderLugt

Grand Rapids

Klaaren Cottage

A l l i s o n Vander Wal

Wyoming

Cavanaugh Duplex

Scott Vander Wal

Grand Rapids

College East Apartments

Aaron VandeWege

Zeeland

P a t t e r s o n Cottage

A n i t a Van Engen

Glendora, CA

C e n t e n n i a l Park Apartments

K a r l Vandrese

Gladstone

College East Apartments

Jessica Van Oort

Deer Lodge, MT

Deutsches Haus

Heidi Van Langevelde

Holland

Parkview Apartments

A l l i s o n Van Lonkhuyzen

Alma

Kleinheksel Cottage

Brad VanZoeren

Grand Rapids

Parkview Apartments

Rachel VanZoeren

Zeeland

Reeverts Cottage

Sonia Viveros

Crestwood

Brumler Apartments

Greg V l i e t s t r a

Portage

Hoffman Cottage

E r i c Vogel

Orange City, IA

Poll Cottage

Mary Walter

Ravenna

C e n t e n n i a l Park Apartments

Derek Walvoord

Holland

Holland

J e a n e t t e Ward

Brown Deer, WI

Cavanaugh Duplex

S a l l y Ware

Burr Oak

Vennema Apartments

C a r r i e Waterloo

Ann Arbor

C e n t e n n i a l Park Apartments

B r i a n Weaver

Kentvood

Kraker Apartments

Amanda Weerstra

Holland

Holland

Shannon Werner

Grand Rapids

Kleinheksel Cottage

E l i z a b e t h Wesselink

Grand Rapids

Kleinheksel Cottage

J o n a t h a n Wierengo

River H i l l s , WI

College East Apartments

Amy Wilderspin

I n d i a n River

College East Apartments

Jamie Williams Vander Borgh Apartments

2 0 2

Junior

Class

Eaton Rapids

I

Williams


h o p e

c o l l e g e

juniors i

Williams

n

r

H

Zylstra

Travis Williams Bell Cottage Aviso n Cottage Garden P r a i r i e , IL Voorhees Hall Brutnler Apartments G r e t c h e n Wolf a n g e r Dysktra Hall E r i c Wondergem Cosmopolitan Hall

4

Grand Rapids B r a n d o n Wong Holland Holland N o e l l e Wood Columbia Apartments . Downers Grove, IL Andrew Wright College East Apartments Holland Emily Young Holland McBaln Michael Yount College East Apartments Mlddleville Chris Zachman Parkview Apartments

Cavanaugh Duplex Derek Zoetevey Holland Angelique Zorc Holland Joseph Zupanclc College East Apartments Jeff Zylstra Holland

After all the hassles of visiting, interviewing, writing essays, and filling out financial aid forms, tuition was finally sent to the college of choice. Waiting impatiently throughout the summer for schedules and housing assignments in the mail, fear built for the day to leave home. There are many different facets that drew each student to this small liberal arts college called home and held in the highest regard. Current students have a wealth of opportunities available by attending the College. According to assistant director of admissions, Gary Camp, admission to the college is not a simple process. "We are competitive," he said. There are many reasons why students choose to send their applications. Some are drawn to for the academic standing. For many, an imposing lecture hall and the teaching assistants found at large universities did not look appealing, but the Ph.D.'s in teaching all levels of classes looked attractive here. For others, the small size of

Hope determined their arrival here. Freshman Jenny Mark likes the small student-to-faculty ratio. After visiting several times, Mark found that students represent more than numbers. The college's reputation for small classes and many opportunities to get involved in activities is widely known and appreciated. "You really get to know your professors," Mark said. "You also know people and don't just blend in to the crowd." Some students, such as freshman Tina Damhuis, chose the religious opportunities and spiritual growth. She wanted to come for the, "good reputation, as well as the Christian dimension. The popular chapel program and praise band are highly publicized on campus visits and through widespread distribution of chapel CD's. The chapel soundtracks influenced Mark so greatly that she finally decided that this was the school for her. "I realized what a strong

Holland Kewadin Grandville Zeeland

Christian influence there was and how excited people were about that," she said. Currently, 2,900 students, from forty one states and thirty two countries made the journey from the admissions process to the ranks of student, according to the Admissions office. There are many reasons why each student is a necessary part of campus. Camp believes the typical student is one who is "serious about studies, wants to become actively involved in their areas of extra curricular interest, and appreciates an atmosphere where one's faith is an active part of living."

by

l e i g n

ann

s c h m i d t

chpice XOT ÂŤ tne future Junior

Class

2 0 3


h o p e

c o l l e g e

sophomores

Al-Rayes

Dina Al-Rayes

Kuwait

Kollen Hall

Timothy A l l e s

Grand Rapids

Kollen Hall

C h r i s t i e Antles

Holland

Holland

Marc Arnoys

Wyoming

Scott Hall

Jen A s l a n l a n

Kalamazoo

Gllmore H a l l

Maggie Babcock

Enon, OH

Phelps Hall

Cynthia Bannlnk

Holland

Llchty H a l l

Sarah Barendse

Grand Rapids

College East Apartments

Chad Barton

Holland

Durfee Hall

Brent Bash

Lelpsic, OH

Phelps Hall

m

Many students met at the Laketown Beach on Oct. 16, to pluck such treasures as bottles, glass, cigarette butts, and even a baby carriage wheel from the beach. "We've done the sweep five of the last six years, and to me the beach seemed a lot cleaner this year," said professor Stephen Hemenway, advisor for the Environmental Issues Group (EIG). "They have planted a lot

beach sweep t s

tsand ^ by

2 0 4

c a r r i e

Sophomore

Class

t e n n a n t

of dune grass on the beach, and this has kept people off part of the sand on the beach." The annual sweep lured fifteen students, along with Hemenway, to collect trash and record the total amount removed from the beach. EIG sponsors the event. "I think it's important that we take action to stop what we can stop," said junior Jesse Koskey, president of the Environmental Issues Group. "Especially with recycling, because that's something that a lot of people don't know about, and it makes a big difference." The group separated recyclables from non, and gave the four bags of trash to Saugatuck Dunes authorities. Students were surprised to discover three syringes along with their load of other unexciting trash. But the beach sweep accomplishes more than simply picking up junk. In at least one case, the tallies kept for the cleanup effort have had a positive effect on beach litter. According to Hemenway, on the first year of

the event students picked up hundreds of pieces of shotgun wadding. When it was discovered that most of them came from a shooting range in Wisconsin, officials took action. "They were told to stop shooting [over the water], and they did, and there have been fewer and fewer each year," Hemenway said. Participants included five members of the Centurian fraternity, who joined forces with EIG to clean up the Laketown Beach. "It went great," said senior Centurian John Delcalzo. "We got all kinds of great stuff, cleaned up, and had a great time. We are all pretty proud of ourselves." Beach sweepers said they enjoyed the chance to get outside and help the environment. "People were excited about it," Koskey said. "We had great weather and that makes a big difference." "I wish more people would have been there," Delcalzo said. "I wish we could clean more beaches, because I'm sure the other beaches are dirty too.'

Bash


h o p e

c o l l e g e

sophomores

Jeckman

Clifton

E r i n Beckman

Scottvllle

Phelps H a l l

Tim Bekkerlng

Holland

Durfee Hall

Angela Benson

Rosebush

Gllmore H a l l

Kelll Bltterburg

Cairo, Egypt

Dykstra Hall

Amanda Black

C a r t e r s v l l l e , GA

Dykstra H a l l

Jessica Black

Chardon, OH

S t r y k e r Cottage

Kyle Black

St. Johns

Kollen H a l l

Daryl Blood

S t a t e College, PA

Scott Hall

Kathleen Boes

Grand Rapids

Phelps Hall

A l l i s o n Bo l i n g

Troy

C e n t e n n i a l Park Apartments

Robin Bolt

Lansing

College East Apartments

Stacy Borden

Kalamazoo

Dykstra H a l l

Erlka Borgeson

Ann Arbor

Gllmore H a l l

Klmberly Bos

Kalamazoo

Brownstone Apartments

Jenny Boss

Holland

Phelps Hall

J i l l Bostelaar

Dewltt

Dykstra H a l l

Angela Boulls

Portage

Phelps H a l l

Brooke Bouma

Kalamazoo

Kollen H a l l

IP

Robert Brandt

Grand Rapids

College East Apartments

Rachel Breen

Husdonvllle

Llchty H a l l

Jon B r l c k n e r

Lansing

Durfee Hall

Ena Brooks

Kalamazoo

Gllmore H a l l

Angela Brown

Grand Haven

Voorhees Hall

J o n Brown

Holland

Durfee Hall

J e f f Burgess

Jenison

Holland

Anna Burns

Memphis, TN

Voorhees Hall

Ann By l a n d

Fremont

Gllmore Hall

Renee Carlson

Gladstone

Llchty H a l l

J u l l e Carpenter

Burkley

Kollen Hall

Michelle Chambers

Eaton Rapids

Deutches Haus

Diana Chamot

Haslett

Gllmore H a l l

Todd Chassee

Wyoming

Durfee Hall

Adrienne Christopher

Spring Lake

Llchty Hall

Kathryn Clndric

LaGrande, IL

Kollen Hall

Amie C l i f t o n

Bellevue, WA

Gllmore Hall

Sophomore

Class

2 0 5


h o p e

c o l l e g e

sophomores—

Cockman

i

Meagan Cockman

Davison

Voorhees H a l l

J a n e U e Coffey

Grand Haven

Llchty H a l l

Bryoe Cofflng

Ht. Vernon, OH

Kollen H a l l

C h r i s t y Colbrunn

Clarkston

Gllmore H a l l

Gary Cooper

St. Joseph

Kollen H a l l

Adrlanna Crain

Standish

Van Vleck H a l l

Seth Crawley

Oxford

Wyckoff H a l l

Noah Dale

Montpiller, VT

Durfee Hall

Dan Daly

East Grand Rapids

Holland

E l i z a b e t h Davidson

Holland

Gllmore H a l l

Nathan DeBoer

Muskegon

Durfee H a l l

K r l s t y Jo Deer

Cadillac

Kollen H a l l

Melanle De F e y t e r

Gladwin

Gllmore H a l l

David DeHommel

Jenlson

Scott H a l l

Kevin DeKam

Caledonia

Kollen H a l l

r Kurt DeMaagd

Zeeland

Voorhees Hall

Erin DeMeester

Rockford

Voorhees H a l l

Nicole Dennis

Fort Wayne, IN

Phelps Hall

Cory Den Uyl

Holland

College East Apartments

Rebecca deVelder

Somerset, NJ

Parkview Apartments

Kevin DeYoung

Jenlson

Van Zyl Cottage

Kirk DeYoung

Rock Rapids, IA

Durfee Hall

Dana Dillon

Lansing

Phelps H a l l

Jason Divozzo

Oak Park

Wyckoff Hall

Andrev Dressier

Kalamazoo

Reese Cottage

Stacy Drexler

Deerbrook, WI

De Graff Cottage

Angle Dyke

Husdonville

Voorhees H a l l

C h r i s t i n e Dykstra

Ludlngton

Gllmore H a l l

Chad Eastman

Ovlt

Durfee H a l l

Laurie E l l i s o n

Wayne

Voorhees H a l l

Caroline Enos

Gaylord

Kollen H a l l

Amie Evans

Mlddlevllle

Llchty H a l l

Brian Field

Rockford

Scott Hall

Chris Fink

Hudsonvllle

Kollen Hall

Victoria Folkerts Kollen Hall

2 0 6

Sophomore

Class

Oakland, NS


h o p e

c o l l e g e

sophomores

Gulkema

Robert F o l l e t t

Dowaglac

Vlsscher Cottage

Aaron Frank

P a l a t i n e , XL

Hollnad

J i l l Frederlckson

Puxlco, MO

Kollen H a l l

Andrew Frushour

Mason

Phelps Hall

Davn Garland

Wyoming

Voorhees H a l l

Mary Gehl

Chicago, XL

Voorhees Hall

Leon Gereax

Buelah

Scott H a l l

Mellsa Gibson

St. Anthony, MN

College East Apartments

Brandon Goodyke

Hudsonvllle

Kollen H a l l

Andrew Gookln

Traverse City

Durfee Hall

Meg Graske

Spring Lake

Van Vleck H a l l

Erica Gray

Allegan

College East Apartments

Megan Grey

Haslett

Gllmore Hall

J a n e t t e Grlebe

Chelsea

Verbeek Cottage

Kerry Gross

Kalamazoo

C e n t e n n i a l Park Apartments

Mark Gulkema

Caledonia

Kollen Hall

Every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday morning this semester, record numbers flocked to Dimnent Chapel for the morning service. Attendance is at an alltime high, with an estimated 1,200-1,300 people leaving standing room only for latecomers. They are accompanied by the rock beat of the Chapel Worship Team, including bongo drums, a drum set, bass, electric, and acoustic guitars, synthesizer, and yes, even a saxophone. "It is the work of God's Spirit and the spiritual hunger of the students that causes these huge mass attendances at Chapel services," said Ben Patterson, Dean of the Chapel. He also cites prayer, preaching of the Gospel, and the friendly relationships of the Chaplain's Office with the student body as factors in the growth of the chapel program. Faculty staff, and students give varied reasons for their attendance. "Worship is an important part of my faith, and

that is why I go to chapel," said senior Seth Kaper-Dale. "I am a fairly regular Chapel attender," said President John Jacobson in an April faculty meeting. "I enjoy being there because the atmosphere is exciting and upbeat. It is not subdued, but it is worshipful." The Chapel program began its rapid growth after the current Keppel House staff came on board in 1994 and changed the format from a more traditional style. When he was hired as the Dean of the Chapel, Patterson spoke with many students about what they would like to see in chapel. He discovered that they wanted to hear messages that related to issues that they faced in their student lives. They also favored singing and hearing more upbeat music. But there are some students who do not appreciate the more charismatic worship style. "I prefer a more intellectual method for approaching Christ," said senior Peter Ganeff.

Regardless of such criticism, the chapel program has continued to grow and enjoys the support of the administration. "In the last two years the Chapel program has attracted a great amount of participation and interest," said Jacobson in a faculty meeting last spring. "It has become visible and, indeed, it is often audible; and it has had, I believe, a very positive influence on the spiritual life of many students, faculty and staff, as well as upon people in the community and in the church who are touched by it," Jacobson said, u k

powpr

the

spirit by dan c a r r i e

Sophomore

c w i k & t e n n a t

Class

2 0 7


h o p e

c o l l e g e

sophomores

Guse

9

Lorl

9

Dowagiac

GUBO

Van Vlwck Hall

Michelle Halduc

Saline

DykBtra Hall

James Hamilton

Grand Rapids

OKWI Apartmontfl

Joy Hankamp

01 lmor<- Hnll

Robb Harmsen

Marne Hamilton

Scott Hall

Instead of slaying at grandma's house and ea(ing leftover turkey again over Christmas break, 121 students ventured to the Urbana Missions Conference. Held of the University of Illinois campus every three years, Urbana gathers speakers, missions agencies, and students from around the world. The focus was how to serve God, whether it at home or abroad. Chaplain Delores Nasrallah called Urbana "a soul searching experience and an opportunity to let God shine His flashlight into our hearts." Five intense days brought this opportunity to soulsearch. The preparation began in October as Lori Fair, the Director of Campus Outreach, introduced the conference in chapel. After

searph Of Âąne . neart by

n i k e l l e

2 0 8

S o p h o m o r e

j o h n s o n

C l a s s

&

the group formed, they met to pray and prepare for the trip. Fair christened her group •"Urbana-heads." Gathering in the darkness of early morning and the coldness of December, the group met to begin their road trip. The orange and blue of the three buses contrasted to the dull, grey sky and the miles of corn fields as they finally arrived at U of I. Encountering what was the first of many lines, the UrbanaHeads shuffled through tables at the registration hall. They then went various ways to what would be their home for the next five days. Their homes were vacant U of I student dorm rooms. After unpacking, meeting roommates, and rushing through dinner, they headed to the assembly hall for the first evening session. Seas of people streamed into the Assembly Hall, but the Urbanites sat together in the general sessions. They looked minuscule in comparison to the I9,()(){) other people there from around the world. "God made me aware of how many people are here to do his work," said sophomore Laura Newman. After the speakers and general sessions, some free time allowed

amanda

b l a c k

each of the students to meet new people for lunch, nap or do some reading. The mornings and evenings brought an opportunity to meet together as small groups in the dorms to pray and learn about people from around the world. "I have three new friendships with international students because of Urbana. God's grace is so immense," said sophomore Meg Gustafson. The effects of Urbana lasted even after it officially ended at midnight January I with communion. At a final meeting of the urbana heads. Fair had some parting words. "It is my hope that you've walked away from Urbana convicted and God changed your hearts." For juniors Matt Kuiper and Mark LaChonce, and sophomore Amie Clifton, Urbana left them with a need to pray. They formed the World Prayer MOB which meets weekly to pray for others around the world and on campus. "Urbana was awesome, but I think the heart and the fire I carried away from it will be much more satisfying in the long run," said sophomore Megan Hicks,


h o p e

Harrand

c o l l e g e

sophomores 1 9

9

Klein

7

Amy Harrand

Traverse City

Phelps Hall

Melissa Hart

Buchanan

Kollen Hall

Karen Hasse

Three Rivers

Welmers Cottage

Jeremy H e a v l l i n

Fennvllle

Scott Hall

Sarah Hendrlck

Grand Haven

Lampen Cottage

Jason Hester

Grand Blanc

Reese Cottage

Megan Hicks

Trabuco Canyon, CA

Welmers Cottage

Erik Hlemstra

Wyoming

Wyckoff H a l l

Katie H l l b r e c h t

Kalamazoo

Centennial Park Apartments

Brlen H i l l s

Grand Haven

Gllmore Hall

James Hllmert

Fort Wayne, IN

Kollen Hall

Johnny Ho

Holland

Durfee H a l l

, Hopkins

Kathleen Ho: Gllmore Hall

... Grosse Polnte

Dawn HolHdge. Phelps Hall

... Grand Rapids

Kate Horjus .... Phelps Hall

E r i n Horrigan

West Olive

Klelnheksel Cottage

Kelly Howard

Columbus, OH

Gllmore Hall

Heather Hulzing

Northvllle

College East Apartments

Laurie H u t c h e n r e u t h e r

Southfleld

Llchty Hall

Liz Huxley

Alma

Brumler Apartments

Michael I n g e r s o l l

Kalamazoo

Kollen Hall

Karl Jackson

Canton

College East Apartments

Nlkelle Johnson

Midland

C e n t e n n i a l Park Apartments

Zach Jonker

Petoskey

Van Saun Cottage

C h r i s t i n a Kaminskas ....

... Grand Rapids

Gllmore Hall

J e n n i e Karr

Prospect Heights, IL

Phelps H a l l

Carine Kauffman

Wilmette, IL

Bledler Apartments

Leslie Kay

C r y s t a l Lake, IL

Gllmore Hall

Heidee Kemnic

Holland

Holland

Rachel Kemink

Grandville

Gllmore Hall

Kimberly Kent

Chicago

S t r y k e r Cottege

Matthew Kern

Farmington H i l l s

Scott Hall

Katie Keyes

Wyoming

Kollen Hall

Sarah Klaasen

Holland

Gllmore H a l l

Matt Klein

DeWitt

Kollen Hall

Sophomore

Class

2 0 9


h o p e

c o l l e g e

sophomores

Kobylak

9

Greg Kobylak

Troy

Durfpp Hall

Tamml Konynenbelt

Holland

Holland

Craig Kopaa

Midland

Kollen Hall

Shojl Koreeda

Ann Arbor

Voorhees Hall

K a r r i Kronemeyer

Orlando, FL

Gilmore Hall

Almee Kubaaiak

Battle Creek

Phelps Hall

Sarah Kulpers

Grandvllle

Hlndkamp Cottage

J o r l Kumpf

Mt. Prospect, IL

French House

J e n n i f e r LaBell

Osslneke

Kollen Hall

Phung Lam

Holland

Durfee Hall

K r l s t l Langland

Holland

Kollen Hall

Ben Lappenga

Holland

Durfee Hall

Tony LaSoraa

Kentvood

Holland

Kerl Lav

Nlles

Gilmore Hall

J e n n i f e r LeVan

Constantlne

Van Drezer Cottage

Kate Llntemuth

Holland

Gilmore Hall

Jeanne Longstreet

Hudsonvllle

Holland

G r i f f i n Loynes

Haslett

Kollen Hall

Jessica Luecht

Germantown, WI

Holland

David Lunn

Holland

Durfee Hall

Ryan Luurtsma

Hudsonvllle

Kollen Hall

Michelle Lynch

Battle Creek

Phelps Hall

Mary MacDermald

Vassar

College East Apartments

Stacey Mackowlak

Walled Lake, Wl

Phelps Hall

Melissa Manchester

Hartland

Llchty Hall

Melissa Marema

Grand Rapids

Ross Cottage

Kelly Martin

Osvego, 1L

Llchty Hall

Megan Masta

Jonesvllle

Kollen Hall

Stacey Mathlesen

Rldgeway, NJ

Gilmore Hall

Tonl May

Portland

Kollen Hall

Erin Mayer

Chardon, OH

S t r y k e r Cottage

Tracy McArthur

Holt

Voorhees Hall

Dan McCue

Bexley, OH

Durfee Hall

Mike McCune

Lansing

Kollen Hall

Benjamin McLouth Biedler Apartments

2 1 0

S o p h o m o r e

Class

Shelby

9


h o p e

McPherson

c o l l e g e

sophomores

Metzler

Matthew McPherson

Holland

Durfee Hall

Renata Melxner

Brighton

College East Apartments

Beth Mejuer

Kalamazoo

Kollen Hall

Kevin Menken

Holland

Scott Hall

Calvin M e r r l t t

Hudsonvllle

Holland

Josh Metzler

Chelsea

VanZyl Cottage

1

Last year. Public Safety recorded sixteen students involved in serious alcoholrelated incidents, ranging from severe property damage to the four or five alcohol poisonings, said Dr. Darell Schregardus, Assistant Dean for Health and Counseling and Director of Counseling. One student nearly died from excessive alcohol consumption. "How much of a problem do we need to have before we say that's too much?" Schregardus said. "If we say that it's somebody else's problem then we are in denial as a campus community." In a Harvard University study from 1993, 140 colleges showed that 63 percent of males and 56 percent of females were binge drinkers. The clinical definition of binge drinking is five or more drinks in a row one or more times during a two week period for men, and four or more drinks in a row at the same frequency for women. A drink is defined as a 12-ounce beer, a 12-ounce wine cooler, a four ounce glass of wine, or a shot of liquor. The Health Clinic conducted a survey of 295 students last February and March, of whom 53 percent of men and 18 percent of women surveyed said they drank weekly. Of the survey group, 13 percent of men and 18 percent of women said they abstained completely from alcohol consumption. But, it is important to keep in mind this is not representative of campus life due to

sample size and several uncontrolled variables within the survey. Although it would be unfair to draw conclusions from this survey, Schregardus said it is a problem that needs to be addressed here. "Students tell me that it's serious enough of a problem," he said. "And we as professionals have seen enough of the damaging effects." Some of the more frequent problems resulting from an occasion of binge drinking, as quoted from the Harvard study, are hangovers, doing something later regretted, missing class, or forgetting bits and pieces of the previous night. In the Harvard study, 14 percent of women and 17 percent of men were hurt or injured and 26 percent of women and 33 percent of men engaged in unplanned sexual activity as a direct result of binge drinking. Schregardus cited the need for greater visibility of people willing to help those with alcohol-related problems. One such group is AIM (Alcohol Issues Matter), a student-run group that works to increase

alcohol awareness on campus. AIM puts on a number of social and educational programs throughout the year, including "Cocoa in the Grove." In the Pine Grove, the organization provides an alcohol-free environment to socialize, supplying hot cocoa in cups with information about alcohol printed on them. "AIM is not anti-party," said Kevin Burgun, president of AIM. "Our mission is to promote the responsible use of alcohol if one chooses to do so and support those who choose to abstain." In addition to this, the Frost Research Center, Student Congress, and administrative departments are tools that can be used to increase awareness of alcohol-related problems and improve the situation, he said. Despite his view on the entrenchment of drinking in our society, Schregardus expressed optimism that society will be able to address issues around irresponsible drinking. "I really think we can do it," Schregardus said. "We've changed society's actions and behaviors towards smoking and in areas such as caring for the environment.'

social sEfehed by

dave

c l a u s s e n

Sophomore

i

Class

2 1 1


h o p e

c o l l e g e

sophomores

Mezeske

1

Emily Mezeske

Holland

Van Vleck Hall

Ryan M i l l e r

Haslett

Wyckoff Hall

J i H Modrak

Alpena

Phelps Hall

Fablola Monroy

Lima, Peru

Llchty Hall

Matthew Morgan ,

. Rockford

Scott Hall

J u l i e Morin...

Holland

Holland

Melody Morscheck Centennial Park

B r e t t Mulder ..

.Kalamazoo Holland

Durfee Hall

T. Ryan Mulder

. Caledonia

Kraker Aparti

Stephen Mugg ..

Holland

Holland

Jessica Nelson ....

Ludington

Dykstra H a l l

Laura Neumann....

L i n c o l n s h i r e , XL

Gllmore H a l l

Josh Nevcks

I n d i a n a p o l i s , IN

Dosker Cottage

K a t h r y n Nichols . Llchty Hall

K a t h r y n Nixon....

