Milestone 1996

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lot has c h a n g e d in the 130 years s i n c e Hope College w a s f o u n d e d , but the p r i n c i p a l s that f o r m the f o u n d a t i o n of this i n s t i t u t i o n have not. The peace of m i n d felt w h e n relaxing in the Pine Grove has been the same for many g e n e r a t i o n s of students. It's still a great escape f r o m the w o r l d that seems to m o v e faster w i t h each p a s s i n g day. (PR Photo)

1996 Milestone Hope College vk Holland, Michigan 49423 http://www.hope.edu email: milestone@hope.edu Volume 79 Student Enrollment 2,720

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or more than 130 years Hope College has been the "Anchor of Hope for this people in the future." Since 1866, Hope has changed to keep pace with the times, but still held tight to the traditions and beliefs that define it as one of the most outstanding liberal arts colleges in the state and nation. Because of this reputation for excellence, record enrollment has p u s h e d s t u d e n t numbers higher for the second year in a row, topping 2,900 for the first time in Hope's history. Second only

H o p e ' s e x c e l l e n c e w a s r e c o g n i z e d by m a n y different s o u r c e s t h r o u g h o u t the year. The Fiske Guide to Colleges 1996 n a m e d Hope as a " b e s t b u y " a l o n g w i t h o n l y 41 other c o l l e g e s a n d u n i v e r s i t i e s in the nation. U.S. News and World Report r a n k e d Hope in the t o p half of the c o u n t r y a m o n g 161 n a t i o n liberal arts c o l l e g e s . (PR Photo)

to the class of 1998, the incoming freshmen class included 709 students, only four short of a record 713 last year. The higher number of students brought new problems to campus. The imperative purchase of more cottages and apartment buildings, along with relocation of others, o v e r w h e l m e d the m a i n t e n a n c e staff and physical plant with work. Relocated cottages replaced parking lots and caused a parking crunch as students arrived. W h e n students felt c r a m p e d , many headed out of the dorms. Off-campus partyA s student p o p u l a t i o n c o n t i n u e d to i n c r e a s e , s o d i d t h e e x p a n s i o n of c a m p u s . G r o u n d was b r o k e n for the n e w S15 m i l l i o n H a w o r t h C o n f e r e n c e / L e a r n i n g Center a n d the 179 student C o o k residence hall on Aug u s t 17. A d d i t i o n a l h o u s i n g including five cottages and the Kraker a p a r t m e n t b u i l d i n g was p u r c h a s e d to r e d u c e the h o u s i n g c r u n c h u n t i l the new hall is c o m p l e t e d in the fall of 1997. (PR Photo)

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ing led to increased arrests and ticketing by the Holland Police Department, sparking student protest about the crack down. The presence of Hope Public Safety at the breakups raised questions about the involvement of the college in off-campus activities.

D a n Shelley g i v e s Lara Plewka a ride o n his back at t h e e n d of the long homecoming parade. Sophomores Shelley a n d Plewka were p a r t n e r s o n the 1998 pull team as puller a n d morale. (Photo by A n t h o n y Perez)


R a c h e l Anson and Jill Harkins dance t o m u s i c in the homec o m i n g parade as Gretchen Wolfanger laughs on. A n s o n , Harkins, and Wolfanger are m e m b e r s of the 1998 Nykerk s o n g team a n d they represented the g r o u p in the parade a l o n g w i t h other team m e m b e r s . (PR Photo)

S t u d e n t s take advantage of one of the few remaining warm s u n n y days and attend an o u t d o o r chapel g a t h e r i n g in the Pine Grove. The recently revamped chapel p r o g r a m in u n d o u b t e d l y n o w the m o s t popular campus activity. H u n d r e d s of s t u d e n t s attend the gathering each of the three times a week it is held. (PR Photo)

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W h e n spring finally arrived, students and professors took advantage of the l o n g awaited sunshine and w a r m temperatures. H o l d i n g classes outside p r o v i d e d an e s c a p e f r o m the m o n o t o n y of the c l o s e d up classrooms and florescent lights. (PR Photo)

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Newly introduced legislation hoped to curb underage drinking throughout the state. The policy allows police officers to administer a preliminary breath test to any minor they believe is intoxicated. Tests resulting in a .02 percent and above would result in a Minor in Possession Citation. Back on campus, the Campus Life Board unanimously W h e n the m e n ' s basketball team a d v a n c e d t o the Final Four for t h e first t i m e in Hope College history, over a thousand students, faculty, parents, and community members headed t o Salem, Virginia, f o r the t w o games. M e m b e r s of the Hope College Dew Crew have b e c o m e the m o s t f a m o u s of fans, a t t e n d i n g every g a m e along the v i c t o r y path. The g r o u p chartered buses across the c o u n t r y a n d filled h o t e l rooms with students to follow and s u p p o r t the team they w e r e s o p r o u d of. (PR Photo)

voted to implement the proposal to restructure pledging. The changes attempting to give the pledging program a makeover took effect in the spring with positive results. Resid e n c e Life was also busy with the parietal debate. Due to r e q u e s t s f r o m m a i n t e nance, h o u s e k e e p i n g , and students,

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pushed back from 11 a.m. to 10 a.m. H o p e ' s many Greek o r g a n i z a t i o n s e x p e r i e n c e d a big c h a n g e t h i s year. P l e d g i n g was r e v a m p e d a n d r e s t r u c t u r e d t o prevent p r o b l e m s of the past. T h r o u g h all the c h a n g e s , a new fraternity came into existence t o a d d e v e n more d i v e r s i t y t o the c u r r e n t g r o u p s . A b o v e , m e m b e r s of the Delta Phi s o r o r i t y a n d Phi Kappa A l p h a fraternity ride t h r o u g h the H o m e c o m i n g parade o n their float. (PR Photo)

While the wheels of government were turning, other changes also took effeet. New computers, print-

ers, and other technical equipment will be purchased following a $3 per semester increase in the student activities fee. A $ 1000 increase in tuition will be used for these same reasons along with covering basic budgetary cost increases.

T h e college community experienced o n e of the w o r s t w i n t e r s in recent history. Students will long remember the -40 degree temperatures on their early morning walks t o classes. The c o l d a n d ice even delayed s o m e final exams, s o m e t h i n g that h a s n ' t happened for years. (Photo by Zach Johnson)

As tuition increased so did the number of Greek organizations. Alpha Kappa Phi was approved by the Inter Fraternal Council, making them the seventh fraternity on campus. Another example of the changes the have distinguished Hope College for over 130 years.

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Student Life 6

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years, students have defined life at Hope College. Traditions, some almost 100 years old, continue to represent student life of the past and present while defining the college. I n the fall of 1994, a g r o u p of f o o t b a l l players w e r e n ' t able t o d r e s s for t h e big h o m e c o m ing game. W a n t i n g t o do all they c o u l d t o be a part of the game, they d e c i d e d t o paint their c h e s t s a n d s u p p o r t their f e l l o w players o u t o n the field. A s the spirit and enthusiasm the g r o u p i n s p i r e d in the c r o w d grew, a w a v e of b o d i e s sent the painted fans crashing t h r o u g h the s t a d i u m ra ilin g a n d " T h e Red Dog P o u n d " was born. Eric Friedman, Jeff "Spanky" A m l o t t e , Mark Proff, Steve Myers, Craig Kopas, J o s h Zondervan, and Brian Tucker have c o n t i n u e d the t r a d i t i o n again t h i s year; without falling t h r o u g h the railing. (PR Photo)

Thousands of students find homes in fraternities or sororities, participate in Pull and Nykerk, or on sports teams. Others spend their college years writing for the Anchor, as a disc jockey for the campus radio station, or as a member of the many other groups on campus. Diversity of people and interests gives the campus its distinguishing character and uniqueness that makes it Hope College.

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places students travel different roads to arrive at hope M* Âť .

he time came once again for the entering freshman class to take their place on Hope's campus. The class of 1999, the last class of this century, has already secured their place in Hope's history as being the first class to cause the college to have a waiting list for a c c e p t e d students. Orientation w e e k e n d brought over 700 students f l o o d i n g into the dorms with their prized possessions from home. Wall posters MkNIfiEKM from home and pictures of family and high school friends were among the treasured items. Box after box m a d e its way up the T h i s year the o r i e n t a t i o n t e a m stairs as family u s e d the t h e m e of "All Roads Lead to Hope". A r o u n d c a m p u s , m e m b e r s and unfamiliar s t u d e n t s a n d f a m i l i e s OA's helped were p o i n t e d in different d i r e c t i o n s move everyone by the familiar o r i e n t a t i o n a r r o w s . (PR Photo) in. For this new freshmen class, Friday, August 25, will always remain in their memories as a life changing day. For some it meant leaving their parents on the other side of the country.

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while for others it meant moving just a few miles down the road. In either case, the first night in the dorms found students without the c o m f o r t s and securities of home. The first glimpse of Hope was filled with orientation groups and activities. Name games, mixers in the Pine Grove, and settling in with roommates occupied most of the weekend. What event could be more memorable than taking ID pictures that will be haunting for the next four years. The next few weeks always brings laughter between friends when looking at each others pictures. The highlight of the weekend was the ever famous Flayfair, a mystery kept from the entering freshman class each year by their Orientation Assistants. After this time of bonding in the gym, one could hear "I want a standing o v a t i o n " periodically throughout campus. The weekend was one filled with tears and excitement. Leaving loved ones brought tearful good-byes, while starting new friendships brought hope for the future. The 1995 orientation team successfully welcomed another freshman class to their new home and into the family we know as Hope College. hv

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L a y i n g in the s u n , these s t u d e n t s are getting to know e a c h other a n d their new h o m e for the next four years. Orientat i o n w a s a time t o meet other students going t h r o u g h the same new experiences. Games and icebreakers in the Pine Grove usually accomplished t h i s best. (PR Photo)

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O r i e n t a t i o n Assistants are always a vital part of freshmen orientation. OA's tended themselves to help students feel at home and get to know other new students. Moving students into the dorms and answering the numerous questions about college life are other jobs done by the OA's. (PR Photo)

O v e r arms, under legs, and just being all twisted up could explain the feelings of entering freshmen during the first few days on campus. Usually, after orientation weekend, everything seems to make a little more sense. (PR Photo)


S e c o n d year morale girl Janeen Gipson supports rope anchor Dave Schrler both mentally and physically throughout the event. When physical endurance is gone, a puller must rely on his morale for courage and mental strength. (Photo by Jill Fischer)

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PI Disappointment crosses the faces of freshmen Brian Grzan and Mike Adamski as they walk toward the bank of the Black River to congratulate the even year team on their victory. (PR Photo)

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Celebrating their victory over odd year, the '98 team follows tradition by j u m p i n g into the Black River. Chants acknowledging the worthiness of their opponents cross back and forth between the teams after the event. (PR Photo)

W i t h every muscle tense and ready for the next command. Ken Hawk listens to a series of commands from his morale, Erika Dianis, (Photo by Jill Fischer)

I he Pull: a tradition and a I family that only those who | participate can fully understand. Each participant f i n d s something in themselves that they didn't know existed before. For many, the pull is a time to overcome both mental and physical barriers to accomplish a common goal. For the 98th year, even and odd year teams lined up on opposite sides of the Black river, ready for a day of war. The 1995 Pull left its mark in Hope's history as being the first year to have a female on the rope. Keri Law pulled for the '99 team as an alternate. She was able to pull only for the first twenty minutes due to an injury she acquired during practice. Last year, Nina Bieliauskas of the '97 pull team started off with the intensions to be a puller, but later decided to take on the role of morale. Those who came to watch the event on the afternoon of September 23, will tell you what a battle it was. The '98 team ripped rope from '99 within the first half-hour of the competition. The majority of the time found both teams fighting back and forth for a few precious inches of rope. Messages between pullers ran up and down the rope informing each other which pit the marker was in. As it came down to the three hour time limit. Even year again

took a few more inches. Both teams were physically drained, but continued to fight for the rope they worked so hard to obtain. The end whistle sounded leaving both teams locked in, holding their breath to hear if they had won. Tension t h i c k e n e d the air as both the teams and the spectators waited for the news to arrive. The outcome brought '99 rolling slowly off the r o p e , w h i l e on the other bank cheers erupted. Even year had a m e n d e d their loss from the year before. F o l l o w i n g commands from the pull coach, Lori Parent yells calls The cheers were followed to Beau Batton as the '98 team pulls in unison to gain more rope by a stream of from the odd year. Both Parent pullers clad in and Batton joined the team for the red and black first time this year. (Photo by Jill pouring into the Fischer) Black River to celebrate their victory. Another year of pull was over, with only one team leaving the winner. Two feet, ten inches; that was the difference.

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even year wins competition for a second year T

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he beautiful sound of voices, : the laughter of a play, and the [ message in a speech give Nykerk its magic. The fourth of November marked the 60th year of the tradition. The night started off with '99 Song giving a spectacular performance of We Go Together from the popular 50's m u s i c a l Grease. Odd year incorporated the use of two t r u m p e t s and an alto sax played by members of the song t e a m to give the music an extra flare. Next, even year orator, Jess Grevenstuk titled her speech "Learning to w e a r mouse ears." She expressed the t h e m e of "wonder" to the F r e s h m a n Orator Kelley Martin audience by enc h a l l e n g e d the a u d i e n c e w i t h her couraging them s p e e c h "Dare t o W o n d e r . " Martin to stop and said, " M y goal w a s t o challenge the a u d i e n c e t o fully d i s c o v e r the j o y s smell the roses. G o d has In store for our lives. (PR The crowd Photo) was f o u n d in fits of laughter as '99 Play acted out "Wizard in Wonderland." The spoof intertwined the adventures of Alice in Wonderland and Dorthy trying to

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return home to Kansas. New to the tradition this year was the joint performance of both song teams singing Friends by Michael W. Smith. '98 Song coach Angie Strey said that this was added to the competition to show that this wasn't a cut throat event, but a friendly competition. The Song coaches wanted to create a sense of unity between the two teams. The friendly competition continued with the sparkle of gold top hats flashing together. Even year Song gave a sensational performance of One from the Broadway musical A Chorus Line. Kelly Martin, 99 Orator, gave her speech, "Dare to wonder" in the next part of the evening. Martin challenged the audience to "open your heart to possibilities and be amazed at the surprises you will encounter." Martin's performance finished off the evening for odd year. '98 Play ended with a light hearted performance of "Snow White and the Seven Dorks." The sketch centered around the dorks helping Dopey memorize answers for his appearance on a final round of Jeopardy. The '98 team came home 2-0, taking the cup home for the second year in a row. This became the third year in a row that even year had possession of the beloved Nykerk cup.

BY jeanette petkus

Tracy R y n s b u r g e r as Dopey, Marcy Zlegler as Happy, a n d Buger p l a y e d by Heather Maas make up part of the cast for " S n o w White a n d the Seven D o r k s . " The s p o o f on the Disney c a r t o o n was p e r f o r m e d by '98 play. (PR Photo)

B e t h Heneveld played the Queen a n d Laura McCralne played the Mirror a n d narrator for the Even Year Play team. The play e a r n e d the cast a first place award and contributed to the Nykerk w i n by the "98 team. (PR Photo)


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Above: Debbie Paterik p e r f o r m s as the character Dorthy for the '99 play team. The F r e s h m e n spend months p r e p a r i n g for the Nykerk t r a d i t i o n every year. (PR Photo)

F r e s h m a n Kristen Sitz played the role of the White Rabbit, g i v i n g an o u t s t a n d i n g p e r f o r m a n c e In the '99 play " W i z a r d of W o n d e r l a n d . " (PR Photo)

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alumni join students for a weekend of spirit

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lowed the parade to Holland Muhen most people hear homecoming. they think of root- nicipal Stadium for the big game ball, parades, and cool fall against Albion. The Dutch had a weather. Homecoming at Hope challenge facing their greatest College is a full weekend of activi- football rival, who also happen to ties mixed in with the usual tradi- be the defending national champions. tions. The Dutch held their own Hundreds of alumni, students, parents, and community members, throughout the first half, but Albion braved the cold weather this year stole the homecoming game in the second half, winning 34-24. Into participate in the weekend's events. The parade started off early jured players contributed to the Saturday, including fifteen floats, loss, as senior starting quarterback t r u c k s f i l l e d Jason Bays and senior linebacker Tim Dimmock were both forced to with p u l l e r s , and cars filled leave the game late in the second with many stu- quarter. Other weekend activities also dent organizaattracted crowds. Alumni reunions tions and memare popular during this time of year bers of the and were held for the classes of homecoming 1980. 1985. and 1990. A special court. reunion was held for student athThe Social letes from the 1950's. Former Activities coaches from the era were also recCommittee ognized and alumni athletes parsponsored the parade with a ticipated in tennis, basketball, and soccer games throughout the weektheme of "Dec a d e s : P a s t , end. Specific departments around P r e s e n t , and c a m p u s took advantage of the F u t u r e , " many returning alumni. The chemJ u n i o r s Eric F r i e d m a n a n d Jeff awarding cash " S p a n k y " A m l o t f celebrate w i t h the istry and biology departments held p r i z e s to the new H o m e c o m i n g K i n g Colin lectures by past students and also winners of the C o n n a i r e d u r i n g the h a l f t i m e honored current faculty members. float contest. c e r e m o n y . C o n n a i r e t o o k the The De Pree Art Center gallery feaT h e K a p p a t h r o n e by p o s t i n g fliers t h r o u g h o u t tured an exhibit of work by area c a m p u s reading " C o l i n C o n n a i r e Delta Chi sofor K i n g " . He said " I t h i n k it really rority took the middle and high school students. h a d to be done, just t o s h o w that I Homecoming weekend had $100 first place c o u l d " . (PR Photo) something to offer past and present prize with their students, staff, and parents. Old Flintstones Meet the Jet sons float. friends were reunited, and new The Alpha Gamma Phi sorority won second place as pirates in a friends were made while enjoying ship they called "Swashbucklin". events and traditions keep alumni The Dorians and Centurians flew coming back, and new students in third in the "Dorian Delorian" finding a lifelong home. from Back to the Future. The season's largest crowd fol-

BY anthony perez

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M e m b e r s of the 1997 Pull Team make their way t h r o u g h the homecoming parade o n a B r o n c o they t u r n e d into a last m i n u t e float. Many m e m b e r s of the team r e m a i n close friends after the Pull a n d are seen together at many campus activities. (PR Photo)

T h e flying D u t c h m e n take the field for the s e c o n d half of the h o m e c o m ing g a m e against A l b i o n . A Briton touchdown before halftime stole the lead for the rest of the game. (PR Photo)


T h e 1995 H o m e c o m i n g Queen Mary B o e l k i n s is c o n g r a t u l a t e d by fellow c o u r t c a n d i d a t e a n d f r i e n d Lisa S h r o c k . B o e l k i n s , a senior in P s y c h o l o g y , is f r o m Davison, M i c h i g a n . (PR Photo)

S o p h o m o r e Elizabeth Collins f i s h e s off the side of the Sigma lota Beta float as Sarah Stielstra laughs on. The entire s o r o r i t y p o o l e d their t h o u g h t s on the c o n s t r u c t i o n of the float, a n d d e c i d e d t o use items f r o m past SIB g e n e r a t i o n s t o reflect the parade theme. (PR Photo)

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I he b l o w - u p g a m e s have b e c o m e o n e of the m o s t p o p u l a r activities at S p r i n g Fling. On the v e l c r o wall, s t u d e n t s wear a suit that s t i c k s t o the wall after j u m p i n g off a b o u n c y inflated s u r f a c e . ( P h o t o by A n t h o n y Perez)

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S o p h o m o r e Clint M o o r e takes a p u n c h at his s e c o n d - y e a r r o o m mate Peter Martin. " T h i s w a s the s e c o n d year in a row that we b o x e d at S p r i n g F l i n g , " s a i d Moore. " I g u e s s y o u c o u l d say it's a g o o d way t o take out y o u r f r u s t r a t i o n s w i t h y o u r r o o m m a t e . " Many s t u d e n t s d r a g g e d their f r i e n d s a n d r o o m m a t e s into the b l o w - u p b o x i n g r i n g for three r o u n d s of s t r e s s relieving a c t i o n . (Photo by A n t h o n y Perez)

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'At^Sprihg spring fling successful despite rain and rumors

W Freshman Todd Cooper races his roommate down the bungee run. Students run as far as they can, while stretching the bungee cord behind them. They compete t o see who can place the velcro baton the furthest before being s n a p p e d back by the giant elastic cord. Because of the bad weather, the giant b l o w - u p games were installed In the Union and Phelps. (Photo by Anthony Perez)

hether you call it May Day, event like this, but I wish the S p r i n g F l i n g , or S p r i n g school could have planned it betFestival, it is still the same ter. I hope next year we can (again) thing. Classes are let out early, get a big band to play her so that I there is a picnic in the Pine Grove can go." In spite of the change in with bands playing, and inflatable location, nearly 150 students did games to jump, run, or box on. At make the trek to Grand Rapids for least that is what is supposed to the concert. happen. This year though, the SAC didn't weather wasn't as cooperative as forget about the it has been in the past. The rain students who and cold temperatures forced the c h o s e to stay dining hall to open its doors for the home on May picnic, and although Phelps' em- Day. Many acployees tried to create the perfect t i v i t i e s w e r e ambiance, it wasn't the same as the p r o v i d e d f o r Pine Grove. student's enjoyFor some students though, the ment, including /•"Sv?' picnic was the least of their wor- boxing, frisbee ries. The Social Activities Com- painting, a hypmittee (SAC) had booked Blessid notist, and Union of Souls to play at this year's blowup games. festival. Unfortunately, some misFreshman communication and wet feet by the Kari J a c k s o n Dow forced SAC to move the con- and sophomore cert from Hope to Calvin College. Adeana Demos k K n o l l c r e s t F i e l d h o u s e on the were contendCalvin campus has hosted concerts ers f o r the before and was eager to have the blowup boxing. W h e n H y p n o t i s t Tom DeLuca visited c a m p u s for S p r i n g Fling, F r e s h m a n Brent Rowe d i s c o v e r e d what It group perform. This move angered Demos waited was like t o be h y p n o t i z e d . He c o u l d have never many students, some of whom re- in line for about i m a g i n e d what he w o u l d be d o i n g on stage in front of turned their tickets. Sophomore twenty minh u n d r e d s of s t u d e n t s . Here, DeLuca I n f o r m s the Melinda Tuinstra c o m m e n t e d , v o l u n t e e r s that the t e m p e r a t u r e Is s o u r i n g past 105 utes, even degrees a n d s t u d e n t s begin f a n n i n g t h e m s e l v e s and "Every person who I knew that t h o u g h she r e m o v i n g clothes. (Photo by A n t h o n y Perez) bought tickets for the concert didn't want to. ended up selling them back be- "My friend made me box," she cause it wasn't here." Approxi- complained. However, after her mately sixty-five students agreed three rounds were up, she had a with Tuinstra and sold their tick- much different attitude about the ets back for a full refund. event. "I had a great time and I'm Tuinstra spoke for many stu- ready to fight Mike Tyson," joked dents who choose not to travel to Demos. Demos' friend, sophoCalvin for the concert. " W h o more Jessie Hancock, watched the wants to go there to see a Hope boxing matches from ringside. "I sponsored event? I was really didn't want to wait in line, but I happy that they (SAC) did get a big did get (Continued on page 256)

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images opens eyes to the beauty of different life-styles

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hile West M i c h i g a n residents can boast having m a n y a d v a n t a g e s over surrounding areas, multiculturalism is something that is glaringly lacking. To celebrate and raise awareness of the importance of other cultures, Hope students, faculty, and members of the community performed "Images: A Reflection of Culture" on Saturday, March 30 at the Knickerbocker Theater. More than 100 s t u d e n t s participated in the variety s h o w and the p r e c e d i n g baW ^ zaar which included ten exhibits, On display were many examples of literature, art, j e w e l r y , and other unique objects, all s h o w i n g the rich tradition of the cultures they repreS o p h o m o r e Chikako Katsuyama. sented. a student from Japan, performs a At the booth song on the Picolo. Katsuyama from Japan, wears authentic Japanese clothing two s t u d e n t s as she plays "Miyabi" on the painted browsinstrument. (Photo by Z. Johnson) ers n a m e s in native characters while explaining the meaning of the name. The display from Africa contained bright jewelry, intricately carved walking canes, and simple musical instruments. A few of the booths had

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ethnic food ranging from miniature tacos and quiches to gummy bears, all of which caused more than a few Hope students to wish they had skipped Phelps to hold out for the feast they unsuspectingly discovered. While munching, guests were barraged with cultural music. Those hosting the booths were dressed in both modem and traditional clothes indigenous to the area they represented. The bazaar was only the beginning of the evening's festivities. The show began with an energetic speech by Muturi Muriuki and a brief look at what was to come as the dark stage was momentarily lit, revealing several of the night's participants dressed in outfits that represented their culture. From the beginning, the show was kept casual as it tried to balance new and old, humorous and serious in its efforts to entertain and teach. Throughout the show, "Reflections" were presented that showed the style and clothing of different cultures. The first was of Mexican style and included a hat dance. The two girls in the piece wore c o l o r f u l o r n a m e n t e d red dresses with huge skirts held extended at shoulder level while performing the hat dance. Following them was "Sukiyaki," a Japanese song and dance. Weilding fans and dressed in sandals and robes, the performers danced in unison forming a large circle to sing a traditional song before singing the chorus of a modem pop song. Next came "Reflection #2," a display (Continued on page 194)

A t the close of the annual Images Program, all the participants took the stage for one last time. The students from all parts of the world filled the stage, representing the world's many different cultures and life-styles. (Photo by Zach Johnson) S e n i o r Rosi Rodriguez wears a beautiful traditional dress as she performs the authentic Mexican Hat Dance. Many students who participate in Images display customs or traditions that have been passed down t h r o u g h time, (Photo by Zach Johnson)


I r m a r i a Jade Medel a n d Sheryl Gabriel display their authentic Indian f a s h i o n s . Each is a little different, r e p r e s e n t i n g the dress of different c o u n t r i e s . (Photo by Zach J o h n s o n )

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V K u n - c h u n Gwen Yao p e r f o r m s " S u k i y a k i , " a Japanese dance, a l o n g w i t h Wakanako Sugawara a n d Sachie Sumi. Yao is f r o m Taiwan and Sugawara and Sumi are o n e year guest s t u d e n t s f r o m Ferris University in Yokohama, Japan. (Photo by Zach Johnson)

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sac brings a little las vegas to hope college

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AC's sixth annual Casino Night brought over 600 students dishing out money on Las Vegas style gambling tables. "Viva Las Vegas" was the theme for one of the Social Activities Committee's most attended events of the year. For three hours, beginning at seven p.m., gamblers could bet as m u c h money as they pleased. For some, the evening would bring great luck, for others, their money was gone in the blink of an eye. But just like Vegas, the o d d s were the same for everyone. No Vegas setting w o u l d S o p h o m o r e J a m i e Weidner is be c o m p l e t e serenaded by the k i n g of r o c k a n d role d u r i n g the e n t e r t a i n m e n t break without a gaudy at Casino Night. The i m p e r s o n a t o r wedding chapel p e r f o r m e d all the c l a s s i c Elvis and an E l v i s s o n g s a n d w a s the perfect guest impersonator. for the Phelps c a s i n o . ( P h o t o by Elvis roamed A n t h o n y Perez) the tables giving the crowd an unexpected surprise. The die hard Elvis fans could have their picture taken with the king in a BMW in front of a wedding chapel. After the lights were turned off

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on the Vegas marquis and the tables were closed for the night, the excitement continued with a dance and the announcement of the grand prize winner. After a time of socializing and dancing with friends and strangers alike, two lucky people were on their way to Florida. The suspense was over after freshman Missy B e r k i m e r w a s a n n o u n c e d the grand prize winner. Her prize was two tickets to Walt Disney World in Florida. Accompanying the tickets was a limousine ride to the airport, round trip airfare, a two night hotel stay, and two hundred dollars in spending money. Berkimer's boyfriend accompanied her to Florida. He just happened to be visiting from the University of Chicago and less than five hours after discovering their good fortune, the two were off for a weekend of fun.

Just like any good fairy tale, the end always comes too soon. After a night in the city of lights, Hope students had to return to their studies, and remember not to spend their money so frivolously. After a weekend of carefree fun in the sunshine of Florida, Berkimer also had to return to the everyday grind.

BY jeanette petkus

Sophomore Darren Tigelaar wins big on the b l a c k j a c k table as Cherith Caldwell, K r i s t i n Nowak, J o d i McFarland, a n d Sue Checklick l o o k on. Winnings from all t h e g a m e s c o u l d be u s e d t o buy prizes at the e n d of t h e night. L o c a l businesses d o n a t e d prizes for t h e event ranging from bottles of Pepsi to a color television. ( P h o t o by A n t h o n y Perez)

Sophomore Katy W h i t f i e l d busts a move o n the d a n c e floor and Kathryn Wing w a t c h e s t o see h o w its d o n e . The d a n c e w a s held f o l l o w i n g the g a m b l i n g as s t u d e n t s w a i t e d t o hear t h e w i n n e r of the Disney W o r l d trip. (Photo by A n t h o n y Perez)


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F r e s h m a n Sarah Henry c o l l e c t s her w i n n i n g s f r o m the dealer after a g a m e of dice. S o p h o m o r e Betsy Card places her bet on the table, h o p i n g t o have as m u c h luck as Henry. (Photo by A n t h o n y Perez)

Freshman Shana Gordner is h a v i n g a streak of g o o d luck and is thrilled t o be winning money from house dealer a n d SAC staff m e m b e r Tyler Smith. Most people have favorite games they stick with t h r o u g h o u t the night because they seem to do better on t h e m than others. (Photo by A n t h o n y Perez)

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committee provides award winning events on campus

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hether watching a campus movie or laughing at a comedian, students kept busy on the weekends thanks to SAC. The Social Activities Committee (SAC) is the main programming board for the social events of Hope college. Sixteen dedicated students comprised the committee which planned exciting events such as Winter Fantasia, Sibling's Weekend, Spring Fling and all the 1995 Homecoming festivities. The group also plans the traditional Labor Day activities, including a p i c n i c and a m u s i c a l perf o r m e r in the Pine Grove. Most of the entertainers brought to campus were chosen by the Social Activities C o m m i t t e e at conferences S t u d e n t s laugh hysterically as held by the NaTom DeLuca c o m m a n d s h y p n o tional Associatized s t u d e n t s t o i m a g i n e they are c o m p l e t e l y naked. The " n a k e d " tion for Cams t u d e n t s franticly s c u r r y to hide pus Activities b e h i n d c h a i r s a n d e a c h other so (NACA). This the a u d i e n c e c a n n o t see t h e m . year SAC trav(Photo by A n t h o n y Perez) elled to Louisville, K Y and Nashville, TN to find the best college comedians, musicians, and novelty acts. SAC was privileged to be awarded twelve awards for graphics and to be the only Great Lakes committee se-

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lected as "Associate's Choice" for 1995. Many of SAC's events allowed students to get involved with and benefit from the experience. For instance, Casino Night winner, Melissa Berkimer, enjoyed an allexpense paid trip to Disney World. Voices of Praise, winner of the All College Sing competition, proceeded to Chicago to compete in a regional talent competition. In add i t i o n , h u n d r e d s of s t u d e n t s walked away from "Creative Dating" with renewed self-confidence and 101 innovative dating ideas. The 1995-1996 school year culminated with "The Ultimate Final." SAC brought in EMI recording artists Blessid Union of Souls, Fainter Denny Dent, and Hypnotist Tom Deluca. Frisbee spin art and several inflatable games made for one of the biggest events ever held by the committee. Each year the Social Activities Committee continues to reevaluate and improve events in order to m a k e t h e m the best p o s s i b l e . SAC's tradition of quality entertainment at minimum cost to the students will continue to benefit the Hope College community for years to come. Anne Bakker-Gras, the director of student activities commented, "The dedication of the members of SAC is amazing. They can accomplish anything." The group works hard for the students, giving them one of the best campus activities programs in the n a t i o n . ^

BY anthony perez

D u r i n g SAC's Talent Jam, Dean of Chapel Ben Patterson was the star of the s h o w , performing with Pete Christensen, Peter B e c k m a n , Russ Nelson, J a s o n Law, a n d Amy VanAuken t o the s o n g " Y o u Are You." The g r o u p t o o k first place for their inspirationally f u n n y song. ( P h o t o by A n t h o n y Perez)

M u s i c a l act Earth Tones r o c k e d the Pine Grove d u r i n g the a n n u a l Labor Day p i c n i c . Class may be in s e s s i o n , but SAC plans many e v e n t s for students d u r i n g the national holiday. (Photo by Jill Fischer)


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H y p n o t i z e d by Tom DeLuca at S p r i n g Fling, s o p h o m o r e Crystal Wright strikes her best s u p e r m o d e l pose. S t u d e n t s on stage flexed their m u s c l e s a n d s t r u t t e d their stuff, unaware that h u n d r e d s of s t u d e n t s were w a t c h i n g their every move. (Photo by A n t h o n y Perez)

S o p h o m o r e s Jamie Weider a n d Tien Do will be ready t o hit the frisbee-golf c o u r s e after creating their o w n spin-art frisbees. Students c o u l d create their o w n for no charge d u r i n g S p r i n g Fling. (Photo by A n t h o n y Perez)

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air jam make-over fills knick stage with talent

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t was C h a p l a i n Ben Patterson as w e ' v e never seen him before. Plungers in one hand and a bag of potato chips in the other, Patterson led the way to victory for Hotter Lunch at the annual Talent Jam. "You Are You" captured the audience's attention with its innovative choreography and memorable props. "I was kind of n e r v o u s , " said Patterson. I didn't know if people would think it was funny or stupid." Judging from the huge a u d i e n c e applause and first place prize, it was a success. "The Grocery Store perSong" formed by theatre and vocal performance major Megan Hicks came in a close second. The skit/role play told the story of a woman that went to the grocery store after b r e a k i n g up with her boyfriend. When T h e lead g u i t a r i s t for t h e b a n d Sloe Plow j a m s " L i g h t B u r n t Out, the express lane Need Less t o Say." The o r i g i n a l cashier refuses s o n g by the g r o u p had an alternato check her out tive s o u n d w i t h a lot of energy. because of The a u d i e n c e really got into the three items too m u s i c and the r e s p o n s e w a s positive. (Photo by A n t h o n y Perez) many, the man of her dreams comes to the rescue and buys her extra items and an engagement ring. Third place went to "Seasons of a Mime," performed by Shan-

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non Slawson. With her white face outlined in black and white gloves on her hands, Slawson used telling facial expressions and hand movements to tell the story of a mime falling in love. The evening began with the alternative sound of the grunge band Sloe Plow singing "Light Burnt Out, Need Less to Say." Scattering silver tinsel over the stage, the 4 RD's followed with a lip-sync performance of Nine Inch Nail's "Head Like a Hole." The band got the audience involved by passing out records and when the a u d i e n c e started to t h r o w the records through the air the band merely dodged them and kept on going. For the grand finale, they smashed a computer screen. Stand-up comedian Nick Holt outshone the emcee and had the audience roaring with laughter. It was a "Crazy" night for the six a c a p e l l a s i n g e r s of P a t s y Cline's classic. Looking elegant in black dresses and reaching every note, the group charmed the audience. Winding up the evening. Fish's Lament hit the stage. The four-person band rocked to Goo Goo Doll's "2 Days in February" setting the audience clapping along. It was a tough choice forjudges Damisha Taylor, Director of MultiCultural Life, Holly McKee, RD of Dykstra Hall, and Vera Van Hoboken from the Holland Sentinel. After long deliberation they awarded Hotter Lunch with the $150 grand prize. Hicks came in runner up with $75, and the $50 award went to Slawson. ^

BY kim powell

J u n i o r Pete Christensen, senior R u s s Nelson, a n d j u n i o r Brian W o l t h u i s hit the stage as Hotter Lunch, performing " Y o u are You." Senior Peter Beckman, junior Jason Law, s o p h o more Amy VanAuken, a n d Chaplain Ben Patterson j o i n e d t h e m in the c r o w d p l e a s i n g first place performance. The upbeat s o n g and funny antics brought a s m i l e t o the faces of the audience. ( P h o t o by A n t h o n y Perez)

D u r i n g Hotter L u n c h ' s "You are You," Chaplain Ben Patterson sauntered on stage w e a r i n g a f u r hat that came down on his f o r e h e a d w i t h flaps t o c o v e r his ears. The l o o k w a s completed with sunglasses, a b o w tie a r o u n d the collar of his red a n d w h i t e shirt, a n d suspenders to h o l d his boxer s h o r t s up. (Photo by A n t h o n y Perez)


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M e g a n Hicks stole s e c o n d place single handedly w i t h her oneactress skit "The Grocery Store Song." The r o m a n t i c s t o r y of love f o u n d in a g r o c e r y store c a p t u r e d the hearts of the a u d i e n c e a n d judges. (Photo by A n t h o n y Perez)

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S i x ladies in elegant d r e s s e s and voices to m a t c h t o o k the stage t o s i n g Patsy Cline's classic "Crazy." Their h a r m o n i o u s talent c a p t u r e d the audiences' attention f r o m the first note. (Photo by A n t h o n y Perez)

Talent Jam 25

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T h e Hope College C h o r u s d i s p l a y s their talent under the d i r e c t i o n of James Morrow at the Christmas p r o g r a m . The g r o u p has over seventyfive m e m b e r s and performs many t i m e s a year on a n d off c a m p u s . (PR Photo)

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annual event brings out magic of Christmas

M e m b e r s of the Chapel Choir p e r f o r m at the first of f o u r Vespers p r o g r a m s . The c h o i r t o u r s in t h e United States, Canada, Europe, a n d has appeared o n t h e televised Hour of Power f r o m t h e Crystal Cathedral in California. A s a part of the Vespers Christmas p r o g r a m , the g r o u p is broadcast each year o n PBS. (PR Photo)

Senior J o n a t h a n Chen, a m e m b e r of the Hope College Symphonette, accompanies t h e College C h o r u s at Vespers. The c o l l e g e ' s many talented musical groups perform during the a n n u a l service. (PR Photo)

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t takes a lot of e f f o r t to carry out a hallowed tradition. Over 200 student musicians brought the magic of Christmas to the fore during the first weekend of December, but their work in creating the powerful spirit of Vespers is just one part of the collective efforts that bring the yearly tradition to life. Behind the sparkling lights, scarlet poinsettias, and heavenly music that is Christmas Vespers, there is an unseen presence that brings the whole act together— hard work. Choir, chorus and symphonette members start working on their pieces the first day of class. Mark Van Soest ('97), a chapel choir member, considers all the preparation worthwhile. Working twenty-five hours a week, he has found it somewhat difficult to balance time between his job, studies, and the large time commitment of Vespers. "In the last two days I've gotten about five hours of sleep," he said. Yet the demands of preparation and the f o u r - p e r f o r m a n c e weekend of Vespers itself is pays for itself, he said. "It's worth it every year. Just to be able to participate in something like Vespers really makes everything worth it." Elizabeth Wesselink ('98), a violinist in the Symphonette and a participant in Vespers last year as a choir member, is also enthusiastic about the event. "I love it," she said. "It's a lot of hard work, but a lot of fun." Not as visible as the performers are the people who literally set

up the service—the custodial staff. Custodians unite to set up the event, literally rolling out the red carpet and turning the chapel into a Christmas wonderland of lights, beribboned trees and wreaths. And their hard work doesn't go unrecognized. James Morrow, choir director, and Stuart S h a r p , vocal music instructor of the music department, had e g g s and good conversation with the custodial staff on the Saturday f f e - -l morning of the first performance. This is the t w e n t i e t h year that faculty have been treating the cus- J a m e s M o r r o w leads the Chapel todians to Choir d u r i n g the f i f t y - f o u r t h Vespers Service. Morrow, w h o has b r e a k f a s t "to show apprecia- lead the choir in the annual service for the past t w o years, said " T h e tion f o r their i n d i v i d u a l energy that is e x p a n d e d s a c r i f i c e of a on Vespers is remarkable." (PR weekend," Photo) Sharp said. Every contributor to Vespers is vital to the smooth outcome of the event. Morrow, choir director of Vespers for the past two years, agrees. "The individual energy that is expended on Vespers is remarkable," he said. "Each participant's commitment is significant in that it is given to a collective effort which becomes truly transcendent. This, to me, is one of the most touching (continued on page 195)

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ON ¥hop e computers and technology draw students together •

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he room is silent, except for the clattering of keys. • Without paper or a telephone, Hope students communicate their ideas, feelings, information. or theories with their friends. Communication is simple, quick, and gratis with the assistance of a computer and an e-mail account, which are available to each student. With the stroke of a few keys, a student can to access their account and send a letter electronically anywhere in the world to anyone who has access to a computer and a modem. According to Carl Nit Skarch Heideman the l.nd U a c t l f Wh.« I Waal Director of IU( Computing, Placa* Worth a Vntl .JJ eighty percent Find VVhdtevei Warld N«m» Haadlmcx V o u V e L o o k i n q fa»9iii».T»>ici ^ . © 1 of students use For e-mail at least once a w e e k , while fifty percent of the stuT h e W o r l d Wide Web has b e c o m e the r o a d t o i n f o r m a t i o n f r o m all over dent body uses the w o r l d . B e h i n d a s i n g l e m e n u e - m a i l every a n d o n l y a few s e c o n d s away, is day. The averk n o w l e d g e on all s u b j e c t s imaginage student able. A c c e s s to t h e Web has sen d s or reb e c o m e easier as m o r e c o m p u t e r labs b e c o m e available t h r o u g h o u t ceives five c a m p u s . ( P h o t o by A n t h o n y Perez) messages a day, proof that the on-line revolution has become commonplace at Hope. "It's the fastest and cheapest way for me to keep in touch with my f r i e n d s , " said f r e s h m a n Nikelle Johnson. "I use it almost exclusively to talk to my friends. I never know when they will be home." Access to e-mail is simple, given the number of computer labs on campus. Five of the residence

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halls have computers for use any time of the day or night, with the remaining residence halls slated to receive labs in 1996. There are also specialized labs around campus that provide access to wordprocessing, e-mail accounts, the World Wide Web, computer-aided drawing, and specialized class work. The labs in Van Wylen Library were greatly improved this year. The library's cataloging system has gone on-line, facilitating the search for research materials. In an instant, the entire holdings of the library are at the fingertips of the user anywhere on campus. The library also added two new databases for research, ERIC, an educational data base, and Remote. There were also computers installed in the library that provide access to the World Wide Web, a network of information and photographs for both research and entertainment. This became a popular form of research throughout the year b e c a u s e i n f o r m a t i o n is quickly and easily accessed. Long into the morning, computer users could be found surfing the net to find the information for which they were looking. On Hope's campus, communication has greatly changed from its earlier forms. Communication is now and forever computer-aided. This new necessity and now common past-time allows students to do research, find entertainment, or keep in touch with others. The clatter of keys is a sound that has become familiar to all Hope students. It now means more than word-processing; it is a link to the world.

BY amanda black

Computers have b e c o m e the life-line of a l m o s t all a s p e c t s of life. They have become c o m m o n place in b u s i n e s s e s , schools, homes, and brief cases. The a d v a n c e s in c o m p u t e r information and t e c h n o l o g y are tremendous and grow each day. The W o r l d Wide Web a n d e-mail have become standard terms of all l a n g u a g e s as w e b sites b e c o m e as essential as the p h o n e number. ( P h o t o by A n t h o n y Perez)

S t u d e n t s use c o m p u t e r s not o n l y t o write papers, but for homework a s s i g n m e n t s in m a n y classes. Chemistry and math c l a s s e s use CAPA programs extensively for daily practice a n d review. (Photo by Zach Johnson)


D u r i n g the 1995-1996 year, chemistry labs were all outfitted with computers at each station. Taking the place of the normal lab book, the computers allow instant feed-back and results for students. Classrooms throughout campus in all academic areas continue to have computers installed for daily use. (Photo by Anthony Perez)

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students turn to chapel in search of faith ach Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, hundreds of students and faculty join together at 10:30 am for worship. The chaplain staff, in their second year of nurturing the spiritual wellbeing of the campus, has caused chapel attendance to rise significantly. Ben Patterson, the dean of chapel, has brought a great spiritual revolution to campus. His dynamic sermons have made the good news of salvation come alive for many students. Chaplains Paul B o e r s m a and D o l o r e s Nasrallah contributed regularly to the chapel services. Their messages give diversity to the subjects discussed during the services. Dwight Beal, the director of w o r s h i p and music, brings his talents to the students by S t u d e n t s s i n g a l o n g t o their leading the favorite w o r s h i p s o n g s . Many w o r s h i p team s t u d e n t s are first attracted t o and beginning chapel because of t h e great e ach service m u s i c . (PR Photo) with a f e w songs of praise. The year started with a plea from the chaplain staff to "Obey Your Thirst." This catchy theme was supported by a passage from John 7:37, "Let anyone who is thirsty come to see me, and let the one who believes in me drink." During November, the theme of chapel took a new turn. "Break Di-

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viding Walls" underlined every service. Questions such as, "In what ways do we prematurely judge one another at Hope College? How can we break down the dividing walls between groups on campus with the love of Christ?" The days that followed gave students practical ways to break down the walls that divide campus. Spring semester was again a time of great spirited progress. The largest programs to come from the chaplain staff were the various spring break opportunities for student to serve Christ. Four programs were available for mission work. The New York program offered the chance to work in the inner city with the F e l l o w s h i p Church. Habitat for Humanity took students down to West Virginia to build a house in the Appalachian Mountains. Students who decided to spend the week in Oklahoma helped the Native American community on a reservation. The last opportunity for students was to stay the week at the Potter's House, a 650 acre farm in Georgia. This program helps men who are recovering from drug and alcohol abuse return to society. The spiritual side of Hope College has really grown throughout the year. Students have been challenged to be more devoted to God through their lifestyles. "...For works of service, so that the body of Christ my be built up until we all reach unity in the faith and in the knowledge of the Son of God, and become mature, attaining to the whole measure of the fullness of Christ." Ephesians 4 : 1 2 - 1 3 . ^

BY jeanette petkus

H u n d r e d s of s t u d e n t s raise u p their h a n d s in praise of Jesus, asking his b l e s s i n g for the new s c h o o l year. The w a r m late-summer weather a l l o w e d chapel t o be held o u t s i d e in the pine g r o v e o n several o c c a s i o n s . (PR Photo)

Chaplain Dolores Nasrallah a n d Dean of Chapel Ben Patterson listen a l o n g as D w i g h t Beal leads the c h a p e l attend a n t s in a prayer. Each m e m b e r of the chapel staff p l a y s an active role in the w e e k l y chapel services, each c o n t r i b u t i n g in turn throughout the year. (PR Photo)


J u n i o r Danielle T h o r p and Director of W o r s h i p and Music Dwight Beal lead the chapel service in praise t h r o u g h s o n g . Popular Chapel s o n g s have t w i c e been recorded on cassettes a n d CD's a n d d i s t r i b u t e d t o s t u d e n t s for free. (PR Photo)

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S t u d e n t s clap a l o n g t o a new s o n g written by the w o r s h i p and m u s i c team. The m u s i c i a n s have often taken an "unholy" song and changed the w o r d s s o it can be used in chapel. The "saved" songs instantly become popular w i t h the students. (PR Photo)

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buil^ habitat promotes volunteerism

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hile the dream of owning a home may seem out of reach for many families, Habitat for Humanity seeks to make this d r e a m a reality. Since 1993, Hope's chapter of this organization has helped many Holland area families realize this dream. This year, the Hernadez family's dream came true step by laboring step. O n e of the h a l l m a r k s of Habitat's philosophy is the " h a n d - u p not handout" idea. The families chosen for habitat are not Noo-ProW given a house, but must work axne. t o w a r d s their dream. There is a " s w e a t equity" requirement, a miniT h e reconstructed house the m um number Hernandez family will m o v e into is of hours to be located near the c o l l e g e at C o l u m b i a a n d 18th street. The h o m e will be worked by the c o m p l e t e d in t h e fall of 1996 a n d the family, and the family will b e c o m e o w n e r s in s o o n interest-free after. ( P h o t o by J i l l Fischer) material costs are paid by the eventual owners. Joseph Hernandez and his three oldest sons spent their time on Saturday mornings working towards their dream. The project house is located on the corner of 18th and Columbia. It was damaged in a fire in May of 1994, and then donated to Habitat. Along with Lakeshore Habitat. members of the Holland and

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Hope communities have volunteered their time, sweat, work, friendship, and love to assist the Hernandez family. Both individual students and clubs combined their talents this year. Every Saturday morning whether rain, snow, sunshine, or cold, a group of students made the trek to Columbia Avenue to lend a hand in the realization of a dream. Hope Habitat chapter also were active in other projects to support the community. Projects ranged from parties hosted for area children to a phone-a-thon to raise funds for Habitat. During regular a t t e n d a n t s at the fall f o o t b a l l games. Habitat members sold football programs . Later in the fall, students chose to give up their warm beds and heated rooms for a sleep-out in the pine grove. The event was held to raise awareness of the plight of substandard housing and to raise their own understanding. This service organization, founded to represent an ethical responsibility for neighbors and to p r o m o t e a spirit of v o l u n t e e r i s m , has served as a bridge between Hope and the community surrounding it. Holland is a better place for the Herandez family, the students who volunteered, and the community. Habitat makes realities of dreams; realities built on hope, hard work, and a volunteer spirit. ^

BY amanda black

Junior Katherine K r u s e of t h e Alpha Gamma Phi S o r o r i t y tears d o w n walls of the fire damaged porch. Almost all c a m p u s fraternities and sororities p a r t i c i p a t e d in the rebuilding of the Habitat H o u s e as part of their organization's community service. ( P h o t o by Jill Fischer)

J u n i o r John Mark Oudersluys and s o p h o m o r e Eric Nickels of t h e O m i c r o n Kappa Epsilon fraternity s h o v e l s n o w off t h e roof of the p o r c h so it can be t o r n d o w n . A new p o r c h w i l l be cons t r u c t e d as part of the i m p r o v e m e n t s . (Photo by J i l l Fischer)


S e n i o r Sarah Young and sophomore Nicole Doucette replace fallen rafters on the second floor. Both girls spent the entire weekend volunteering for the project. (Photo by Jill Fischer)

S e n i o r Melissa Immink and Habitat advisor Case Vander Leaft replace damaged steps by recycling other steps that are no longer needed. Habitat reuses or repairs everything possible to save money and keep the cost of the home down for the new family. (Photo by Jill Fischer)

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shfyis corrugated crafts set sail for lake michigan contest

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hile the s u m m e r sun was still shining and Lake Michigan still warm, the Engineering Design class decided to take learning out of the classroom. In September, Hope engineering students hit the big lake with nothing more then cardboard, duct tape, creativity, and in one c a s e , an outboard motor. Visiting assistant professor John Krupczak split his senior design class into t h r e e to f i v e person teams and gave them the weekend to construct a boat out of a limited amount of cardboard and duct tape. The finished products took many different T h e " P h a n - D o o 2000" isn't exactly shapes. A cataa yacht, but it floats. Senior Trung maran, canoe, Phan p a d d l e s in his c o r r u g a t e d craft, h o p i n g t o reach s h o r e first. and a c a r p e t The w o r k i n g boat was made out of roll raft were a only c a r d b o a r d and duct tape. (PR few of the dePhoto) signs. One group hit the waves on a simply constructed surf board. No matter what shape the ship took, the students just hoped they would float. The teams headed to Tunnel Park bright and early the follow-

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ing Monday morning to test their corrugated canoes and catamarans. A pole marking the end of the swimming area was picked out approximately 100 feet off shore. Each group sent a member of their team around the course in the boat they constructed. The vessel and sailor that make it back to shore still floating in the least amount won the competition. All of the boats made the journey around the pole and back to shore without a leak. The team with the simplest design rode ashore first in their homemade surfboard. Senior Malia Havlicek paddled the board to the sandy beach as the others followed. Even the outboard motor powered boat couldn't keep up with this California surfer. Building boats is only one of the projects the design class tackles. Building bridges from wooden sticks and Elmer's glue also kept the group busy. After tediously constructing the wooden bridges, the engineering students predict exactly how much weight the structure can hold; just as it crashes before their eyes. This is a class that takes learning into the real world, applying their knowledge to the concepts they study. Real-life application of ideas and lessons help relate books to the subjects they teach about. ^

BY anthony perez & matt lenger

T h e raft race b e g i n s as the cardboard boats are l u n c h e d into Lake Michigan. A 200 f o o t r o u n d trip race t o o k the racers around a swim b u o y a n d back t o shore. All the boats m a d e it back to s h o r e above water, but the c o r r u g a t e d surf b o a r d floated in first t o w i n the contest. (PR Photo)

S e n i o r s John Lawler a n d Curtis B e e k m a n put an extra layer of tape a r o u n d their oars before heading d o w n t o the water. One c a r d b o a r d boat was p o w e r e d by a small outboard motor while the rest were paddled w i t h oars or arms. (PR Photo)


U s i n g a battery p o w e r e d o u t b o a r d motor to propel his boat seemed like a g o o d idea t o senior Dan Lydon. A s he s o o n f o u n d out t h o u g h , the machine was no match for the h u m a n p o w e r e d surf board that reached shore first. (PR Photo)

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M a t t Lenger, Travis Long, and Todd Soderquist launch their carpet roll catamaran named "Gilligan's Dream." This original creation fared well in the race and made it back t o s h o r e still floating. (PR Photo)

Soggy Ships 35


A b i o l o g y student uses a m i c r o s c o p e for s t u d y i n g slides. Hope's o u t s t a n d i n g b i o l o g y p r o g r a m results in p l a c i n g h i g h n u m b e r s of s t u d e n t s in graduate, medical, a n d dental s c h o o l s . (Photo by Karen M c K e o w n )

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Leading students, faculty, a n d staff spiritually, the newly revamped chapel p r o g r a m has seen enormous s u c c e s s . The music and w o r s h i p team lead the packed chapel service every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. (PR Photo)

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^ 0 3 ? hope receives national attention from college guides

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H o p e ' s Pep Band performs at the fall Homecoming game, a d d i n g spirit a n d energy t o the c r o w d . The band, a l o n g w i t h the cheerleaders, leads the c r o w d in s u p p o r t of the f o o t b a l l team. (PR Photo)

Senior cheerleader Tom Poole carries a giant Hope flag t h r o u g h the student s e c t i o n d u r i n g the homecoming f o o t b a l l game. The co-ed cheerleading team is one of a kind among Michigan's small liberal arts colleges. The team successfully competes against many d i v i s i o n II s c h o o l s at annual camps. (Photo by A n t h o n y Perez)

n two d i f f e r e n t o c c a sions this year, Hope received notable recognition in a well-known and respected college guide. The September 18, 1995 issue of U.S. News and World Report includes a guide to what it considers to be "America's Best Colleges" of 1996. This year's guide ranks Hope 74th out of the 161 most outstanding liberal arts colleges in the country. The guide divides the schools into first, second, third and fourth "tiers," with those schools falling into the first tier being the highest rated by the magazine. This year Hope moves into the second tier for the first time, having been in the third tier in past years. Only three other Michigan schools are included in the national liberal arts colleges category: Albion and Kalamazoo Colleges share a berth with Hope in the second tier, and Alma is placed in the third tier. Earlier in September, Hope was also rated as a "best buy" in "The Fiske Guide to Colleges 1996." This guide, written by The New York Times' former education editor Edward B. Fiske, contains essays and statistical information on more than 300 colleges and universities. Its best buys are twenty public and twenty-two private institutions recognized because they "offer remarkable educational opportunities at relatively modest cost." "Guides like these are useful

because people look to outside, objective kinds of evaluative criteria," said James R. Bekkering, vice-president for admissions. "For Hope to be included in the top half of the most outstanding liberal arts colleges in the U.S. News and World Report guide, and also to be included in "The Fiske Guide" as an outstanding institution — and then on top of that to be earmarked by "The Fiske Guide" as one of twenty-two private best buy institutions in the United States I hope will say something about Hope's value to prospective students and their a d u l t F r i e n d s s t o p and chat on their influencers," he way t o m o r n i n g classes. Hope's said. But while small c a m p u s a n d low p o p u l a t i o n c o n t r i b u t e to the c o m m u n i t y these guides are feeling and prevent s t u d e n t s f r o m most useful to b e c o m i n g lost in the c r o w d . (PR prospective stu- Photo) dents, they are also valuable to current and graduating students at colleges and universities. "The academic reputation of the school you attend is important to employers," said Dale Austin in Career Services. "However, the biggest value would be for those (continued on page 196)

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I he fifty-seven members of the Hope College Chapel Choir display their talent at the Musical Showcase. The choir's distinctive robes were first worn by the group in 1960 and are filled with symbolic images. The white material and circular pattern of the robe represents purity of tone and faith. The deepening color gradations on the robes represent the natural deepening of voices. Horizontal black bars are reminiscent of the musical staff. (PR Photo)

M e m b e r s of the Collegium Musicum are a select group of vocalists. The group includes Ann Barry, Megan Hicks, Lisa Schrock, Angela Strey, and Marcy Ziegler as sopranos. Alison Beukelman, Mary Boelkins, Janet Tate and Sarah Wentzloff as altos. Ryan Nace, James Palmer, Jonathan Scakel, and Kent Wattleworth represent the tenors. Bass singers include Robert Abbott, James Hamilton, and Dan McCue. (PR Photo)


musical performers display talent at de vos hall

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resident Jacobson introduced the performers of the Hope College Musical Showcase as the "cream of the crop," on Monday, March 4 at De Vos Hall in Grand Rapids. The audience was immediately captivated by Michael See's performance of Intermezzo in EFlat Minor, Op. 118, No. 6 by Brahms. The Percussion Ensemble followed See's performance, taking over with the presentation of a Navajo Greeting. The intertwining of bells and marimba set the stage for a collage of rhythm and voice. Guitarist Robert Lunn's nimble fingers waltzed the frets of his guitar, filling the hall with the sound of strings on classical wood. Robert Abbott's organ performance let loose a bevy of low-belly m e l o d y as he p l a y e d Tocatta Giocosa, Op. 36, No. 2 by William Mathias. The Jazz Ensemble frolicked with the fat jazz sound of a big band. Bryan Coyl, Justin French and Joshua Quinlan took turns strutting their stuff on the sax. Ann Scheiber's superior recital of a piece by Giacomo Puccini jolted listeners with awe. The cello quartet echoed warm v i b r a t o and the C o l l e g i u m Musicum shed strange harmonies. Robin Bolt and Gwen Veldhof dueled piano performances before J a m e s M o r r o w c o n d u c t e d the Chapel Choir through angelic bliss. The wind symphony danced through curious timings and volume changes.

Sarah Wentzloff's solo trumpet was followed by the college chorus singing a song of longing. Thom Working led the Hope Horns through a piece by Custav Guentzel, and Chikako Katsuyama masterfully tumbled through intricate notes that mimicked the sound of the wind. Interstellar Gel funked it out with g r o o v e s and c h o p s of late night jazz rock. Laura Clark played a high speed piano piece wired with t e n s i o n and interspaced moments of fury. Chad G i f f o r d performed a Romanian Dance on the violin with Lynka Hakken on the piano, folM e m b e r s of the String Orchestra lowed by a perperform at De Vos Hall In Grand c u s s i o n trio Rapids. The Orchestra Is made up p e r f o r m i n g a of a select number of students John C a g e playing the violin, viola, cello, or piece using tin bass. Many m e m b e r s also p e r f o r m in other musical g r o u p s . (PR cans and a Photo) conch shell. Peter Kurdziel took listeners on a carnival ride with the organ at his fingertips, and the orchestra performed a grand finale which spun a whirlwind before the thunderous conclusion.

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scribes and artists display their unique creations

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arious forms of art allow for different creative output. Student output ranges from creative writing to painting and sculpture. These student scribes and artists work and learn in a Hope College environment tailor made for the enrichment and refinement of their skills. The De Free Gallery has showcased the students' as well as professionals' work throughout the year, while the English department and Opus' Visiting Writers Series has b r o u g h t Pulitizer Prize w i n n e r s and promising young authors to the Knickerbocker Theater. Ten writers shared their work and some of their methods for writing. Professor Heather Sellers, herself a visiting writer exV i s i t i n g Writers Series author Lee S m i t h v i s i t e d the college d u r i n g plained the imfirst semester. H u n d r e d s of portance of this s t u d e n t s , faculty, staff, a n d series. "Stuc o m m u n i t y m e m b e r s came to hear d e n t s here at Smith. (PR Photo) Hope get to see writers that are real people, with lives and voices-palable presences. They can see what fame isn't all about-that writers are just regular people who happen to write a lot." Senior Heidi Aronson, a senior who spearheaded the series along with Kristen Knippenberg, ex-

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plained that the writer's series is for more of a public audience than just writers. "You don't have to be a writer to learn." The different writers bring with them a broad experience. Not only can writers learn from those pen words, but so can anyone interested. "Here at Hope," observed Kristen, "even science m a j o r s catch the arts. Hope College is a good h o m e f o r the Visiting Writer's Series." Commenting on the increasing size of the series, Aronson remarked, "The program has burg e o n e d . " Since it b e g a n , the p r o g r a m ' s audience has grown from a few students to nearly three hundred. Those students hear poetry and prose that possesses the power to upset and then awaken the listeners. The writers come with works that incite thought, feeling and discussion. Knippenberg wisely exp l a i n e d the p o w e r of w o r d s : "Works that reflect the common experience awaken us to the simpler things. They revitalize us to consider the everyday and ordinary things. We can reinvent those everyday experiences." The writers brought to us their experiences. In doing so, they challenged all who listened to examine their own lives. The Visiting Writers' Series is a powerful addition to the vast world of the arts at Hope. Another event held in April added to the diversity of art at Hope. "A Dish to Pass," the senior art show displayed the results of four years of learning, working, and dedication (continued on page 256)

S e n i o r art major Deana Rennick s h o w s off o n e of her senior art s h o w projects. The refrigerator filled w i t h b o o k s represents intellect. Two additional refrigerators filled w i t h different items represented passion and reproduction. Her w o r k used household items t o s h o w different facets of being a woman. Rennick w a n t e d t o explore the different roles played by, and expected f r o m w o m e n in daily life. (Photo by A n t h o n y Perez)


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Michael C h i t w o o d also visited c a m p u s d u r i n g the Visiting Writers Series. In all, ten writers shared their w o rk, stories, and m e t h o d s with audiences. (PR Photo)

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ach year hundreds of students come to campus for the first time. In the process of settling in, many find their niche in the friends they meet and spend time with, the activities they are involved in, or the j o b they find. Many students, new and returning, find a group of people with ideas and values much like their own. At Hope there M e m b e r s of the Kappa Eta Nu or Knickerbocker Fraternity, set sail on the Black River t o w a t c h the annual Pull. On the raft is Jared B u o n o , Mark Ratterink, J o h n Stull, Matt Fouts, Mike Kin, A a r o n Harr, a n d J o h n Hurld. Many fraternities make rafts t o relax on the river for the event. Other people b r i n g boats a n d canoes while the j u d g e s and photographers use paddle boats t o c r o s s the river separating the Pull teams. (PR Photo)

are fourteen specific groups hundreds of students call home. The campus' Greek Organizations have long been a part of life at Hope College, adding diversity and opportunities to meet people and form life long friendships. 4^

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M i I M e m b e r s a n d f r i e n d s of the Phi Tau Nu fraternity relax on the p o r c h of their newly relocated cottage. The E m m y h o m e made a c r o s s c a m p u s t r i p f r o m t e n t h t o thirteenth street. ( P h o t o by A n t h o n y Perez)

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XiZ— J u n i o r Nick VanderBorgh, along with sophomores Dan Pickering, Chris Garbrecht, a n d Ryan Spangler, h a n g out in the Cosmopolitan basement after their weekly business meeting. (Cosmopolitan A r c h i v e s Photo)

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despite changes, greek system continues to thrive

A C h i Phi Sigma u s e d the fraternity van for a " f l o a t " t h i s year. C o m p l e t e w i t h bull h o r n s , brothers, and big speakers, the A r c a d i a n s rode t h r o u g h the h o m e c o m ing parade w i t h the '97 Pull Team d a n c i n g behind. (PR Photo) T h e Alpha Gamma Phi pirates s h o w off their banner for the annual homecoming parade. The sorority took s e c o n d place w i t h their float called "Swashbucklin." (PR Photo)

f t e r d o u b t s and questions surfaced about the Greek pledging program the Campus Life Board (CLB) started the ball rolling in what would be the biggest pledging revision ever to hit Hope's campus. In the Spring of 1995 CLB became concerned with the number of negative comments on a faculty survey concerning pledging. To compensate for the complaints, CLB demanded all twelve organizations to submit copies of their pledging program for review. That summer an in-depth interv i e w i n g p r o c e s s of o v e r 100 actives, recent pledges, de-pledges, Greek alumni, and advisors was conducted. Questions focused on activities and feelings surrounding pledging. Identities were kept confidential from the general public. While the a dminis tra tion claimed it was just chasing rumors and most were not threatened by the investigation, many Greeks drug their feet, refusing to cooperate with the process. As a result of the study, CLB didn't stop with the interviewing and felt that pledging as a whole must be recreated. In the fall of 1995, the Ad Hoc Committee was created. The board conisting of active Greeks, administration, and faculty designed a new pledging program in order to stop hazing and promote positive pledging. The new proposal passed in De-

cember, unanimously. With the rules and regulations of pledging clearly outlined, hopes were high as the campus kicked off rush two weeks into second semester. But three of the six fraternities were slapped with rush violations by the administration. After a p p e a l i n g the violations, the Arcadians and Fraternal Society were g r a n t e d a six day p l e d g i n g program rather than the normal three and a half weeks. The Cosmop o l i t a n s said g o o d - b y e to pledging for the 1996 year as the administration stripped them of their rights to M a r c y Cohen, Rachel Webb, and Sarah Gorter ride along with the induct new Alpha Phi Omega fraternity a n d members, even their h o m e c o m i n g float. F o l l o w i n g though bids the Decades theme, the g r o u p c h o s e the medieval times for their were h a n d e d out to eligible float design. (Photo by A n t h o n y Perez) men. Ad Hoc made minor changes to the proposal and in April the committee was dissolved. Although bad press dominated the headlines of The Anchor and (Continued on page 46)

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O n e of the fastest g r o w i n g sororities on c a m p u s , the Sigma lota Beta w o m e n have seen n u m b e r s rise c o n t i n u a l l y for many years. Here, the Sibs ride a l o n g College Avenue on their float. (Photo by A n t h o n y Perez)

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The Lakeshore Press, Greeks continued to thrive and constructively contribute to Hope's campus and the Holland community. In conjunction with Hope College's chapter of Habitat for Humanity, all twelve sororities and fraternities sent volu n t e e r s each w e e k e n d throughout the y e a r to help build Habitat's rfftlSLm latest commu1 nity p r o j e c t : converting the shell of a fireruined house for a local family. Throughout the months, many organizations held mixS o p h o m o r e Amy Austin, along ers and holiday w i t h j u n i o r s Nicole Clements a n d get-togethers Melissa Harriger at a Kappa Delta for members of Chi s o r o r i t y s p r i n g r u s h event. the community. The Kappa Chis w e l c o m e d several The Delta new m e m b e r s to the g r o w i n g s o r o r i t y after the 1996 r u s h a n d Phis enterpledge period. (Kappa Chi tained " h i g h A r c h i v e s Photo) risk kids" with an annual Easter egg hunt. The Kappa Chis and Centurians raised funds for Multiple Sclerosis, and the Alpha Phis scoured the floors and scrubbed the walls of the Holland City Mission. The Knickerbocker fraternity

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collected over 2,000 soda cans in their annual "Cans for Dystrophy" drive. Alpha Phi Omega loaded up bins with recycled furniture and other goods at Holland's Project Pride and the Praters rung up funds for Evergreen Commons as part of an annual phone-a-thon. Taking over the Kletz for an evening in mid-December, women gathered together, mingling and chatting, learning more about sorority life before the formal rush period at the annual Sorority Christmas Party. During rush. Pal Hellenic Board sponsored a massive sorority rush can drive. Women who were rushing and active Greek women collected several hundred canned food products and donated them to the Holland City Mission. Adding to the diversity of Hope's Greek system was the addition of the new fraternity. The men of Alpha Kappa Pi were approved by C L E as the newest Greek organization, increasing the total number of Greek organizations to thirteen. Existing for more than 160 years, the Greek system has out lived everything about Hope Coll e g e - e v e n its n a m e . D e s p i t e changes, rewrites, losses and additions, the largest social system on H o p e ' s c a m p u s c o n t i n u e s to change, thrive, and grow.

BY a.I. halverson

A l p h a Theta Chi fraternity m e m b e r s and their sister s o r o r i t y Kappa Beta Phi hitch a ride in the back of the p i c k - u p truck pulling their float. Besides the new Alpha Kappa Pi fraternity, the Centurians and Dorians are y o u n g e s t Greek organizations on campus. (PR Photo)

T h e Sigma Sigma s o r o r i t y members celebrate their ninetieth anniversary w i t h sisters a n d alumni. The g r o u p , o n e of the oldest Greek organizations on c a m p u s , was f o u n d e d in late 1905. (PR Photo)


A few years ago, the Phi Kappa Alpha fraternity threw a few c o u c h e s on the bed of an eighteen wheeler. They invited the Delta Phi sorority to join t h e m and called it a h o m e c o m i n g float. This recent tradition c o n t i n u e d again t h i s year in the 1995 h o m e c o m i n g parade. (PR Photo)

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ALPHA PHI SORORITY

Alpha Gamma Phi Transforming, learning, sharing, supporting, knowing, loving, precious, permanent. If anything at all, a sorority is not entirely, a flower, rush retreats, family rings, worn out songs, elections, or matching shirts. And it's not an institution, a creed, an obligation, or a way of life. If your going to insist that it is something, a sorority is sharing; long tired entitles of black coffee and exam snacks when you can't remember the Renaissance architects of the mossy taproot system. Borrowing a skirt from Julie, a blouse from Stephie, a scarf from Amy-Lynn, and a coat from Jess and passing it off as your own. Painting a room for pledges to meet in or polishing silver for the 38th Homecoming. Participating in tree planting and coming home to laugh with your sisters. Transforming cardboard into a magical seabound ship only because a sorority is finding special friends who will be with you a lifetime, through the good and bad S t e p h a n i e A d a m s , Lia Tinkelman, times. A m y - L y n n Halverson, a n d Jesse A sorority is Guest celebrate b i r t h d a y s w i t h thier sisters. a kind of evaluation. You grow up and learn more of life than if you had lives somewhere else. You learn that you've got to have that one small acre that belongs to you by yourself, but that you still need the warmth of others. You learn that each individual is unique and has some special quality that is their own. And if you're very smart, or very lucky, you learn that no matter how big or how messy the world becomes, what is precious and what is permanent is always the same. In the very end, a sorority can only be a way to stumble up the back stairs and walk out the front door,

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F r o n t R o w : S t e p h a n i e A d a m s , J u l i e P a r k e r , H e i d i M i c k e l s o n ; Second R o w : E r y n F o l e y . J e s s G r e v e n s l u k . San B e a v e r ; T h i r d R o w : A m y - L y n n H a l v e r s o n , B e t h T h o r r e z . M e g a n M a d d o x , Lia T i n k e l m a n , G i n a S m i e s , Pattj D o n o v a n . Kalherine Kruse; Back Row: Melissa O o m s . M o n i c a M a n n i n g . Kami Datema, Sara Minnaar.

B e a u t i f u l faces, beautiful g i r l s : Front t o Back: Kristin Burke, Lisa Lee, Katherine Kruse, Sara Beaver, Sarah Young, Melissa Cooper, Katy Carpenter, Heidi M icke lso n , Monica M a n n i n g , A m y - L y n n J a r c h o w , AmyL y n n Halverson, Sara Minnaar, a n d Stephanie A d a m s .

T o o hot t o handle: Monica Manning, Heidi M icke lso n , a n d Katherine Kruse check out the student art at DePree Art Center Gallery.

A m y - L y n n Halverson, Gina Smies, a n d Katy Carpenter e n j o y i n g the c o m p a n y of their current sisters a n d perspective m e m b e r s at the rush final tea. At the tea, rushees s p e n d o n e last e v e n i n g w i t h the sorority before pledge bids are passed out.


DELTA PHI SORORITY

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M e m b e r s of the sorority h e l p i n g at Youth Day at the Holland Civic Center. Helping each year w i t h games and providing entertainment for the kids is a favorite activity of the group.

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T h e Delphi ladies celebrate the season at the annual sorority C h r i s t m a s party. Many look f o r w a r d t o the great f o o d and e x c h a n g i n g gifts w i t h their sisters. M e m b e r s of the sorority and their brother fraternity, the C o s m o p o l i tans, ride on a flatbed as the g r o u p s traditional h o m e c o m i n g float.

Celebrating over 85 years of friendship and sisterhood at Hope College. T h e Delta Phi Sorority came into being with the first meeting on October 8, 1910. Set up as a society for the literary and cultural development of its members, Delta Phi has continued to grow and evolve, superseding the highest expectations of the first twelve charter members. Imbedded in the heart and tradition of Delta Phi lies the commitment to service; to the community, to the college, and most importantly, to its members. This strongly held belief has triggered the numerous service projects in the community, the many positions of student authority within the college, and several events for either the members exclusively or jointly with other student organizations. Senior citizens and "at risk" children from broken homes have been the focus of Delta Phi's effort to give back to the community. The demanding struggle to help those in need is deeply m a n i fested within a sorority boasting over fifty members. The college has also seen Delphis spring T h e Delphis and Sigmas o n their up in several ar- way to Michigan State for the eas across cam- traditional party with the Sigma pus. Winning Alpha Epsilon fraternity. countless awards and recognitions, numerous positions on other student organizations, and voting membership on several college boards and committees have all put Delta Phi in the forefront. Yet all this hard work in the pursuit of ideals has not left the Delphis blinded to sisterhood. Through a retreat at the beginning of the year, scheduled social events with other organizations, and extravagant formals, the Delta Phi sorority rose high on the wings of life. Delta Phi is a united sisterhood with support for their members in all ways possible. This year was a conglomerate of events and activities that go above and beyond what the first twelve women began.

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DORIAN

SORORITY

Kappa Beta Phi Dorian sorority celebrates friendship in service to community, campus, and sisters. OiiiHfA'OiiHwhlcr I'm Ik-nulm be si cncupsulaletl 1110 spint til | he I )oriim Soroiity in hei IcjjcntJiiry KO's hit, All l iifd ///Âť, A Ciivoritc pick al Dorian forinals and dull* ni).'lils, I he acid Kiek numher does justicc lo ihe sixly ei^hl women ol Kappa Beta Phi who spenl iheii I W b y e a i doinji juNl Ihal...gelling fired up. I he Dorians ivaMirmed then eommilincnt loeom niimily service early on in ihe semesier, rebuilding low ineome homes with Habilal Poi I Inmamly. They also aided Special Olympic parlicipanls and walked pooches loi ihe Humane Sociely. h i n d raisers in eluded Ihe Valenline's I )ay balloon sale, Phone a Ihon loi Ihe Alumni l und and selling up Ihe new Malh and Hotly Works in Weslshore Mall I )t>i ian social events involveil a I lalloween Party wiih Ihe ('endirians, the rmeisonian/Dtiiian Olym pics and Around the World wiih the Praters. Date nights included a "Post (lame" Iheme party and a bowl a ihon. Fall Pormal was held in Muskegon. In April Ihe Spring l ormal was held V l c k l Cndo, Snrnh VnnHnrkon, aboaitl the Prin Kathy Bioclnw, nnd Androa Voga nl cess, a river Die 1995 toolbnll (Innlti lull dnlonlghl. boat on the Grand River in I ansing. I he " Thursday night TV lineup" and ihe smash lui I riftuls alsoi|uickly became an unollicial Dorian rilual. l ive Dorians graced Homecoming Court ami live were ibrown candlelights loi pearlings and engage menis I he ll)l)(> Spring Hush, "(let the Hig Picture" brought in 2S new actives undei the revampeil pleilg iug program while the Soroiity bitl "larewell" to IS seniors, live ol whom graduated Phi Beta Kappa. I Vbbie t '.uupbell ami Mieki l iens acted as presidents lor I and spi mg semesters, Siace> Wendl ami Kalhy Biec law acted as vice presidents. w>\

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B o c k coltogo women Jon Wonvor, Lynn Smllh. Grolchon Borg, Anglo Stroy, Shannon Laurson, Mlckl Frons, and Laura Pochla. Bock cotlago Is otton tho location of tho Dorian "Frlonds" Thursday night prlmo tlmo party.

D o r i a n sonlors rocrult now pledges (or the last time at tho spring 1996 round robin.

T h e sorority hanging out on one of many occasions to celebrate nothing but great friendships.


KAPPA CHI SORORITY

Kappa Delta Chi Pledging honor, giving friendship with a goal to make each member grow individually and as a group.

T h e Sorority gets the number one vote for the Homecoming float competition. The ladies s h o w off what hard w o r k and lots of creativity can get. The prize m o n e y was a great incentive too.

M e m b e r s of the sorority sport the latest In ancient Roman f a s h i o n for a toga party with the Centurian fraternity.

I he Kappa Delta Chi Sorority was founded in 1962 when the need for a sixth Hope College sorority became evident. As the new group grew, they moved from their first home in the basement of Gilmore Hall into a private campus cottage. The Kappa Chi Sorority now stands strong at twenty-one women. Jacqui Bollard said. "The times I have with my sisters are some of the best in my life. I wouldn't trade them for anything." Social events were numerous throughout 1996. A fall retreat started off the new year and allowed everyone to get back in touch after the long summer apart. Homecoming provided a chance for all the ladies to work together on the float. The Flintstones Meet the Jetsons float took first place among all the other sororities and fraternities. A traditional fall formal was held off campus and was a great c h a n c e to get away from the hectic new semester. The formal was f o l l o w e d by a Multiple Sclerosis fundraiser dance with the Centurian fra- m .

. ls ydance served not only as a so-

IMew 1996 actives Karen Randinitis, Jessica Parrish, and Annette Norton at a literary meeting. The new actives talked

cial event, but

about their new experience in the

t e r n l t

also one that s o r o r i t y would benefit the community. Local business donated door prizes and all the money raised at the dance was donated to Multiple Sclerosis. Other service events throughout the year included serving dinner at the Hospice of Holland's annual fund raising auction. The sorority also headed to the beach, not to lay in the sun, but for a "beach sweep." The ladies spent the afternoon cleaning up the sandy shores for the DNR at the Holland State Park.

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SIB

SORORITY

Sigma lota Beta In the trickle of friendship, the wonders of concern, the crashing sound of laughter, and the soft splash of sisterhood.

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T h e purpose of the Sibylline sorority is for the intellectual, moral, and social development of its members. The Sibylline women strive to uphold the values and beliefs set forth by their founders and Hope College by setting a good example through serving the college and community. Instead of writing about all the wonderful things that the Sigma Iota Beta did together throughout the year, it was decided to print this poem which has special meaning for every member of the sorority. "Waves on the Beach." The soft little trickle of unknown curiosity at the break of dawn flows quietly along the endless stretch of sand. So much to learn about the wonders of the ocean. The sun begins to rise as the curiosity begins to spread. The water begins to make waves Waves of knowledge, pain, laughter, and happiness. The many rays from the sun warm the sands with careful assurance. Loud crashing is heard from the waves hitting the sand. The sand holds firm always together. The waves die back down to a soft splash an the beach The time has come for the waves and sand to become one. One, in the trickle of friendship, the wonders of concern, the crashing sound of laughter, and the soft splash of sisterhood coming together with a big wave of love.

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Sibyline 52

A m a n d a Fry, Melissa Altobelli, Carrie Carley, Laura Lange, Rebecca Whitefoot, Rachel Hall, Beth Perry, Dana Jensen, Sarah Lubbers, Kelly Gilroy, Susan Reeves, A m y Strassburger, a n d Jen Bechtel at the 1995 H o m e c o m ing parade.

M o n i c a Pellow, Kristin Vink, Toni Visser, Kori Foster, Val Pacheco, Sarah Beemer, Mary Boelkins, Sheree McFarland, Kay Otto, Susan Reeves. Jen Zeerip, K i m B e n t o n a n d Beth VanDenBerg.

M e m b e r s of the s o r o r i t y carry the " S i b C h e f " back t o his h o m e in the cottage after the H o m e c o m ing parade. The Chef j o i n e d the girls as part of the Sigma lota Beta " D e c a d e s of S i s t e r h o o d " float.


SIGMA SORORITY

Sigma Sigma Celebrating over ninety years of friendship, strength and honor at Hope College.

M e m b e r s of the sorority having a c l o s e d Halloween party. Having closed parties allows the ladies t o b e c o m e closer as a family and learn even more about each other.

T h e new Sigma actives s i n g the sorority toast s o n g together for the last t i m e as a pledge class. The girls do many t h i n g s together that help t h e m f o r m a life l o n g b o n d as a class. Pledging creates the f r i e n d s h i p that sororities and fraternities are built on.

A t one of the last parties of the year w i t h the O m i c r o n Kappa Epsilon fraternity, the girls also hang out with sisters before everyone heads h o m e for the summer.

r o u n d e d over ninety years ago in 1905, the sorority still carries on the traditions and ideas that Sigma Sigma was built upon so long ago. The ladies of Sigma Sigma still represent strength and honor within their sisterhood, a characteristic that distinguishes them from other sororities at Hope College. For ninety years, the sorority has reached out into the Holland community by providing selfless service to all. Working with Habitat for Humanity and arranging holiday parties for underprivileged children at the local Lincoln E l e m e n tary School are just a couple of the y e a r ' s activities. Time spent with sisters is also an important aspect of Sigma Sigma. The fall started off with a traditional f o r m a l and a c o u p l e datenights. The spring brought another formal and another M e m b e r s of the S o r o s i s Society in line for the start of the homef a b u l o u s datenight. Ac- c o m i n g parade. The Sigmas, tivities with j o i n e d by alumni, celebrated their 90th anniversary d u r i n g the other Greek or- h o m e c o m i n g festivities. ganizations on campus were also held throughout the year. The relationship between Greek organizations is keep up through activities like these. The revamped spring rush and pledge program welcomed eighteen new actives into the Sorosis Society. The sorority says good-bye to the seniors they have shared so much with and know so well, wishing them luck in the future.

Sigma 53

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ARCADIAN

FRATERNITY

Chi Phi Sigma Proud history, members, and motto of service, love, and wisdom. In the past, the Arcadians said they are very proud of their organization—its history, its members, and motto of service, love, and wisdom. The Chi Phi Sigma fraternity provides a unique and life-long opportunity of special experiences and brotherhood to its members at Hope College. The group said they believe in the social aspects of fraternity life and often organize social events with other sororities and on occasion with other fraternities on campus. But, keeping everything in perspective, they also recognize their responsibility to the community in a positive manner through various service projects during the year. Editors note: After many, many, requests and reminders for pictures and information on current service and social events, the Arcadian fraternity did not submit a single thing. They are the only Greek organization who failed to do so. Information used was taken from previous editions of the Milestone and pictures were borrowed from public relations. ^

T o p a n d Right: Chi Phi Sigma b r o t h e r s c r u i s e t h r o u g h the 1995 h o m e c o m i n g parade on t o p of the blue a n d w h i t e A r c a d i a n Van.

M e m b e r s of the Chi Phi Sigma fraternity hang out on the newly reconstruced p o r c h of their cottage. The Arcadian cottage made a cross campus move from tenth t o thirteenth street.

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CENTURIAN

FRATERNITY

Alpha Theta Chi A fraternity responsible for the development of its members; members responsible for the development of the fraternity. S c o t t Vander Beek, Erik Eldred, Tim Witvoet, Wayne A n g u i l m , Scott Austin, and Marcus Wasilevich s p e n d one last evening w i t h the fall rushees before they become pledges. A r u s h informal is held to signify the e n d of rush.

M a r c u s Wasilevich, Doug Gle, Dave Nicolson, Brian Capps, Zach Hegg, and J o h n Lawler getting ready for the Dorian/Centurian Halloween Party. They often have parties with other Greek organizat i o n s t o get t o k n o w t h e m better. J u n i o r s Mike Chesser and Dan Styf h a n g i n g out at the Centurian Cottage before g o i n g out on a Friday night. The cottage serves as a place the entire fraternity can hang out w i t h their brothers.

I he Alpha Theta Chi was founded in 1966 because of the demand for Greek organizations. Many hopeful rushees were continually being turned away from existing fraternities because of size limitations. The Centurian name came from the 100th anniversary of Hope College, which fell on the same year as the founding of the fraternity. The former Zwemer hall served as a home for the new group until it was demolished to make room for the new Seminary library. Dwindling numbers caused the Centurians to disappear in 1981, but new interest resulted in reestablishment in the fall of 1986. Since this time. Alpha Theta Chi has continued to grow. The Centurians can be seen in most campus organizations and activities. Pull, Nykerk, Student Congress, Anchor, SAC, Varsity and Intramural sports are j u s t a few. Along with these activities, the f r a t e r n i t y holds forma ls and datenights throughout the year. Parties with other Greek organizations including Rib'em & Blues, Around the World, and N e w 1996 actives Ryan Sterk, Greg Folkert, Scott Huizinga, Eric Beach Grillin' keep up campus Zondervan, A d a m Hudson, Scott Vashel, Kris McKee, Bill Kim, and relations. Jared Herron celebrate b e c o m i n g S e r v i c e active at a party with their brothers. events include helping on the Habitat for Humanity house. Project Pride, Environmental Awareness Group's tree planting, Multiple Sclerosis fund raiser dance with the Kappa Chi Sorority, and UN1CEF trick-or-treating. The Centurian Fraternity is dedicated to providing a brotherhood for members that crosses all boundaries. Fifty-one very different people learn from each other and provide trust, love, and respect, for all brothers.

Centurian 55

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EMERSONIAN

FRATERNITY

Phi Tau Nu With a purpose of promoting the moral, intellectual, and social development of its members. I he Emersonian fraternity was founded at Hope College in 1919 as a Literary Society. As the Society grew and the need for an additional fraternity also increased, the Emersonians became an official fraternity in early 1929. Since this time, the fraternity has grown to become one of the biggest on campus, adding to all aspects of life at Hope College. The members of the fraternity have come to represent all p e o p l e at the college, but especially student athletes. Members of the football, baseball, basketball, track, hockey, lacrosse, pull, tennis, and soccer t e a m call t h e Emersonians brothers. The brothers learn from each others different experiences and T h e E m m e r s o n i a n Cottage made a e n j o y playing two block move across campus the d i f f e r e n t early in the summer. Many Greek sports when tocottages were m o v e d t o make g e t h e r as a r o o m for the new H a y w o r t h group. Conference Center and C o o k residence hall. Involvement in Hope College varsity sports has earned fraternity members many different awards. They include Rich Kesteloot being named to the First Team All-MIAA in football and Nick Ward being named to the All-MIAA Team in track. The most important quote to the Emersonians is one that represents the fraternity and is one all people can live by. "The only way to have a friend is to be a friend," by Ralph Waldo Emerson.

Emersonian 56

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V F r o n t R o w : M a t t L u h m a n n , D . J . H a m m i n g h , R i c k F r e n s , R i c h C r u m b i e , A a r o n O t i s , J a s o n C o x , S t e v e Oursler, Brent Buckingham, S h a w n DeWulf, Jason G r i m m , Tom Dixon; Back R o w ;

C h i Le, N i c k W a r d , J a s o n Hall,

G r a n t W i l h e l m , T r e v o r S t a m e s , M a t t J o h n s o n , N i k B a n c h o f f , C a m G a t r e l l , M i k e W e i s s , T r o y H a y e s , P e t e r Field. D a n Y o u n g , B r a d S t e g e n g a , B r a d F e e n s t r a , T o d d H o m s b y , R i c h K e s t e l o o t , T r o y D a v i s , D e r e k B a b i n , T o m Doran.

M e m b e r s of the E m e r s o n i a n fraternity gather for a weekly business m e e t i n g in the basement of their cottage. Because of the Cottage move, a new basement was constructed a n d remodeled. The basement is an i m p o r t a n t place for many of the fraternity f u n c t i o n s or just for the brothers to h a n g out.

B r o t h e r s and perspective members hang out at the rush formal. The f o r m a l is held at the e n d of r u s h in order t o b e c o m e better acquainted with the rushees. For many fraternities a n d sororities, the f o r m a l marks the e n d of rush a n d is f o l l o w e d by the d i s t r i b u t i o n of bids.


COSMOPOLITAN

FRATERNITY

Phi Kappa Alpha Possessing a goal to strengthen the individuals and fraternity socially, morally, and intellectually. Front Row; Dan Pickering, Nate Hoekzema, Ryan Cook, Kirk Brukirk, Dave Albrecht, Brad Crandell, Tony Zorc, Chris Foster, Dan Capps, Chris Garbrecht, Joel Brandt, Sam Vail, Roy Piersma, Ryan St. John, Luis Leguizamon, Jason Johnson, Jason Eshuis, Chris Collins, Josh Kooistra, Peter Payette, Derek VanderHeide, Ben Mills, Barret Alger, Dave Clausen, Nick VanderBorgh; Back R o w : Drew Sill, Jason Vandeller, Marc Hes, Ryan Spangler, Marc Humphrey, Rob Gillespie, Chris Potter, Paul Handley, Chris Vantimmeren, Jeremy Beard, Omar Postigo, Steve Tobias, Dan Potter, Drew Ysseldyke, Marc Christinidis, Peter Warburton, Kip VanDam, Scott Nyman.

J o e l Brandt, Jeremy Beard, and Marc H u m p h r e y float d o w n a north Michigan river in the annual C o s m o p o l i t a n fall canoe trip.

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J e r e m y Beard, A n d y Sill, Marc Humphrey, Nate Hoekzema, and Chris Vantimmeren in Breckenridge, Colorado. Members of the fraternity headed west over C h r i s t m a s break for the great skiing. P a u l Handley, J a s o n Vandellen, Kip VanDam, Luis Leguizamon, Nick VanderBorgh, Rob Gillespie, J a s o n J o h n s o n , and Mike Kooistra in Panama City d u r i n g the 1996 s p r i n g break.

I he Cosmopolitan Fraternity has it origins in the early history of Hope College. It was founded as a literary society in 1890 on a foundation of friendship, progress, and truth. Since this time, the fraternity has strived to maintain the goals that have represented the organization for over 106 years. Rooted deep in the Cosmopolitan history is a firm commitment to community service. This commitment continues today through many different activities. The year started off with the Oxtam charity and was followed by a "beech sweep." Each fall the fraternity heads down to the Holland State Park and cleans up trash along the lake shore with the Department of Natural Resources and other Greek organizations. Community service continues during Eart/i Jam. During this week, the men are involved in various activities throughout an entire w e e k . The C o s m o s were also involved in the Habitat for Humanity h o m e b u i l d i n g project. Socially, the fraternity was involved in many activities M e m b e r s of the fraternity traveled throughout the to the north of Mexico for s p r i n g break 1996. While in Mexico the year. In the g r o u p went horse back riding in 1996 homethe highlands. coming festivities, they continued the unofficial tradition of the semi truck float with the Delta Phi sorority. Being reunited with Cosmopolitan alumni is also a highlight of homecoming. Date nights and seasonal formals completed the events of the year. The Cosmopolitans believe a person should always be true to themselves. A quote used to represent this idea says, "Do not follow where the path may go. Go instead where there is no path and leave a trail." ^

Cosmopolitan 57

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FRATERNAL

SOCIETY

Omicron Kappa Epsilon Striving to cultivate higher moral standards, establish noble friendships, and promote intellectual attainments. T h e Fraternal Society has enjoyed another successful year as an organization dedicated to creating a brotherhood. To be a part of Omicron Kappa Epsilon means to be a part of the friendship, love, and truth that burns in the hearts of all it's members. As one of the oldest active fraternities in the nation at over 160 years old, the Praters strive to cultihigher vate moral standards, establish noble friendships, and promote intellectual attainments. The group kept very busy this year with many service activities. Members were busy w o r k i n g on the Habitat for Humanity p r o j e c t , and F r a t e r n a l m e m b e r s Jeff raising money M u l h o l l a n d , Travis Buth, Paul Stuit, for Evergreen and J o h n Mark O u d e r s l u y s h a n g C o m m o n s out together on a 1996 s p r i n g break t r i p . through a phone-a-thon. OKE paired up with the Sigma sorority to throw a Christmas party for neighborhood children. For the final service project of the year, the Fraters held a food drive for the local Holland Mission. Socially, the men were busy also. The Frater-Delta Phi Halloween party. Prater Frolics, the traditional canoe trip, and Hog Bash made for a busy fall semester. The 161st Anniversary Literary Meeting, ski formal, and the active-alumni golf outing finished off the year. J *

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Fraternal 58

O K E brothers Ken H o w k , Brett Karis, Erich VanRavenswaay, Craig Maki, Ryan Cerny, J o n Chrysler, Eric Nickels, J o h n Mark Oudersluys, Chad Wiegle, a n d Marc Posthumus e s c a p e the c o l d a n d enjoy the warm, sunny weather on a trip down south for s p r i n g break. A l l d r e s s e d up at the first ever Prater ski f ro m a l, Jeff McDoniels, Chris VerMeulen, Zack Gallegos, Joe Novak, Peter Huizenga, Ryan Maher, a n d Kevin Lewis.


KNICKERBOCKER

FRATERNITY

Kappa Eta Nu Upholding the years old traditions of fellowship, moral, and intellect through unity.

Front Row: Jared Buono, Eric Almli, Matt Fouts; B a c k R o w : John Flurld, John Donnelly, Jeff Kin, Pete Poel, Andy Poles,

A n d y Poles, Jared Buono, Eric Almli, J o h n Donelly, Pete Poel, and Matt Fouts hang out for another Wednesday night at the Knick House.

K n i c k e r b o c k e r members John Hurld and Jeff Kin display the g r o u p ' s banner above their "Cans for Jerry's K i d s " sign. The g r o u p held the can drive t o raise m o n e y d u r i n g the annual Labor Day Telethon.

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T h e Knickerbocker fraternity is one of Hope's oldest at over eighty-five years. The group was founded in 1909 by twelve men from the freshman class. Since this time, the Knicks have upheld the traditions started by their founders, the traditions of Kappa Eta Nu: fellowship, moral, and intellect. The unity that has developed within the fraternity can by represented by the active members as well as the alumni. The unity of the men has held them together for many years through thick and thin. Small numbers allow the men to be close friends through brotherhood. Pete Poel, John Hurld, Eric A l m l i , John Donnelly, Andy Poles, Matt Faust, Jeff Kin, Mike Kin, Chris Kaplan, and Jared Bono make up the list of actives for 1996. Several activities kept the Knickerbocker men busy A l p h a Gamma Phi j o i n e d the throughout the Knicks for a closed party d u r i n g Spring Fling. Members of the t w o year. The group Greek organization have become kicked off the close t h r o u g h many activities. year with a can drive to raise money for Jerry's Kids and the Labor Day Telethon. During Earth Day, many different activities keep them busy as they helped spread environmental awareness. The group also took part in the National AIDS Rally. Other activities included parties with other Greek organizations and the annual Knickerbocker canoe trip in the fall.

Knickerbocker 59

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APHIO

FRATERNITY

Alpha Phi Omega

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Founded on leadership, friendship, and service, while building lasting friendships on campus and across the nation. Ipha Phi Omega is the nations largest Greek letter fraternity and Hope's only national co-ed fraternity. More than 256,000 students on 682 campuses across the nation have been a part of APO and alumni cover all walks of life, including the mayor of Holland and the President of the United States, Bill Clinton, Alpha Phi Omega has three goals: To encourage leadership, foster good fellowship, and extend service to our fellow man. Hope's chapter of Alpha Phi Omega, Nu Beta, is active in many activities in the Holland community and on campus. Each year the group publishes the freshman directory, Felicitations, for new students. APO also sponsors all the blood drives on campus, a s s i s t s the Boy Scouts with many activities, and participates in Project Pride, just to name a few. The fraternity holds datenights, a n n u a l formals, and A P O members making smores over parties with the campfire at Camp Gerber. The o ther camgroup makes a trip to the camp twice pus c h a p a year and it is always a g o o d time. ters. At regional and national conferences, chapters from the surrounding states and the nation come together to discuss fraternity issues and get to know each other. The highlights of the year are the fall and spring trips to Camp Gerber. Members stay for the weekend and do everything from painting cabins to swimming to relaxing around the campfire. The 1996 year has been another great one for Alpha Phi Omega. The fraternity continues to grow in numbers and in life long f r i e n d s h i p s . ^

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APO 60

E a c h year during a weekend trip to Camp Gerber, the fraternity does some service work for the park, then spends the rest of the time relaxing and hanging out with brothers. Here, the group is on their way to do some painting and other jobs to earn service hours.

A P O members get a hand of cards going while others are outside trying to get a campfire started. The fraternity continues to grow with more new actives In 1996 than any previous year. The group welcomes new members twice a year.

D u r i n g the closed fall rush event, APO Invited all the rushees to a Lake Michigan beach house for a cook out and to get to know each other better.

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HONORARY

FRATERNITY

Sigma Omicron Hope College's Honorary dance fraternity provides opportunities and a common bond for members.

Front R o w : Jennifer Whitesell, Ellen Tomer. Nicki Flinn, Mindy Woolard, Shaylynn Krueger, Jodi James, Jennifer Mancini, Monica Pellow; B a c k R o w : Sandra Federico, Vicki VanWagnen, Clayton Gibson. Rebecca Partenheimer, Nathanael Buckley, Mary Shenton, Ann Paeth, and Kirsten Singer.

O igma Omicron was founded in 1991 as an honorary dance fraternity. The motivation came from a group of artists who shared a particular art form and felt the need for a common group. The goals of the group would be few and simple, but lay the foundation for a growing organization. Two of the most important goals include providing opportunities to educate the community about the world of dance, and providing a social group with a common bond. Members of the fraternity take part in various events through the dance department, keeping a strenuous schedule throughout the year. These events take place on campus, in the community, and in churches. On campus, dance students throughout campus display their work in the Student Dance Concert each semester. The show is not only a s h o w case for the artists, but is student c h o r e o g r a p h e d . S a n d r a Fererico, Monica Pellow, Dance 22 is an- and Jennifer Whitesell have spent most of the past four year together, other c o n c e r t inside and o u t s i d e of the Fraternity. for student work but is choreographed by the dance department faculty. Off campus. Strike Time Dance Company travels to elementary schools throughout the community. The material includes student written, choreographed, and performed demonstrations that teach about the art of dance. The Sacred Dance group is a liturgical group that preforms traditional dances in area churches. Working hand-in-hand with the professional Aerial Dance Company provides real world experience in the profession of dance.

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WJPE

E l l e n Tomer. J o d i James, Angela LoCicero, Monica Pellow, and Nicki Flinn take a break on stage while p r e p a r i n g for Dance 22. The d a n c e r s s p e n d m o n t h s preparing for a p r o d u c t i o n that lasts only a c o u p l e of h o u r s .

N a t h a n a e l Buckley, Jennifer Whitesell, Vicki VanWagnen, Nicki Flinn, Sandra Federico, Kirsten Singer, a n d Kirsten Heinrich prepare for a p e r f o r m a n c e of the Strike Time Dance Company.

Sigma Omic ron 61 w


HONORARY

FRATERNITY

Beta Beta Beta A professional and biological honor society for undergraduates at Hope College. B e t a Beta Beta defines itself as a professional and biological honor society for undergraduates; thus, a major reason for its existence is to recognize those undergraduates who excel academically and in doing so promote excellence in the biological sciences. If doing nothing more, TriBeta would be a valuable member of the academic community; however, Beta Beta Beta also urges its members to e x t e n d their k n o w l e d g e of nature by undertaking scientific research and publishing the results. Each TriBeta chapter is an association of bio l o g i s t s and student biologists w o r k i n g together which A n n e Bartuszevige, Nicole helps make Durocher, Brian McKanna, a n d Heather Bair b o w l at Holland them competent Lanes. TriBeta went b o w l i n g for academicians, Halloween as a c h a n c e t o get away professional f r o m c a m p u s a n d have a g o o d scientists, and time. often friends. TriBeta members are busy throughout the year, not only in the classroom, but also out in the world. The club went camping at Hoffmaster State Park in the fall, where they had a chance to be surrounded by nature. The group also participated in tree planting at Riley Park for Earth Day. During Science Days at local elementary schools, TriBeta plans fun activities that expose and teach children about nature and the world around them.

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TriBeta 62

F r o n t R o w : Tom Akland. Nicole Durocher, Teresa Friedrich, Heather Bair; B a c k R o w : Anne Bartuszevige, Brian M c K a n n a , Aaron TeCroney, Daniel Styf, Dr. Blankenspor.

S e n i o r s Teresa Friedrich and Nicole D u r o c h e r get the evening fire started at the TriBeta fall c a s i n g trip. The g r o u p went t o P.J. Hoffmaster State Park in Grand Haven for the annual t r i p


M e m b e r s of the 1995-1996 Hope College Student Congress turned this c o n v e r t a b l e Into a float so they could participate in the a n n u a l fall h o m e c o m i n g parade. The g r o u p is an i m p o r t a n t part of c a m p u s by providing a voice for s t u d e n t s in college i s s u e s a n d decisions.

HOPE

COLLEGE

Student Congress Providing Hope College students opportunities for leadership on campus. T h e Students who serve on Student Congress are elected representatives of the student community and have an opportunity to directly influence decisions which affect the campus life of the Hope College Community. Student Congress representatives serve on the various college boards and committees. In addition, the Appropriations Committee of the congress is responsible for the allocation of the student activities fee to student run organizations. The activities fee paid by each student supports the entire student activities program by providing for the various budgets. Allocations of funds are controlled by the Appropriations Committee of the Student Congress chaired in 1996 by comptroller Jon DeWitte. New officers and members of the Congress are elected each semester.

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Social Activities Committee Planning and organizing the social activities for the student body of Hope College. M embers of Ihe Social Activities Committee (SAC) iiiive one of the greatest jobs on campus. When else can you gel paid to hang out with stars, travel across the country, and attend all the campus social events for free? Students who work for the group are always having a great lime and become great friends in ihe process. Almost all events on campus are planned and ran by the committee. SAC holds events that are so much a part of Hope College, it would be hard to imagine campus life without them. Labor Day activities. Sibling's Weekend, Casino Night, Fantasia, All College Sing, Talent Jam. and Spring Fling are Hope College traditions. Not to mention the Kletz comedians, musicians, and exam parties the group also puts on. A l l this work has earned SAC many different awards. The 1 9 9 5 Associate's S a c m e m b e r s Jennifer Smith, Choice Award Steve Halrston, a n d Kristen f r o m the NaD o u g l a s s help out at the Dating tional AssociaDoctor Event In the Kletz. tion of Campus Activities (NACA) and numerous other national and regional graphic arts awards were won by the group for their hard work. "We never settle for mediocrity. Every event is reevaluated in order to make it bigger and better the next year," commented Kristen Douglass, a four year member of the organization. "SAC continually wants to improve themselves in order to best meet the needs of Hope's diverse community; working for the students SAC can plan, prepare and promote for months on end. but an event is not a success until students choose to attend and enjoy themselves."^

F r o n t K n w : I x ' x i Linscheid. Kristen Douglass. Kiircn Paradis. A n n e Bakker-Gras, Jennifer S m i t h , Kristen Stekelee. M a r y Lucas: H u c k R o w : Steve Halrston. B r a d Prince, K e v i n Randall, T y l e r S m i t h . Jeremy M o n t y . Peter Emery.

P e t e r Emery, Steve Halrston, a n d Mary L u c a s take a break f r o m d a n c i n g at the Winter Fantasia. The annual formal dance attended by about 400 people is a Hope College t r a d i t i o n a n d is usually held at the g l a m e r o u s A m w a y Grand Hotel in Downtown G r a n d Rapids.

B r a d Prince, Kevin Randall, Kristen Douglass. Dave Coleman, the Dating Doctor; A n n e BakkerGras. a n d Jennifer Smith.

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L e x i Linscheid h a n d s out the First Date K i t " at the Creative Dating p r o g r a m . Many s t u d e n t s learned h o w t o f u n the f u n back in dating.

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NEWSPAPER

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M e m b e r s of The Anchor stall Julie Blair, Michelle Piel, J e n n Dorn, J i m Riekse, Jill Fischer, J o d i McFarland, Greg Paplawsky, and Laura Mihailoff at the fall retreat. The annual trip allows the staff to get t o k n o w each other better and learn h o w t o w o r k together.

S e n i o r Editor-in-Chief Julie Blair s t r u g g l e s t o get out an issue of the paper. On the night before printing, many staff m e m b e r s can be f o u n d in the office until all h o u r s of the night, or in s o m e cases, the next day. The final p r o d u c t a n d student reaction keeps the staff c o m i n g back for more.

Making the newspaper essential to the student life of Hope College. P u b l i s h i n g a college newspaper is a labor of love. You aren't given much money to do it and you work weird hours. Sometimes you don't sleep for days at a time and your grades almost always take a nose dive. But when the paper comes out and you overhear someone talking about a story on the front page. The Anchor staff says that's enough to make them run back to the office for more. The goal of the staff in September was to make The Anchor essential to student life. They wanted newspapers in every academic building, dorm room, and bathroom stall on campus. Eight months later, they couldn't keep the paper in stock. Under the leadership of Editor-in-Chief senior Julie Blair and advisor Dennis Renner, circulation skyrocketed. The staff went from running 8 page issues to 12, 16, and finally a 24 page newspaper—the longest publication in the history of the college. In part this was due to a flashy redesign and a dedication to sharp news and feature writing. But most importantly, the coverage sold. The staff wrote about issues never b e f o r e A n c h o r advisor and professor d i s c u s s e d in Dennis Renner with s t u d e n t s Julie Blair, A m y - L y n n Halverson, Sufjan The Anchor. Stevens, Glynn Williams, Nina Pieces included Bieliauskas, and Jenn Dorn. s e g m e n t s on daterape, STD's, prejudice, and racism. The Anchor cracked the story on the restructuring of Greek pledging and followed revisions on the alcohol policy. They tracked Student Congress' smoking proposal and ran the first Anchor Extra to alert the campus of the Congress reelection and the circumstances surrounding it. In the past few years, The Anchor has changed from merely mediocre to a high calibre publication. The staff refined the paper with gritty writing and hard ball attitudes. ^

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HSO The mission of the Hispanic Student Organization is to promote an understanding of Hispanic culture in the Hope College community H s O was established at Hope College in 1989 to represent the growing number of Hispanic students on campus. The group serves the students of the college by introducing them to the richness of various Hispanic cultures (Mexican, Cuban, Puerto Rican, Dominican etc.) through various activities and programs. Although HSO represents the Hispanic population, they encourage membership to all students regardless of race, or nationality. The group welcomes all members of the Hope and Holland community to share their presence, ideas, comments, questions, and concerns at all meetings and events. The group keeps busy throughout the year with many events and activities. HSO starts off the year with their annual Fiesta Night during Hispanic Heritage Month in September. Members of the group serve authentic Mexican food at the event that k i c k s off the heritage month. November first markes the " D a y of the Dead," or "Dia de los Muertos" in Mexico. An exhibit in the Kletz is displayed by HSO A t the Fiesta Night Hispanic members to Heritage Month kickoff, Darnish Taylor, Rebeca Rodriguez, and honor those Rosi Rodriguez serve authentic who have died. Mexican food. There is a traditional belief that spirits come back on this day and a beautiful atmosphere is set to receive them. Not a day to mourn, but is symbolized as a day to be happy. The group takes a trip every year to the annual National Hispanic Leadership Conference. The event was held is Chicago this year and is one that HSO looks forward to attending. The conference focuses on leadership by bringing Hispanic speakers from all over the world. Students enjoy networking with the speakers, dances, and most of all, a weekend in the great windy city.

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J a s o n Gaston, Roselia Patino, Ismaria Medel, Andy Van Eden, and Rebeca Rodriguez at the National Hispanic Leadership Conference in Chicago.

b D a w n l t a Rodriguez samples all the great Mexican food at the 1995 Hispanic Student Organization's Fiesta Night.

Student officers make up the governing body of HSO. The 1996 officers are Vice President Rosi Rodriguez. Treasurer/ Secretary Dawnita Diaz, and President Rebeca Rodriguez.

J a d e Medel, Sheryl Gabriel, and Rosi Rodriguez recruit new members and introduce their organization at the Student Activities Fair.


B e c k y Rodriguez, Tony W i l e r s o n , and Michelle Taylor give a presentation at the Black Coalition Senior Banquet.

HOPE

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Black Coalition /' / '"»**

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Standing firm on the foundation of yeaterday, building a stronger today; forging steadfast into tomorrow.

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Interna t io n a l students Nsiki Sisulu and Lungi, a l o n g w i t h a l u m n i Jerry J a c k s o n talk to Black Coalition guest speaker Camell McMorris after his presentation.

S e n i o r Zahra Ismaeli and Dawnita Diaz stand by the Black Coalition and Hispanic Student Organization d i s p l a y s at the annual Images Program in the K n i c k e r b o c k e r Theater.

I he Black Coalition (BC) was established in 1967 and is currently located within the student offices in DeWitt Center. The mission of BC is to aid in the establishment of diversity and to promote equality of Hope College's campus by utilizing African-American history, experiences, issues, and perspectives. The group provides events on campus that deal with Black heritage; helping to educate and stimulate the community of Hope College. These events also strengthen the identity of members of the AfricanAmerican race. By doing this, they are creating an environment in which all cultures will be visible and accessible to fellow s t u d e n t s , thereby opening an avenue for understanding, l e a r n i n g , and appreciation of different cultures. BC feels that this is a step towards J u n i o r Theo Robert and Director eliminating of Mulit-Cultural Life Darnisha bias that grows Taylor visit the displays at the 1996 from fear, ste- Images program. r e o t y p e s , and intolerance. The group welcomes anyone committed to, or interested in the mission of Black Coalition regardless of race, religion, sex, or nationality to take part in any activities of the group. Black Coalition had a busy schedule throughout the 1996 school year. The group started off the year participating in the fall homecoming parade. A Halloween party for Higher Horizon children and a trip to Depauw University for the GLCA Black/Latino Leadership Conference followed. Community Host dinners, food fairs, dances. Gospel Fest, Images, and the Ujima Conference filled the rest of the year. The senior banquet with the Hispanic Student Organization finished off the busy year.

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Fellowship of Christian Students Providing opportunities to grow in a relationship with Jesus Christ. 1 ellowship of Christian Students (FCS) is Hope College's largest Christian student organization. FCS provides students with an opportunity to grow in their relationship with Jesus Christ through music, prayer, and guest speakers. The group gives students a time and place for Christian fellowship and fun while growing spiritually. FCS is involved in many activities throughout the year, keeping students busy during the weekly meeting and weekend retreats. At the Monday night meetings, students gather for worship, prayer, sharing, fellowship, and great speakers. FCS is famous for their great inspirational speakers from on and off campus. For the weekends, FCS usually had a great event planned. Activities included Laser Storm, scavenger hunts, a luau, return to childhood party, belated new years party, Dow nights, Christmas caroling, work projects, snow football, and Euchre tournaments, just to name a few. The traditional fall retreat was also held this year. A trip to C r a n - H i l l R a n c h kept the group busy for an entire weekend. Horse back riding, wall climbing, small F e s brought in an instructor and members learned a few line dances groups, canoeing, as one of their many weekend hay r i d e s , c a m p activities throughout the year. fires, polar bear swimming, and night hikes provided endless fun. Tom Elenbaas was also invited to speak to the group. Over Christmas break, some members of the group headed to the inner city of Chicago for some mission work. Activities included painting, child care, caroling. bible studies, working in soup kitchens, and resident interaction. All learned from the experience and arew as Christians.

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Cancers pushing off during the FCS fall retreat at Cran-Hill Ranch. The group had many activities planned and kept busy throughout the weekend. O n their way to the Grand Roller Rink for an FCS skating party. The group "went back to the good old days and skated in circles for hours."


HABITATy!Habitat for HOPE

COLLEGE

Humanity Representing an ethical responsibility for our neighbors and promoting a spirit of volunteerism.

Front R o w : S t a c i e R i c h a r d s , v i c e - p r e s i d e n t ; B r i a n W o l t h u i s , b u i l d i n g c o o r d i n a t o r ; P e t e C h r i s t e n s e n , president; G r e t c h e n B o r g , f a m i l y l i a s o n ; B a c k R o w : L a u r i e E l l i s o n , s e c r e t a r y ; M e l i s s a I m m i n k , v o l u n t e e r coordinator; D e r k Z w a r t , t r e a s u r e r ; B r i a n Y o u n g , f u n d r a i s i n g c o o r d i n a t o r .

L a u r i e Ellison, Brian Wolthuis, Pete Christensen, Brian Yarch, and Robin Ebright tell people what the group is all about at the Habitat for Humanity Alternative Fair. S t a c i e Richards and Melissa Immink host the Lozano family at the Habitat of Humanity Family Night Dinner. The group invites families they have helped to the annual dinner.

H a b i t a t for Humanity was founded in 1993 to help dreams become reality. By building low priced homes in the Holland community without compensation, Habitat is demonstrating care of brothers and sisters as a Christian community. As the group helps others, they are helping themselves become better people and Christians. The homes built also stand as a permanent covenant between Hope College and Holland, and take learning off campus into the community for lessons that will last a lifetime. Stacie Richards comm e n t e d , "Working with Habitat for Humanity and the family partners is the most rew a r d i n g and joyful activity I have engaged in." Besides working on the H o p e College Habitat sponsors and assists many families in the Habitat project Holland area. The Cruz family is house, the one the group has grown close to. g r o u p is involved in many other activities. Early in the year, the group raises money for the project. During Fall Clean up, the members clean professors' yards and windows as a fund-raiser. At the Alternative Fair, displays of building materials are made and students, faculty, and staff make donations for the items. To raise awareness of the lack of adequate shelter and overabundance of substandard homes, the group held a sleep out in the pine grove. Many students and Greek organizations participated by constructing cardboard "homes" for the night. Building Hope, the Hernandez home, is the first house the campus chapter has built. The group has had great support from the faculty, staff, and students. It is just one of the many homes Habitat is building all over the world.