Basking Ridge, NJ New Lenox, IL

Kollen Hall

tudents make a trek through mounds of snow from dorms on the south side of campus to Phelps dining hall. Nobody will forget the cold and snow throughout the winter season that never seemed to end. The Arctic like weather caused class across campus to be canceled for the first time in over a decade. (Photo by Zach Johnson)

2 1

2

Sophomore

i

Class

9

9

Nixon


h o p e

c o l l e g e

sophomores

Norden

Qulmby

Andy Norden

Jenlson

Scott Hall

Tony Norris

Hastings

Kollen Hall

Anthony Olds

Charlotte

Phelps Hall

Caroline Olds

Kalamazoo

College East Apartments

Suzanne Onken

Stevensville

Lichty H a l l

Nate Oostendorp

Zeeland

Voorhees H a l l

Robert Oostveen

Galesburg

Scott Hall

J a c l y n Ornee

Zeeland

Lichty Hall

J e a n Oselka

New B u f f a l o

Klaasen Apartments

Erin Overmeyer

Fort Wayne, IN

College East Apartments

Adam P a a r l b e r g

Caledonia

College East Apartments

Dvayne Pablsz

Eastpolnte

Scott Hall

Steve Paplavsky

Grand Rapids

Kollen Hall

Michelle P a r k h u r s t

Grand Rapids

Phelps Hall

Debbie P a t e r i k

Orland Park, XL

Klaaren Cottage

Anna Patmos

Hudsonville

Gllmore Hall

Dan P a t t e r s o n

Holland

Scott Hall

Kevin Paulisse

Grandville

Voorhees Hall

Lance P e l l o v

Canton

Reese Cottage

J e f f Penney

Rochester

Beadier Cottage

Amy P e t t y

Chelsea

College East Apartments

Bradley Peuler

Wyoming

Scott Hall

Mark Piersma

Kentwood

Kollen Hall

Mike P o r t e r

West Bloomfield

Belt Cottage

Melissa Powell

Naperville, IL

Kollen Hall

David Powers

Grand Rapids

Kollen Hall

Megan Powers

Jackson

Lichty Hall

-"f

Christy P r a t t

Jackson

Kollen H a l l

Wes P r e s c o t t

Ludington

Holland

Michael P r i e s

Grand Rapids

Kollen Hall

Stacey P r i n c e

Watervllet

Gllmore Hall

Amanda Pryor

Marshall

College East Apartments

Matthew Putnam

Greenville

Kollen Hall

Nicole Putzke

New B u f f a l o

Claasen Apartments

Beth Qulmby

W i l l l a m s v i l l e , NY

Welmers Cottage

Sophomore

Class

2 1 3


h o p e

sophomores

Ramthun

MarUee Ramthun

Montague

Gllmore H a l l

J o e l Rasdall

Durango, CO

Durfee Hall

Emily R a t e r l n g

Green Lake, WI

Gllmore Hall

Matthew Reynolds

Lansing

Mandeville Cottage

J e n n i f e r Richardson

Sterling

Centennial Park Apartments

Scott Richardson

Glen Arbor

Scott Hall

Anna Rlggs

Wllmette, IL

Gllmore H a l l

Guy Rlsedorph

Grant

Scott Hall

J e n n i e Robblns

Kalamazoo

College East Apartments

Jase Roberts

Lexington

Scott Hall

Jessica Robinson

Grand Rapids

Van Vleck Hall

Andrew Roelofs

Hudsonvllle

Kollen H a l l

Anne Roulo

Westland

Van Vleck Hall

Mary Roush

Midland

Llchty Hall

Nadla Samhourl

Bloomfleld H i l l s

Phelps Hall

Amy Sanders

Stanwood

S t r y k e r Cottage

Joshua Schlcker

Roscommon

Phelps Hall

Amanda Schneider

Birmingham

Voorhees Hall

Karl Schneider

Birmingham

Llchty Hall

Chris Schol t e n

Allendale

Durfee Hall

Gretchen Schoon

Holland

College East Apartments

G a r r e t t Schulz

River Forest

Kollen Hall

K a t r l n Seld

Muskegon

Kollen Hall

Ryan Shaw

West Branch

Van Zyl Cottage

Sandy Sheppard

Holland

Llchty Hall

Erin S h l e l

Shawney Mission, KS

College East Apartments

Ray Shock

Holt

Kollen Hall

Ben Slkma

Momence, IL

Durfee Hall

Matt Simons

Plerson

Vlsscher Cottage

Karen Smallegan

Hudsonvllle

Gllmore H a l l

Darcy Smith

Muskegon

Kollen Hall

Eunice Smith

Zeeland

College East Apartments

Kelly Smith

Dorr

Scott Hall

Rachel Smith

Nunlca

Deutsches Haus

Sarah Snyder Kollen Hall

2 1 4

c o l l e g e

Sophomore

Class

S t e r l i n g Heights

Snyder


h o p e

c o l l e g e

sophomores

: Spalding

Swets

J e n n i f e r Spalding

Brighton

Kollen H a l l

C r y s t a l Sprouse

Kansas City, MO

Van Vleck H a l l

Beth St. C l a i r

St. Louis, MO

Dykstra H a l l

C a t h e r i n e Stedman

Chenoa, XL

Klaaren Cottage

Pat Stegeman

Caledonia

Phelps H a l l

Marl Stephan

Cadillac

Phelps H a l l

Paul S t e r n

Big Rapids

Durfee H a l l

Karin Stevens

Haslett

Gilmore Hall

Mary S u l l i v a n

Rochester, NY

Kollen Hall

Ben Swets

Grand Rapids

Kollen Hall

w

When people think of Nykerk they think of girls singing, acting and giving orations. Another side of Nykerk that is sometimes quiet but never overlooked is the morale guys. "I love morale. It's been great for me as a coach to get to know some younger Hope students that I wouldn't necessarily have gotten to meet. I have been blessed with a great group of guys to coach," said James Palmer, an alumni of the class of '98 team and morale coach for 2000. The job of the morale guy is to entertain the girls at the end of each practice with antics such as silly skits and songs. In addition, morale guys decorate the doors of their Nykerk girls and serve them at the Nykerk Breakfast. "I feel morale allows people to find out what their classmates are really like and have tons o' fun at the same time," said Seth Crawley, a Moraler for the class of '99. "The whole Nykerk experience is like a month-long sugar rush." Although moraling is a lot of fun, it is also a big time and money commitment. Morale guys spend as much time over the course of three weeks creating skits and songs as the song and play girls spend in practice. They also pay for their t-shirts which donned nicknames such as "Lightning," "Flash,"

"Marlon Brando" and "James Bond." "The morale guy is more than just a clever name on the back of a t-shirt; a morale guy represents class, style, enthusiasm, creativeness and all-out craziness!" said Matt Simons, a moraler for the class of '99. On Nykerk night the morale guys entertained the song girls before they performed and psyched the girls up during intermission. The morale guys' enthusiasm and bright smiles helped lead the class of '99 to victory. "Nykerk morale is in a class all by itself, said Simons. It's not like the Pull, not like the HopeCalvin game, it's not like Spring Fling, it's not the grand sound of the symphonette窶年ykerk morale is an entity of enthusiasm."^

faces

. behind I *

r

l

by

a n n i e

j a k o s z

spirit Sophomore

Class

2 1 5


h o p e

c o l l e g e

sophomores

Tanls

9 Ryan Tanls

9

Holland

Durfee Hall

Robert Temple

Canton

Voorhees Hall

David Theune

Spring Lake

Durfee Hall

E r i n Thompson

Howell

Phelps Hall

J a n n a h Thompson

Port S a n i l a c

Dykstra Hall

K a t h e r l n e Tigelaar

Gi l f o r d , CT

Gllmore Hall

Rebecca Timmer

P e l l a , IA

Dykstra Hall

Mike Toburen

Hastings

Kollen Hall

Aaron Todd

Holland

Durfee H a l l

A l i c i a Tomicich

P a c i f i c , MO

Phelps Hall

Darren Toohey Holland Mike Traver

Australia Port Huron

Wyckoff Hall

Next year, one of the campus's oldest residence buildings will no longer be housing students. The loss of Centennial Park Apartments has affected housing plans for over 100 residents. The building held 48 apartments, many of them designed for two people. The loss of these apartments was supposed to be offset by the construction of Cook Residence Hall, but students who lived in apartments are leery of the dorms. "Although the building is old an has various problems (leaking sinks, etc.), it has character. 1 will definitely miss living there," said sophomore Katie Hilbrecht.

ne

by

2 1 6

Sophomore

Class

k e r r y

g r o s s

Living in Centennial Park afforded many advantages including the "off-campus" feel of its location and the view of the tulip-lined Centennial Park along with the uniqueness of each apartment. Built in 1927, the building has led a varied life. It began as a Masonic Temple then was renewed with medical offices. By the mid-80's, the offices began to dwindle. The college leased it in 1986 from the Keystone Company. At this time 10th Street landmark underwent significant changes. "CP," as it is affectionately called by its residents has a rich history with the college. One of the most interesting stories included the 1993 complete flooding of the basement and first floors, which resulted in new furnishings and carpets for these areas. The seventy-five year-old plumbing and the high maintenance costs have prompted the college to let the Keystone lease lapse. Centennial Park will be missed in the future. "1 think that I am going to miss CP apartments. I loved being right next to the park and our apartment was huge compared to the other campus apartments," said Hilbrecht.


h o p e

c o l l e g e

sophomores

Uddln

Zanin

Saml Uddln

Elgin, IL

Wyckoff Hall

Bryan Van Haltsma

Scotvllle

Wyckoff Hall

Christopher VanDeven

Fort Gratiot

Cosmopolitan H a l l

J e f f VanderLaan

Kentwood

College East Apartments

Heidi VanderLugt

Kalamazoo

Phelps Hall

Bethanle Vander Kamp

Grand Rapids

College East Apartments

Chris Vander S l i c e

Shelby

Durfee Hall

Melissa VanNull

Holland

Phelps H a l l

Sarah Van Spronsen

Grand Rapids

Dykstra Hall

Mike Veen

Pentwater

Durfee Hall

Ben Velderman

Zeeland

Zeeland

Heather V e l t l n a

Byron Center

C e n t e n n i a l Park Apartments

Jonathan Vertalka

Grand Ledge

Durfee Hall

Kim V l l e t s t r a

Kalamazoo

Dykstra Hall

Amy Vos

Holland

Phelps Hall

Richard Voss

Ludlngton

Durfee H a l l

Mlml Vacker

I n d i a n a p o l i s , IN

Llchty Hall

J e n n i f e r Warren

Hastings

Gilmore Hall

Mlsten Weeldreyer

Mattawan

Gilmore Hall

ToddWendrlck

Brighton

Durfee Hall

Heather Wesp

Big Rapids

Dykstra Hall

Bethany Wezeman

Palos Heights, IL

Phelps H a l l

Michelle Wilcox

Lake Odessa

Dykstra Hall

Almee Williams

Stevensvllle

Kollen Hall

Rachel Williams

Greenville

Kollen Hall

Llndsey Woodstra

Grand Rapids

Ross Cottage

Kelly Yager

Dexter

Gilmore H a l l

n

E l i z a b e t h Yared

East Grand Rapids

Gilmore Hall

Jessica Zayaz

Frultport

Phelps Hall

Kelly Zweerlng

Hudsonvllle

Gilmore H a l l

Andrew Zwyghulzen

Rockford

Durfee Hall

Glna Zanln

College East Apartments

Lemont, IL

Sophomore

Class

2 1 7


h o p e

c o l l e g e

freshmen

Aalderlnk

1 9

Robin A a l d e r l n k

Holland

Phelps Hall

Gerald Abbett

LaCrosse, IN

Kollen Hall

Amanda Ackerson

Mason

Dykstra H a l l

Christopher Acton

Rochester, NY

Phelps Hall

E l i z a b e t h Alossa

Parkrldge, IL

Dykstra H a l l

Lindsay Albers

Hamilton

Kollen Hall

K a t h e r l n e Alverson

Holland

Dykstra H a l l

Sarah Anders

South Butler,NY

Dykstra

E l i z a b e t h Anderson

Malta,IL

Voorhees Hall

Kelly Anderson

Muskegon

Dykstra H a l l

Dana Andrews

Petoskey

Kollen Hall

Andy Ardema

Kalamazoo

Durfee H a l l

Meredith Arvady

Kalamazoo

Dykstra H a l l

A l l i s o n Ash

Grosse Polnte

Kollen Hall

Ryan Atwell

Muscatine, IA

Phelps Hall

E l l l z a b e t h Bailey

Okemos

Dykstra

Jessica Baker

Woodstock, IL

Voorhees

Ross Baldwin

Lansing

Kollen Hall

Michelle B a r n e t t

Alpena

Dykstra Hall

Glenda B a r n h a r t

Wyoming

Dykstra H a l l

Matt Baumann

Johnsburg, IL

Phelps Hall

A n j a n e t t e Baver

Bessemer

Kollen Hall

Kevin Bazan

Allegan

Wyckoff Hall

Sacha Beery

Wooster, OH

Kollen Hall

J u l i e Beglln

Marshall

Voorhees Hall

Nick B e l l l l

Clio

Cosmopolitan H a l l

Kelly Bellgraph

Hastings

Gllmore Hall

Paul Bengellnk

Holland

Durfee Hall

Chris Bennett

Midland

Cosmopolitan H a l l

J i l l Bennlnk

Mason

Dykstra H a l l

Timothy Bensen

Wllllamston

Durfee H a l l

Andrew Berdasono

St. C l a i r Shores

Kollen Hall

Erik Berg

Lansing

Wyckoff Hall

Kate Berghorst

Hudsonvllle

Dykstra H a l l

Paul Berke

Park Ridge, IL

Kollen Hall

Carrie Berlin

East Polnte

Phelps Hall

Reld Beyerleln

Royal Oak

Scott Hall

Nicholas Blaglnl

DeWltt

Cosmopollltan Hall

Eric Bishop

Saginaw

Scott Hall

Sara Bishop

Dewltt

Dykstra Hall

Paul Blsson

Muskegon

Scott Hall

Tara Blacqulere

Caledonia

Kollen Hall

Bryan Boersma

Holland

Durfee H a l l

Chad B o l l i n g e r

Petoskey

Scott Hall

J e n e t t e Bonglorno

Oxford

Gllmore H a l l

Howdy Bouton

Hinsdale, IL

Kollen H a l l

Thomas Bouwens

Zeeland

Durfee Hall

Gretchen Bouwer

Grand Rapids

Dykstra Hall

2 1 8

Freshmen

Class

Bouwer 9

7


h o p e Bowling

c o l l e g e

—-freshmen 1 9

9

Buege

7

Letty Bowling Dykstra Hall Kerrl Boouvs Gllmore Hall Mark B r a y Kollen Hall P a t r i c k Bremmer Kollen Hall Curtis Brinks Scott Hall S a r a h Brock Dykstra Hall

Byron Center Holland Plymouth Grand Rapids Middle view Lansing

S a r a Brown Dykstra Hall J o s h u a Brugger Durfee Hall J e f f Brust Wyckoff Hall S t e p h a n i e Brursema Dykstra Hall Court Buchanan Kollen Hall Jeremy Buege Phelps Hall

The Children's After School Achievement Program (CASA) at Hope received support from a variety of businesses and local organizations for its work with local elementary school children. Such grants were essential in making it possible for CASA to provide its after-school and summertime programs for local elementary age children according to Connie Brummel, the director of the CASA program. The goals of the program included providing academic support, cultural awareness and substance abuse prevention. The program was intended to increase high school graduation rate and decrease the risk of drug and alcohol abuse among its students. Another goal of the program was to inform parents of their children's experience in CASA and to become more involved their children's education. The CASA program established by Marge Rivera was initially housed at the First United Methodist Church and administered by Latin Americans United for Progress. The program became a part of Hope in 1989.

The 1996-97 program afforded 87 kindergarten through fifth grade students with the opportunity to participate in CASA. The program began in late September and met twice a week in Lubbers Hall for two hours per session. Some students were involved in the program to gain experience for an education major, but the majority just enjoyed volunteering. Sophomore volunteer Brian Field reflected on his experience. "It was a unique way for Hope to interact with the community," he said. Grants from the First of America Bank and Herman Miller supported the annual summer session that runs for six weeks each year. The Holland Community Foundation provided funds for a newsletter for CASA parents. Funding for additional books for reading instruction was made possible by the Holland Junior Welfare League. Area Target Stores and Holland Community Hospital provided funds to support the 1996-97 academic year program. Specific book titles were selected under the advisement of

Kingsly Grand Haven P a l a t i n e , IL Holland West W i n f l e l d , NY Evart

Sharon Iverson, a librarian with Holland Public Schools, and Richard Mezeske of the Hope education faculty. Mezeske was involved in CASA "to encourage students in (his) literary education courses to participate in the vital mentoring and tutoring which CASA offers area elementary students in the program." Each of the five awards CASA recently received were for less than $1000 proving that it does not take hundreds of thousands to make a significant difference in the program.

grants

live flife to by

a n n - m a r i e

Freshmen

campion

Class

2 1 9


h o p e

c o l l e g e

freshmen -

Burdo

1

9

9

Dykstra Hall Dykstra Hall Dykstra H a l l Durfee Hall Durfee Hall Kollen H a l l

Dykstra Hall Phelps Hall Dysktra Hall Dykstra H a l l Durfee Hall Phelps H a l l

ta

Taking a break from classes for the Critical Issues Symposium has been a fall tradition since 1980. The Symposium provided the opportunity to excite discussion, inspire thought, and link education to the community and the world around Holland. Noted speakers and experienced media members discussed "The Role of Media in American Society." A series of keynote addresses, focus sessions, and a final round table discussion allowed students to examine how the media operates and its roles in each of our lives. "Presenters spoke about media selection, and factors which shape the information we receive from the media," said senior communications major Dan Foster. Opening the session, Pamela

Shoemaker, a public communication professor from Syracuse University, delivered the speech "Mediating the Images: Influences that Shape Media Content." "She talked about the thing that journalists should be—the critical thinking skills that are at the heart of journalism," said Assistant Provost Alfredo Gonzales. Focus sessions followed the keynote address. These ranged from issues of power, MTV, censorship, to minorities in the media. Students met in smaller groups to discuss the ideas presented. Students even sat on the floor of Maas to hear local television personality Lori Cook, also known as Miranda. The focus sessions allowed students to converse with presenters, ask questions and meet in a personal setting. Political Science professor David Ryden referred to the focus sessions, "a nerve-wracking enjoyable and stimulating experience." "The crowd was very engaged, and asked great questions, so we had a very lively dialogue, which I really enjoyed," said

making media issue by

2 2 0

amanda

Freshmen

b l a c k

Class

Ryden. Jeff Cohen, the Executive Director of Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting, brought a different view point with his speech, "Media in the American Political Process." He criticized the media's lack of fairness and blamed partly on the big companies that own most outlets. The former chair of the National Endowment for the Arts, John Frohnmayer, gave a controversial speech. Foster said he "argued that the first amendment should guarantee complete freedom because out of the cacophony of voices truth will ultimately emerge." He added that "this relativistic view of the truth was challenged by members of the audience." Ryden said that the Symposium is vital for community relations. "[The local papers] serve as a key link between Hope and the community in which it is located. This compels the school to maintain good relations with the media and likewise that the media be responsible in its coverage of what is going on at the school. 1 think that the relationship is a healthy one."


h o p e

c o l l e g e

freshmen

Cogan

Estes

Dykstra Hall R a c h e l Comegys Dykstra Hall Ruby Cook Dykstra Hall Tracy C o r n e l l Dykstra Hall

Fremont Holland

Durfee Hall Phelps Hall

Durfee Hall E r l c k a Cunningham Dykstra Hall . . . H i c k o r y H i l l s , IL Dykstra Hall Kollen Hall Kollen Hall Kristy Dalrymple Dykstra Hall

Van Vleck Hall Lichty Hall Gllmore Hall Dykstra Hall J o e l l e n Delong Dykstra Hall Banu D e m l r a l p Dykstra Hall

... I s t a n b u l , T u r k e y

Dykstra Hall Kollen Hall Phelps Hall J u l i e DeVlsser Kollen Hall Rebecca DeVrles Dykstra Hall J o n a t h a n DeWaal Cosmopolitan Hall

Holland ,.. I n d i a n a p o l i s , IN

Kollen Hall P a t r i c i a DeYoung Dykstra Hall Zach D i c k i n s o n Scott Hall P h i l i p DlllllnghaiD Kollen Hall Voorhees Hall Dykstra Hall

Lichty Hall Kollen Hall K a t h e r l n e Drop Van Vleck Hall Dykstra Hall Dykstra Hall Gllmore Hall

>H

Dykstra Hall Phelps Hall Stephanie Dykhuls Dykstra Hall A l i s o n Elchman Dykstra Hall

, Dovners Grove, IL

Kollen Hall Dykstra Hall

Dykstra Hall Scott Hall Kollen Hall Dykstra Hall College East Apartments Dykstra Hall

Freshmen

Class

2 2

1


h o p e

c o l l e g e

freshmen

Falconer

1

Daniel Falconer Kollen East Hall M i c h e l l e Fangmeler Dykstra Hall Michelle Fawley Dykstra Hall Melissa Feenstra Dykstra Hall Joslln Feinauer Dykstra Hall Ben F e l l o w s Phelps Hall

Traverse City

Portage Grand Haven R o y a l Oak Lansing

Roscommon Lansing Grand Rapids Grand B l a n c Edmore Watervliet

Learning the campus is challenging to each new student, but the challenge becomes greater for students with disabilities. It is the job of Louise Shumaker, the director of Student Disabled Services, and her seeing-eye dog named Willy to educate and help students face obstacles which must be overcome. About eighty students on campus have disabilities. They include physical handicaps as well as vitality problems, such as heart conditions and epilepsy. Most of the disabilities fall into four categories: vision impairments, hearing impairments, mobility problems, and other

campus trials da?ly life 2 2 2

j o r i

9

I n v e r g r o v e Hts, MN

Chad F e r g u s o n Kollen Hall Kevin F l t t o n Scott Hall David F l e m i n g Phelps Hall Sheri Folta Dykstra Hall J e s s i c a Forquer Phelps Hall Emilie Forrester Dykstra Hall

by

9

kumpf

Freshmen

Class

hidden impairments. Two women have vision impairments; one uses a cane and the other has a dog. The school allows these students to come to school early in August to learn the "floor plan." Shumaker said that four students use wheelchairs. They too are allowed to come early and learn which doors open with the push of a button and how to avoid stairs. Another option for visually impaired or learning disabled students is books on tape. Some textbooks come with a tape, but many have to be made by other students. Finding students willing to read a book onto a tape is something Shumaker has to arrange. Students also volunteer to read to these students, to help them with their studies. Most of the students with disabilities take about twelve credits each semester, so it often takes them an extra semester to graduate. Most plan to go on to graduate school. "Graduate school is important because employers expect more from people with disabilities. It takes more for them to prove their worth," Shumaker said. Smaller obstacles that these students overcome are transpor-

tation and little things like preparing themselves in the morning. A large obstacle is the lack of social inclusion. Many are not involved in campus organization or jobs, because it is difficult to be hired. As for eating, they are allowed to eat in the Kletz if they want because it is less crowded. Sophomore Kelly Martin found out what life was like with a disability when she was diagnoses with Epilepsy in the fall. "Epileptics must face prejudices and stigmas. For these reasons, they must try to hide their disability. Unfortunately, this contributes to the problem and keeps everyone unaware of the issues," she said. Each year, Shumaker organizes an awareness week for disabilities. Barriers are created for people who are ignorant of disabilities. Students experience these barriers to become more aware of what the campus challenges exist. During the week, Martin gave a speech for 50 members of the faculty and staff. "Hopefully the week will lead to year-round awareness and permanent understanding," Martin said.


h o p e Frentz

c o l l e g e

freshmen

Hoffman

Christopher Frentz Wyekoff Hall Aaron F r l t e s c h e Scott Hall E m i l y Fuqua Dykstra Hall Dave G a b r l e l s e Kollen Hall S e t h Oardner Phelps Hall Andrew Gee Kollen Hall

Haslett Okemos Ann Arbor Orland Park, IL B a t t l e Creek Grant

Scott Gerhardt Scott Hall B e t s y Gibbs Van Vleck Hall David Glancy Scott Hall J e n n i f e r GHesman Phelps Hall Adam G U l d d e n Phelps Hall Andrea Gondec Van Vleck Hall

Petoskey Grand Haven Fremont Macomb Delton Scottsdale

Ryan G o n z a l e s Durfee Hall E r i c Goodman Phelps Hall S t a c l Gordon Kollen Hall Laurie Gorter Dykstra Hall Lorl Gorter Llchty Hall Brian Grablnskl Durfee Hall T r a v i s Graham Scott Hall J e n n i f e r Gralow Dykstra Hall Thomas G r e e n d a l Wyckoff Hall E l i z a b e t h Greenwood Kollen Hall D a n i e l Griggs Durfee Hall P h i l i p Gronsman Voorhees Hall J e a n e t t e Grund Dykstra Hall C a r o l y n n Haase Dykstra Hall Thaddeus H a c k w o r t h Phelps Hall Nathan Hadley Phelps Hall Laura Hagaen Dykstra Hall Laura Hahn Dykstra Hall Matt H a h n f e l d Phelps Hall J a s o n Hald Kollen Hall Ashley Hall Dykstra Hall Jeremy H a r l n g Scott Hall C a r r i e Harlow Llchty Hall Jason Harris Voorhees Hall

Troy Okemos Dewltt Grand Rapids Wapun, WI S p r i n g Lake

Hudsonvllle G u l l d e r l a n d , MY Whitehall Downers Grove, IL Grand Rapids Los A n g e l e s , LA

Ishpemlng F o r t Wayne, IN S t . Joseph C l i n t o n Township Holland Midland

Midland Haslett F r a n k f o r t , IN T r a v e r s e City Lansing Alpena

H a r t w e l l Gary Scott Hall J e n n i f e r Harvey Dykstra Hall Matt H a s s e n r l k Durfee Hall Todd H a u l e n b e e k Phelps Hall Andrea Hays Dykstra Hall B r a d l e y Herrema Kollen Hall

Charlottesvle

K a t h l e Herweyer Dykstra Hall Amanda Heydon Dykstra Hall Tim Hoebeke Kollen Hall L i s a Hoekstra Phelps Hall Beth Hoffman Dykstra Hall K a t l Hoffman Van Vleck Hall

Kalamazoo

Freshmen

Columbus, OH Holland Kalamazoo Wllllamston Grand Rapids

Rockford Grand Rapids Grandvllle Park F o r e s t , IL Vlcksburg

Class

2 2 3


h o p e

c o l l e g e

freshmen

Hofman

1

9 * 9

Hussein g; 7

H e a t h e r Hofman Dykstra Hall Kollen Hall Kollen Hall Dykatra Hall Dykstra Hall Durfee Hall Aneglla Huddleston Dykstra Hall Cosmopolitan Hall H e i d i Huebner Llchty Hall Wyckoff Hall Dykstra Hall Wyckoff Hall

t

The air in Wichers Auditorium was charged with the desire to change the "Darker Vision of Hope" experienced by AfricanAmerican students. Around 100 students, faculty, and staff gathered to participate in the panel discussion sponsored by the Black Coalition, often speaking passionately about campus diversity. "[It] is not welcoming," said senior Zahra Ismaeli as she spoke of her first impression as a freshman at "Picnic in the Pine Grove." "I didn't see any minorities, and when I did see them, I saw Hispanics. And what were they doing? They were serving us dinner. 1 thought, '1 am in the wrong place.'" According to senior Ntsiki Sisulu, President of Black Coalition, the purpose of the panel was to start conversations about the black experience on campus. Sisulu sees a need to confront this issue. "As time goes on, you realize that getting used to it is not the way to go," she said. Moderator James Motiff began by talking about how signs advertising the panel discussion were removed and destroyed. According to Sisulu, all but three

the, rtfieed. for a ne.w. ^ vision by

2 2 4 F r e s h m e n

Class

c a r r i e

t e n n a n t

or four of the original 60 signs were taken down within 24 hours of their posting. Some were even burned. Panelists discussed the factors contributing to the low numbers of minority students on campus. Five percent of the student population is minority students, including 24 black students. "There are a number of things that makes it difficult to attract minorities [to campus]," said Steve Spencer, Assistant Professor of Psychology. According to Spencer, Hope has been "late in coming" to the issue of an emphasis in improving diversity. "We need to make this a major issue," he said. Jim Bekkering, VicePresident of Admissions, pointed out the racial disparity in the percentages of students accepted that choose to enroll. Overall, the percentages is 42%, while only 25% of African-American students who are accepted by Hope choose to enroll. "Many of these students visited the campus," Bekkering said. "As they looked at this place, 1 can speculate that they saw a sea of white faces." Marcus Robinson, panelist and Coordinator of MultiCultural Admissions, cited factors such as the low numbers of black faculty and staff, scant social and Continued on page 226


h o p e

c o l l e g e

freshmen

Hylen 1 9

9

Kilby

7

Kollen Hall Dykstra Hall Kollen Hall Dykstra Hall Dykstra Hall Dykstra Hall Cathleen Jaworowskl ... Dykstra Hall Cosmopolitan Hall Wyckoff Hall Katherlne Johnson Dykstra Hall

Grand Rapids

Dykstra Hall Dykstra Hall Holly Cosmopolitan Hall J e n n i f e r Kamphuls Dykstra Hall Durfee Hall J e n n i f e r Kasperskl Dykstra Hall

Coldwater

Dykstra Hall J e f f r e y Kauffman Scott Hall

Phelps Hall Kollen Hall Phelps Hall Dykstra Hall Dykstra Hall Kollen Hall

f f \ Dtu kri I ision OfHope: Tht Blark SiuJenl Lxpcrirnce

e*

panel discussion addressing the experience of the African American student on campus fills Wichers auditorium with students, faculty, staff, and community members. The event was sponsored by the Black Coalition as part of their commitment to expand campus diversity. (Photo by Anthony Perez)

j1

HOPE COLLEGE

7 BLACK mv/ COALITION

Freshmen

Class

2 2 5


h o p e

c o l l e g e

freshmen

Klrkpatrlck

9

Kevin Klrkpatrlck Scott Hall Kelly Klein Dykstra Hall J i l l Kllnger Dykstra Hall Peggy K l o t t Dykstra Hall N i c h o l a s Knebl Durfee Hall Adrlann Knepshleld Gllmore Hall

Knepshleld 9

Eureka, MO DeWltt Grand Rapids Kalamazoo Ludlngton Mlddletown

the, „need

for a

oordinator of Multicultural Admissions, Marcus Robinson, cites the low numbers of black faculty, scant social and cultural opportunities, and limited fields of study as discouraging to minority perspectives. (Photo by Anthony Perez)

o ConIinued from page 225 cultural opportunities for minority student?, and limite fields of study as discouraging to black/minority perspectives. "We need to commit to this issue in a concrete way," Robinson said. As an abstract principle, he said, many members of the community agree that more diversity is needed. But when it comes down to planning concrete changes, "some people at that point feel infringed upon," he said. Ismaeli brought up everyday difficulties for black students, such as the lack of black social life, magazines, radio stations, and hair products, even "going downtown and having people follow you." This says to black students that "Hope doesn't care about me. It doesn't see me as a need," she said. Some questioned the priority of minority issues when organizations such as Black Coalition, Hispanic Student Organization, and the International Relations Club regularly receive only half the funding requested from

2 2 6

Freshmen

Class

Student Congress. "I'm seeing students in pain and administrators and people with money," said sophomore Krista Brewer. "I hear all these wonderful ideas and I don't think that anything will happen." Because events of these multicultural organizations tend to draw few participants, they receive small amounts of money from the Appropriations Committee of Student Congress, according too Student Congress President Ryan Cook. But leaders argue that they are unable to plan large events with the budgets they have to work with. "I don't think the student body as a whole understands the importance of these speakers," Sisulu said. "How can you pay a speaker $5,000 when you have $200?" Robinson sees these organizations not as traditional clubs, but as advocacy groups for minority life-styles. The amount of money they receive from Student Congress sends a message about the priority of the life-style they support, he said.