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HOPE

COLLEGE

EIG Exists to educate and act on environmental concerns on Hope's campus and throughout the world. I he Environmental Issues Group (EIG) was started in 1989 by Dr. Hemenway who was inspired after a trip to Austria. He saw the way the Austrians cared for their environment and then started the campus group at home. Since this time, EIG has sponsored seven Earth Jams and many other activities. The group kept busy throughout the year. Commitments included cleaning up local public beaches in the Great Lakes Beach Sweep, and helping Jackie Bertolins plant 2300 trees in the Holland area. The group was proud to host a seminar on "Caring for Creation," and also hosted several other speakers including representatives from the Holland Greenways Committee and the Nature Conservancy. EIG joined forces with Amnesty International in raising awareness of human rights and the right to a clean environment. On campus, the group started a recycling program in Centennial Park apartments, in addition to continuing the dorm program. ^

HOPE

COLLEGE

Geology Club Providing a group for students with a common interest and an opportunity to learn about the Earth. I he Hope College Geology Club provides a group for geology majors and other students with a common interest, and gives them an opportunity to learn about the Earth. The group was involved in the Great Lakes Beach Sweep, Tulip City Gem and Mineral Show, co-sponsoring Geology seminars. Science Day, Earth Week, camping trips, and spelunking. Dr. Amy Thompson is the advisor and Laura Sturmfels and Jared Buono were the co-presidents for 1996.

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G e o l o g y Club members Jeremy Caulklns, Chris Blgler, Kim Shull, Jared B u o n o , Peter Lepczyk, a n d Chip George on an e n v i r o n m e n tal trip. The g r o u p had many activities t o learn about the w o r l d a r o u n d them.

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HOPE

COLLEGE

Women's Issues Enhancing Hope's awareness of social, political, and economic barriers to women.

Left to Right: Crystal Sprouse, Gretchen Rumohr, Amy Eshleman. Jessica Whiton. Anne Lucas. Mary Ellen Walter, Heidi Giddy, Anne Horton. Not P i c t u r e d : Tracy Bednarick, Sarah McClure. Karen M c K e o w n , Laura Mihailoff, Colleen Ortwine, Doreen Deniston.

W o m e n ' s Issues Organization (WIO) is a student organization open to women and men. WIO seeks to enhance Hope's awareness of women's issues through weekly meetings and periodic events on campus. All interested people are welcome to attend all meetings and events. Goals include acknowledging the accomplishments and contributions of women locally as well as world wide. The group works to question those possible social, political, and economic barriers which inhibit women. They are dedicated to educating the college community by means of women's literary material, on-campus lectures, and other special events. They desire to challenge the Hope College community to become more aware of the importance of women within the community and to help women and men alike seek to make this country and the world a more just environment.

STUDENT

RADIO

WTHS Serving the entertainment and infromational needs of the student community.

A WTHS s t u d e n t d i s c j o c k e y a n n o u n c e s t h e n e x t s o n g o n h i s m i d - a f t e r n o o n r a d i o s h o w . T h e recently e s t a b l i s h e d a l t e r n a t i v e m u s i c p r o g r a m i n g is p o p u l a r w i t h t h e H o p e C o l l e g e s t u d e n t and Holland c o m m u n i t y .

I he Hope College student run radio station is housed in studios in the DeWitt Center and holds an FM license as 89.9. The station operates under the direction of the Student Media Committee and broadcasts throughout the Holland area and serves the entertainment and information needs of the student community. A staff of approximately 100 students, including student management personnel and disc jockeys are responsible for programing and day to day operations of WTHS. An alternative music format is currently used by the staff and student disc jockeys. Positions are open to all Hope College students for time slots throughout weekdays and weekends.

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HOPE

COLLEGE

1998 Pull Team Determination, strength, and experience enabled the Even Year Team to pull rope from P u l l e r Dan the hands of their oppoShelley gets nents. The team was victori- ready to pull and lock-in as ous in one of the greatest Moraler Lara Plewka watches college traditions in the na- for commands and encourtion. ages her

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partner. The pair returned to the Pull team for their second and final year of the annual event.

E v e n Year team members hold the giant rope against the skin-ripping heaves of their opponents on the opposite banks of the Black River. Moralers provide mental relief from the physical pain as the cheering c r o w d fills the air with screams of support for their even year family. R o p e anchor Dave Schrier uses his entire body to provide a foundation for the '98 team. Moraler Janeen Gipson does all she can to provide mental and physical support and keep her puller on his feet for the three hour event.

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T h e Hope College Pull. A freshmen vs. sophomore tradition dating back more than ninety-eight years. It is the ultimate test of strength, desire, and teamwork, at the same time building these traits like no other experience in life could.


HOPE

1997 Pull Team

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P u l l e r s , moralers, and coaches, d r e s s e d and painted In black a n d w h i t e prepare for another pull c o m m a n d f r o m the f r o n t line. Moralers verbally e c h o the arm c o m m a n d s of the '99 team c o a c h s t a n d i n g above the long line of pullers.

One of strongest freshman teams in many years, Odd year kept '98 fighting until the very end. The team has learned all they need for a another trip to the Black River. Next year, they will be the ones jumping in.

O d d Year team anchor J o n VanderVelde m o a n s under the strain of the p u l l i n g rope. A '99 team c o a c h and '97 Pull Team alumni yells w o r d s of m o t i v a t i o n at the tired VanderVelde.

ONE WAY

A " o n e w a y " s i g n stands almost as a s c r e a m i n g billboard t o the m o n u m e n t a l task literally in the hands of the team. Other s i g n s stand in s u p p o r t of the pullers, d i s p l a y i n g nicknames and inspirational sayings.

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COLLEGE

1998 Nykerk Teams

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E v e n year p e r f o r m s " O n e " f r o m the Broadway m u s i c a l A Chorus Line. Their h a r m o n i o u s v o i c e s and s h i n y g o l d hats b l e n d e d and m o v e d together as " o n e . "

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For a second year in a row the class of 1998 walked away with the beloved Nykerk cup. The teamwork and talent Even Year put into each element of the competition brought them success on and off stage.

S n o w White a n d the Seven D o r k s " was the 1998 play creation. The d o r k s in the play help Dopey m e m o r i z e a n s w e r s for his final r o u n d o n the game s h o w Jeopardy. The hilarious play c o n t r i b u t e d t o Even Year's 2-0 w i n .

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HOPE

COLLEGE

1997 Nykerk Teams A creative play, spectacular song, and a power orator displayed the talent of the Odd Year team. With experience under their belt, the group will carry the cup next time around.

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T h e 1999 Play m e m b e r s perform "Wizard in Wonderland." The play intertwined the adventures of Alice in Wonderland and Dorothy f r o m The Wizard of Oz trying to return home to Kansas.

F o r a blast f r o m the past, the '99 Song girls gave a spectacular p e r f o r m a n c e of We Go Together f r o m the 50's musical Grease.

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HOPE

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Alcohol Issues Matter Educating peers about the responsibilities that accompany the consumption of alcohol. / A l c o h o l Issues Matter (AIM) advocates responsibility of an individual who chooses to consume alcohol. AIM's goals are to provide education to the student community and hold alcohol alternative events on and off campus. Members of the group represent the entire student body of Hope College. This diversity establishes an understanding of different points of view and allows AIM to appeal to students throughout campus. Students who drink as well as students who don't take part in the group's activities. AIM was founded by two students who felt a need for a campus group that would educate on the issue of alcohol. Since its founding, the group has grown to include twenty-seven members and it c o n t i n u e s to gain c a m p u s and community wide attention. The group kept busy throughout the year with many different r events. The National ColleA l M members Jill Harkens, giate A l c o h o l Amanda Black, Jori Kumpf, and Matte Scholtens eat dinner Aw a r e n e s s together at their weekly meeting. Week was brought to campus and included "Moctails" in Phelps. The group became a familiar sight in the Pine Grove this winter, passing out free hot cocoa to students on cold mornings. A speaker was invited to talk to students and an awareness dance was held in the Kletz. The group finished up the year with a safe spring break message. AIM had another speaker and a raffle to encourage students to be safe as they escaped from college for spring break ' 9 6 . ^

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S o p h o m o r e s Matthew Scholtens, Jill Harkins, Jen Sails, and Kevin Burgun give out free cocoa in the Pine Grove. This was the one and only time they counted on cold weather, instead it was warm and sunny.

J e n Sails headed to Washington D.C. for the National BACCHUS Conference in November. Kevin Burgun and Casey Carney also made the trip to the east coast to learn the latest in alcohol awareness education. S o p h o m o r e s Rachael Mack and Jill Harkens organize flyers to pass out during National Collegiate Alcohol Awareness Week. AIM held many different events during the week to promote responsible drinking.


HOPE

COLLEGE

Amnesty International A worldwide movement working for the protection of human rights.

Front Row; Kristin Kelley, Amy Allison; B a c k R o w : Don Keler. Sally Pavlik, Julie Meyers; Not P i c t u r e d : Steve Sundbeck, Hristo Dimitrov, Rebecca Partenheimer.

/ A m n e s t y International is a worldwide movement working for the protection of human rights. It seeks the release of those detained anywhere because of their beliefs, color, sex, ethnic origin, language or religious creed, provided they have not used nor advocated violence. People held under such circumstances are termed prisoners of conscience. Amnesty works for fair and prompt trials of all political prisoners and works on behalf of people detained without charge or trial. The group opposes use of the death penalty, torture, or cruel, inhuman, degrading treatment or punishment of prisoners without reservation. Locally, Amnesty writes letters to government officials (U.S. and foreign) who are in position to intercede and halt these abuses. Amnesty also works to raise campuswide awareness of the issues addressed by the group throughout the world.

HOPE

COLLEGE

Pan-Hel Fostering a harmonious and efficient inter-sorority relationship on campus.

Members of each Sorority on Hope's c a m p u s makes up the Pan-Hellenic Board. They are: Alpha G a m m a Phi, Delta Phi, Kappa Beta Phi, Kappa Delta Chi, Sigma Iota Beta, and Sigma Sigma.

I he Pan-Hellenic Board provides a chance for all the sororities to have a voice in their governance at Hope College. Three representatives from each sorority attend weekly meetings to discuss business, concerns, or activities of the Greek organizations. Pan-Hel initiates action as required to foster harmonious and efficient inter-sorority relationships. The group also aims to further the cooperative spirit between the sororities and the college community. Besides the day-to-day business of the organization, many activities are held throughout the year. Halloween and Christmas open houses, as well as Round Robin are held for perspective rushees.

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HOPE

COLLEGE

Sailing Club Who says sailing is for the summer? Only frozen water stops this sailing club. I his tough group of men and women doesn't limit their boating to warm weather. They simply improvise. Try ten layers of improvising. Before races Greta Dykstra ('96) puts on two pairs of leggings. Socks. Turtleneck. Sweatshirt. One-piece waterproof suit. Rubber gloves. Boots. And of course, a hat. For extra protection she duct tapes her clothes at her wrists and ankles to keep out the bone chilling water. While the rest of Hope is huddling under blankets, waiting for spring, the ten member student-run organization heads to Wisconsin, Lansing and various other places to race in regattas. In the fall, club members hit the lake in thirteen foot "Flying Juniors," which the Lake Macatawa Bay Club loans out to them, trying to get in a few hours of practice before they head off to the races. Last season, traveling teams made up of a minimum of four students loaded up the boats, packed up plenty of warm clothes and drove off to five regattas before the weather dropped too low. The highlight? For Roy Pereira ('97) it was at Michigan State, He was racing with Than Dykstra ('96) and had forgotten his sailing boots. So, Pereira wore D y k s t r a ' s shoes, overlooking their large size. Sophomore Finally they got on the waKim Shull learns ter. The wind was blowing out of h o w t o run the race c o m m i t t e e control and so was their boat. If at the Sailing fact, it blew right into the water Club's fall and both men ended up in the cold practice. wet stuff. Everything seemed OK. except the shoes. They were sinking to the bottom the lake. Luckily, Pereira reacted quickly. He ducked under the water and retrieved them. For the Dykstra brother-sister duo. both walked away from the season with the Midwest Collegiate Sailing Association's Sportsmen Award. "This was a successful year." Dykstra said.

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S e n i o r Than Dykstra races against several other universities in the single h a n d e d championships held at Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Many team m e m b e r s learn h o w to sail for the first t i m e in the club, o t h e r s have been sa ilin g for their entire life. The small boats provide a good opportunity to learn.

F r e s h m a n crew Jessica Thomas hangs o n t o to the jib and keeps a w a t c h f u l eye for other boats, while Skipper Ryan Harrell drives the tiller and navigates t h r o u g h the c h o p p y waters of Lake Michigan at University of Chicago Spring Thaw Regatta.

J u n i o r Greta Dykstra and her brother, senior Than Dykstra await their t u r n to race at the Chicago Spring Thaw. The brother and sister team have rebuilt the sailing c l u b and have been the student leaders for the past few years.


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Inquiring Minds Providing a forum for open and honest discussions on issues of philosophical importance. Inquiring Minds was founded in the fall of 1993 when Dr. Andrew Dell'Olio of the philosophy department called a motion for transforming the previously existing Philosophy Club into a discussion group that is open to all members of the Hope College Community. The idea was welcomed and supported by the philosophy department, students, and faculty. The goals of the Inquiring Minds group are to provide a forum for an open and honest discussion on issues of philosophical importance as well as political importance. The group hopes to raise the level of reflection on campus by providing an opportunity for s t u d e n t s and faculty to explore issues in an informal setting rather than in a r e g u l a r classroom. Weekly meetings were held every Thursday at the Leaf and Bean Too Coffee Shop, and the A n n a Barnett, Alexandria Parker, i s s u e s raised and Amer Madi attend an Inquiring were numerous. Minds meeting at the Leaf and Discussions in- Bean Too coffee shop. cluded religion, sexism, God the mother, the interpretation of art, animals rights, and free will verses determinism. The group also took part in the discussions inspired by W o m e n ' s Week and hosted A l f r e d o Gonzales, the Assistant Provost and coordinator of the Critical Issues Symposium for the 1997 school year. Information and ideas regarding names of speakers, topics to be discussed as well as possibly activating the role of the students at the symposium were discussed. Attendance at the discussions was at times as high as twenty-five when the issue discussed was of great importance to students on campus. Traditionally at the weekly meetings, an average of ten to twelve students and faculty were in regular attendance.

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I n q u i r i n g Minds advisor and Philosophy p r o f e s s o r Dr. Andrew Dell'Olio listens to comments f r o m a student.

A student attends one of the weekly g r o u p meetings. Many students f r o m all fields of study came to the meetings for d i s c u s s i o n . On many occasions, attendance was overwhelming.

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German Club Providing a group with common interests and academic goals. The club provides activities and opportunities that reinforce language learning. A b o v e : They may be t o o old to trick-or-treat but not t o get dressed up. Some m e m b e r s of the g r o u p proudly s h o w off their Halloween costumes. Right: Members of the German Club o n the beach of Lake Michigan.

R i g h t : The g r o u p is all dressed up for the annual c l u b Halloween party at the German House. The g r o u p played lots of fun games and ate candy until their teeth hurt.

F a r Right: Last call for Barbecue. The German Club headed out to the beach for s w i m m i n g and dinner on a great s u n n y evening.

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Sports Medicine Front Row: Melody Morscheck, Zahra Ismaeli, Adrienne Christopher, Wendy Hughes, Beth Couvreur, S u m m e r Crosby, Kathryn Nichols, Brandy W a w i e m i a , Rich Ray; B a c k Row: Tonia Bruins, Brian Rosenau, Nathan Davies, Andy Norden, Margaret Abfall, Lisa Jutle, Tasha Guild, Chris Heaton.

Student trainers take the court and field for hands on experience. by Tom Akland s

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Urmder the watchful eye of Dr. Rich Ray, student trainers are given varying degrees of trust and responsibility in treating Hope's athletes, Having worked over twenty hours a week in this and other clinical settings, and by passing stages of competency exams, they have mastered the skills necessary to rehabilitate, protect and massage Hope's finest athletes. The athletic training program began in 1982 when Dr. Ray joined the faculty. Before Ray, students could always help the trainer but could never become certified as a trainer themselves. Today, athletic training is a highly competitive new major in the Kinesiology Department involving at least three

years of class work, the passing of a competency sequence, completing a minimum of 1500 clinical hours with Hope sports team responsibilities, late night jacuzzi parties in the warm whirlpool in the Training Room and three threemonth off-campus internships. After finishing the requirements, a rigorous national certification exam is taken. Student Trainers have time ontask working with hot and cold therapies, ultrasound and massage treatments, strengthening and stretching work, and maintenance of injured athletes using tape and pads to support joints or weaknesses caused by injury. Chris Heaton, a seasoned senior, espe-

cially enjoys the "palliative" treatments, doing the things that make the injured player feel better. By promoting the well being of the athlete, Heaton believes that they will be able to "deal with the trials and consequences of an injury." After treatments are taken care of, student trainers disperse to monitor all the afternoon practice sessions. A trainer plays an important role on the teams that he or she is assigned to. They are present at practices and wherever the team goes and help make important decisions about the injured members of the team. Traveling to all away games for a sport in the fall season and a sport in the winter season can whittle away study

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time, trainers say. Although the work is time-consuming and intense, Meg Abfall ('96), a four-year training room veteran, "can't imagine herself doing anything else." Like many student trainers, Abfall knew Dr. Ray and the program he runs at Hope before she applied. Now, three and-a-half years later, grad school and the life of a university trainer await. In the mean time, Abfall has an internship during the winter sports season and is working on mastering her techniques and suppressing her gag reflex. I feel bad saying this, but I've seen some great broken bones and dislocations here at Hope," Abfall said,

Sports Med. 81

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Orientation Staff Students welcoming and helping new students feel at home in the Hope college community. I he Orientation Staff is made up of 125 upper class volunteers who are the first faces to greet the incoming students in the fall. This staff is responsible for moving the boxes, motivating the students and creating a meaningful experience for the new members of the Hope family. Each person who volunteers to be an O.A. (Orientation Assistant) goes through a three day training session and is responsible for helping the new students adjust to life at Hope. This is accomplished by involving new students with each other as soon as they hit the campus. Icebreakers, interactive games, discussion groups, informational sessions, tours of Holland and Hope and a whole host of other activities are provided by the members of the Orientation Staff. Each O.A. is responsible for a group of ten to twelve new students. They become the teachers, motivators, and friends for the new students. It is also an opportunity for J u n i o r s Courtney Ward, Heather new students to Dillabough. a n d Trudy Cavanagh c o n n e c t with have been f r i e n d s s i n c e f r e s h m e n orientation. They d e c i d e d t o be a s o m e o n e who part of the p r o g r a m t h i s year has been because of their experience. (PR a r o u n d the Photo) block. In addition to O.A.'s there are ten to twelve students who act as Assistant Directors (A.D.'s). These students return to school a week early and become the trainers and motivators for the O.A.'s. This is a wonderful leadership opportunity for these students. Current members of the staff when asked why they volunteer for this weekend say, "It is a chance for me to give back to Hope." "I meet so many new people." "It is fun!" This encompasses the spirit of the whole weekend. Students helping Students to feel a part of the Hope Community.

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Over a hundred students volunteer each year for the Orientation Assistant and Director j o b s . The leadership skills they d e v e l o p in the p r o c e s s of h e l p i n g the new s t u d e n t s feel at h o m e will be useful t h r o u g h out life. (PR Photo)

A g r o u p of Orientation A s s i s t a n t s wait for f r e s h m e n t o start arriving. Many of the OA's have s u c h a good time w i t h the new s t u d e n t s , they continue with the j o b for the rest of their Hope College years. (PR Photo)

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M e m b e r s of the Orientation staff carry the pieces of a loft into Scott Hall. New students say having people move t h e m is In the best part of the weekend. (PR Photo)

K a r i n Schaefer, Peter Beckman, Victoria Cade, and Becky Ponka help s t u d e n t s move all their b e l o n g i n g s in t o the dorms. (PR Photo)

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Residential Life Staff Developing a comprehensive community and student development program in each residential facility and throughout campus.

K o l l e n Hall Residential Life Staff: A m a n d a Anderson, Rebecca Gerhardstein, Eric Friedman, Travis Halliwill, Liz Freeman, A m y VanAuken.

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V o o r h e e s Hall Residential Life Staff: Matt Sterenberg, A r i n Neucks, Gabriela Decklnga, Angela Tracy, a n d Sara Watkln.

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Resident Life 84


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Gospel Choir Lifting up the name of Jesus Christ our Lord by sharing the gospel through song. I he Hope College Gospel Choir, formally organized in 1992, is under the direction of Darnisa Taylor and Vanessa Allen. Weekly rehearsals enable the choir to learn songs which reflect both contemporary and traditional black gospel styles. Throughout the year, the choir has many opportunities to perform and minister in area churches and on campus. The choir believes that music is a tool God uses to minister His Word to others. The group always invites all who enjoy singing to join them. Afterall, "It's a music thing!" During the year, the Gospel Choir performed at Faith Reformed Church, Harderwyk Reformed Church, Haven Reformed Chruch, at Gospel Fest '96, after school programs, during the Martin /, Luther King, Jr. service, and at the end of the year c o n c e r t . About fortyfive people make up the choir. The So- B a s e player Matt Youngberg and pranos include sax player J o s h u a Quinlan, along with other m e m b e r s of the band, J u l i e are an important part of the choir. Grahmann, Crystal Wright, Shannon Slawson, Anne Barry, Tracy Datte, Jamie Williams, Sonja Rawie, Rebecca Denison, Corine Widi, Brien Hills, Sabrina Kamphuis, Keri Law, Adriana Grain, and Michelle Taylor. The Altos include Amy Hall, Kathryn Nichols, Trudy Castillo, Kelly Martin, Becky Timmer, Emily Ratering, Erin Frazer, Any VanAuken, Becky Menning, Gwen Veldhof, Jeni Cline, Alyssa Vine, and Lisa Moua. Tenors include Gretchen Wolfanger, Sandra Frederico, Sarah Hendrick, Muturi Muriuki, Steve Eicher, Pete Christensen, Melissa Immink, Matthew Kuiper, and Brian Wolthuis. Michael Lemorie, John Vega, Joshua Quinlan, Matt Youngberg, and Vanessa Allen accompany the choir. ^

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C h o i r m e m b e r s have a little f u n after practicing for a big performance. After all the time spent together, the entire g r o u p becomes closer t h r o u g h o u t the year.

G o s p e l Choir Director Darnisha Taylor w a r m s up the choir before practice. She always gets the g r o u p p u m p e d up before any event. Afterall, "It's a music t h i n g ! "

Gospel Choir 85

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Musical Groups

1

Affirming and promoting the understanding that musical experience enriches and ennobles human spirit. I hat music has the power to shape the human mind and soul is a belief well articulated by ancient Greek philosophers. They asserted that music's effect on listeners was so powerful it could transform them into philosophers, poets, even political leaders. So important was the influence of music to these philosophers that they considered its study an essential component in the education of any civilized human being. In short, they asserted that music could make the world a better place; and this is what Hope's Music Department believes too. And this is why the department is strongly committed to increasing the awareness of the importance of fine music to society. The mission statement of the department embodies this belief: "The mission of the Music Department is to affirm and promote the understanding that musical experience enriches and ennobles human spirit." To fulfill this mission, the department adopted two goals: To enable students to become influential leaders in the areas of teaching, performing, and research: and to assist them in becoming professionally successful in their chosen fields. To cultivate an enduring appreciation of musical art and its positive impact on the human condition by providing significant musical experiences to the college community and beyond/

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Taken from the Hope College Catalog.

Chapel Choir S o p r a n o I: Emily A p p l e b y . A n n Barry. M e g a n Hicks, A u b r e y H o w e . A n n e Scheiber. Kristen Sitz, J a n n a W i n n . M a r c y Ziegler. S o p r a n o II; Erika Dianis. L a u r a Pechta, Allyson Pickens, D e b o r a h R i m b o , Lisa S c h r o c k , J e n n i f e r S m i t h , T h e r e s a Spencer, A n g e l a Slrey, Elizabeth Stroh, Kathryn W i n g . A l i o I: Kristina M. Bakker. Mary Boelkins, Elizabeth Carroll, A m a n d a F l o w e r s , Kristin K n i p p e n b e r g , M e g M o r g a n . A m b e r Toth. Julie Zwiesler. A l t o II; Alison J o B e u k e l m a n . M i r i a m Beyer. M i r i a m G a r c e l l a n o . Janet Tate. Kristen T h o m a s o n . Sarah J o W e n t / l o t f . C a r o l y n W i l l i a m s . T e n o r I : GeolY A b b a s . A d a m Barr. T h o m a s G o o d h a r t . Kent Wattleworth. T e n o r I I : JelT A m l o t t e . Kevin D e Y o u n g . Ryan J a n u s . Ryan N a c e . T h o m a s Springer. Andrew Zwyghuizen. B a s s I; R o b e r t Abbott. Daniel Fischer. G r e g o r y Folkert. Daniel M c C u e . Ryan Miller. Dale Rohrbach. Micah Sjoblom. B a s s I I : J a m e s H a m i l t o n . D a n H a n s e n . Peter Houlihan. Peter K u r d / i e l . T h o m a s Poole. J o n a t h a n Pott. A a r o n Vande Wege.

— Musical Cms 86

College C h o r u s S o p r a n o s : Heidi B r o n k e m a . J a c q u e l i n e C h a p m a n . Katharine Fansler, Jill Floyd. Susan G e r m a i n . Collette Harding. J a c q u e l i n e Heisler, D a w n Hollidge, J e n n i f e r Hurley, Kristin Kelley, M a r t h a L a n g m u i r , Tracy M c A r t h u r . L a u r a M c C r a i n e , Kara McGillicuddy, Debbie Paterik, Esther Peterson, Beth Q u i m b y , Maria Helene S e a m a n , Knsten Sitz. Shannon S l a w s o n . C a t h y S t e d m a n , Becky T i m m e r , Julie Tracy, Lara Wagner, Kelly Z w e e r i n g . A l t o s : Emily A t w o o d , Molly Billideau, Carley Boss, Kirstin Foss, Shana Gordner, Megan Gray, Kerry G r o s s , Rachel H a v e m a n , Katie Hilbrecht. Laurie Hutchenreuther, Nikelle J o h n s o n , Julie Klopp, J e n n i f e r Melin, Yvonne O l i p h a n t . Emily Ratering, Ayumi Suzuki. M i c h e l l e Taylor. Marie Tsuji, Sara VanderLind. Kari Vandrese. A i m e e Williams. T e n o r s : G e o f f A b b a s . Eric Elsholz. C h a r l e s Huttar. Michael Meyer. A d a m Paarlberg. N a t h a n Roehl. Todd Schuiling. Ryan Shaw, T h o m a s Springer, S k i p p Yowler. A n d r e w Zwyghuizen. B a s s e s : Jon B e n s o n , Tony Bull, C h r i s Carlson, Dan Hakken, Erik Hiemstra. A n d y H u i s m a n , M a t t h e w Kuiper. Mark L a c h o n c e , J e d e d i a h L e a c h m a n . Daniel M c C u e . Josh Metzler. Jason J. Sanicki. Nathan Schnarr. M a t t h e w Scholtens. Tomislav Skarica. G o r d o n S t e g i n k . Bruce Ter Beek, Michael T h e l e n . L e s l i e W o r k m a n .


Symphonette Violin: Jonathan Chen. Chad Clifford, Tammy Kamphuis. Chikako Katsuyama. Anne Lucas, Mary Lucas. Syeung Mishler. Jennifer Nash. Caroline Olds, Jeffrey VanderLaan. Derek Walvoord, Elizabeth Wesselink. Viola: Mami Kalo, Laune Van Ark, Elizabeth Yared. Cello: Jamie Kempkers, Karen Sepura, Matthew Sleensma. Bass: Matthew McKenzie, Kyle Ritsema. T r o m b o n e : Kolin Redman, Kari Schneider, Anthony Wilkerson. ÂŤ P e r c u s s i o n : Michael Lemorie Flute: Alison Beukelman, Christine Dykstra, Karrie Kropp O b o e : Julie Bulls, Angela Brown C l a r i n e t : Carrie Maines, Karen Paradis Bassoon: Krislina Eden, Juliane Klopp H o r n : Marka Cross. Miriam Garcellano, Sarah Van Harken T r u m p e t : James Hilmert, Sarah Wentzloff

String Orchestra First Violins: Amanda Walvoord, Jon Chen. Tammy Kamphuis. Jennifer Nash Second Violins: Derek Walvoord, Carrie Olds. Sye Mishler Violas: Mami Kalo. Laurie Van Ark Cellos: Robert Ritsema, Jamie Kempkers Bass: Kyle Ritsema

Collegium M u s i c u m S o p r a n o s : Ann Barry. Megan Hicks, Lisa Schrock, Angela Strey. Marcy Ziegler Altos: Alison J. Beukelman. Mary Boelkins. Janet Tale. Sarah J. Went/lolT T e n o r s : Ryan Nace. James Palmer. Jonathan Schakel. Kent Wattleworth Basses: Robert Abbott. James Hamilton. Dan McCue

Musical Grps 87 1 3 D


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Spans 88


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Sports

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Hope College because they believe what is offered will help them develop into the best person possible. While pursuing an academic path is the main focus of most students, some also look beyond the of the classroom and onto the field for athletic goals. Whether intramural or varsity sports, the experience contributes to the S e n i o r Rich Kesteloot gives senior J i m Smith a few w o r d s of m o t i v a t i o n in the last c o u p l e m i n u t e s of the game against Olivet. The Dutch's s t r u g g l e and desire for a w i n in the final game of the season paid off. With only fortyfive s e c o n d s left in the s e c o n d half, a t o u c h d o w n put Hope ahead t o w i n 33-28. It was a g o o d way t o end the final season of the many senior players. (PR Photo)

overall development of the person and teaches a student what can not be learned in a book. Working with others for a common goal and performing at personal best for the good of a team are life-long lessons.

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1996

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Sports 89

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"Th is was a season that produced a thriving positive attitude among the players even In the face of adversity." Travis Williams Team Member

or the first time in 25 years the Dutchmen started off the season with a new head coach. Dean Kreps, a member of the coaching staff since 1986, assumes only the sixth full-time head football coach position at Hope since 1917. Kreps succeeded Ray Smith who retired after the 1994 season, ending the career of the most successful coach in Hope football history. This tradition would prove to be a challenge for the 1995 staff and team from the start of the season. The Wheaton Crusaders stole the first victory from the Dutch, arriving with eighteen returning starters including several with All-American credentials. Hope averaged just 2.1 yards per rush against Wheaton, earning them only one touchdown. With this disappointing season opener behind them, the Dutchmen faced the Tigers of DePauw, both whom were looking for their first win of the season. Hope triumphed last year 19-0, but walked away this year without a win. Not until the third home game against Aurora would Hope earn their first victory, crushing the Spartans 40-6. Brandon Graham put his team on the board in the first quarter with a 32-yard field goal, and would follow with three more touchdowns before the end of the fourth quarter. Travis Williams added a few points near the end of third quarter and Bryan Boodt blocked the only extra point attempt by Aurora. The Dutch flew by the Spartans in the fourth quarter as Steve Oursler received a 30-yard touchdown pass from Jason Bays. Boodt grabbed an Aurora pass late in the fourth quarter for the final six points of the game. Graham carried the ball 33 times for 188 yards and three touchdowns. Bays completed 14 of 21 passes for 179 yards including one touchdown. Most importantly, this game would provide the confidence needed as the team began the MIAA season. But four losses into the MIAA season, Hope's confidence had well run out. With only one game remaining against Olivet, the Dutchmen's last hope was not to finish dead last in the conference. Hope was successful in the competition for the league's number five spot, winning over Olivet 33-28. Doug Gle received the first touchdown pass from Justin Wormmeesker in the first quarter. Wormmeesker also threw the second touchdown pass to Tom Bonnema early in the third quarter. Later in the quarter. Olivet came from behind to take the lead, only to be crushed by the Dutchmen in the fourth quarter. Doug Gle received two more touchdown passes from Brandon Graham and Jason Bays, Bays also made the final touchdown handoff to Nick Holtvluwer with 45 seconds remaining in the game. Trevor Stames made all three successful extra points in Hope's best comeback of the season.

NEW ERA by Anthony Perez

Wheaton De Pauw Wabash Aurora Adrian Albion Alama Kalamazoo Olivet B

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Football 90

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Sophomore running back Brandon Graham set a Hope and MIAA rushing record g a i n i n g 293 yards o n 44 carries in a 33-28 v i c t o r y over Olivet. He also became the only Hope player since 1974 t o rush over 1,000 yards in a season, finishing w i t h 1,139 yards on 220 carries. Left; Senior D o u g Gle congratulates teammate Tom Bonnema after he scored a second touchdown against Olivet. (PR Photos)

Senior J a s o n Bays prepares to throw a pass t o senior receiver Jesse Crotty. Bays proved to be the most valuable quarterback o n the team, completing forty-four passes for nearly 500 yards after five games. (PR Photo)


S u r p r i s e offensive plays by the Crusaders kept the D u t c h m e n on their toes d u r i n g the first game of the season. Paul Rose a n d Travis Buth attempts to hold back Wheaton late in the game after necessary defensive f o r m a t i o n c h a n g e s were made. (PR Photo)

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F r o n t r o w : Paul Rose. Jeremy Norris, Rich Kestelool, Jeff Comfort, Tom Bonnema, Jason Bays. Kevin Valdes, Jim Smith, Nick Ward, Brian Bainbridge, Bob Sikkema, Ron Friel, Jason Hall. Doug Gle. Brad Feenstra, Sean Davis. Jesse Crotty; Second Row: Dave DeHommel, Jeff Kemner, Justin Wormmeester, Nick Holtvluwer, Brandon Graham. Jared Vickers. Todd Homsby. Rick Frens. Kyle DeHorn. Jason Hester. Matt Johnson. Sean Talsma. Pat Collins. Dirk Dewitt. Bryan Boodt; T h i r d Row: Brent Buckingham. Lou Raj. Todd Kolster. Steve Jurgens. Jeff Hondrop Travis Buth. Tim Dykstra. Trevor Stames. Jeremy Whitworth. Aaron Otis. Todd Vasicek. Mark Hiddema. Joel Smith. Kevin Nash. Mike Volkers. Andy Fate; F o u r t h Row : Cam Gatrell. Tom Doran. Marty Maier. Justin Albertson. Travis Halliwill. Tony Petkus. Mike Farmer. Jose Mata, Marty Gravelyn. Corey Monsma. Jeff Hiddema. Mike Smith. Adam Osmun. Chad Barcheski. Adam Labbe, Steve Buyze; Fifth Row: Brian Stears, Jim Walker, Adam Taylor, Calvin Merritt. Troy Davis. Ryan Redinger. Matt Hunwick. Kelly Smith, Terry Troeger, Dave Uyl. Adam Paarlberg, Josh Bruwer. Travis Williams. Troy Davis, Jeremy Rice; Sixth Row : Paul Orr, Tim Hibma. Damon Estep. Steve Paplawski. Ryan Mulder. Greg Vaughn. J.P Buckingham, D J Reybum, Tony Olds. Brandon Doroh. Scott DeKuiper. Matt Luhmann. Mike Mead. Brock Myers. Matt Fewless. Matt Putnam; Seventh Row: Chris VanHuis. Jeremy Heavilin. Tim Alles. Scott Breslin. Brett Kohler. Steve Sanders. Steve Oursler. Case McCalla. Fred Hackett. Randy Ames. Ryan O'Connell. Josh Windeller. Seth Crawley. Brad Bolton. Nik Banchoff. Byron Schartzer; Back Row: Dr. James Lemire, team physician; Dr. Richard Ray, athletic trainer; Rob Royer, Chad Miller. Jason Gibbs, student assistants; Stuart F n t / . George Kraft, assistant coaches. Dean Kreps. head coach; Michael Ricketts, defensive coordinator; Jim VanderMeer, Doug Smith, Tom Cassell, assistant coaches; Chi Le. student manager. Gordon VanderYacht. equipment manager

Football 91

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"The team enjoys everything about the season, but being able to attend the final four with the basketball team and be a part of that experience was really exciting."

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Laura Bonnema Team Member

ave you ever wondered who gets a crowd on their feet again once they have been slammed down in their seats by another team's success? Only through hard work and a deep commitment to Hope's sports does the cheerleading squad manage to bring the crowd to their feet time and time again. Hope's cheer team prides itself on having kept its squad coed for such a long time. Most schools in the MIAA don't have a squad, let alone one that is coed. It has been a very successful year for the Dutch. Each year, the team attends a summer camp where they acquire new skills and demonstrate what they have learned. This summer the camp was held at the University of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. The squad placed fourth for division II schools in the competition. Placing so high against large school squads demonstrates the talent and ability present in Hope's cheerleaders as well as providing confidence for the team. During the football season, the squad was led by Captain Tom Poole. The team practiced two hours each day, perfecting stunts and cheers in front of the Dow Center. The team cheered at all home games and traveled with the team to lend support at away games. Second semester brought some new faces to the squad. "We really are a new team this semester," said Captain Tyler Smith. Demands on the cheerleaders for basketball are much the same as for football. Before each game, the squad practiced their stunts and showed off their talents to the crowd. This routine excited the crowd for the game ahead. But it isn't always this easy to get the crowd warmed up. Sometimes the cheer squad performs at their utmost just to get a mild roar from the people in the stands. The crowds enthusiasm changes dramatically during each game. "It depends on the game really. The crowd is more intense if the score is close than if we are blowing them away by thirty points," said Smith. In addition to keeping the crowd excited at the games, the squad puts on a clinic for high school cheerleaders. Approximately 600 students from the surrounding areas come to a day long clinic to improve their own skills. Sessions in dance, cheer, and stunts are offered throughout the day. In the evening, the squads enter a competition performing a cheer they used for their own crowds at home, and also one they learned that day from Hope's squad. The next time the crowd is yelling in response to a cheer, remember who brought out this excitement. The Hope College cheerleaders.

SPIRIT OF HOPE by Jeanette Petkus

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Cheerleading 92

Cheerleaders (Top t o Bottom) Karen Cabansag, Amy Goorhouse, Laura McKee, Chris Danapilis, Curtis Beekman, a n d Dave Muir f o r m a pyramid to get the crowd pumped-up at a h o m e basketball game. W i t h a very c l o s e score, it is important for the cheerleaders t o get the fans loud in s u p p o r t of their team. Left: Sophomore Laura Bonnema gets the fans t o respond to a chant started by the squad. (PR Photos)

Sophomore Clint Moore uses a megaphone to make the cheers louder in the o u t d o o r football stadium. The cheerleaders enjoy the f r e e d o m and r o o m of being able to cheer o u t d o o r s at the football games. (PR Photo)


Junior Tyler Smith supports Amy Goorhouse in a s i n g l e a r m lift. The cheer team uses many stunts and gymnastics in their performances to keep the crowd on their toes throughout the games. (PR P h o t o )

F r o n t R o w : A m y G o o r h o u s e , C a s e y Slayton, A m y G r a s m a n . Julie H o l w e r d a ; M i d d l e R o w : coach M a x i n e DeBruyn, Karen Cabansag, Laura McKee, Laura Bonnema, Jennifer Smith, Angela Jennings, coach Wes W o o l e y ; B a c k R o w : C u r t i s B e e k m a n , D a v e M u i r , C l i n t M o o r e , C h r i s D a n a p i l i s , Tyler S m i t h , T o m P o o l e .

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Hoezee and sophomore Kelly Etheridge prepare their offensive s t r a t e g y as they wait

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named to the AllMIAA first team for her outstanding season p l a y . (PR Photo)

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F r o n t R o w : Jenny Petscher. Leianne Biehl. Michelle W e r k m a n . Beth Hoezee, J P. Plummer, A m i e Clifton: M i d d l e R o w : Becky Skutt. Jean Kegerreis, Jill Fredrickson. Elizabeth DeHaan, Becky Schmidt. C h n s t i e Eding, Kristi Langland. Jenifer Thorn, Karla Welters: B a c k R o w : Amy Petty, Jenny Oosting, Rachel Postmus. Abby Nienhuis, Kelly Etheridge. Emily Bakker. Lisa Larzelere.

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ope's volleyball team finished the season with a 25-10 overall record. This is the best finish they have had in the last six years; beating last year's record of 21-11. For the fourth year, Karla Wolters has lended her abilities as a coach to the Lady Dutch and led them through another successful season. The team had a wonderful season, finishing second in the MIAA with a 9-3 league record, losing twice to Kalamazoo, and once to Calvin College. The only time Hope played out five full consecutive games in the MIAA season was during their first matchup with Calvin. Both teams kept each other on their toes throughout the night. Hope took the first game 15-8. Calvin made a strong comeback, winning the second game 15-17. Hope again returned energetic during the third game with a 15-10 point match, bringing the evening to 2-1 in Hope's favor. Calvin counteracted with strategy and skill to bring the fourth game to a close at 12-15. With the match tied 2-2, Hope needed to win the fifth game to defeat the Calvin team. Having already played four strenuous games, the team needed to find the desire within themselves to come out on top. The Dutch ended the evening with a 15-11 victory in the last game. In addition to a successful season, the Dutch were re-

"We had a lot of confidence. We won our first rally scoring game of the year and ever since that we felt like we owned rally games." Karla Wolters Coach

SETTING GOALS

Sophomores Becky Schmidt and Liz DeHaan j u m p up for a block against Adrian. Great defense by the Dutch contributed t o their outstanding second place season f i n i s h at 2510. Right: Schmidt prepares t o spike the ball against Adrian and w i n the set. She was named to the MIAA s e c o n d allconference team. (PR Photo)

warded w i t h many individual honors. For the first time since 1989, Hope boasted of an All-Region honoree. Outside hitter, Emily Bakker is one of only three women ever to receive this honor in Hope's history. Holly Vandenberg last earned this title in 1986 and each year following through 1989. Bakker was one of five players honored from the MIAA. The regional team to which Bakker was recognized consists of NCAA Division III players from colleges in Michigan, Indiana, Ohio, and Pennsylvania. In addition to being named to the regional team, Bakker was surprisingly placed only on the second team All-MIAA team. Sophomore Becky Schmidt joined her teammate in this honor. Two other Hope players were named to the first team. Senior, Michelle Werkman was named to the first team for the third year. Senior Captain, Beth Hoezee, enjoyed her second year being named to the team. With another outstanding season behind them, including various individual recognitions, Hope's volleyball team will be a tough contender in the title for MIAA champions next year.

by Jeanette Petkus

Albion Kalamazoo Alma Calvin Olivet Adrian Kalamazoo Albion Calvin Alma Olivet Adrian

0-3 3-0 1-3 1-4 0-3 0-3 3-0 0-3 3-0 1-3 1-3 0-3 Volleyball 95

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"This year's team was well balanced throughout which made everything from practice to games fun. I've never played with such a diverse team talent wise."

'T

1

he men s soccer team was turning heads again this year, leaving their mark in Hope history. A 15-2-1 season record won the Dutch their second consecutive MIAA championship and a number five ranking in the ISAA Division Three Soccer Poll. The season got off to a rough start, loosing to national champs Methodist College at the Ohio Wesleyan Tournament in September. But with this season opener behind them, the team remaind undefeated for fifteen consecutive g a m e s , including nine shutout wins. A difficult win against Alma moved Hope in to first place in the MIAA halfway through the season. Dutchman Josh Sheldon kicked the first goal of the game with 24:14 left in the first half. Alma reclaimed that point three minutes later and tied the game at 1 -1. Throughout the rest of the game there were few shots by either team. Hope attempted eight shots, but only two sliped past Alma. The second goal by the Dutch against came late in the

Jason Currie Team Member

STILL ON TOP

by Anthony Perez

Calvin Adrian Albion Alma Kalamazoo Olivet Calvin Adrian Albion Alma Kalamazoo Olivet w

.

Soccer 96

2 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 2 0

2 6 2 2 4 5 3 2 6 2 0 5

game with 5:09 left to play. Blair Richards' winning goal was his first season and career goal at Hope. "The ball bounced off (Ruiters) chest after my first shot and somehow it bounced back to me and somehow I got it over his legs. It was sittin' right there. (John) Conlon hit it to him first. He hit it into the keeper and it came back to me," Richards explained. Hope goalie Aaron Angeli saved two shots from Alma and helped hold the final score of the game at 2-1. The eighteen returning lettermen made this a season to remember. Consistent scoring by team members kept Hope on the board. Ten players scored two or more goals throughout the season and junior forward Geoff Rodocker and senior forward Paul Rosenbrook each scored eleven goals. The Dutch finished the season with a 52-13 scoring record. This year's championship marks the third for Coach Steve Smith in his six years with the team. His players were recognized throughout the MIAA and the nation. Nine members were chosen for the coach's all-conference team. Since the start of the All-MIAA program, this is the first time Hope has seen so many players receive this recognition. Junior John Conlon earned the title of most valuable player in the MIAA and a first team placing on the 1995 All-MIAA Soccer Team along with Angeli, Rosenbrook. Rodocker, Tyler Williams, and Jason Currie.

S e n i o r full back Tyler Williams r u n s for the ball after a hard tackle against Calvin College by teammate John Conlon. Both Williams and C o n l o n received allregion honors, being voted t o the NSCAA D i v i s i o n III Mideast Team. The team represents colleges in Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, a n d Ohio. Lett: Sophomore back Chris Dombrowski searches the field t o make his next pass. (PR Photos) F orward Paul Rosenbrook w a t c h e s the ball after winning a hard-fought header. Behind, Josh Sheldon prepares for Calvin to regain c o n t r o l of the ball. (PR Photo)


P a u l R o s e n b r o o k is d i s a p o i n t e d after a s c o r i n g o p p o r t u n i t y is b l o c k e d b y Kalamazoo College. Hope d e f e a t e d t h e H o r n e t s in t h i s first match-up, but they would become the only t e a m in t h e M I A A t o d e f e a t t h e D u t c h . (PR P h o t o )

*

F r o n t R o w : Ryan Groulx, Steven Coy, Chris Riker, Andrew Dressier, Chris Molidor, Dwayne Pabisz, Greg Kobylak, Jeremy Luhmann, Lance Pellow; M i d d l e R o w : Chris Dombrowski, Jim Becher, Aaron Dean, Matt Herriman. Mark DeFeyter, coach Steve Smith, Lee Schopp, Aaron Angeli, Kevin Lewis, RJ. Huizenga, Blair Richards; B a c k R o w : Josh Meersma, Geoff Rodocker, John Conlon, Paul Rosenbrook, Josh Sheldon, Tyler Williams, Jason Currie, Nathan Kronewetter, Zack Jonker. George Landolt.

Soccer 97

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w

" T h is

was the first year that there were no 'cut and dry' starters. We could count on everybody who went in."

hether it was because of excellent comer kicks, great head balls, or just strong talent, the women's soccer team rightfully earned their fourth place ranking in the MIAA. The Lady Dutch had five of their six MIAA wins at home on their own field. The first victorious home game of the season was against Wheaton College. The first scoring opportunity for Hope came less than six minutes into the first half when freshman Lindsay Williams headed a ball into the goal. Tina Gill earned the assist for that goal with a corner kick to her teammate. Hope's second goal of the game came by means of Tracy Phelps also with an assist from Gill. Wheaton's only goal of the game came as the clock was winding down late in the first half, ending the game 2-1 in Hope's favor. Another success story for the team was their second match-up with Alma. The day was cold and rainy, but these conditions made the victory that much more meaningful. The only score of the game belonged to Hope's team captain, Kim Nolan. "It was great, Kim cut through two defenders. One girl tripped her, and they all fell to the ground. Kim's shot landed perfectly in the corner of the goal. It was so

T T:

Kim Nolan Team Captain

Senior team captain K i m Nolan k i c k s the ball into the net against Adrian, scoring one of the three p o i n t s that would win the game for the Lady Dutch. Left: Lauren O ' D o w d and Heidi Smithers maneuver the ball t o away f r o m their opponents so a scoring attempt can be made. (PR Photos)

BUILDING YEARS by Jeanette Petkus

Calvin Adrian Albion Alma Kalamazoo Olivet Calvin Adrian Albion Alma Kalamazoo Olivet 1 3 0

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cold and rainy, and Kim j u s t come up off the ground in victory, " recalls teammate Gretchen Schoon. The Lady Dutch also had the luxury of practicing new strategies in games without the threat of defeat. The team beat Olivet in both games, winning 8-0 in their first match and 8-1 during their second meeting. During the first game, the entire team had an opportunity for quality time out on the field. "We split the team in two for this game. The upper classmen played the first half, and the freshmen played the second half. Both groups played really well," said Schoon. The second game against Olivet was pretty much the same story. "It was a fun game, everybody played and passed well," said Nolan. With a repeat of the Wheaton game, Williams again scored off a corner kick within the first four minutes of the first half. This goal was followed by three others against Olivet within the first twenty minutes. Looking back on the season. Coach Stein Slette was very impressed with his team. "The freshmen have come out and played well, but just like the rest of the team, they have struggled at times as well. They have done a fine job for us, and with only three seniors, we are looking forward to next year." ^

Teammates congratulate Linsay Williams on her goal which became the winning point for the Lady Dutch against Kalamazoo. This w i n was the first of the season against the undefeated Hornets and the also the first ever for Hope College against the team. (PR Photo)


J u n i o r Tracy Phelps steels c o n t r o l of the ball f r o m A l b i o n in t h e i r s e c o n d match with the Lady Brits. Great d e f e n s e by Hope held back Albion but o f f e n s e w a s t h e n a m e of the game and their o p p o n e n t s d o m i n a t e d . (PR Photo)

m F r o n t R o w : Susan Looman, Krista Brewer, Stephanie Stiegler, Leah McAlpine. Ceci LaBarge, Carrie LaBarge; M i d d l e R o w : Lisa Knott, Heather Huizing, Trystin Kleiman, Trish Voss, Kim Nolan, Mari Kissinger, Tina Gill, Becky Karrow, Kathryn Nichols, Tracy Phelps; B a c k R o w : coach Scott Modisher, Heidi Smithers, Lauren O Dowd, Beth Hopma, Lindsay Matheny, Shelly Kuyers, Meg Hopkins, Mimi Wacker, Gretchen Schoon, assistant coach Anne Irwin. Not pictured are Melody Morscheck and Lindsay Williams.

Soccer 99

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"We had a lot of talent, but couldn't get everyone playing strongly at once. With everyone back next season we plan to contend for the league championship."

play for the love," said returning letterman Jay Prasad. This season, though it presented challenges to the youngest team in the M1AA, provided them with an opportunity to hit the links and indulge in their love. Led by fifth-year coach Bob Ebels, Hope's four freshman and five sophomores finished fourth in the conference. Facing an older and more experienced field, the Dutch finished in the middle of the standings, gaining valuable experience in each of their seven tournaments. The team's strongest finish came in their first outing. The Dutchmen finished second, only eight strokes behind the eventual MIAA champions. Olivet. Continuing favorably for the rest of the season, the team finished in third or fourth place in five of six tournaments. The lack of experience held by Hope golfers did not signal a lack of leadership. At a level where most collegiate golfers are learning from their older teammates, sophomore Kevin Freng stepped forward to lead his team. "As captain," explained Freng, "1 tried to set a good example for the freshmen." Finding success in this mission. his leadership and teaching proved invaluable to the young team. A lack of experience also does not signal a lack of ability. Freshman Robert Wager shone in his first season of collegiate golf. He not only captured the top spot on the team with an average of 79.1 strokes per tournament, his sixth place conference finish earned him the honor of being named to the First All-MIAA Team. The future

"W

Kevin Freng Team Captain

PARING UP by Amanda Black

Duck Lake Bedford Valley Pine River Winding Creek Forrest Hills Lanawee Kalamazoo 13l)

Golfl00

2 (390) 3(421) 4(413) 3 (396) 6 (437) 4(411) 4(416)

looks bright for this freshman sensation. A lack of experience does not signal a lack of effort either. Hope finished the year with a record identical to 1994. but this year was considerably more of a team effort. While Wager led the team, four other golfers finished among the leaders of the conference. Captain Kevin Freng averaged 82.4 strokes per tournament, finishing fourteenth. Brian Formsma ended the season in twentieth place with his 83.9 stroke average. Finally, Prasad took twenty-sixth place with his 85 stroke average. The team earned their finish together, learning from their struggles. Prasad explained why their struggles were not in vain. "We learned a lot about each other through the tough times." This season of rebuilding taught the team to look forward to the future. "We are dedicated to winning the conference next year, not only for us and the school, but for Coach Ebels, who deserves a winner," said Prasad. As experience is gained, the leadership, ability, and effort of the team will continue to be factors contributing to a bright future.

F reshman sensation Robert Wager concentrates on his form in order to sink a putt. Wagner lead the Dutch with an average of 79.1 strokes per tournament. Left: Bryan Fix completes a putt on the green at Hope's home course, Winding Creek Golf Club. (PR Photos)


O o p h o m o r e Bryan Fix carefully measures the perfect angle for his shot. Playing in every team t o u r n a m e n t , he f i n i s h e d the season w i t h a s t r o n g 83 stroke average. (PR Photo)

F r o n t r o w : Mike McCune, R o b e n Wager, Jeff Bays, Pete Te WinkJe; B a c k R o w : Bryan Fix, Kevin Freng, Bryan Formsma, Adam Henkel, Jay Prasad, and coach Robert Ebels

Golf 101

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F r e s h m a n Melody O o n k practices her s w i n g at the team's h o m e c o u r s e j u s t o u t s i d e of Holland. Having many freshmen an the team, e x p e c t a t i o n s are h i g h for w i n n i n g an MIAA c h a m p i o n s h i p d o w n the road. (PR Photo)

l . e f t to K i u h t : Melody O o n k . Gina Pellerito. Elizabeth Yared. Anne Colenbrander, Nancy K e n n e d v Teresa Musselman. and coach Jane Holman

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w Freshman Teresa Musselman attempts to sink the ball on the eighth hole. Musselman said the closeness of the team exceeded her expectations. "I was surprised how close everyone was. I guess having only six golfers and everyone attending each match helped." Right: Anne Colenbrander golfed a great game at the

ith only two returning players. Hope's golf team took second place again this year behind Alma College. Golf became an intercollegiate sport in 1991 and Hope's teams were MIAA champions from 1991-1993. For the past five years, the lady golfers have proven themselves season after season. The 1995 team consisted of two juniors and four freshman. Freshman sensation. Gina Pellerito, started strong from the beginning. In fact, she broke a course record on her first time out. In the first tournament hosted by Olivet, Pellerito completed the course with eighty-two strokes. The old record of eighty-three strokes was held by Hope's Lisa Strover in 1993. Pellerito's closest competition in the tournament finished only one stroke behind her. Pellerito also captured the winning medal in the second tournament of the season, hosted by MIAA champions Alma College. Pellerito finished the day in eightyfour strokes, three strokes ahead of Cathy Curley from Alma who finished second. "I was really excited, I was really overwhelmed. It was nice coming in as a freshman because there is no pressure. After you do really good, it is a lot easier to get nervous, because the pressure is on then," commented Pellerito. Nancy Kennedy also played a key role on the squad. In the first four tournaments, she ranked third or fourth each time. In the fifth tournament, she placed second, only four strokes behind the leader. The team finished the year as strong as they had b e -

"I was really nervous about how well we would perform in the conference, but the four freshmen proved to be a great asset. Next year, I believe that we have a strong chance to become MIAA champions!" Nancy Kennedy Team Captain

gun.

STROKE AHEAD Creek tournament,

finishing

In the ' a s t

tour-

second. (PR

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Kennedy and Anne Colenbrander tied for the second and third place spots with ninety-two strokes each. The Dutch were also rewarded by placing team members on the All-MIAA teams. All conference teams in golf consist of the top twelve players in the conference. The top six are placed on the first team, and the following six on the second team. Hope placed three players between these two teams. Pellerito finished fourth in the conference with a season total of 630 strokes, giving her a spot on the first team. Kennedy finished seventh, giving her the leading spot on the second team. The two previous years, Kennedy placed on the first team. Kennedy finished her third season with 641 strokes. Freshman. Liz Yared also placed on the second team with 676 strokes for the season.

by Jeanette Petkus

Marshall Pine River Grand Rapids Tomac Woods Lenawee Kalamazoo Winding Creek

2 (373) 2 (358) 3 (382) 2 (356) 2 (385) 2 (370) 2 (376)

coif IDS - 7 3 0


"The attitude, dedication, and cohesiveness of the team was the best of any year that I have seen. This squad earned the respect of coaches around the region..."

tarting out the season with a solid core of returning runners, the cross country team had outstanding finishes in most meets and a second place MIAA final standing. The team started out the season with a strong finish at the Hope Invitational, held in Holland at Beechwood Reformed Church. Twenty-three runners hit the grass for a second place finish, just behind Siena Heights College. Senior team captain Erik Carpenter finished seventh, with Dan Bannink only seconds behind. Carpenter's finish time of 25:52 beat his personal best record of 26:06 last year. All members of the team achieved outstanding or personal best times and coach Mark Northuis got a good idea of where his team stood. Later in the season, the success and strength of the team was still showing. At the League Jamboree held at Calvin College, the team finished in second place behind the meet's host. Members of Hope's team destroyed Calvin's domination of the race, passing many of the Knight's better runners. This race demonstrated the talent the Dutch possessed. "I couldn't have been more pleased with the development of this year's team," commented Eric Carpenter. The twenty-fifth annual Corn Cob race relieved the stress of the many meets and invitationals. The race was held with the women's cross country team near the football stadium in Smallenberg Park. Nineteen co-ed pairs of runners competed in the race which used a com cob baton to pass between runners. In the end, sophomore Jeremy Bogard and senior partner Laurel Plotzke won the race, only ten seconds ahead of the second place team.

Eric Carpenter Team Captain

FAST PACE by Anthony Perez

Hope

Meet

Hope Invitational 2nd G.L. Colleges Inv. 3rd MIAA Jamboree 2nd Athletics North Inv. 1st Roadrunner Inv. 6th Jim Drews Inv. 1st MIAA Jamboree 2nd MIAA Champshps. 2nd NCAA Great Lakes Regional Meet 9th ~J30s

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Plotzke also won the race as freshman, but said the competition was a little more intense this year. After the friendly competition of the Com Cob race, the pressure was back on. The team headed to the NCAA Great Lakes regional meet hosted by Alma College, and faced arctic weather hosted by mother nature. A wind chill below thirty degrees, cold wind gusts, slush, and ice were elements the Dutch had to battle in addition to runners. Sophomore Jesse Graf was rushed to the hospital along with four other runners from rival teams to treat apparent hypothermia. In an Anchor interview Graf said, "My body lost control and my core temp needed to be raised." Despite the gruesome conditions, many runners had good finishes. Eric Carpenter finished twelfth with Dan Bannink, Mike Cranmer, Tim Franklyn, Jeremy Bogard. and Matt Lappenga close behind.

S e n i o r Eric Carpenter and junior Dan Bannink lead the pack of runners at the Hope College Invitational. Carpenter finished 45th out of 184 runners at the NCAA Division III championships and also earned All-MIAA first team recognition. Bannink was also recognized with an AllMIAA second team nomination. Left: Sophomore Jesse Graf competes at the MIAA Jamboree. (PR Photos)

Josh Zondervan nears the end of the MIAA Jamboree race. The Dutch finished the race in second place, just behind rival Calvin College. (PR Photo)


i

S o p h o m o r e Aaron Vande Wege breaks through a g r o u p of rival r u n n e r s d u r i n g the H o p e Invitat i o n a l h e l d at B e e c h w o o d b y t h e Bay. H o p e f i n i s h e d s e c o n d o u t of f i v e t e a m s p a r t i c i p a t i n g in t h e race.

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F r o n t R o w : Joel N e m m e s , Jon Reeves. D a n Bannink. Richard Maples, Eric Carpenter, Chad N y k a m p , Dale Furst; S e c o n d R o w : Bryan VanHaitsma, Tim Franklyn, Matt Lappenga, Joe Fritsch, Mike Cranmer, Jesse Graf, David Schrier, Josh Zondervan; T h i r d R o w : C o a c h M a r k Northuis, Ryan Shaw, J e r e m y Bogard, Aaron Vande Wege, Ryan Sullivan, Tom Horling, Josh Metzler, Scott Derby.

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"...Fears about bonding of such a large freshmen group with the rest of the team completely disappeared as we formed friendships stronger than any win or loss." Marie Matchett Team Co-captain

ith spirits high and running shoes tied, the women's cross country team hit the road for what would turn out to be a successful season. With just under half the team being freshmen, it was not clear how the team would perform and bond. Fears quickly faded as the team became a tight knit group. Hope hosted the first MIAA Jamboree on September 23. Hope finished with 42 points, second to Calvin who ended the race with 24 points. Co-captain Marie Matchett led the team with a time of 19:30. Placing fourth behind Matchett was sophomore Ellen Schultz. Schultz came in eleven seconds behind her teammate with a time of 19:41. Also placing in the top five was co-captain Michelle Neel with a time of 19:49. The MIAA championships proved to be a very competitive day for the team. Hope again finished second behind Calvin with a score of forty. Hope's top finisher was Matchett who placed third with a time of 18:58, only eight seconds behind the leader. Again placing in the top five were Schultz and Neel with times of 19:09 and 19:19 respectively. The NCAA regional meet was the most difficult race or the year. The team had both tough competition and of severe weather to battle. Hope finished fifth in the meet which was hosted by Alma. The weather conditions included a wind chill temperature below twenty degrees, and the course buried under six inches of slush and ice. Runners were sent to the hospital for hypothermia and other injuries caused by the extreme cold. "I tried to remember that the weather was the same for everyone. I kept telling mys e l f , ' Y o u can make it through this," said Schultz. Hope placed four runners on the All-MIAA teams. Matchett, Neel, and Schultz each secured a place on the first team, while Jennifer Passcher was named to the second team. In addition to the hard work that goes into every meet, the cross country team did manage to lighten up the mood for the annual Com Cob Relay. The Cob race is a competition between pairs of cross country runners. One male and one female make up a team. The day starts with a two mile warm-up before the race. The race consists of twelve laps around the park and the football stadium. The women run 650 meters around the park, and then pass the baton (cob of com) to the men who run 1.000 meters around the stadium and park. The winners this year were sophomore Jeremy Bogard. and senior Laurel Plotzke.

ON THE RUN

by Jeanette Petkus

Meet

Hope

Hope Invitational 1st G.L. Colleges Inv. 1st 2nd MIAA Jamboree Athletics North Inv. 2nd Roadrunner Inv. 3rd Tori Neubauer Inv. 1st MIAA Jamboree 2nd MIAA Finals 2nd NCAA Great Lakes Regional Meet 5th / J O

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Pacing each other as a team, Hope runners, Cindy Bannink, Katie Stanger, Sarah Rop, and Molly Griebe keep pushing t h r o u g h the rest of the competition t o take the lead at the Great Lakes Colleges Invitational. The team ended the race w i t h a first place finish. Left: Freshman Ann Byland keeps a s t r o n g pace in first place at the Hope Invitational. (PR Photos)

A s the g u n is fired, the team makes a quick start t o ensure a t o p place f i n i s h in the race. The Lady Dutch ran s t r o n g each race t o secure second place in the MIAA. (PR Photo)


lifi

i Jenny Passchier, Jannah Thompson, and Becky Timmer run hard for a strong f i n i s h at t h e final invitational race of t h e y e a r . (PR Photo)

: .-v..

t

F r o n t R o w : R e b e c c a Timmer, Mary R o u s h , Laurel Plotzke, Marie Matchette, C y n t h i a Bannink, Tien Do, Ellen Schultz; M i d d l e R o w : Audra Martin, Michelle K n a u f f , J a n n a h T h o m p s o n , A n n Byland, Corrine Cravotta, T a m m y B o u w e n s , Sarah Rop, Sarah C a r p e n ter, Sarah Flegel; B a c k R o w : Michelle Neel, Stacy B r o w n , Erin Shiel, J e n n i f e r Passchier, Katie Stanger, Molly Griebe, M e g a n Powers, Carrie Langstraat, Susan VanderWeide, Ellen Byland, and C o a c h M a r k Northuis.

(ross C 'ountn 107 yf


"I

I am so proud of my team for its effort, passion, will to win, and industriousness to hang together to execute the plan we've had all year." Glenn Van Wieren Coach

T

1

he Dutchmen deserve respect not just from fans, but finally from the rest of the nation. For years Hope College's Men's basketball team has dominated MIAA and other regular season foes with little trouble at all. It is in the NCAA tournament, however, that the Dutchmen have met their match. Throughout the ninety plus year history of the basketball program at Hope, only one has the team gone further than the second round. Not only did they get past the second round of the tournament this season, they went all the way to the final four in Salem, Va., only to get just barely snuffed by Rowan College of New Jersey 100-93. After a 22-4 season the Dutchmen hosted the first two rounds of the tournament in the Dow Center on Thursday February 29, and Saturday, March 2 against Kalamazoo College and John Carroll University respectively. After Hope got through the tough win over feisty Kalamazoo, the rest of the tournament was easy as pie. The Hornets, who gave Hope their only loss of the MIAA season, was in control of the tempo almost the

HOPE DREAM TEAM by Glyn Williams

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Basketball 108

entire game, and as anyone can tell you, he who controls the tempo will control the win. That saying is true, with a clause in it that reads, just as long as the one controlling the tempo makes the right plays in the clutch situation. With a 1:24 left to play in the game, it was all tied up at 58 after a couple important free throws from Marc Whitford. Hope hero Joel Holstege then hit one of two free throws, to put the Dutchmen up 59-58 with 1:08 left until the buzzer sounds. K-Zoo used about seventeen seconds of the clock to score a two point basket, putting them ahead and making the crowd a little nervous. After Holstege scored a finger roll to put the Dutchmen back up on top, the Hornets somehow managed to waste about thirty seconds before they scored again, notching the numbers at 62-61 Hornets favor. That gave Hope 10.1 seconds, just the time they needed to get one last shot off to win the game. But who do you go to? Duane Bosma who led the MIAA in both scoring and rebounding? No, for he was being outplayed by K-Zoo ace Jeremy Cole in the paint. (Continued on page 144)

I n the first game of the MIAA tournament, Duane Bosma reaches up t o score against Albion. At the e n d of the season, B o s m a lead the MIAA in individual scoring, free t h r o w shooting, and rebounding. The graduating senior was also v o t e d t o the AllMIAA First Team for the f o u r t h consecutive t i m e in his basketball career at Hope College. Left: Joel Holstege s h o o t s for two points against Calvin College in their first m a t c h - u p of the season. (PR Photos)

Teammates and fans rush o n t o the c o u r t t o congratulate sophomore Joel Holstege on his gamewinning basket against Kalamazoo College. Holstege shot the basket with four s e c o n d s left in the game and w o n the game 65-62. (PR Photo)


S o p h o m o r e sensation Kris Merritt o n the offense against Kalamazoo College. The Hope forward was named to the All-MIAA S e c o n d Team for his o u t s t a n d i n g free t h r o w i n g , r e b o u n d i n g , a n d b l o c k i n g . (PR Photo)

F r o n t R o w : David Meulenberg, Pat Stegeman, Marc Whitford, Duane Bosma, Tom Gortsema. Jeff Van Fossan, Chris Vander Slice, Kris Merritt; B a c k R o w : assistant coach Matt Neil, student assistant coach Tim Schoonveld, Kevin Britnell. Joe Davelaar, Joel Hostege, Jason Vander Woude, Dan Van Hekken, Matt Brown, Matt Spencer, assistant coach Tom Davelaar. head coach Glenn Van Wieren.

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he overall record of the women's basketball team isn't spectacular, and it surly doesn't reflect the intensity with which the team played during each game. The team had a solid playing season reinforced by personal achievements within the M1AA. The Lady Dutch's preseason was a rough time for the team. "Eight of our games we played, we were blatant underdogs. We lost those, we lost some we should have lost, and we lost some that we should have won," said third year coach Todd Gugino. As soon as league games came around, the team took a turn in a new direction. Four of the first five MIAA games were victories for the Lady Dutch. Hope's fourth win in this streak was against Adrian, winning 58-46. This was a hard win which was battled for during every minute of the game. With just over five minutes left in the first half, Hope was behind 18-12. After two additional minutes of play, Adrian closed the gap bringing the score to 2119. A d r i a n kept pushing their talent to tie up the game with just 1:36 left in the half. After t w o f r e e throws by cocaptain K a r i Nysse, the Dutch closed the half with a score of 23-21. The second half was less of a battle and the Lady Dutch's talent really came out, especially at the free-throw line. Hope was on the road to victory once again. Hope also showed their skill as a team during their second match-up with Albion. The Lady Dutch had the lead early in the first half with a 26-8 score. Albion, using teamwork and accurate shooting, managed to bring the score to 47-30 by halftime. The second half played much like the first. With only five minutes remaining on the clock, Albion once again closed the large gap Hope had created earlier, but the Lady Dutch still managed to end the game with a score of 75-65. Amy Meyers contributed significantly to the outcome. With only twenty minutes of playing time, Meyers scored eighteen points, averaging just less than one point a minute. Awards for the Lady Dutch were plentiful in the 1996 season. Nysse was named to the second team All-MI AA, while Meyers. Dana Smith, and LisaTimmer all received honorable mentions. In addition to her award, Nysse also broke two records during the season. In Hope's first game with Albion, Nysse scored forty-two points, establishing a new single game record in both Hope College and MIAA history. She also broke another Hope and MIAA record by making sixteen of eighteen free throws in the same game. ^

SOLID GAME by Amanda Black

Alma 67 38 Albion 70 74 Olivet 55 97 Kalamazoo 53 62 Adrian 46 58 Calvin 82 44 Alma 59 52 Albion 65 75 Olivet 47 97 Kalamazoo 57 61 Adrian 84 69 Calvin 54 45 MIAA Tournament 87 90 Albion Calvin 59 42 1 3 0

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Shooting for t w o points, j u n i o r Lisa Timmer is assisted by senior Kari Nysse. Nysse was o n e of the t o p five individual scorers and n u m b e r one in free throw s h o o t i n g in the MIAA. She also finished s i x t h in rebounds. Left: Lisa Timmer on the offense against Adrian College. Timmer was one of the t o p ten players in rebounds a n d steals. She placed n u m b e r one in s h o t s blocked. (PR Photos)

Head c o a c h Tod Gugino plans a last minute strategy for a close game against Albion. The Lady Dutch pulled t h r o u g h in the e n d t o w i n 74-70. (PR Photo)


S o p h o m o r e guard Christie Eding attempts to dribble past A l b i o n and attempt a shot. The Lady Dutch defeated t h e B r i t o n s In b o t h g a m e s of t h e r e g u l a r s e a s o n a n d a g a i n in t h e f i r s t r o u n d o f t h e M I A A T o u r n a m e n t . (PR P h o t o )

1 F i r s t R o w : Christie Eding, Johanna LaGore, Gina Webster, Kari Nysse, Danielle Hop, Lisa Timmer, Jennifer Costing, Allison VanLonkhuyzen, Dori Freeland; B a c k R o w : manager Darius Randall, student assistant A n n Neucks, head coach Tod Guigino, Dana Smith, Tara Porter, Amy Meyers, Shelly Kuyers, junior varsity coach Wayne Tanis, junior varsity assistant coach Sarah LaGore, varsity assistant coach Karen Bastien,

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"The team is as close as any group of guys on campus. We become a family when we swim together."

H

Jens Milobinski Team Captain

itting the water, the Dutch brought more than just swimming ability to the pool. They brought with them experience, a commitment to excellence. poise, maturity and a spirit of camaraderie. The team was well balanced with experienced fourth year swimmers, enthusiastic first year swimmers, and all those in between. As senior captain Jens Milobinski asserts, "I feel that the success of this season was due to the closeness of our team and our incredible coaching staff. "

With the only MIAA loss to the eventual champions, Kalamazoo, the 3-1 finish gave the Dutch a second place finish in the MIAA. In tournaments, the Dutch fared equally well or better, taking second place in the Grand Valley Diving Triangular, the Wheaton Invitational, and the Wabash Diving Invitational. The Dutch captured first place in the Wheaton Quadrangular. The spectacular finishes this season came from a well-balanced, hard working team. The success of the team is also seen in the honors bestowed on them. Hope had four swimmers named to the All-MIAA team. Senior Keith Nykamp received his

FAMILY TIES by Amanda Black

| i Alma 91 120 Grand Valley 93 146 Calvin 83 123 Kalamazoo 135 105 Albion 74 101 Oakland 152 83 Xavier 87 116 I 3 J

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fourth consecutive naming, while junior Derek VanderHeide received his second. Milobinski and sophomore Joe Zupancic received their first bid to the all-conference team. In the MIAA, the Dutch again fell to Kalamazoo, finishing 152 points behind. In second place, 239 point ahead of the third place team Calvin, The Dutch's finish dominated the rest of the MIAA. In the 200-meter Free Relay, Milobinski, Dan Shelley, Derek Mazurek. and Bob Springsteen set a Hope pool record and an MIAA record with their stellar time of 1:23.79. That performance automatically qualified them for the NCAA tournament. VanderHeide placed first in the 50-yard freestyle event with his time of :21.31. N y k a m p . M i l o b i n s k i , Springsteen, and VanderHeide captured the number one finish in the 200-meter Medley. This performance also qualified them for the NCAA tournament and set an MIAA record. Shawn Kinser took first in the 200-meter freestyle event. The swimmers that earned the chance to swim in the NCAA tournament continued to show why they were there. The Dutch finished eight in the nation. Swimmers Nykamp. VanderHeide, Springsteen, Shelley, Milobinski, and Kinser all earned All-American accolades. Another successful season for coach John Patnott was more than just tradition. Incredible dedication, experience. hard work, and closeness combined to brine the 1996 men's swimming team incredible success.

Jens Milobinski. Bob Springsteen. a n d Derek VanderHeide cheer as Shawn Kinser's f i n i s h puts the 400yard Freestyle Relay team in first place against Calvin. The four swimmers received AllAmerican Performance a w a r d s for the same race at the NCAA Championships. Left: Freshman Dan Daly c o m p e t e s in the 100yard breaststroke against Albion College. (PR Photos)

Sophomore Jonathan Wierengo c o m p e t e s in the 100yard butterfly competition against Calvin College. The Dutch defeated the K n i g h t s in t h i s meet and again at the MIAA and NCAA championships. (PR Photo)


Junior Mike Robbert concentrates before his one meter d i v e at t h e Hope-Calvin meet. Robbert led t h e D u t c h in scoring on both one and three meter d i v i n g . (PR

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F r o n t R o w : Luke Pinkerton, Mike Robbert, Derek Mazurek, John Housenga, Brandon Nyboer, Bob Springsteen, Mike Porter, Dan Daly, Steve Brenner; Back R o w : diving coach Jim Mitchell, assistant coach Dave Bekker, Shawn Kinser, Bill Malpass, Derek VanderHeide. Jens Milobinski, Joe Zupancic, Aaron Hoffman, Jon Wierengo, Dan Shelley, Keith Nykamp, head coach John Patnott.

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"A lot of dedication is put into this sport and our accomplishments this year both in the pool and with each other will be hard to equal."

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Dawn DeBoer Team Captain fEK'iFllfflBrifl HOFECOUl-G* SWIV. M 1 & DIVING

ynasty might best describe the 1996 women's swimming team. A senior tri-captain explains the reason for her team being a dynasty, "We had eight girls come in first semester freshman year and seven that have finished the season this year. We had an awesome class with an awesome four years." The fours years of bonding, practicing together, travelling together, and swimming together, drew this team closer and from that closeness came success. Undefeated in all but two dual meets, the team showcased their success. This is the eighteenth consecutive year that the women have finished with a strong record of at least six wins. The class of 1996 entered into a long history of victory and success. They continued that tradition by leaving their stellar marks in Hope's history books. The Lady Dutch were undefeated in all MIAA match-ups. Against Xavier College, senior Kristen Hoving's winning times in the 500-yard freestlye and the 1,650-yard freestyle races automatically qualified her for the NCAA tournament. Junior Megan Hunter also qualified with her 100-yard breastroke time. Two weeks later, the entire team earned a trip to the finals with their first place finish in the MIAA tournament, held on campus at the Kresege Natatorium. The class of 1996 brought home a first place MIAA championship each one of their fours years in the pool. Hope captured first place in all

FINAL GLORY by Amanda Black

Opponent

Hope

Alma 96 120 Grand Valley 107 124 Calvin 69 151 EMU 235 55 Kalamazoo 97 143 Albion 80 126 Oakland 143 85 Xavier 91 102 Swimming 114

five of the relay events and in eleven of the twelve individual events. Kristen Hoving was a triple winner with record MIAA times, having won the 500-yard and 1,650-yard freestyle events four years consecutively. Junior Lindsey Chelf won three events as well. Megan Hunter defended her league championship while Emily Schmidt, Teresa Kirland, Dana Horner, and Kari Jackson earned first place finishes. This phenomenal success could only come from a team as dedicated and hard-working as this one. This dominating season finish leaves the mark of a dynasty. The national NCAA tournament, held in Atlanta, Georgia, was also successful for the Dutch. With outstanding times in all races and relays, the team finished fifth in the nation. This was an end to a season that shows how hard work can pay off. The four years that Dawn DeBoer, Kristen Hoving, Tersea Kirkland, Nicole Lamkey, Denice Masselink, Jennifer Palma, and Alyson Robertson swam together were an incredible success. Their dynasty in Hope swimming will not be forgotten.

Oophomore Simone Scher dives off the starting b l o c k for the 50-yard freestyle event. Scher received an AilAmerican award for her outstanding performance as part of Hope's 800yard freestyle relay team. Left: J u n i o r Emily Schmidt dives off the three meter board. Schmidt became the MIAA champion in t h i s event. (PR Photo)

Lady Dutch Dana Horner, Kristen Hoving, and Teresa Kirkland take the winners stand in their lucky wooden s h o e s ; and you thought they were only for dancing. (PR Photo)


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F r o n t R o w : Mindy Moffat, Alyson Robertson, Monica Stubbs, Teresa Kirkland, Dawn DeBoer, Nicole Lamkey, Kari Jackson, Liz Huxley; B a c k R o w : assistant coach Dave Bekker, diving coach Jim Mitchell, Dana Homer, MelissaThiel, Megan Hunter, Adena Demos, Lindy Celf, Simone Scher, Cindy Bannink, Jennifer Palma, Kristen Hoving.

S o p h o m o r e Mindy Moffet c o m p e t e s in the 100-yard breast stroke competition against Calvin College. The Dutch defeated the K n i g h t s and all other MIAA teams t o f i n i s h the season w i t h a perfect 4-0 record. (PR Photo)

S e n i o r A l y s o n Robertson c o m p e t e s in the 100-yard backstroke in the dual meet against Calvin College. Hope defeated the K n i g h t s 151-69. (PR Photo)

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Having a young team had its disadvantages, but nevertheless, the Dutchmen's season finish demonstrates the talent and potential the team possesses.

s the ball flies over the net with speed and force, it is easy to see the beauty that the sport of tennis possesses. With every swing, the player seems to portray that he is just merely on the defensive. The men of Hope's tennis team do a great job of making the sport look easy. This only comes after hours of practice, hitting balls in to the net or chasing balls hit onto another court. For the fourth year. Coach Steve Gorno guided his team through another challenging season. Hope had to work hard to keep up with their competition, and their work proved fruitful in the end. The tennis team consisted of only freshmen, sophomores, and juniors, but still possessed the leadership that allowed the Dutch to hold their own throughout the season. The season began with a team trip to Hilton Head, South Carolina, for preseason spring training. Through hours of practice and four competitive matches, the team gained valuable experience. Through many hours in a crowded van and a week in a Hilton Head hotel, the group bonded as a team and friends. The team f i n ished the MIAA season in third place with

GREAT FORM by Jeanette Petkus

Kalamazoo 9 0 Albion 0 9 Alma 0 7 Kalamazoo Valley 2 7 Aquinas 5 4 Adrian 0 9 Calvin 7 2 MIAA Tournament 3rd Tennis 116

a 3-2 record. A young team with less experience than older, power teams was a big factor in the season outcome. The 3-2 standing does show what this young team is capable of though, and with another year behind the racket, the record is sure to improve. Sophomore Jeff MacDoniels finished first on the team in singles and doubles matches. During the 1996 season, he had fifteen wins and eight losses in singles competitions and twelve wins, ten losses in doubles matches. Saum Rahimi and Steve DeVrieze finished second and third consecutively behind MacDoniels. The Dutch received many honors for their play this season. Junior Rich Sturmfels was awarded the Stowe Sportsmanship Award. MacDoniels was named to the A11-M1AA first team while Rahimi and DeVrieze were placed on the All-MIAA second team. Having a young team had its disadvantages, but nevertheless, the Dutchmen's season finish demonstrates the talent and potential the team possesses.

Sophomore Jeff MacDoniels returns a serve f r o m his opponent f r o m Calvin College. MacDoniels was placed on the AllMIAA team for his outstanding contribut i o n s t o the team. Left: Sophomore Steve DeVrieze, prepared to return the ball f r o m his opponent. DeVrieze was nominated to the AllMIAA team at the completion of the season. (PR Photo)


S t e v e DeVrieze serves t o his o p p o n e n t f r o m A d r i a n College. The Dutch beat the B u l l d o g s 9-0 in the matches, c o n t r i b u t i n g t o the team's 3-2 season f i n i s h and a t h i r d place s t a n d i n g In the MIAA. (PR Photo)

A l p h a b e t i c a l O r d e r : R o b e r t B r a n t . Bret C o o k , S t e v e D e V r i e z e , C o a c h -

S t e v e G o m o . D a n K u b a c k i , E v a n L l e w w l y n , Jeff M a c D o n i e l s , S a u m R a h i m i , C h r i s S a n d r o . P a u l S c h m u d e , R i c h S t u r m f e l s , G r e g Vliststra, Jay Wallace.

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"We worked really hard to accomplish our goals. Hilton Head was a great experience, mostly by bringing the team closer together."

17

or yet another year, the Hope College women's tennis team has dominated the court. Strong leadership and sheer talent have brought the Lady Dutch to the front of the pack. A spring training trip to Hilton Head Island. South Carolina, enabled the team to try out their skills and get to know each other better. The trip built bonds that held strong throughout the season and may have contributed to the great success of the team. Junior captain, Audrey Coats, led in both the singles and doubles brackets. Coats' partner, Becky Lucas, joined her in the number one doubles slot, and finished behind Coates in the singles bracket placing second. Hope opened their MIAA season with a win over Kalamazoo College. Hope conquered the Hornets with a score of 7-2. Lucas and Coats showed that they were a force to be reckoned with by placing first in the doubles competition. All but one of the singles players won their matches, contributing to a great season opener. The second week of MIAA play brought another victory for the team. Hope placed third in the Great Lakes Colleges Tournament, losing only to DePauw. Hope dominated the court to win against both Ohio Wesleyan and Kalamazoo College, allowing Hope's undefeated ^

Megan Logie Team Member

Audrey Coats s w i n g s for a return against Calvin. Coats became a two-time MIAA m o s t valuable player after receiving the award again this season. She also posted a Hope r e c o r d for singles victories w i t h a 25-3 record. Left: Coats waits for the serve of her opponent from Albion College. (PR Photos)

SERVING DREAMS by Jeanette Petkus

Opponent

Hope

Kalamazoo 2 7 Albion 1 8 Alma 0 9 Adrian 0 9 Calvin 0 9 MIAA Tournament 2nd / 3 D

Tennis US

MIAA record to stand after the tournament. At the Midwest Invitational tournament in Madison, Wisconsin, the Lady Dutch finished fifth out of sixteen teams. The most intense game of the tournament was against St. Thomas College of Minnesota. Lucas and Coats again dominated the court with their accurate shots and strong defense. This tournament brought high rewards for Coats. She tied the Hope record for the most singles victories in a season. At the same time, she remained only three games away from matching the doubles record. The outlook for next year's team seems even more promising than this year. The team will be keeping its main leaders for one more season. With another season behind her belt. Sophomore Heidi VanLangerlde will continue to make a name for herself out on the court. As this season proves, just because these ladies wear skirts doesn't mean that they are weak players. Time and time again during the season, the Lady Dutch proved to the college and community that they can play as or more competitively than any team.

Sophomore Erin Sowerby awaits a serve f r o m her opponent. Sowerby had an outstanding season, finishing third o n the team in singles and doubles w i n s . (PR Photo)


J u n i o r Becky Lucas returns t h e ball t o her opponent from Calvin College. Lucas was named to the All-MIAA First Team f o r her f a n t a s t i c s e a s o n play. (PR P h o t o )

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F i r s t R o w : Megan Logie, Rachel Hillegonds; B a c k R o w : coach Kathy Van Tubbergen. Joy Green, Audrey Coates, Heide VanLangevelde, Jen Hendrics, Becky Lucas, Erin Sowerby, Kate Clay, Alison Ray, Nicole Dangremond.

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"The whole league is balanced enough to where we able to just play game by game."

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Stu Fritz Coach

by Amanda Black

he Dutch hit the field with a new team this year. Along with the six returning seniors and five juniors, the underclassmen brought a desire and a willingness to work toward their endeavors. Though the numbers may not show a team with a marvelous record, the season was measured as a success in the k n o w l e d g e and experience the team gained. Beginning the year in Panama City Beach, Florida, the Dutch faced a field of strong teams. Hope earned a victory in a game of the tournament, beating Otterbein, Ohio, by a run. The next victory came five meetings later when the Dutch doubled Rio Grande, Ohio's single run. After the training season took them away from the sunshine and back to the frosty Michigan spring, the experience was helpful and first game was a success. The Hope College team beat Kalamazoo 6 to 2. Sen i o r Steve Marso brought h i s powerful bat to the lineup. With a hefty .455 batting average and his nine RBI's, he led the Dutch with consistent and powerful batting. His batting average placed him second in the MIAA. He also sat atop the standings in triples for the season. His leadership on the team came not only from his hitting ability, but from his drive to play baseball well. He set a great example for the young team. Pitchers Todd Lucas and Matt Vriesenga, both underclassmen, brought a willingness to work to the diamond. Lucas entered a game in the fourth inning against Olivet. In two innings, he collected four strike-outs while only giving up one run. His ERA dropped to 4.08. Senior Keith Zoulek closed the 12-10 win. Freshman Vriesenga's minuscule ERA of 1.67 placed him among the leaders of the MIAA. His control is strong and his delivery calculated. In twenty-nine innings pitched, he only allowed six earned runs while striking out fourteen of the batters that he faced. The Dutch finished out the season on the road, with a three game series at Adrian and at Calvin. Although the team only won a single game out of six, the knowledge they acquired about these teams will be useful next season. Getting to know the teams will allow the Dutch to focus attention in areas needed, and improve their record next year. Also, learning about their teammates and the way each plays will allow the team to pay together better and more effectively. Though their record contained losses, the young team did not consider this a wasted season. With twenty-two players poised to return for the next season, the future is bright for the Dutch's line drive.

LINE DRIVE Kalamazoo Kalamazoo Kalamazoo Albion Albion Albion Alma Alma Olivet Olivet Olivet Alma Adrian Adrian Adrian Calvin Calvin Calvin •435-

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2 6 9 1 3 10 4 1 4 2 18 5 1 3 5 0 5 0 8 6 10 12 0 1 2 1 7 3 1 3 5 0 2 1 10 3

Freshman pitching sensation Matt Vriesenga throws a ball against a Calvin hitter. Vriesenga led the Dutch pitching squad with five w i n s . His outstanding season earned him a place o n the AllMIAA second team. Left: Vriesenga throws a pitch against Adrian. (PR Photos)

Sophomore catcher Mike Meeuwsen rounds t h i r d base after a h o m e r u n hit by Steve Marso. Marso had an outstanding season, leading the MIAA in batting, total bases, RBIS, and triples. (PR Photo)

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S e n i o r Ken O s b o r n watches the batter for a hit o r a n a t t e m p t t o steel. O s b o r n , a catcher for the Dutch, was named to the All-MIAA S e c o n d Team along w i t h seniors Steve Marso, Chad Casserly, and freshman Matt V r i e s e n g a .

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F r o n t R o w : Beau Batton, Matt Klein, D am on Mikoy, Chris Greiman, D.J. R e y b u m , Mike Brya, Garrett Heyns, Adam Labbe, Frank Quealy; Second R o w : Matt McMurray, Dave Uyl, Matt DeBoer, John Fickes, Ryan Tanis, Steve Marso, Dean Esteves, Jim Dobbins, Keith Zoulek, Ken O s b o m , Todd Lucas, trainer Zahra Ismaeli; T h i r d R o w : Assistant coach Dave McWhinnie, assistant coach Ron Boeve, Ken Byard, Damon Estep, Matt Vriesenga, Jim Veltman, Todd Hart. Josh McManis, Mike Meeuwsen. Chad Casserly, head coach Stu Fritz, assistant coach Tom O s b o m , Matt Gravelink.

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"There was a lot of team unity and all members played a part. Our motto, 'never a doubt,' helped us go as far as we did." Lisa Larzelere Team Member

ach sport is a chapter in the history of Hope College and each season is a different page of these chapters. The 1996 season will forever be a high light of the softball team's chapter. This recordshattering season was filled with streaks of wins, phenomenal ERAs and lofty batting averages. Hope dominated the MIAA and the players were seen at the top of nearly every category. This teams faced high expectations, following last season's MIAA championship and a fifth place national tournament standing. Eleven players returned to this year's team. Along with fifteen new freshman, including pitching sensation Lisa Larzelere, the Dutch exceed those expectations and wrote their own glory in Hope College's sports history. The 1996 team shattered the four year-old record of fifteen consecutive victories from the onset of the season. Beating that by three games, the Lady Dutch won their first eighteen contests by margins of as large as eleven runs. The season began in Florida at spring training. Here Hope dominated, gaining six victories in six outings. Hope earned fifteen runs against Hamline College in their second game of the season. The seventh consecutive victory was a shutout victory with the Lady Dutch scoring eleven runs against their opponents. The pitching combination of freshman Lisa Larzelere and senior Keri Roelofs provided incredible poise for the Lady Dutch this season. Larzelere had a 12- 2 record with an MIAA leading 0.50 earned run average. Roelofs began the season with a six victory streak. She combined with Larzelere to give the Dutch a phenomenal 1.36 ERA during the record-shattering streak of victories. Hope could also be seen at the top of the batting average category. Senior Wendy Murphy led the MIAA with a .609 average while senior Laurie Byington followed with a .483 average. Freshman Christa Murphy led the MIAA in bases stolen. At the NCAA tournament hosted by Hope College, the Lady Dutch opened the tournament winning 4-3 over Calvin College. The team was looking for their third trip to the national tournament since 1991, but losses to the defending national campions from Chapman University of California and Calvin College pulled them from the running. The women's softball team's success throughout the year were numerous and recognition at the end of the season was great. The Lady Dutch earned their second consecutive MIAA championship and six players were named to the Division III Central All-Region softball team. Seniors Laurie Byington, Wendy Moore, and Amy Moeckel were named to the all-region first team. Freshmen Lisa Larzelere and Christa Murphy, along with junior Lisa Timmer were named to the second team.

NEW PAGE by Amanda Black

Kalamazoo Kalamazoo Albion Albion Adrian Alma Alma Olivet Olivet Calvin Calvin Solihull

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S e n i o r Keri Roelofs pitches the ball against an Albion batter. Roelofs had an excellent season, achieving career records for pitching victories (43) and pitching decisions (65). Left: Teammates congratulate a player on a game winning home run. (PR Photos)

With a Kalamazoo runner on base, Wendy Moore watches for a throw from the catcher. Moore was named the third base All-MIAA Player and also given a spot on the first team Division III Central AllRegion Team. (PR Photo)


F r e s h m a n Christa Murphy slides into t h i r d b a s e u n d e r a p l a y e r f r o m St. M a r y ' s College. Murphy earned a place on the 1996 D i v i s i o n III C e n t r a l A l l - R e g i o n S o f t b a l l Team for her c o n t r i b u t i o n s to the team. (PR P h o t o )

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( : F r o n t R o w : Wendy Moore, Amy Moeckel, Laurie Byinglon. Keri Roelofs, Kelli DeHaan; Second R o w : Wendy Kooiker. Heather Ozinga. LisaTimmer, J.P. Plummer, Andrea Johnson. Lisa Larzalere. Erin Beckman, G i n a Z a n i n ; T h i r d R o w : Head Coach Karla Wolters, g a m e videotaper J.J. Jones, manager Andrea H a n m a n , Angle Barnes, Kristi Langland, Sarah Frego, Sara Warber Cory Downing. Krista Murphy, statistician Kevin Burgan, trainer Tonia Bruins, assistant coach Barb Gras.

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J u n i o r Randy Ames passes the baton to freshman Dave DeHommel in the 1600 meter relay against Alma College. (PR Photo)

F i r s t R o w : Jim Shields, Wes Prescott, Nick Ward, Jon Gillesby, Erik Carpenter, Flash Maples, Jon A d a m s o n , Randy A m e s ; S e c o n d R o w : N o r m Fritsch, M i k e C r a m m e r , J.D. Vickers, Justin Albertson, Paul Ballard, D o u g Gle, Matt P u t n a m , Dave D e H o m m e l ; T h i r d R o w : J e r e m y Rice, Jon R e e v e s , D a n B a n n i n k , Jeff Trytko, Scott M o r e h o u s e , Joel N e m e s , Craig K o p a s ; F o u r t h R o w : Kevin D e Y o u n g , P.J, H u i z e n g a , A n d r e w V a n K a m p e n , C h a d N y k a m p , T i m Franklyn, Scott Derby, J e r e m y B o g a r d ; F i f t h R o w : team trainer A d r i e n n e Christopher, team trainer Nate Davies, c o a c h D o n n a Eaton, coach M a r k Northuis, c o a c h Todd Farmer, c o a c h Michael Ricketts.

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"reshman Matt Putnam j u m p s the 400 meter hurdles at the Hope College Invitational. Right: Freshman Jeff Trytko c o m p e t e s In the l o n g jump competition. Putnam's and Trytko's excellent finishes contributed t o the teams second place overall f i n i s h at the meet. (PR Photo)

S e n i o r Eric Carpenter and j u n i o r Chad Nykamp race in the 800 meter run d u r i n g the Hope College invitational. Carpenter w a s named t o the AllMIAA Track team for his outstanding contributions to Hope's team. (PR Photo)

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he goals of track and field are few: to test endurance, will, and to build up a feeling of camaraderie. The Dutch achieved these goals this year. The look of the team has changed since last season as thirteen new freshmen joined the ranks of the trackers. They looked to the five seniors, Erik Carpenter, Jon Gillesby, Rich Maples, Chad Nykamp, and Nick Ward for guidance and experience. Ward and Gillesby both lived up to their expectations. Both set a school record for the hammer throw with NCAA championship qualifying performances at the Augustanna Invitational. It was Ward who shattered Gillesby's school record of 164 feet, 1 inch with an incredible toss of 169 feet, 10 inches. In Gillesby's next effort, he broke his own record with a toss of 168 feet, 10 inches. Carpenter also set an example for the rest of the team with a victory in the 1500 meter run. The MIAA teams posed more of a problem for the Dutch. In dual meets, Hope's record stood at 1 3, giving them a fourth place standing. In the annual Field Day with all MIAA teams competing, the Dutch finished with seventy-four points for a fourth place finish. Gilfesby in the shotput and Carpenter in the 1500 meter run led the Hope team at the Field Day with first place finishes in their events. Carpenter's finish time of 3:51.88 in the run was a new Hope College record and also qualified him for the NCAA finals. Gillesby's javelin throw of 172 feet, 2 inches, and Dan B a n n i n k ' s 5000 meter run finish of 14:59.63 gave them second place finishes in their events. In the 400 meter hurdles, Jon Adamson's time of :55.84 and Matt Putnam's time of :57.34 gave them third and fifth place finishes respectively. Nick Ward finished fourth with a throw of 46 feet, 1 inch in the shotput. Jeff Tryko earned sixth place with a long jump of 10 feet, 10.5 inches. Nykamps's 1:57.73 800 meter run finish gave a sixth place finish. Hope's relay teams put out a strong effort in their events. The 4x 100 meter relay team finished with a time of :45.07 and the 1600 meter relay team finished in 3:25.53 for fourth place. In addition to Carpenter's NCAA qualifying time, Ward and Gillesby also qualified to participate in the NCAA finals, but in events not part of Hope's regular season field events. Usually throwing shotput and discus in dual meets, the two will compete in the hammer finals along with twenty other competitors from the NCAA. The senior tracksters set an example for the underclassmen this year. Future seasons should be more successful as this year's underclass team members become the leaders of the team, following in the class of 1996's footsteps.

Everyone on the team always gave 100 percent and we all had a good time in competition. I will remember it always." Rich Maples Team member

NEW START by Amanda Black

Alma 86 68 Albion 100 49 Adrian 66 84 Calvin 106 42 Auburn Invitational 6th Spring Break Inv. 7th Hope Invitational 2nd Track 125

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S o p h o m o r e Susan VanderWeide and f r e s h m a n Carrie Langstraat c o m p e t e against A l m a College in the 5000 meter run. (PR P h o t o )

F i r s t R o w : B e c k i S p e n c e r , A m y M e y e r s , A m a n d a Hill, A m y C o o k , A m a n d a M a t h e w s , T a m m y C a s e ; S e c ond Row:

J e n n i f e r W a r r e n , L a u r e l P l o t z k e , C r y s t a l W r i g h t , B e c k y T i m m e r , K a t i e S t a n g e r , Erin S h i e l ;

T h i r d Row: Susan VanderWeide, Megan Powers, Sarah Kuipers, Sarah Carpenter, Carrie Langstraat. Jannah T h o m p s o n ; F o u r t h Row: Julie Holwerda, Molly Griebe, Susan Kingma, Jaclyn Ornee, Tasha Guild; F i f t h R o w : team trainer Adrienne Christopher, team trainer Nate Davies, coach D o n n a Eaton, coach Todd Farmer, coach Mark Northuis, coach Michael Ricketts.

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Oophomore Crystal Wright takes the lead in the 100 meter hurdle race. Wright's excellent finish contributed t o a first place s t a n d i n g by the Lady Dutch at the meet. Right: Junior Amy Meyers prepares for the shotput competition. Meyers was named t o the AllMIAA team for her outstanding 1996 season. (PR Photo)

Junior Julie Holwerda prepares t o receive the baton f r o m freshman Amanda Matthews. Holwerda is usually found r u n n i n g in the 400 meter hurdle competition and received an All-MIAA nomination for her accomplishments. (PR Photo)

he whistle sounds. Shortly after, a tight pack of runners quickly approaches the grandstands and continue by in a great blur. From another part of the lawn, a grunt is heard shorty followed by the thump of something heavy hitting the hard ground; the throwers are practicing before their competition. Track meets are a whirlwind of runners, hurdlers, and throwers. Hope's women's team is fortunate to have some of the best. The season proved to be successful for the women's team. At the Springtime Invitational in Auburn, Alabama, the team placed eighth with thirty-two points. At the Spring Break Invitational at Emery University in Atlanta, the Lady Dutch placed tenth. As the season progressed from these first meets, this pack of runners passed the bleaches faster with each race and the throwers grunts became louder with each further throw.

"Not many people returned this year so there was a lot of new runners. Hopefully they will do well for us in the future." Julie Holwerda Team member

Hope's invitational was a clear demonstration of the talent the team possessed. The Dutch finished first in the tournament with 112 points. Aquinas College, who finished second with only twenty-nine points, was the team's closest competitor that day. Co-captains, Amy Meyers and Amanda Hill, were key members on the team. Meyers, an All-MIAA performer.

STRONG WILL is the current defending champion in the javelin competition. She proved herself again this season by contributing her talent to the throwing squad. Hill lead the sprinters through the season with personal best times in the 100 and 200 meter dashes. The fourth annual Augustana College Invitational proved to be a thrilling experience for the women's team. Freshmen Jaclyn Ornee put her name in the record books by breaking Hope College's longest recorded hammer throw. The old record stood at 124 feet, 7 inches. Ornee made a sizable increase in this distance with a throw measuring 126 feet, 8 inches. Julie Holwerda also had a successful day at Augustana. She finished second in the 400 meter hurdles. With a time of 1:03.11, Holwerda was automatically qualified for the NCAA tournament. The team did well in all events at the 1996 MIAA Track and Field Championships, finishing in third place with 98 points. Jannah Thompson and Amanda Hill led the team with a first place finishes. Hill finished the 100 meter dash in : 12.92 and Thompson completed the 800 meter run in 2:19.56. Finishing out the year as successfully as they started, Amanda Hill, Jannah Thompson, Julie Holwerda, Amy Cook, and Amy Meyers were all elected to the All-MIAA Track Team for their outstanding contributions to the team,

by Jeanette Petkus

Alma 77 68 Albion 40 99 Adrian 34 109 Calvin 94.5 39.5 Auburn Invitational 8th Spring Break Inv. 10th Hope Invitational 1st Track 127 1 3 0 -


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i ^ • o m e t i m e s the most vital compo-

T h e 1996 retiring faculty members represent over 150 years of combined service t o Hope College. The five retirees have each contributed more t h a n a quarter century of their great talent a n d leadership t o the s t u d e n t s a n d s u c c e s s of the college. Pictured left t o right are Dr. Carl S c h a c k o w , p r o f e s s o r of e d u c a t i o n and chair of the d e p a r t m e n t ; Dr. Charles Huttar, p r o f e s s o r of English a n d

nent of the campus is the one not given the deserved credit and recognition. But without the faculty and staff, the students would not be here and the college would cease to exist. They are the lifeblood of this great institution and their contributions are critical. They help the students reach their dreams while learning about themselves. Physicist or biologist,

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dancer or artist, custodian or maintenance. each contributes vitally

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interim director of interdisciplinary s t u d i e s Dr. Irwin Brink '52, professor of c h e m i s t r y ; Dr. Crotter Tharin, professor of g e o l o g y ; and Dr. Herb Weller, professor of Spanish. (PR Photo)

to the balance and success of the place so many students look for hope. ^

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b r a ^ W G national recognition given to hope's communication department

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hroughout the past several years Hope College has been noted for its excellence in the seiences, but now the Communications department has something to brag about. It has been awarded the 1995 "Program o( Excellence" recognition, a national honor from the Senior College and University section of the Speech Communications Association (SCA). "I believe that the deciding lactor was our course rationale, which e x p l a i n e d why we teach the courses that we do and how they interrelate with one another." said communications professor and chairperson of the department James I lerrick. The focus of this year's competition was overall general cur riculum in the department of com munications. The communications department submitted a self-study, which gave an overview of the en

tire department, including course descriptions and evaluations, as well as a description of each member of the faculty that told where they attended school and awards that they have received. The study was then sent to a panel of judges who represent broad disciplinary expertise. The panel then evaluated the study, along with other entries from a myriad of liberal arts colleges as well as smaller state universities across the country, to de termine who would be the recipi ent of the award. Judges' comments ol Hope's department included praise that Hope had the most concern by far for the departmental role in general education and the development of students' critical thinking skills, as well as numerous studentfaculty research opportunities. "In my mind, Hope's communication department is the most underrated department in the school." I)( u >|

Ht KSILIA ALVtREZ RUF SRHNISH JANET ANDLHSON MATH C H A R L E S ASCHBRI NNER MUSIC PRISCILLA ATKINS LIBRARIAN

JANE B A C H ENGLISH MARK B A I R HISTORY ANNE B A K K E R - G R A S STUDENT DEVELOPMENT RICK BALFOUR RDOD SERVICE

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said Eric I lultgren ('96), a communications major. "I've taken a class with every communications prof on campus and they are all magnificent and well worth the price of admissions." The department also contributed information about the summer institute that Hope hosts annually, which focuses on essential curriculum in the department of communications. This seminar draws educators from all over the country and is the only one of its kind in the nation, according to I lerrick. The SCA competition is designed to focus on undergraduate education in communications at smaller colleges and universities. "At the larger state schools, the graduate programs tend to overwhelm the undergraduate, so this competition is here to emphasize the undergraduate communication departments." I lerrick said.

The department and the other recipient of 1995 "Program of Excellence" John Carroll University in Cleveland. Ohio, will be recognized at the SCA annual meeting in San Antonio in November. The communications department has received regional honors from the Central State Communications Association twice in the past, in I9S7 and in 1991. The department boasts of ap proximately 70 students majoring and 30 students minoring in communications. Thirty majors graduate each year. From there, the siu dents continue into all kinds of different professions, ranging from teaching to public relations. "We try to emphasize the number of different careers paths that can be taken from this department." Herrick said.

BY jenn cloni

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WESLEY BALL MUSIC MARY BANNINK STUDENT DEVELOPMENT CHRIS BARNEY BIOLOGY ALBERT BELL HISTORY

HARVEY BLANKENSPOOR BIOLOGY

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professor garners award for twenty year of service to hope college

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t ' s the kind of s u m m e r most students only dream about. Standing there surrounded by architecture over 1000 years old in one of the worlds most beautiful, romantic and cultural cities . This is not a dream for some sixty students every summer. It becomes a reality thanks to Hope College's Vienna Summer School P r o g r a m and D o c t o r Stephen Hemenway, professor of English. Earlier this fall, Hemenway and Paul G. Fried, the founder of the p r o g r a m , were h o n o r e d with framed and signed posters to commemorate the 40th anniversary of The Vienna Summer School Program. For the past 20 years, Hemenway has headed up this program and his dedication has not gone unnoticed.

"Doc is tireless about helping people out while in Vienna," said Hollis Pangle ('96). Steering away from the tourist v e r s i o n of t r a v e l i n g E u r o p e , Hemengway gave the students keys to d i s c o v e r i n g the real Vienna. "He knows the back roads and the locals, you aren't with the tourists anymore." Pangle said. "Bec a u s e you are with Doc H e m e n w a y you see the real Vienna." Vienna Summer School gives students the opportunity to study, live and travel in Vienna for three or six weeks from the end of May to the middle of July. "By the end of the trip you are familiar with Vienna." Pangle said. "It feels like home." There are many opportunities for cultural growth. "I was never really interested

in cultural stuff like opera," Pangle said. "And there I was in Mozarts 'Magic Flute,' probably the best opera I'll ever see." Students also have great opportunities for travel. Last summer the g r o u p went to Venice, Salzburg, Prague and an overnight hiking trip in the Austrian Alps. "I really liked Venice," Pangle said. We went to an Italian restaurant for dinner." Pangle said. "Afterward we started walking around the city and sat by the water. Then it hits you, here you are in this foreign country sitting on the shore." Students don't have to travel with the group and they are free to stay in Europe after the session to travel on their own. "I wish I would have traveled afterward, about half of the students did," said Sara Beaver ('96). "I would like to go back." Going back is just what many

alumni will be doing this summer. This year, to celebrate its anniversary, a reunion tour will be held. Alumni will return to Vienna from June 7-23. The 40th anniversary h a p p e n s to c o i n c i d e with the 1000th anniversary of the city. This will only add to the exhibits and celebrations for students and alumni to attend. This year, a reception with the mayor of Vienna, a formal ball, and a 40th anniversary dinner are planned for both alumni and firsttime students. Returning alumni will be reunited with old friends and places that made a lasting impression. "I learned so much about myself, my limits and what I could handle." Beaver said.

BY kim powell

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hope-calvin nursing department gets shot at honors

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t a school that has been praised over and over in the area of liberal arts, one of Hope's only professional programs is going international. On Thursday, September 21, faculty members of the HopeCalvin Nursing Department assembled in the Hayworth Room to consider joining Grand Valley State University and becoming m e m b e r s of Kappa Epsilon, a chapter-at-large of Sigma Theta Tau, an international nursing honors society. "Becoming a member of this organization is among the highest honors in nursing," said Dr. Sheryl Feenstra, professor of nursing for Hope at Calvin College. The goal of Sigma Theta Tau is to support and recognize nursing excellence by awarding scholarships and research grants.

In order to improve facilities, Hope College and Calvin College merged to form one nursing department in the early 80's. Even though they are a combined nursing program, both Hope and Calvin students take classes separately. Not only have the numbers multiplied from the merger, but the Hope-Calvin Nursing Department is working to internationalize its name with honors. Due to the small size of the Hope-Calvin Nursing Department, it would be impossible to have separate chapters. Out of the 135 juniors and seniors in the combined program, only one-third are Hope students. Hope and Calvin will be joining the already existing chapter of Kappa Epsilon at Grand Valley State University, Grand Rapids, Michigan.

Under the same chapter as G.V.S.U.. Hope-Calvin's Nursing Department will be representing the whole of Western Michigan. G.V.S.U. and Hope-Calvin Nursing Program will share the same chapter title, however, the programs will function separately. To become a member of Sigma Theta Tau, a college or university must have been a pre-existing member of the Nursing Honor Society for at least two years. The Hope-Calvin department has been involved for three years. Consequently, over half of the Hope nursing staff are m e m b e r s of Sigma Theta Tau already. Students are eligible for the honor society only as senior nursing students maintaining at least a 3.3 grade point average and ranking in the top one third of their class. These fortunate students are

nominated by the department. Once accepted they may obtain scholarships and grants for their continued education as well as for quasi-scientific research. Dr. Mary Keiner of the University of Indiana Sigma Theta Tau headquarters toured Calvin and Hope College nursing facilities. Keiner's visit consisted of several site visits to classrooms, a department board luncheon, and a large group meeting. During a discussion session. Dr. Keiner sought input from seniors of both schools. In April the Nursing department obtained results at the State of Michigan's Chartering Ceremony and Nursing Convention held in Livonia. Information was not available at printing deadline.

BY laura mihailoff

FACULTY A N DSTAFF

IRWIN BRINK CHEMISTRY SANDRA BRUINS FACILITIES COORDINATOR BAARS B U U M A N EDUCATION MARIA B U R N A T O W S K A - H L E D I N CHEMISTRY

GARY C A M P DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONS DAVE C O R O T H E R S MATHEMATICS JOHN COX ENGLISH DONALD CRONKITE BIOLOGY

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mmsassss F A C U L T Y A N D S T A F F SANDER DEHAAN GERMAN ANDREW D E L I X X I O PHILOSOPHY HERB DERSHEM C O M P U T E R SCIENCE MARY D E Y O U N G MATHEMATICS

professor attends re-enactment of first detonation of atomic bomb

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s the sun rose over the desert of White Sands, New Mexico, chemisl1 try professor Don Williams waited with great anticipation for his watch to read 5 a.m. On July 16, 1995 Williams, along with many others, was escorted to the White Sands Missile Range Base to re-enact the first detonation of the atomic bomb. The Smithsonian Institute led a tour of 30 teachers and others interested in nuclear power on the trail taken by the creators of this famous weapon. Spurred by both professional and personal interest, people came from all over the country to visit the missile base. From traveling the back roads and seeing the site in its original state, to arriving at the time the original scientists arrived, the group followed each step in complete detail. Although they did not set off an actual bomb, people on the tour could get a feel for the thoughts and mind-sets of the original scientists on that day. I tried to get to the thoughts that they h a d , " said W i l l i a m s . "I wanted to know what they were thinking when they created this bomb." Police led small caravans down a 17 mile long road to the Trinity

Site where people gathered to think quietly about the place. It was a solemn and quiet time," Williams said. " P e o p l e came, walked around, discussed feelings, and drove home." Not all visitors were quiet and respectful. One man protested the use of the word Trinity on a monument that was in remembrance of destruction. He ran up to the site and shouted anti-weapon comments and then dowsed the monument with symbolic blood. Military personal wrestled him to the ground, handcuffed him and led him away. A total of 6,000 people visited the site on July 16 to remember the event and talk with experts. Trinity Site is in a bowl of mountains, with nothing around for miles," Williams said. "Just the triangle monument, a few tents and a long stream of cars — similar to 'Field of Dreams'." After the scientists at White Sands discovered how to harness atomic power, the United States d r o p p e d an a t o m i c b o m b on Hiroshima, Japan for the first time in history. The bomb, carried by the plane Enola Gay on August 6, 1945, was the first step in changing warfare forever. Hand-to-hand combat was a thing of the past.

Countries could attack each other from thousand of miles away, and the threat of a so-called "cold war" became a very real fear. Although Williams was only seven when the bomb was dropped and World War II e n d e d , the memories still remain branded in his mind. Williams became greatly interested in atomic power while he was in college. It all started with a summer job at the first commercial power plant in the United States," Williams said. "And it hasn't stopped." Not only does he teach general chemistry and senior seminar at Hope, but also is Chairman of Michigan's Low Level Radioactive Waste Authorities Board of Governors. I don't just study this stuff and leave it there," Williams said. "I'm dedicated to solving problems with nuclear waste." Williams is constantly reading and updating his mind with new information that will help him better understand nuclear power. Not only is Williams tough on educating himself, but he also pushes students to be tough on themselves. "I am constantly telling my students to ask questions," Williams said. "Why are you doing this research? What is going to

be the end result?" One way to teach this idea to his students is through the atom bomb. "Everyone questions whether or not it was 'morally right' to drop the bomb," Williams said. "What people really should be wondering is if the scientists who created the bomb knew what they were doing and how their work would be used." Williams feels that some students today do not think about the end result when working on a project. "Students need to educate t h e m s e l v e s before creating a project," Williams said. "They need to question the outcome and if it will be positive or negative." In a society that has always questioned values, Williams wants students to looks at the morality of issues. Moral education is very important." Williams said. "It's something that should be taught and students should look at." According to Williams, the best way to achieve open discussion is by educating the public. "People need to have openness in projects," Williams said. "There needs to be no more secrets."