"That is Student Congress saying. 'Here's how important we feel your issues are.' We need to look at funding these groups in a different way," Robinson said. Junior Crystal Wright sees a need for educating faculty as well as students in minority issues. "Many of the staff and faculty have no clue how to deal with minorities. You can't just include me by asking in class, "What is the black perspective?' That's not including me. That's excluding us," she said. Another audience member questioned the true extent of the college's commitment to expanding diversity. "If the campus and the institution is committed to serving the students, there needs to be an institutional commitment on the part of the institution from the top down," said a former staff member of another GLCA institution, who wished to remain anonymous. Robinson agreed. "When it's important to us, we put the full force of the institution behind it," he said.


h o p e

c o l l e g e

freshmen

Knight 1 9

9

Mill

7

Cynthia Knight Woorhees Hall L o r l Knudsen Dykstra Hall K r i s t i n Koolker Dykstra Hall J o n a t h a n Kopchlck Phelps Hall J e n n i f e r Kossorls Dykstra Hall M i c h e l l e Kramer Dykstra Hall C h a r l e s Krueger Kollen Hall Justin Kmpsky Kollen Hall M i c h a e l Ladd Phelps Hall R a c h e l Lamb Gllmore Hall Barbara Langeland Dykstra Hall Scott Langlols Voorhees Hall Tannla Lascano Gllmore Hall Jeremy L a t c h a v Scott Hall H a z e l Lawson Kollen Hall S t a c e y Lemke Dykstra Hall G r e t c h e n Lemmen Dykstra Hall Melyssa Lenon Van Vleck Hall Janet Llbrlzzl Dykstra Hall Renee L i c k Dykstra Hall Paul L l l U e Scott Hall Jarod Llppert Scott Hall J e s s i c a Loomls Van Vleck Hall Laurl Lorls Dykstra Hall Temple L o v e l a c e Dykstra Hall Chris Love Scott Hall J o l e n e Lukey Dykstra Hall Matthew M a h a f f e y Durfee Hall C h r i s t o p h e r Mahlmann Voorhees Hall J a s o n Main Cosmopolitan Hall Mary B e t h M a r c h l o n d a Van Vleck Hall J e n n i f e r Mark Dykstra Hall R o c h e l l e Marker Dykstra Hall Barclay Martin Kollen Hall Sarah Martin Dykstra Hall K r l s t l n e Martlno Van Vleck Hall Donna Maupln Dykstra Hall S u s a n McAndrew Dykstra Hall S t e v e n McBrlde Scott Hall J e s s i c a McCombs Dykstra Hall Drew M c C u l l e y Kollen Hall Todd McKlm Kollen Hall J i l l McKlnnen Dykstra Hall R a c h e l Meengs Phelps Hall Charrle Melnts Dykstra Hall L e s l i e Merrlman Gllmore Hall Renee Meyer Dykstra Hall Jennifer Mill Dykstra Hall

Freshmen

Kalamazoo S u t t o n s Bay Jenlson Grand Rapids Jenlson N a p e r v l l l e , IL

Jackson C l i n t o n Township Jackson B r o o k f i e l d , WI B e l l v o o d , IL Hopkins

Ecuador Charlotte P r i n c e t o n , IL Fenton Wlllllamston Mecosta

Orland Park, IL S h e l b y Township R o s e v l l l e , MN Alma Holland N l l e s , IL

G r a n v i l l e , OH Okemos Okemos Montezuma, IA T i f f i n , OH Lakevlew

New B a l t i m o r e Manistee Lansing Kansas City, KS Midland Mt. P r o s p e c t , IL

Northvllle Iowa City, IA Chicago, IL Holland Fanwood, NJ Rochester H i l l s

Chelsea Muskegon Okemos Hastings Mt. Vernon, IA South Haven

Class

2 2 7


h o p e

c o l l e g e

freshmen *

Miller

1 9

9

7

Amy M i l l e r Ollmore Hall David M i l l e r Phelps Hall Dykstra Hall Dykstra Hall Susan M i l l e r Phelps Hall Amy M o l d e n h a u e r Gllmore Hall Laurel Monette Dykstra Hall Dykstra Hall Dykstra Hall K e r l Moore Kollen Hall Llchty Hall Kim Morean Phelps Hall

This year the college became a microcosm of the fashion industry by showing off the latest styles, while at the same time, succumbing to the freshest social trends. While walking through the Pine Grove on an average day, students saw an eyeful of what to wear and how to dress from casual to dressy and from preppy to grunge. No matter what you liked to wear, the campus was well-represented across the gamut of fashion. "I see a lot of hats and polar fleeces," said junior Stacy Bogard. "It really appears that

. the, trends that define time by

2 2 8

g l y n

Freshmen

W i l l i a m s

Class

and

the fashion industry is wellrepresented here and that's a good thing. It's swell to have variety, otherwise all you see is yourself everywhere and no one else." The men on campus were conspicuously donned in stocking caps, polar fleeces, and could be seen sporting Oakley sunglasses, even when the sun was nowhere to be found. "It was big this year to have 'burns and wear your shades all the time," said freshman Dave Gabrielse. "I saw a lot of different lengths of the sideburns. Some guys had the little Luke Perry length, and others had fat Elvis chops." There were a few more options for women as far as the fashion lines went. Skinny strap tanks and overalls stole the scene while bandanas, beads and candied nail polish accessorized their attire. Mule shoes were the answer to the wooden shoe epidemic. People of both sexes enjoyed shaving their heads, piercing their bodies, wearing corduroy everything, and playing frisbee golf. "I think some things are unisex in nature and people of all

a n n - m a r i e

kinds like to wear them," said senior Aaron Smith. "Fashion and style is the universal and if it looks good then I say wear it." Catch phrases such as "phat," "whatever," and of course the oft used "Show me the money," from Jerry Mag aire were popular on campus all year long. "I think hip words from the sixties and seventies came back huge this year," said sophomore Tim Bekkering. "Words like groovy, phat, coolcat, stuff like that. I like it because you get a loose feeling and relaxed when you use words like those." As far as hobbies go, there is the mainstay of sign stealing, roller blading, and frisbee golf. Mostly, those are big every year, but it appeared that the golfers were out in full force this year. In fact, the Cosmopolitan and Centurian fraternities even sponsored a frisbee golf tournament late in the year. The big music of the school year past was Ani Difranco, Dave Matthews Band, the various chapel CD's, Jars of Clay, ESPN's Jock Jams, and the local paisley dAve, while the big hang out became the newly-opened Socrates Coffeehouse and Newscenter.

campion


Pyszora

3

K l r s t e n Morlan Dykstra Hall J e n n i f e r Morris Dykstra Hall C r a i g Morton Phelps Hall Doug Morton Voorhees Hall J a c k Muldaer Kollen Hall J e s s i c a Mulder Dykstra Hall

S h e l b y Township

K a t h r y n Mulder Phelps Hall B r i t t a n y Mull Voorhees Hall P e t e r Myers Durfee Hall Anna Naber Gllmore Hall J e s s a l y n n Nagy Van Vleck Hall J o h n Neeb Scott Hall

Holland

Bloomfleld Fruit port Portage Grand Rapids Queensbury, NY

Coopersvllle Western S p r i n g , XL Zeeland Canton Cedarburg, W1

Carrie N e v e l l Gllmore Hall Hal Nguyen Wyckoff Hall Eric Nichols Kollen Hall Greg N l e n h o u s e Kollen Hall Melllssa Nlenhuls Gllmore Hall Melissa Norrlf Voorhees Hall

Reed City Kentwood Grandvllle S p r i n g Lake Zeeland Plnckney

J o n l Norwood Kollen Hall Andrew Ohm Kollen Hall K r l s t y Oldham Gllmore Hall E l i z a b e t h Ornee Llchty Hall Andrew O t i s Scott Hall Michelle Oullette Dykstra Hall Cherylynn Outcall Gllmore Hall Sarah Pacclone Dykstra Hall N i c o l e Palmer Van Vleck Hall Laura P a r s o n s Dykstra Hall Brian Paul Scott Hall Trlchs Pearson Phelps Hall Kemberlee Pease Dykstra Hall S a r a h Pepper Phelps Hall Shonda Perdue Phelps Hall E r i c a Perez Gllmore Hall Ryan P e t e r s Scott Hall Jennifer Pett Phelps Hall Dave P h e l p s Phelps Hall Jonathan Phillips Cosmopolitan Hall Jenny Pierce Dysktra Hall J i l l Plerson Van Vleck Hall Christopher Poest Phelps Hall Casey P o r t e r Dykstra Hall Ashley Pries Phelps Hall Adrlenne Prince Voorhees Hall Andrew P r l n s Wyckoff Hall Marie P r o v o s t Gllmore Hall Erica Puntel Dykstra Hall J e n n i f e r Pyszora Dykstra Hall

Freshmen

Muskegon Grand B l a n c Lansing Zeeland East Jordan Mllford

I n d i a n a p o l i s , IN Portage Grand Haven Midland Bad Axe Apple V a l l e y , MN

Kalamazoo Lake Odessa Lalngsburg Flint T r a v e r s e City Holland

Evart Traverse City South Haven B a t a v l a , IL B r u n s w i c k , OH Stockbrldge

Byron Center Mt. P l e a s a n t East L a n s i n g A l l e n Park C e n t e r v l l l e , OH C l i n t o n Township

Class

2 2 9


h o p e

c o l l e g e

freshmen

Ramirez

1 9

Vanessa Ramirez Phelps Hall Clinton Randall Kollen Hall Karl Rasche Kollen Hall Joshua Rasdall Scott Hall Jason Redoutey Kollen Hall N a t a l i e Rejc Dykstra Hall Dan R e n n e r Phelps Hall P a t r i c i a Rhiew Kollen Hall Klmberly Richardson Van Vleck Hall Sarah Robbins Dykstra Hall Lesley Robinson Gllmore Hall Erin Rodenhouse Van Vleck Hall

Holland Midland East L a n s i n g Durango, CO Hazlett Farmington H i l l s

S o u t h Haven Farmington H i l l s Sanford Alpena New C a r l i s l e , IN Holland

Rhonda Rop Dykstra Hall Todd Rosenbrook Scott Hall H e a t h e r Roy Dykstra Hall A l e x a n d e r Ruch Kollen Hall H o l l y Russcher Gllmore Hall Matthew R u s s i c k Voorhees Hall

Muskegon Erie Alpena Kentwood Fennville Muskegon

Emily S a a l f e l d Phelps Hall Talandila Sakala Phelps Hall Kellie Salvaterra Dykstra Hall Aaron Schantz Kollen Hall Chester Scherer Kollen Hall K e l l y Schermer Van Vleck Hall

East L a n s i n g Zambia Romeo Hastings H a r r i n g t o n , IL Gambler, OH

Kathryn Schmidt Van Vleck Hall L e i g h Ann S c h m i d t Dykstra Hall Heather S c h o l t e n Dykstra Hall Kurtis Scholtens Scott Hall William Schoonveld Kollen Hall Lori S d o r t i n o Dykstra Hall

Fort Wayne, IN N a p e r v i l l e , IL Hudsonville N a p e r v i l l e , IL Grand Rapids F i n d l a y , OH

David S c h o u t Voorhees Hall Todd S e e s o n s Oggel Apartments Katie Shelley Dykstra Hall Amy S h i n e m a n Dykstra Hall J o h n Shoemaker Voorhees Hall L o r i Simmer Dykstra Hall Katieq Sine Dykstra Hall H i l a r y Skuza Phelps Hall Mark S l a b a u g h Scott Hall Stacey Slad Dykstra Hall Sara S l o w l n s k i Dykstra Hall J e n n i f e r Smith Gllmore Hall

Holland Detroit Saginaw Glen, NY Fort Wayne, IN Clare

B a t t l e Creek Kalamazoo Homer Downers Grove, IL

Mellinda Smith Holland Sarah Smith Dykstra Hall Stacy Smith Dykstra Hall Matthew S m i t l e y Phelps Hall JohnSoltis Voorhees Hall K e v i n Sonnemann Scott Hall

2 3 0

Freshmen

Fort Gratiot Holland

Holland Harrison Wyoming R o c h e s t e r , NY Gaylord T r a v e r s e City

Class

Sonnemann i 9

7


h o p e Spaman

c o l l e g e

freshmen

Sutton

Andee Spaman Phelps Hall Rebecca S p e y e r Phelps Hall Rita Spires Dykstra Hall V i c t o r i a Sprague Dykstra Hall Ben S t a n c l l Scott Hall Lisa S t a r t Dykstra Hall Kayrl Stead Gllmore Hall Sarah S t e i n Kollen Hall Trlcla Stein Dykstra Hall Jessica Stickler Dykstra Hall David S t l e l s t r a Scott Hall Scott Stockert Phelps Hall A l l l c l a Stojlc Gllmore Hall Sarah Stroven Gllmore Hall Robert Struck Wykcoff Hall Laura S u l l i v a n Dykstra Hall Melissa Surlan Phelps Hall Kate S u t t o n Dykstra Hall

Rockford Byron Center F r a n k f o r d , IN P a l a t i n e , IL Grand Rapids Muskegon

Dearborn Ann Arbor Port Huron Remus Holland C e n t e r v l l l e , OH

LaGrande Park Albion Orland Park, IL Manistee Hudsonvllle E a t o n Rapids

embers of Alcohol Issues Matter (AIM) blend and serve "mocktails" to students In Phelps Dining Hall. The annual event is held to raise awareness of alcohol abuse and encourage responsible use. Students turned out in large numbers to take advantage of the free drinks and sober socializing. (Photo by Josh Neucks)

Freshmen

Class 2 3 1


h o p e

c o l l e g e

freshmen

Sweester

1 9

9

7

Phelps Hall Durfee Hall Phelps Hall Todd T e s t e r Cosmopolitan Hall Rebecca T h o r e s o n Dykstra Hall

•f

Kollen Hall Sara Tillema Llchty Hall Durfee Hall Van Vleck Hall .. C a n b e r r a , A u s t r a l i a Holland Dykstra Hall Phelps Hall

Dykstra Hall Todd T u l g e s t k e Phelps Hall Cosmopolitan Hall E r l n n VanAuken Voorhees Hall Dykstra Hall H o l l y Van Dam Kollen Hall

Bright sun, sand covered beaches, the scent of suntan otion, and slaying up air hours of the night: all define spring break. For 175 students, however, spring break was actually quite different from the expected. After waiting eagerly in a line that wound down the steps of the Keppel House almost to Gilmore Hall, over 150 students singed up for 11 out-of-state mission trips. Each trip had a male and female leader and thirteen students crammed into vans headed for their respective places for one week. Some went out of the state to Chicago, while others even left

br

tradingb -sun for. service by leigh ann s c h m i d t

2 3 2

F r e s h m e n

C l a s s

the country for tropical locations as far away as Jamaica and Hounduras. Hours of planning went into each trip to have transportation, a place to stay, and jobs to do. One trip leader for Kentucky, sophomore Josh Metzler knew how much work it was. "I had to arrange for food, coordinate with the people who were hosting us in Kentucky, make travel plans, and drive," Metzler said. "I felt responsible for making sure that everyone got along with each other and had a good time." As trip leaders, they held group meetings ahead of time so everyone felt comfortable before hopping in a van for many hours of travel. Each mission group participated in some kind of work project from painting to building houses. Freshman Betsy Gibbs, traveled to Honduras and found herself in construction. "We built the walls of a building that became teachers' offices, closets and bathrooms for the children." While groups participated in physical labor, they also inter-

acted with the people in the communities. "We built relationships with the children and adults of Honduras that were centered on Jesus and His love," said Gibbs. In addition to a week of laboring and serving, each trip tried to take a day away from work and do some sight seeing. Sophomore Jill Bostelaar and her group traveled west to South Dakota. They crammed in numerous scenic places, such as the Black Hills and Mount Rushmore in one day. Bostelaar was highly impressed with the Badlands. "First we prayed together on a ledge overlooking this beautiful scene of God's creation and then we watched the sunset," Bostelaar said. Each trip was highly rewarding for all the individuals involved in different ways. Most learned valuable lessons from their experiences. "I really need to work on trusting God," Metzler said. "We came back with so much...changed eyes, changed hearts, changed lives," Gibbs concluded.


h o p e

c o l l e g e

freshmen

Van V l l e t

1 9

9

Zwart

7

Kim Van V l l e t

Grand Rapids

Gllmore Hall

A n n a l l s e Van Wyngaraden

Caledonia

Dykstra Hall

P a u l Vander Laan

Orland Park, XL

Phelps Hall

E l i z a b e t h Vander Llnd

Grand Rapids

Dykstra Hall

E m l l l a n a VanderElzen

Water ford

Van Vleck Hall

Stacey VanderMolen

Grand Rapids

Phelps Hall

P a u l VanderHelde

Grand Rapids

Scott Hall

William Vander V l l e t

Holland

Kollen Hall

J a c l y n VandeWege

Holland

Phelps Hall

K r l s t e n VandeWege

Zeeland

Dykstra Hall

E l l l z a b e t h VanHekken

Holland

Dykstra Hall

Tom VanHekken

Holland

Durfee Hall

J i l l Veldhof

Holland

Holland

H i l a r y Vellenga

Kalamazoo

Dykstra Hall

Amy Vincent

Holland

Gllmore Hall

K r l s t l Vincent

Pewamo-Westpahlla

Gllmore Hall

Angela Vlsser

Holland

Kollen Hall

J o h n Vlnka

Hoffman Estates, XL

Kollen Hall

Bryan Volk

Traverse City

Phelps Hall

David Vrugglnk

Grandvllle

Kollen Hall

Chuong Vu

Muskegon

Kollen East Hall

Emily Wahlstrom

DeKalb, XL

Dykstra Hall

Michelle Washburn

Shelby Township

Dykstra Hall

Betsy Waterloo

Ann Arbor

Lichty Hall

Anne Weener

Holland

Dykstra Hall

Chanda Wenger

Mlddlevllle

Kollen Hall

Amy Sue West

Holland

Kollen Hall

Sara W e s t f a l l

Livonia

Dykstra Hall

J o s h u a Wheeler

Water v l l e t

Phelps Hall

Kim White

New Lenox, XL

Dykstra

Nathan Whltmyer

Hartland

Durfee Hall

E l l s s a Wlckmann

Holland

Lichty Hall

Sarah Wlechertjes

Holland

Dykstra Hall

Sarah Wlersema

Kalamazoo

Dykstra Hall

D a n i e l Wllkens

Shannon, XL

Durfee Hall

J a c q u e l i n e Williams

Brookland, NY

Dykstra Hall

Kortnea Williams

Traverse City

Gllmore Hall

B r i a n Wolf

Marshall

Wyckof f Hall

E l i z a b e t h Wood

Holland

Holland

Anna Wynbeek

Rockford

Dykstra Hall

C h a r l i e Wyngarden

Zeeland

Wyckoff Hall

Nicole Yeldlng

South Haven

Phelps Hall

Melissa Zelger

Three Oaks

Dykstra Hall

Jason Zlemer

P a l a t i n e , XL

Wyckoff Hall

Daniel Zoller

S a r a s o t a , FL

Wyckoff Hall

Rebecca Zwart

Wyoming

Dykstra Hall

Freshmen

Class

2 3 3


h o p e

c o l l e g e

alpha phi

Burke

Ylngllng

a l p h a gamma phi

K r i s t i n Burke Holland K a m i l a Datema Alpha Gamma Phi Cottage Jess Grevenstuk Alpha Gamma Phi Cottage

Senior Junior Junior Senior

Holland Amy-Lynn H a l v e r s o n Alpha Gamma Phi Cottage Amy J a r c h o v Holland

Junior Senior

K a t h e r i n e Kruse Holland Megan Maddox Holland M e l i s s a Ooms Alpha Gamma Phi Cottage

Sophmore

Alpha Gamma Phi Cottage

Sophomore

Holland Blythe Siddall Holland Beth Thorrez Holland LiaTinkelman Holland E l i z a b e t h Baker Gllmore Hall Kelly Barton Phelps Hall

Senior Senior

Junior , Bloomfield H i l l s Junior

Senior Senior Sophomore , L i b e r t y v i l l e , IL Sophomore

Dykstra Hall Mandy C r e i g h t o n Phelps Hall

Freshman Freshman

Amanda M e r r l t t Grant Centennial Park Apartments Junior AnnMarle Murphy B u f f a l o Grove, IL Kollen Hall Freshman Mary J a n e S m i t h Adrian Phelps Hall Freshman Carl Ylngllng Morris P l a i n s , NJ Phelps Hall Freshman

small fbrms strong bonds by

2 3 4

amanda

Alpha

b l a c k

Gamma

Phi

Sorority

Large in the 70's, Alpha Gamma Phi has become the smallest sorority of the 90's. Adapting to that change, 14 women have found their home on campus. The drastic reduction in membership came in 1996. The Alpha Phi's graduated 14 sisters, but only brought in four new members. "There were only 12 total in the world that were active," said active Amy-Lynn Halverson. When Halverson rushed there were 23 actives. The smaller size piqued her attention. "It was cool because it was like an extension of my biological family that I got to choose," she said. One advantage to the small size is the opportunity to be travel down most of the avenues of leadership. In big sororities, one or two members have specific jobs they hold for the semester. When membership is

small, more responsibility falls on each person. "I may not be the treasurer, but I have written checks," Halverson said. "Each member takes on more responsibility individually." A small sorority also fosters an intimate atmosphere. Over half the women live in the Alpha Gamma Phi cottage on campus. The meetings are run more like a family get together, rather than a formal business meeting with an agenda. But being small has its problems. "If somebody misses a beat, we can look bad. We can be so unified that we speak for each other. It keeps you on your toes," Halverson said. Despite the problems, being in a small sorority has been a positive experience. "Out of everything in my college experience, I think that I have learned the most about leadership from my small sorority," she said.

J


h o p e Andresen

c o l l e g e

alphi phi omega

Wltte

a l p h a phi omega

Bradley Andresen Kraker Apartments Robert Andretz Holland Sherrl Barnadyn Gllmore Hall Anne B a r t u s r e v i g e Beck Cottage J o n a t h a n Brockmeier Voorhees Hall

Ypsllanti Junior S a i n t Johns Senior Boyne C i t y Freshman Howell Senior Holland Junior

Jacqui Bullard S t . Johns Kappa Delta Chi Cottage Junior E l i z a b e t h Card Lansing Sib Cottage Junior Marcy Cohen New Port Richey, FL Parkview Apartments Senior G r e t c h e n Conrad S t . Joseph Van Drezer Cottage Junior J . J . Ekkens Alto Brownstone Apartments Junior

Karen Graham . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F a r m l n g t o n Venema Apartments Senior Karen Kowal E l m h u r s t , IL Doesburg Cottage Senior Shannon Lewis Kalamazoo Van Vleck Hall Freshman Stephanie Miller Albion Brownstone Apartments Junior A r i n Neucks I n d i a n a p o l i s , IN Dosker Cottage Senior

J u l i e Pa t o u t Welmers Cottage A n t h o n y Perez Reese Cottage K a t e Reed Van Drezer Cottage Sarah Richards Van Drezer Cottage Mary S c r i b n e r Kollen Hall

H o u s t o n , TX Sophomore Flint Junior Williamston Junior Haslett Junior Hart Sophomore

Michelle Taylor Chicago,IL Centennial Park Apartments Junior Derk Z w a r t Wyoming Centennial Park Apartments Senior Nathan Bair Zeeland Kollen Hall Freshman Michelle Balcerski Westerville,OH Van Vleck Hall Freshman Stephen Curtis Hinsdale,Il Kollen Hall Freshman

Erica Dianis Vennema Apartments Deborah Emery Centennial Park Apartments Tasha G u i l d Llchty Hall Andrea K e l l y Dykstra Hall S h a n n o n Kenny Dykstra Hall

E r i n Kurek Llchty Hall L i s a Moua Voorhees Hall Karen O l s e n Gllmore Hall Loreal Parent Parkview Apartments Sonja Rawie Van Vleck Hall

I v y Shen Vennema Apartments Melinda Tuisntra Centennial Park Apartments Natalie Williamson Kulzenga Cottage Christy Witte Dykstra Hall

Alpha

Phi

Midland Junior Muskegon Sophmore Lansing Sophmore Manistee Freshman vrheaton,IL Freshman

Bridgeman Sophmore S t . Anna,CA Sophmore Holt Sophmore Grand Rapids Junior Ada Sophmore

New York,NY Sophmore Plainwell Junior South Bend,IN Junior Newaygo Freshman

Omega

Fraternity

2 3 5


h o p e

c o l l e g e

arcadian

Ahmad

chi

D e n n i s Ahmad Yonkman Cottage J.P. Buckingham Yonkman Cottage Steven Bushouse Holland James B u t z Holland S t e v e n Buyze Phelps Hall

phi1 4 i gma

Midland Junior Eaton Rapids Sophomore Coldwater Junior Ottawa Lake Senior Mancelona Sophomore

Colin Connalre Holland Matthew DeJong Yonkman Cottage Jim D o b b i n s College East Apartments John Early Yonkman Cottage Adam G a l l Kraker Apartments

Cambridge, MA Senior D u b l i n , OH Sophomore Marshall Senior E l g i n , IL Sophomore Alto Junior

du

v >*

During the 1940's, Hope temporarily lost many of its male students to service in World War II. Facing a severe decrease in numbers, Hope's fraternities meshed together as one organization, taking one pledge class of new members in the meantime. Upon the war's end in 1946, returning fraternity members disbanded this mixed group and re-formed their respective organizations. The one new pledge class was left to create their own fraternity. Fifty years later, the Arcadian fraternity was proud to mark their silver anniversary at the 1996 Homecoming. Senior Pete Liechty, fraternity president, learned firsthand how much planning it takes to celebrate such an anniversary. "The amount of work involved was incredible. We've

chi jpni srgma celebrates ccn years by

2 3 6

Chi

Phi

Sigma

Gall

D"

Fraternity

amy

s t r a s s b u r g e r

been preparing for this for the past six years," Liechty said. All that planning was worth it when the active fraternity members hosted over 100 alumni during the weekend. The events included Homecoming rituals such as floatbuilding, cider and doughnuts at the Arkie cottage, participation in the parade, and a halftime cookout at the stadium. This year, the Arcadians also joined in a special banquet in the Maas Auditorium before heading to their traditional Homecoming formal, held at Fausti Fazool's. Although the fraternity's most well-known alumnus, evangelist Robert Schuler, was not in attendance, the Arkies were proud to welcome back alumni from all over the country and from all five decades, most notably Chaplain Van Heest, one of the original founding fathers of the fraternity. "Chaplain Van Heest is, in a way, the backbone of this fraternity," declared alumni Jeff Tucker ('92). "This weekend was a great tribute to him. On the whole, the actives really outdid themselves; as alumni we were really proud.'


h o p e

c o l l e g e

arcadian

Geuss

chi

Uyl

phi sigtra

D a r r e n Geuss Holland Chad G i f f o r d Parkview Apartments J e s s e Graf Yonkman Cottage S h a n e Hanson Yonkman Cottage Matt Herrlman Dosker Cottage

Peter Houlihan Kollen Hall J e f f e r y Keniner Yonkman Cottage Greg Kern Yonkman Cottage George L a n d o l t Holland Tony LaSorsa Holland

C h r i s Legg Holland James Lenger Holland Peter Llechty Holland Evan L l e w e l l y n Holland C h r i s t o p h e r Madden Yonkman Cottage

Traverse City Sophomore A n a c o r t e s , WA Senior Alamosa, CO Sophmore Maplewood, MN Junior Mason Junior

Traverse City Sophomore Brighton Sophomore Rochester H i l l s Sophomore West L a f a y e t t e , IN Junior Kentwood Sophomore

C o l t s Neck, NJ Junior Holland Sophomore Coldwater Senior Fremont Senior Fort Gratiot Sophomore

Marc M o n t p e t l t Holland Vllasack Phothlsan Holland Steve Sanders Holland Christopher Sandro Kollen Hall Paul Slater Yonkman Cottage

Midland Senior Holland Junior Grandvllle Senior Greenville Sophomore Dover, NH Sophomore

Michael Spradllng Holland Chad S t o r e y Holland Jay Wallace Yonkman Cottage Tyler White Holland Rob A l l i s o n Kollen Hall

Holland Senior Holland Junior Muskegon Sophomore Allegan Senior Kalamazoo Freshmen