BY amy halverson

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JENNY E V E R T S RELIGION S U S A N FELDKEMP P R O V O S T OFFICE L E E FBRESTER GERMAN RICHARD FROST D E A N OF S T U D E N T S

director of disabled student services receives award

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t all goes to show that time, d e d i c a t i o n , and belief in what you do will pay off. Louise Shumaker, the director of Disabled Student Services, was honored with the "State Advocate of the Year" award in Lansing during the "Invest in Ability Week" conference last week. Those nominated for the award are selected by sub-committees. "1 was nominated by a man who worked at Hope when I was a student here. He was once a service provider for me, and now we are colleagues. It is flattering to be recognized by my colleagues for the things that I have been involved in," Shumaker said. The criteria for the award is primarily someone who has been involved in advancing disability rights and has been a role model for the disabled. "They give the award to some-

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one who is involved in volunteering in the community and advocates disability rights, as well as educating people on disabilities," Shumaker said. And active in the community she is. Shumaker is involved in several local committees, including the Center for Independent Living, which she helped to get underway in Holland three years ago. "The Center for Independent Living is an organization involved in supporting the self-determination of people with disabilities," Shumaker said. Shumaker is also a member of the Commission on Disabled Concerns, a group appointed by and directly linked to the governor. This allows the committee to make more of an impact on how Michigan's Governor Engler directs funds and programs on disability issues. Shumaker has made a career

out of helping those with disabilities. She has worked as the director of disabled student services for the past nine years, and is primarily responsible for the starting of that department on Hope's campus. Shumaker, a Hope graduate, interned on campus where she coordinated the disabled student services. She started the program because the disabled students on campus did not have a place to go and get services. Once the program was underway, Shumaker was asked to stay on as director. "I am the literal example of having a job fall right into your lap," Shumaker said, laughing. Her job responsibilities include a number of components. Although she is not a therapist, she counsels students with disabilities and talks with them one-on-one about disability issues. She also organizes support groups for disabled stu-

dents and coordinates services such as note-takers and providing accessible housing and classrooms. Another facet to her job is awareness on campus. Shumaker lectures in classes about disabilities in addition to aiding in Awareness Week, which gives people the opportunity to learn about disabilities as well as learn what it is like to have a disability. Finally. Shumaker works on architectural barrier removal and making more places on campus accessible. "Hope is the only private college that has disabled student services," Shumker said. "They have addressed the issues of disability for a long time and they do this because they want to do the right thing. Hope has been extremely progressive as far as disabilities issues have been concerned.'

BY jenn dorn


professor testifies on federal racial preference programs

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conomics professor John E. Lunn left the comforts of Hope and headed to the Hill, where he testified before a House of Representatives subcommittee regarding federal racial preference programs on Oct. 25. Lunn is an expert on the subject of state-man dated affirmative action programs. He researched labor market discrimination in the construction industry extensively while a professor at the University of Louisiana, focusing specifically on whether the state was discriminating against m i n o r i t y - and women-owned firms seeking highway construction projects. This research suggested that competitive market forces are more effective than affirmative action programs in leading to equal opportunity. HOPE

The subcommittee on Social and Economic Impacts of Racial Preference Programs addressed whether current 'preference' action programs are effective in their goals. Congress is currently considering legislation that would reduce federal Affirmative Action programs. While the overall experience was "interesting," Lunn said, he felt as if the panels were simply pawns of the various politicians rather than sources of information. The proceedings lasted only two hours, and Lunn said he felt that some politicians made an appearance at the hearing simply to get their questions 'on the record.' Still, many attended the proceedings, he said. Lunn served with two other economists, evaluating the economic impacts of affirmative ac-

tion. In testifying to the subcommittee, Lunn explained, "I was focusing on minority-owned firms. The two other economists represented the perspectives that the programs were beneficial, while the other felt the evidence showed the least educated and poorest minorities were actually harmed by the pro grams." "Whether any change in the specific legislation will occur or not, I have no idea," Lunn said. His purpose was not to review legislation that is currently in place and decide whether or not it is effective, but rather to comment on the bigger picture of the programs in general, he said. "I'm an economist, not a lawyer," he said.

BY Jessica owens

FACULTYANDSTAFF

D A N GERBENS BIOLOGY JULIE GOEBEL S T U D E N T DEVELOPMENT ALF REDO GONZALES ASSISTANT PROVOST FBNDA GREEN S T U D E N T DEVOLPMENT

EDWARD HANSON GEOLOGY JACQUELINE HEISLER DIRECTOR OF A S C JAMES HEISLER BTONOMICS S T E V E N HEMENWAY ENGLISH

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LYNNE HENDRIX ACCOUNTING J A M E S HERRICK COMMUNICATIONS LDRI H E R T E L BIOLOGY L A B DIRECTOR BRUCE HIMEBAUGH HUMAN RESOURCES

JACK HOLMES POLITICAL SCIENCE JON HUISKEN REGISTRAR KELLT J A C O B S O N LIBRARIAN JOHN JACOBSON HOPE C O L L E G E PRESIDENT

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educators' society inducts 'pioneering' student chapter

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hree years of educational trailblazing received formal r e c o g n i t i o n last Thursday when representatives of the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development formally inducted Hope's "pioneering" student chapter, the first of its kind in the organization's history. ASCD is a premier professional association for educators, counselors and a d m i n i s t r a t o r s that stretches across national boundaries, linking members worldwide. That link was extended to the student ASCD members of the College at the induction. "Hope is the first college anywhere, ever to have an undergraduate chapter of ASCD," said President John Jacobson. The idea to join the group began in 1993, when eight students and education professors Jeanine Dell'Olio and Leslie Wessman undertook the challenge to create a student chapter of the organization

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that would provide members additional a v e n u e s of preparation through professional networking and enhanced classroom experiences. Three years later, membership in the chapter has increased to around 130 future teachers. ASCD membership internationally is up to nearly 200,000 people at the heart of the educational field. Representatives from ASCD named Hope's chapter as a prototype for college campuses internationally. "Hope College has paved the way for what we at ASCD expect to be many future such chapters," said Dr. Gene Carter, executive director of ASCD. In an effort to show these future chapters how to get started, ASCD members on campus created a portfolio that will serve as a membership kit for college and university education departments all over, according to ASCD coconvener Nicole Rottenberg ('97).

"You have in fact launched a new learning community," Carter said. "They are blazing a new pathway into the future." Director of ASCD Field Services Dr. Susan Nicholas has supported the student chapter since its start, and said that their membership comes at a critical point of change facing educators. "The work that I've done with this emerging student chapter is some of the best that I've done with ASCD," she said. The work that ASCD students have a c c o m p l i s h e d has been equally constructive, according to members. "Our student chapter of ASCD has become a learning environment in which the professionals in our area share their expertise of education," said member Karyl Morin ('97).

BY jodi mcfarland


neh scholarship allows professor to publish mother-daughter works

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nne Larsen, a French professor, has received a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH). Larsen received the maximum amount, $30,000, for her new edition of the collected works of the Dames des Roches, m o t h e r - d a u g h t e r 16th century French authors. "What I am doing is a critical edition," Larsen said. "Essentially, I am bringing out of the shadows the complete works of the motherdaughter writing team, the Dames des Roches. The original tests were published in the 1600's, and they have not been republished since then, not in 400 years." Only 87 of the 914 applicants received funding from the "199697 Fellowships for College Teachers and Independent Scholars" competition. Larsen is planning on producing the second and third volumes which of the works of the

mother-daughter twosome. "I will be making these works accessible for a large audience, both graduate and undergraduate for the first time," Larsen said. Larsen's first volume in the edition, "Les Oeuvres," was published in 1993 and she anticipates that the second and third, "Les Secondres Oeuvres" and'Les Missives," to be published in 1999. "I will be re-establishing the entire texts, correcting the errors, and also writing an introduction to the works" Larsen said. "It is interesting to note, also, that the third edition, their letters, is the first time that women have ever published their letters, which entail what their lives were like, what they saw and how they lived." Since academic and popular interest in the Dames des Roches has been growing, Larsen feels an additional responsibility in her efforts.

"Remarkably, this rediscovery of the writings of this mother-pair has begun in the absence of the availability of their work," she said. "The Dames des Roches allow us to examine the challenges that women faced in the early modern period as they sought to define themselves as writers and scholars. They were devoted to women's education and to female independence in an age deeply ambivalent toward erudite women." Larsen will spend the first year of sabbatical on the east coast, at the libraries of Harvard and Columbia University, which are the only facilities in the country that have the texts available to read. She also plans to make at least one trip to Paris so that she may compare her transcripts with the original volumes of the Dames des Roches.

BY jen dorn

FACULTYANDSTAFF 't.

LFNN JAPINGA RELIGION PETER JOLIVETTE PHYSICS LDRNA JARVIS PSYCHOLOGY DAVID J E N S E N LIBRARY

K E V I N KRAAY B U S I N E S S OFFICE GEORGE K R A F T KINESIOLOGY PERRY L A N D E S THEATRE ANNE LARSEN FRENCH

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social work department seeks acceptance from national accrediting agency

G

ood t h i n g s c o m e to those who wait. At least that is what the Social Work department is hoping. Five years ago when a Social Work program was finally established at Hope, the department decided it was high time they try to get accredited. But it's not as simple as it sounds. The process is long and tedious. "We are still in the process of getting accredited," said Professor Piers of the Social Work department. who has been an integral part of the accreditation process. "The very earliest that we could get accredited is February of 1997." Before the Social Work department could even consider attempting to get accredited, there were certain qualifications that had to be fulfilled. "The program has to have two

full-time professors who are accredited and who have professional experience in the Social Work field," Piers said. This duo became a reality for the d e p a r t m e n t when Deb Stuertevant was hired eight years ago. "Once the program became its own, we decided to move into the direction of getting accredited," Piers said. "We decided that it was something that we needed to strive towards." Essentially what it means to be accredited is that the program meets certain requirements that have been set by the National Accrediting Agency. A set of standards have been set up based on what the Agency feels undergraduate students in Social Work should know. But it means more than that to the students; coming from an acHOPE

G L E N LDWE ADMISSIONS THOMAS LUDWIG PSYCHOLOGY D O N A L D LUIDENS SOCIOLOGY/SOCIAL WORK JOHN LUNN BDONOMICS AND BUSINESS

JOSEPH MACDONIELS COMMUNICATIONS LARRY MALFROID MUSIC GREG MAYBURY ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES WILLIAM MAYER ART

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credited program can be valuable in the working world. "Being accredited can help in the professional world," Piers said. "Employers know what it means to be accredited. Jobs that are not open to students now will be." Coming from an accredited program can also help when going on to graduate school. "Students from an accredited program can waive up to one year of a Social Work Master's Program," Piers said. "There are qualifications, of course, but the opportunity is there." The process involves years of contact with members of the Social Work community and Social Work educators. The department had to fill out the initial forms, which were then reviewed by the Council of Social Work Education. Site teams are sent out to review

the school, the department, and the courses. After a self-study is submitted by the department, the Council decides if the department should apply and be recommended for accreditation. Hope's Social Work department just send in its self-study, which took over three years to complete and is anxiously awaiting a response from the Council in June. Accreditation says something about the department is an accomplishment to be proud of. "It is simply a public statement and more tangible proof that the students are competent," Piers said. "My colleague and I are committed to the Social Work profession and we want to make sure that the profession is protected against incompetence.

BY jenn dorn

FACULTYANDSTAFF


HOPE

2

FACULTYANDSTAFF

VIRGINIA MCDONOUGH HUMAN RESOURCES HOLLY MCKEE BARBARA MEZESKE ENGLISH RICHARD MEZESKE EDUCATION

JAMES MOTIFF PSYCHOLOGY TONY MUIDERMAN BIONOMICS AND BUSINESS WILLIAM M U N G A L L CHEMISTRY PHILIP MUNOA RELIGION

DAVID MYERS PHYCHOLOGY FUMIHITO NAKAJIMA HISTORY/L^N CLASSSICAL D E P T ROGER N E M E T H SOCIOLOGY NANCY NICODEMUS ENGLISH

JOYCE NIELSON LIBRARY CIRCULATION T E D NIELSON COMMUNICATIONS JOHN NORDEN C O L L E G E ADVANCEMENT JACOB NYENHUIS CLASSICS

DAVID O'BRIEN LIBRARIAN R o t GEHLING GREG OLGERS PUBLIC RELATIONS BARB OSBORNE C O L L E G E ADVANCEMENT

Faculty/Staff

139 I3D


HOPE

KELLY OSBORNE CLASSICS BRUCE PEARSON MATHEMATICS ANTHONY PEROVICH PHILOSOPHY TIMOTHY PENNINGS MATHEMATICS

JOHNATHON PETERSON GEOLOGY S T U A R T POST ADMISSIONS S T E V E N BOUMA-PREDIGER RELIGION JAMES PIERS SOCIOLOGY

JOHN QUINN CLASSICS DENNIS RENNER COMMUNICATIONS TOM RENNER PUBLIC RELATIONS MAURA R E Y N O L D S CLASSICS

I

JULIO RIVERA DANCE DINEAN RUNYAN A S S T DIRECTOR CAREER SERVICES DAVID RYDEN POLITICAL SCIENCE MARCUS ROBINSON ADMISSIONS

ELIZABETH SANFORD CHEMISTRY C A R L SCHACKOW EDUCATION PETER S C H A K E L ENGLISH BARBARA SCHIPPER CONFERENCE SERVICES

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'••• Faculty/Staff

140

I •LLEGE

FACULTYANDSTAFF


founder of women s studies wins award for outstanding program

J

ane Dickie, Director of Women's Studies and Professor of Psychology, I has broken a lot of ground around / Hope, She's a founder of the Women's , Studies Program, she was the first female psychology professor at Hope, and she made the campus aware of sexual assault by being the one of the author's of the first policies addressing this issue. After 24 loyal years, hundreds of hours, and tons of broken ground, her efforts didn't go unnoticed. Dickie HOPE

was awarded the first Women's Studies GLCA award on April 13 at a Women's Conference held at Albion. Twelve Academic Deans from the Great Lakes College Association or GLCA created an award to recognize Dickie's outstanding Women's Studies program here at Hope, as well as her academic achievements. On her award it reads that Dickie was chosen to win the award because of her "effort and training in psychology, in motherhood, and in combining feminism and faith at a churchrelated college. She has used her •

knowledge and endurance to create a Women's Studies program here at Hope and has helped the committee (GLCA) build a consortial program with a global vision." In 1992 the Women's Studies degree joined the roster of possible majors here at Hope. At which time Dickie became the director. "The pioneering of Women's Studies began in 1982, and those first graduates helped get the old program off it's feet and contributed to where it is today" Dickie said. Just within the past years.

Women's Studies at Hope has grown in popularity. "It provides a challenging and unique educational experience for both women and men," Dickie said. "It complements the college's emphasis on multi-cultural diversity and global understanding while facilitating personal growth in human relationships." This fall Dickie will be taking a year sabbatical with her husband to South Africa to work, teach and live with the people of Western Cape.

BY m. thompson

FACULTYANDSTAFF

m

TODD SCHUILING C O L L E G E ADVANCEMENT D A R E L L SCHREGARDUS PSYCHOLOGY MICHAEL SEYMOUR CHEMISTRY GLORIA SHAY REGISTRAR OFFICE

LOUISE SHUMAKER S T U D E N T DEVELOPMENT GLORIA SLAUGHTER LIBRARIAN STEIN S L E T T E KINESIOLOGY AND ATHLETICS MARCIA SMIT NURSING

RAY SMITH KINESIOLOGY THOMAS SMITH E O N O M I C S AND BUSINESS N E A L SOBANIA HISTORY LINDA STROUF MUSIC

Faculty/Staff

141

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ffli

P r o f e s s o r Sellers and her a d v a n c e d creative w r i t i n g class meet for d i s c u s s i o n at the Leaf a n d Bean coffee s h o p . The warmer weather a n d s p r i n g fever it b r i n g s called for a c h a n g e of pace a n d an escape f r o m the n o r m a l c l a s s r o o m . (Photo by A n t h o n y Perez)

DEBORAH STURTEVANT SOCIOLOGY DEBRA SWANSON SOCIOLOGY TODD STEEN B : O N O M I C S AND B U S I N E S S MARY A N N E S Y D L I K BIOLOGY

J O H N TAMMI T HEATRE E L L I O T TANIS MATHEMATICS D A R N I S H A TAYLOR STUDENT DEVELPMENT DARRYL THELEN PHYSICS

AMY THOMPSON GEOLOGY LDIS T V E R B E G BIOLOGY JEFF TYLER RELIGION RICHARD V A N D E R V E L D E MATHEMATICS

R \ U L VANFAASEN BIOLOGY J A M E S VANHEEST C O L L E G E ADVANCEMENT BOB VANHEUKELOM FOOD SERVICE J O H N VANIWAARDEM MATHEMATICS

1 3 b "" Faculty/Staff

142

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HOPE

JS

FACULTYANDSTAFF

JAMES VANPUTTEN PHYSCS KATHY VANTUBBERGEN WOMEN'S TENNIS COACH LEONARD VANWYK MATHEMATICS MARY VANVELS PUBLIC S A F E T Y

I

KATHLEEN VERDUIN ENGLISH A L L E N VERHEY RELIGION JAMES VYVYAN CHEMISTRY HUBERT W E L L E R SPANISH

LARRY WAGENAAR JOINT ARCHIVES DIANE WICKMANN S T U D E N T DEVELOPMENT D O N A L D WILLIAMS CHEMISTRY SUSAN WILLIAMS FOCUS

BOYD WILSON RELIGION ELLIE WINTERBOLINE C O L L E G E ADVANCEMENT K A R L A WOLTERS KINESIOLOGY JOHN YELDING EDUCATION

JAMES ZDETEWAY POLITICAL SCIENCE DAVID ZWART EDUCATION

Faculty/Staff

143

1 3 0 -


HOPE DREAM TEAM Continued from page 108 Who else but Holstege? As always, the man did his job, and connected on an unbelievable layup with 4.4 seconds left to put Hope ahead 63-62. Pandemonium struck hard and Kalamazoo's coach was in a quandary and that is where the bad decision making really hurt the Hornets. With 4.4 seconds left, there are plenty of options to 0 t o t consider, even if K-Zoo had no more time-outs. Instead of making the right choice, Kalamazoo tossed a hail-Mary down court hoping, praying that a Hornet would fly up, grab it, and then score, but such was not the case. Kris Merritt was right in the passer's lane and he caught the ball, forcing the Hornets to instantly foul. Merritt made both from the foul stripe and the Dutchmen won 65-62. For the next four games of the tournament Hope won by an average margin of seventeen points. The Dutchmen received excellent performances from all players of course, but specifically a core of five players who managed to score in double figures nearly every game. Those five players were Holstege, Bosma, Whitford, Merritt, J u n i o r Marc Whitford reaches up to steel the ball from Trinity Christian College. Whitford finished the season as and Kevin Brintnell. the number four shooter for the Dutch with 86 points, Holstege especially was unstoppable. Through the giving him a total of 178 career points and a .424 shooting entire tournament he averaged a whopping 21.5 points average. (PR Photo) and nearly seven assists per game in the tournament. He scored the winning basket against K-Zoo in the first round, was two rebounds shy of a triple double, and scored 39 (you read right) points in the championship game. All this and he was only a sophomore. The entire season was a little on the peculiar side, as the Dutchmen started off the season with an 0-1 record, and at one point early on, they were 6-3. From that game on, Hope won 21 of their next 22 games, and coasted to the most wins in Hope College men's basketball history at 27-5. There is much debate over at what point the Dutchmen opened their eyes are realized their potential was being wasted in the early part of the season. Some say it is after a humiliating 39 point blowout loss to traditionally shoddy Aquinas College on Saturday, December 16. Others, Coach Glenn Van Wieren included, think it was the return of Jeff Van Fossan and co-captain Matt Spencer from very serious injuries, both of whom are graduating. The there is the final theory that the three-game trip to New York the S e n i o r Ouane Bosma slams a second Dutchmen launched in late December dunk against rival Calvin College. The Dutch took over the first game against the brought the team together as a family Knights, defeating them 93-76, but in the more. Perhaps it is a combination of all second match-up, Hope squeaked by only three. It is hard to say, as all three events one point ahead at 67-66. (PR Photo) happened within two week span. What is not hard to say, however, is that the Dutchmen are not through. They will not be happy until they come home to Holland with an NCAA Division 111 Championship trophy. Hopefully they won't have to wait long to get one, as some may argue them to be an even better team next year.

Opponent

Hope

Alma 60 74 Albion 70 88 Olivet 75 97 Kalamazoo 68 73 Adrian 53 73 Calvin 70 93 Alma 67 89 Albion 80 94 Olivet 68 97 Kalamazoo 67 65 Adrian 74 92 Calvin 66 67 MIAA Tournament Albion 62 75 Kalamazoo 78 89 NCAA Tournaments Kalamazoo 62 65 John Carroll 61 80 Wscn-Whtwater 66 88 Wittenberg 60 69 Final Four Tournament Frnkln. & Mrshl. 57 76 Rowan 100 93 4 3 0 — Buskethall 144

i

Duane Bosma Shoots for two more points against Kalamazoo College in the first game of the NCAA Tournament. The Dutch struggled, but defeated the Hornets 65-62. Bosma was named the MIAA Player of the Week four times throughout the 19951996 season, the first in the third week of play and then again in week eight, eleven, and finally fourteen. Bosma was also named one of the MIAA CoMost Valuable Players along with Jeremy Cole of Kalamazoo College. (PR Photo)


A s the Dutch take a final time out near the e n d of the game against Wittenberg University, fans h o l d up "Final F o u r " s i g n s in a n t i c i p a t i o n of the inevitable v i c t o r y over the Tigers. Hope defeated Wittenberg 69-60 in the f o u r t h a n d final game of the NCAA t o u r n a m e n t , a d v a n c i n g t h e m t o the Final Four in Salem, Virginia. (PR Photo)

i

/h 0WV

S e n i o r Guard Kevin Brintnell makes a q u i c k pass to Duane Bosma. Britnell was n a m e d t o the All-MIAA First Team for the first time t h i s year for his o u t s t a n d i n g c o n t r i b u t i o n s t o the team's success. (PR Photo)

Basketball 145

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A


Seniors 146


Future graduates listen to Dr. John Shaughnessy's Commencement speech in which he challenged the students to "Try for the best, but recognize that not every success needs to be a home run." He continued, "My dream for you today is that you will have lives not only filled with satisfaction of accomplishment, but also abundant with the joy of touching and being touched by others." Approximately 555 seniors participated in the commence-

T

he first class of eight students

graduated from the newly founded Hope College on July 17, 1866. Those students probably never imagined how the college would grow to become the institution it is today. Now, 130 years later, another class leaves the place they have called home for four years of their life. One thing which has not changed is the recognized excellence in academic programs, and the charismatic Christian community each class is a

ment exercises and about 2,700 family members, and faculty attended the ceremony at the Holland Civic Center. Because of the rain and cold. Commencement was moved indoors for the first time since 1982, limiting available seating for visitors. (Photo by Anthony Perez)

part of and has grown from. The graduates will leave, but always remain, helping to provide hope for the f u t u r e . ^

1 8 6

1996

Seniors 147 w


HOPECOLLEGE

LORS

MEG ABFALL OSSEO KINESIOLOGY/ATHLETIC TRAINING

DAN ACKER E L M G R O V E WL POLITICAL SCIENCE/COMMUNICATIONS

ERIN A L E X A N D E R E A S T G R A N D RAPIDS KINESIOLOGY

ERIC PAUL A L M L I PINCKNEY CHEMISTRY/BIOCHEMISTRY

AARON ANGELI ROCHESTER E X E R C I S E SCIENCE

WAYNE A N G U I L M SPARTA POLITICAL SCIENCE/HISTORY

Seniors I4S

KIMBERLY A C K E R M A N N PARCHMENT PSYCHOLOGY/SOCIOLOGY

OLGA ANANINA MOSCOW RUSSIA INTERNATIONAL S T U D I E S

HEIDI A R O N S O N BARRINGTON IL ENGLISH/ART

STAPHANIE A D A M S JANESVILLE ART

KELLY A N D E R S O N MUSKEGON ENGLISH

RITA A S S I N K ZEELAND ELEMENTARY EDUCATION


ALEXANDER AUMAUGHER HUDSON VILLE ACCOUNTING

D E R E K J. BABIN OTSEGO BOLOGY

MICHELE AXTERAVEST HUDSONVILLE NURSING

H A N A N I. A / V W A D JERUSALEM ISRAEL BIOLOGY

JENNIFER L. AZZAR S O C I A L WORK E A S T G R A N D RAPIDS

I

BRYAN BAINBRIDGE WYOMING B U S I N E S S ADMINISTRATION/B:ONOMICS

J CAMRYN BANGERT PSYCHOLOGY G R A N D RAPIDS

SARA BEAVER PORTAGE BOLOGY/CHEMISTRY

ANNA ELIZABETH BARNETT ELWOOD IN ENGLISH/PHILOSOPHY

PETER CHRISTOPHER BECKMAN HOLLAND C O M P U T E R SCIENCE

WAYNE B A R R E T T POLAND O H POLITICAL SCIENCE

JODI K. BARSTOW G R A N D RAPIDS BIOLOGY/BUSINESS


R. BRYCE B E R G E T H O N S T JOSEPH CHEMISTRY

JENNIFER BLACK PARK RIDGE I L S O C I A L WORK

J E F F E R Y D. B R O W N HUDSONVILLE EXERCISE SCIENCE/ART

MARY B O E L K I N S DAVISON PSYCHOLOGY

GRETCHEN BORG ZEELAND SOCIAL WORK

KATHY BRECLAW G L E N ELLYN I L SCIENCE C O M P O S I T E

Seniors 1.^0

DUANE BOSMA WYOMING ELEMENTARY E D - MATH/SCIENCE

CHRISTA BROWN L A K E CITY SOCIAL WORK

JOY B L A C K C L I N T O N TOWNSHIP NURSING

JULIE R. BLAIR FLOWER MOUND T X POLITICAL SCIENCE/COMMUNICATIONS

CHAD BOLEMA HOLLAND MATH/SCIENCE

TOM BONNEMA KENTWOOD B U S I N E S S ADMINISTRATION/BIONOMICS

M E L I S S A J. B O W E R S MCBAIN L A N G U A G E A R T S COMPOSITE

SARAH BRASS ROCKFORD IL L A N G A R T S COMPOSITE/ELEM E D

DARRICK P BROWN HOLLAND C O M P U T E R SCIENCE


PATTY B R U I N I N K S HOLLAND PSYCHOLOGY

KAREN CABANSAG S T U R G I S MI NURSING

NICOLE J BUIKEMA MORRISON I L S P E C I A L EDUCATION

D E B R A S. C A M B E L L COLUMBUS O H ELEMENTARY E D - MATH/SCIENCE

BRIAN CAPPS D O W N E R S G R O V E IL CHEMISTRY

JAMI L. C A R B O N N E A U ROCKFORD S P E C I A L EDUCATION - E I,

*1 fe. K 7

JEFFERY A. C A R L S O N JENISON ENGLISH

PATRICIA C A R L S O N HOLLAND ENGLISH

WENDY R. C A R R O L L N E W B U R G H IN S P E C I A L EDUCATION

ERIK C A R P E N T E R STAMFORD C T CHEMISTRY

Seniors 151


KATHERYN CARPENTER COLUMBUS O H ENGLISH

KRISTY CHAPMAN WYOMING

TAMARA L. C A S E BIOLOGY MORRIS I L

CHAD CASSERL* PORTAGE PHYSICAL EDUCATION

DAVID BENJAMIN CHARNIN G R A N D RAPIDS POLITICAL SCIENCE/HISTORY

ERICK M. C H I T T L E MASON HISTORY

ELIZABETH CATHEY MASON SOCIAL WORK

NIKOLAS H. CHMIEL C H E S T E R T O N IN CHEMISTRY/BOCHEMISTRY

W

af MARK CHRISTINIDIS ROCHESTER H I L L S BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

HEATHER COLLINS MARSHALL SPECIAL EDUCATION - L , D

JEFFERY COMFORT SALINE ENGINEERING PHYSICS

MARYBETH CONGDON MIDLAND SOCIAL WORK

COLLEGE

IORS Seniors 152


MARGARET CONKLIN TECUMSEH SPECIAL EDUCATION - L D

KATHY CORCORAN MUSKEGON L A N G U A G E A R T S COMPOSITE

COLIN CONNAIRE CAMBRIDGE M A POLITICAL SCIENCE/PSYCHOLOGY

JILL CORNELL LAFAYETTE IN B O L O G Y / P s YCHOLOGY

ADAM COUTURIER LAKE LEELANAU ENGLISH/PS YCHOLOGY

J A S O N W. C O X S T JOSEPH BOLOGY/PS YCHOLOGY

4 JASON CURRIE G R A N D RAPIDS BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

SARA D DECAIR E A S T LANSING PHYSICS

KEVIN DAHLMAN CEDARBURG WI RELIGION/ENGINEERING PHYSICS

ANNETTE DANIELS BLOOMINGDALE I L MUSIC EDUCATION. INSTRUMENTAL

RACHEL DECKER ELMHURST IL PSYCHOLOGY

KELLI DEHAAN KALAMAZOO PS YC HOLOGY SOCIOLOGY

CHANEL DEAN ALDEN SPECIAL EDUCATION • L D

ELISABETH DEKKEP HOLLAND HISTORY ENGLISH

Seniors 15.1


vi

SUSAN DENNISON PISCETORRY N J EDUCATION

JASON DILLABOUGH GLENVIEW IL PSYCHOLOGY

KELLY A. DERMODY KENTWOOD CHEMISTRY

HRISTO D DIMITROV SOFIA BULGARIA POLITICAL SCIENCE/BUSINESS ADMIN

<S>

TAD DOEZEMA G R A N D RAPIDS ENGLISH/COMMUNICATIONS

MARK DUNN EAST LANSING BIOLOGY

Seniors 154

STEVE DUNN EAST LANSING BIOLOGY

NICOLE L. DUROCHER FENTON BIOLOGY

KRISTEN DOUGLASS KETTERING O H COMMUNICATION

GRETA DYKSTRA TRAVERS CITY LANGUAGE ARTS


/ KIM E B R I G H T GLENVIEW IL PSYCHOLOGY/RELIGION

S T E V E N A . ELCHER AU GRES RELIGION

AMY EBRIGHT G R O S S E POINT ENGLISH

MELISSA ELBERT HOLLAND ELEMENTARY EDUCATION

ROBIN M. E B R I G H T G R O S S POINTE PSYCHOLOGY/SOCIOLOGY

H A T T I D. E K E L B A R G E R ITHACA COMMUNICATIONS

ERIK E L D R E D KALAMAZOO PSYCHOLOGY

KARA ENGELSMA G R A N D RAPIDS CHEMISTRY

V

J A M E S M, E N G L I S H JENISON ELEMENTARY E D / S C I E N C E C O M P O S I T E

SUSAN ESSENBURGH HOLLAND LANGUAGE ARTS

AIMEE E U V R A R D HOLLAND MATH - SCIENCE COMPOSITE

DAVID T EVANS ROCHESTER HILLS B U S I N E S S ADMINISTRATION

SEN Seniors /.V


HOPECOLLEGE

S E N IORS

S A N D R A A. FEDERICO ANGOLA N Y DANCE/EDUCATION

S A R A H FINE B R A Z I L IN PSYCHOLOGY

HORI F O S T E R SPRING L A K E PS YCHOLOGY/BIOLOGY

Seniors /J6

ALEX FEDOTOTSZKIN ROCHESTER B U S I N E S S ADMINISTRATION

J U S T I N FINK LANSING PHILOSOPHY

M A T T H E W Fours G R A N D RAPIDS PSYCHOLOGY

KATHLEEN E PENT MUSKEGON ENGLISH/ART

RAM F E S S E N D E N SHELBY S P E C I A L EDUCATION - L D

VICKI FOLIA GRAND BLANC CHEMISTRY

JENNIFER L. FORBES WYOMING B U S I N E S S ADMINISTRATION

LISA M. F R A N K L I N CADILLAC SPECIAL EDUCATION

MICKI J. F R E N S FENNVILLE EXERCISE SCIENCE


AARON FREY KALAMAZOO NURSING

T Y S O N O FRIDAY IOWA C I T Y IA CHEMISTRY

TRICIA G A M M O N S ALPENA EDUCATION

MATTHEW S. GARVELINK HOLLAND BIOLOGY

JASON GASTON KALAMAZOO NURSING/RELIGION

ROCHELLE GAUTHIER C R O S S E ILE MATHEMATICS

T E D GEERDINK HOLLAND FRENCH

RENAE GEERLINGS ZEELAND THEATRE

SARA GEMMEN HUDSONVILLE NURSING

MARY C. GERCELY SCHOOLCRAFT PSYCHOLOGY

KRISTIN GEURINK HOLLAND NURSING

JON GILLESBY DOWAGIAC BIOLOGY

I DOUG GLE BRIGHTON EXERCISE SCIENCE

KELLY G O U L D MUSKEGON ELEMENTARY EDUCATION

KAREN GRAHAM FARMINGTON H I L L S BIOLOGY/POLITICAL S C I E N C E

A M Y R. G R A S M A N DECATUR POLITICAL SCIENCE/COMMUNICATION

Seniors 157


CHRISTOPHER G. GREIMAN TECUMSEH BIOLOGY

LETHA HARNISH WESTLAND NURSING

AMY HAVERDINK HAMILTON GERMAN/INTERNATIONAL S T U D I E S

CHRISTOPHER HEATON NORTHVILLE KINESIOLOGY/ATHLETIC TRAINING

Seniors l.'tN

KATHRYN GUY ATHENS G A PSYCHOLOGY/FRENCH

JASON K HALL WAYLAND E X E R C I S E SCIENCE/PHYSICAL E D

S E R G E E. H A L L Y N DOWNERS GROVE IL PHYSICS/COMPUTER SCIENCE

R O B E R T J. H A R R I S O N OAK HARBOR WA HISTORY/ENGLISH

ANDREA HARTMAN KALAMAZOO RELIGION

ANGELA HARTMAN KALAMAZOO PSYCHOLOGY

JOHN FHAVENAAR KALAMAZOO PSYCHOLOGY

J A S E Y J. H E L G E M O FREMONT L E A R N I N G DISABILITIES

M A L I A M. HAVLICEK CORONADO C A ENGINEERING PHYSICS

BECKY

1

HENEVELD CANTON LANGUAGE ARTS

D A N I E L L E K E N D R A HAYS WILLIAMSTON B U S I N E S S ADMINISTRATION

JAMIE L. H E N S O N HOLLAND EDUCATION


HOPECOLLEGE

S E N IORS

MATT HIERHOLZER SPRING L A K E BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

JODI H O E K S T R A KALAMAZOO MATH

MIKE H O G U E TRAVERSE CITY OS

KEITH HIMEBAUGH HOLLAND ART/COMMUNICATIONS/RELIGION

SARAH ANN HOEKSTRA WYOMING L A N G U A G E A R T S MATH/SCIENCE

JEFF HOLWERDA WHEATON I L B U S I N E S S ADMINISTRATION

HOLLY MINES ROXBURY C T HISTORY

B A R T O N J. HISGEN D O W N E R S G R O V E IL ENGLISH

TAR A H O E K WATER HOLT S P E C I A L EDUCATION - L D

B E T H A. HOEZEE HUDSONVILLE SPECIAL EDUCATION


JOHN HOUSENGA HOLLAND COMPUTER SCIENCE

KRISTEN MOVING OAKBROOK I L EXERCISE SCIENCE

TODD A HOYER CUYAHOGA FALLS O H COMMUNICATION

WENDY L. H U G H E S WATERFORD KINESIOLOGY/ATHLECIC TRAINING

J O N E. HULTGREN GLENVIEW IL COMMUNICATION

M E L I S S A IMMINK HOLLAND ENGINEERING PHYSICS

Z A H R A C ISMAELI PITTSBURGH PA AOLOGY/CHEMISTRY/KINESOLOGY

JULIE JAASMA MODESTO C A CHEMISTRY/PHYSICS

SARAH JANKE G R A N D HAVEN CHEMISTRY/BIOLOGY

JULIE A. JENNINGS ALLEGAN SPECIAL EDUCATION - E.I.

JENNIFER A. JONES CLEVELAND O H KINESIOLOGY

RACHEL KARPANTY BENTON HARBOR COMMUNICATION

HOPECOLLEGE

S E N IORS w •'

Scniors 160 •7X-,-


MICHAEL KAUFMAN BYRON MATH/POLITICAL SCIENCE/EDUCATION

MICHELLE A. KAVANAUGH OTSEGO SOCIAL WORK

CATHERINE KEICH S T LOUIS M O ENGLISH

RICH K E S T E L O O T LEXINGTON BIOLOGY/EXERCISE SCIENCE

£ LAURA KIEFER WESTERVILLE O H BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

J O S E P H A. KING FLUSHING POLITICAL SCIENCE/BUSINESS ADMIN.

TERESA KlRKLAND CHENEY WA EXERCISE SCIENCE/BIOLOGY

KRISTEN KNIPPENBERG LANSING ENGLISH/MUSIC

-

M E R E D I T H KDOYER HOLLAND THEATRE

NICOLE LAMBRIDES A N N ARBOR PSYCHOLOGY

CHRISTINE KRUEGER MILFORD NURSING

NICOLE LAMKEY BARRINGTON I L SOCIAL S T U D I E S COMPOSITE/ ELEM. E D

JOHN LAWLER ROCHESTER H I L L S ENGINEERING PHYSICS

LISA LEE FARMINGTON H I L L S PSYCHOLOGY

Seniors 161


MATTHEW LENGER WYOMING ENGINEERING PHYSICS

TRAVIS E. LONG UNION C I T Y IN ENGINEERING PHYSICS

D E B O R A H S. LUMM PAW PAW B U S I N E S S ADMINISTRATION

STEVE MARSO HUMBOLT IA SPANISH/POLITICAL SCIENCE

w

Seniors 162

K A R I J. LLLJEHORN D E S PLAINES IL PHYSCIS/ART

ANN LDOMAN BELLEVILLE IL ACCOUNTING

STEVE MAHER PORTAGE CHEMISTRY

MARLA MARTIN OAKLAND C A RELIGION/PSYCHOLOGY

M E N G K. LIM HOLLAND BIOCHEMISTRY

MELISSA LDEKS ROCKFORD LANGUAGE ARTS/SCIENCE/MATH

WILLIAM A. LDRENZ S O U T H HAVEN PHYSICS/MATH

ANNE LUCAS HILLSDALE WOMEN'S S T U D I E S / E N G L I S H

MONICA J, MANNING G R A N D RAPIDS B U S I N E S S ADMINISTRATION/ENGLISH

RICHARD L. M A P L E S HOMER HISTORY/ANCIENT CIVILIZATION

DENICE MASSELINK HOLLAND ACCOUNTING

SARAH MCCLURE PRYAR O K ENGLISH


IAN L . M C D O W E L L ANN ARBOR SOCIOLOGY

SHEREE M MCFARLAND VASSAR BIOLOGY

W I L L I A M R. M C G O V E R N PORTAGE CHEMISTRY/ENGINEERING PHYSICS

KRISTIE MEENDERING G R A N D RAPIDS S P E C I A L EDUCATION - L D

L -

K

i • S T E V E N A. MEEUWSEN ZEELAND PHILOSOPHY

TRACY MENKEN HOLLAND PSYCHOLOGY

i i ^ B E T H MIHOCKO QUINCY LANGUAGE A R T S

CATHY MILLER KALAMAZOO BIOLOGY

JUDITH L. MILLER DALTON O H RELIGION

SARA MINNAAR LANSING PSYCHOLOGY

SEN Seniors 163


COLLEGE

S E N ICRS

S C O T T A. MODISHER LIVERPOOL N Y MATH

JACQUELYN MOL HOLLAND ENGLISH

ELIZABETH NELSON JENISON LANGUAGE A R T S COMPOSITE

Seniors 164

AMY L. MOECKEL S T JOSEPH COMMUNICATION/SPANISH

JEREMY MONTY SCHENECTADY N Y P O L I T I A L SCIENCE/COMMUNICATION

KRISTIN N E L S O N HOLLAND PSYCHOLOGY

TERESA MOGDICS MUSKEGON HISTORY

M I C H E L L E M. M O J Z A K G R A N D RAPIDS BIOLOGY

WENDY MOORE WYOMING S P E C I A L E D U A C T I O N • E.I

SARAH NELLER HAMPTON N H EDUCATION

RUSSEL NELSON MADISON WL C O M P U T E R SCIENCE

DAVID T NICHOLSON GKEMOS ENGLISH


SARI E. NIENHUIS HOLLAND PSYCHOLOGY/COMMUNICATION

SHANNON NIVEN G R A N D RAPIDS COMMUNICATION

KIM N O L A N HOLLAND BIOLOGY

NYKAMP G R A N D HAVEN ACCOUNTING

KARI L. NYSSE HUDSONVILLE PSYCHOLOGY/SOCIOLOGY

MELISSA L/NN O'CONNOR EAST AMHERST N Y B U S I N E S S ADMINISTRATION/PSYCHOLOGY

HOPE OOSTERHOUSE WYOMING SPECIAL EDUCATION

KAREN OOSTERHOUSE CALEDONIA BIOLOGY

C O L L E E N M. O R T W I N E NOVI ENGLISH

CHRISTINE OSBORN MT PLEASANT MATHEMATICS/PHYSICS

T H O M A S S. OSBORN SAULT S T E MARIE KINESOLOGY

AMY OTIS EAST JORDAN G E R M A N / S E C O N D A R Y EDUCATION

KAY O T T O S T LOUIS F%RK M N PSYCHOLOGY

Russ

KEN OSBORN SAULT S T E . MARIE ENGINEERING PHYSICS

CHAD NYKAMP HOLLAND HISTORY

M E G H A N OBERLY TOLEDO O H L E A R N I N G DISABILITIES

Seniors


JENNIFER S U E PALMA WYOMING L E A R N I N G DISABILITIES

A A R O N W PARKER MUSKEGON POLITICAL SCIENCE

L A U R A PECHTA HILLSDALE COMMUNICATIONS/POLITICAL SCIENCE

MOLLIS PANGLE KALAMAZOO BIOLOGY/PSYCHOLOGY

JULIE L. PARKER MARSHALL BIOLOGY/PSYCHOLOGY

MONICA

PELLOW

S H A N N O N PANSZI INDIANAPOLIS IN PSYCHOLOGY/CHEMISTRY

JENNIFER PARKS ALLEGAN PSYCHOLOGY/CHEMISTRY

MARLAINA PARSONS STURGIS B U S I N E S S ADMINISTRATION

TARA L. PEARSON COLDWATER COMMUNICATIONS

JENNIFER PERKINS BAY C I T Y PSYCHOLOGY

CAROLYN PERRY BUFFALO N Y SOCIAL WORK

rf! JEFFREY A PESTUN B A T T L E CREEK C O M P U T E R SCIENCE

Seniors IMi

S T E V E N L. PETROELJE ZEELAND RELIGION

MLMI P H A N HOLLAND BUSINASS ADMIN./INTL STUDIES

TRUNG PHAN WYOMING ENGINEERING PHYSICS


•lOPECOLLEGE

S E N IORS

MICHELLE PHELPS THREE RIVERS ENGLISH

JENNIFER MICHELLE PLUMMER HOLLAND KINESOLOGY

HEATHER PROUGH SHIPSHEWANA IN SOCIAL WORK

J. A N D R E W PIERCE SPRING L A K E B U S I N E S S A D M I N / P S Y C H ./POLL SCI

CAROLEE PORTER ROCKFORD SOCIAL WORK

ILIANA D RAIKOVA SOFIA BULGARIA B I O N O M I C S / B U S I N E S S ADMINISTRATION

J O E L PLATINGA P E L L A IA POLITICAL SCIENCE

LAUREL PLOTZKE DECATUR I L MATH

ROBIN P R A N G E MARINE C I T Y CHEMISTRY

MARK PROFF EAGAN M N BIOLOGY

J A M E S RAIRICK GRAND LEDGE BIOLOGY/CHEMISTRY

JANNA RAPP GRIGGSTOWN N J HISTORY

Seniors 167


SUSAN REEVES KALAMAZOO NURSING

KAREY REICHERT - SLATER HOLTON S P E C I A L EDUCATION

•\ J O E L REISIG BIRMINGHAM ENGLISH/BUSINESS

NANCY R E U S HOLLAND S O C I A L WORK

ALYSON L. R O B E R T S O N C H I C A G O IL CHEMISTRY

AMANDA RODRIGUEZ FENNVILLE S O C I A L WORK

DENNIS RIETMAN ZEELAND ENGINEERING PHYSICS

ROSALBA RODRIGUEZ FENNVILLE S O C I A L WORK

THEODORE R ROBERT BENTON HARBOR POLITICAL S C I E N C E / E N G L I S H

KERI ROELOFS HUDSONVILLE NURSING

COLLEGE

IORS Seniors InS


SCOTT ROOK US G R A N D RAPIDS B U S I N E S S ADMINISTRATION

BRIAN ROSENAU CADILLAC A T H L E T I C TRAINING

PAUL ROSENBROOK ERIE COMMUNICATION

L I S A J . Ross MT PLEASANT B U S I N E S S ADMINISTRATION

9

S H E L L I BTNN R O T T S H A F E R GRAND RAPIDS HISTORY/SPANISH

ANNE SCHEIBER BLOOMFIELD HILLS ENGLISH/SECONDARY EDUCATION

DANIELLE ROZEBOOM G R A N D RAPIDS ENGLISH/EDUCATION

CARLA L

SHANNON RUCKERT CENTREVILLE B U S I N E S S ADMIN./COMMUNICATION

ORTENCIA RUIZ ALMA POLITICAL S C I E N C E / S O C I A L WORK

SCHERPENISSE MATH

•Ni

C H A D SCHOLTEN ALLENDALE BIOLOGY

LISA SCHROCK MASON COMMUNICATION

TOBY Q . S C H U L E R NORTH MUSKEGON LANGUAGE A R T S COMPOSITE

AMY L SEIBERT P L E A S A N T RIDGE COMMUNICATION

Seniors 169


KRISTEN SEID NORTH MUSKEGON PSYCHOLOGY/BIOLOGY

SLON S E V E R I N CERESCO MATH - SCIENCE C O M P O S I T E / E L E M . E D

BROOKE SHELDON SPRING L A K E POLITICAL S C I E N C E

HOLLY S H E R W O O D

Mr ALISON SHIELDS EVANSTON IL PSYCHOLOGY

MICAH SJOBLOM OAK F^RK IL PSYCHOLOGY

JAMES SMITS ZEELAND S P E C I A L EDUCATION

Seniors 170

LUNGA SINUKA S O U T H AFRICA

GINA SMIES WHITEHALL PHYSICAL EDUCATION

TODD SODERQUIST HASTINGS N E ENGINEERING PHYSICS

BRYAN S H O W E R S WlLLIAMSTON C O M P U T E R SCIENCE

DANA SMITH LITCHFIELD SCIENCE C O M P O S I T E

MATTHEW P SPENCER HOLLAND SEPCIAL EDUCATION - E I

KIRSTEN SINGER FAIRFIELD O H PSYCHOLOGY/DANCE

LYNN E L I Z A B E T H S M I T H G R A N D RAPIDS E N G L I S H / S E C O N D A R Y EDUCATION

CHRISTINA STEIN B G RAPIDS CHEMISTRY


SHAWN STEINER WARSAW IN CHEMISTRY

AMY STILLWELL DUBLIN O H SOCIAL W&RK

ANGELA STREY HIGGINS L A K E POLITICAL SCIENCE/SOCIOLOGY

S A R A J. S T U L L GRANDVILLE EDUCATION

9

I

LAURA STURMFELS PACIFIC M O GEOLOGY

A N G E L A TAYLOR DOWNERS GROVE IL CHEMISTRY

AARON TECRONEY CLYMER N Y BIOLOGY

JENNIFER RENEE T H O M A S PLAINWELL BUSINESS/COMMUNICATION

Seniors 171

I


HOPECOLLEGE

NO R s

JENNIFER M. TOLMER SOUTHGATE POLITICAL SCIENCE

S T E V E TRIEMSTRA KALAMAZOO COMPUTER SCIENCE

KEVIN VALDES DOWAGIAC BIOLOGY Seniors

72

AMBER TOTH G R A N D HAVEN MUSIC EDUCATION/LANGUAGE A R T S

JOSEPHINE TRIPOLI HOWELL SPECIAL EDUCATION/PSYCHOLOGY

J E R E M Y S C O T T VAN EK HAWTHORNE N J PHILOSOPHY

HEIDI T R A N T O W RIVERFOREST I L SOCIAL WORK

U

AMY TROENDLY S T C H A R L E S IL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

S A R A VAN P U T T E N KALAMAZOO INTL. STUDIES/B:ON./POLITICAL SCIENCE

JEREMY J. TUINSTRA PLAINWELL RELIGION

NAOMI T S U K A M O T O FUJISAWA JAPAN PSYCHOLOGY

CORY VAN T I L HOWARD CITY PSYCHOLOGY/BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION


ANDREW T VANDAM JENISON BUSINESS/ENGLISH

CHRISTINE VANDEBUNTE BYRON CENTER ELEM, E D / L A N G U A G E A R T S COMPOSITE

BETH VANDENBERG KALAMAZOO L E A R N I N G DISABILITIES

S C O T T VANDERBEEK VICKSBURG B U S I N E S S ADMINISTRATION

S A R A H M. V A N H A R K E N NEWARK N J POLITICAL SCIENCE

ERIC VANNAMEN PALOS H E I G H T S I L ACCOUNTING

AMY Vivio

KATHERINE VLASICA ASTORIA N Y BOLOGY

r SHANNON LEIGH VANDERSPOOL B R I S T O L WL SPANISH/PSYCHOLOGY

R E B E C C A VANDYKE SPRING L A K E PSYCHOLOGY

A N D R E W P V A N PERNIS A S H L A N D WL

MUNISH VASISHT HOLLAND BIONOMICS/BUSINESS

KRITIN E. VINK SPRING L A K E THEATRE

TONI V I S S E R WEST OLIVE B U S I N E S S ADMINISTRATION

NORWAY ENGLISH

Seniors 173


CYNTHIA VOORHEES R O S E M O N T PA SPANISH/INTERNATIONAL S T U D I E S

RCUS WASILEVICH LISLE IL CHEMISTRY/BIOLOGY

DARRYL WEGNER HOLLAND ENGINEERING PHYSISCS

D A N I E L J. W H I T E MUSKEGON LANGUAGE A R T S COMPOSITE/ELEM E D

Seniors 17-1

KARSTEN VOSKUIL HOLLAND POLITICAL SCIENCE

JENNIFER WEAVER MUSKEGON COMMUNICATION

JULIE WEISS CHELSEA LANGUAGE A R T S COMPOSITE

JENNIFER WHITESELL G R A N D RAPIDS DANCE

AARON WALK PINCKNEY BIOLOGY/CHAMISTRY

RACHEL WEBB DOWNERSGROVE IL ACCOUNTING

STACEY WENDT HOLLAND LANGUAGE A R T S COMPOSITE/ELEM E D

ROBERT GEORGE WIESENTHAL POLITICAL SCIENCE W H EATON IL

NICK W A R D PORT HURON ENGINEERING

AMITY WEELDREYER MATTAWAN MATH - SCIENCE COMPOSITE/ELEM E D

MOLLY K. W E S T S T LDUIS M O RELIGION

RYAN W I L C O X HAMILTON BIOLOGY/CHEMISTRY/HISTORY


TONY WILKERSON KALAMAZOO RELIGION

K R I S T E N WILT LAKEWOOD O H S P E C I A L EDUCATION - L , D

C H R I S T O P H E R M. W I R T H ZEELAND COMMUNICATION

JULIE WRIGHT DOWNERS GROVE IL S O C I A L WORK

K U N - C H U N YAO LANSING THEATRE

PATH Y E N HOLLAND ACCOUNTING

A M A N D A J. WININGER S O U T H HAVEN PSYCHOLOGY

JANAY K. W O R M M E E S T E R JENISON B U S I N E S S ADMINISTRATION

S A R A H YOUNG WILLMAR M N ENGINEERING PHYSICS

T I M O T H Y M, W I T V O E T PORTAGE B U S I N E S S ADMINISTRATION

C H R I S T O P H E R D. W Y N G A R D E N G R A N D RAPIDS POLITICAL SCIENCE

ANNA ZAWADZKA WILMETTE IL ACCOUNTING

Seniors 175


i JENNIFER ZEERIP HOLLAND B U S I N E S S A DMIN /COMMUNICATIONS

CINDY ZLRBEL COLOMBUS O H ELEMENTARY EDUCATION

MONIKA N. Z W A R T HOLLAND HUMANITIES/EDUCATION

K i m Jones, senior in education, makes her way into the Civic Center p a r k i n g lot to f i n d her w a i t i n g family. Because the graduation ceremony was held i n d o o r s , many relatives a n d f r i e n d s of graduates were unable t o attend. 1996 markes the first t i m e in eight years that g r a d u a t i o n was not held o u t d o o r s at the Holland Municipal Stadium. (PR photo)

Seniors 176

A N T H O N Y ZDRC BATAVIA IL ACCOUNTING

ELISE ZUBER ZEELAND S O C I A L WORK


T w o graduates e x c h a n g e h u g s and c o n g r a t u l a t e each other after the ceremony. Former s t u d e n t s say g o o d - b y e to c l a s s m a t e s for the last time as many will not be reunited until f u t u r e class reu n i o n s . (Photo by A n t h o n y Perez)

A long t i m e g r o u p of f r i e n d s gathers for one last g r a d u a t i o n p h o t o by parents. The rain held off so graduates were able t o leave the c r a m p e d Civic Center and take advantage of more space outd o o r s . (Photo by A n t h o n y Perez)

SENI student efforts land them in mortar board

J

ackie Mol ('96) works part time at the Ottawa County Red Cross as the volunteer coordinator. She sings in the Hope College Chorus and even though her days are tightly scheduled, she still finds time to maintain an impressive 3.913 cumulative CPA. Mol's efforts haven't gone unnoticed. Last year, she was chosen to be part of Mortar Board, a senior national honors society. She and thirty-nine other Hope College students are members of this society which recognizes excellence in academics. Recently, new members for next year were selected. The process is long and takes up a majority of the Board's spring semester.

Names are gathered from juniors with a minimum 3.3 GPA and informative letters are sent out, urging them to pick up an application. Applicants are asked their campus, service, and community activities. "Through the application, we get a better picture of what these people are doing," said President Hollis Pangle ('96). "We are looking for a well-rounded person." By this point, GPA is no longer important. Admission into the Mortar Board is now based on leadership abilities and service projects. The actual selection of new members is a blind process, where the names of the applicants are not visible to the board members, just

their personal information. Of the total number of applicants, each board member selects their own top forty. From this total, forty new members are chosen. The juniors are made aware of their entrance through tapping, which involves a current member going to the junior's class with a balloon and a small card which was read aloud explaining the meaning of Mortar Board. They then participate in an induction ceremony. The new board selected for next year's senior class includes, coPresidents Laura Listenberger ('97) and Fatin Muhawi ('97), Vice-President Julie Grahmann ('97), Secretary Kiersten Krause ('97), Treasurer and Historian Theppanya Keolasy ('97).

The Mortar Board participants are involved in many activities which collaborate with other organizations, such as Take Back the Night, the AIDS Walk, a carnation sale during Nykerk, and turkey baskets for Thanksgiving. They also organize Wearing of the Blue, a breakfast for freshmen and sophomores who have made the Dean's List, in an effort to encourage them to continue to excel. Trick O' Treating for Cans held this Halloween filled up the entire back seat and trunk of Pangle's M e r c u r y Sable with cans of C a m b e l l ' s and S p a g h e t t i O ' s among several other a c t i v i t i e s . ^

BY stacy bogart

Seniors 177 - m


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T h e Class of 1996 listens t o a lesson f r o m the Holy S c r i p t u r e read by Ben Patterson, the dean of chapel. The reading came f r o m Psalm 100, o f f e r i n g invaluable advice as the g r a d u a t i n g class heads into the w o r l d o u t s i d e Hope College. (Photo by A n t h o n y Perez)

H o p e College President J o h n J a c o b s o n says a few w o r d s t o the g r a d u a t i n g class before a w a r d i n g degrees a n d certificates. Students received degrees in o n e of four d i s c i p l i n e s : Bachelor of Arts, Music, Science, or Nursing. (Photo by A n t h o n y Perez)

T w o of the newest Hope a l u m n i say c o n g r a t u l a t i o n s and g o o d - b y e before leaving c a m p u s one last t i m e as students. Former s t u d e n t s will be reunited again at many future h o m e c o m i n g s and class reunions. (Photo by A n t h o n y Perez)

1 3 0

Graduation 178


T h e 1996 Baccalaureate s e r m o n was delivered by Dr. J o h n Hessellnk. Titled " L i f e Means he c h a l l e n g e d s t u d e n t s t o fill in the blank and contemplate what gave meaning t o their life. (Photo by A n t h o n y Perez)

M a r y Boelkins, a p s y c h o l o g y major, receives a Bachelor of Arts Degree f r o m President J o h n J a c o b s o n a n d Dean of Chapel Ben Patterson. (Photo by A n t h o n y Perez)

P r o f e s s o r of P s y c h o l o g y Dr. J o h n S h a u g h n e s s y delivers the 1996 c o m m e n c e m e n t of address. He titled his speech "Your Were G o o d , " d e s c r i b i n g the a c c o m p l i s h m e n t s of the class. (Photo by A. Perez)

Graduation 179

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T

hough many differences abound,

the 2,700 students undoubtedly possess one thing in c o m m o n : all are integral pieces of

f

Hope's community. Students experience an environment that encourages learning, not only f r o m within the classroom, but also f r o m personal interaction and dialogue stretching beyond assigned lecture times. Real life is an invaluable learning tool. Without active student participation in classes, sports, clubs or organizations,

T h e spirit of students: unending and unbreakable. The excitement they find in life, a favorite team, field of study, or anything else, is simply amazing. Together they can do anything, and will often struggle and fight until they do. These 2,700 souls are the undeniable spirit of Hope. (PR Photo)

Hope College would not continue to be an institution of outstanding excellence.

186

w

.

s 180 Undergrads

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Undergr


Undergrads 181

m


A f t e r participating In Hope's great Pull tradition as freshmen and sophomores, the junior class takes on a new role in the event. To the freshmen class, the juniors become leaders and teachers in a tradition the new students are experiencing for the first time. The juniors become the freshmen's coaches, mentors, and friends as they are taught to morale or pull on the great rope like so many before them. The juniors become role models not only on the banks of the Black River, but also on campus, in the classroom or on the playing field. They share their knowledge with those who come after them, while looking ahead for answers

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ooking forward to their fast approaching senior year, juniors made the necessary preparations for culmination of their days at Hope. Many students spent their third year studying abroad, surrounded by rich cultural diversity. Others opted to travel to places such as Chicago, Washington D.C. and Philadelphia to intern for prestigious companies. However, the majority of juniors remained in Holland to find internships and conduct independent studies. No matter how students chose to study during their junior year, all were undoubtedly keeping their bright futures foremost in mind. ^

Juniors 183 1 3 0


I n April 1995 Kansas Republican Senator B o b Dole became the s i x t h Republican t o formally declare his c a n d i d a c y for a m o v e into the White House in 1996. T h i s is the t h i r d presidential attempt for Dole, w h o u n s u c c e s s f u l l y ran in Republican primaries in 1980 and 1988. His intention is t o cut taxes, balance the budget and "lead A m e r i c a n back t o her place in the s u n . " Dole began his political career in 1951, s e r v i n g in the Kansas legislature. He s e r v e d in the House of Representatives f r o m 1961 t h r o u g h 1969 a n d has been a Senator since. Dole's latest bid t o b e c o m e president d o e s not have precedence on its side -- only three t i m e s have s i t t i n g Senators been elected President. Age is another factor that may d i s c o u r a g e voters. If elected, Dole w o u l d be 73 years o l d u p o n entering office. T h i s w o u l d make him the oldest newly elected president in history. (AP Info a n d Photo)

HO^C:SBSSS J U N I O R S ROBERT ABBOT JALAA ABDELWAHAB A F S H I N AFARIN TOM A K L A N D KERRY A L L E E JEFF AMLOTTE HEATHER BAIR

D A N I E L BANNINK MATTHEW B A R T O N JEREMY B E A R D ERIC B E C K E R JAMI B E C K S V O O R T MELISSA BERENDS CHAD BETZ

R A C H E L BIERLING BRYAN B O O D T TAMMY B O U W E N S JOANNA BOWMAN JOEL BRANDT J A S O N BUCATA NATHANIEL B U C K L E Y

BROOKE B U D D E TODD BULGARELLI CINDY BUONORANE JULIE B U T T S JAMES BUTZ J E F F BYAM

Juniors 184


O n A p r i l 19, 1995, a car b o m b e x p l o d e d in Oklahoma City, d e s t r o y i n g the Alfred P. Murrah Federal B u i l d i n g a n d killing s c o r e s of men, w o m e n a n d y o u n g children. The f o r c e of the blast tore off the b u i l d i n g ' s facade and sent it f l y i n g fifty feet a c r o s s the street, where it s l a m m e d into another b u i l d i n g a n d came t o rest in a p a r k i n g lot. W i t h the outer wall of the b u i l d i n g s u d d e n l y gone, w o r k e r s t u m b l e d out of their offices and into the street where the blast had c a r v e d a crater 30 feet wide. Shortly after the e x p l o s i o n , T i m o t h y McVeigh, a Gulf War veteran was arrested for c a r r y i n g a concealed w e a p o n . Two days later, he was recognized as one of the b o m b i n g s u s p e c t s a n d was charged. At printing, McVeigh's trial was still pending. (AP Info a n d Photo)

JUNIORS

MARK B Y L A N D JULIA CALABRO CHRIS CASEY JEREMY C A U L K I N S TRUDY CAVANAGH H A S A N CHOUDHRY PETER CHRISTENSEN

NICOLE C L E M E N T S AUDREY COATES BSTRICK C O L L I N S MICHAEL C R A N M E R LAUREN CRAWLEY D A N I E L CWIK SETH DALE

SARAH DEHAAN S C O T T DEKUIPER JOHN DELCALZO R E B E C C A DENISON DEBRA DEVRIES SEAN DEWULF C H R I S DEMSUNG

E L I Z A B E T H DICKINSON SARAH DINGERSON MIMI D O JIM DOBBINS JEREMY D O B O S R O B E R T DOERING THOMAS DORAN

Juniors 185 130-


the cost of hooks is in the eye of the beholder

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hen Saum Rahimi ('97) leaves the Hope-Geneva Bookstore after purchasing his books each semester, his wallet is substantially lighter. "It is very frustrating," Rahimi said. "(First) semester, for four classes, the total was just under $350. At the end of the semester I'll get a fraction of that $350 back. And in the sciences, they are always getting new editions so there is a good chance 1 w o n ' t get any return on my investment." Most Hope students feel the burden of book costs, but few feel it to the N u r s i n g , biology, a n d c h e m i s t r y m a j o r s shell out the same extent as most m o n e y each semester for b o o k s . Often because Rahimi. As a biof the q u i c k l y a d v a n c i n g fields, b o o k s are updated each year, r e n d e r i n g an $85 investment w o r t h l e s s ology/chemisafter one semester of use. J u n i o r b i o l o g y m a j o r s try double maJ o s h McMantis and J a s o n Doublestein experience t h i s j or, Rahimi p r o b l e m every semester, i n c l u d i n g w i t h this Microbiolmust shell out ogy class. (Photo by Zach J o h n s o n ) the big bucks, since these two majors have the most expensive per book average at Hope College. The average biology textbook runs about $60, with chemistry close behind at $56. Another cash intensive major is nursing, with the highest possible textbook tab of $810. "I spent $560 on books this year," Shannon Laursen ('97), a nursing student, said. "I'll use the books again next year, but that is still a lot of money to spend at one time."

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As the cash register total spirals upward, many Hope students are left wondering why books are so expensive. The answer presented by many is that they are not. "Books are actually a very good deal," according to Terence W. M o o r e in J u n e ' s Chronicle of Higher Education. " A c a d e m i c books cost what they do for very valid reasons, including production costs, the time and skill needed to produce high quality products, the research, copyrights, and revisions needed to keep the textbooks accurate and up-to-date," Moore relates in his article "Believe it or Not, Academic Books are Bargains." Paula Shaughnessy, the textbook manager at the Hope-Geneva bookstore, might disagree with Moore's sentiments. "Books seem to be more expensive to me," Shaughnessy said. "The prices seem to be exceeding the inflation rate, which I'm sure that they would justify by sighting the increase in paper costs." Shaughnessy, however, wants to dispel the commonly held student notion that the bookstore is making a substantial profit. "We do what we can to get books more cheaply for students," Shaughnessy said. "We go through national used book wholesalers, trying to cycle used books through again before ordering new books from the publisher." Used books are of little use to students when new editions of textbooks are published, but this inconvenience is necessary, according to Susan Williams of HarcourtBrace College Publishing. "The basic rule of thumb for

publishing companies is to revise their textbooks every three years," Williams said. "Books, especially in the science fields, quickly become obsolete with today's new advances in research and technology. Revisions are necessary to keep the books up-to-date and accurate." Although the bookstore usually increases the price of textbooks twenty-five percent, a new policy implemented by the administration could cause the price of some materials to increase eight fold. "In the past, various departments sold manuals outside the bookstore," Shaughnessy said. "Now, in order to avoid hidden costs, all such manuals are sold by the bookstore. It is more expensive than going through the department, but at least you know what you are going to spend." Boyd Wilson, professor of religion, fears allowing his course materials to be sold through the b o o k s t o r e . W h e n I ask the publisher's permission to Xerox their materials, it is often free or a penny a page because I don't intend to make money through their sale," Wilson said. The bookstore, as an institution intent on making money, must purchase the copyright of the material in order to print it. Therefore, my packet would cost $5 for photocopying fees while the bookstores edition could cost $40. It is easier to use the bookstore, but handling it myself is in the advantage of the student."

BYjim riekse & heather bosch


HOPE g

JUNIORS

JASON DOUBLESTEIN CORRINE DOWNING KATHERINE D R A K E VICTORIA D U F F JODETTE DUNLAP JOHN DUPERON KRISTINA E D E N

ERIC E L S H O L Z J A S O N ESHUIS KATHARINE FANSLER DAVID FKLDMEIER RAUL FFERRI R E B E C C A FLORY AMANDA FLOWERS

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JONATHON FLY ALICIA FBRTINO D A N F&STER AARON FRANK TIFFINI FRIDAY RON FRIEL JOE FRITSCH

SHERYL GABRIEL PETER GANEFF L E I G H A N N GOODIN TOM G O R T S E M A SHANNON GRAFF JULIE GRAHMANN RATIENCE GRAYBILL

NATE G R E E N W O O D AMY G R E W E L L BROOKE GROENDYKE DENISE HABEDANK RACHEL HALL DAN HANSEN M E L I S S A HARRIGER

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B o o k c o s t s can q u i c k l y add up; almost as fast as the piles of w o r t h l e s s b o o k s that were not b o u g h t back for resale. N u r s i n g s t u d e n t s will s p e n d the most on b o o k s , about $810, a n d dance the least at $344. A b o u t 75 c e n t s of the t e x t b o o k dollar g o e s to the publisher, while the College b o o k s t o r e earns only 25 cents. (Info c o u r t e s y of The Anchor, p h o t o by Zach J o h n s o n )

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JUNIORS JULIE HARRIS TODD HART RYAN H A R V E Y NICOLE HAUCK SCOTT HAZZARD JASON HENDERSON MATT H E R R I M A N

TIM H I C K E Y AMY HINDERER KIMBERLY H I N Z E NATHAN HOEKZEMA AUBREY HOWE MEGAN HUNTER A M Y MARIE HYATT

J O DI J A M E S CHRISTINE JARVIS DANA JENSEN JASON JOHNSON ZACHARY J O H N S O N STEPHANIE KAPER RUSSELL KARSTEN

MAMI K A T O LAURIE KEISLING DONALD KELLER THEPPANYA K E O L A S Y KIMBERLY K I D D E R WILLIAM KINTGZ JOSH htooisTRA

KIERSTEN KRAUSE SHAYLYNN K R U E G E R JENNIFER K R U G E R MICHAEL KRUKOWSKI JOCELYN KWIATKOWSKI LAURA LANGE MATTHEW LAPPENGA

" TI he sight y o u see before you...was i m p o s s i b l e , was unthinkable, just three years a g o , " Israel's Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin t o l d t h o s e present at the East R o o m of the White House. The " s i g h t " was the September 28,1995, s i g n i n g of an a c c o r d between Israel a n d the PLO that w o u l d e n d Israel's military o c c u p a t i o n of West Bank cities and lay the f o u n d a t i o n for a Palestinian state. President C l i n t o n p r e s i d e d over the c e r e m o n y w h i c h featured t w o h o u r s of speeches a n d pageantry before an audience of d i p l o m a t s , f o r e i g n m i n i s t e r s , cabinet secretaries a n d m e m b e r s of C o n g r e s s . The agreement outlines the p r o c e s s for gradual w i t h d r a w a l of Israeli t r o o p s a n d the transfer of g o v e r n i n g a u t h o r i t y for Palestinian selfrule in thirty percent of the West Bank. It also allows for Palestinian elections and the release of 5,000 Palestinian p r i s o n e r s being held by Israel. Unfortunately, Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin was a s s a s s i n a t e d by a J e w i s h extremist in Israel on Saturday, November 4 , 1 9 9 5 . (AP Info a n d Photo)

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HOPE-SGNSA J U N I O R S

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KALENE LARR VALERIE LASORTA J A S O N U^W CHRIS LEGG SARAH LEPARD PETER LEPSZYK LAURA USTENBERGER

EVAN L L E W E L L Y N AMY L D D E N S T E I N S A R A LDOMAN S U S A N LDOMAN NICK L D P R E S T I REBECCA LUCAS ANNA LULL

DANIELLE MACHAN ERIK MANINEN G R E G MARTIN R E B E C C A MARTIN STACEY M A S T E R S O N DAVE M C D O N A L D BRIAN M C K A N N A

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W i t h each g a m e he played, Baltimore orioles s h o r t s t o p Cal Ripken Jr. drew one game closer t o breaking one of baseball's " u n b r e a k a b l e " records. In 1939, Yankee first-baseman L o u Gehrig retired after h a v i n g appeared In 2,130 c o n s e c u t i v e games, an a c c o m p l i s h m e n t that surely w o u l d never be equalled. In 1995, Ripken not only equalled it — he s u r p a s s e d it! On September 6,1995, Ripken t o o k the field, as he had d o n e every Orioles game since May 30,1982, t o play against the California Angels. This was c o n s e c u t i v e game 2,131 — but not until the fifth inning, w h e n baseball games become official. When the fifth inning came, f i r e w o r k s e x p l o d e d as ten f o o t banners bearing "2-1-3-1" were u n f u r l e d in the outfield stands of Baltimore's Camden Yards. The fans s t o o d and cheered for Ripken, w h o emerged f r o m the d u g o u t and gave his jersey t o his wife and t w o children. His teammates p u s h e d the reluctant Ripken back out o n t o the field where he made a " t h a n k y o u " lap a r o u n d the ballpark, s h a k i n g hands with the fans. The ovation lasted t w e n t y - t w o minutes. Befitting a hero, Ripken hit a h o m e run in the game w o n by the Orioles 4-2. (AP Info and Photo)

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JUNIORS

LAURA MCKEE KAREN MCLDUTH J O S H U A MCMANIS BRIAN M C N A M A R A R E B E K A H MENNING C H R I S T O P H E R MICHEUS L A U R A MIHAILOFF

NATHAN MIHALEK DANIELLE MILLER JULIE MOES MICHELLE MOLINE MEG MORGAN K A R Y L MORIN MEGAN MULDER

M U T U R I MURIUKI KATHERINE M U R P H Y RYAN N A C E KEVIN NASH MONA NASIR JOEL NEMES SARA NICLES

STEFANY NICODEMUS JEREMY NORRIS JEREMY NOTMAN MELISSA O'CONNELL RYAN O ' C O N N E L L D A N ODERKIRK JEFFREY O E G E M A

LISA O G D E N REBECCA O L D S KRISTEN OOSTVEEN MATTHEW O S E L K A JOHNMARK OUDERSLUYS HEATHER OZINGA HEATHER PAPANEK

G R E G PAPLAWSKY D A N I E L L E BARKER SALLY FVW/LIK RYAN RAZDUR HOLLY P E L O N ROY PEREIRA BRIAN P E T E R S O N

MARK P E T E R S O N JENNIFER P E T S C H E R HEIDI PFAU J A M E S POLAK VIC P O L I T E S REBECA BDNKA JONATHAN P O T T

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SHV-ebutral students question the saftey of college transportation

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elli DeHaan (96) couldn't get a ride from Hope's shuttle van-service so instead she got a ride to the hospital. DeHaan was attacked returning from an off-campus party, a location unaccessible to the shuttle vans due to college policy. Her assault raised questions around campus as to the soundness of the College policy concerning off-campus transportation. • DeHaan was headed home from Moon Tower on fourteenth street when she decided to cut through the parking lot behind College East apartments. Two men, one white and one black, yelled for her to "come t a l k , " an o f f e r which DeHaan ignored and continued walking. Apparently angered by the snubbing, the men followed her. "I wasn't going to run because 1 knew they could out run me," DeHaan said. "The next thing I knew, a guy grabbed my arms and the other guy started whaling on me." DeHaan was hit in the stomach between five and eight times, her assailant asking, "You're too good to talk to us?" When she began to yell, her attackers ran off. DeHaan ran home and called

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her friend Monica Zwart ('96) to take her to the hospital. They spent three hours in Holland Community Hospital's emergency room, where DeHaan was administered a CAT scan to check for a possible ruptured spleen. The test was negative and DeHaan was released after being treated for bruises and abrasions. After the attack, Tom Renner, director of public relations, issued a statement encouraging students to "walk in groups and use the shuttle vans." Dehaan had no such access to the shuttle van and could not convince anyone to walk home with her. Zwart contends that even walking in groups doesn't guarantee one's safety. She was accompanied by a male last year when she was assaulted, after which she had to have her jaw realigned. Both women view extended shuttle van service as a possible solution to avoid future violence. "It is something that needs to be looked into," DeHaan said. "If transportation had been available, I would have taken it. I think I'd rather have people puking in the back of vans than being assaulted." "If they really want to stop violence, they need to do more than discouraging us to go to parties," Zwart said. "People are going to

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get to parties, and it is on the way home that we are really in danger." Two years ago, the vans were allowed to shuttle students off campus, but that practice was cut due to skyrocketing demand. "We simply couldn't take everyone everywhere they wanted to go," Greg Maybury, director of operations and technology, said. "The most obvious solution was to reduce the demand by changing the a v a i l a b i l i t y f r o m one c o l l e g e owned facility to another." Richard Frost, dean of students, disagrees that students are entitled to get rides to off-campus parties. "They want to move off-campus, be able to drink and yet still get rides back?" Frost questioned. "This isn't a one way street." Frost sees other potential problems with offering the shuttle service. "If we are to provide transportation to a party, why not to Meijer's or the mall?" Frost said. "It would seem like a reasonable request." Concern for the van drivers is also an issue. "Drunk students could be obscene with the drivers, cussing them out," Frost said. "If the driver says to get off the van, a fight could result." Shuttle van drivers agree that drunks can be unruly on the vans.

but are concerned about the safety of those who have to walk off-campus. "I have been abused by drunk riders, especially when I don't know them, "Amer Madi ('97), a shuttle driver, said. "They hop in the van and are loud and obnoxious. But I did drive a girl off-campus for a study group, simply because if my sister had to walk home, I would hope someone would make sure she got there safely, especially in light of recent attacks." Liability is also a stumbling block for the College. "If we transport a student to a party, where they are injured, the opportunity to litigate is quite high," Frost said, "We would have played an active role in the student's injury." Frost believes that it is the students' responsibility to take care of one another. "Students need to do things together," Frost said. "How many students could have driven Kelli home? Offer to walk other students home. It is a common courtesy that one should extend. Work with the community police, reporting people who don't seem to belong in the neighborhood. Work with landlords to get adequate lighting around houses."

BY jim riekse

JUNIORS

GRETCHEN RAMOHR KATHY REESE JON REEVES MICHELLE RHOADES STACIE RICHARDS STEPHANIE RICHARDSON

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O n October 3, 1995, the l o n g - r u n n i n g , real-life s o a p opera played its final episode. In " t h e trial of the century," O.J. S i m p s o n w a s a c q u i t t e d in the J u n e 12, 1994, s t a b b i n g m u r d e r of his f o r m e r wife, Nicole B r o w n S i m p s o n , a n d her friend, Ronald G o l d m a n . A m e r i c a n s f o l l o w e d the trial for more than a year, listening t o testimony, d i g e s t i n g the e v i d e n c e and s p e c u l a t i n g o n whether the f o r m e r f o o t b a l l superstar and f i l m actor was guilty. The jury reached its verdict in less t h a n f o u r h o u r s deliberation, after listening t o 133 days of t e s t i m o n y a n d c o n s i d e r i n g more than 800 pieces of evidence. It was a case that w o u l d leave A m e r i c a n s w i t h many lasting images: A w h i t e Ford B r o n c o leading a police chase; S i m p s o n t r y i n g on " t h e murder g l o v e s " in c o u r t ; The t e s t i m o n y of p r o s e c u t i o n w i t n e s s Police Detective Mark Fuhrman, w h o s e c r e d i b i l i t y was later d e s t r o y e d w h e n it was s h o w n that he lied under oath about his use of racial epithets. In a statement m a d e s o o n after his acquittal, S i m p s o n v o w e d he w o u l d dedicate his life to a search for the real killers.

HdMg

MICHAEL ROBBERT JACOB ROESCH NICOLE R O T T E N B E R G DEREK ROWE JASON RUBEL TANIA S A L E A N N E SCHAIRBAUM

EMILY S C H M I D T JAMES SCHREUDER NATHAN S C H U C H AMANDA SCHULD SHANNON SEE ANDREW SHARP BROOKE SHERROD

NICK S L A G E R CASEY SLAYTON SCOTT SLEZAK MARK SMITH TYLER SMITH MEGAN SMITLEY J A S O N SOMMER

STEVE SPITTERS MICHAEL SPRADLING KATIE STANGER T R E V O R STARNES MATT S T E E N S M A REBECCA STEPHENS SUEIAN S T E V E N S

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F o r a few days, a religious man d o m i n a t e d the headlines. A n d for a change, it gave A m e r i c a n s s o m e t h i n g g o o d t o talk about. The n e w s m a k e r was Pope J o h n Paul II, and the o c c a s i o n was his visit to the United States in early October 1995. The 75 year-old pontiff began his five-day visit by a d d r e s s i n g the United Nations General A s s e m b l y in c o n j u n c t i o n w i t h the o rg a n iza t io n 's 50th anniversary. During his stay, the pope celebrated o u t d o o r Mass in both New York a n d New Jersey. Rainy, w i n d y weather d i d little t o d a m p e n the spirits of the faithful w h o gathered t o hear h i m speak, c a t c h a g l i m p s e of him or even t o u c h h i m as he swept past. In Baltimore, Maryland, he a d d r e s s e d an audience at the baseball s t a d i u m and l u n c h e d at a s o u p k i t c h e n before f l y i n g back t o Rome. T h r o u g h o u t his visit, the pope called for greater attention t o the needs of the less fortunate.

JUNIORS WENDY STIMER TARA S T O L L E N M A I E R CHAD STOREY JENNIFER S T R A U S S MICHAEL S T R U C K MARK STUBBS DANIEL S T Y F

RYAN S U L L I V A N S T E V E N SUNDBECK JOY S U N D S M O A^UMI S U Z U K I J A N E T TATE R O B E R T TAYLOR E T H A N TEERLING

CHRISTOPHER T H A R P MEGAN THOMPSON S T E V E TOBIAS E L L E N TOMER SCOTT TUINSTRA GEORGE URBAN B R E N T VANDER KDLK

C L A R E N C E VANDERBORGH D E R E K VANDERHEIDE J A S O N VANDERWOUDE RYAN V A N D E R Z W A R T A N D R E W VANEDEN STACEY V A N L A N G E V E L D E TVLER VANLONKHUYZEN

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continued from page 18

M u t u r i Muriuki f r o m Nairobi, Kenya, involves the audience in a t r a d i t i o n a l s o n g and dance called " K a n i s a Litajengwa na Kina Nani." (Photo by Zach J o h n s o n )

of traditional and modern African clothes. Breaking slightly from the theme, the next act included the Holland High School Pep Squad. The four girls' synchronized movements were enjoyed by the cheering onlookers as they danced to pulsating rhythms and loud rap music. "Reflection # 3 " was of Indian clothing with students modeling one-piece dresses highly ornamented with colorful embroidering. The following act was a reading of Palestinian poetry that expressed the constant suffering of the oppressed people in the Middle East. A poem was read first in its original language, Arabic, and then in English. Abdelwahab then read a poem of his own that dealt with the stereo typical view the western world has of his people. This dramatic reading was the first act to deal with the pain felt both at home and

g e n e r a t e d by the treatment received from others. "Reflection #4," a look back at the U.S.A. during the '50s and '60s followed, reminding us of the long g o n e p o o d l e skirt a n d l e t t e r sweater. One of the highlights of the evening was "Kanisa Litajengwa a o K n i a Nani" led by Muriuki. He took the audience on a short "journey" into a small African town while teaching the crowd a song and dance that everyone stood to participate in. Muriuki sang verses and the audience sang the choruses, repeating E-o-o-o, E-o-o-o, while swinging their arms to the c h o r o g r a p h y a l s o t a u g h t by Muriuki. Following the song, a popular waltz from the twentieth century, "Voices of Spring," was performed as the U.S.A. was again visited. Next up was "Reflection #5," a l o o k at P a l e s t i n i a n c l o t h i n g . Multi-layered and versatile, the clothing showed the balance of

beauty and function in Palestinian style. A Bohemian skit followed, once again showing the need for expanded thinking in Western society. Set up as a comedy that reinforced stereotypes before breaking them down, the two actors depicted a cold land while guzzling Vodka. The stereotypes were challenged with images that depicted their struggles and their victories, The Merengue that followed demonstrated the artistic and free s p i r i t e d l i f e - s t y l e of South America. The barefoot men wore cowboy hats and the women wore long flowing skirts as they danced in pairs and as a group. A n o t h e r r e f l e c t i o n , "#6," showed the clothes that Japanese s t u d e n t s w e a r to s c h o o l : the women dress formally and the men wear u n i f o r m - l i k e suits. Live J a p a n e s e Takio d r u m m i n g and Kagura dancing was another high point of the evening. Three drums and a piccolo sounded sycopated

JUNIORS KlMBERLy V A N O S T R A N C H R I S VANTIMMEREN KELLY V A N V A L K E N B U R G VICTORIA VANWAGNEN GARY V E L D H O F TOM V E R B E E K MICHAEL VDLKERS

K A T H L E E N WAS

R o s s VRIEZE S H A N E WAGNER SHAWN WALBECO MARY WALTER D E R E K WALVOORD S A R A H WATKIN \

KENT WATTLEWORTH VALERIE W E B B OLIVIA W E L C H SARAH WENTZLOFF PIYAN WDLTHUIS K R I S T I E WOLVEN MARCIA Z I E G L E R

JULIE ZWIESLER

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beats while the Kagura, a dance with a Samuri sword, was performed. The last reflection depicted the ever-popular 'VOs and '80s style. Dressed to disco, the '70s models were followed by the moonwalking, red leather jacket and spandex wearing models of the '80s. The last performance of the evening was a dramatic reading entitled "Colors of the World". The recitation showed the growing sense of pride as well as the pressures facing racially mixed adolescents as they grow comfortable with their identity. The show concluded with the cast standing together on stage under numerous flags that hung together as a reminder of the importance of every ethnic group and culture.

J a l a a Abdelwahab. a student f r o m Palestine, contributes t o the annual Images p r o g r a m w i t h traditional dress and a personal p o e m about In his country. (Photo by Zach J o h n s o n )

R o s i Rodriguez, Hanan A w w a d , Beta Bajwa, Sheryl Gabriel, Ismaria Medel, Ellen Kassis, a n d Becky Rodriguez represent c o u n t r i e s f r o m all over the w o r l d . (Photo by Zach J o h n s o n )

BY m. morgan

continued from page 25

and profound aspects of Vespers." An event with a deep sense of history and tradition, the first Christmas Vespers was held Dec. 7, 1941, the day Pearl Harbor was bombed. Since then. Vespers has grown immensely. Today, there are four Vespers services in a two-day span. About 4,000 tickets to the performances are sold each year. PBS records

and broadcasts the program nationally. A full recording of the event is available on CD, cassette, and video. These can be ordered or bought through the bookstore. "We probably sell 250 to 300 CDs per year," said Mark Cook, Hope-Geneva Bookstore director. But media attention is just a detail compared to the powerful

service itself, made up of "great traditions mixed with new music," said Robert Ritsema, director of the Symphonette. "I think this is a marvelous event with a tremendous history and great sense of tradition," Morrow said. "I am thrilled to be a part of it." ^

BY heather bosch S e n i o r Kolln Redman, a member of the Symphonette, accompanies the College Chorus. The Symphonette, c o n d u c t e d by Robert Ritsema, appears in Christmas Vespers each year. (PR Photo)

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w

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dence, second year students tackled Hope's educational, spiritual, and social scenes. Having experienced the rigorous academic load and fined-tuned their study habits during their first year, many sophomores took on more responsibilities by joining various organizations, sports teams, and community groups. Students' second year in college was also a critical time for planning life goals and, ultimately, choosing a major. By focusing on a particular field of study and becoming members of social groups, sophomores further enjoyed the Hope experience,

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Sophomore chemistry major Rebecka Cook prepares a chemical mixture In lab. Cook is o n e of h u n d r e d s of students who c o m e to Hope for nationally k n o w n academic programs. By c h o o s i n g an institution with a strong f o u n d a t i o n in her major field, Cook can be c o n f i d e n t she has started o n the right path to her future. (Photo by A n t h o n y Perez)

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SOPHOMORES N A S S E R ALFAOIH JUSTIN ALBERTSON DAVID A L B R E C H T ELIZABETH A L L E N MELISSA ALJOBELLI FRANCES ANDERSON NJORD ANDREWS

KATHRYN A U E R TROY A U M A U G H E R MARK B A K E R KRISTINA B A K K E R KATHRYN B A L C E R KATHERINE B A R N E S A N N BARRY

JEFFREY BATES B E A U BATTON KRISTEN BECKNER TRACY BEDNARICK ALISON BEUKELMAN MIRIAM B E Y E R AARON BIRSEN

1 P r e s i d e n t Bill Clinton entered the t h i r d year of his t e r m as no president has d o n e for forty y e a r s — w i t h a Republican Congress. A s he began t h i s new year, he resolved t o " p u t aside partisan d i f f e r e n c e s . " A l t h o u g h c a u t i o u s in dealing w i t h the new Congress, Clinton has raised his profile and taken a f i r m stand on issues. He said he w o u l d try t o w o r k w i t h the R e p u b l i c a n s on their agenda, but w o u l d " n o d o u b t " veto s o m e of their p r o p o s a l s . In April, Clinton filed the necessary d o c u m e n t s w i t h the Federal Election C o m m i s s i o n and made f o r m a l his candidacy for re-election. (AP Photo)

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SOPHOMORES KlMBERLy B O E R S M A JEREMY BOGARD STACY B O G A R D KIM B O H N W A G N E R LINDSEY BOLO L A U R A BONNEMA JON BOSMAN

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L A R A BREMER S T E V E BRENNER MICAH B R O W N STACY B R O W N DAVE BRZEZINSKI ANTHONY BULL KEVIN BURGUN

KELLY B U S H SARAH BUYLSMA ELLEN BYLAND JOHN BYRN VICTORIA C A D E CHERITH C A L D W E L L CHRIS C A L D W E L L

CASEY CARNEY SARAH CARPENTER MATTHEW C A S S E L L JACQUELINE CHAPMAN MATTHEW C L A R K E JENNIFER C L I N E KATHLEEN COLEMAN

T h i s s u m m e r it seemed as t h o u g h Hootie and the B l o w f i s h were playing every time y o u t u r n e d on the radio. The f o u r - m a n rock g r o u p that seemed to c o m e out of n o w h e r e and d o m i n a t e the radio scene d i d not go u n n o t i c e d on the v i d e o scene. Hootie, f e a t u r i n g v o c a l s by lead singer Darius Rucker, w o n an MTV award for best new artist for their video, " H o l d My Hand." The presentation was made at the 12th annual MTV Video Music A w a r d s in September 1995 at Radio City Music Hall in New York. Dennis Miller hosed the ceremony, w h i c h i n c l u d e d awards t o Tom Petty for best male video, " Y o u Don't K n o w How It Feels," and Madonna for best female video, "Take a Bow." TLC w o n video of the year for "Waterfalls." (AP Photo)

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FRIE top-rated sitcom sucks in college students

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or some, Thursday night television is a relaxing ritual of couch potato glory. For others, it's an evening of s l a c k - j a w e d d r o o l i n g at modelesque midriff-baring babes. And all can recognize that it is indeed a national phenomenon. Just ask Lori Strehler. "Every week, we cram as many as people as we can into our room and watch 'Friends," says Strehler ('98). "There's no talking allowed except during commercials." "Usually we're so enthralled that no one says anything, but if they do they're told to be quiet." A boob tube marvel that premiered S e p t e m b e r 22, 1994, "Friends" has picked up eight Emmy nominations and rocketed up the Nielsen TV ratings, grabbing the third place spot, just trailing "ER" and "Seinfeld." Why does this TV show have such broad appeal? And, beyond

that, why has it become such a widespread obsession? "Their lives and situations are very real and so you have a connection to their c h a r a c t e r s , " Strehler said. "I think the show is big because the characters are really fun," said Ann Byland ('99). "They take real-life situations and make them funny." Beau Batten ('98), another "Friends" f a n , says that "Everyone's good looking. And Jennifer Aniston is gorgeous." Dr. Ted Nielsen, professor of the broadcasting courses here at Hope, has a different explanation of the show's incredible success. "The key is that the writing is very well done. It's really crucial." Whatever it may be, this "Friends" frenzy involves much, much m o r e than a T h u r s d a y evening TV show. Needing a Jennifer Aniston fix? One only needs to trek to the

nearest Seven-Eleven to view her mug on everything from "People " to "Teen Beat." Or wander into your local BoRic's and you too, can be transformed into a shag sporting "Friends" clone. Even wanderers in cyberspace can be haunted by more than a hundred "Friends " internet sites. Assorted web gems are the Jennifer A n i s t o n H o m e P a g e and The "Friends" frequently asked questions page, where your heart's heaviest questions can be resolved. "Friends" sweatshirts. "Friends " posters. And the oh-so peppy theme song that everyone knows by heart. "Television sets the styles among a certain age group, and 'Friends' targets the 1834 age bracket," Nielsen said. "The spin-off merchandising has really been successful. Still, some say merchandising the sexy sextet strips the show of its likability.

HOMCYSSIA

"I think that it's kind of getting out of hand," said Anna Resele ('98). "All the hype is just making it cheesy. Before, it was just a good show, and now they're killing it." "I guess they're supposed to be people you can identify with, but really-they're not," Aslanian ('99) said. "None of them really have jobs or seem to really work, but they have these gorgeous apartments...they just hang out on their couch." No one can dispute that with all of the h y p e and publicity, "Friends " has indeed been wildly successful. But as we've seen with the t w e n t y s o m e t h i n g hits "90210" and "Melrose Place," we all know what goes up must come down. "It will be interesting to see how long this will last...or if it's just a fad," Nielsen said.

BY heather bosch

SOPHOMORES

KIMBERLT- C O L L I N S DALE CORLEW ANDY C O V E BRADLEY CRANDELL SUM M ER CROSBY C H R I S DANAPILIS TRACY D A T T E

LUCY DAVIS WILLIAM DAY CHRIS DEBOER ANGELA DERJREST ELIZABETH DEHAAN CARRIE DEVRIES S T E V E DEVRIEZE

JON DEWITTE KEVIN DEYOUNG RACHEL DECKER G A B R I E L A DECKINGA BRENT DEMAS ADEANA DEMOS S C O T T DERBY

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SARA DETTAAN ROBERT DEVRIES ERIKA DIANIS SARA DILLBECK TIEN D O CHRIS DOMBROWSKI FfcrRiciA D O N O V A N

NICOLE D O U C E T T E BRIAN DYKHUIS TIM DITKSTRA G R E G DZIUVAN JANA EBERT CHRISTIE EDING KEVIN EDLEFSON

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P E T E R EMERY D A A N E ETHERIDGE COREY E V E R T S C H R I S T I N A FABEZ DANIEL FISCHER JILL FISCHER LISA FISHER

BRYAN FIX NICOLE FLINN

KIRSTIN F b s s DORI FREELAND A M A N D A FRY DENNIS F U L L E R CHRIS GARBRECHT

MIRIAM G A R C E L L A N D KARA GEBBEN JENNIFER GEERDINK SUZIE GEERLINGS HEIDI G E I B JENNIFER GEORGE HEIDI G E R B E N S

Sr presidfnt k—

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E l i z a b e t h Dole, wife of the GOP presidential nominee Bob Dole, and President of the A m e r i c a n Red Cross, visited campus to speak about her husband's candidacy. On March 15, in the Maas Auditorium, Dole s p o k e t o about 200 students, faculty a n d community members. (PR Photo)

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REBECCA GERHARDSTEIN S U S A N GERMAIN BENJAMIN GIBNEY BRIAN GIERE RACHAEL GOEI THOMAS GOODHART SHANNON G O U L D

JODIE GRABILL BRANDON GRAHAM E D GREENLEAF STEPHANIE HAGGARD S T E V E HAIRSTON AMY H A L L TRAVIS HALLIWILL

THERESA HANSEN S H A N E HANSON S T E V E HANSON J I L L HARKINS KEVIN HARTGERINK RONALD HAVEMAN K E V I N HAVILAND

J e r r y Garcia, c o - f o u n d e r of rock m u s i c ' s the Grateful Dead, died of a heart attack while in a d r u g rehabilitation center in s u b u r b a n San Francisco. The guitarist, c o m p o s e r a n d singer passed away o n A u g u s t 9, 1995, just eight d a y s after his 53rd birthday. Followers q u i c k l y gathered to note the p a s s i n g of their fallen leader. C r o w d s f o r m e d in public areas in San Francisco, Garcia's h o m e t o w n , a n d in other cities t o share their loss. The Grateful Dead blended rock, bluegrass and folk flavors into their s o u n d . A l t h o u g h s t u d i o r e c o r d i n g s by the g r o u p were rare, w i t h the most recent in 1989, the Dead remained a very popular concert attraction. (AP Photo)

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SOPHOMORES G E N A N N E HAYS A N N E HEIBY JENNIFER H E N D R I C K S SHAWNA H E N D R I C K S O N CHRISTINE H E R M A N DAVID H E R W E Y E R J I L L HICKEY

AMANDA HILL DANIEL HOAG MARK HOEKSTRA J U L I A HOFFMAN K E R R I HOFFMAN JOEL HOLSTEGE NICHOLAS HOLTVLUWER

AMY HONEYSETT STACIE HOPKINS T O D D HORNSBY KRISTEN HOSFORD TARA H O S F O R D J U L I E HOVING LISA HUGHES

EDDIE HWANG MILICA IVANOVIC RYAN J A N U S MICHELE JASTRZEBSKI JILL ENELL JOEL JOHNSON MATTHEW J O H N S O N

LISA J U T T E E L L E N KASSIS CHIKAKO KATSUYANA CARINE KAUFFMANN S A R A H KEAY KRISTIN K E L L E Y

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I n September 5, 1995, France resumed u n d e r g r o u n d nuclear testing w h e n it detonated a device under a remote atoll in the South Pacific. W o r l d w i d e protest preceded the nuclear test, and c r i t i c i s m f r o m the w o r l d f o l l o w e d it. Anti-nuclear d e m o n s t r a t i o n s were staged in various parts of the world, i n c l u d i n g Paris, Tokyo, Switzerland, Australia, and Hiroshima. Two days of rioting, l o o t i n g and f i r e b o m b i n g e x p l o d e d In Papeete, Tahiti, w h i c h lies about 750 mile f r o m the test site. Two ships, part of a Greenpeace "peace flotilla," were s t o r m e d and captured by French c o m m a n d o s nearby. France's President J a c q u e s Chirac defended the tests, saying they w o u l d provide i n f o r m a t i o n a l l o w i n g them to c o n d u c t c o m p u t e r simulated tests in the future. (AP Photo)

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JAMIE KEMPKER MARIE KEUNING AMANDA K L A P P VALERIE K L E I N H E K S E L CHRISTOPHER KLINE JENNIFER K L U N D E R JAMES KNAPP

i ERIN K N E C H T ERIN MDCOUREK WENDV M30IKER TORI KDOTSTRA J E S S E KSSKEY TAMARA KRCMAR MELISSA KROLIK

crashing computers leave students wired

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ick any table in the Kletz and mention computers, and you are sieged by tales of Mac lab melancholy. A glitch in a save caused Peter Poel ('98) to lose hours of work, a system error swallowed Melinda Tinstra's ('98) five-page paper and Daul Kurdziel ('96) waited at CIT for half an hour to get a question answered. Their stories are not at all uncommon. Hope has seen a rise computer errors and increased usage, but CIT believes that the worst is over as they race to meet the demand. Early in the year, Hope's VAX system suffered a system error, unceremoniously ending students' email sessions. The VAX, which a layman might consider a phone line to computers all over the world, allows students to communicate over the Internet and access the World Wide Web. Fortunately, the VAX rarely c r a s h e s , a c c o r d i n g to Carl Heideman, head of CIT. Unfortunately, Hope's file server, which is much more important for the College's computing health, has seen more than its fair share of woes lately.

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The file server, which runs such Hope favorites as WordPerfect, has been less than reliable this year. It crashed ten times early in the semester and again occasionaly since then. The worst instance was November 7, when Hope labs were rendered inoperable for over eight h o u r s , the r e a l i z a t i o n of a procrastinator's worst nightmare. Not only were students unable to use the computers, anything they had not saved at the time of the crash vanished before their harried eyes. Such file server crashes are "Devastating, absolutely the worst to lose," according to Heideman. Heideman blames this year's influx of problems on a number of variables. "We've had hardware and software problems, but the main factor is that computer usage is double the rate from last year," Heideman said. "We try to buy enough performance to keep up with the demand, but usage has increased at a nonlinear rate. We knew it would go up, but not this much." New computers that were supposed to unburden computer stress have actually added to the dilemma. "We replaced 62 PCs with

Pentiums, but they arrived in late August, so w e ' v e been b a c k logged." Already buried in requests, CIT is also operating short staffed, especially lacking student staffers to work the night shifts in the computer labs. "Students must be too rich these days, because no one is applying, " Heideman said. "I've got money to pay if anyone is interested." The faculty are not fond of losing their data either, or experiencing a hassle to get to it. Many Hope professors expect their programs to run smoothly and are upset by the delays and errors they encounter. "They bring things in and ask if they'll run," Heideman said. "We respond that they will but there will be problems. The faculty say that is o.k. until they actually experience the problems." Many believe that an easy solution is just a few dollars away, but Heideman fights this assumption, "People believe that technology is cheap, free and accessible," Heideman said. "This is not the case. We spent $200,000 this summer and are talking about things that could easily run up to $1 million."

Money is already being spent to improve the situation. An email message from Tom Renner, director of public relations, details how the College is "replacing Hope's VAX's with a single, faster system on December 16." The College will also be installing file servers with more capacity to prevent crashes. Hope's computing technology would make an even greater advance if the proposed idea of a "technology fee" is adopted. "Many schools already have a technology fee added to the tuition," Anderson said. "Such a fee would allow Hope to do things more quickly than under the current financial structure." According to Anderson, the fee would be about $100 per student, bringing in an additional $250,000 a year. "The fee could, in essence, double what we are spending now, significantly enhancing opportunity," Anderson said. Such funds would aim to increase the " c o n n e c t i v i t y " of Hope's computers. "More and more students will be bringing their own computers to campus and the College wants to provide


hope A S A

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KARIE KROPP M A T T H E W KUIPER KlMBERLy KUITE CAROLINE LABARGE CHRISTINE L A B E L L E MARK L A C H O N C E JOHANNA LAGORE

YVONNE LAMOTTKE SHANNON LAND MARTY LANDES M A R T H A LANGMUIR SARAH LARSEN A D A M LJ^UGHLIN JANET LEE

JAMES LENGER TODD UNGBEEK ALEXIS UNSCHEID MISTINE LDWRY MARY L U C A S MATT LUHMANN HEATHER M A A S

RYAN M A A S C A R R I E MAINES R E B E C C A MAITNER FKMELA M A R D KEVIN MARTIN PETER MARTIN ANN MAST

KIMBERLY M A X S O N DEREK MAZUREK NICOLE MCCLAIN A N N MCCRACKIN LAURA MCCRAINE BETH MCCUSKER ANGELIOUE MCDOUGALL

SARAH MCGAUGHEY K A R A MCGILLICUDDI' MICHAEL MCMAHON SARAH MEENGS MICHAEL MEEUWSEN

them with an easier way to access the Internet," Anderson said. This would involve wiring individual rooms which "would take some time even with the money," Anderson said. The new Cook residence hall under construction will be wired for such easy access. Students who would oppose such a technology fee don't have to take up arms yet. "It is not cast in concrete," Anderson said.

BY jim riekse

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S o p h o m o r e Scott Engelsman uses a hallmates's c o m p u t e r t o access Hope's on-line menu f r o m Kollen Hall. Engelsman Is u s i n g the on-line class o f f e r i n g s list t o establish his schedule for s e c o n d semester. While most students c o n n e c t t o the college c o m p u t e r system for email, many find the other services helpful and more convenient than calling or v i s i t i n g the department. (Photo by A n t h o n y Perez)

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I n January 1995, Newt G i n g r i c h became the first Republican Speaker of the House in forty years. The 51 year-old Georgia C o n g r e s s m a n had his s i g h t s set o n this p o s i t i o n even before he w o n a House seat on his t h i r d try in 1976. G i n g r i c h has p r o v e n adept at g r a b b i n g headlines and p r e a c h i n g morality. In 1989, he d r o v e Speaker J i m Wright f r o m o f f i c e w i t h relentless attacks of ethics v i o l a t i o n s . He helped o r c h e s t r a t e the " C o n t r a c t W i t h A m e r i c a " as the GOP's national agenda in the 1994 elections. It called for a balanced budget a m e n d m e n t , welfare reform a n d anti-crime package. In A p r i l 1995, his prime-time televised speech m a r k e d the first t i m e a c o n g r e s sional leader received s u c h coverage. In the address, G i n g r i c h s u m m a r i z e d t h e first 100 days of the new C o n g r e s s . (AP Photo)

HOPE

AMANDA MERRITT KRIS MERRITT MERECEDES MERVENNE MEGAN MEYER SHERRI MEYER BLAIR MILES K E N T MILLER

BEN MILLS JESSICA MIXER MINDY MOFFAT MILUSKA MONROY CLINTON MOORE S C O T T MOREHOUSE AMY MOSIER

ROBERT MYERS KUNI NAGANO ABBEY NIENHUIS NATASHA NORRIS KRISTIN NOWAK BRANDON NYBOER ADAM OSMUN

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D e s p i t e c o n t i n u e d NATO air strikes and U.N. peace efforts, the conflict in the former Yugoslavia raged on, w i t h no letup in sight. 1995 began w i t h a four m o n t h cease-fire mediated by the former United States President J i m m y Carter, but the truce d i d n ' t put an e n d to the fighting. The former Yugoslavia has been the scene of a civil war since J u n e 1991, and the f i g h t i n g intensified in 1992 after the republic of Bosnia-Herzegovina declared its independence. In May 1995, NATO planes attacked Serb a m m u n i t i o n depots. The Serbs r e s p o n d e d by attacking "safe areas," killin g many and taking h u n d r e d s of U.N. peacekeeper hostages. In June, Serbs d o w n e d a U.S. F-16 over n o r t h e r n Bosnia. The pilot. Air Force Captain Scott O'Grady, hid for six days until he was rescued by U.S. Marines. (AP Photo)

SOPHOMORES AARON OTIS C Y N T H I A RVCHECO S U S A N BVLLESCHI J A M E S RALMER KAREN RIRADIS R O Z E U A PATINO J O N PEPPER

HOLLY P E T E R S O N JEANETTE PETKUS BRIAN P E T R O E L J E JENNIFER P E U L E R CRAIG PHILLIPS ALLYSON PICKENS M I C H E L L E PIEL

LARA PLEWKA R E B E C C A PDBUDA J I L L POHLMAN ANDY PONSTEIN TARA P O RTER R E B E C C A POSTMA RACHEL POSUS

CHRISTOPHER POTTER KIMBERLY P O W E L L ELAYNE P R O V O S T LOUIS R A J DARIUS R A N D A L L KEVIN RANDALL WILLIAM R A N D A L L

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SOPHOMORES JANE R O E T E R S KELLY ROGERS S A R A H ROP ANDREA ROSSI JODI ROYER VIRGINIA RUSHING JOHN RYDBECK

BETSIE RYPMA RENEE S A A R JENNIFER S A L L S - B A I L E Y DAWN S A M S E L L MAIKE S A N D E R S J A S O N SANICKI SIMONE SCHER

ERIN SCHILLER B E C K Y SCHMIDT RAUL SCHMUDE MATTHEW BCHOLTENS DAVID SCHRIER J O S E P H SCHWEISS BRIAN SCORDINSKY

S U S A N SCROEDER JULIE S E I D E L DANIEL S H E L L E Y JAMES S H I E L D S KIMBERLY S H U L L ANDREW S I L L MLUNGISI S I S U L U

SHANNON SLAWSON BRIAN S L E N K MONIKA SMITH ERIN SOWERBY T H E R E S A SPENCER K A R A SPORER DIANE S T JOHN

T h e Student Activities Committee booked Blessid Union of Souls to play at this year's Spring Fling. The performance was sensational. Shortly after, a local radio station again booked the group for the local Tulip Time festival. The group performed live on eighth street downtown. (Photos by Anthony Perez)

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upperclassmen placed back in residence halls

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elinda Tuinstra ('98) is a good student, her CPA is great, she has a spotless judicial record, and always tries to follow the system. But, even following the correct channels, the system can backfire. For Tuinstra, it did. Wednesday, April 17,6:07 p.m. in the Maas Auditorium. Tension was thick in the air. Living arrangements for hundreds of Hope students were being decided. For most first and second-year students on campus, room draw is a big deal. But it was an even bigger deal for some very unhappy juniors. "What really bothers me," Tuinstra said, "Is that I went though the Hope College system, and it did not work for me." Tuinstra, and hallmates Shannon Gould ( ' 9 8 ) and J e s s i e Handcock ('98) all got stuck in Kollen, doing time in residence halls for their third year in a row. According to the Hope College

housing policy, they don't have enough credits to qualify for cottage or apartment draw. Students are placed in descending order by how many credits they have earned. From there, numbers are called in order and students choose their abode for the following year. The order that people pick is based on credit, according to Derek Emerson, Associate Director of housing and residential life "It's just the same as registering for class," he said. Despite the fact that not all residents are pleased with their housing outcome for next year, the selection process has improved over the past couple of years. Students used to pick their room draw number out of a basket. "C1T helped us a lot. They report all students to us in order strictly by credit hours," Emerson said. "It's the same order registration is in." The idea that credits earned

outside of classes at Hope can be counted for campus housing does not sit well with some students. "Clep, A.P., College Placement credits, and high school credits should not be used in the Hope College housing procedure," Tuinstra said. "Are we supposed to pick our friends by credits?" said Shannon Gould ('98). "Because that is the only way you can get the housing you want!" "I transferred here to Hope because at Alma we never got to live in anything but dorms," Handcock said. "And now at Hope, as a junior I'm still in them. I remember being told when I transferred that, as an upper classeman, I could live in an apartment or cottage." Students are required to live in resident halls freshman year. Typically, sophomores do as well. With enough credits, students could find themselves out of the dorms and into on-campus cottages or apartments or in off-campus houses and

start paying rent and living on their own in their own apartments or houses. Though they may think that they are guaranteed off-campus housing, even some seniors have lost out. Amy Wright, a fifth-year senior with 137 credits, ended up on campus along with all the freshmen, sophomores and yes, even the juniors. "I didn't fill out the forms in time to get off campus," said Wright. Even though upperclassmen were disgruntled, most freshmen walked away happy. "If I can at least get the floor of my choice, then I'll be happy," said Abby Kuyper ('99). Derek Emerson had some words of advice for those who did not get lodgings of their choice in the draws this year: always sign up on the waiting lists; it just may pay off. "We call people all summer," said Emerson.

BY megan thompson

SOPHOMORES

SARA STEPHEN MATTHEW S T E R E N B E R G STEPHANIE STIEGLER SARAH STIELSTRA JONATHON STIMSON JEREMY S T O E P K E R AMY STRASSBURGER

JOSHUA STRATTON LDRI S T R E H L E R MONICA S T U B B S DANIEL SWEETSER D A N I E L TAYLOR K E L L I TEERMAN JODI T E N H A R K E L

HOP!

MICHAEL T H E L E N DARREN TIGELAAR A R L E N E TORRENCE J U L I E TRACY KIMBERLY TRIEZENBERG MARIE TSUJI MELINDA TUINSTRA

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S A M U E L VAIL AMY VANAUKEN KIP VANDAM MARC VANDERBEEK MICHAEL V A N D E R E L Z E N SARA VANDERLIND KARA VANDERLUGT

S A R A H VANDERSTEEN A L I S Y N VANDERWAL S C O T T VANDERWAL S U S A N VANDERWEIDE AARON VANDEWEGE KARI VANDRESE ANITA VANENGEN

HEIDI V A N L A N G E V E L D E A L L I S O N VANLONGHUYZEN JESSICA VANOORT B R A D L E Y VANZDEREN REINA VENDRAMINI LEISCHEN VERWYS J A R E D VICKERS

GREG VLIETSTRA R A C H A E L WAGNER J E A N E T T E WARD CARRIE WATERLOO BRIAN WEAVER AMANDA WEERSTRA UUJRA WENDT

O n August 24, 1995, human rights activist Harry Wu set foot on American soil after being imprisoned in China for sixty-six days. Wu, a native of China and a naturalized U.S. citizen, had been taken into custody on June 19 while trying to enter China at a remote border crossing. He was convicted on charges of stealing state secrets and was sentenced to fifteen years in prison. Within hours, however, he was released and deported in an apparent attempt to improve delicate relations with the U.S. W u ' s t r i p t o China had been one of several clandestine treks he had made since 1991 for the purpose of researching and filming evidence of abuses in China's prison labor camps. His efforts had resulted in television documentaries that gained international attention. (AP Photo)

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HOIBVIH+H S O P H O M O R E S

ERIC W E S T H U S • A V I D WHITE JONATHAN WIERENGO AMY WILDERSPIN DAVID WILLIAMS JAMIE WILLIAMS MATT WILLIAMS

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NATALIE WILLIAMSON JENNIFER WILSON KATY WING JANNA WINN GAYLE WIRTZ GRETCHEN WOLFANGER BRANDON WONG

N O E L L E WOOD ANDREW WRIGHT CRYSTAL WRIGHT J. KIRSTEN WUCHTER ANDREW WYATT EMILY YOUNG MICHAEL Y b u N T

SKIPP YOWLER CHRIS ZACHMAN R A C H E L ZEGERIUS JOSEPH ZUFANCIC JEFFREY Z Y L S T R A

1 I n September, 1995, Colin Powell e m b a r k e d on a c r o s s - c o u n t r y b o o k tour t o p r o m o t e his autobiography, "My A m e r i c a n Journey." As he did this, he also p r o m o t e d the n o t i o n that his next journey might be along the c a m p a i g n trail, seeking the presidency of the U.S. In 1996. Powell, 58 years old, is the former c h a i r m a n of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the first A f r i c a n - Ame r i c a n p e r s o n to hold that position. He rose to fame t h r o u g h his leaders h i p in the Persian Gulf War. He sees himself as the " s e n s i b l e center of the A m e r i c a n political s p e c t r u m , " declaring no allegiance to any political party. (AP Photo)

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a p p l y i n g to g r a d u a t e schools. Those in Admissions do pay attention to objective sources when considering who to accept." With this latest recognition, Hope becomes the only Michigan school to be recognized by both U.S. News and World Report as an outstanding national institution, and to be cited by "The Fiske Guide" as a best buy. The two sources are obj e c t i v e , and each put e m phasis on different criteria when establishing rankings. S o p h o m o r e Nykerk orator J e s s Grevenstuk chal"The Fiske lenges the a u d i e n c e w i t h the t h e m e of " w o n d e r , " Guide " conside n c o u r a g i n g t h e m t o s t o p a n d smell the roses. ers e l e m e n t s G r e v e n s t u k titled her speech " L e a r n i n g t o Wear like c a m p u s , Mouse Ears". The annual Nykerk c o m p e t i t i o n is just social opportuo n e of the many t r a d i t i o n s and activities that make up the life, history, a n d diversity of Hope College. (PR nities, and Photo) "quality of life." U.S. News, however, ranks institutions using primarily statistical information. Each school is evaluated using ten criteria, including student SAT or ACT scores and the number of freshmen in the top ten percent of their high school graduating class.