Brad B o l t o n Kraker Apartments Brad DeKulper Scott Hall Matt Handzo Kollen Hall Peter Kellepourey Kollen Hall C h r i s Kerr i n s Phelps Hall

Jeremy R i c e Phelps Hall Kyle Schaub Wycoff Hall Tom S c h r l p s e m a Holland Luke S m i t h Kollen Hall Dave U y l Phelps Hall

Chi

Phi

Junior Norton Shores Freshmen C l i n t o n Township Freshmen Nashville Freshmen Lansing Freshmen

Maple C i t y Sophomore S u t t o n s Bay Freshmen Holland Sophmore Oscoda Freshmen Caledonia Sophomore

Sigma

Fraternity

2 3 7


h o p e

c o l l e g e

centurian

Andretz

alpha t h e t a chi

Robert Andretz Holland Daniel Bannlnk Stuphen Cottage Jonathan Charnln Centurian Cottage M i c h a e l Chesser Parkview Apartments John Delcalzo Holland

Saint Johns Senior Holland Senior Grand Rapids Junior Grand Rapids Senior Westtown, NY Junior

Lloyd Dunlap Holland Brian Dykhuls Spain P e t e r Emery Spain Gregory F o l k e r t Holland Joseph F r l t s c h Holland

E l m h u r s t , XL Junior N a p e r v i l l e , XL Junior Birmingham Junior Mt. P l e a s a n t Senior Normal, XL Senior

Z a c h a r y Hegg Holland J a r e d Herron Durfee Hall Adam Hudson Centurian Cottage Scott Hulzinga Sutphen Cottage W i l l i a m Kim Phelps Hall

Holland Senior Wyoming Sophomore I n d i a n a p o l i s , XN Sophomore Holland Senior Glen E l l y n , XL Sophomore

Peter Martin W a p p i n g e r s f a l l s , NY Centurian Cottage Junior K r l s t o p h e r McKee K e t t e r i n g , OH College East Apartments Sophomore C l i n t o n Moore M a r t i n e z , GA Centurian Cottage Junior Timothy S c o t t B e l o l t , WX Parkview Apartments Junior David S c h r l e r Wooster, OH Centurian Cottage Junior

J a s o n Sommer Holland Matthew S t e e n s m a Holland Ryan Sterk Centurian Cottage Jeremy S t o e p k e r Scotland Daniel Styf Holland

Ovosso Senior Grand Rapids Junior Jenison Sophomore Detroit Junior Hastings Senior

Marc VanderBeek Parkview Apartments Scott Voshel Holland Matthev Williams Centurian Cottage Jason Zlter Centurian Cottage Seth Bruggers Scott Hall

Vlcksburg Junior Holland Junior Glen E l l y n , XL Junior Cadillac Junior Lima, Peru Freshmen

Chris Danapllls Mandervllle Cottage John Fairchild Phelps Hall Matt F r e t z Scott Hall B r i a n Grzan Scott Hall Rob Henry Cosmopolitan Hall

S t . Joseph Junior Royal Oak Freshmen O r a d e l l , NJ Sophomore East Hazel C r e s t , XL Sophomore Manistee Freshmen

Tyler Jansen Durfee Dan K u b a c k l Durfee Hall P h i l i p Leete Phelps Hall Dave Rohner Phelps Hall

2 3 8

Alpha

Theta

Chi

Fraternity

Delton Sophmore Toledo, OH Sophomore V i r g i n i a Beach, VA Freshmen F r a n k l i n Lake, NJ Sophomore

Rohner


h o p e

c o l l e g e

centurian

Rutherford

alpha t h e t a

Williams

chi

Bob R u t h e r f o r d Durfee Hall Mark T e n h o r Phelps Hall J e f f Trytko Scott Hall Adam W e s s e l i n k Phelps Hall John Williams Wyckoff Hall

The Greek system is one of the oldest social systems on campus. It is steeped in tradition and changes are noticed easily. For the Centurian Fraternity, New Member Education put them at the forefront of Greek change. The men decided to have New Member Education over winter break, rather than after its close. Each new member stayed on campus during the mid-February break to begin their Greek education. "It is an experience I will never forget. Those two weeks were hell, but it is worth it. I gained 45 brothers and friends I'll never lose," said new active sophomore Jeff Trytko. The Cents started a new trend for their organization by using winter break as an opportunity to conduct New Member Education. When this idea was introduced by an alumni pledge master several concerns arose, but steps were taken to make this radical idea work. "We knew a lot of the guys would like to go home, or make other plans, but we notified all of them throughout rush, a month in advance, to help them plan accordingly," said senior Dan Bannick. Only one of the 18 new members had an unavoidable conflict. "It was rough not being with family over winter break, but

Downers Grove, IL Freshmen S t a t e n I s l a n d , NY Sophomore Mt. Morris Sophomore Grand Rapids Freshmen Glen E l l y n , I L Freshmen

through New Member Education, I made my family bigger," said Trytko. One of the biggest advantages of using winter break for New Member Education is there was no school conflict, which gave the new members more time to focus on the fraternity without the stress of academics. It also allowed the Cents to try new and exciting things, although they were unable to conduct the program along with the rest of the Greeks. "It was a shame that we were unable to new member educate with the other fratemities and sororities, because we missed getting to know everyone and the feeling of unity it creates," said senior Rob Andretz. The new members were all supportive of this new idea. "The whole process of Centurian New Member Education helped me develop a strong relationship with my new member brothers. I also developed a love for the fraternity," said freshman Bob Rutherford. The Cents themselves saw this change as important. "I am proud to be a member of an organization that values education enough to piratically change the New Member Education process to allow our new members succeed in school and their new social environment," said senior Dan Styf. ^

&eak ^ ^ build brotherhood by

k i m b e r l y

r i c h a r d s o n

Alpha

Theta

Chi

Fraternity

2 3 9


h o p e

c o l l e g e

cosmopolitian

Albrecht

phi

David A l b r e c h t Grandville Jeremy Beard Holland J o e l Brandt Holland Dan Capps Cosmopolitan Hall David Clausen Cosmopolitan Hall

Grandville Junior Grand Rapids Senior Holland Junior Downers Grove, IL Junior Rlngwood, NJ Junior

C h r i s t o p h e r C o l l i n s .. Holland R y a n Cook Holland Jason Doublestein Holland Christopher Garbrecht Cosmopolitan Hall N a t h a n Hoekzema Holland

Interlochen Junior . . . . . Grand Rapids Senior Petoskey Senior B a t t l e Creek Junior Grand Rapids Senior

Jason Johnson Holland Joshua Kooistra Holland L u i s Leguizamon Holland Benjamin M i l l s Cosmopolitan Hall Roy P e r e i r a Holland

Eagan, MN Senior Grand Rapids Senior Holland Senior Grand Rapids Junior Singapore Senior

Luke P i n k e r t o n Holland Christopher Potter Cosmopolitan Hall E r i c Sevensma Holland Andrew S i l l Cosmopolitan Hall Ryan Spangler Cosmopolitan Hall

G r a n d v i l l e , OH Senior Mt. P r o s p e c t , IL Junior Rockford Senior Nov! Junior Saline Junior

Andrew S t o r e r Holland Joshua S t r a t t o n Mulder Cottage Stephen Tobias Holland Samuel V a i l Van Saun Cottage C h r i s t o p h e r Van Dam Cosmopolitan Hall

Holland Senior E a s t Grand Rapids Junior N a p e r v i l l e , IL Junior Kalamazoo Junior Grand Rapids Junior

C l a r e n c e VanderBorgh Holland Derek Vander Heide Holland C h r i s Van Timmeren Holland Drew Y s s e l d y k e Holland Mike Adamski Cosmopolitan Hall

Saginaw Senior Grand Rapids Senior Grand Rapids Junior Grandville Senior Hudsonville Sophomore

Ali Alladala College East Apartments Matt B r u n s o n Wyckoff Hall C h r i s Cappa Cosmopolitan Hall Mike G e n t i l e Phelps Hall Ryan H a r r e l l Cosmopolitan Hall

2 4 0

Phi

Kappa

Alpha

C l e v e l a n d , OH Junior Mexico, NY Sophomore N a p e r v i l l e , IL Freshmen West O l i v e Freshmen Kalamazoo Sophomore

Fraternity

kappa a l p h a

Harrell lu


h o p e

c o A l• l

e g e

Humbarger

White phi

kappa a l p h a

Marc Humbarger Wycof f Hall Jason Koolstra Cosmopolitan Hall Chip K o r s t a n g e Cosmopolitan Hall Ben Lane Kollen Hall Hob Myers College East Apartments

B a t t l e Creek Sophomore Grand Rapids Sophomore Grand Rapids Sophomore Traverse City Freshmen P o v e l l , OH Junior

Doug H l c h t e r Kollen Hall B r e n t Hove Cosmopolitan Hall A a r o n M. S m i t h Wykoff Hall C l i n t Smith Cosmopolitan Hall Jeremy S t o n e r Durfee Hall

H i n s d a l e , IL Freshmen Ann Arbor Sophomore Grand Rapids Sophomore B a t t l e Creek Sophomore B a t t l e Creek Freshmen

Josh Strand B u r n s v l l l e MN Wyckoff Hall Freshmen Jason Terpstra South Holland,IL Phelps Hall Sophomore Matt VanDam «••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• Wyoming Kollen Hall Freshmen Craig VandanBerg Byron Center College East Apartments Junior Dave W h i t e Arlington,VA College East Apartments Junior

The Cosmopolitan fraternity closed the door on an era when they moved out of the offcampus house that had become synonymous with off-campus partying. While the house on 50 E. 16th street, known to many students as "Treehouse," will not be physically destroyed, but will no longer be a place for partying or an off-campus residence for members of the fraternity. The owner, Charles Danby, bought the house for his sons, Charles and Douglas, '90 and '92 graduates, and both Cosmos, to live with their fraternity brothers off campus. Danby continued to rent the house to Cosmos after his sons graduated. The name Treehouse evolved about eight years ago when members of the Delta Phi sorority lived on the first floor and Cosmos lived upstairs. While the Cosmopolitan sister sorority eventually moved out of the house, the name stuck. Since that time it has developed a reputation as an off-campus "party house." At one time in Treehouse's history it was not unusual for four-to five-hundred people to

pass through the door in a single night, said a former resident. For Cosmo Daniel Pickering, the best thing about Treehouse was the variety of people. "It was a place where you could always meet lots of different people," he said. The Holland Police Department has been called more than once to break up large crowds of students disturbing the neighbors. Community police officer Lisa Bancuk has arrived at party houses and stood amazed that so many students could be packed into one house. There are currently a variety of theories as to exactly why Cosmos lost Treehouse. "Initially, it was thought to be lost due to a lack of residents, but it was due to the fact that the landlord was preparing to sell the house," said Pickering, one of the last three Cosmos to live in the house. In actuality, Danby decided to sell the house because he was tired of not making any money

off the property because he spent so much on repairs. "I'm selling it because it is a party house. I couldn't stay ahead of keeping it fixed. It was trashed," he said. Some Cosmos, like Pickering, see the loss of Treehouse as the end of a legacy. Others question if the recent demise of not only Treehouse, but other long-standing offcampus party houses such as the Prater's Homestead, and the Arcadian's Cornerstone and Cooper Street Pier could be signaling the end of the most recent party era near campus.

by

kirn p o w e l l and j e s s i c a owens

cosmos

^fall 4. tfrom treenouse Phi

Kappa

Alpha

Fraternity

2 4 1


h o p e

c o l l e g e

delphi

Ackerman

delta

Tara Ackerman Holland Camrln A n d e r s o n Kollen Hall S t a c y Berman Holland Rebecca Blom Kollen Hall Gina B u v a l d a Delta Phi Cottage Erin Chatelain Holland

S t . Joseph Senior Lake Z u r i c h , IL Sophomore Kentvood Senior Hudsonville Sophomore Muncie, IN Sophomore Portage Senior

Kristin Chatelain Kollen Hall Erin Daly Delta Phi Cottage Mimi Do Holland K e l l i Draeger Ross Cottage ATM Ron E t h e r i d g e Grand Rapids Tina G i l l Centennial Parks Apartments

Portage Sophomore Webster, NY Junior Holland Senior Hudsonville Sophomore Grand Rapids Senior Kalamazoo Sophomore

R a c h e l Goei Holland Shannon Graff Holland Sara Grant Delta Phi Cottage Kate G r i t t e r Llchty Hall B r o o k e Groendyke Holland J e n n i f e r Hendrix Delta Phi Cottage

Grand Rapids Junior Williamsburg Senior Grand Rapids Sophomore Grand Rapids Sophomore Grand Rapids Senior Granville Junior

B e t h a n i e Hopma Delta Phi Cottage S a r a h Keay Brumler Apartments Lisa Knott Delta Phi Cottage Heather Knowles Oggel Apartments J e n n i f e r Krueger Holland S a r a Looman Holland

L i b e r t y v i l l e , IL Junior Ovosso Junior East L a n s i n g Junior Grand B l a n c Sophomore Flushing Senior Holland Senior

S u s a n Looman Holland Heather Lovern Oggel Apartments Rebecca M a i t n e r Delta Phi Cottage D a n i e l l e Mannes Centennial Park Apartments L i n d s a y Matheny Delta Phi Cottage Leah M c A l p i n e Holland J e s s i c a Mixer Delta Phi Cottage Megan Mulder Holland Abby N i e h h u i s Holland L a u r e n O'Dovd Holland Cynthia Pacheco Holland Tracy Phelps Holland

Holland Senior Grand B l a n c Sophomore Grand Rapids Junior Wyoming Sophomore Grand B l a n c Sophomore Durand Senior Muskegon Junior M o l i n e , IL Senior Holland Junior Marshall Junior Holland Junior Dearborn Junior

Lara P l e v k a Delta Phi Cottage Nicole Pryor Holland Melinda Ratdavong Brownstone Apartments Jorita Resales Holland Amy Romin Brumler Apartments Karlye Schmitt Delta Phi Cottage

Whiehall Junior Grand Rapids Senior Lansing Junior Mason Senior N a p e r v i l l e , IL Junior Plymouth Junior

Amanda S c h u l d Holland Rebecca S p e n c e r Holland Karen Sugden Brownstone Apartments K e l l i Teerman Delta Phi Cottage S h a n n a Ten C l a y Llchty Hall Arlene Torrence Brumler Apartments

Hartford Senior Petoskey Senior Charlotte Senior Holland Junior Grandville Sophomore B o l i n g b r o o k , IL Junior

2 4 2

Delta

Phi

Sorority

phi


h o p e

c o l l e g e

delphi

Vandersteen

Yonker

d e l t a phi

Sarah Vandersteen Brumler Apartments

Grand Rapids Junior

Holland Lelschen Vervys Delta Phi Cottage

Junior Junior

Ross Cottage

Sophomore

Holland

Senior

Centennial Park Apartments Courtney Welton Holland Kathryn Whitfield Delta Phi Cottage

Senior Junior

Kollen Hall

Sophomore

College East K r l s t a A. Brewer Licthy Hall

Dana V a n d e r p l o v Dykstra Hall T e n l e U e VanEck Dykstra Hall Jen Yonker Dyksra Hall

Sophomore

Sophomore Sophomore

Gilmore Hall

Freshman

Kollen Hall Lindsay Etherldge Gilmore

Sophomore

Dykstra Hall

Freshman

Gilmore Hall

Freshman

Freshman

Dykstra Hall

Fresman

Dykstra Hall

Freshman

Ross Cottage

Sophmore

Dykstra Hall

Freshman

Kollen Hall

Sophmore

Llchty Hall

Freshman

Van Vleck Hall

Freshman

Gilmore Hall

Freshman

Jenlson Freshman Rock f o r d Freshman Orland Park, IL Freshman

elta Phi Sorority members line the edge of their traditional homecoming float with the Cosmopolitan Fraternity. The Delphis and their brother fraternity, the Cosmos, rent a semi trailer and fill it with couches each year to pull both groups through the parade. (PR Photo)

v

Delta

Phi

Sorority

2 4 3


h o p e

c o l l e g e

dorian-—

Bolo

kappa b e t a

LindseyBolo Dorian Cottage

Junior

Junior

Brumler Apartments

Junior

Kollen Hall

Sophomore

Dykstra Hall

Sophomore

Amy F i s c h e r •••••••••••« Mayor's Cottage Jodl Frens Dorian Cottage J e n n i f e r Orleme Dorian Cottage

Flint Senior

Llchty Hall Leah Hesse France Rebecca H o l l e n b e c k . . Cavanaugh Duplex

Sophomore

Junior Junior

Senior Junior

S t a c l e Hopkins Beck Cottage H e a t h e r Huf f s t u t l e r , Gllmore Hall

Junior Sophomore

Gllmore Hall

Sophomore

Brumler Apartments Jeanna Kelnath Brumler Apts. Laurie Kelsllng Brownstone Apartments

Junior Junior Senior

Christine Kelley Dorian Cottage Dawn K l e l n h e k s e l Brownstone Apartments L i s a Kranz Llchty Hall Carrie Langstraat .... Kollen Hall Shannon Laursen Holland K a r l Lesser Venema Apartments

Sophomore Senior Sophomore Sophomore Senior Junior

The Dorian sorority had mething special to celebrate uring Homecoming this year. d " Despite the sorority's disbandment from 1971 to 1988, the Dorians welcomed over 50 alumni back to campus for their 75th anniversary. Events included the traditional Homecoming brunch at Alpenrose, where alumni from as far back as 1940 shared stories and songs with the active members. The Dorian tent at the football game added to their celebration of history; older alumni brought everything from sweatshirts and photos to antique formal dresses

by amy s t r a s s b u r g e r

to display at the tent. Sophomore Kara McGillicuddy, the sorority's vice-president, described what this anniversary meant to the actives. "It's made us appreciate the sorority so much more, and given us a real perspective on just how old we are," McGillicuddy said. She added that her sisters were especially excited to talk with older alumni because of the Dorians' cloudy pre-1971 history. "We've looked even in the college archives and we can't find anything about the Dorians from before our disbandment. It's like our history's disappeared,"

diamond event Kappa

phi

Sophomore

Llchty Hall V i c t o r i a Cade Cavanaugh Duplex

2 4 4

Lesser

Beta

Phi

Sorority

McGillicuddy said. This weekend's alumni, most notably a '42 grad, filled in some of those blanks by providing the women with bits and pieces of that history. Sue Cherup ('64), an education professor, is proud that the actives are making the past a priority. "The girls are gathering all the memorabilia they can find to display in the house," she said. She too was impressed with the anniversary events, especially with the friendships that still exist among Dorian alumni. "People had a real concern for where others were, what they were doing with their lives. I had other friends when I was at Hope, but it's my Greek friends and my sisters that are still my closest." Marking 75 years of Dorian sisterhood this Homecoming proved that those bonds are as strong as ever.


h o p e

c o l l e g e

dorian

Lucas

Zeneberg

kappa b e t a phi

Brownstone Apartments J o d i e Manning Kollen Hall

Senior Sophomore

Llchty Hall

Sophomore

Dorian Cottage

Junior

Dorian Cottage

Junior

Macatawa

Senior

Roxanne Pascente Dykstra

Sophomore

Dorian Cottage Jeanette Petkus Beck Cottage

Senior Junior

Cavanaugh Duplex

Junior

Dorian Cottage

Junior

Cavanaugh Duplex

Junior

Bethany Rathbun C l i f t o n S p r i n g s , NY Llchty Hall Sophomore S t e p h a n i e R i c h a r d s o n . . . . . Bloomf l e l d H i l l s Beck Cottage Senior V a l k y r i e Sakshaug Columbia Apartments Junior Kollen Hall

Sophomore

Mayor's Cottage

Senior

Champion Apartments

Senior

Holland

Junior

Kollen Hall

Sophomore

Venema Apartments

Sophomore

Brumler Apartments

Junior

Dorian Cottage K r i s t i n Zimdahl Cavanaugh Duplex

Junior Senior

Dykstra Hall

Freshman

Dykstra Hall A n n - M a r i e Campion Phelps Hall E l l e n Colenbrander Dykstra Hall

Freshman Freshman Freshman

Phelps Hall

Sophomore

Llchty Hall

Freshman

Dykstra Hall

Freshman

Dykstra Hall

Freshman ,. D o w n e r s G r o v e , I L Freshman

Dykstra Hall Stephanie Jones De Graaf Cottage

Sophomore

Dykstra Hall

Freshman

B o n n i e Nannenga De Graaf Cottage J e n e l l e Orzechowski Dykstra Hall Jaime Partridge Dykstra French House

K r i s West . Phelps Hall Arm Z e n e Phelps

Sophomore

Dykstra Hall

Sophomore Freshman Freshman Sophomore

Kollen Hall

Sophmore

Dykstra Hall

Freshman

Marquette Freshman Roscommon Freshman

Kappa

Beta

Phi

Sorority

2 4 5


h o p e

c o l l e g e

emersonian

Banchoff

phi t a u nu

Nlklfor Banchoff Kuyper Cottage Chad B a y s Kuyper Cottage James B e c h e r Kuyper Cottage Brent Buckingham Holland Troy D a v i s Kuyper Cottage

Sean DeWulf Holland B r i a n Diaz Bledler Apartments Thomas Doran Holland M i c h a e l Farmer Scott Hall Richard Frens Kuyper Cottage

2 4 6

p

hi

Plnckney Sophomore Montague Junior S t . Joseph Junior Eaton Rapids Senior Big Rapids Junior

Grand Rapids Senior L i b e r t y v i l l e , IL Junior Mason Senior N. Muskegon Sophomore Grand Rapids Junior

J a s o n Grimm Holland D a v i d Hammlngh Holland Mark H o f s t e e Scott Hall Todd Hornsby Krulthof Cottage Chad I r i s h Holland

Plymouth Senior Holland Junior Kentvood Sophomore Grand Rapids Junior East Lansing Senior

Matt J o h n s o n Krulthof Cottage Todd Lucas Columbia Apartments Jeremy Luhmann Scott Hall M a t t h e v Luhmann Krulthof Cottage P a u l McKee Beldler Apartments

S t . Joseph Junior Kalamazoo Junior Fort Gratiot Sophomore Fort Gratiot Junior K e t t e r i n g , OH Sophomore

Steven Oursler Holland Anthony Petkus Scott Hall Michael P e t t i g l i o Kuyper Cottage Ryan R e d i n g e r Kuyper Cottage D.J. R e y b u r n Kollen Hall

B a t t l e Creek Senior Jenison Sophomore Boyne C i t y Junior Grant Sophomore DeWitt Sophomore

Trevor S t a r n e s . . . . Holland Jared Vickers Centennial Park Kent W a t t l e w o r t h Holland Grant Wilhelm Holland J u s t i n Wormmeester ... Scott Hall

, S h e l b y Tvp. Senior Leslie Junior Canton Senior Grand Haven Junior Jenison Sophomore

Matt A n d e r s o n Scott Hall Mike B r y a Kollen Hall Andy F a t e Kollen Hall Joe Fitzsimmons Scott Hall Jeremy Gasper Kollen Hall

S t . Joseph Freshmen Lansing Sophmore Kalamazoo Sophmore Jenison Freshman Belding Freshman

Andy G o h l Kollen Hall Marty G r a v e l y n Holland Jared Hicks Scott Hall Brock I s a n h a r t Kollen Hall Adam Labbe Kollen Hall

Ann Arbor Freshman Grand Haven Sophmore Bad Axe Freshman DeWitt Freshman Cadillac Sophmore

Tau

Nu

Fraternity

Labbe


h o p e Leltz

c o l l e g e

emersonian

Young

phi t o u nu

-

Jay Leltz Kollen Hall Erik Mannlnen Bledler Apartments Mark Ozlnga Cosmopolitan Hall Ted P a t r i c k Kollen Hall Dave RataJ Wyckoff Hall

DeWltt Sophmore Klncheloe Junior . Palos Heights,IL Junior Shepherd Freshman Traverse City Freshman

A a r o n W. S m i t h Scott Hall Greg Vaughn Scott Hall JeffVThltmore Kollen Hall Sklpp Yowler Kraker Apartments Zac Young Scott Hall

Stevensvllle Sophomore Traverse City Sophmore Jackson Sophmore Portage Junior Holland Sophmore

uniors Todd Hornsby and Matt Luhmann get an air jam going while sophomore Nik Banchoff dances across the stage during Greek Week. The event held in the Pine Grove brought the Emersonians and all the other Greek organizations together for a little friendly competition and to build unity among the groups. (Photo by Amy-Lynn Halverson).

Phi

Tau

Nu

Fraternity

2 4 7


h o p e

c o l l e g e

fraternal

Aurlemma

otnicron

A n t h o n y Aurlemma Phelps Hall S h a u n Bredeweg Holland Travis Buth Holland R y a n Cerny Holland Dylan Crotty F r a t e r n a l Cottage

B e n s e n v l l l e , IL Junior Grand Rapids Special Undergraduate Grand Rapids Senior Traverse City Senior M a n d e v l l l e , LA Sophomore

Stephan Currle F r a t e r n a l Cottage Chip George Holland G a r r e t t Heyns Kollen Hall K e n n e t h Hovk F r a t e r n a l Cottage Peter Hulzenga Phelps Hall

York, PA Junior Holland Senior S i o u x City, IA Sophomore B a t t l e Creek Junior Oak Brook, IL Junior

Matt J u n g Holland Steve Jurgens F r a t e r n a l Cottage Brett Karls Holland S t e v e Kraseman Kollen Hall David Krouse Holland

Sturgis Senior Fond du Lac, WI Junior Muskegon Senior N a p e r v i l l e , IL Sophomore Holland Senior

Kevin Levis Holland Ryan Maher F r a t e r n a l Cottage C r a i g Maki Holland Corey Monsma Kollen Hall S t e p h e n Mugg Holland

Portage Senior B a r r i n g t o n , IL Sophomore Jenison Junior Muskegon Sophomore Holland Senior

Jeffrey Mulholland Holland Chad N e f f F r a t e r n a l Cottage Eric Nickels Holland JohnMark O u d e r s l u y s Holland Joel Petersen Kollen Hall

Lee P o s t h u m u s Holland J e f f Renz Holland Jeffrey Strauts F r a t e r n a l Cottage Paul S t u l t Kollen Hall A n d r e v Thompson Kollen Hall

Bay City Senior B y r o n Center Junior S o u t h Haven Junior Portage Senior Holland Junior

Grand Rapids Senior Holland Sophomore Lake Z u r i c h , IL Junior Grand Rapids Sophomore Lansing Sophomore

M i c h a e l VanWieren Holland Holland Junior T y l e r V a n L o n k h u y z e n . . . . Downers Grove, IL Holland Senior Erich VanRavensvaay Okemos Holland Senior Zack VandenBerg Grand Rapids Holland Junior J o n a t h a n VanderVelde A t l a n t a , GA Holland Sophomore

Matt V r l e s e n g a Kollen Hall Frater Washington F r a t e r n l a l Cottage Hans W e l n b u r g e r Holland C l a y t o n Bergsma Durfee Hall Ben C o l l m a n Kollen Hall

248

Omicron

Kappa

Grand Rapids Sophomore S c h n e c t a d y , NY Senior Royal Oak Senior Holland Freshman S a n i b e l , FL Freshman

Epsilon

Fraternity

kappa

epsilon

Collman


h o p e

c o l l e g e

—fraternal

Wong

o m i c r o n kappa e p s i l o n

B . J . Damstra Kollen Hall P h i l Haan Kollen Hall Chad J o l d e r s m a Holland Ben K l i m e k Kollen Hall Damon Mlkoy Russia

J e f f Mulder Kollen Hall Matt V a n d e r n a a l d Kollen Hall K e v i n Van Tlmmeren Kollen Hall A a r o n Wong Wyckoff Hall

Older than the college itself, the Fraternal Society has the unique honor of being the only local fraternity founded outside the campus confines. Almost 163 years ago, the Fraternal Society was formed at Union College in New York. Alumni Philp Phelps and current President of the Holland Academy, now Hope College, recreated the disbanded brotherhood. As the first local alumni. President Phelps began the tradition of committed alumni. Like Phelps, four other Hope College presidents once wore the gold OKE letters. Besides local presidents, graduated Fraters run the helms of two other colleges. James Bultman heads Northwestern College while Arend Lubbers presides over Grand Valley State University. Many Fraternal alumni have also left their marks on history. A.J. Muste. the Civil Rights activist, once pledged the Fraternal Society. James Poppin, the neurosurgeon who worked to save President Kennedy's life in Dallas, was also a part of the Fraternal brotherhood. Noted historian and Frater, William Wichers received the honor of

Knight of the Orange, the knighthood of the Netherlands. The influence of Frater alumni can be felt around the campus today. Provost Jacob Nyenhuis wore navy, as did several members of the Board of Trustees. Stu Post, the group's advisor and 1960 graduate serves the college as the Vice-president of admissions. "We thought that we were a great fraternity with a great heritage. We felt very good about it," he said. Even though their time has passed as actives, the alumni interact with current actives. Homecoming provided a weekend to bridge the gap between the old and the new. Over 40 alumni attended a literary meeting, which brought the Fraternal Society back to its beginnings as a literary society. In the earlier days of the fraternity, Greek life served a different purpose than it does today. "The social life of the

Grand Rapids Freshman Grand Rapids Freshman Holland Sophmore East Lansing Freshman Rochester H i l l s Sophmore

Grand Rapids Freshman Petoskey Freshman East Grand Rapids Freshman Grand Rapids Sophmore

college was left up to the fraternities," Post said. Robert DeYoung, Vice President of College Advancement agreed. "We didn't have a student center; we had Greek life. They didn't live together like they do now. It was an active part of the campus," De Young said. Mingling with alumni from other generations has been a benefit of Fraternal brotherhood for De Young. "Each generation is so different. It is fun to hear their experiences," De Young said. "Peers are important to foster these experiences. The fraternity does this like an anchor." It is also important to recognize the potential of the current actives. Post said. Senior Hans Weinburger won an English award this year. "The leadership is still there. It bodes well for future trustees," Post said.