BY b. hollenbeck Lauded 212

E n j o y i n g the last of the w a r m summer weather, t h i s foreign language drill class headed o u t s i d e for review. Hope's beautiful campus and b u i l d i n g s are a key attraction for students. (PR Photo)

F reshman Michelle Haiduc donates blood at one of the many A m e r i c a n Red Cross B l o o d Drives held in the Maas Auditorium. The Alpha Phi Omega fraternity s p o n s o r s the drives throughout the year as part of their commitment to community and campus service. (Photo by Karen McKeown)

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P r e f e r r e d by s t u d e n t s for s u m m e r exercise, t r a n s p o r t a t i o n , and recreation, In-line skates have b e c o m e a necessity on c a m p u s . (Photo by A n t h o n y Perez)

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K r o f e s s o r Julio Rivera a n d his dance s t u d e n t s finishup the s c h o o l year p r a c t i c i n g outside. Each student created their o w n dance and then d e m o n s t r a t e d and taught it t o other m e m b e r s of the class. (Photo by A n t h o n y Perez)

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• ailing from all over the world,

new students descended upon H o p e ' s campus in late August. After a couple weeks of "learning the ropes," freshmen had acclimated to their new surroundings and second " h o m e . " During the first year of college new friendships were formed, email was discovered, and Ramen noodles proved to be a sustainable food source. More importantly however, new students were welcomed into the open arms of the Hope College community as many others have been for over 130 years, uk

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F reshmen Wendy Ross a n d Emily Hollenbeek race d o w n the bungee run for a little friendly competition. S p r i n g Fling was just o n e of the many events and activities they have experienced since coming to Hope. Meeting d u r i n g orientation weekend like many others, they have b e c o m e great friends, and even s o r o r i t y sisters. (Photo by A n t h o n y Perez)


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HOPE C O L L E G E

FRESHMEN GEOFF A B B A S MICHAEL A D A M S K I JULIE ADLOFF DINA ALRAYES TIMOTHY A L L E S SCOTT ANDERSON SINTA A N T O N

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MOLLY A R N O L D MARC ARNOYS JENNIFER A S L A N I A N STACEY ASSINK C Y N T H I A BANNINK ANGELA BARNES CHAD BARTON

KELLY B A R T O N BRENT BASH JEFFREY BAYS TIM BEKKERING MATT B E L L ANGELA BENSON MOLLY BILLIDEAU

It was a match between two players vying for the top position in women's tennis. On September 9,1995, Germany's Steffi Graf emerged on to as she beat Monica Seles in New York to win her fourth U.S. Open Title. For Graf, it was the third consecutive Grand Slam title, coming after victories at Wimbledon and at the French Open. In spite of her defeat on the tennis court, Monica Seles feels like a victor of sorts. This loss was the first in a dozen matches that marked her inspired return to the sport after a two-year absence. Seles had been stabbed in the back by a deranged fan at a match in Hamburg, Germany. "It has been very exciting to be playing again," Seles said. " A s long as I keep having fun, that is what is going to matter to me the most." (AP Info and Photo)

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FRESHMEN

K E L L I BITTENBURG AMANDA BLACK JESSICA B L A C K KVLE BLACK A L I S S A BLAISING • A R Y L BLOOD KATHLEEN BOES

ROBIN BOLT ERIKA B O R G E S O N AMY B O S HEATHER B O S C H JENNIFER B O S S JILL BOSTELAAR ANGELA BOULIS

BROOKE BOUMA KIMBERLY BOX ROBERT BRANDT RACHEL BREEN KRISTA B R E W E R JONATHAN BRICKNER ENA BROOKS

A N G E L A BROWN JOHN BROWN MIKE BRYA ANNA BURNS ANN BYLAND CHRISTOPHER CARLSON LAURA CARLSON

T h e g a t h e r i n g in Washigton, D.C. on October 16,1995, was tremend o u s . H u n d r e d s of t h o u s a n d s of A f r i c a n - A m e r i c a n men c o n v e r g e d on the nation's capital in response t o the call f r o m L o u i s Farrakhan, the Nation of Islam's leader, to rally for unity a n d b r o t h e r h o o d . It was the fourth-largest d e m o n s t r a t i o n in W a s h i n g t o n ' s history, a n d the largest predominately AfricanA m e r i c a n gathering. Dozens of speakers, i n c l u d i n g civil rights veterans Rosa Parks, Dick Gregory, a n d the Reverend Jesse J a c k s o n . Stevie Wonder sang, and Maya A n g e l o u read a poem that urged the men t o do right by themselves and " s a v e your race." The rally's climax was Farrakhan's speech in w h i c h he led the men in a pledge t o "never raise my hand w i t h a knife or gun t o beat, cut or shoot...any h u m a n being. (AP Info and Photo)

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R E C o a R b college officials discuss capping enrollment

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ope officials recognize the need to stabilize student body growth, President John H. Jacobson told faculty in his State of the College address early in the year. With the graduation of the Class of 1995, the smallest class at the College, a larger-than-anticipated freshman class of 693 filled the campus to bursting for the fall semester. "We have more students living on campus than ever before," said Associate Director of Housing Derek Emerson. 2094 students living in college housing, to be exact. That's up f r o m 2 0 4 0 s t u d e n t last year, Emerson said.

A combination of factors, including a strong academic reputation, religious and value orientation and good facilities all contribute to Hope's increasing appeal to applicants, according to Jacobson. The record numbers forced officials to c o n s i d e r e m e r g e n c y housing over the summer, but the College placed every student in housing, with a few rooms to spare. The addition of the Kraker Building, at Ninth Street and River, and other cottages to the College's available housing eased the burden, making it possible to drop earlier plans to put students in residence hall study rooms. "We continue to add to our housing stock," said President

John Jacobson. "We're always buying houses, about five to six houses per year." But housing is not the only concern a larger student population brings to Hope. Hiring several new and part-time faculty should lessen burdensome class sizes, and which should remain relatively the same, Jacobson said. "Class size will not be changed except in a few very popular areas," he said. Hope took preliminary steps at stabilizing the size of the student body in the spring, when it created the first-ever waiting list for those who did not turn in their $300 security deposit by May 1. But admissions officials underestimated the number of first-year students

that would make the deadline and were left with the challenge of finding adequate housing and facilities for another large class. "It (larger population) has many ramifications for the academic program and the financial structure of the college," Jacobson said. Stabilizing growth would head off added future expenses for expanding facilities and buying up more adjoining property, Jacobson said in his State of the College address. Issues like how to handle possibly becoming more selective in admissions have yet to be tackled, he said.

BYjodi mcfarland

FRESHMEN JULIE CARPENTER EMILY C A S S E L L MICHELLE CHAMBERS TODD CHASSEE ADRIENNE CHRISTOPHER KATHRYN CINDRIC AMIE C L I F T O N

MEAGAN COCKMAN J A N E L L E COFFEY BRYCE COFFING CHRISTY COLBRUNN AMY C O O K LORI C O R N E L L SARAH CORTRIGHT

ELIZABETH COUVREUR ADRIANA C R A I N S E T H CRAWLEY TODD C U R E L L NOAH D A L E D A N I E L DALY NICOLE D A N G R E M O N D

E L I Z A B E T H DAVIDSON NATHAN DAVIES KIRK D E YOUNG MATT D E B O E R ALISON DEBRUIN NATHAN D E E B O E R KRISTY DEER

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F r e s h m a n Joel Petersen gets help m o v i n g all his b e l o n g i n g s in t o his d o r m r o o m f r o m an Orientation Assistant. Petersen is one of 288 males and 405 females that arrived o n c a m p u s for the first time at the end of August. (PR Photo)

FRESHMEN

DAVID D E H O M M E L ERIN D E M E E S T E R NICOLE D E N N I S CORY D E N U Y L RYAN D E V R I E S DANA DILLON JASON DIVOZZO

STACY D R E X L E R MELISSA DUNKERLEY ANGIE D Y K E CHRISTINE D Y K S T R A CHAD EASTMAN REBECCA EDEMA LAURIE E L L I S O N

D E B O R A H EMERY SCOTT ENGELSMAN CAROLINE E N O S AMIE EVANS S A R A H FABER MONROY FABIOLA MELANIE F E Y T E R

BRIAN F I E L D HOWARD FITZGERALD SARAH FLEGEL KATHERINE R X K E R T VICTORIA F O L K E R T S ROBERT R I L L E T T

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HOPE

ERIN FRAZER J I L L FREORICKSON MATTHEW F R E T Z ERIN FREY ANDREW FRUSHOUR JESSICA GAVIN MARY G E H L

L E O N GEREAUX BRANDON GOODYKE ERIN GOOKIN S H A N A GORDNER MARGARET G R A S K E MEGAN GRAY JOY GREEN

J A N E T T E GRIEBE KERRY G R O S S BRIAN G R Z A N MARK GUIKEMA TASHA G U I L D LDRI G U S E J A M E S HAMILTON

JOY HANKAMR MATT HARING ROBB HARMSEN AMY H A R R A N D RYAN H A R R E L L MELISSA H A R T KAREN HASSE

JEREMY HEAVILIN MEREDITH H E R B S T N E A L HERR KELLY HERREMANS JASON HESTER MEGAN HICKS JEFF HIDDEMA

I n the evening of October 4, 1995, Hurricane Opal came ashore on Florida's Gulf Coast, packing sustained winds of 125 miles per hour. Before It was through, the storm killed at least twenty people and caused at least $1.8 billion in damages to insured properties, making it the third-costliest storm in U.S. history. The storm destroyed or damaged thousands of homes and businesses along a 120 mile stretch of the Florida Panhandle. Many of its residents were still recovering from and repairing damage inflicted by Hurricane Erin two months earlier. Opal caused the sea to rise fifteen feet and swept away nearly everything on the lower floors of homes and businesses along the edge of the coast. (AP Info and Photo)

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HOSHSFFLSA F R E S H M E N

MARK HIDDEMA ERIK H I E M S T R A KATHERINE H I L B R E C H T BRIEN H I L L S SARA HOOLSEMA KATAHERINE H O R J U S S H E R I HOVING

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KELLY H O W A R D MARC HUMBARGER LAURIE HUTCHENREUTHER AMY HUXLEY KARI JACKSON ANDREA JOHNSON ERIN J O H N S T O N

REBECCA JONES Z A C H JONKER JESSICA JOYNT SARAH KAETTERHENRY KATHRYN K A H L E R CHRISTINA K A M I N S K A S SABRINA KAMPHUIS

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T h e Cleveland Indians and the Atlanta Braves squared off in the first W o r l d Series in t w o years. The hard-hitting Indians c o m p i l e d a lofty team batting average of .291 for the season, while the Braves p i t c h i n g staff, led by Greg Maddux (19-2), was widely a c k n o w l e d g e d to be the game's best. The Braves w o n the Series in six games, after taking a t w o - g a m e s - t o - n o n e lead in their home park. They w o n the Series on their return to Atlanta w i t h a 1-0 victory marked by David J u s t i c e ' s h o m e run a n d the one-hit p i t c h i n g of Tome Glavine, w h o was named Series MVP. (AP Info and Photo)

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P a r k i n g lots were r e m o v e d as cottages were relocated f r o m one e n d of a block to another or completly across campus. With more students on campus with even more cars, parking spots became a rare find. Here, the Chaplin's o f f i c e rests o n its new f o u n d a t i o n after moving a block d o w n 10th street to make r o o m for the Haworth Center. (Photo by A n t h o n y Perez)

HOPE

JENNIE KARR S A R A H KAY R A C H E L KEMINK JEFFREY KEMNER KIMBERLY K E N T MATTHEW K E R N KATIE K E Y E S

A N G E L A KILPATRICK S U S A N KINGMA BRIAN KIRKPATRICK SARAH KLAASEN TAMARA K L O K GREGORY KSBYLAK TAMMI KDNYMENBELT

JASON KDOISTRA CRAIG KSPAS SHOJI KDREEDA S U S A N KORPELA CHRISTIAN KSRSTANGE KARRI KRONEMEYER DANIEL KUBACKI

AIMEE KUBASIAK SARAH KUIPERS JORI KUMPF ERIN KUREK ADAM LABBE KIMBERLY L A K E EMILY LALDNDE

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S H R I N K students want more parking spots, Hope wants less cars

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inding a parking space behind the cottages on 13th Street last year was a special thing, worthy of a pat on the back from friends or an excited call home. Besides the cottage dwellers, the lot drew cars from Kollen and other nearby dorms. The conditions have worsened this year when four cottages were moved from 10th Street, adding more people, while actually diminishing the size of the lot. The reaction from students hasn't been cheerful. "There are way too many cars for the number of spots we have," Kuyper cottage resident, Kent Wattleworth ('97), exclaimed.

Rochelle Gauthier ('96), a resident of the Dorian cottage, brought her parking concerns to Dean Frost. When Gauthier can't find a place behind her house, she must park in one of the new lots that the college has built on 15th Street, a dilemma which she believes poses a "major safety question." "Parking in the central campus lots has become so difficult that we need some kind of safety assurance in the exterior lots," Gauthier said. "The new lots are being built increasingly further away and we at least should have some kind of safety phone," she said. Duane Terpstra, assistant director of Public Safety, said the new parking lots

are being improved; lights were installed in most and phones are in the works. Terpstra admits that the College does sell more permits then it has parking spots, but "many students register two cars and bring one or r e g i s t e r and park their car off-campus. We do early morning surveys and often find empty spaces." Those spaces are less numerous than last year, due to the graduation of Hope's smallest class and the arrival of its largest. Last year there were 863 permits to students, 247 freshmen permits and 103 commuters, according to Terpstra.

While building more parking lots would seem the best solution to absorb new students. Bill Anderson, vice president of business and finance, has a different perspective. "We hope to discourage students from bringing cars as much as possible, rather than building new parking lots," he said. Additional student parking is extremely expensive for Hope College to acquire. "It costs $1,500 per space to pave," Anderson said. "A 70 car lot would also include the purchase of four properties, averaging another $3,200 per space." ^

BY jim riekse

FRESHMEN ANDREW UVMGE KERRI L A N G E R A K KRISTI L A N G L A N D BEN LAPPENGA KERI LAW JEBEDIAH L E A C H M A N JAY L E I T Z

MEGAN LDGIE JESSICA LUECHT DAVID LUNN MICHELLE LYNCH MARY MACDERMAID STACEY MACKOWIAK CHRIS M A D D E N

CHRISTINA MALKOWSKI MELISSA MANCHESTER MELISSA MAREMA KELLY MARTIN MEGAN MASTA STACEY MATHIESEN TONI MAY

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ERIN MAYER CASE MCCALLA DANIEL M C C U E K A R L A MCKENNA BENJAMIN M C L D U T H MATTHEW MCPHERSON RENATA MEIXNER

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HOPE

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FRESHMEN

K E V I N MENKEN CALVIN MERRITT JOSH M E T Z L E R CHRISTOPHER MEUZELAAR JULIE MEYERS EMILY MEZESKE DAMON MIKOY

S Y E U R D MISHLER MATT MORGAN MELODY MORSCHECK LISA MOUA B R E T T MULDER TIMOTHY MULDER CHRISTA MURPHY

TERESA MUSSELMAN MARK N E L S O N JOSH N E U C K S LAURA NEUMANN KATHRYN NICHOLS ANDREW NIEMEYER KATHRYN NIXON

ANDREW NORDEN TONY NORRIS ERIN OBRYAN ANTHONY O L D S CAROLINE O L D S KAREN O L S O N SUZANNE ONKEN

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It was Hillary Clinton's first visit to China, and she made it a memorable one. In a speech to the United Nation's Fourth World Conference on Women, the first lady took on the world. Her speech, delivered on September 5, 1995, made a call for human rights and freedom of expression. She said it was indefensible that many women who registered for the conference were denied visas or were unable to fully participate. Mrs. Clinton surprised her audience and the host nation by rebuking Beijing for its treatment of private activists who said they were harassed by authorities during a parallel forum held In Huairou, China, just thirty miles away. The conference platform called for measures to alleviate women's poverty, improve health care, job opportunities and education. (AP Info and Photo)

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HopEtgiSl

FRESHMEN ROBERT OOSTVEEN JACLYN ORNEE JEAN OSELKA LEAH OTT ERIN O V E R M E Y E R DWAYNE FKBISZ S E T H FKLMATEER

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S A R A F)ALMER S T E V E BVPLAWSKY A D A M BS,RRLBERG D E B O R A H BATERIK ANNA RATMOS DANIEL BSTTERSON K E V I N RWJLISSE

L A N C E PELLOW JEFFREY PENNEY AMY P E T T Y B R A D L E Y PEULER MARK PIERSMA ANDREW P O L E S SHANNON P O W E L L

DAVID POWERS MEGAN POWERS CORINNE PRANGE CHRISTY PRATT WESLEY PRESCOTT MICHAEL PRIES

T h e news was terrible to begin with; an Amtrak train derailed while crossing a trestle in a remote desert region of Arizona, fifty-five miles southwest of Phoenix. What made the news even worse was the suspicion of sabotage. Occurring around 1a.m. on October 9, 1995, the derailment of Amtrak's Sunset Limited, en route from Miami to Los Angeles, sent four of its cars into the gulch thirty feet below the trestle. One person was killed and more than seventy were injured. The derailment was caused by the removal of a metal bar that held two sections of rail together. The culprit installed a wire, disabling a light that would have warned the train's crew about the break. Found at the scene was a letter that made reference to the federal sieges at Waco, and Ruby Ridge, and also mentioned the FBI. The letter raised fears that the derailment was the work of antigovernment terrorists. (AP Info and Photo)

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FRESHMEN STAGEY PRINCE A M A N D A PRYOR NICOLE P U T Z K E B E T H QUIMBY JOSHUA QUINLAN MARILEE R A M T H U N JOEL RASDALL

EMILY RATERING JENNIFER RASSCHIER JOY R E D M O N D HOLLY R E T L E W S K I JENNIFER RICHARDSON J E S S E RICHARDSON K A R A RICHTER

AMY RIFE A N N A RIGGS A L E X RIHANI K A R A RILEY G U Y RISEDOREH JOSE ROBERTS JEANINE R O B E R T S

JESSICA ROBINSON NICOLE R O D G E R S ROBERT RODSTROM DAVID R O H N E R ANNE ROULO TONYA R O U S E MARY R O U S H

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IESANSA

FRESHMEN

B R E N T ROWE J O H N RUMOHR KARI R U S S E L L NADIA SAMHOURI UDDIN SAMI AMY S A N D E R S J O S H U A SCHICKER

NATHAN SCHNARR KARI SCHNEIDER NICOLE SCHNEIDER CHRIS SCHOLTEN G R E T C H E N SCHOON GARRETT SCHULZ KATRIN SEID

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SARAH SEXTON RYAN SHAW IVY S H E N ERIN SHIEL RAY SHOCK BENJAMIN SIKMA MATTHEW SIMON

A S H L I SIMPSON K R I S T E N SITZ KAREN SMALLEGAN C L I N T O N SMITH DARCY SMITH R A C H E L SMITH HEIDI SMITHERS

S t u d e n t s , faculty, staff, and community members take part in the 5000 meter run during the Hope College 18th Annual Run-BikeSwim-Walk on Saturday, October 14. The run has been held on Homecoming weekend since 1978 when the Dow Health and Physical Education Center was opened. The events also includes a 3,200 meter walk, 5,600 meter, and 8,000 meter cycling, 400 or 800 meter swimming. A health fair provides diet, nutrition, exercise and stress information, alcÂŤig with body fat, blood pressure, and muscle strength measurements. (PR Photos)

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—«HM-H SARAH SNYDER JENNIFER SPALDING T H O M A S SPRINGERTIGGLEMAN CRYSTAL SPROUSE CATHERINE S T E D M A N MARI S T E P H A N KARIN S T E V E N S

BRITTAN STRANGWAYS MARY SULLIVAN BENJAMIN S W E T S RYAN TANIS AMY TATE ROBERT TEMPLE CHARLES TERPSTRA

PETER T E W I N K L E DAVID T H E U N E ERIN THOMPSON ALAN THORPE KATHERINE TIGELAAR REBECCA TIMMER J E N N Y TOAN

MICHAEL TOBUREN AARON TODD BECKY TRAN MICHAEL TRAVER ERIN T R O X E L J E F F TRYTKO

P r i m e Minister Yitzhak Rabin was shot to death on November 4, 1995, moments after telling cheering thousands that "people really want peace." Rabin, 73, had descended from a city hall balcony and was about to get into his limousine when the gunman fired three bullets at close range, hitting him in the back and stomach. As crowd members surged toward the shooting scene, Rabin's car raced to Tel Aviv's Ichilov Hospital. The assassination -- the first of an Israeli leader since the founding of the state in 1948 -- stunned the nation. World leaders from President Clinton to Yasser Arafat reacted with sorrow and outrage, declaring that the peace process would continue. (AP Info and Photo)

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FRESHMEN


COLLEGE

FRESHMEN

JULIE TWIETMEYER DAVE U Y L KRISTIAN VAN WYK AMANDA VANDERHILL JAMES VANDERHYDE BETHANIE VANDERKAMP

JEFFREY VANDERLAAN CHRISTOPHER VANDERSLICE BRYAN VANHAITSMA CHRIS VANHUIS MELISSA VANNUIL MICHAEL VANOPSTALL

S A R A H VANSPRONSEN KURIA VANWIEREN MICHAEL VEEN BENJAMIN VELDERMAN GWEN VELDHOF JONATHAN VERTALKA

ALYSSA VINE SONIA VIVEROS KIMBERLY V L I E T S T R A RICHARD \A3SS MARY WACKER JENNIFEER WARREN

MISTEN WEELDREYER TODD WENDRICK HEATHER WESP B E T H A N Y WEZEMAN MICHELLE WILCOX ERIC WDNDERGEM

AARON WDNG LINDSEY WOODSTRA CAROLYN WORKING ALEXIA WYSOZAN KELLY YAGER BRIAN YARCH

ELIZABETH YARED ZAC VBUNG MATTHEW YOUNGBERT JESSICA ZAYAZ DARCY Z E H MICHAEL ZDLNIEROWICZ

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KELLY ZWEERING ANDREW ZWYGHUIZEN

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•COLLEGE

ALPHAGAMMAPHI STEPHANIE ADAMS S A R A H BEAVER KRISTIN B U R K E KATHERYN C A R P E N T E R KAMILA DATEMA JESSE GUEST AMY-LYNN HALVERSON AMY JARCHOW

KATHERINE K R U S E LISA L E E MEGAN MADDOX MONICA MANNING HEIDI MICKELSON REGINA MILLER SARA MINNAAR J U L I E RARKER

JEAN-MARIE R E D E N T E GINA SMIES B E T H THORREZ LIA TINKELMAN S A R A H YOUNG JESS GREVENSTUK MELISSA OOMS ERYN F O L E Y

alpha kappa pi becomes hope's seventh fraternity

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embers of Hope's newest fraternity have reason to celebrate after being approved by the Inter Fraternal Council, making them the seventh fraternity on Hope's campus. Founded on the values of academic excellence, community, and open-mindedness, Alpha Kappa Pi's twenty-seven actives have high hopes of adding a new dimension to the circle of Greek life. Last summer the incubation process started among a few of the men and from there the formation took off. First they were approved by Extracurricular Affairs in October. In November the Campus Life Board gave them the big thumbs up. Since them, their

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membership has grown not only in size, but in support. "We felt that existing organizations on campus recognize academic excellence but don't actively foster its growth and development among students," said secretary Andrew Van Fernis ('96). "Our goal is to motivate students by providing a support system that will maintain a commitment to learning in a rigorous academic setting." But the men of Alpha Kappa Pi won't stop there. They intend to extend their goals of high academic standards beyond their organization to the entire campus. By providing several opportunities for meetings of the minds, the men

want to expand intellectual growth. "This is a totally different group," said Justin Fink ('96), president of IFC. "I don't see them as taking away from other groups, but instead providing access to untapped resources and adding to the multi-faceted sphere of Greek life." Although the group didn't participate in pledging this year, they hope to initiate a pledge class next fall, at the earliest. Getting approval was the first big hurdle, and now members are breathing a sigh of relief. "Right now, I'm ecstatic," said Jeff Oegema ('97) currently serving as president of Alpha Kappa Pi. "It's been a long road and we are glad to finally have

our work come to fruition," Matthew Barton ('97) and Oegema feel there is room at Hope for an academically geared organization, outside of the department honor societies. After much investigating, they felt that a fraternity was the best organizational structure to build the foundation for their brainchild. The Dorians were the last Greek organization formed on campus in 1988, when they refounded a sorority that was disbanded in 1971. The sorority has grown to seventy members. The same growth is anticipated by Alph Kappa Pi.

BY jen weaver


HOPE C O L L E G E

ALPHAPHIOMEGA BRADLY A N D E R S E N ROBERT ANDRETZ SHERRI BARNADTN ANNE BARTUSZEVIGE NINA B E L I A U S K A S JONATHAN BROCKMEIER JACQUELYN B U L L A R D KATHY C O R C O R A N

GRETCHEN CONRAD DOREEN DENNISTON JENNIFER E K K E N S SARAH GORTER KAREN GRAHM K A R E N WDWAL LDRI M A D A U S STEPHANIE MILLER

ARIN N E U C K S SARAH NORTHROP A L E X A N D R I A RURKER J U L I E FKTOUT A N T H O N Y PEREZ KATHERINE R E E D S A R A H RICHARDS KARIN S C H A E F E R

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MARY SCRIBNER M I C H E L L E TAYLOR RACHEL WEBB ANTHONY WILKENSON DERK ZWART

T h e first U.S. Apache and Blackhawk helicopters roared into Bosnia on December 24, 1995, a tangible sign of a NATO mission commanders said was on target and taking control of front line positions. While the eight American helicopters, part of the first Armored Division, were arriving into the northern city of Tuzla, the headquarters for U.S. troops, French soldiers were extending control in Sarajevo, where a curfew was lifted for Christmas Eve and Christmas.

APO

231


A L P H A T HETACHI ROBERT A N D R E T Z WAYNE ANGUILM DANIEL BANNINK CURTIS BEEKMAN JEFFREY BROWN ERIK B U T C H A R T BRIAN C A P P S

DAVID CHARNIN JONATHAN CHARNIN MICHAEL CHESSER JOHN D E L C A L Z O KYLE DE'IOUNG JASON DILLABOUGH LLDYD D U N L A P

BRIAN DYKHUIS ERIK E L D R E D PETER EMERY JOSEPH FRITSCH ZACHARY HEGG JOHN LAWLER RICHARD MAPLES

Alt

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PETER MARTIN CLINTON MOORE DAVID NICHOLSON TRUNG PHAN MATTHEW RAPP J O E L REISIG DAVID SCHRIER

TIMOTHY S C O T T S T E V E SPITTERS MATT STEENSMA JEREMY STOEPKER DANIEL S T Y F MARC VANDERBEEK S C O T T VANDERBEEK

JEREMY VAN EK R o s s VRIEZE MARCUS WASILEVICH MATTHEW WILLIAMS TIMOTHY W I T V O E T JASON ZITER ADAM HUDSON

S C O T T HUIZINGA WILLIAM KIM KRISTOPHER MCKEE RYAN S T E R K

Centurian

232


HOPE C O L L E G E

CHIPHISIGMA S T E V E N BUSHOUSE JAMES BUTZ COLIN CONNAIRE JESSE CROTTY S E A N DAVIS TIM DIMOCK JIM DOBBINS

P

WILLIAM D R E Y E R C H A D GIFFORD SHANE HANSON MATT HERRIMAN PETER HOULIHAN J O S E P H KING GEORGE LANOOLT

CHRIS L E G G JAMES L E N G E R PETER U E C H T Y EVAN L L E W E L L T N CHRIS MARTING MARC MONTPETIT CHAD NELSON

ANDREW PIERCE VILASACK P H O T H U S A N BRAD SADLER STEVE SANDERS CHARLES SHURLOW MICHAEL SPRADLING CHAD STOREY

PHIL TOLLENCE JASON WINDALER B R E N T WILLIAMS T Y L E R WHI TE DENNIS A H M A D JAMIE BUCKINGHAM MATTHEW D E J O N G

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JESSE GRAF GREG KERN ANTHONY LASOR CHRISTOPHER S A N D R O RHUL SLATER JAY W A L L A C E

Arcadian

233

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MIMI D O KARA DOEZEMA A L L I S O N ETHERIDGE SARA GEMMEN R A C H A E L GOEI SHANNON GRAFF BROOKE GROENDYKE KATHRYN G U Y

JENNIFER H E N D R I C K S B E T H HOEZEE SARAH JANKE S A R A H KEAY JENNY KRUEGER ELIZABETH LAMBERTS S A R A LDOMAN S U S A N LDOMAN

R E B E C C A MAITNER MARY MCGINN J E S S I C A MIXER JULIA MULDER MEGAN MULDER ABBY NIENHUIS S A R I NIENHUIS LAUREN O'DOWD

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CYNTHIA F^CHECO MARLAINA PARSONS LARA PLEWKA NICOLE PRYOR M E L I N D A RATDAVONG JORITA R O S A L E S ORTENCIA RUIZ KARLYE S CHM ITT

AMANDA SCHULD KAREN SUGDEN K E L L I TEERMAN A R L E N E TORRENCE B E T S E Y VAN FAASEN S A R A H VANDERSTEEN LEIISCHEN VERWYS C O U R T N E Y WELTON

REBECCA BLOM GINA B U W A L D A KRISTIN C H A T E L A I N S H A N N A CLAY KELLI DRAEGER TINA G I L L KATE G R I T T E R B E T H A N I E HOPMA

1 3 0 •

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Delta Phi 234


HORAHBI D E L T A P H I

USA KNOTT HEATHER K N O W L E S HEATHER LOVERN DANIELLE MANNES UNDSAY MATHENY L E A H MCALPINE AMY ROMIN BEKKI SPENCER

B E T H VOLKERS TRISH V b s s ARIKA WECKWERT KATHRYN WHITFIELD

KAPPADELTACHI AMY AUSTIN JENNIFER BROOKS JACQUELYN B U L L A R D NICOLE C L E M E N T S CHARLOTTE DUCKETT CRISTIE DYKEMA JENNIFER FDRBES MERCEDES MERVENNE

MELISSA HARRIGER MONA NASIR SARAH N E L L E R CAROLYN PERRY S U S A N POZZANGHERA ANNE SCHAIRBAUM KARI S N Y D E R TARA STOLLENMAIER

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HOPE C O L L E G E

KAPPABETAPHI HEATHER BAIR L A U R A BAKER J U L I E BLAIR LINDSEY B O L O G R E T C H E N BORG KATHY BRECLAW VICTORIA C A D E DEBBIE C A M P B E L L

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AMY FISHER JODI F R E N S M C K I FRENS R O C H E L L E GAUTHIER JENNIFER GRIEME LEAH HESSE STACIE HOPKINS LAURIE KEISLING

DAWN K L E I N H E K S E L SHANNON LAURSEN A N G E L A LDCICERO A N N LDOMAN REBECCA LUCAS D E B LUMM NICOLE M C C L A I N K A R A MCGILLICUDDY

MEG MORGAN LISA NOVAK SHANNON FKNSZI L A U R A PECHTA HOLLY F ^ L O N JEANETTE PETKUS ALLYSON PICKENS M I C H E L L E PIEL

REBECCA PONKA STEPHANIE RICHARDSON LYNN SMITH ANGELA STREY AMY TROENDLY KRISTINA VANDERMARK S A R A H VAN H A R K E N A N D E R A VEGA

JENNIFER WEAVER STACEY W E N D T JENNIFER WILSON C Y N T H I A ZIRBEL CARLA BOSS S A R A H CATROS ANNA DEMESHUK J I L L DONEHOO

R A C H E L HAVEMAN BECKY HOLLENBECK L E A H JONES JEANNA KEINATH CHRISTINE K E L L E Y LISA K R A N Z CARRIE LANGSTRAAT KARI L E S S E R

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Dorian

236


KAPPABETAPHI J o ELLYN MANNING D A N A MAROLJ R O X A N N E RASCENTE B E T H A N Y RATHBUN VALKYRIE S A K S H A U G LJSA S H E N K ROCHELLE TEDESCO

MIRA V E L A S C O JAIME WEIDNER BRANDI W H E L A N KRISTIN Z I M D A H L

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KAPPAETANU ERIC A L M L I JARED BUONO J O H N DONNELLY JOHN HURLD J E F F KIN KNICKERBOCKER KNIGHT LADY

<i> PETE POEL ANDY P O L E S J . J . YONEYOKA

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HOPECOLLEGE

OMICRONKAPPAEPSILON A N T H O N Y AURIEMMA SHAUN BREDEWEG TRAVIS B U T H RYAN C E R N Y J O N CHRYSLER DYLAN CROTTY JASON CURRIE STEPHAN CURRIE

TAD D O E Z E M A J U S T I N FINK ZACHARIAH G A L L E G O S CHIP G E O R G E JEFF HONDORP K E N N E T H HOWK PETER HUIZENGA MATTHEW J U N G

S T E V E N JURGENS B R E T T KARIS DAVID K R O U S E FFCUL KUIPER KEVIN LEWIS DAVID LUNDBERG JEFFREY M A C D A N I E L S RYAN M A H E R

CRAIG M A K I JEFF MULHOLLAND C H A D NEFF ERIC N I C K E L S J O E NOVAK J O H N MARK O U D E R S L U Y S LEE POSTHUMUS MARC P O S T H U M U S

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UOYOV,^ FRATER WASHINGTON H A N S WEINBURGER JOEL PETERSON JEFF RENZ RAUL S T U I T ANDERW THOMPSON ERICH VAN RAVENSWAAY

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FFCUL H A N D L E Y MARC H E S NATHAN HOEKZEMA MARC HUMPHREY ROBERT GILLESPIE J A S O N JOHNSON JOSHUA (OOISTRA LUIS LEGUIZAMON

BENJAMIN M I L L S SCOTT NYMAN JOHN NORDEN PETER FAYETTE ROY PEREIRA DANIEL PICKERING LUKE PINKERTON OMAR POSTIGO

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CHRISTOPHER POTTER D A N POTTER KDLIN REDMAN DENNIS RIETMAN LESLIE RITTON RYAN S T JOHN ERIC SEVENSMA ANDREW SILL

RYAN SRANGLER JOSHUA STRATTON ANDREW STORER S T E P H E N TOBIAS SAMUEL VAIL CHRISTOPHER VAN D A M NICK VANERBORGH DEREK VANDER HEIDE

CHRIS VAN I IMMEREN PETER WARBURTON DREW YfesELDVKE ANTHONY ZDRC

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SIGMAIOTABETA CINDY A C H T E R H O F MELISSA ALJOBELLI JENNIFER B E C H I T E L S A R A H BEEMER KIM B E N T O N MARY B O E L K I N S CARRIE CARLEY ELIZABETH COLLINS

MARKA CROSS NICOLE D O U C E T T E KDRI RDSTER A M A N D A FRY ALLISON GERDS KELLY GILROY U S A GOODIN MISSY G R E Y D A N U S

RACHEL HALL JODI H O E K S T R A CYNTHIA HOFLAND DANA JENSEN SHANNON LAND LAURIE LANGE SARAH LUBBERS HEATHER M A A S

JENNIFER MANCINI SHEREE MCFARLAND JULIE MOES K E L L I E MOX KAY O T T O VALERIE RACHECO MONICA F E L L O W B E T H FERRY

JENNIFER PIHLAJA SUSAN REEVES HOLLY R E T L E W S K I SARAH STIELSTRA AMY STRASSBURGER KIM T R I E Z E N B E R G B E T H VANDENBERG TONI V l S S E R

K R I S T I N VINK R A C H A E L WAGNER REBECCA WHITEFOOT JULIE WRIGHT J E N N I F E R ZEERIP CONNIE B A H N S E N SARA BLDSOE ELIZABETH CARD

TRUDY C A S T I L L O HILLARY FAITH STEPHANIE FERIKS K3RI G R A B O W KLRSTEN HEINRICH ELIZABETH HENEVELD JULIE HOLWERDA C A T H L E E N KING

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Sibylline 240


HOPE

3

SIGMAIOTABETA TRYSTIN KLEIMAN CARRIE TOOP JESSICA OWENS AMY PERKINS ABBY POCHERT KATHLEEN RILEY GIN A ROWE SARA RYE

ELIZABETH STROH SARA VAN HOOSE SUZY V E L A Z Q U E Z

he Dallas Cowboys won their third Super Bowl in four seasons on January 1 8 , 1 9 9 6 , beating Pittsburgh 27-17. The team did it behind the heroics of quarterback Larry Brown, whose career has been spent in the shadow of glamor guys named Troy, Michael, Emmit, and Deion. With this win, the Cowboys placed themselves in elite company. No team has won so many Super Bowl titles in such a short span. These Cowboys, basically the same mix of stars and blue-collar workers who won under Jimmy Johnson, went just as far with the oft-maligned Barry Switzer. (AP Photo)

—

Sibylline 241

1 3 0 -


HOPECOLLEGE

PHITAUNU D E R E K BABIN NIK B A N C H O F F B R E N T BUCKINGHAM JASON COX RICHARD CRUMBIE TROY DAVIS SEAN D E W U L F TOM DIXON

TOM D O R A N B R A D FEENSTRA PETER FIELD RICK F R E N S RONALD FRIEL CAMERON GATRELL J A S O N GRIMM DAVID HAMMINGH

JASON H A L L TROY HAYS T O D D HORNSBY MATTHEW JOHNSON RICH K E S T E L O O T MATT L U H M A N N AARON OTIS STEVEN OURSLER

TREVOR STARNES BRAD STEGENGA JARED VlCKERS NICK W A R D KENT WATTLEWORTH GRANT WILHELM D A N YOUNG C H A D BAYS

JAMES BECHER BRIAN DIAZ M I C H A E L FARMER MARK HOFSTEE RAUL M C K E E MIKE P E T T I G L I O TODD LUCAS JEREMY LUHMANN

J U S T I N WORMMEESTER

Emersonian 242


H O P EK O L L E G E

SIGMASIGMA ELIZABETH ANKER JODI B A R S T O W MICAN B O T K E N I C O L E BUIKEMA REBECKA COOK TERESA CUPP BEECKY DRANE GRETA D T K S T R A

KlMBERLy E K E R T ALICIA RDRTINO JANEEN GIPSON AMY GRASMAN D A N I E L L HAYS G E N A N N E HAYS AMI H I N D E R E R KlMBERLy HINZE

JENNIFER HOEKSEMA J E N N I F E R HOLWERDA JULIE HOVING AMANDA KLAPP KELCEE KDESTNER TIFFANY L A N G E VALERIE L A S O R S A M Y K A LOCK

MARIA M O R E N O SARA NICLES STEFANY NICODEMUS K A R E N PIRICH K E L L E Y RAYMOND KELLY R O G E R S A N D R E A ROSSI SHELLI ROTTSCHAFER

SHANNON RUCKERT SARAH SLAGH SARA SPYKERMAN JENNIFER T H O M A S MEGAN THOMPSON R E B E C C A VAN D T K E KATHERINE V L A S I C A OLIVIA WELCH

LAURA WENDT JENNIFER WOOOHAMS JANAY W & R M M E E S T E R MONIKA Z W A R T ERIN B A R R O N E MEGAN BEATTY ROBYN D I S E L K O E N STEPHANIE GEBHARDT

RACHEL HILLEGONDS EMIDT H O L L E N B E E K ABIGAIL KUIPER KRISTA M E D E N GINA P E L L E R I T O L A R A WAGNER

Sigma 24 J -J30-


HOPE

COLLEGE

Milestone Staff Recording Hope College's history for the students and college community for seventy-nine years. U u n e eighth, and my summer finally begins. I'm sure there can be no better feeling than when I throw this final page shipment in the mail box. It has been a great experience being editor of the 1996 Milestone. I learned a lot about publishing, Hope College, and how much I procrastinate. If you've ever loved something so much that it takes up almost every free minute, then you know how I feel about this job. Sometimes I think I've spent more time in front of the PowerMac than sleeping or studying combined. But I'm already looking forward to doing it all again next year—maybe because I get to go home for two months first. I hope everyone who bought the book will enjoy it. We made a lot of changes and improvements throughout the process of creating this Milestone. Most notable is all the writing and features. Throughout the staff and student section, we published Anchor articles we thought would be fun to remember a few years down the road. The price of books, parking problems, computer crashes, and all the other things we spent the year complaining about. World event pictures were also added to the student s e c t i o n s along the Hope " e v e n t s . " We thought it would be nice to have a reminder of the history off campus as well as on. We tried to get all campus groups to submit pictures and information, but only those printed did. You would think that when a group commits their time to something they really care about for an entire year, they would want some reminder or recognition. Being only three people, the staff could not continually chase people around campus, although we really wanted them to be a part of the book. I would like to personally give a huge thanks to all who made this book possible. We have had tremendous help from an uncountable number of people throughout the year. Without you, this p i e c e — y o u r p i e c e — o f Hope C o l l e g e history would not be possible. Anthony Perez 96 Milestone Editor

A n n e , The best part of the year was getting to know you, especially our after school lunches and Blessid Union of Souls adventure. You have been so helpful with Filemaker, PageMaker computers, Zips, printers, money, the Washington trip and book designs. You have taught me so much and given me even more inspiration. Good luck with your career and interests. I am looking forward to two more years together.

Anthony Perez Milestone Editor in Chief

Anne Bakker-Gras Milestone Advisor J D , Thanks for all the help getting the book off the ground with cover, color and spec advice. Thanks for all the lunches at Pietros, help with the computers, and cutting costs. We and Walsworth are lucky to have you working for us. PS. I'm ready for bigger and better next year—we just have to get it past ABG. Thanks for everything again.

R h o n d a , Thanks for being so patient during my endless number of calls. It took me a while to figure out "the Walsworth way," but with all your help, I think the book has come together easier and with less stress. I can't wait to meet you and all the people at the plant this summer. I look forward to a couple more years of working with you.

Milestone staff interests, comments, or questions? 395-7883/E-mail Milestone@Hope.edu

Milestone 244

J.D. DeMare Publishing Representative

Rhonda Holmes Walsworth Service Representative


MANY

THANKS

Tom Renner Karen Bos Public Relations Robilynn Snip HolliTigchon Business Office Merrie Bannink Diane Wickman Student Development Steven DeJong Brad Bouwkamp CIT Department Mail Room Staff Union Desk Workers Maintenance Staff

Jeanette Petkus Associate Editor

Amanda Black Associate Editor

A s I sat down to write each of my articles. I tried to capture the spirit of each event; some turned out better than others. Sometimes I had to try and place myself in situations 1 knew little, if nothing about, and write something that would bring back vivid memories to those who read it. To all of you 1 hope I accomplished what I set out to do. Some memories we will treasure forever. Others, in time will slip from out thoughts, never to be recalled again. I can think of times in the past two years, many this past year, when I thought I would never forget how painful of lovely my life seemed to be. But now when I search back through all that I have experienced, I too can vaguely recall events that seemed so crucial to me at the time. To me, this is one of the most tragic games life can play with us; to lose the memory of events that made us who we are. I hope that through the Milestone we can hold off some of those memories that are to lost for just a while longer.

C a p t u r i n g a school year is an arduous task. There are moods, emotion, and subtleties that go beyond the score of the homecoming game or which class won the Pull or Nykerk. The Milestone does and excellent job of capturing the entire experience and full range of emotions. I hope that my output brings back those memories. I would like to thank the staff for letting me waltz in second sememster and do what I love the most. Anthony, thanks for listening to my occasional whining about homework and deadlines. This has been a very enjoyable experience.

Shannon Gould Kristen Douglass Milestone writers Jill Fischer Zach Johnson Milestone photographers

CONTRIBUTORS TomAkland Stacy Bogart Heather Bosch Jenn Dorn Amy-Lynn Halverson Matthew Haseltine Becky Hollenbeck Jodi McFarland Karen McKoen Matt Morgan Jessica Owens Kim Powell Jim Riekse Megan Thompson Jen Weaver The Anchor Campus Groups Greek Organizations

MILESTONE COLOPHON The 1996 Milstone was produced using Aldus PageMaker 5.0 on a Power Macintosh 7200/75. Page proofs were printed full size on an Accel-a-Writer 8100. Proofs accompanied page files saved on Iomega Zip disk for disk submission mounting. Publisher: The 79th volume of the Milestone was printed by Walsworth Publishing Company, 306 North Kansas Avenue, Marceline, Missouri 64658. Representatives: J.D. "Yearbook Guy" DeMare was our publishing representative and Rhonda Holmes was our customer service representative at Walsworth. Cover: Poly laminated 4-Color with Matte Gold hot foil type and GR-29 graining printed on white stock 701. The binding is 9 x 12 Smyth Sewn. Endsheets: Color is Black with Gold 873 duotone photos. Text is Gold 873 and fonts represent those used in each book section. Paper Stock: All pages were printed on eighty pound Monarch Gloss. Type Specs: 130 years of Hope design is made of unicorn Script, Ambient Script, Airfoil Script, and Times. Body copy is ten point times. Captions are eight point bold Helvetica with ten point leading. Folios use the 130 year design with eight point italic Times. Headlines and subheadlines vary from section to section. Photographs: Class photos were taken Appleyard photography of South Haven, Michigan. Sports team pictures were taken by Hope College Public Relations. Greek group pictures were taken by Steven Dejong of Hope College CIT. Greek and Group section photos were taken by those given credit. Advisor: Anne Bakker-Gras, Student Development Departmatfk Hope College.

Milestone 245

-J30


T

here are

many people contained in this 79th volume of the Milestone. People from all over the nation and world bring diversity to the halls, campus and classrooms we all share. Although all are here for the same reason, each is headed in their own direction. All are represented in a different place in this book by choosing to become a part of campus groups, Greek organizations, or remaining independent. However different, all are brought together forever in this book about the history of students—the history of Hope College,

1 996

186

Crf (J^jCryi

•m

Index 246

F reshmen Puller J.D. Kenslnger and Moraler Beth Volkers embrace the inspiring news of precious inches stolen from the Even Year team. Despite many gains throughout the event, rope came easier for the Even year as they stole the event by a few inches. In the three hour give and take match, '98 won the annual tug of war by only thirty-four inches. Kensinger and Volkers are only two of the several hundred people represented in this index and throughout the 1996 Milestone. (PR Photo)


i

s •m

Index 247

130


Abbas, Geoff Abbott, Robert

86, 216 86, 87, 184, 38, 39 Abdelwahab, Jalaa 184, 195 Abfall, Meg 148,81 Achterhof, Cindy 240 Acker, Dan 148 Ackerman, Tara 234 Ackermann, Kimberly 148 Adams, Staphanie 148 Adams, Stephanie 230, 4 8 Adamski, Mike 10,216 A d a m s o n , Jon 124, 125 Adloff, Julie 216 Afarin, Afshin 184 Ahmad, Dennis 233 Akland, Tom 62, 184 Al-Faqih, Nasser 198 Al-Rayes, Dina 216 Albertson, Justin .. 87, 124, 198 Albrecht, David ... 5 7 , 2 3 9 , 198 Alcohol Issues Matter 76 Alexander, Erin 148 Alger, Barret 239, 57 Allee, Kerry 184 Allen, Elizabeth 198 Allen, Vanessa 85 Alles, Tim 87,216 Allison, Amy 77 Almli, Eric 148,237,59 Alpha Kappa Pi Fraternity ... 230, 46, 5 Alpha Phi O m e g a Fraternity 231,60,45, 46,212 Alpha Phi Sorority .... 77, 230, 48, 45, 46 Altobelli, Melissa 240, 52, 198 Alverez-Ruf, Hersilia 130 Ames, Randy 87, 124 Amlotte, Jeff 14,86, 184,7 Amnesty International 77 Amtrak 225 Ananina, Olga 148 Anchor, The 65 Andersen, Bradly 231 Anderson, A m a n d a 84 Anderson, Bill 223 Anderson, Frances 198 Anderson, Janet 130 Anderson, Kelly 148 Anderson, Scott 216 Andretz, Robert 231, 232 Andrews, Njord 198 Angeli, Aaron 9 6 , 9 7 , 148 Anguilm, Wayne .. 1 4 8 , 2 3 2 , 5 5 Aniston, Jennifer 200 Anker, Elizabeth 243 Anson, Rachel 3 Anton, Sinta 216 Appleby, Emily 86 Arcadian Fraternity 233, 54, 45 Arnold, Molly 216 Arnoys, Marc 216 Aronson, Heidi 148, 4 0 ASCD 136 Aschbrenner, Charles 130 Aslanian, Jennifer 216 Assink, Rita 148 Assink, Stacey 216

J 3 D

.... Index 248

Atkins, Priscilla 130 Atlanta Braves 221 Atwood, Emily 86 Auer, Kathryn 198 Aumaugher, Alexander 149 Aumaugher, Troy 198 Auriemma, Anthony 238 Austin, Amy 235 Austin, Dale 37 Austin, Scott 55 Awwad, Hanan 149, 195 Ax-TerAvest, Michele 149 Azzar, Jennifer 149

Babin, Derek 149,242,56 Bach, Jane 130 Baer, Mark 130 Bahnsen, Connie 240 Bainbridge, Bryan 87, 149 Bair, Heather 2 3 6 , 6 2 , 184 Bajwa, Gurjyot 149, 195 Baker, Laura 149,236 Baker, Mark 198 Bakker, Emily 94, 95 Bakker, Kristina 198 Bakker-Gras, A n n e 6 4 , 2 4 4 , 130 Balcer, Kathryn 198 Balfour, Rick 130 Ball, Wesley 131 Ballard, Paul 124 Banchoff, Nik 56, 87, 242 Bangert, C a m r y n 149 Bannink, Cindy 106, 115 Bannink, Cynthia 107, 216 Bannink, Dan .... 232, 104, 105, 124, 125, 184 Bannink, Mary 131 Barcheski, Chad 87 Barnadyn, Sherri 231 Barnes, Katherine 198 Barnes, Angela 123,216 Barnett, Anna 149, 79 Barney, Chris 131 Barr, Adam 86 Barrett, Wayne 149 Barrone, Erin 243 Barry, Ann . 85, 86, 87, 38, 198 Barstow, Jodi 149,243 Barton, Chad 216 Barton, Kelly 216 Barton, Matthew 230, 184 Bartuszevige, A n n e 62,231 Baseball 120-121 Bash, Brent 216 Basketball ... 108-111, 144-145 Bastien, Karen 111 Bates, Jeffrey 198 Batten, Beau 200 Batton, Beau I I , 121, 198 Bays, Chad 242 Bays, Jason 8 6 , 8 7 , 14 Bays, Jeff 101,216 Beal, Dwight 30,31 Beard, Jeremy 184,239,57 Beatty, Megan 243 Beaver, Sara . 1 4 9 , 4 8 , 1 3 1 , 2 3 0 Becher, Jim 97, 242 Bechitel, Jennifer 240 Bechtel. Jen 52 Becker, Eric 184

Beckman, Erin Beckman, Peter Beckner, Kristen Becksvoort, Jami Bednarick, Tracy Beekman, Curtis

123 149, 83, 24 198 184 71, 198 149,34, 92, 93, 232 240, 52 113, 115 37 216 131 216 216 86 149,240,52 184 150 20 234 70 62 184

Beemer, Sarah Bekker, Dave Bekkering, James Bekkering, Tim Bell, Albert Bell, Matt Benson, Angela Benson, Jon Benton, Kim Berends, Melissa Bergethon, Bryce Berkimer, Missy Berman, Stacy Bertolins, Jackie Beta Beta Beta Betz, Chad Beukelman, Alison 86, 87, 38, 198 Beyer, Miriam 86, 198 Biehl, Leianne 94 Bieliauskas, Nina 11,65, 2 3 1 , 2 3 4 Bierling. Rachel 184 Bigler, Chris 70 Billideau, Molly 86, 216 Birsen, Aaron 198 Bittenburg, Kelli 217 B l a c k , Kyle 217 Black, A m a n d a .... 7 6 , 2 4 5 , 2 1 7 Black Coalition 67 Black, Jennifer 150 Black, Jessica 217 Black, Joy 150,234 Blair, Julie 150,65,236 Blaising, Alissa 217 Blanchard, Carrie 234 Blankenspoor, Harvey . 1 3 1 , 6 2 Bldsoe, Sara 240 Blessid Union of Souls 208 Blom, Rebecca 234 Blood, Daryl 217 Boelkins, Mary 15, 1 5 0 , 8 6 , 8 7 , 2 4 0 , 179, 52, 38 Boersma, Kimberly 199 Boersma, Paul 30 Boes, Kathleen 217 Boeve, Ron 121 Bogard, Jeremy 106, 104, 105, 124, 199 Bogard, Stacy 245, 199 Bohnwagner, Kim 199 Bolema, Chad 150 Bolo, Lindsey 236, 199 Bolt, Robin 217, 39 Bolton, Brad 87 Bombe, Michelle 131 Bonnema, Laura .... 92, 93, 199 Bonnema, Tom 8 6 , 8 7 , 150 Bono, Jared 59 Boodt, Bryan 86, 87, 184 Booker, Linda 131 Books 186 Bookstore, Hope-Geneva .. 186 Borg, Gretchen ... 1 5 0 , 6 9 , 2 3 6 , 50 Borgeson, Erika 217 Bos, Amy 217 Bosch, Heather 217 Bosma, Duane .. 150, 108, 109, 144, 145 Bosman, Jon 199 Bosnia 231

Boss, Carla 86, 236 Boss, Jennifer 217 Bostelaar, Jill 217 Botke, Mican 243 Boulis, Angela 217 Bouma, Brooke 217 Bouma-Prediger, Steven .... 140 Bouwens, T a m m y 107, 184 Bowers, Melissa 150 B o w m a n , Joanna 184 Box, Kimberly 217 Brady, Allen 131 Brandt, Joel 2 3 9 , 5 7 , 184 Brandt, Robert 116, 217 Brass, Sarah 150 Breclaw, Kathy .... 1 5 0 , 2 3 6 , 5 0 Bredeweg, Shaun 238 Breen, Rachel 217 Bremer, Lara 199 Brenner, Steve 199, 113 Breslin, Scott 87 Breukink, Kirk 239 Brewer, Krista 217, 99 Brickner, Jonathan 217 Brink, Irwin 129,132 Brintnell, Kevin 145, 109 Brockmeier, Jonathan 231 Bronkema, Heidi 86 Brooks, Ena 217 Brooks, Jennifer 235 Brown, Angela 87,217 Brown, Christa 150 Brown, Darrick 150 Brown, Jeffery 150, 232 Brown, John 217 Brown, Larry 241 Brown, Matt 109 Brown, Micah 239, 199 Brown, Stacy 107, 199 Bruininks, Patty 151 Bruins, Sandra 132 Bruins, Tonia 81, 123 Brukirk, Kirk 57 Bruwer, Josh 87 Brya, Mike 121, 217 Brzezinski, Dave 199 Bucata, Jason 184 Buckingham, Brent 87, 242, 56 Buckingham, J.P. 87 Buckingham, Jamie 233 Buckley, Nathaniel 184,61 Budde, Brooke 184 Buikema, Nicole 151,243 Bulgarelli, Todd 184 Bull, Tony 86, 199 Bullard, Jacquelyn 2 3 1 , 2 3 5 , 5 1 Bultman, Baars 132 70, 237, 59 Buono, Jared Buonopane, Cindy 184 Burgun, Kevin 76, 123, 199 Burke, Kristin 230, 4 8 Burnatowska-Hledin, Maria 132 Burns, Anna 217 Bush, Kelly 199 Bushouse, Steven 233 Butchart, Erik 232 Buth, Travis 87, 238, 58 Butts, Julie 87, 184 Butz, James 233, 184 Buwalda, Gina 234 Buylsma, Sarah 199 Buyze, Steve 87 Byam, Jeff 184 Byard, Ken 151, 121 Byington, Laurie 1 5 1 , 1 2 2 , 1 2 3 Byland, Ann 106, 1 0 7 , 2 1 7 Byland, Ellen 107, 199 Byland, Mark 185 Byrn, John 199

I 996

Cabansag, Karen

151,92,

93, 234 Cade, Victoria 83, 236, 199 Calabro, Julia 185 Caldwell, Cherith 20, 199 Caldwell, Chris 199 Cambell, Debra 151 Camp, Gary 132 Campbell, Debbie 236, 50 C a m p u s Life Board 45, 5. 230 CAPA 28 Capps, Brian 151,232,55 Capps, Dan 239, 57 Carbonneau, Jami 151 Card, Betsy 21 Card, Elizabeth 240 Carley, Carrie 240, 52 Carlson, Christopher .... 217,86 Carlson, Jeffery 151 Carlson, Laura 217 Carlson, Patricia 151 Carney, Casey 76, 199 Carpender, Katy 48 Carpenter, Erik .. 151, 104, 124, 105, 125 Carpenter, Julie 218 Carpenter, Katheryn 152, 230,48 Carpenter, Sarah 107, 199 Carroll, Elizabeth 86 Carroll, Wendy 151 Carter, Gene 136 Case, Tamara 152 Casey, Chris 185 Casino Night 20, 21 Cassell, Emily 218 Cassell, Matthew 199 Cassell, Tom 87 Casserly, Chad 152, 121 Castillo, Trudy 85, 240 Cathey, Elizabeth 152 Catros, Sarah 236 Caulkins, Jeremy 70, 185 Cavanagh, Trudy 82, 185 Celf, Lindy 115 Centurian Fraternity 14, 232, 5 5 , 4 6 Cerny, Ryan 238, 58 Chambers, Michelle 218 Chapel 30-31,3 Chapel Choir 86 Chapel Choir 38, 39, 27 C h a p m a n , Jacqueline ... 86, 199 C h a p m a n , Kristy 152 Charnin, David 152, 232 Charnin, Jonathan 232 Chassee, Todd 218 Chatelain, Erin 234 Chatelain, Kristin 234 Checklick, Sue 20 Cheerleading 92-93 Chelf, Lindsey 114 Chen, Jonathan 87, 27 Chesser, Michael 232 Chesser, Mike 55 China 224,210 Chittle, Erick 152 Chitwood, Michael 41