J ^an enduring

history Kw

/n m n ki /H /n black 1^1 n ^ L/by amcmda

Omicron Kappa Epsilon Fraternity 2 4 9


h o p e

c o l l e g e

knickerbocker

Cooper

kappa e t a

Ben Cooper Scott Hall John Donnelly Holland Nick J e w e l l Scott Hall Mark S t u b b s College East Apartments C r a i g Tommola Kollen Hall

Grand Rapids Sophomore Holland Junior North B r a n c h , MN Freshmen Richland Junior S a u g e r t l e s , NY Freshmen

bu

by amcmda black

greek

lifer, f

the:& .own type 2 5 0

Kappa

nu

Eta

Nu

Fraternity

Button down, bow-tied fraternity men are not found here, but the Knicks aren't what you think either. Smashing the stereotype, the smallest fraternity on campus believes in brotherhood but creates their own pace. Marching to the beat of a different drummer does not mean they are misfits, on the contrary it simply means the Knicks have their own style of going Greek. Despite a distinctive style, the Knicks still carry on much of the traditional Greek events. Standing near the Anchor Monument, the hackey-sacflipping Knicks collected cans to recycle. Hundreds of dollars were raised 10 cents at a time for Muscular Dystrophy and Jerry's Kids. "We are just like any other fraternity," junior Mark Stubbs said. "We are all about brotherhood. Since 1909, the Knickerbocker Fraternity has stood for moral, intellectual, and social maturity and fellowship," he said. It is the traditions the Knicks hold that make them typical fraternity, rather than the exception. "These traditions have continued throughout the good times and bad. However, the bond between these men has prevailed over all," Stubbs said. Stereotypes exist throughout campus for each Greek organization. A quick conversation with any student can reveal this. "One things that I've seen so far, there are a lot of stereo-

types," Stubbs said. Even though a stereotype exists, the Knicks are well liked around campus. "We seem to be liked by everybody. But under the excellent support from the administration and alumni, the Knick were able to hold the traditions of the past and maintain the guidelines for the future," said Stubbs. Being stereotyped does not mean they don't have and individual an identity. The men in black struggled this year with the loss of their landmark, the 'Knick House' due to financial reasons. The former sight. 110 E. 10th St. served not only as a home for the members, but as a social center as well. Stubbs said that the house would be "sorely missed, but the tradition will live with the newly acquired 'Knick House." Being one of the smallest fraternities also contributes the misunderstanding. Its ninemember size is almost a third smaller than the next-smallest fraternity, the Promethians. Stubbs said they have always been a smaller fraternity. "The Knicks held on through rough waters and low numbers. [They] were honored to have five new members who will lead the Knicks into the future." He also likes the smaller size, which creates a closer bond. "It creates better bonding. It is easier to get to know brothers well, especially through New Member Education," he said.

Tommola


h o p e

c o l l e g e

kappa chi

Austin kappa

delta

Simpson

chi

Kappa Delta Chi Cottage Jacquelyn Bullard Kappa Delta Chi Cottage

Gaylord Junior Junior

Holland

Senior

Parkview Apartments

Junior

College East Apartments

Senior

Voorhees Hall

Junior

Mercedes Mervenne Holland

West O l i v e Junior Jerusalmen, Israel Kappa Delta Chi Cottage Senior

Stef fens Cottage

4 Joanne Randlnltlfl Gllmore Hall Casey S a g g e r s Dykstra Hall A s h l l Simpson Voorhees Hall

Senior

Holland Karen R a n d i n l t l s Kappa Delta Chi Cottage Anne S c h a l r b a u m Kappa Delta Chi Cottage

Senior

Kappa Delta Chi Cottage

Junior

Kappa Delta Chi Cottage Tara S t o U e n m a l e r Champion Apartments Bobble Streelman Kappa Delta Chi Cottage Heather Coverdale Phelps Hall Krlsten Elsholz Voorhees Hall

Junior

Junior Junior

Junior Senior Freshman Freshman

Dykstra Hall

Freshman

Dykstra Hall

Freshman

Gilmore Hall Lynae N a g e l k l r k Voorhees Hall

Sophmore Sophmore

Gilmore Hall

Freshman

Phelps Hall

Freshman

Plymoth Freshman D u m f r i e s , VA Freshman Charleviox Sophmore

he Kappa Chi Sorority slightly modified the theme of this year's homecoming parade, "There's No Place Like Home," with their float titled "There's No Place Like Hope." The sorority is always actively involved in the events around campus and in the community. (PR Photo)

Kappa

Delta

Chi

Sorority

2 5

1


h o p e

c o l l e g e

Afarln

Atallah a l p h a kappa phi

Afshln Afarln Alpha Kappa Matt B a r t o n Alpha Kappa Anthony B u l l Alpha Kappa J o h n Duperon Alpha Kappa Ryan J a n u s Alpha Kappa

F o r t Wayne,IN Pl/Schup Cottage Senior S t e r l i n g Heights Pl/Schup Cottage Senior Manistee Pl/Schup Cottage Junior Cedar Pl/Schup Cottage Senior Mt. P r o s p e c t , I L Pl/Schup Cottage Senior

Theppanya Keolasy F o r t Wayne,IN Alpha Kappa Pl/Schup Cottage Junior Michael Krukowskl Grand Rapids Champion Apartments Junior Ben Messer Stilvell,KS Alpha Kappa Pl/Schup Cottage Junior Sye M i s h l e r Chesaning Phelps Hall Sophmore J e f f Oegema Fridley,MN Alpha Kappa Pl/Schup Cottage Senior

S t e v e Sundbeck Manistee Kraker Apartments Senior Mike T h e l e n Mason Japan Junior James V a n d e r h y d e Comstock Park Alpha Kappa Pl/Schup Cottage Junior E r i c Westhus S t . Louis,MO Voorhees Hall Junior Andrew W y a t t S t . Louis,MO Alpha Kappa Pl/Schup Cottage Junior

S c o t t Anderson Wyckoff Hall Bassam A t a l l a h Durfee Hall

umor Theppanya Keolasy and Senior Matt Barton, members of the Alpha Kappa Phi fraternity, participate in a balloon bursting contest at the Greek Olympics held in the Pine Grove during Greek Week. (Photo by AmyLynn Halverson)

2 5 2

Alpha

Kappa

Phi

Fraternity

Holland Sophmore Palestine Freshman


h o p e

c o l l e g e

promethian

Sprlr

a l p h a kappa phi

ErlcElaholr College East Apartments Howard F i t z g e r a l d Kollen Hall Christopher J. Meuzelaar Voorhees Hall James S l t a t l Scott Hall Thomas S p r i n g e r Wyckoff Hall

Dundee Senior West O l i v e Sophmore Lansing Sophmore Holland Freshman Grand Rapids Sophmore

A The last time there was a new Greek organization on campus, the members of the Alpha Kappa J Pi Fraternity were in elementary school. 1986 brought the re-establishment of the Centurians who were the seventh fraternity on campus. Ten years later, and 30 after the introduction of the last fraternity, the Promethians entered the scene, bringing a distinctive focus. This different focus of the organization allows them to fill a need on campus. While socializing is an important aspect, the fraternity focuses on academic excellence. The members are required to have at least a B- average or a recommendation from a faculty member. Instead of the stereotyped Greek activities like parties, the Promethians' events foster academic endeavors. The Greek letters chosen for its name signify the commitment to academics. They stand for academic excellence, brotherhood, and open-mindedness. Early in the year, they began hosting weekly help sessions to assist the academically challenged. Signs around campus featuring Albert Eienstien's head drew students to the Alpha Kappa Pi Cottage for help on all subjects ranging from Chemistry to English. The group's New Member Education program took a different approach. They published the schedule on their Internet home page. Keeping the atmosphere of openness, the

Promethians hosted a nontraditional grouping of events. New members had the opportunity to explore jazz played by current members or spend an evening working with scientific experiments. The group also spent an evening watching movies and spent an evening playing chess and backgammon, two classic games. The academically focused fraternity officially came into existence in the spring of 1996 after gaining approval from both the Campus Life Board and the Inter-Fraternity Council. It took less than a year from the time the idea for the new fraternity until its reality. IFC officially approved their existence in March of 1996. In the spring of 1995, cofounder senior Jeff Oegema rushed the Cents, who were known for studious members. He did not receive a bid, but still wanted to be part of the Greek Life. Not finding an existing place to fit in, he organized plans for a more perfect place. Along with his roommate, senior Matt Barton, Oegema began to form plans to create a fraternity that would include students who wanted the Greek atmosphere of brotherhood.

without the party stigma. As the plans became more solid, more members came aboard. Before they officially existed, there were 27 members. New Member Education brought in eight new members to the group. The fraternity is expected to expand. In the beginning, a co-ed fraternity was considered, but the fraternity decided on being male. If co-ed, the group would be unable to secure a campus house for meetings and housing for some of the members. Being exclusively male, the college gave them Shuppert Cottage on 15th street as a home. Not to leave the women out, a sister sorority is being considered that would espouse the same ideals. Alpha Kappa PI entered the scene during immense changes in the Greek system. With a refined system of New Member Education, the new fraternity brought a fresh outlook to the changing Greek system. ^

|home academic ^ commitment by amanda blac

Alpha

Kappa

Phi

Fraternity

2 5


h o p e

c o l l e g e

sibylline

Achterhof

sigma i o t a b e t a

Cindy A c h t e r h o f Holland M e l i s s a A l t o b e l l l .... Sib Cottage Constance Bahnsen Gllmore Hall Sara Bledsoe Kollen Hall S a r a h Bylsma Sib Cottage E l i z a b e t h Card Sib Cottage

F a i r f a x , VA Senior . . . . R o c h e s t e r , NY Junior Holland Sophmore Rochester H i l l s Sophmore Portage Junior Lansing Junior

Carrie Carley Holland Trudy C a s t i l l o Bledler Apartments Elizabeth Collins Sib Cottage Marka Cross Holland Hillary Faith Sib Cottage Stephanie Freriks Gllmore Hall

Brighton Senior San Juan, PR Junior 8 Muskegon Junior ยง Hamilton Senior L i b e r t y v i l l e , IL Junior Zeeland I Sophmore

Mandy F r y Sib Cottage A l l i s o n Gerds Holland Kelly Gilroy Holland L i s a Goodin Beeuwkes Cottage KoriGrabow Kollen Hall Rachel Hall Holland

Plymoth Junior R o y a l Oak Senior Lansing Senior Rochester H i l l s Junior Muskegon Sophmore S a r a s o t a , FL Senior

Kristen Heinrich College East Apartments E l i s a b e t h Heneveld Centennial Park Apartments Cynthia Hofland Brumler Apartments J u l i e Holwerda Holland Dana J e n s e n Holland C a t h l e e n King Beeuwkes Cottage

Plymoth Junior Canton Junior i B a t t l e Creek Senior Wheaton, IL Senior Muskegon Senior East Jordan Sophmore

T r y s t i n Kleiman Kollen Hall C a r r i e Koop Gllmore H a l l L a u r i e Lange Holland Sarah Lubbers Holland H e a t h e r Maas College East Apartments J e n n i f e r Mancini Holland

Holt; Sophmore j Holland Sophmore Belleville Senior Sandy, UT Senior Allendale Junior P i t t s f o r d , NY Senior

J u l i e Moes Holland K e l l l e Mox Sib Cottage J e s s i c a Ovens Brumler Apartments Amy P e r k i n s Gllmore Hall Beth Perry Holland Hoang Pham Dykstra Hall

Holland Senior Midland Junior C l i n t o n , NY Junior Alto Sophmore Greenville Senior Grand Rapids Sophmore

Jennifer Pihlaja Holland Abby P o c h e r t Venema Apartments Holly Retlewski Sib Cottage Kathy R i l e y Beeuwkes Cottage Gina R o v e Kollen Hall Sara Rye Gllmore Hall

Bessemer Senior Midland Junior Owosso Junior Grand Rapids Sophmore Portage Sophmore Haslett Sophmore

Sarah S t i e l s t r a Sib Cottage Amy S t r a s s b u r g e r Sib Cottage Elizabeth Stroh Kollen Hall Kimberly Trlezenberg Brumler Apts Sara VanHoose Kollen Hall Suzanne Velazquez Gllmore Hall

2 5 4

Sigma

Holland Sophmore Alto Junior Montrose Sophmore P a l o s Park, IL i Junior Greenville Sophmore N a p e r v i l l e , IL Sophmore

lota

Beta

So ro r it y

I

Velazquez


h o p e

c o l l e g e

sibylline

Waara

Warber

sigma i o t a beta

K a t h r y n Waara Venema Apartments R a c h a e l Wagner Beeuwkes Cottage C a r o l y n Working Holland Meredith Ak i n s Dykstra Hall

Sophmore Junior Sophmore Freshman

Kollen Hall

Sophmore

Kollen Hall

Sophmore

Allssa Blalslng Kollen Hall

Sophmore

Dykstra Hall

Freshman

Dykstra Hall N i c o l e Glovanardl .... Dykstra Hall

Freshman Freshman

Kollen Hall

Sophmore

Kollen Hall

Freshman

Kollen Hall Andrea J o h n s o n Kollen Hall

Sophmore

Kollen Hall Kathryn Kahler Gllmore Hall Angela K l l p a t r l c k Kollen Hall

Sophmore Sophmore

Kollen Hall

Sophmore

Lisa Larzelere Kollen Hall Dykstra Hall H i l l a r y Reyenga Kollen Hall Mollle Schodorf Kollen Hall

Sophmore

Sophmore

Omaha, NE Sophmore . . C h i c a g o H e i g h t s , XL Freshman R o c k f o r d , XL Freshman

Junior Mason Van Vleck Hall Freshman S t e p h a n i e S t l e g l e r . . . . .. . . . F a r m l n g t o n H i l l s Holland Junior

V a n l s s a Tlmm Kollen Hall S a r a Warber Kollen Hall

Owosso Sophmore Jenison Sophmore

unior Jessica Owens and sophomores Katie Waara and Elizabeth Stroh, members of the Sigma lota Beta sorority, precede the Sib and Emersonian float carrying the letters of their brother fraternity. (PR Photo)

4

Sigma

lota

Beta

Sorority

2 5 5


h o p e

c o l l e g e

sigma

Barrone

Artman 'I sigma sigma

Kollen Hall

Sophomore

Kollen Hall

Sophomore

Holland

Senior

Holland

Senior

France

Junior

Holland

Senior

Sophomore

Kollen Hall Holland

Senior

Holland

Senior Senior

Holland Phelps Hall J a n e e n Glpson Sigma Cottage

Sophomore

Holland

Sophomore

Sophomore

Junior

Sigma Cottage

Sophomore

Kollen Hall Holland

Senior

Holland

Senior

Holland

Senior

Emily HoUebeek Kollen Hall J u l i e Hovlng Centennial Park Apartments

Sophomore Junior

Sigma Cottage

Junior

Sigma Cottage

Sophomore

Kollen Hall

Sophomore

Holland

Senior

Holland

Senior Senior

Holland Amanda Matthews Kollen Hall

Sophomore

Kollen Hall

Sophomore

Holland

Junior

Holland

Senior

S t e f a n y Nlcodemus Holland Emily Nleuvsma Kollen Hall

Sophomore

Kollen Hall

Sophomore

Sigma Cottage K e l l y Rogers Sigma Cottage

Senior

Junior Western S p r i n g s , IL Junior Sophomore

Kollen Hall

Sigma Cottage

Junior

Holland

Junior Junior

Holland

Sophomore

Kollen Hall

Senior

Holland Melissa VanRavensvaay Kollen Hall

Sophomore

Lara Wagner Oggel Apartments

Junior Senior

Holland Centennial Park Apartments J e s s i c a West Oggel Apartments J e n n i f e r Woodhams Centennial Park Aparmtnets B e t h Artman Dykstra Hall

2 5 6

Sigma

Sigma

Junior Junior Junior Freshman

Sorority


h o p e

c o l l e g e

sigma

Clapp

Ward

s i g m a sigma

m

Dykstra Hall

Freshman

College East Apartments

Sophomore

Van Vleck Hall

Sophomore

Dykstra Hall

Freshman

Dykstra Hall

Freshman

Dykstra Hall

Freshman

Phelps Hall Christine Orejuela Phelps Hall

Freshman

Voorhees Hall Shannon Powell Phelps Hall

B e t h Tlmmer Dykstra Hall Nicole Travis Dykstra Hall Mary E l l e n Ward Phelps Hall

m

Megan Thompson, a senior, was consumed wiih the usual second-semester senior activities. The business major already had a few job interviews. She's was also busy with 16 credit hours and Sigma Sigma New Member Education. She's was looking forward to participating in Vienna Summer School in May. When Thompson goes to the library to find a book for a paper, this ten-minute chore takes her over an hour-and-a-half to execute. When she's ready to go to class, she needs someone to help her maneuver through the heavy doors of Scott Hall. After breaking her femur in her right thigh in a serious snowmobile accident over winter break, Thompson returned, viewing campus in a whole new light—as a handicapped student. Thompson broke her femur, one of the hardest bones in the body to break because of its strength. Following the accident she endured a painful ride back to the main road with her snowmobile partner driving the snowmobile. "My broken bone kept clanging together with every bump. I screamed the whole way

Freshman

Freshman Sophomore

Phelps Hall

Freshman

Dykstra Hall

Freshman

Holland Freshman Traverse City Freshman Portage Freshman

back," Thompson said. A week-long hospital stay followed, during which Thompson discovered exactly how this accident would affect her life. She then spent a week at home, teaching herself how to shower and get dressed. Thompson's off-campus house was not handicapped assessable, so she was set up in a guest room on the first floor of Scott Hall. Her Sigma Sigma sorority sisters have provided a support network, from new members who have made cheerful posters to decorate her wall, to the actives, who run errands for her and help maneuver the wheelchair. "I need somebody to pick me up after classes," Thompson said. "The doors in the dorm are so heavy! If I only had a few close friends on campus, I don't think that I could make it." Louise Shumaker, the Director of Disabled Student

Services, has also been a strong source of support for Thompson. "She's been super helpful," Thompson said. "She's the one who got me this apartment." But Thompson realized that she needs help in almost everything she does. For someone, who's always been extremely independent, this is difficult to adjust to. "It's scary not being in control," she said. "I've never liked relying on people, but now I have no choice." "I would rather have questions on how I'm doing or even an offer of help, but I don't want everybody's pity," she said. Yet Thompson does have concrete plans for herself, the most important scheduled for May. "My biggest goal is to make it across the stage at graduation with out any aiding walking devices," she said.

* -i nnew challenges by amy strassburger

Sigma

Sigma

^

Sorority

2 5 7


Staff "The highlight of yearbook this year was the trip to Missouri. It was a great opportunity for us to bond as a staff. I especially treasure my friendship with the Sports Editor." —Aim-Marie Campion, Staff Writer

"Despite the long hours and hard work, just knowing that the year's work is finished and soon we'll see the finished product, makes me excited and overjoyed." —Nike lie Johnson, Layout/Sales

"It was a blessing to be a part of the staff and bond during our trip adventures. The excitement of a finished design is why I love working on the Milestone." —Christy Colbrunn, Layout/Design

"I had a great year working for the Milestone. I think the best bonding experience a group can have is to roll into a ditch in a van together." —Christy Kaminskas, Staff Writer

"Gathering quotes from people and watching events was always lots of fun. I'll never forget getting locked out of DeWitt and missing a big deadline." —Shannon Gould. Staff Writer

"I thank God for having mercy on this pitiful lost, weak soul; I thank Him for bringing me here. I have learned something about everything, and I have grown. Praise God." —Peter Kim, Copy Editor

"Working for the Milestone was a great experience. I was able to make many connections throughout campus and spent many long fun nights in the office bonding with the s t a f f —Annie Jakosz, Staff Writer

"I am so glad that I got to work on the Milestone. It has given me a sense of accomplishment throughout the year and 1 got to meet a lot of swell people on the staff." —Jennifer Pyszora. Sales

"I am glad that I was a part of the Milestone staff. We shared many great memories including several hours in a large ditch in Missouri. I made several great friends and I can't wait to do it all again next year." —Kim Richardson, Staff Writer

2 5 8

Milestone

Staff

acing a more imposing foe than a yearbook deadline, staff members show off their catch— Jaws at Universal Studios in Orlando. The training get-away provided a break from academics and yearbook deadlines. (Photo by Anorland O. Tourest)

xcellence is a hallmark of the 1997 Milestone and Walsworth Publishing Company. The staff explores the publishing plant, providing an opportunity to see the printing process. (Photo by Awall Sworthguyd)

—2 efore the black ice experience, an unsuspecting staff innocently enjoys their trip to Brookfield, Missouri. The trip provided a unique bonding opportunity. (Photo by Kim Richardson)


ere ends another chapter in Hope College history and the job of getting it all collected. As a nursing major. I ask myself daily what drives me to this insanity called Milestone. I sacrifice academic opportunities that costs $19,000 a year for an award winning book. 1 am a student that denies deadlines come before homework, yet know the truth as I sit in front of the Power Mac each night. I would like to deny ever sleeping in the office, cutting class for lunch with the publisher, scanning photos on Friday night, and eating Kletz food, but these are the sacrifices I made for this book. For the first time in many years, a staff was formed to create the book. After several years as a one person job, many people combined efforts for what we believe to be one of the best Milestones ever made. I believe it is a reflection of the staffs' effort in learning to make a book from start to finish. At times I wondered if it was easier with less people, but I have learned they make it more than a job. The fellow staffers, now addicted to caffeine and often napping on the floor next to me, have become some of my best friends and kept me going when I wanted to quit. They are the reason I came in each day, and the reason I will be back next year." —Anthony C. Perez, Milestone Editor-in-Chief " M labor of love is coming to an end. I will be glad to close the book on countless caffinated nights, endless phone calls, 4 -> • r and frustrating computer problems. But those problems made the fun possible, like friendships, unforgettable trips, and seeing the final output of our work. This book is the biggest project I have attempted. It taught me the true meaning of commitment and delayed gratification. I wouldn't trade a minute of this job for anything. As one other busy editor, Willard Wichers wrote at the close of the 1931 Milestone, 'Some people are able to make good grades and have idle hours, others edit a yearbook.' So true." —Amanda Black, Student Life Editor

"

m

T

orking for the Milestone has been a wonderful learning experience for me as well as just simply a lot of fun. It was great bonding with the different types of people on staff from all different backgrounds and at one point we bonded during a less than ideal situation in a ditch in Missouri. Overall, I would say that the past year has been one of mixed emotions in more ways than one. Not to toot my own horn, but I brought to the Milestone a different view of life at Hope and in society and I hope that view was at least partially reflected in the sports pages and other sections." —Glyn Williams, Sports Editor

tarting a new way of living; the dorms, the cafeteria and classes with freedom, was all an experience for me as a freshman. But being a part of the Milestone staff will be by far one of the greatest experiences here on campus. The responsibility and opportunities I obtained during the year as a section editor will help to take me through the next three years as a student and later through my career. Though it was a job on campus, it was not always work and no play. The road trips, laughs and especially the rest of the staff made the long months of work and late nights all worth while. I can not wait to do it all again next year." —Erica Perez, Greeks and Groups Editor

Contributors Stacey Bogard Dave Clausen Dan Cwik Troy Davis Jess Grevenstuk Kerry Gross Amy-Lynn Halverson Katie Hilbrecht Jori Kumpf

Dan McCue Jessica Owens Ryan Pazdur Kim Powell Leigh Ann Schmidt Amy Strassburger Carrie Tennant Noelle Wood Mike Zuidema

Photographers Josh Neucks Zach Johnson

Amy Otteson Beth Bailey

Milestone

Staff

2 5 9


p close, freshmen Tina Damhuis, Stephanie Bruursema and sophomore Anna Patmos examine a cow heart for their Introduction to Biology lab. The hands on course is one of the classes that fulfills the science portion of the newly revamped core curriculm. The courses included expose students to many subjects from religion to science that may not otherwise been included In their major. (Photo by Anthony Perez)

• C-'l

19

2 6 0

Index

9 7


Di

8 VJO I J r C l f tf FROM COMMUNITY, THIS INDEX

GROUP LIFE.

REFLECTS BOTH THE INDIVIDUAL PERSON AND THE

EACH NAME IN THIS INDEX CARRIES A UNIQUE VIEWPOINT IN THE

FABRIC OF THE COLLEGE. SOME PEOPLE CAME FROM HOLLAND WHILE SOME MAY HAVE TRAVELLED THOUSANDS OF MILES FOR THEIR EDUCATION. THE GROUPS ARE AS DIFFERENT AS THE INDIVIDUAL INTERESTS. STUDENTS.

NOT EVERY NAME BELONGS TO

FACULTY AND STAFF BRING THEIR OWN TALENTS TO CAMPUS. OVER

2 0 0 0 ORIGINAL FACES APPEAR IN THIS MILESTONE.

EACH ONE HAS A STORY TO

TELL; EACH VIEWPOINT DEFINES THE COMMUNITY. ^

Index

2 6 1


Aalderink, Robin 218 Abbett, Gerald 218 Abbott. Robert 164 Abdelwahab. Jalaa 164 Academic Support Center 52 Achatz. Thomas 115,193 Achterhof. Cynthia 66, 164, 179. 254 Ackerman, Tara 61. 242, 164 Ackerson, Amanda 130, 218 Ackerson, L. Scott 164 Acton, Christopher 218 Adamski, Mike 61,89, 240 Adamson, Andrew 184, 264 Admissions 203 Afarin, Afshin 71,164,252 Agheana, Ion 50 Ahmad, Dennis 64, 236 Aiossa, Elizabeth 218 Akins, Meredith 66, 199, 255 Akland. Thomas 164 Al-Rayes, Dina 204 Albers, Lindsay 218 Albertson, Justin 122 Albrecht, David 240 Alcohol Issues Matter 96, 231 Alexander. Jennifer 164 All College Sing 24 Alladala. Ali 240 Alles, Timothy 122, 204

Allis, James 52 Allison, Amy 165 Allison, Rob 128, 237 U p h a Epilson Delta 111 Alpha G a m m a Phi Sorority .. 19, 58, 234 Alpha Kappa Pi Fraternity ... 71, 253 Alpha Phi Omega Fraternity .. 70, 235 Alpha Theta Chi Fraternity .. 62, 238 Altobelli, Melissa 254 Alvarez-Ruf, Hersilia 50, 89 Alverson, Katherine 218 Alvesteffer, Elizabeth 139 Ames, Randy 122 Amlotte, Jeffrey 1, 162, 193 Anchor 4, 78 Anders. Sarah 218 Andersen. Janet 50 Anderson. Camrin 242 Anderson. Elizabeth 218 Anderson, Frances 34, 193 218 Anderson, Kelly Anderson, Matt.. 66. 122, 156, 246 Anderson, Megan 165 Anderson. Scott 20, 71, 89, 252 Andre, Maria Claudia 50 Andresen, Bradley 71, 235 Andretz, Robert . 62, 165, 235, 238 Andrews, Dana 218 Andrews, Njord 66, 193 Antles, Christie 204 Appleby, Emily 165 Arcadian Fraternity ... 19,42, 64, 236 Ardema, Andy 218 Ardway, Meredith.... 130, 147,218 Arnold, Molly 243

ith a first class seat, Josh Shicker rides the PCS "float" in the homecoming parade as Mike Veen pushes him along. PCS members decorated the sides of the Herbie Curbie can with streamers and signs promoting the group. (Photo by Josh Neucks)

2 6 2

Index

Amoys, Marc Artman, Beth Arzumanora, Irina Aschbrenner, Charles Ash, Allison Aslanian, Jen Atallah, Bassam Atkins, Priscilla Atobelli, Melissa Atwell, Ryan Auer, Kathryn Aumaugner, Troy Auriemma, Anthony Austin, Amy Awadullah, Ali

204 69, 256 107 50 89, 218 204 71, 252 53 66 218 193 145 69, 248 58, 65, 251 61

fAttMfjSSi Babcock, Maggie 204 Bach, Jane 45 Bachert. Bret 122 Baer, Marc 48, 200 Bahle, Jean Reed 55 Bahnsen, Connie 66, 254 Baht. Karen 69 Bailey. Dina 193 Bailey. Ellizabeth 218 Bair. Heather 165 Bair, Nate 71, 235 Bajiva, Beta 99 Baker, Elizabeth 58, 234 Baker, Jessica 218 Baker, Joseph 193 Baker. Judy 51 Baker Scholars 110 Bakker, Emily 126, 193 Bakker, Kristina 193 Bakker-Gras, Anne 1, 172, 272 Balcherski, Michelle 71, 235 Baldwin, Ross 122, 218 Ball, Wesley 50 Ballard, Paul 1, 156 Banchoff, Nikifor 246, 247 Bandstra, Barry 54 Bannink, Cynthia 138, 147, 204 Bannink. Daniel.. 24, 62, 136, 156, 165,238 Barber-Gibson, Karen 50 Barcheski, Chad 122 Barendse. Sarah 204 Barnadyn. Sherri 235 Barnes, Angie 154 Barnes, Katherine 193 Barnett, Dave 107 Bamett, Michelle 218 Barney, Christopher 30,43 Barnhart. Glenda 218 Barr, Adam 180, 184 Barrone, Erin 69, 159, 256 Barry, Ann 98, 193 Bartlett, Lisa 62, 245 Bartley, Jacqueline 45 Barton, Chad 204 Barton, Kelly 58, 89, 192, 234 Barton, Matt 71, 101, 165,252 Bartuszevige, Anne.... 71, 165, 235 Basketball 140, 142 Bateman, John 165 Bates, Jeff 193 Batten, Beau 152 Baumann, Matt 36, 218 Baver, Anjanette 218 Bays, Chad 193, 246 Bazan, Kevin 218 Beals, Rebecca 193 Beard, Jeremy 1. 60, 152, 165, 240 Beatty, Megan 69, 256 Beaver, Dave 17, 60 Becher, James 128, 246 Bechtel, Jen 66

Beck, Jill 66, 255 Becker, Eric 193 Beckering, Tim 89 Beckman, Erin 154, 205 Beckner, Kristen 193 Becksvoort, Jami 165 Bednarick, Tracy 193 Beery, Sacha 218 Beetham, Mindy 165 Beglin. Julie 69, 218 Bekker, Dave 145, 147 Bekkering, James 195,224 Bekkering, Tim 205, 228 Belill, Nick 218 Bell, Albert 48 Bellgraph, Kelly 218 Belmore, David 122 Benarick, Tracy 96 Benedict, Pickney 45 Bengelink, Paul 218 Bennett, Bruce 165 Bennett, Chris 218 Bennett, Nicole 43 Bennink, Jill 218 Bensen, Timothy 156,218 Benson, Angela 205 Benson, Kim 114. 159 Berdasono. Andrew 218 Berends, Melissa 165 Berg, Eric 149,218 Berghorst, Kate 218 Bergsma, Clayton 128, 248 Berke, Paul 137, 156,218 Berlin, Carrie 218 Berman, Stacy 242 Beta Beta Beta 108 Betz, Chad 165 Beukelman, Allison 193 Beyerlein, Reid 218 Biagini, Nicholas 122, 218 Bicknell, Jessie 193 Biehl, Leianne 165 Bierling, Rachel 165 Bigle, Chris 167 Billideau, Molly 66, 255 Birkhead, Christina 89 Bishop, Eric 145, 218 Bishop, Sara 218 Bisson, Paul 122,218 Bitterburg, Kelli 94, 205 Black, Amanda .... 28. 96, 205, 259 Black Coalition 32, 80, 225 Black, Jessica 205 Black, Kyle 205 Blackquiere, Tara 127, 154,218 Blaising, Alissa 66, 255 Blake, Pat 17, 36 Blankespoor, Harvey 43 Blauser, Kristina 165 Bledsoe, Sara 66, 254 Blom, Becky 61, 242 Blood, Daryl 205 Bodenbender, Brian 46, 48 Boersma, Bryan 89, 192, 218 Boersma, Kimberly 193 Boes, Kathleen 205 Boeve, Ron 152 Bogard, Jeremy 137, 156, 193 Bogard, Stacy 228 Bohnwagner, Kimberly 193 Boling. Allison 205 Bollinger, Chad 149, 218 Bolo, Lindsey 62, 244 Bolt. Robin 205 Bolle. Sage 61,243 Bolton, Brad 65. 122. 237 Bombe, Michelle 55 Bongiomo, Jenette 218 Bonnema, Laura 45, 193 Boodt, Bryan 122, 193 Boomgarden, Jimmie 256 Boouws, Kerri 219 Borden, Stacy 205 Borgeson, Erika 205 Bos, Amy 146, 147 Bos, Carley 62, 244 Bos, Kimberly 96, 205 Bos, Lisa 165 Bosnian, Calvin 193

Boss, Carley 244 Boss, Jenny 205 Boss, Mark 69 Boss, Megan 89 Bostelaar, Jill 138, 205, 232 Botke. Mican 69, 256 Boucher, Jeff 59 Boudreau. Tim 44 Boudreaux. Katie 42 Boulis, Angela 205' Bouma, Brooke 205 Bouma-Prediger, Steven 54 Bouton. Howdy 218 Bouwens, Tammy 139 Bouwens, Thomas 145, 218 Bouwer, Gretchen 218 Bouws, Kerri 66 Bovenkerk, Stephen 165 Bowling, Letty 219 Bowman, Joanna 166 Boyadjieva, Alina 99, 166 Boyd. Sylvia 50 Boyer. Rodney 43 Brady. Allen 43 Brandt. Joel 61. 166, 240 Brandt. Robert 149, 205 Bray, Mark 140, 219 Bredeweg, Matt 193 Bredeweg, Shaun 69, 248 Breen, Rachel 205 Breewer, Steve 145 Bremer, Lara 193 Bremer, Sara 193 Bremmer, Patrick 219 Brenner, Steve 193 Brewer, Krista A 61. 130, 243 Brewer. Krista M 62, 226 Brickner, Jon 205 Brinks, Curtis 219 Brock, Sarah 219 Brockmeier, Jonathan 71, 235 Bronkema, Heidi 24, 166 Brooks, Ena 205 Brown, Angela 205 Brown, Anne Marie 50 Brown, Heather 166 Brown, Jeffery 166 Brown, Jon 205 Brown. Rebekah 61. 89, 243 Brown, Sara 127, 219 Brown, Stacy 139, 193 Brugger, Joshua 89, 219 Bruggers, Seth 62, 238 Bruininks, Aaron 15 Bruins. Tonia 193 Brunson. Matt 61, 240 Brursema. Stephanie 219, 260 Brust, Jeff 219 Bruwer, Josh 122 Brya, Mike 66, 152, 246 Brzesinski, David 193 Bucata, Jason 166 Buchanan, Court 219 Buckingham. Brant 122, 246 Buckingham, J.P. 65. 122. 236 Buckley, Nathanel 166 Budde, Brooke 71. 166 Buege. Jeremy 219 Bull, Anthony 71. 252 Bullard, Jacquelyn 65, 235, 251 Bultman, Baars 45 Buonopane, Cindy 166 Bur, Debbie 130 Burdo, Aimee 220 Burgess, Jeff 205 Burgun, Kevin 96, 193,211 Burk. Kara 13,220 Burke. Kristin 58,234 Bumatowska-Hledin. Maria 43 Bums, Anna 50, 205 Burr, Debbie 66.131 Burton, Elizabeth 166 Busch, Kristen 66, 255 Bush, Kelly 193 Bushouse, Steven 65, 236 Bussing, Sarah 220 Buth, Travis 21, 122, 248 Butts, Julie 166 Butz, James 166, 236


Buwalda, Gina Buyze, Steven Byland, Ann By land, Ellen Byland, Mark Bylsma, Sarah Bymes, Timothy

49, 61, 122, 89, 16, 45, 16, 101, 66,

242 236 205 193 166 254 220

Cade, Victoria 62, 244 Calabro, Julie 38 Caldwell, Cherith 96,194 Caldwell, Christopher 194 Camp, Gary 203 Campion, Ann-Marie 245,258 Canan. Joshua 140, 220 Capla, Erin 97 Cappa, Chris 61, 89, 240 Capps, Dan 19,61,89,240 Capuano, Jill 220 Caracuel, Anna 65 Card, Scott 69, 158 Card, Elizabeth 66, 235, 254 Carey, Jacqueline 42 Carley, Carrie 66, 166, 254 Carlson, Laura 61, 243 Carlson, Renee 143, 154, 205 Carney, Casey 96, 104, 194 Carpenter, Jessica 220 Carpenter, Julie 205 Carpenter, Sarah 139, 159 Carr, Matthew 166 CASA 219 Casey, Christopher 166 Cassell, Tom 122 Castillo. Trudy 32, 66, 254 Catel, Mylene 50 Catlin, Claudia 220 Catros, Sarah 62, 194, 244 Caulkins, Jeremy 47 Cavanagh, Trudy 166 Centurian Fraternity 62, 238 Cemy, Ryan 248 Chamber Orchestra 28 Chambers, Michelle 12, 205 Chamot, Diana 205 Champaigne, Amy .... 89, 145, 147, 220 Champion, Paula 220 Chapel Choir 28 Chapla, Erin 96 Chapman, Jason 220 Charnin, Jonathan 62, 89, 238 Chassee, Todd 20, 205 Chatelain, Erin 166, 242 Chatelain, Kristin 61, 242 Checklick, Susan 166 Cheerleading 124 Chelt. Lindy 146, 167 Chemistry Club 109 Chen, Henry 194 Cherup, Sue 244 Chesser. Michael 167, 238 Chi Phi Sigma Fraternity 19, 42, 64. 236 Choudhry, Hasan 167 Christel, Mark 53 Christensen, Peter 167 Christmas Vespers 26 Christopher. Adrienne 205 Chrysler, John 69 Cindric, Kathryn 80, 205 Ciovanardi, Nicole 127 Clapp, Megan 69, 147, 257 Clark, Kristin 167 Clark, Michael 220 Clarke, Matthew 194 Clausen. David 19, 61, 240 Clements. Nicole . 65, 89, 167, 251

Clifton, Amie 205, 208 Coates, Audrey 150, 167 Cockman, Meagan 206 Coffey, Janelle 206 Coffing, Bryce 206 Cogan, Leslie 221 Cohen, Marcy 71, 167, 235 Cohen, William 48 Coke, Sara 58, 234 Colbrunn, Christy 1 3 , 9 6 , 2 0 6 , 2 5 8 Colenbrander, Anne 135, 168 Colenbrander. Ellen 62, 134, 245 College Chorus 28 Collegium Musicum 28 Collins. Christopher 61. 89. 240 Collins, Elizabeth 66, 254 Collins. Kimberly 194 Collins. Patrick 122,168 Collman, Ben 69, 248 Comegys, Rachel 127, 221 Conlon, John 128, 129 Connaire, Colin 65, 236 Conrad, Gretchen 70, 235 Conway, Colleen 53 Conway, William 168 Conway, Joan 50 Conway, Scott 194 Cook, Amy 159 Cook, Ben 105, 194 Cook, Bret 149 Cook, Nancy 45 Cook, Rebecca 256 Cook, Ruby 221 Cook, Ryan 161, 168,240 Cooper, Ben 58, 250 Cooper, Gary 206 Cooper, Todd 66, 122 Copper, Chris 60 Corlew, Dale 194 Cornell, Tracy 221 Corretti, Jerri 161 Cosmopolitan Fraternity .. 19,60, 240 Cotts, Paul 152, 221 Cove, Andy 194 Coverdale, Heather 65, 251 Cox, John 45 Coy, Steve 128 Coyle, Brian 50 Crain, Adrianna 206 Craioveanu, Mihai 50 Cranmer, Michael 16, 136, 156, 168 Crawley, Lauren 168 Crawley, Seth 206, 215 Creighton, Amanda 58, 89, 192, 234 Critical Issues Symposium ... 220 Crocker. Brian 221 Cronkite, Donald 43 136, 138 Cross Country Cross, Marka Jo 66, 168, 254 Crotty, Dylan 248 Crouch, Jeffery 94, 168 Cruz, Miguel 89, 221 Cunningham, Ericka 221 Cuny, Lee Ann 221 Cupp, Teresa 69, 169, 256 Currie, Christopher 221 Currie, Stephan 248 Curry, Earl 48 Curtis, Cory 160 Curtis, Stephen 71, 112, 235 Cusack, Paul 161,221 Cwik, Daniel G 169

Dale, Noah Dairymple, Kristy...

.206 .221

rv M 0 utting the finishing touches on their cardboard home, Craig Tommola and Carl Rasche prepare to spend the night in the Pine Grove. The annual Habitat for Humanity night provides an opportunity for students to understand what the group tries to prevent— homelessness. Many students and organizations constructed makeshift shelters to protect them from the elements of the night. (Photo by Josh Neucks) Daly, Dan 145, 206 Daly, Erin 61, 242 Damhuis, Christina .. 203, 221, 260 Damstra, B.J 69, 249 Dandavati, Annie 39, 51, 101 Danford, Cloe Ann 51 Dangremond, Nicole 62, 245 Danopolis, Chris 62, 238 Darr, Beth 95 Datema, Kamila 58, 234 Datte, Tracy 42, 194 Davelaar, Joe 140 Davelaar, Kate 221 Davelaar, Tom 140 Davidson, Elizabeth 206 Davis, Jill 89, 194 Davis, Troy 161,246 Day, Janet 194 Day, William 169 De Bruyn, Maxine 50 De Feyter, Melanie 206 de Forest, Angela 138, 194 De Haan, Sander 50 De Haan, Sarah 169 De Young, Mary 50 Dean, Aaron 128 DeAvilla, Shana 69 Deboer, Christopher 194 DeBoer, Jill 221 DeBoer, Nathan 206 DeBruyn, Maxine 51 Deer, Kristy Jo 206 deHaan. Elizabeth 126. 194 DeHaan, Renae 194 DeHaan, Sara 24 DeHommel, David .. 122, 156, 206 DeHom, Kyle 122, 169 DeJong, Matthew 105, 236 DeKam, Deidre 221 DeKam, Kevin 89, 206 DeKuiper. Brad 65, 122, 237 DeKupier, Scott 122, 169 Delcalzo, John 15, 62, 204, 238 Dell'Ollio, Andrew 52 Dell'Olio, Jeanine 45 Delong, Joellen 221 Delta Phi Sority 60, 243 Delta Omicron 106 DeMaagd, Kurt 206 Demas, Brent 194 DeMeester, Erin 206 Demiralp. Banu 221 Demitroff. Robin 221 Demshuk. Anna 62, 244 Den Uyl, Cory 206

Denelsbeck, Kevin 44 Denison, Rebecca 169 Dennis, Nicole 206 Denton, Elizabeth 221 DePuy. Mike 221 Derby, Scott 136, 156, 194 Dershem, Herb 44 deVelder. Rebecca 206 DeVisser. Julie 221 DeVries. Debra 169 DeVries. Rebecca 36, 221 DeVries, Robert 194 Devries, Ryan 89 DeVrieze, Steve 149, 194 DeVos Concert Showcase 28 DeWaal, Jonathan 221 DeWitt, Jeffrey 221 DeWitt-Brinks, Dawn 44 DeWulf, Sean 246 De Young, Christopher J 169 De Young, Erica 34 De Young, Kevin 206, 264 De Young, Kirk 206 De Young, Matt 89 De Young, Patricia 221 De Young, Peter 169. 176, 184. 264 De Young, Robert 249 Dianis, Erica 71, 235 Diaz, Brian 246 Diaz, Rafael 194 Dickie, Jane 53 Dickinson, Elizabeth 128, 169 Dickinson, Zach 221 Dillabough, Heather 169 Dillbeck, Daniel 169 Dillbeck, Sara 24, 194 Dillilngham, Philip 221 Dillon, Dana 206 Disselkoen, Robyn 69, 256 Divozzo, Jason 206 Dixon, Kathryn 221 Dixon, Sarah 221 Do, Mimi 61, 242 Dobb, Dave 128 Dobbins. James 152,169, 175, 236 Dobos, Jeremy 161, 169 Dombrowski, Chris 128 Donehoo, Jill 62, 244 Donk. Tony 45 Donnelly, John 58, 250 Doombos, Mary 51 Doran. Thomas 169, 246 Dorian Sority 63, 244

Doroh, Brandon 194 Doublestein, Jason 61, 169, 240 Doucette, Nicole 194 Doughty, Janet 23, 169 Downing, Corrine 154, 169 Doyle, Colleen 147, 221 Draeger, Kelli 61, 242 Dragoo, Justin 221 Drake, Katherine 194 Dressier, Andrew 128, 206, 270 Drexler, Stacy 206 Dreyer, Bill 89 Driesenga, Steve 26 Drop, Katherine 96, 221 DuBois. Emily 221 Duff. Victoria 169 Duffey, Sara 221 Dukes, Jenny 221 Dunkelberger, Karen 194 Dunlap, Lloyd 238 Dunlap, Sarah 221 Duperon. John 71. 170.252 Durante, llena 146, 159. 221 Dyhuis, Brian 238 Dyke. Angie 206 Dykhuis, Stephanie 221 Dykstra, Brian 69 Dykstra, Christine 206 Dykstra, Greta 104, 256 Dykstra, Than 104 Dykstra, Tim 122 Dykuis, Brian 62

Early, John Eastman, Chad Eaton. Donna 50. Ebels, Bob Ebert, Gana Eckert, Kimberly . 68, 89, Eckold. Julie Edema, Becky Eden, Kristina Eding. Christine 126, Edlefson, Kevin Eichman, Alison

Index

64, 236 206 156. 159 132 194 170, 256 104 69, 257 194 143. 194 194, 200 221

2 6 3


Eilers, Thomas 221 Eisenga, Joy 221 Ekkens. J.J 71, 170,235 Elder, Robert 51 Elliott, Karen 221 Ellis. Reuben 45 Ellison, Laurie 206 Elmore, Alicia 15 Elrod, Matthew 43 Elsbrie, Scott 122, 221 Elsholz, Eric 36, 71, 170, 253 Elsholz, Kristen 65, 251 Elverson, Katie 159 Emersonian Fraternity 19, 66, 256 Emery, Deborah 71, 235 Emery, Peter 62, 238 Engle, Laurie 99 Enos, Caroline 20, 206 Environmental Issues Group 92, 204 Ergang, Katie 62, 245 Erickson, Katie 221 Ernst. Jennifer 138, 159,221 Eshuis, Jason 170 Esnart. Sakala 221 Esterline, Jenny 62, 151 Estes, January 89. 221 Esteves, Dean 122, 152 Etheridge, Allison 61, 170, 242 Etheridge, Diane 194 Etheridge, Lindsay 61, 243 Etheridge, Sharon 51 Evans, Amie 206 Everts, Clara 23, 25 Everts. Corey 194 Everts, Janet 54

Fair, Lori 208 Fairchild. John 62, 238 Faith, Hillary 66, 254 Falconer, Daniel 222 Fangmeier, Michelle 147, 222 Fansler, Katharine 170 Farmer, Michael 66, 122, 246 Fate, Andy 66, 246 Faulk, Erin 65, 251 Fawley, Michelle 222 Feenstra, Cheryl ^1 Feenstra, Melissa 222 Feikema, Brenda 51 Feinauer, Joslin 222 Feldmeier, David 170 Fellows, Ben 132, 152,222 Fellowship of Christian Students 74, 264 Ferguson, Chad 222 Ferri, Paul 170, 184 Festerling, Wendy 194 Fiedler, John 45 Fiedler, Julie 45 Field. Brian 206, 219 Fike, Francis 45 Fine Arts 50 Fine. Sarah 42 Fink. Chris 206 Fischer, Amy 170, 244 Fischer, Daniel 170 Fischer, Jill 195 Fischer, Mindy 10.48.53,66, 89, 255 Fitton, Kevin 156, 222 Fitzgerald, Howard 71, 253 Fitzsimmons. Joe 66, 122, 152, 246 Fix, Bryan 20, 132 Fleming, David 222 Flikkema, Mary 51 Flinn, Nicole 36, 170 Flory. Rebecca 170 Flowers. Amanda 170 Floyd. Russell 50 Folkert. Gregory 62, 170, 238 Folkert, Libby 69, 130, 257 Folkerts, Victoria 89, 206

u

anging out on a Saturday night, Andrew Adamson, Holly Maxfield, Dave Voss, and Peter DeYoung chat on the porch of VanZyl Cottage at the annual PCS Luau. Each weekend, Fellowship of Christian Students held weekend activities open to all students on campus. (Photo by Zach Johnson) Follett, Robert Folta, Sheri Football Forquer, Jessica Forrester, Emilie Fortino, Alicia 170, 256 Foss, Kirstin Foster. Dan Foster, Lee Fouch, Collette Frank, Aaron Franklyn, Timothy Fraternal Society Frederickson, Jill Freeberg, Bruce Freeland. Dori Frego, Sara Freng, Kevin Frens, Greg Frens, Jodi Frens, Richard Frentz, Christopher Freriks, Stephanie Fretz, Matt Freudenberg, Cory Friday, Tiffini Friedman. Eric Friel, Ron Fritsch, Matthew 170, 238 Fritz, Stuart Fritzsche, Aaron Frushour, Andrew Fry, Amanda Fujimoto, Naoya Fuller, Denny Fuqua, Emily Furst, Dale

p A i i s l ^ f elebrating the cancellation of classes, sophomores Ryan Shaw, Josh Metzler, and Kevin DeYoung enjoy a snowball fight in the Pine Grove. With windchills reaching 50 below zero and snow drifts reaching four feet, Old Man Winter took his toll on Holland. (Photo by Amanda Black)

2 6 4

Index

Gabriel, Sheryl Gabrielse, Dave Gall. Adam

207 222 122 222 222 15,68,72,95, 195 220 50 195 207 24, 42, 136 68, 248 127, 207 52 195 154 132, 195 66, 122 62, 244 122, 246 223 66, 89, 254 62, 238 89.195, 170 4, 94, 170 122 62, 72, 136, 50, 122, 152 223 207 50, 66, 254 170 66 89, 223 137

6

99, 171 223, 228 236

Gambino, Nathan 195 Ganeff, Peter 3, 77, 167, 171,207 Garbrecht, Christopher 240 Garcellano, Miriam 195 Gardner, Seth 223 Garland, Dawn 207 Garvelink, Matt 152 Gasper, Jeremy .. 66, 122, 152, 246 Gauthier, Christina 234 Gebhardt, Stephanie 69, 256 Gee, Andrew 223 Geerlings, Julie 270 Geerlings, Suzie 195 Gehl, Mary 207 Geib, Heidi 195 Gentenaar, Robert 50 Gentile, James 43 Gentile, Mike 10,60,89,240 Geology Club 108 Geology Department 46 George, Chip 68, 171, 248 George, Jennifer 65, 251 Gerbens, Dan 43 Gerds, Allison 66, 171, 254 Gereax, Leon 207 Gerhardstein, Rebecca 195 Gerhardt, Scott 223 Germain, Susan 195 Gesink, Chris 52 Geuss, Darren 64, 237 Gibbs, Betsy 223, 232 Gibbs, Janis 48 196 Gibney, Ben Gibson, Kendrick 50 Gibson, Laura 69, 257 Gibson, Melisa 207 Giddy, Heidi 95, 196 Giere, Brian 105, 196 Gifford, Chad 237 Gill, Tina 131,242 Gilligan, Carrie 61, 243 Gilroy, Kelly 66, 171,254 Gina, Zanin 217 Giovanardi, Nicole 66, 255 Gipson, Janeen 19, 69, 256 Glancy, David 145, 223 Glendinning, Joseph 128 Gliesman, Jennifer 147, 223 Glildden, Adam 223 Goei, Rachel 242 Gohl, Andy 122, 246 Golf 132, 134 Gomez, Carlos 196

Gondec, Andrea Gonzales, Alfredo Gonzales, Ryan Goodin, Leigh Ann Goodin, Lisa Goodknecht, Josh Goodman, Eric Goodrich, Erika Goodyke, Brandon Gookin, Andrew Goorhouse, Amy Gordon, Staci Gomo, Steve Goiter, Lori Gortsema, Thomas Jr Gospel Choir Gould, Shannon Grabinski, Brian Grabow, Kori Graduation Graf, Jesse 34, 64, Graff, Shannon Graham, Brandon Graham, Karen Graham, Linda Graham, Travis Grahmann, Julie Gralow, Jennifer Grant, Sara Graske, Meg Grass, Barb Gravelyn, Marty Gray. Erica Gray, Kristen Graybill, Patience Grazan, Brian Greek Life Green, Charles Green, Joy Greendal, Thomas Greenwood, Elizabeth Greenwood, Nathan Greiman, Chris Grevenstuk, Jess Grewell, Amy Grey, Megan Greydanus, Marissa Griebe, Janette Griebe, Molly Grieme, Jennifer Griggs, Daniel Grimm, Jason Gritter, Kate Groendyke, Brooke

223 220 122, 223 171 66, 254 122 223 256 207 207 171 223 148 223 140, 171 33,76 196, 258 122, 223 66, 254 38 89, 137, 237 61, 172, 242 122 235 50 223 172 223 61, 242 207 154 66, 122, 246 147, 207 96 172 62 19,72,118 53 34, 151. 196 223 223 172 152 58, 234 196 207 172 207 139, 159 244 223 149, 246 61. 242 172. 242


... 30, 207 223 ..89. 238 ..58. 234 207 154, 235 52 172 .. 34, 208 208

.. 69, 249 223 172 93 122

223 173 223 223 50 , 8 9 , 223 223 156, 223 208 ....24, 28 197 223 i, 89, 255 173,254 122 1,73, 234 208 246 50 197 156, 237 208 197 48 197 161,237 152 223 . 96, 197 223 208 209 104, 240 173, 251 145, 223 209 173 223 223 209 128, 223 173 223 62, 244 197 127 164 .32, 173 223 . 69, 256 173,180 122, 209 . 66, 255 173, 238 66 l, 66, 254 42 50 45, 204 173 .61,242 209

Hendricks, Ben 61, 172 Hendrickson, Shawna 197 Hendrix, Lynn 50,104 Heneveld. Elisabeth 66, 254 Heneveld. Tim 197 Henry. Rob 62. 137 Herrema. Bradley 223 Herrick. Jim 44 Herriman. Matthew 173. 237 Herron, Jared 238 Hertel. Lori 43 Herweyer, Kathie 223 Hes, Marc 61 Hes, Scott 61 Hess, Kristen 62,245 Hesse, Leah 244 Hester, Jason 122,209 Heuebner, Heidi 89 Hewitt. Sara 173 Heydon. Amanda 139, 159, 223 Heyns, Garrett 69, 248 Hickey, Jill 197 Hicks, Jared 66, 122, 246 Hicks, Megan 8, 36, 208 Hiddema, Jeff 122 Hiddema, Mark 122 Hiemstra, Erik 209 Hierholzer, Matthew 173 Hilbrecht, Katie 209, 216 197 Hill, Amanda Hillegonds, Rachel 256 Hillman, Judy 42 Hills, Brien 209 Hilmert, James 209 69, 256 Hinderer, Ami Hinze, Kimberly 69, 173, 256 Hispanic Student Org 32,82 Ho, Johnny 209 Hoag, Daniel 23, 55 Hockey 160 Hoebeke, Tim 89, 223 Hoeksema, Camie 69, 256 Hoekstra, Joan 173 Hoekstra, Lisa 142, 223 Hoekstra, Mark 197 Hoekstra, Rebecca 173 Hoekzema, Nathan 60,173, 240 Hoffman, Beth 223 Hoffman, Heather 88, 89, 224 Hoffman, Julia 197 Hoffman, Kati 34, 223 Hoffman, Kerri 197 Hoffmaster, Kathleen 209 Hofland, Cynthia 66, 254 Hofman, Judd 224 Hofstee, Mark 18. 66. 122. 246 Hoglund. Stacy 62. 245 Holesinger, Nathan 224 Hollebeek. Emily 69, 256 Hollenbeck, Rebecca 244 Hollidge. Dawn 20, 209 Holman, Jane 134 Holmes, Jack 30, 51 Holstege, Joel 140, 197 Holwerda, Jeff 89 Holwerda, Julie 66, 197, 254 Homecoming IS Hondorp, Jeff 122 Honeysett, Amy 71 Hoogenboom, Lisa 197 Hoolsema, Sarah 61 Hoover, Tim 224 Hop, Danielle 11,43, 89 Hope Asian Perspective Association 32,81 Hope Democrats 94 Hope Republicans 95 Hopkins, Stacie 244 Hopma, Bethanie 61, 130, 242 Hotjus, Kate 209 Homer, Dana 58, 173 Homsby, Todd 72, 122, 246 Horrigan, Erin 209 Horsman, Katie 224 Horton, Annette 65, 96, 173, 196, 251 Hosford, Kristen 143 Hosford, Tara 142,197 Hossink, Sarah 224

Houlihan, Peter 65, 237 Hoving, Julie 69, 256 Hoving, Sheri 255 Howard, Kelly 209 Howe, Aubrey 197 Howell, Ross 224 Howk, Kenneth 68, 72, 248 Hoyt, Mary 69 Huddleston, Angella 98, 224 Hudkins, Bradley 224 Hudson, Adam 15, 62, 89, 238 89, 224 Huebner, Heidi Huffstutler, Heather 244 Hughes, Lisa 197 Huisken, Jon 195 Huizenga, Peter 68, 248 Huizenga, Brad 62 Huizing, Heather 209 Huizinga, Scott 62, 173, 238 Humbarger, Marc 61, 241 Hundal, Khurrum 224 Hunt. Beth 224 Hunter. Megan 146, 173 Hurley, Jennifer 195, 244 Hussein, Wario 224 Hutchenreuther, Laurie 209 Huxley, Liz 209 Hwang, Eddie 197 Hwang, Yooyeun 45 Hyatt, Amy 174 Hylen, Jeremy 225 Hyma, Stephanie 225

lannacone, Steven 50 Immink, Darin 225 Ingersoll, Michael 209 Interfraternity Council 72 International Relations Club.. 99 Irish, Chad 246 Irvine, Lori Jean 88, 225 Irwin, Anne 50, 131 Isanhart, Brock 152, 246

Ismaeli, Zahra Isonhart, Brock Ivanovic. Milica

224 66 197

NViOSJS86

Jackson. Kari Jacobsma, Kelly Jacobson. John Jakosz. Annie James, David James, Jennifer James, Jodi Jansen. Kelly Jansen, Tyler Jantovsky, Sara Janus, Ryan Japinga, Lynn Japinga, William Jarchow. Amy Jarvis. Christine

14, 147.209 53 28, 207 62, 245, 258 42, 45. 52 925 . 54, 167,174 174 62, 238 225 71,252 54 50 58, 234, 174 174 53 Jastrzebski. Michele .. 197 Jaworowski, Cathleen 225 Jazz Ensemble 28 Jellema, Mary 45 Jenkins, Jennifer 23 Jensen, Dana 174, 254 53 Jewell, Nick 59, 250 Jewett, Ed 122,225 Jipping. Michael 44 Johnson. Andrea .. 66, 89, 255 Johnson. Jason 61, 174, 240 Johnson. Jennifer 174 Johnson,Joe 198 Johnson,Joshua 225 Johnson, Katherine .... 225 Johnson, Matt 246 Johnson. Michelle 44, 58 Johnson. Nikelle 28, 209, 258

Johnson. Tryg Johnson, Zach Johnston, Deirdre Joldersma. Chad Joldersma. Kevin Jones, Leah Jones. Michelle Jones, Stephanie Jonker, Zach Joos, Kelly Joynt, Jessica Jubar, Aaron Jung, Matthew Jurgens, Steve Jutte, Lisa

152 11, 89. 198 44 69. 101. 249 198 62, 244 53, 225 46, 245 128, 209 225 66, 255 122, 225 69, 174, 248 122, 248 198

Kaetterhenry, Sarah 71 Kahler, Kathryn 66, 255 Kallemeyn, Sylvia 50 Kaminskas, Christina 209, 258 Kamphuis, Jennifer 225 Kamphuis, Tammy 198 Kapenga, Ben 14, 122, 225 Kaper-Dale, Seth 174, 207 Kaper-Dale, Stephanie 174 Kappa Beta Phi Sorority . 63, 244 Kappa Delta Chi Sorority 65, 251 Kappa Eta Nu Fratenity 1, 58, 252 Kapps, Dan 89 Karis, Brett 69, 248 Karr, Jennie 209 Karrow, Rebecca 66, 139 Karsten, Russell 174 Kasimatis, Margaret 53 Kasperski, Jennifer 159,225 Kassis, Ellen 198 Kassuba, Jerry 96 Kato, Mami 174 Katsuyama, Chikako 198 Katl, Beverly 225

orklng to save chemistry journals, library assistants soak water from the precious pages after a flood In the library's basement. The January deluge damaged many books while others were saved by being freeze-drled In Skokle, Illinois. (PR Photo)

Index

2 6 5


Krbez, Jennifer 175 Kreps, Dean 5, 50, 122 Krolik, Melissa 198 Krombeen, Benjamin 171 Kronemeyer, Karri 96, 210 Krouse, David 248 Krueger, Charles 227 Krueger, Jennifer 175, 242 Krukowski, Michael ..71, 175, 252 Krupczak, John 167 Krupsky, Justin 152, 227 Kruse, Katherine 58, 234 Kubacki, Dan 62 Kubasiak, Aimee 210 Kuiper, Abigail 69, 256 Kuiper, Matthew 1, 69, 198, 208, 256 Kuipers, Sarah 159, 210 Kuite, Kim 198 Kumpf, Jori 210 Kurek, Erin 71,235 Kwiatkowski, Jocelyn 176

rONJl iLfc^.

etting back to nature, junior Amy VanAuken and senior Brian Wolthuis meet face to face with a friendly donkey during the Homecoming Hoedown at Tuesink's Farm. Students came by the bus load from residence halls and cottages alike to spend a fall night under the stars. (Photo by Anthony Perez) Kauffman, Carine

209

Kauffman, Jeffrey.... 136, 156,225 Kay, Leslie 16, 209 Keay, Sarah 61. 242 Kegerreis, Jean 127, 198 Keinath, Jeanna 244 Keisling, Laurie 62,174, 244 Kellepourey, Peter 65, 122, 237 Keller. Donald 174 Kelley, Christine 244 Kelly, Andrea 71,235 Kelly, Quinn 225 Kemerer, Stacey 225 Kemink, Rachel 52, 209 Kemner, Jeffery 65, 122, 237 Kemnic, Heidee 209 Kempke, Jamie 54 Kennedy, Nancy 134, 174 Kenny, Shannon 71, 117, 235 Kensinger, J.D 61 Kent, Kimberly 209 Keolasy, Theppanya 174, 252 Kern, Greg 65, 237 Kern, Matthew 209 Kerrins, Chris .... 65, 137, 156, 237 Kesler, Curtis 152, 225 Ketcher, Carrie 139 Keuning, Marie 198 Keyes, Katie 209 Kidder, Angela 139,225 Kiesl, Jeneen 225 Kilby, Greg 128, 225 Kilpatrick, Angela 66, 255 Kim, Chul 198 Kim. Peter 258 Kim, William 15,62,89,238 King, Cathleen 66, 89, 254 Kingma, Susan 139, 159 Kintz, William 174 Kirkpatrick, Kevin 145, 226 Kissinger, Marianna 164 Klaasen, Susan 209 Klapp, Amanda 68, 256 Klay, Robin 50, 100 Kleiman, Trystin 130, 254 Klein, Kelly 226 Klein, Matt 152,209 Kleinheksel, Dawn .... 63, 174, 244

2 6 6

Index

Kleinheksel, Valerie 198 Klimek, Ben 69, 128, 249 Kline. Chris 198 Kline, Matt 66 Klinger, Jill 226 Klok. Tammy 198 Klopp, Juliane 175 Klott, Peggy 226 Knapp, James 198 Knauff, Michelle 198 Knebl, Nicholas 226 Knecht, Erin 198 Knepshield, Adriann 226 Knickerbocker Fraternity 58, 252 Knight, Cynthia 227 51 Knoppers, Sherry Knott, Lisa 61, 130, 242 Knowles, Heather 61, 242 Knudsen, Lori 227 Kobylak, Greg 210 Kocourek, Erin 159 Koestner, Kelcee 69, 256 Kohler, Brett 122 Kolster, Tod 122 Konynenbelt, Tammi 210 Kooiker, Kristin 227 Kooiker, Wendy 154, 198 Kooistra, Jason 60, 241 Kooistra, Joshua 61, 175, 240 Koop, Carrie 66, 89, 254 Kootstra, Tori 175 210 Kopas, Craig Kopchick, Jonathan 89, 227 Koreeda, Shoji 210 Korstange, Chip 61, 241 Koskey, Jesse 204 Kossoris, Jennifer 227 Kostner, Kevin 69 Kotman, Kristin 65, 251 Kowal, Karen 71, 175,235 Kraft, George 50, 122 Kraft, Roberta 28 Kramer, Michelle 147, 227 Kramer, Nick 137, 139 Kranz, Lisa 62, 244 Kraseman, Steve 68, 89, 248 Krause, Kiersten 101, 175

Labb, Mike Labbe, Adam LaBell, Jennifer LaBelle, Christine LaCross Club LaChonce, Mark Ladd, Michael Lafata, Mike LaGore, Johanna Lahr, Glendene LaLonde, Emily Lam, Phung Lamb, Rachel Land, Shannon Landes, Perry Landolt, George Lane, Ben Lange, Laura Lange, Tiffany Langeland, Barbara Langerak, Kerri Langland, Kristi Langlois, Scott

128 66, 122, 246 71, 210 198 104 96, 198, 208 227 52 143 52 66, 255 210 227 198 55 237 61, 241 176, 254 69, 176, 256 227 245 127, 154, 210 122, 227

Langstraat, Carrie ... .. 62, 107, 139, 159, 244 Lapenga, Matt 136, 176 Lappenga, Ben 24, 34, 3 6 , 2 1 0 Larr, Kalene 176, 187 50 Larsen, Shannon 21 Larzelere, Lisa 66, 89, 154, 255 Lascano, Tannia 227 Lasley, Tanya 62, 245 LaSorsa, Tony 89,161,210,237 LaSorsa, Valerie 176,256 Latchaw, Jeremy 227 Laursen, Shannon ... 176,244 Lausch. Julie 61,243 Lauson, Hazel 159 Laverty, Kimberly .. 198 176 Law, Keri 11,89,210 Lawrsen, Shannon .. 63 Lawson. Hazel 139,227 Leachman, Jedediah 71,89 Leete, Phil 62, 167 237 Leguizamon, Luis... 61,240 Leigh, Patricia 51 Leinesch, Heidi 69, 257 Leitz, Jay ...66, 140, 247 Lemire, James 122 Lemke, Stacey 227 Lemmen, Gretchen . 227 Lenger, James 237 Lenon, Melyssa 227 Lepard, Sarah 177 Lepczyk, Peter 47 244 Leutch, Jessica 69 LeVan, Jennifer 210 50 Lewis, Kevin .. 68. 128, 161, 177, 248 Lewis, Shannon 71,96, 235 Liao, Min-Ken 43 Librizzi, Janet 227 227 Liechty, Peter 64, 236 Lighthouse 77 Lillie, Paul 148, 227 Lindscheid, Alexis .. 198 Lingbeek, Todd 198 Lintemuth. Kate 210 Lippert, Jarod 144, 227 Listenberger, Laura. 100, 177 64, 149. Llewellyn, Evan 177, 237 Lock, Myka 256

Lookhuyzen, Tyler Longstreet, Jeanne Loodeen, Paul 101, Looman, Sara 61, Looman, Susan 61, Loomis, Jessica LoPresti, Nicholas Loris, Lauri Louwerse, Keith Lovelace, Temple Lovem, Heather Lowe, Chris Lowry, Mistine Loynes, Griffin Lubbe, Adam Lubbers, Sarah 66, Lucas, Becky .... 63, 150, Lucas, Mary 16, 115, Lucas, Todd 43, 53, Luecht, Jessica Luhmann, Jeremy Luhmann, Matthew Luidens, Donald Lukey, Jolene Lull, Anna Lunn, David Lunn, John Luurtsema, Ryan Lynch, Michelle

1^9 210 112, 161 177, 242 177, 242 227 177 227 193 115, 227 61, 242 227 143, 198 210 152 177, 254 177, 245 196, 198 152, 246 210 246 122, 247 55 227 177 210 50 122, 210 210

Maas, Heather Maas, Ryan MacDermaid, Mary MacDoniels, Jeff MacDoniels, Joe MacDoniels, Kate Machan, Danielle Mack, Rachael Mackowiak, Stacey Madden, Christopher Maddox, Megan Mahaffey, Matthew Maher, Ryan Mahlmann, Christopher Mahsun, Carol

66, 254 198 139, 210 148 44 69, 257 177 198 210 237 58, 234 227 69, 248 227 42

j

tudents work together to score in a pickup game of volleyball at a 14th Street block party. When students were not busy in the back yard or in the Pine Grove, many hit the court in the Dow for the many intramural sports. (Photo by Josh Neucks)


122, 227 198 ..61,242 248 127,255 144 210 177,254 122

98 196 143, 242 247 .. 62, 245 .. 96, 227 210 203, 227 227 .. 62, 245 139 227 50 210, 222 62, 238 177 227 177 227 98 198 210 . 4 2 , 177 138, 177 130,242 210 256 227 184, 264 210 257 210 42 198 65 177, 242 227 210 122, 227 122

177 245 42 227 198 199 112,210 117, 227 210 139 177 199 . 4 3 , 183 177,188 ,. 62, 244 178 53 178 ., 62, 238 178 140,246 227 . 14, 227 210 178 199 153, 178 152 178 211

104 178 .69,256 227 199 128, 129 152, 199 227 61 211

Mejuer, Beth 211 Menken, Kevin 211, 270 Menken, Laurie 52 Merchant, Brent 122 Merriman, Leslie 227 Merritt, Amanda 58, 234 Merritt, Calvin 211 Merritt, Kris 141, 199 Mervenne, Mercedes 65, 251 Messer, Ben 71, 252 Metzler, Josh ... 1 3 6 , 2 1 1 , 2 3 2 , 2 6 4 Meulenberg, David 141 Meuzelaar, Christopher 258 Meyer, Meghan 199 Meyer, Renee 8, 227 Meyer, Rob 61 Meyer, Sherri 199 Meyers, Peter 11 Mezeske, Barb 45 Mezeske, Emily 212 Mezeske, Richard 4 5 , 1 0 0 , 219 Michael, Del 42 Mihailoff, Laura 147,178 Mihalek, Nathaniel 178 Mikoy, Damon 69, 249 Milestone 102, 258 Mill, Jennifer 227 Miller, Amy 55, 228 Miller, Danielle 178 Miller, David 152, 228 Miller, Janel 228 Miller, Kent 199 Miller, Michelle 228 Miller, Ryan 212 Miller, Stephanie 178, 235 Miller, Steve 152 Miller, Susan 139, 159, 228 Mills, Benjamin 19, 61, 240 Miloblinski, Jens 149 Mishler, Sye 28, 71, 252 Mitchell, Jim 145, 147 Mixer, Brad 65 Mixer, Chad 89 Mixer, Jessica 61, 95, 242 Mlynarczyk, Susan 51 Moderman, Melissa 156, 159 Modrak, Jill 212 Moes, Julie 66, 254 Moffat, Mindy 199 Moldenhauer, A m y 228 Moline, Michele 178 Monette, Laurel 228 Monroy, Daniza 32, 228 Monroy, Fabiola 32,212 Monroy, Miluska 3 2 , 9 8 , 199 Monsma, Corey 69, 122, 248 Montpetit, Marc 64, 178, 237 Moore, Clinton 62, 238 Moore, Janel 139, 228 Moore, Keri 228 Moran, Heather 243 Morehouse, Brian 142 Morehouse, Scott 156 Moreno, Maria 256 Moreno, Pilar 69 Morford, Jen 147, 228 Morford, Robert 178, 191 Morgan, Heather 61 Morgan, Kelly 61, 243 Morgan, Kim 127, 1 5 4 , 2 2 8 Morgan, Margaret 6 2 , 1 7 8 , 245 Morgan, Matthew 212 Morian, Kirsten 229 Morin, Julie 212 Morris, Jennifer 229 Morris, Nick 122 Morrison, Joyce 50 Morrow, James 26,50 Morscheck, Melody 130, 212 Mortar Board 100 Morton, Craig 122, 229 Morton, Doug 229 Motiff, James 53, 224 Motiff, Judith 50 Moua, Lisa 71, 235 Mouser, Sandra 178 Mox, Kellie 66, 73, 254 Mugg, Stephen 69, 2 1 2 , 2 4 8 Muhlenberg, David 140

ss

ft. aking a radical departure from the standard blanket, sophomores Kevin Menken, Andrew Redstrom, Jase Roberts, and Guy Risendorf pull up a couch in the Pine Grove during the annual Spring Fling. The couch, carried on the shoulders of the men from a nearby dorm room, provided cozy surroundings to watch the bands, comedian and passersby. (Photo by Anthony Perez) Muiderman, Anthony 50 Mulder, Jack 229 Mulder, Brett 212 Mulder, Jeff 89, 249 Mulder, Jessica 151, 229 Mulder, Jill 171, 178 Mulder, Kathryn 229 Mulder, Kevin 69 Mulder, Megan .... 26, 61, 178, 242 Mulder, Ryan 212 Mulholland, Jeffrey 18, 248 Mull, Brittany 229 Multi-Cultural Life 32 Mulroney, Diane 50 Muma, David 199 Mungall, William 43 Munoa, Phillip 54 Murie, Shaun 132 Muriuki, Muturi 3 2 , 7 1 , 178 Murphy, AnnMarie 58, 234 Murphy, Christa 61, 154, 243 Murphy, Katherine 13, 179 Murphy, Tyler 178, 183 Murray, Greg 43 Musselman, Teresa 65, 251 Myers, David 42, 53 Myers, Peter 89, 229 Myers, Rob 241

fA'tS Naber, Anna Nagelkirk, Lynae Nagy, Jessalynn Naja, Erinn Nakajima, Fumihito Nannenga, Bonnie Nash, Kevin Nasir, Mona Nasrallah. Delores Ncihols, Kathryn Neeb. John Neff. Chad Neil, Matt Nelson, Jessica Nelson, Steve Nemes, Joel

13, 62, 65,

145.

94. 101,

229 251 229 147 50 245 122 251 208 154 229 248 140 212 42 179

Nemeth, Joel 156 Nemeth. Roger 55 Netzloff, Holly 179 Nelzly, Dave 43 Neucks, A n n 71, 143, 179, 235 Neuisma, Emily 69 Neuman, Elizabeth 199 Neumann, Laura 208, 212 Neucks, Josh 212 Newell, Carrie 229 Nguyen, Hai 229 Nichols, Eric 66, 122, 229 Nichols, Kathryn 130, 212 Nickels, Eric 69, 248 Nicies. Sara 68, 180, 256 Nicodemus, Nancy 45 Nicodemus, Stefany 69, 256 Niehhuis, Abby 61, 242 Nielsen, Ted 44 Nienhouse, Greg 132, 229 Nienhuis, Anthony 61 Nienhuis, Mellissa 229 Nieuwsma, Emily 256 Nixon, Kathryn 212 Norden, Andy 213 Norris, Melissa 229 Norris, Natasha 199 Norris, Tony 213 North, Oliver 30 Noithuis, Mark 50. 136, 139, 156. 159 Norwood, Joni 24, 36, 229 Notman, Jeremy 180 Nursing Department 44 Nyboer, Brandon 144 Nyenhuis, Jacob 3, 101 Nykamp. Chad 180 Nykerk 12, 90, 215

Ofori-Mensa, Akua 13, 65, 251 Ogden, Lisa 199 Ohm. Andrew 149. 229 Oldham. Kristy 229 Olds, Anthony 20, 122, 213 Olds, Caroline 213 Olds. Rebecca 180 Olipant. Yvonne 180 Olsen. Karen 71.235 Omicron Kappa Epsilon Fraternity 69, 248 Ondersma, Ryan 199 Onken. Suzanne 213 Ooms, Melissa 13, 58, 234 Oonk, Melody 135 Oostendorp, Nate 213 Oosting, Jennifer 143 Oosting, Lexie 127 Oostveen, Kristen 181 Oostveen, Robert 213 Orchestra 28 Orejuela, Christine 69, 257 Orientation 8, 84 Omee, Elizabeth 229 Omee. Jaclyn 159,213 Orzechowski, Jenelle 62, 245 Osborne. Kelly 50. 53 Oselka, Jean 213 Oselka, Matthew 199 Osmun, Adam 122 Otis, Aaron 122, 199 Otis, Amy 89 Otis, Andrew 229 Otteson, Amy 65, 192, 251 Oudersluys. John Mark 69. 1X1. 24K Ouilette, Michelle 229 Oursler, Steven 122. 246 Outcalt, Cherrylynn ... 16, 130, 229 Overmeyer, Erin 213 Owens, Jessica 66. 254 Ozinga. Heather 154. 181, 184 Ozinga. Mark 66, 247

CTONÂŁ

N l i w ^ O'Brate, Amorora O'Brien, David O'Connell. Ryan Oderkirk. Daniel O'Dowd, Lauren Oegema, Jeffery

199 53 122, 180 180 130, 242 71, 180, 252

6

Paarlberg, Adam Pabisz, Dwayne Paccione. Sarah

index

122, 213 213 229

2 6 7


erging video images, Lance Pellow uses a cutting edge Macintosh computer to produce a communication production project. The fully equipped television studio in Lubbers Hall is used by students for class projects and public access productions. (Photo by Anthony Perez) Paccioni, Sarah 154 Pacheco. Cynthia 242 Padilla, Rachel 69, 257 Palleschi, Susan 139, 199 Palmer, James 200, 215 Palmer, Nicole 229 Pan-Hellenic Council 72 Papanek, Heather 181, 191 Paplawsky, Gregory 181 Paplawsky, Steve 122, 213 Parent, Loreal 71, 235 Parker, Alex 71, 181 Parker, Alexandria 181 Parker, Danielle 181. 187 Parkhurst, Michelle 213 Parks, Jack 200 Parrish, Jessica 65, 181, 251 Parsons, Laura 89, 229 Partners in Promise 99 Partrdige, Jamie 34, 62, 89, 245 Pascente, Roxanne 62, 245 Passchier, Jenny 62, 139, 245 Pater, John 200 Paterik, Debbie 213 Patmos, Anna 213, 260 Patnott, John 50, 144, 146 Patout, Julie 235 Patrick, Ted 66, 122,247 Patterson, Ben 38, 207 Patterson, Dan 24, 36, 213 Paul, Brian 229 Paulisse, Kevin 106, 213 Pauls, Katherine 181 Pavlik, Sally 181 Pazdur, Ryan 181 Pearson, Tricha 229 Pease, Kemberlee 229 Peaslee, Graham 43 Pellerito, Gina 69, 135, 256 Pellow, Lance 128,213,268

2 6 8

Index

Pelon, Holly 63, 73, 181, 245 Penn, Courtney 32 Penney, Jeff 213 Pennings, Tim 50 Penrose, Larry 48 Pepper. Sarah 229 Perdue, Shonda 89, 96, 229 Pereira, Roy 61, 181, 240 Perez, Anthony 71, 103, 235, 258 Perez, Erica 159, 229, 258, 270 Perkins, Amy 66, 254 Perkins, Angela 107 Perovich, Nick 52 Perry, Beth 66, 181, 254 Perry, Meghan 181 Peters, Ryan 229 Petersen, Joel 68, 248 Peterson, Brian 181 Peterson, Holly 200 Peterson, Jennifer 181 Peterson, Jonathan 47 Peterson, Mark 181, 187 Petit, Anne 50 Petkus, Henry 245 Petkus, Jeanette 245 Petkus, Tony 66, 122, 246 Petroelje, Brian 200 Petscher, Jennifer 126, 181 Pett, Jennifer 229 Pettiglio, Michael 246 Petty, Amy 127, 213 Peuler, Bradley 213 Peuler, Jennifer 200 Pfau, Heidi 182, 184 Pham, Hoang 66, 254 Phelps, Dave 229 Phelps, Tracy 130, 242 Phi Kappa Alpha Fraternity . 19, 60, 240

Phi Tau Nu Fraternity 67 Philips, Craig 182 Phillips, Jonathan 229 Phothisan, Vilasack 237 Pickens, Allyson 62, 245 Pickering, Daniel 241 Piel, Michelle 245 Pierce, Jenny 36, 229 Piers, James 55 Piersma, Mark 132, 213 Pierson, Jill 96, 229 Pihlaja, Jennifer 95, 182, 254 Pinkerton, Luke 144, 167, 182, 240 Pinkham, Janet 42 Pirich, Karen 69, 256 Pisselkaen, Robyn 95 Plewka, Lara 61, 89, 242 Pochert, Abby 66, 254 Poel, Peter 58 Poest, Christopher 229 Polak, James 182 Poley. Eryn 58, 60, 234 Polik, William 43, 106 Polites, Victor 182 Polk, Shannon 182 Ponka, Becky 13, 62, 245 Ponstein, Andy 200 Pool, Pete 58 Porter, Casey 229 Porter, Mike 145, 213 Porter, Tara 143, 200 Portfleet, Dianne 45 Post, Stu 249 Posthumus, Lee 248 Postmus, Rachel 143 Pott, Jonathan 182 Potter, Christopher 19, 61, 240 Potter, Dan 61 Potte, Smoky 7, 24 Potts, Rebecca 61, 147, 243 Powell, Kimberly 200 Powell, Melissa 71,89,213 Powell, Shannon 69, 257 Powers, David 213 Powers, Megan 139, 159, 213 Pozzanghera, Susan ... 65, 182, 251 Prasad, Jay 132 Pratt, Christy 213 Prentz, Chris 145 Prescott, Wes 137, 213 Pries, Ashley 96, 159, 229 Pries, Michael 213 Prince, Adrienne 146, 229 Prince, Stacey 213

Prins, Andrew 229 Promethian Fraternity ....70, 252 Proff, Mark 5, 105, 164, 182 Provenzano, Shay 122, 156 Provost, Elayne 200 Provost, Marie 229 Pryor, Amanda 213 Pryor, Nicole 61, 242, 182 Psychology Department 42 10, 89,192 Pull Puntel, Erica 229 Putnam, Matthew 156, 213 Putzke, Nicole 213 Pyszora, Jennifer 229, 258

Quealy, Frank Quimby, Beth Quinn, John

Rahimi, Saum Raj, Louis Ralph, George Ralph. Stephen Ramakrishna, Deepa Ramirez, Connie Ramirez, Vanessa Ramthun, Marilee Randall, Clinton Randall, Daruis Randall, Kevin Randinitis, Joanne Randinitis, Karen

152 13,28,54,213 50

148, 149 122, 200 23, 55 182 182 188 230 214 230 143 172 65, 251 65, 251

Ransom, Kathy 52 Rasche, Carl 89, 230, 263 Rasdall, Joel 214 Rasdall, Joshua 230 247 Rataj, Dave Ratdavong, Melinda 61, 242 Ratering, Emily 214 Rathbun, Bethany 62, 245 Rawie, Sonja 71, 235 Ray, Richard 50, 122 Reber, Traci 182 Redell, Sarah 200 Redente, Jeanmarie 182, 234 Redinger, Ryan 122, 246 Redoutey, Jason 122,230 Redmond, Andrew 268 Reed, Kate 70, 235 Reese, Kathy 182 Reeves, Jon 24, 137, 156, 182 Rejc, Natalie 130, 230 Renner, Dan 122, 230 Renz, Jeff 69, 248 Resele, Anna 201 Residential Life 86 Retlewski, Holly 66, 254 Reybum, D.J 122, 152, 246 Reyenga, Hillary 66, 159, 255 Reynolds. Bill 55 Reynolds, Keely 257 Reynolds, Matthew 214 Reynolds, Maura 50 Rhiew, Patricia 36, 230 Rhoades, Michelle 182,187 Rice, Jeremy 122, 156,237 Richards, Blair 128 Richards, Sarah 71, 235 Richardson, Jennifer 214 Richardson. Kimberly 159, 230. 258 Richardson, Sarah 70 Richardson, Scott 214 Richardson, Stephanie 182, 245 Richets, Mike 159 Richter, Doug 61, 241 Richter, Kara 61. 243 Ricketts, Eve 182 Ricketts, Michael 156,122 Ridl, Jack 45 Riekse, James 183 Riekse, Jamie 61, 243 Riggs, Anna 214 Riker. Chris 128,201 Riley. Kathy 66, 254 Risedorph, Guy 214, 268 Ritsema, Robert 28, 50

ith the midnight sky as a backdrop, two bouncers try a nontraditional form of exercise out behind their cottage. The trampoline provided an escape from the frustration of academics and a chance to let loose their inner child. (Photo by Josh Neucks)


rmed with whipped cream, orientation assistants perform a skit at OA Olympics. The group used the activity to prepare for using a sense of humor and energy to welcome the freshmen to campus during orientation weekend. (Photo by Zach Johnson) Ritton, Khris 61, 125 Rivera, Julio 50 Robbins, Jennie 214 Robbins, Sarah 230 Roberts, Douglas 183 Roberts, Jase 136,214,268 Robins, Daina 23, 55 Robinson, Jessica 214 Robinson, Lesley 230 Robinson, Marcus 224 Rodenhouse, Erin 230 Rodocker, Geoff 128 Rodriguez, Rebecca 183 Rodstrom, Robert 201 Rodtie, Dave 66 Roe. Bruce 15 Roehling, Patricia 53 Roelofs, Andrew 89, 214 Roesch, Jacob 183 Roeters, Jane 201 Rogers, Kelly 69, 256 Rohner, Dave 20, 34, 36, 62 Roiwe, Brenda 89 Romin, Amy 61, 242 Rop, Rhonda 230 Rosales, Jorita 183, 242 Rosenbrook, Paul 128 Rosenbrook, Todd 128, 230 Ross, Heidi 201 Ross, Jimmie 50 Ross, Wendy 69, 89, 256 Rossi, Andrea 69, 256 Rotloff, Leif 122 Rottenberg, Carmen 95 Rottenborg, Nicole 183 Roulo, Anne 214 Rouse, Tonya 61 Roush. Mary 214 Rowc. Brent 61, 89, 241 Rowe, Chad 161 Rowe. Derek 183 Rowe, Gina 66, 89, 254 Rowlett, Winston 183 Roy. Heather 154, 230 Royer, Jodi 143 Royer. Rob 122 Rozendal, Sondra 51 Rubel. Jason 184 Ruby. Chad 152, 201 Such, Alex 156, 230 Rucht. Alex 89 Ruhrup. Joshua 184 Rumohr. Jon 98 Rumohr-Voskuil. Gretchen 184 Russcher. Holly 30, 230 Russick. Matt 122

Russick, Matthew 230 Rutherford, Bob.... 24, 26, 62, 136, 156, 239 Rygenga, Hillary 130 Ryden, David 51, 220 Rye, Sara 20, 66, 254 Rye, Wheaty 21 Rynolds, William 45 Rynsburger. Misca Lynne 184 Rypma, Betsie 201

(AiiSlSSS36 Saalfeld, Emily SAC Saggers, Casey Sailing Club Sakshaug, Valkyrie .

147, 230 201 . 16.20,34, 82 65, 251 105 62, 245 184 201 230 214 201 214 65, 122,

Salomon, Karen Salvaterra, Kellie .... Samhouri, Nadia Samsell, Dawn Sanders, Amy Sanders, Stephen .... 184,237 Sandro, Christopher 237 Sanford. Elizabeth .. 43 Schairbaum, Anne .. 251 Sehairer, Cheryl 45 Schakel, Peter 45 Schantz, Aaron 230 Scharbaum, Anne ... 65 Schaub, Kyle ... 65, 122, 237 Scherer, Chester 230 Schermer, Kelly 230 Schicker, Joshua 20, 24, 34, 36, 214, 262 Schiller, Erin 201 Schmidt. Becky 126 Schmidt. Emily 147, 184 Schmidt, Kathryn ... 230 Schmidt, Leigh Ann 230 Schmitt. Karlye 61, 242 Schmude, Paul 149, 201 Schneider, Amanda. 214

Schneider, Kari 214 Schodorf, Mollie 255 Scholten, Barb 45 Scholten, Chris 214 Scholten, Heather 230 Scholten, Rebekah 185 Scholtens, Kurtis 230 Scholtens, Matthew 201 Schoon, Gretchen .... 130, 159,214 Schoon, Michelle 143 Schoonveld, Tim 140 Schoonveld, William 230 Schopp, Lee 128 Schout, David 230 Schrader, Brock 122 Schregardus. Darell 53, 96, 211 Schreuder. James 185 Schrier, Dave 62, 89, 238 Schripsema, Tom 65, 237 Schrock. Anne 66, 89, 192, 255 Schroeder, Susan 201 Schuch, Nathan 185 Schuld, Amanda 61, 242 Schultz, Ellen 159, 201 Schulz, Garrett 214 Schut, Acacia 185 Schweiss, Joseph 201 Sciortino, Lori 230 Scordinsky, Brian 201 Scott, Caryl 201 Scott, Timothy 62, 238 Scribner, Mary 62, 71, 235, 245 Seaman. Maria 201 See, Shannon Ronna 185 Seid, Katrin 214 Selkirk, Jason 122 Sellers, Heather 45 Selmer. Erin 89, 243 Sessons, Todd 230 Sevensma, Eric 61, 240 Seymour. Michael 43 Sharp, Andy Brady 185 Sharp, Stuart 50 Shattucky, Jason 201 Shaughnessy, John 42, 53 Shaw. Ryan 137, 214, 264 Shearer, Rebecca 185 Sheehan, Amanda 185 Sheehan, Brent 201 Sheldon, Josh 128 Sheldon. Lesley 61 Sheldon. Melissa 185 Shelley, Dan 11. 89. 144. 192, 201 Shelley. Katie 89, 230, 277 Shen. Ivy 71,94, 235

Shenk. Lisa 62, 245 Sheppard, Sandy 214 Sherrod. Brooke 185 Shiel, Erin 89, 159, 214 Shields, Jim 122, 201 Shilts, Melinda 135, 201 Shimizu. Nobuyuki 185 Shineman, Amy 230 Shock. Ray 214 Shodorf. Mollie 66 Shoemaker. John 230 Shull, Kimberly 185 Shumaker. Louise .... 196, 222, 257 Sibyline Sorority 66, 256 Siddall. Blythe 58, 185, 234 Sigma Iota Beta 66, 256 Sigma Omicron 108 Sigma Sigma Sorority 18, 69, 73, 257 Sikma, Ben 214 Sill, Andrew 61. 89, 240 Silver, Michael 43 Simmer, Lori 230 Simon, Caroline 52, 196 Simons, Lloyd 201 Simons, Matt 96, 214 Simpson, Ashli 65. 251 Sine. Katie 230 Singer, Ashley 185 Singer. Kirsten 54 Sipsma, Jamie 201 Sisulu. Mlungisi 185, 201, 224 Sitonu, Ivana 69, 224 Sisulu, Nontsikelelo 185, 224 Sitati, James 32,71,98,253 Sitz, Kristen 36 Skarica, Tomilav 39 Skuza, Hilary 230 Slabaugh, Mark 230 Slad, Stacey 13, 230 Slager, Nick 105 69, 256 Slagh, Sarah

Slater. Paul 65, 237 Slaugt, Sarah 169 Slaughter. Gloria 53 Slawson. Shannon 201 Slayer. Nick 104 Slayton, Casey 185 Slenk, Brian 201 Slette. Stein 50, 131 Slezak. Scott 71,252,185 Slowinski, Sara 230 Smallegan, Karen 214 Smit, Marcia 45. 51 Smith. Aaron M 61, 66, 122, 191.228, 241 Smith. Aaron J 185, 247 Smith, Ami 63, 185, 245 Smith. Clint 61, 241 Smith, Darcy 214 Smith, Doug 122 Smith, Elizabeth 185 Smith, Eunice 214 Smith, Jennifer 150, 186,230 Smith, Joel 156, 186 Smith, Kelly 122,214 Smith, Kristy 34 Smith, Luke 65, 88, 156, 237 Smith, Mark 42 Smith, Mary Jane 58, 234 Smith, Melinda 230 Smith, Rachel 22, 55, 214 Smith. Raymond 50 Smith, Richard 55 Smith, Sarah 186, 230 Smith, Stacy 230 Smith, Steven 50, 128 Smith, Thomas 50 Smith. Tyler 172, 186 Smitley. Matthew 89. 230 Smitley, Megan-Kathleen 186 Sneller, Leslie Anne 39, 186 Snyder, Kari 73, 251 Snyder, Sarah 214

iscussing plans for his upcoming Intermission page, sophomore Matt Morgan explains his ideas to Anchor editor Jodi McFarland. The arts page appeared in the weekly campus newspaper to keep students up to date on happenings around the campus and town. (Photo by Zach Johnson)

Index

2 6 9


Stimer. Wendy 186 Stimson, Jon 201 Stockert, Scott 231 Stoepker. Jeremy 238 Stojic, Allicia 231 Stollenmaier, Tara 95, 251 Stoner, Jeremy 61, 137, 156, 241 Storer, Andrew 61, 240 Storey. Chad 65. 104, 105, 237 Stoughton, John 50 Strand, Josh 61,89, 241 Strand-Hales, Gisela 50 Strangways, Brittan 201 Strassburger, Amy 66, 89, 254 Stratton, Joshua 240 Strauss, Jennifer 186 Strauts, Jeffrey 18, 69, 248 Streelman, Roberta Ann ... 65, 251,

Sobania, Neal 48 Soccer 128,130 .Softball 155 Soltis, John 122, 230 Sommer, Jason 186,238 Sonnemann. Kevin 230 Sowerby, Erin 150 Spalding. Jennifer 215 Spaman. Andee 231 Spangler, Ryan 18. 61, 240 Spears, Andrea 69, 257 Spence, Julie 201 Spencer. Rebecca 61, 159, 186, 242 Spencer, Steven 53, 224 Spencer. Theresa 201 Speyer, Rebecca 231 Spires, Rita 231 Spitters, Steven 186 Spradling. Michael 186, 237 Sprague, Victoria 231 Spring Fling 16 Springer-Tiggleman, Thomas . . 7 1 , 253 Sprouse. Crystal 97, 196. 215 Spykerman, Sara 256 Stafiej, Kris 139 Stancil, Ben 231 Stanger. Katie 139. 186 Staples, Ben 201 Stapleton. Mike 89, 161 Stames, Trevor 122, 186,246 Start, Lisa 231 Stead. Kayrl 231 Stedman. Catherine 215 Steen, Todd 50 Steensma. Matthew 15. 62, 186, 238 Stegeman, Pat 140, 215 Stegink, Gordon 44 Stein, Sarah 231 Stein, Tricia 231 Steketee. Kristi 251 Stephan, Mari 215 Sterenberg. Matthew 201 Sterk, Aimee 186 Sterk, Ryan 62, 238 Stem, Paul 215 Stem, Todd 100 Stevens, Karin 215 Stewart, Joanne 43 Stickler, Jessica 231 Stiegler. Stephanie 66. 89, 255 Stielstra, David 89. 231 Stielstra, Sarah 66, 254

186 Strehler. Lori Strittmatter. Robert Stroh. Elizabeth Stroh. Judd Strouf, Linda Stroven. Sarah Struck. Michael Struck, Robert Strumler, Ryan Strumfels, Rich Stubbs, Mark Stubbs. Monica Student Congress Stuit, Paul Sturmfels, Richard Sturtevant. Deborah Styf, Daniel Su, Timothy Sugden, Karen Sullivan, Laura Sullivan, Mary Sullivan, Ryan Sundbeck, Steven Sundsmo, Joy Surian. Melissa Sutton, Kate Swanson. Debra Swanson, Mary Swanson. Todd Sweetser, Daniel Sweetser, Douglas Swets, Ben Swier, Matthew Swimming Sydlik, Mary Anne

202 122 66, 254, 255 98, 105 23, 50 231 186 136, 231 19 176 58. 250 147 4,30,100 68, 248 167, 186 55 117,239 186 187, 242 231 215 187 71, 176, 187 187 154, 231 231 55 69. 96 50 202 232 215 232 144,146 43

s a hang-out during lunch and a cure for the late-night attack of munchies, the Kltez snack bar provides the setting for a study meeting. Serving a full menu of meals and snacks, the Kletz caters to the tastes of students and facutly. (Photo by Josh Neucks)

Tailford, W. Matthew Talent Jam Talsma, Sean Tammi, John Tanis, Ryan Tanis, Wayne Tanner, Ashley Tannis, Elliot Taylor, Dan Taylor, Jeffrey Taylor, Michelle Taylor, Robert

161, 187 36 122 23, 55 152, 216 143 62, 245 50 202 54 235 187

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ver 120 students and the chaplain's staff listen to a speaker at the University of Illinois' Assembly Hall. Urbana featured students and speakers from around the world to discuss the role of missions and opportunities for service. (Photo by Zach Johnson)

2 7 0

Index

Taylor, Stephen 43 Tedesco, Rochelle 62, 187, 245 Teerman, Kelli 61, 242 Temple, Rob 32, 216 Ten Harmsel, Jill 232 Ten Clay. Shanna 242 Tenhor, Mark 62, 239 Tennis 148, 150 Terpstra, Duane 52 Terpstra, Jason 241 Tester, Todd 122,232 TeWinkle, Pete 132 Thatcher, Kerry 187 Thayer, Dean 161 Theil, Melissa 146, 147 Theilen, Kristen 61 Thelen, Mike 96, 252 Theune, David 216 Theartre Productions 22 Thiel, Melissa 188 Thomas, Jessica ... 69, 89, 104, 256 Thompson. Andrew 69, 248 Thompson. Erin 216 Thompson. Janelle 13, 139 Thompson. Jannah 216 Thompson. Megan 69, 188, 257 Thoreson, Rebecca 232 Thomell, Jamie 232 Thorpe. Alan 65, 161 Thorrez, Beth Ann 188, 234 Tigelaar, Darren 202 Tigelaar, Katherine 216 Tillema, Sara 232 Timichi, Alicia 89 Timm, Vanessa .... 45, 66, 139, 255 Timmer, Rebecca 107, 138, 159,216 Timmer, Beth 69, 257 Timmer, Lisa 143, 154, 188 Timmer, Todd 232 Tinkelman, Lia 234 Tobias, Aaron 122 Tobias, Stephen 61, 240 Tobias, Jessica 261 Toburen, Mike 216 Todd, Aaron 216 Tomer, Ellen 188 Tomicich, Alicia 216 Tommola, Craig... 58, 89. 250. 263 Tonn. Carrie 34,232 Toohey. Darren 128, 216 Toohey. Sean 128, 168. 232 Torrence. Arlene 61, 242 Torrence, Julie 61 Track 158 Track, Jennifer 232

Tracy, Aaron

188 202 ->32 61 Travis, Nicole 69,257 Trezenberg. Kim 202, 254 Trinh. Christine 232 Trytko, Jeff 62, 239 Tuinstra, Melinda ... 71.235 Tulgestke, Todd ...65,122, 232 52 Tverberg, Lois 43 Tyke, Charlene 188 Tyrrell, John 232

STQiJil

Uddin, Sami 216 Udell, Christopher 184. 188 Ueda, Mayumi 189 Union of Catholic Students .... 75 208,270 Urbana 122,152,237 Uyl, Dave

Vail. Samuel 24. 61. 240 Van Antwerp, Sara 189 Van Dam. Holly 232 Van Dam, Matt ^ Van Dyken, Brian 1^9 Van Eden. Andrew 1^ Van Engen, Anita 20Vim Faasen, Betsy 61,243 Van Haitsma. Bryan 136. 217 Van Iwaarden, John 50 Van Iwaarden, Ron 50 Van Langevelde, Heidi 202 Van Lonkhuyzen, Allison 20Van Oort. Jessica 20-


Van Tubbergen, Kalhy 150 Van Valkenburg. Kelly Jo 189 Van Vliel, Kim 233 Van Wieren. Glenn 50. 140 Van Wieren, Kuria 127 Van Wieren, Michael 69 Van Wyk, Leonard 50 Van Wyngaraden, Annalise 130, 233 Van Zoeren. Brad 65 Van Zetten, Aaron 128 VanAuken, Amy 202, 266 VanAuken, Erinn 164, 232 Vance, Valorie 89, 232 VanDam, Christopher 61, 240 VanDam, Matt 61, 89, 241 VanDellen, Jason 61 VandenBerg, Craig 61, 241 VanDenBerg, Dave 202 VandenBerg, Zack 68, 248 Vander Elzen, Michael 202 Vander Kolk, Brent 189 Vander Laan, Paul 233, 272 233 Vander Lind, Elizabeth Vander Meeden, Pearce 189 Vander Naald, Matt 128 Vander Vliet, William 233 Vander Wal, Allison 202 Vander Wal. Scott 202 Vander Woude. Jason 140 Vander Beek, Marc 62, 238 VanderBorgh, Clarence .... 189. 240 VanderElzen, Emiliana 233 VanderHeide, Derek 61, 145, 189, 240 VanderHeide, Paul 61, 233 Vanderhyde, James 71, 252 VanderKamp, Bethanie 217 VanderLaan, Jeff 217 VanderLugt, Heidi 217 VanderLugt, Kara 202

VanderWeide, Susan 139 VanderYacht, Gordon 122 VanderZwart, Ryan 189 VanDeven, Christopher 61, 217 VandeWege, Aaron .. 137, 156, 202 VandeWege, Jaclyn 233 VandeWege, Kristen 233 Vandrese, Kari 202 VanEck, Tenielle 61, 243 VanFaasen, Paul 43 VanFossan, Joe 149 Vanghan, Greg 66 VanHekken, Elizabeth 233 VanHekken, Dan 140 VanHekken, Tom 233 VanHoose, Sara 49, 254 VanLangevelde, Stacy 71 Vanlluis, Chris 122 VanLonkhuyzen, Tyler 69, 72, 248 VanNoord, James 189, 191 VanNuil, Melissa 217 VanOstran, Kimberly 189 VanRavenswaay, Erich 69, 89, 248 VanRavenswaay. Melissa... 89. 256 VanSoes, Marc 179 VanSpronsen. Sarah 217 VanTimmeran. Chris 61 VanTimmeren, Kevin 69, 249 Vantloose, Sara 66 VanTubbergan, Cathy 151 Vanvels, Mary 52 VanWagnen, Victoria 189 Van Wieren, Michael 248 VanZoeren, Brad 202 VanZoeren, Rachel 202 Vasicek, Todd 122 Vaughn, Greg 122,247 Veen, Mike 217,262 Vega, Andrea 189, 245

Verhey, Allen Veritas Forum Verry, Dave Vertalka, Jonathan Verwys, Leischen Vickers, Jared Viehl, Maijorie Vincent, Amy Vincent, Kristi Visser, Angela Viveros, Sonia Vizithum, Sara Vlietstra, Greg Vlietstra, Kim Vlnka, John Vogel, Eric Volk, Bryan Volkers, Beth Volleyball Volleyball Club Vos, Amy Vos, Kathleen Voshel, Scott Voss, Dave Voss, Richard Voss, Trisha Vriesenga, Matt Vrieze. Ross Vruggink. David Vu, Chuong Vyvyan, James

54, 180 200 189 140, 217 61, 243 122, 246 51 233 9, 233 89, 233 202 189 95, 202 217 233 202 122,233 61, 243 126 104 217 189 62, 238 264 217 190, 243 69, 152, 248 89. 190. 196 233 233 43

olding hands while falling back into a show drift, sophomore Andy Dressier, and freshmen Erica Perez and Julie Geerlings have a contest for the best snow angel. The large amount of snow provided a chilly escape for students all over campus. (Photo by Anthony Perez) VanderMeer, Jim VanderMolen, Stacey Vandemaald. Matt Vanderplow, Dana VanderSlice, Chris Vandersteen, Sarah VanTimmeren, Chris VanderVelde, Jonathan Vandervelde, Rick VanderWal. Scott VanderWall. Ryan VanderWege, Aaron

122 233 69, 249 61, 243 140, 217 243 240 248 50 36 65,122 136

Velasco. Myra Velazquez. Suzanne Velderman. Ben Veldhof. Gary Veldhof. Gwen Veldhof. Jill Vellenga. Hilary Velting. Heather Vendramini. Reina Ver Beek. Thomas Verazquez. Suzy Verduin. Kathleen

62. 245 254 217 189 28 233 233 126. 127, 217 54 189 66 45

Waara. Kathryn Waara. Katy Wacker. Mimi Wagenaar. Larry Wagner. Lara Wagner. Rachael Wagner. Shane Wahlstrom. Emily Wallace. Jay Walter. Mary Ellen Walvoord. Derek Warber. Sara

255 66. 255 130, 217 53 69. 256 66. 255 190 233 65. 89. 237 96. 202 202 66, 154. 255

Warburton. Peter 19. 61 Ward, Courtney 190 Ward. Jeanette 202 Ward. Maryellen 69 Ware. Sally 202 Warren. Jennifer 217 Washburn, Michelle 233 Washington. Frater 248 Waterloo. Betsy 233 Waterloo. Carrie 202 Watkin. Sarah 190 Wattleworth. Kent 190. 246 Weaver. Brian 202 Webb. Valeriee 190 Weckwert. Arika 61, 243 Weeldreyer, Misten 217 Weener, Anne 233 Weerstra, Amanda 202 Wegner, Dan 122 Weidner, Jaime 64, 245 Weinburger, Hans 69, 249 Weiss. Kim 69 Welch, Olivia 69, 190, 256 Wells, Barbara 55 Welsh, Stephen 190 Welton, Courtney 61, 190, 243 Wendrick, Todd 217 Wendt, Laura 256 Wenger, Chanda 233 Wentzloff, Sarah 190 Werner, Shannon 202 Wesp. Heather 217 Wesselink, Adam . 62, 88, 145, 239 Wesselink, Elizabeth 202 Wessman, Leslie 45, 48 West, Amy Sue 233 West, Jessica 69, 256 West, Kris 62, 245 West, Suzie 139 Westfall, Sara 233 Westhus, Eric 71, 252 Weyrick, Heather 61, 89 Wezeman, Bethany 217 Wheeler, Joshua 36, 132, 233 Whelan, Brandi 45, 62, 245 White, Dave 61, 241 White, Kim 233 White, Tyler 64, 237 Whitfield, Kathryn 61, 95, 243 Whitford, Marc 140, 141 Whitmore, Jeff 66, 247 Whitmyer, Nathan 122, 233 Wickmann, Elissa 233 Widi, Corine 175 Wiechertjes, Sarah 233 Wierengo, Jonathan 145, 202 Wiersema, Sarah 127, 233 Wilcox, Michelle 217 Wilderspin, Amy 202 Wilhelm, Grant 246 Wilkens, Daniel 233 Willams, Glyn 117,258 Williams, Aimee 217 Williams, Brent 65 Williams. Donald 43 Williams, Glyn 155.258 Williams. Jacqueline 233 Williams. Jamie 202 Williams. John 62. 239 Williams. Kortnea 233 Williams. Matthew 62. 238 Williams. Rachel 71.217 Williams, Travis 122, 203 Williamson, Natalie 71, 235 Wilson, Boyd 54 Wilson, Jenny 62, 245 Wilson, John 42 Wilson, Sara 190 Wing, Kathryn 203 Winn, Janna 203 Winnett-Murray, Kathy 43 WIO 96,196 Winter Fantasia 34 Wirtz, Gayle 203 Witte. Christy 71, 235 Wolf, Brian 233 Wolfanger, Gretchen 51, 203 Wolters, Chad 52 Wolters, Karla 50, 127, 154

Wolthuis, Brian Wolthuis, Ronald Wolven. Kristie Wondergem. Eric Wong. Aaron Wong. Brandon Wood. Elizabeth Wood. Noelle Woodhams. Jennifer Woodstra, Lindsey Woolard, Mindy M Working, Carolyn Wormmeester, Justin Wright. Andrew Wright. Crystal Wright. Bro Wilis Wyatt, Andrew Wynbeek. Anna Wynet, Andrew Wyngarden, Charlie

69.

69,

122, 89. 24,

71,

34, 89,

190 45 190 203 249 203 233 203 256 217 190 255 246 203 226 189 S3 252 233 106 233

NV.^46 Yager, Kelly Yam, Phung Yared, Elizabeth Yelding, Nicole Yingling, Cari Yonker, Jennifer Young, Emily Young, Jason Young, Zac Youngberg, Matt Yount, Michael Yowler, Skipp Ysseldyke, Drew

74, 217 32, 190 135, 217 233 58, 234 61 203 190 66, 247 24, 36 203 66, 247 240

Zachman, Chris Zandee, Gail Zanin, Gina Zapanta, Conrad Zayaz, Jessica Zeh, Darcy Zeiger, Melissa Zeneberg, Ann 62, Ziegler, Marcia Ziemer, Jason Zimdahl, Kristin 62, Ziter, Jason Zoetewey, Derek Zoetewey, James Zoller, Daniel Zolnierowcz, Mike Zorc, Angelique Zuidema, Mike Zupancic. Joseph Zwart. Derk 45, 71, Zwart, Rebecca Zweering, Kelly Zwiesler, Julie Zwyghuizen, Andrew Zylstra, Jeff Zisthe, Endng Thnkgod

203 51 154 71 217 143 233 139, 245 24, 190 233 203, 245 238 203 51 233 61, 89 203 144, 150 145, 203 190, 235 233 217 190 217 203 7

Index

2 7 1


Thanks ome people are able to make a company feel less like a business and more like a family. Our customer service representative Rhonda Holmes did that for us through the production of each book. Through calls, faxes, and mail she became a member of our staff, but more importantly, a friend While Rhonda will no longer work with us at Walsworth, she will always have a place in our hearts. Good Luck. Your in our prayers each day.

J.D. DeMare Walsworth Sales Rep Tom Renner Karen Bos Public Relations Merrie Bannink Diane Wickman Kathy Waterstone Richard Frost Student Development Jamie McKee Assistant Advisor Steven DeJong Dave Elsbury

CIT Department Doug Van Dyken Holly Williamson Business Office Student Congress Appropriation; Louie Gonzales Joint Archives Staff Mail Room Andy Union Desk Staff Maintenance Staff Anchor Staff Copy Center Staff Book Store Staff Other Assistance or Services

oing what she does best, Anne Bakker-Gras kneels down in the muddy pit of freshmen Paul VanderLaan and Katie Shelly to measure the outcome of the Pull. Bakker-Gras, the Director of Student Activities, brings passion and energy into each of her meetings with the most active students on campus. For her contributions to the student activities at the College, she was presented with the Patsy Morley Outstanding Programmer Award by the National Association of Campus Activities. She was also featured in the Education Section of the New York Times. As the Milestone advisor, she offers constant support and encouragement in production of this important publication. For this reason, the staff dedicates this eightieth edition of the Milestone to her. She is the one person who makes it all possible.

ilestone was produced using Aldus PageMaker 5.0 on a Power Macintosh computer network. Page proofs were printed full size on an Accel-a-Writer 8300. Proofs accompanied page files saved on Iomega Zip disks for disk submission mounting. Publisher: The 80th volume of the Milestone was printed by Walsworth Publishing Company. 306 North Kansas Avenue, Marceline, Missouri 64658. Representatives: J.D. "Yearbook Guy" DeMare was our publishing representative and Rhonda Holmes was our customer service representative at Walsworth. Cover: Embossed with Cardinal Red and Matte Gold (Antique) hot foil type, white and bronze silk screening and GR-7 graining on navy stock. The binding is 9 x 12 Smyth Sewn. Endsheets: Printed on Series Two Quest White, text is Navy Process Spot Color 289, specially blended to match the cover, with fonts representing the various sections. Paper Stock: All pages were printed on eighty pound Noble Matte. Type Specs: Milestone Logo is Anticlaire Display SSI and Copperplate SSI. All Body Copy is ten point Times. Captions are eight point bold Helvetica. Folios use 12 and eight point Helvetica. Headlines, subheadlines, and drop caps use various sizes of Attic, Chromosome Light. Copperplate Caps SSI, Francis Gothic Normal and Wide, Metropolis IGC, PenTweaksThree SSI. and Schmutz IGC Cleaned fonts. Photographs: Class photos were taken by Appleyard Photography of South Haven. Michigan. Sports team pictures were taken by Hope College Public Relations. Greek group pictures were taken by Steven DeJong of Hope College C1T. Greeks and Groups section photos were taken by those given credit. Advisor: Anne Bakker-Gras, Student Development Department. Hope College. ^

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