Chmiel, Nikolas 152 Choudhry, Hasan 185 Christ, Jesus 68, 85, 30 Christensen, Pete 69, 85, 185, 24 Christinidis, Marc 57 Christinidis. Mark 152,239 Christopher, Adrienne 81, 218, 124 Chrysler, Jon Cindric, Kathryn C1T

238, 5 8 218 209

Clark, Laura 39 Clarke, Matthew 199 Clausen, Dave 239 Clawson, Dave 57 Clay, Kate 119 Clay, Shanna 234 Clements, Nicole 235, 185 Cleveland Indians 221 Clifton, Amie 218, 94 Cline, Jennifer 85, 199 Clinton, Bill . 2 2 8 , 6 0 , 188, 198 Clinton, Hillary 224 Coalition, Black 67 Coates, Audrey . . . 1 8 5 , 1 1 9 , 1 1 8 Cockman, M e a g a n 218 Coffey, Janelle 218 Coffing, Bryce 218 Cohen, Marcy 45 Colbrunn, Christy 218 Cole, Jeremy 108,144 Coleman, Dave 64 Coleman, Kathleen 199 Colenbrander, A n n e ... 102, 103 College Chorus .. 86, 39, 26, 27 Collegium M u s i c u m 38, 39, 87 Collins, Christopher 57, 239 Collins, Elizabeth 15,240 Collins, Heather 152 Collins, Patrick 87, 185 Collins, Paul 239 Comfort, Jeff 87, 152 Computers 204 Concert Showcase 39 Congdon, Marybeth 152 Conklin, Margaret 153 Conlon, John 96, 97 Connaire, Colin ... 1 4 , 1 5 3 , 2 3 3 Conrad, Gretchen 231 Cook, Amy 218 Bret C o o k 116 Cook, Kim 153 Cook, Mark 195 Cook, Rebecka 243, 196 Cook, Ryan 239, 57 T

Cooke, Carolyn 153 Cooper, Melissa 48 Cooper, Todd 17 Corcoran, Kathy 153,231 Cornell, Jill 153 Cornell, Lori 218 Corothers, Dave 132 Cortright, Sarah 218 Cosmopolitan Fraternity 239, 57, 44, 45, 5 Couturier, A d a m 153 Couvreur, Elizabeth 81,218 Cox, Jason 153, 242, 56 Cox, John 132 Coy, Steven 97 Coyl, Bryan 39 Crain, Adriana 85,218 Crammer, Mike 124 Crandell, Brad 239, 57 Cranmer, Mike ... 104, 105, 185 Cravotta, Corrine 107 Crawley, Lauren 185 Crawley, Seth 87, 218 Cronkite, Donald 132 Crosby, S u m m e r 81 Cross Country 104-107 Cross, Marka 87, 240 Crotty, Dylan 238 Crotty, Jesse 86, 87, 233 Crumble, Rich 56, 242 Cupp, Teresa 243 Curell, Todd 218 Curley, Cathy 103 Currie, Jason .. 96, 97, 153, 238 Currie, Stephan 238

Cwik, Daniel 185 Dahlman, Kevin 153 Dale, Noah 218 Dale, Seth 185 Dallas C o w b o y s 241 Daly, Dan 112, 1 1 3 , 2 1 8 Danapilis, Chris 92, 93 Dangremond, Nicole . . 2 1 8 , 1 1 9 Daniels, Annette 153 Datema, Kami 230, 4 8

r"

Datte, Tracy 85 Davelaar, Joe 109 Davelaar, Tom 109 Davidson, Elizabeth 218 Davies, Nathan .... 8 1 , 2 1 8 , 124 Davis, Sean 87, 233 Davis, Troy 87, 242, 56 De Young, Kirk 218 Dean, Aaron 97 Dean, Chanel 153 DeBoer, D a w n 114, 115 DeBoer, Matt 121,218 DeBoer, Nathan 218 Debruin, Alison 218 DeBruyn, Maxine 93 DeCair, Sara 153 Decker, Rachel 153, 234 Deckinga, Gabriela 84 Deer, Kristy 218 DeFeyter, Mark 97 deHaan, Elizabeth 94 DeHaan, Kelli .... 153, 191, 123 deHaan, Liz 95 DeHaan, Sander 133 D e H a a n , Sarah 185 D e H o m m e , David 219 D e H o m m e l , Dave 87, 124 DeHorn, Kyle 87 DeJong, Matthew 233 Dekker, Elisabeth 153 DeKuiper, Scott 87, 185 Delcalzo, John 232, 185 Deliyanides, Dina 154 Dell'Olio, Andrew 79, 133 Dell'Olio, Jeanine 136 Delta Phi Sorority 77, 234, 235, 49, 46 DeLuca, Tom DeMeester, Erin Demeshuk, A n n a D e m o s , Adeana Denison, Rebecca Deniston, Doreen Dennis, Nicole Dennison, Susan Denniston, Doreen Denuyl, Cory Derby, Scott Dermody, Kelly Dershem, Herb DeVries, Debra DeVries, Ryan D e w Crew Dewitt, Dirk DeWitt, Linda

17 219 236 17, 115 85, 185 154, 71 219 154 231 219 105, 124 154 133 185 219 5 87 154

DeWitte, Jon 63 DeWulf, Sean 2 4 2 , 5 6 , 185 De Young, Chris 185 De Young, Kevin 86, 124 De Young, Kyle 232 De Young, Mary 133 De Young, Sarah 154 Dianis, Erika 11,86 Diaz, Brian 242 Diaz, Dawnita 66, 67 Dickie, Jane 134, 141 Dickinson, Elizabeth 185 Dillabough, Heather 82 Dillabough, Jason 154,232 Dillon, Dana 219 Dimitrov, Hristo 154,77 Dimmick, Nicholas 154 Dimock, Tim 14, 233 Dingerson, Sarah 185 Diselkoen, Robyn 243 Divozzo,Jason 219 Dixon, Tom 242, 56 Do, Mimi 234, 185 Do, Tien 107 Dobbins, Jim 1 2 1 , 2 3 3 , 185 Dobos, Jeremy 185 Dobosz, Jennifer 154 Doering, Robert 185 Doezema, Kara 234 Doezema, Tad 154,238 Dole, Bob 184,201 Dole, Elizabeth 201 D o m b r o w s k i , Chris 96, 97 Donehoo, Jill 236 Donnelly, John 59, 237 Donovan, Patti 48 Doran, Tom .... 8 7 , 2 4 2 , 5 6 , 185 Dorian Sorority ... 14, 77, 236, 237, 50 D o m , Jenn 65 Doroh, Brandon 87 Doublestein, Jason .... 239, 186, 187 Doucette, Nicole 240 Douglass, Kristen 1 5 4 , 6 4 , 2 4 5 Downing, Corrine 187, 123 Draeger, Kelli 234 Drake, Katherine 187 Drane, Beecky 243 Dressier, Andrew 97 Drexler, Stacy 219 Dreyer, William 233 Duckett, Charlotte 235 Duff, Victoria 187 Dunkerley, Melissa 219 Dunlap, Jodette 187 Dunlap, Lloyd 232 Dunn, Mark 154 Dunn, Steve 154 Duperon, John 187 Durocher, Nicole 154,62 Dyke, Angie 219 D y k e m a , Cristie 235 Dykhuis, Brian 232 Dykstra, Christine 87,219 Dykstra, Greta 154,78,243 Dykstra, Than 78

I Dykstra, Tim E-mail

87 28

Eastman, Chad 219 Eaton, Donna 124, 134 Ebels, Robert 100, 101 Ebright, A m y 155 Ebright, Kim 155 Ebright, Robin 155, 69 Echos of Style 40-41 Eckelbarger, Hatti 155 Eckert, Kimberly 243 Edema, Rebecca 219 Eden, Kristina 87, 187 Eding, Christie 111, 94 Eicher, Steve 85, 155 Ekkens, Jennifer 231 Elbert, Melissa 155 Eldred, Erik 155,232,55 Elenbaas, Tom 68 Ellison, Laurie 69,219 Elsholz, Eric 86, 187 Emerson, Derek 218,209 Emerson, Nancy 134 Emersonian Fraternity 242, 56, 44 Emery, Deborah 219 Emery, Peter 64, 232 Enell, Jill 203 Engelsma, Kara 155 Engelsman, Scott 219, 205 Engineering Design 34 Engle, Laurie 134 English, James 155 Enos, Caroline 219 Environmental Issues 70 Eshleman, A m y 71 Eshuis, Jason 187 Esia, Jason 57 Essenburgh, Susan 155 Estep, D a m o n 87, 121 Esteves, Dean 121 Etheridge, Allison 234 Etheridge, Kelly 94 Euvrard , Aimee 155 Evans, A m i e 219 Evans, David 155 Everts, Jenny 134

Extracurricular Affairs 230 Faber, Sarah 219 Fabiola, Monroy 219 Faculty and Staff 128-143 Faith, Hillary 240 Fansler, Katharine 86, 187 Farmer, Michael 87, 242 Farmer, Todd 124 Farrakhan, Louis 217 Fate, Andy 87 Faust, Matt 59 Federico, Sandra .... 1 5 6 , 8 5 , 6 1 Fedototszkin, Alex 156 Feenstra, Brad 87, 242, 56 Feenstra, Sheryl 132 Feldkemp, Susan 134 Feldmeier, David 187 FCS 68 Fent, Kathleen 156 Feriks, Stephanie 240 Ferri, Paul 187 Fessenden, P a m 156 Fewless, Matt 87 Feyter, Melanie 219

Index 249

1 3 0 -


Fickes, J o h n

121

Field, Brian Field. Peter

219 242, 5 6

Final Four Fine, Sarah Fink, Justin

108, 145 156 156,230,238

Fischer, Daniel Fischer, Jill

86 65, 245

Fisher, A m y Fiske, E d w a r d Fitzgerald, H o w a r d Fix, Bryan

236 37 219 100, 101

Flegel, Sarah Flinn, Nicki

107,219 61

Flory, R e b e c c a Flowers, A m a n d a

187 86, 187

F l o y d , Jill Fly, Jonathon

86 187

Folkert, G r e g Folkert, Katharine Folkerts, Victoria Follett. Robert Folta, Vicki Football

Gauthier, Rochelle .... 157, 236, 223 G a v i n , Jessica 220 G e b h a r d t , Stephanie G e e r d i n k , Ted Geerlings, Renae

243 157 157

Gehl, Mary G e h r i g , Lou

220 189

G e m m e n , Sara Geology Club George, C h i p

219 219

G e r e a u x , Leon Gergely, M a r y

220 157

F o r m s m a , Brian

100, 101

Fortino, Alicia

243, 187 86 239, 57

Foster, Dan

187

Foster, Kori Fouts, Matt

156,240,52 59, 156 187

G e r h a r d s t e i n , R e b e c c a . 84, 2 0 2 G e r m a i n , Susan 86, 2 0 2 German Club

157

Gibbs, Jason Gibney, B e n j a m i n

87 202

Gibson, Clayton

61

Giddy, Heidi

71

Giere, Brian Gifford, Chad

234, 98, 9 9

Gillesby, J o n

157, 125, 124

F r a t e r n a l Society . 238, 50, 5 8

Gingrich, N e w t Gipson, Janeen

Ill

F r e e m a n , Liz

84

Frego, Sarah French, Justin

123 39

202 233, 39

Gill, Tina Gillespie, R o b Gilroy, Kelly

85, 2 2 0 220,94

80

G e u r i n k , Kristin

Franklin, Lisa 156 F r a n k l y n , T i m .... 104, 105, 124

Freeland, Dori

70, 238 135 240

156,235 134

Frazer, Erin Fredrickson, Jill

157, 2 3 4 70

G e r b e n s , Dan G e r d s , Allison

Forbes, J e n n i f e r Forester, Lee

Frank. Aaron

Garcia, Jerry 202 Garvelink, M a t t h e w 157 G a s t o n , Jason 157,66 Gatrell, C a m 87, 56, 242

55, 86 219

156 86-87

Foss, Kirstin Foster, Chris

G a n e f f , Peter 187 Garbrecht, Chris .... 239, 57, 4 4 Garcellano, M i r i a m 86, 87

57, 2 3 9 240, 52 206 10, 72, 2 4 3

Glavine, Tome Gle, D o u g

221

86,87,157,55,124

Clifford, Chad G o e b e l , Julie

87 135

Goei, Rachael G o l d m a n . Ronald

234, 2 0 2 192

Golf

100-103

Freng, Kevin Frens, Jodi

100, 101 236

Frens, Micki

156,236,50

Gonzales, Alfredo

79, 135

87, 242, 5 6

Goodhart, Thomas

86, 202

Frens, Rick F r e s h m e n Class Fretz, M a t t h e w

214 220

G o o d i n , Leigh A n n e

187 240 220 220

Frey, A a r o n

157

G o o d i n , Lisa Goodyke, Brandon

Frey. Erin

220

G o o k i n , Erin

Friday, Tiffini Friday, Tyson

187 157

Goorhouse, Amy Gordner, S h a n a

F r i e d m a n , Eric Friedrich, Teresa Friel, Ron

14,84,7 62 87, 187, 2 4 2

Friends

200

Fritsch, Joe Fritsch, N o r m Fritz, Stu

232, 187, 105 124 120, 1 2 1 . 8 7

Frost. Richard .... 2 2 3 , 191. 134 Frushour, A n d r e w 220 Fry, A m a n d a Fuhrman, Mark Furst, D a l e

240, 52 192 105

Gorter, Sarah G o r t s e m a , Tom

13t>

.... Index 250

157

187

G r e i m a n , Chris G r e v e n s t u k , Jess

121, 158 230, 12, 212, 48 187

Grewell, A m y Greydanus, Missy Griebe, Janette

240 220

Griebe, Molly

106, 107

Grieme. Jennifer G r i m m , Jason

236 242, 5 6

Gritter, Kate

234

G r o e n d y k e , B r o o k e ... 234. 187 G r o s s , Kerry G r o u l x , Ryan

86, 2 2 0 97

G r z a n , Brian

10, 2 2 0

G u e s t , Jesse Guikema, Mark

230 220

Guild, Tasha

81,220

G u s e , Lori

220

Guy, Kathryn

158,234

Gospel Choir

85

Hansen, Theresa

202

Hanson, Edward Hanson, Shane

135 233, 2 0 2

Harding, Collette Haring, Matt Harkins, Jill Harmsen, Robb H a r n i s h , Letha Harrand, A m y Harrell, Ryan

86 220 3, 76, 2 0 2 220 158 220 78, 2 2 0

Harriger, Melissa Harris, Julie

2 3 5 , 187 188

Harrison, Robert

158

Hart, Melissa Hart, Todd Hartgerink, Kevin Hartman, Andrea Harvey, Ryan Hasse, Karen Hauck, Nicole H a v e m a n , Rachel Haveman, Ronald

220 121, 188 202 158,123 188 220

Henson, J a m i e

158

I

Herbst, Meredith H e r m a n , Christine

220 203

| I

Herr, Neal H e r r e m a n s , Kelly

220 I 220 I

Herrick, J a m e s

Hertel, Lori Herweyer, D a v i d

I

136 1 203 |

Hes, M a r c

239, 57 j

Hesse, Leah Hesselink, J o h n Hester, Jason

236 I 179 | 87, 220 I

H e y n s , Garrett

121 .1

H i b m a , Tim Hickey, Jill

87 203

1 1

Hickey, T i m Hicks, M e g a n

188 I 86, 87, 220. J

H i d d e m a . Jeff

38,24,25 I 87. 220 I

188 86, 2 3 6 202

130,136

H e r r i m a n , Matt .... 97, 233, 188 I Herron, Jared 55 1

Hiddema. Mark

87. 221 I

158 158

Hiemstra. Erik Hierholzer. Matt

86.221 1 159 I

Haviland, Kevin

202

Havlicek, M a l i a H a w k , Ken

158,34 II

Hilbrecht, Katherine Hilbrecht, Katie

Havenaar, J o h n Haverdink, Amy

231, 45 187,109

Hill, A m a n d a Hillegonds, Rachel

221 I 86 I 203 I 243,119 I

H a y e s , Troy H a y s , Danielle

56 158,243

Hays, G e n a n n e Hays, Troy

243, 2 0 3 242

Hilmert, J a m e s Himebaugh, Bruce

87 I 136 I

188

H i m e b a u g h , Keith Hinderer, A m i

159 I 243, 188 I 159 | 243, 188 I 159 |

Hills, Brien

85, 221 I

H a b e d a n k , Denise 187 Habitat for H u m a n i t y 32-33, 6 9

H a z z a r d , Scott

G o u l d , S h a n n o n . 209, 202, 2 4 5 Grabill, J o d i e 202

Hackett, Fred Haggard, Stephanie

Heaton, C h r i s Heavilin, J e r e m y

81. 158 87. 2 2 0

G r a b o w , Kori Graduation

Haiduc, Michelle Hairston, Steve

Hegg. Zach Heiby, A n n e

55. 2 3 2 203

Hines, Holly Hinze, Kimberly Hisgen, Barton

H e i d e m a n . Carl Heinrich. Kirsten

204. 28 240.61

Hispanic S t u d e n t Organization

66

Heisler. J a c q u e l i n e Heisler. J a m e s

86. 135 135

Hoag, Daniel Hoeksema, Jennifer

203 I 243 I

G o u l d , Kelly

Graf, Jesse

157

240 178-179 233, 104, 105

G r a f , Steffi Graff, Shannon

216 234, 187

Gras, B a r b Graske, Margaret Grasman, Amy

Hall, Scott Halliwill, Travis

Graybill, Patience G r e e k s and G r o u p s G r e e n , Fonda G r e e n , Joy

202 121 87 86, 2 2 0 187 42-87 135 2 2 0 , 119

212 64, 202

H a k k e n , Dan

Hall, G i l m o r e Hall, Jason Hall, Rachel

123 220 157,93,243

87 202

86

H a k k e n , Lynka Hall, A m y

G r a h a m , B r a n d o n .. 86, 87, 2 0 2 G r a h a m , Karen 157,231 G r a h m a n n , Julie ... 85, 187, 177

Gravelyn, Marty Gray, M e g a n

G a m m o n s , Tricia

202

G r e e n w o o d , Nate

92, 9 3 86,21,220

G r a t e f u l Dead G r a v e l i n k , Matt

Gabriel, Sheryl 66, 19, 187, 195 Gallegos, Z a c k 58, 2 3 8

G r e e n L e a f , Ed

39 85. 2 0 2 51 87, 158, 242, 56 2 4 0 , 5 2 , 187 83 87, 84, 2 0 2

Hallyn, Serge Halverson, Amy-Lynn

158 65,

230, 48 Hamilton, J a m e s 86, 87, 38, 2 2 0 Hammingh, David 56, 2 4 2 H a n c o c k , Jessie Handley, Paul

209, 17 239, 57

H a n k a m p , Joy H a n s e n , Dan

220 86, 187

H e l g e m o . Jasey 158 H e m e n w a y , Stephen ... 70, 131, Henderson, Jason Hendrick, Sarah

135 188 85

Hoekstra, Jodi Hoekstra, Mark Hoekstra, Sarah

159, 240 | 203 159

Hoekwater, Tara 159 H o e k z e m a , Nathan 57, 188, 239 I

Hendricks, J e n n i f e r ... 234, 203, 119

H o e z e e , Beth . 1 5 9 , 2 3 4 , 9 4 , 9 5 I H o f f m a n , Aaron 113 I

Hendrickson, Shawna Hendrix, Lynne Heneveld, Becky H e n e v e l d , Elizabeth

H o f f m a n , Julia H o f f m a n , Kerri Hofland, Cynthia Hofstee, Mark H o g u e , Mike

203 I 203 | 240 242 159

Hollenbeck, Becky

236

Henkel,Adam Henry, Sarah

203 136 158 12, 2 4 0 101 21


Hollenbeek, Emily 243, 214 Hollidge, Dawn 86 Holman, Jane 102 Holmes, Jack 136 Holstege, Joel 108,203 Holtvluwer, Nick .... 86, 87, 24, 203 Holwerda, Jeff 159 Holwerda, Jennifer .... 1 5 9 , 2 4 3 Holwerda, Julie 93,240 Holwerda, Tim 159 Homecoming 14-15 Hondorp, Jeff 87, 238 Honeysett, A m y 203 Hoolsema, Sara 221 Hootie and the Blowfish .... 199 Hop, Danielle Ill Hope-Calvin Nursing 132 Hopkins, Meg 99 Hopkins, Stacie 236, 203 Hopma, Bethanie 99, 234 Horjus, Kataherine 221 Horling, Tom 105 Horner, Dana 114, 115 Homsby, Todd 87, 242, 56, 203 Horton, Anne 71,235 Hosford, Kristen 203 Hosford, Tara 203 Hostege, Joel 109 Houlihan, Peter 86, 233 Housenga, John 160,113 Hoving, Julie 243, 203 ! Hoving, Kristen .. 160, 114, 115 Hoving, Sheri 221 Howard, Kelly 221 > Howe, Aubrey 86, 188 Howk, Kenneth 238, 5 8 Hoyer, Todd 160 Hudson, Adam 232, 55 ^ Hughes, Lisa 203 Hughes, Wendy 160, 81 Huisken, Jon 136 Huisman, Andy 86 Huizenga, Peter .... 238, 58, 97, 124 | Huizing, Heather 99 Huizinga, Scott 232, 55 Hultgren, Eric 130 Hultgren, Jon 160 Humbarger, Marc 221 I Humphrey, Marc 239, 57 1 Hunter, Megan .... 188, 114, 115 Hunwick, Matt 87 Hurld, John 237, 59 I Hurley, Jennifer 86 j Hurricane Erin 220 I Hurricane Opal 220 I Hutchenreuther, Laurie 86, 221 : Huttar, Charles 86, 129 I Huxley, Amy 221 i Huxley, Liz 115 I Hwang, Ed 203 I Hyatt, Amy 188

Irwin, Anne 99 Ismaeli, Zahra 160, 121, 67, 81 Ivanovic, Milica 203

Jaasma, Julie 160 Jackson, Jerry 67 Jackson,Jesse 217 Jackson, Kari 221, 17, 114, 115 Jacobson, John 218, 178, 179, 136 Jacobson, Kelly 136 James, Jodi 61, 188 Janke, Sarah 160, 234 Janus, Ryan 86, 203 Japinga, Lynn 137 Jarchow, Amy-Lynn 230, 48 Jarvis, Christine 188 Jarvis, L o m a 137 Jastrzebski, Michele 203 Jazz E n s e m b l e 39 Jennings, Angela 93 Jennings, Julie 160 Jensen, Dana 240, 52, 188 Jensen, David 137 Johnson, Andrea 221,123 Johnson, Jason 2 3 9 , 5 7 , 188 Johnson, J i m m y 241 Johnson, Joel 203 Johnson, Matt 87, 56, 203, 242 Johnson, Nikelle 86, 28 Johnson, Zachary 188,245 Johnston, Erin 221 Jolivette, Peter 137 Jones, Jennifer 123,160 Jones, K i m 176 Jones, Leah 236 Jones, Rebecca 221 Jonker, Zack 97, 221 Joynt, Jessica 221 Jung, Matthew 238 Junior Class 182-195 Jurgens, Steve 87, 238 Justice, David 221 J u n e , Lisa 81, 203

Kaetterhenry, Sarah 221 Kahler, Kathryn 221 Kaminskas, Christina 221 Kamphuis, Sabrina 85,221 Kamphuis, Tammy 87 Kaper, Stephanie 188 Kaplan, Chris 59 Kappa Chi Sorority ... 14, 77, 235,51,46 Images 18-19 Immink, Melissa .... 1 6 0 , 6 9 , 8 5 In-line Skating 213 Inquiring M i n d s 79 Introduction 2-5

Kappa Epsilon Karis, Brett Karpanty, Rachel Karr, Jennie Karrow, Becky Karsten, Russell

132 238, 58 160 222 99 188

Kassis, Ellen 195, 203 Kato, M a m i 87, 188 Katsuyama, Chikako . . . . 8 7 , 1 8 , 203, 39 K a u f f m a n n , Carine 203 K a u f m a n , Michael 161 Kavanaugh, Michelle 161 Kay, Sarah 222 234, 203 Keay, Sarah Kegerreis, Jean 94 Keich, Catherine 161 Keinath, Jeanna 236 Keiner, Mary 132 Keisling, Laurie 236, 188 Keler, Don 77,188 Kelley, Christine 236 Kelley, Kristin 77, 86, 203 Kemink, Rachel 222 Kemner, Jeff 87, 222 Kempkers, Jamie 87 Kennedy, Nancy 102,103 Kent, Kimberly 222 Keolasy, Theppanya .. 188, 177 Kern, Greg 233 Kern, Matthew 222 Kesteloot, Rich 87, 161, 242, 56, 89 Keyes, Katie 222 Kidder, Kimberly 188 Kiefer, Laura 161 Kilpatrick. Angela 222 Kim, Bill 55, 232 Kin, Jeff 237, 59 Kin, Mike 59 King, Cathleen 240 King, Joseph 161,233 Kingma, Susan 222 Kinser, Shawn 112, 113 Kintgz, William 188 Kirkland, Teresa . 1 6 1 , 1 1 4 , 1 1 5 Kirkpatrick, Brian 222 Kissinger, Mari 99 Klaasen, Sarah 222 Klapp, A m a n d a 243 Kleiman, Trystin 241,99 Klein, Matt 121 Kleinheksel, D a w n 236 Klok, Tamara 222 Klopp, Juliane 87, 86 Knauff, Michelle 107 Knickerbocker Fraternity 236, 237, 59, 46 Knight, Knickerbocker 237 Knippenberg, Kristin ... 86, 161 Knott, Lisa 235, 99 Knowles, Heather 235 Kobylak, Greg 97, 222 Koestner, Kelcee 243 Kohler, Brett 87 Kolster, Todd 87 Konymenbelt, Tammi 222 Kooiker, Wendy 123 Kooistra, Jason 222 Kooistra, Josh 57, 1 8 8 , 2 3 9 Koop, Carrie 241 Koostra, Mike 57 Kooyer, Meredith 161 Kopas, Craig 222, 1 2 4 , 7 Koreeda, Shoji 222 Korpela, Susan 222 Korstange, Christian 222 Kowal, Karen 231 Kraay, Kevin 137 Kraft, George 87, 137 Kranz, Lisa 236 Krause, Kiersten 188,177 Kreps, Dean 86, 87 Kronemeyer, Karri 222

Kronewetter, Nathan Kropp, Karrie Krouse, David Krueger, Christine Krueger, Shaylynn Kruger, Jennifer Krukowski, Michael Krupczak, John Kruse, Katherine Kubacki, Daniel Kubasiak, Aimee Kuiper, Abigail Kuiper, Matthew Kuiper, Paul Kuipers, Sarah K u m p f , Jori Kurdziel, Daul Kurdziel, Peter Kurek, Erin Kuyer, Shelly Kuyers, Michelle Kuyper, Abby Kwiatkowski, Jocelyn

97 87 238 161 61, 188 188,234 188 34 230, 4 8 222 222 243 85, 86 238 222 76, 222 204 86, 39 222 Ill 161,99 209 188

La Barge, Carrie 99 La Barge, Ceci 99 Labbe, A d a m 87, 1 2 1 , 2 2 2 Lachonce, Mark 86 Lady 237 LaGore, Johanna Ill LaGore, Sarah Ill LaHuis, David 161 Lake, Kimberly 222 LaLonde, Emily 222 Lamberts, Elizabeth 234 Lambrides, Nicole 160 Lamkey, Nicole ... 161, 114, 115 Land, Shannon 240 Landes, Perry 137 Landolt, George 97, 233 Lange, Andrew 223 Lange, Laura 188, 240, 52 Lange, Tiffany 243 Langerak, Kerri 223 Langland, Kristi ... 223, 123, 94 Langmuir, Martha 86 Langstraat, Carrie 107, 236 Lappenga, Ben 223 Lappenga, Matt .. 104. 105, 188 Larr, Kalene 189 Larsen, A n n e 137 Larzelere, Lisa 122, 1 2 3 , 9 4 Lasor, Anthony 233 LaSorsa, Valerie 189,243 Lauded Again 36-37 Laursen, Shannon 2 3 6 , 5 0 , 1 8 6 189,24 Law, Jason Law, Keri 11, 85, 223 Lawler, John .. 1 6 1 , 3 4 , 2 3 2 , 5 5 Le, Chi 87 Leachman, Jedediah .... 86, 233 Lee, Chi 56 Lee, Lisa 161,230,48 Legg, Chris 233, 189 Leguizamon, Luis 239 Leitz, Jay 223 Lemire, James 87 Lemorie. Michael 85, 87 Lenger, James 233 Lenger, Matthew 35, 162

Lepard. Sarah 189 Lepczyk. Peter 70. 189 Lesser. Kari 236 Lewis, Kevin 97, 238, 58 Liechty, Peter 233 L i l j e h o m . Kari 162 Lim, Meng 162 Linscheid. Lexi 64 Listenberger, Laura .... 189, 177 Llewellyn, Evan 233, 189 LoCicero, Angela 61,236 Lock, Myka 243 Lodenstein, Amy 189 Loeks, Melissa 162 Logie, Megan 223, 118, 119 Long, Travis 162, 35 Looman.Ann 162,236 Looman, Sara 234, 189 Looman, Susan .... 234, 189, 99 LoPresti, Nick 189 Lorenz, William 162 L o v e m , Heather 235 Lowe, Glen 138 Lubbers, Sarah 240, 52 Lucas, A n n e 162,71,87 Lucas, Becky 118, 119, 189, 366 Lucas, Mary 64, 87 Lucas, Todd 120, 1 2 1 , 2 4 2 Ludwig, T h o m a s 138 Luecht, Jessica 223 Lugizimon, Louis 57 Luhman, Matt 56, 87, 242 Luhmann, Jeremy 97, 242 Luidens, Donald 138 Lull, Anna 189 L u m m , Deborah 162, 236 Lundberg, David 238 Lunn, David 223 Lunn,John 135,138 Lunn, Robert 39 Luther, Martin King Jr. 85 Lydon, Dan 35 Lynch, Michelle 223

JL*Maas, Heather MacDaniels, Jeffrey M acD erma id. Mary MacDoniels, Joseph Machan, Danielle Mack, Rachael Mackowiak, Stacey Madaus, Lori Madden, Chris Maddox, Megan Maddux, Greg Madi, A m e r Maher, Ryan Maher, Steve Maier, Marty Maines, Carrie Maitner, Rebecca Maki, Craig Malfroid, Larry Malkowski, Christina Malpass, Bill Manchester, Melissa Mancini. Jennifer Maninen, Erik Mannes, Danielle Manning, Ellyn Jo

Index 251

240, 12 238 223 138 189 76 223 231 223 230, 4 8 221 79, 191 238, 58 162 87 87 234 238, 58 138 223 113 223 240,61 189 235 237

- I 3 0 -


Manning. Monica Maples, Richard

162,230,48 162,232, 105, 124, 125 Marema, Melissa 223 Marolt, Dana 237 Marso, Steve 162, 120, 121 Martin, Audra 107 Martin, Greg 189 Martin, Kelly 85, 223, 12 Martin, Maria 162 Martin, Peter 232, 16 Martin, Rebecca 189 Marling, Chris 233 Masselink, Denice 162, 114 Masta, Megan 223 Masterson, Stacey 189 Mata, Jose 87 Matchett, Marie 106, 107 Matheny, Lindsay 235, 99 Mathiesen, Stacey 223 May, Toni 223 Maybury, Greg 191,138 Mayer, Erin 223 138 Mayer. William Mazurek, Derek 112, 113 M c Alpine, Leah 99, 235 McArthur, Tracy 86 McCalla, Case 87, 223 McClain, Nicole 236 McClure, Sarah 71, 162 McCraine, Laura 86, 12 McCue, Dan 86, 87, 38, 223 McCune, Mike 101, 101 189 McDonald, Dave McDonalds, Jeff 58 M c D o n o u g h , Virginia 139 McDowell, Ian 163 McFarland, Jodi 65, 20 McFarland, Sheree 1 6 3 , 2 4 0 , 5 2 McGillicuddy, Kara 86, 236 M c G i n n , Mary 234 M c G o v e m , William 163 M c K a n n a , Brian 62, 189 M c K e e , Holly 24, 139 M c K e e , Kris 55 M c K e e , Kristopher 232 M c K e e , Laura 92, 93, 190 M c K e e , Paul 242 M c K e n n a , Karla 223 McKenzie, Matthew 87 M c K e o w n , Karen 71 M c L o u t h , Karen 190 McLouth, Benjamin 223 M c M a n i s , Josh ... 121, 186, 190 McMorris, Camell 67 McMurray, Matt 121 M c N a m a r a , Brian 190 McPherson, Matthew 223 McVeigh, Timothy 185 McWhinnie, Dave 121 Mead, Mike 87 Medel, Ismaria 66, 195 Medel, Jade 66, 19 Meden, Krista 243 Meendering, Kristie 163 M e e r s m a , Josh 97 M e e u w s e n , Mike 120,121 Meeuwsen, Steven 163 Meixner, Renata 223 Melin, Jennifer 86 Menken, Kevin 224 Menken, Tracy 163 Menning, Becky 85, 190 Merritt, A m a n d a 206 Merritt, Calvin 87, 224 Merritt, Kris 109, 206 Mervenne, M e r c e d e s . 206, 235 Messing, Gail 163 Metzler, Josh 86, 224, 105

m

Index 252

Meulenberg, David 109 Meuzelaar, Christopher 224 Meyer, Megan 206 Meyer, Michael 86 Meyer, Sherri 206 Meyer, Tom 163 Meyers, Amy 110,111 Meyers, Julie 77, 224 Mezeske, Barbara 139 Mezeske, Emily 224 Mezeske, Richard 139 Michels, Christopher 190 Mickelson, Heidi 230, 4 8 Mihailoff, Laura .... 65, 71, 190 Mihalek, Nathan 190 Mihocko, Beth 163 Mikoy, Da mo n 121,224 Miles, Blair 206 Miller, Cathy 163 Miller, Chad 87 Miller, Danielle 190 Miller, Judith 163 Miller, Kent 206 Miller, Regina 230 Miller, Ryan 86 Miller, Stephanie 231 Mills, Ben 239, 57, 206 Milobinski, Jens 112, 113 Minnaar, Sara 48, 163, 230 Mishler, Sye 87, 224 Mitchell, Jim 113, 115 Mixer, Jessica 234, 206 Modisher, Scott 164, 99 Moeckel, Amy ... 1 6 4 , 1 2 2 , 1 2 3 Moes, Julie 240, 190 M o f f a t . Mindy 206,115 164 Mogdics, Teresa Mojzak, Michelle 164 Mol, Jacquelyn 164,177 Molidor, Chris 97 Moline, Michelle 190 Monroy, Miluska 206 M o n s m a , Corey 87 Montpetit, Marc 233 Monty, Jeremy 64. 164 Moore, Clint 92, 93, 232, 206, 16 Moore, Terence 186 Moore, Wendy ... 164, 122, 123 Morale 72 Morehouse, Scott 124, 206 Moreno, Maria 243 Morgan, Matt 224 Morgan, Meg 86, 190, 236 Morin, Karyl 190, 136 Morrow, J a m e s 195, 39, 26, 27 Morscheck, Melody 81, 224, 99 Mortar Board 177 Mosier, A m y 206 Motiff, James 139 Moua, Lisa 85, 224 Mox, Kellie 240 Muhawi, Fatin 177 Muiderman, Tony 139 Muir, Dave 92, 93 Mulder, Brett 224 Mulder, Julia 234 Mulder, Megan 234, 190 Mulder, Ryan 87 Mulder, Timothy 224 Mulholland, Jeff 238, 58 Mungall, William 139 M u n o a , Philip 139 Muriuki, Muturi ... 85, 190, 194 Murphy, Christa . 224, 122, 123 Murphy, Katherine 190 Murphy, Wendy 122 Musical S h o w c a s e 38-39

Musselman, Teresa Myers, Myers, Myers, Myers,

Brock David Robert Steve

224, 102, 103 87 139 206 7

N y m a n , Scott Nysse, Kari

239, 57 165, 110, 111

mir,

Nace, Ryan 86, 87, 190, 38 Nagano, Kuni 206 N a k a j i m a , Fumihito 139 Nash, Jennifer 87 Nash, Kevin 87, 190 Nasir, M o n a 235, 190 Nasrallah, Dolores 30 NATO 231,207 Neel, Michelle 106, 107 Neff, Chad 238 NEH 137 Neil, Matt 109 Neller, Sarah 164,235 Nelson, Chad 233 Nelson, Elizabeth 164 Nelson, Kristin 164 Nelson, Mark 224 Nelson, Russ 164,24 Nemes, Joel 190, 124 Nemeth, Roger 139 N e m m e s , Joel 105 Neucks, Arin 84, 231, 111 Neucks, Josh 224 N e u m a n n , Laura 224 Nicholas, Susan 136 Nichols, Kathryn 81, 85, 224, 99 Nicholson, David 164, 232 Nickels, Eric 58,238 Nicies, Sara 243, 190 Nicodemus, Nancy 139 Nicodemus, Stefany ... 243, 190 Nicolson, Dave 55 Nielsen, Ted 200, 139 Nielson, Joyce 139 Niemeyer, Andrew 224 Nienhuis, Abby .... 234, 206, 94 Nienhuis, Sari 165, 234 Niven, Shannon 165 Nixon, Kathryn 224 Nolan, K i m 165,98,99 Norden, Andrew 81, 224 Norden, John 239, 139 Norris, Jeremy 87, 190 Norris, Natasha 206 Norris, Tony 224 Northrop, Sarah 231 Northuis, M a r k 107,104, 105, 124 Notman, Jeremy 190 Novak, Joe 238, 58 Novak, Lisa 236 N o w a k , Kristin 20, 206 Nu Beta Fraternity 60 Nursing 186 Nyboer, Brandon 206, 113 Nyenhuis, Jacob 139 N y k a m p , Chad 165, 105, 124, 125 N y k a m p , Keith 112, 113 Nykamp, Russ 165 Nykerk 12-13 Nykcrk, 1998 Teams 74 Nykerk, 1999 Teams 75

Oberly, Meghan 165 O ' B r i e n , David 139 O ' B r y a n , Erin 224 O ' C o n n e l l , Melissa 190 O ' C o n n e l l , Ryan 87, 190 O ' C o n n o r , Melissa 165 Oderkirk, Dan 190 O ' D o w d , Lauren .... 2 3 4 , 9 8 , 9 9 O e g e m a , Jeff 230, 190 Oehling, Pat 139 Ogden, Lisa 190 O ' G r a d y , Scott 207 Olds, Anthony 224 Olds, Caroline 87, 224 Olds, Rebecca 190 Olds, Tony 87 Olgers, Greg 139 Oliphant, Yvonne 86 Olson, Karen 224 Onken, Suzanne 224 Online@Hope 28-29 O o m s , Melissa 230, 4 8 Oonk, Melody 102 Oosterhouse, H o p e 165 Oosterhouse, Karen 165 Oosting, Jennifer 94, 111 Oostveen, Kristen 190 Oostveen, Robert 225 Orchestra, String 87 Orientation 8-9, 82-83 O m e e , Jaclyn 225 Orr, Paul 87 Ortwine, Colleen 165,71 Osborn, Christine 165 O s b o m , Ken 165, 121 Osborn, T h o m a s 121, 165 Osborne, Barb 139 Osborne, Kelly 140 Oselka, Jean 225 Oselka, Matthew 190 Osmun, Adam 87, 206 Otis, Aaron 87, 242, 56, 207 Otis, Amy 165 Ott, Leah 225 Otto, Kay 165,240,52 Oudersluys, John Mark .... 238, 58, 190 Oursler, Steve .. 86, 87, 242, 56 Overmeyer, Erin 225 O w e n s , Jessica 241 Ozinga, Heather 190, 123

Paarlberg, A d a m Pabisz, D w a y n e Pacheco, Cynthia Pacheco, Val Paeth, Ann Palleschi, Susan

87, 86 97, 225 234, 207 240, 52 61 207

Palma, Jennifer ... 166, 114, 115 Palmateer, Seth 225 Palmer, James 87, 38, 207 Palmer, Sara 225 Pan-Hellenic Board 77 Pangle, Hollis .... 166, 177, 131 Panszi, Shannon 166,236 Papanek, Heather 190 Paplawski, Steve 87, 225 Paplawsky, Greg 65, 190' Paradis, Karen 64, 87, 207 Parent, Lori 11 Parker, Aaron 166 Parker, Alexandria 79,231 Parker, Danielle 190 Parker, Julie 166,230,48 Parking 222, 223 Parks, Jennifer 166 Parrish, Jessica 235 Parrlberg, A d a m 225 Parsons, Marlaina 166,234 Partenheimer, Rebecca .. 77, 61 Pascente, Roxanne 237 Passchier, Jennifer 107 Paterik, Debbie 86, 13,225 Patino, Roselia 66, 207 Patmos, Anna 225 Patnott, John 113 Patout, Julie 231 Patterson, Ben 30, 178, 179, 24 Patterson, Daniel 225 Paulisse, Kevin 225 Pavlik, Sally 77, 190 Payette, Peter 239, 57 Pazdur, Ryan 190 PBS 195 Pearson, Bruce 140 Pearson, Tara 166 Pechta, Laura . 166, 86, 236, 50 Pellerito, Gina .... 243, 102, 103 Pellow, Lance 97, 225 Pellow, Monica 166, 240, 52, 61 Pelon, Holly 236, 190 Penney, Jeffrey 225 Pennings, Timothy 140 Pepper, Jon 207 Percussion Ensemble 39 Pereira, Roy 78, 239, 190 Perez, Anthony 231,244 Perkins, Amy 241 Perkins, Jennifer 166 Perovich, Anthony 140 Perry, Beth 240, 52 Perry, Carolyn 166, 235 Pestun, Jeffrey 166 Petersen, Joel 219 Peterson, Brian 190 Peterson, Esther 86 Peterson, Holly 207 Peterson, Joel 238 Peterson, Johnathon 140 Peterson, Mark 190 Petkus, Jeanette . 236, 245, 207 Petkus, Tony 87 Petroelje, Brian 207 Petroelje, Steven 166 Petscher, Jenny 94, 190 Pettiglio, Mike 242 Petty, Amy 225, 94 Peuler, Bradley 225 Peuler, Jennifer 207 Pfau, Heidi 190 Phan, Mimi 166 Phan, Trung 166, 34, 232 Phelps, Michelle 167 Phelps, Tracy 98, 99 Phillips, Craig 207 Philosophy C l u b 79 Phothusan, Vilasack 233 )


Pickens, Allyson .. 86, 236, 207 Pickering, Dan 239, 57, 44 Piel, Michelle 65, 236, 207 Pierce, Andrew 167,233 Piers, James 138, 140 Piersma, Mark 225 Piersma, Roy 57 Pihlaja, Jennifer 240 Pinkerton, Luke 239, 113 Pirich, Karen 243 Platinga, Joel 167 Plewka, Lara .... 2, 72, 234, 207 Plotzke, Laurel 167, 106, 107, 104 Plummer, J.P. 123,94,167 Pobuda, Rebecca 207 Pochert, Abby 241 Poel, Fete 237, 59, 204 Pohlman, Jill 207 Polak, James 190 Poles, Andy 237, 59, 225 Poley, Eryn 230, 4 8 Polites, Vic 190 Ponka, Becky 83, 236, 190 Ponstein, Andy 207 Poole, Tom 3 7 , 9 2 , 9 3 , 86 Pope John Paul 11 193 Porter, Carolee 167 Porter, Mike 113 Porter, Tara 207, 111 Post, Stuart 58, 140 Posthumus, Lee 238 Posthumus, Marc 238 Postigo, O m a r 57, 239 Postma, Rebecca 207 Postmus, Rachel 94, 207 Pott, Jonathan 86, 190 Potter, Christopher 239, 57, 207 Potter, Dan 239, 57 Powell, Colin 211 Powell, Kimberly 207, 245 Powell, Shannon 225 Powers, Megan 107, 225 Powers, David 225 Pozzanghera, Susan 235 Prange , Robin 167 Prange, Corinne 225 Prasad, Jay 100, 101, 100 Pratt, Christy 225 Prescott, Wes 124, 225 Pries, Michael 225 Prince, Brad 64 Prince, Stacey 226 Proff, Mark 167,7 Prough, Heather 167 ' Provost, Elayne 207 Pryor, Amanda 226 Pryor, Nicole 234 Pull 10-U Pull, 1997 Team 73 Pull, 1998 Team 72 Putnam, Matt 87, 124, 125 Putzke, Nicole 226

ji r Quealy, Frank i ' I Quimby, Beth jilj Quinlan, Joshua I Quinn, John

121 86, 226 85,226,39 140

Rabin, Yitzhak 228, 188 Rahimi, Saum 186 Raikova, Iliana 167 Rairick, James 167, 238 Raj, Lou 87, 207 Ramohr, Gretchen 191 Ramthun, Marilee 226 Randall, Darius 207, 111 Randall, Kevin 64, 207 Randall, William 207 Randinitis, Karen 235 Rapp, Janna 167 Rapp, Matthew 232 Rasdall, Joel 226 Rasschier, Jennifer 226 Ratdavong, Melinda 234 Ratering, Emily 85, 86, 226 Rathbun, Bethany 237 Rau, Shari 168 Rautiola, Mark 168 Rauzi, Nicole 207 Rawie, Sonja 85 Ray, Alison 207,119 Ray, Rich 81, 87 Raymond, Kelley 243 Red D o g Pound, The 7 Redell, Sarah 207 Redente, Jean-Marie 230 Redinger, Ryan 87 Redman, Kolin 87, 239, 195 R e d m o n d , Joy 226 Reed, Katherine 231 Reese, Kathy 191 Reeves, Jon 191, 105, 124 Reeves, Susan 168,240,52 Reichert-Slater, Karey 168 Reisig, Joel 168,232 Renner, Dennis 65, 140 Renner, Tom 1 9 1 , 2 0 4 , 140 Rennick, Deana 40 Renz, Jeff 238 Resele, Anna 200, 207 Residential Life 84 Retlewski, Holly 240, 226 Reus, Nancy 168 Rexford, Chad 238 Reyburn, D.J 87, 121 Reynolds, Maura 140 Rhoades, Michelle 191 Rice, Jeremy 87, 124 Richards, Blair 96, 97 Richards, Sarah 231 Richards, Stacie 69, 191 Richardson, Jennifer 226 Richardson, Jesse 226 Richardson, Stephanie 236, 191 Richter, Kara 226 Ricketts, Michael 87, 124 Riekse, Jim 65 Rietman, Dennis 168,239 Rife, Amy 226 Riggs, Anna 226 Rihani, Alex 226 Riker, Chris 97, 207 Riley, Kara 226 Riley, Kathleen 241 Rimbo, Deborah 86, 207 Ripken, Cal 189 Risedoreh, Guy 226 Ritsema, Kyle 87

Ritsema, Robert 87, 195 Ritton, Leslie 239 Rivera, Julio 213, 140 Robbert, Mike 192, 113 Robert, T h e o 67, 168 Roberts, Jeanine 226 Roberts, Jose 226 Robertson, Alyson 168, 114, 115 Robinson, Jessica 226 Robinson, Marcus 140 Rodgers, Nicole 226 Rodocker, Geoff 97 Rodriguez, A m a n d a 168 Rodriguez, Becky .. 66, 67, 195 Rodriguez, Dawnita 66 Rodriguez, Rosi 1 6 8 , 6 6 , 18, 195 Rodstrom, Robert 226 Roehl, Nathan 86 Roelofs, Keri 168, 122, 123 Roesch, Jacob 192 Rogers, Kelly 243 Rohner, David 226 Rohrbach, Dale 86 Romin, Amy 235 Rookus, Scott 169 Rop, Sarah 106, 107 Rosales, Jorita 234 Rose, Paul 87 Rosenau, Brian 169,81 Rosenbrook, Paul ... 96, 97, 169 Ross, Lisa 169 Ross, Wendy 214 Rossi, Andrea 243 Rottenberg, Nicole 192 Rottschafer, Shelli 169,43 Roulo, Anne 226 Rouse, Tonya 226 Roush, Mary 107, 226 R o w e , Brent 227, 17 Rowe, Derek 192 Rowe, Gina 241 Royer, Rob 87 Rozeboom, Danielle 169 Rubel, Jason 192 Ruckert, Shannon 169, 243 Ruiz, Ortencia 169, 234 Rumohr, Gretchen 71 Rumohr, John 227 Run-Bike-Swim-Walk 227 Runyan, Dinean 140 Russell, Kari 227 Ryden, David 140 Rye, Sara 241 Rynsburger, Tracy 12

Sadler, Brad Sailing Club Sakshaug, Valkyrie Sale, Tania Sails, Jen Samhouri, Nadia Sami, Uddin Sanders, Amy Sanders, Steve Sandro, Christopher Sanford, Elizabeth Scakel, Jonathan Schackow, Carl Schaefer, Karin

233 78 237 192 76 227 227 227 87, 233 233 140 38 129, 140 83,231

,

A

fi/

Schairbaum, Anne 235, 192 Schakel, Jonathan 87 Schakel, Peter 140 Schartzer, Byron 87 Scheiber, Anne 39, 1 6 9 , 8 6 Scher, Simone 114, 115 Scherpenisse, Carla 169 Schicker, Joshua 227 Schilder, Heide 169 Schipper, Barbara 140 Schletter, Valerie 169 Schmidt, Becky 94, 95 Schmidt, Emily 192, 114 Schmitt, Karlye 234 86, 227 Schnarr, Nathan Schneider, Kari 87, 227 Schneider, Nicole 227 Scholten , Chris 227 Scholten, Chad 169 Scholtens, Matthew 76, 86 Schoon, Gretchen .. 227, 98, 99 Schoonveld, Tim 109 Schopp, Lee 97 Schregardu, Darell 141 Schreuder, James 192 Schrier, Dave . 10, 72, 232, 105 Schrock, Lisa ... 1 6 9 , 8 6 , 8 7 , 3 8 Schuch, Nathan 192 Schuiling, Todd 86, 141 Schuld, A m a n d a 234, 192 Schuler, Toby 169 Schultz, Ellen 106, 107 Schulz, Garrett 227 Scott, Timothy 232 Scribner, Mary 60,231 Seaman, Maria 86 See, Michael 39 See, Shannon 192 Seibert, Amy 169 Seid, Katrin 227 Seid, Kristen 170 Seles, Monica 216

Sellers, Heather 40, 142 Senior Class 146-177 Sepura, Karen 87 Sevensma, Eric 239 Severin, Sion 170 Sexton, Sarah 227 Seymour, Michael 141 Sharp, Andrew 192 Shaughnessy, John 179,147 Shaughnessy, Paula 186 Shaw, Ryan 86, 227, 105 Shay, Gloria 141 Sheldon, Brooke 170 Sheldon, Josh 96, 97 Shelley, Dan 2 , 7 2 , 112, 113 Shen,Ivy 227 Shenk, Lisa 237 Shenton, Mary 61 Sherrod, Brooke 192 Sherwood, Holly 170 Shiel, Erin 107, 227 Shields, Alison 170 Shields, Jim 124 Shock, Ray 227 Showers, Bryan 170 Shrock, Lisa 15 Shull, Kim 70, 78 Shumaker, Louise 134, 141 Shurlow, Charles 233 Shuttle Van 191 Sibylline Sorority IS, 77, 240, 241, 52 Sigma Omicron S i g m a S i g m a Sorority Sigma Theta Tau Sikkema, Bob Sikma, Benjamin Sill, Andrew Sill, Andy Sill, Drew Simon, Matthew

Index 253

61 77, 243, 5 3 132 87 227 239 57 57 227

1 3 0 -


G

Simpson, Ashli 227 Simpson, O.J 192 Singer, Kirsten 170,61 Sinuka, Lunga 170 Sisulu, Nsiki 67 Sitz, Kristen 86, 227, 13 Sjoblom, Micah 170,86 Skarica, Tomislav 86 Skutt, Becky 94 Slager, Nick 192 Slagh, Sarah 243 Slater, Paul 233 Slaughter, Gloria 141 Slawson, Shannon ... 85, 86, 24 Slayton, Casey 93, 192 Slette, Stein 141, 98 Slezak, Scott 192 Smallegan, Karen 227 Smies, Gina 170,230,48 Smit, Marcia 141 Smith, Clinton 227 Smith, Dana 170, 110, 111 Smith, Darcy 227 Smith, Doug 87 Smith, Jennifer 64, 86, 93 Smith, Jim 87, 89 Smith, Joel 87 Smith, Kelly 87 Smith, Lee 40 Smith, Lynn 170,236,50 Smith, M a r k 192 Smith, Michael W 12 Smith, Mike 87 Smith, Rachel 227 Smith, Ray 86, 141 Smith, Steve 96, 97 Smith, T h o m a s 141 Smith, Tyler 64, 21, 92, 93, 192 Smithers, Heidi 227, 98, 99 Smitley, Megan 192 Smits, James 170 Snyder, Kari 235 Snyder, Sarah 228 Sobania, Neal 141 Soccer 96-99 Social Activities C o m m i t t e e ... 14, 22-23, 64, 20, 17 Social Work 138 Soderquist, Todd 170, 35 Softball 122-123 Soggy Ships 34-35 Sommer, Jason 192 S o p h o m o r e Class 196-213

.... Index 254

Sowerby, Erin 118, 119 Spalding, Jennifer 228 Spangler, Ryan 239, 57, 44 Spencer, Bekki 235 Spencer, Matt 109, 170 Spencer, Theresa 86 Spitters, Steve 232, 192 Sports 88-127 Spradling, Michael . . . . 2 3 3 , 1 9 2 S p r i n g Fling 16-17 Springer, T h o m a s 86, 228 Springsteen, Bob 112, 113 Sprouse, Crystal 71,228 Spykerman, Sara 243 St. John, Ryan 239, 57 Stack, Peter 238 Stanger, Katie .... 106, 107, 192 Stames, Trevor 86, 87, 242, 1 9 2 , 5 6 Stears, Brian 87 Stedman, Cathy 86, 228 Steen, Todd 142 Steensma, Matt .... 8 7 , 2 3 2 , 192 Stegeman, Pat 109 Stegenga, Brad 242, 56 Stegink, G o r d o n 86 Stein, Christina 170 Steiner, Shawn 171 Steketee, Kristen 64, 235 Stephan, Mari 228 Stephens, Rebecca 192 Sterenberg, Matt 84 Sterk, Ryan 232, 55 Stevens, Karin 228 Stevens, S u f j a n 65, 192 Stiegler, Stephanie 99 Stielstra, Sarah 15, 240 Stillwell, Amy 171 Stimer, Wendy 193 Stoepker, Jeremy 232 Stollenmaier, Tara 235, 193 Storer, Andrew 239 Storey, Chad 233, 193 Strangways, Brittan 228 Strassburger, Amy 240, 52 Stratton, Joshua 239 Strauss, Jennifer 193 Strauts, Jeffrey 238 Streelman, Bobbie 235 Strehler, Lori 200 Strey, Angela 171,86, 87, 236, 38, 50 String Orchestra 39

Stroh, Elizabeth 86,241 Strouf, Linda 141 Strover, Lisa 103 Struck, Michael 193 Stubbs, M a r k 193 Stubbs, M o n i c a 115 Student Life 6-41 Student Congress 63 Student Trainers 81 Stuit, Paul 238, 58 Stull, Sara 171 Sturmfels, Laura 171,70 Sturtevant, Deborah 142 Styf, Daniel .... 232, 55, 62, 193 Sugawara, Wakanako 19 Sugden, Karen 234 Sullivan, Mary 228 Sullivan, Ryan 193, 105 Sumi, Sachie 19 Sundbeck, Steve 77, 193 Sundsmo, Joy 193 Super Bowl 241 Suzuki, Ayumi 86, 193 Swanson, Debra 142 Swets, Benjamin 228 Swimming 112-115 Switzer, Barry 241 Sydlik, Mary Anne 142 Symphonette 87, 195, 27

Talent J a m 24-25 Talsma, Sean 87 Tammi, John 142 Tanis, Elliot 142 Tanis, Ryan 121,228 Tanis, Wayne Ill Tate, Amy 228 Tate, Janet 86,87, 193,38 Taylor, A d a m 87 Taylor, Angela 171 Taylor, Darnisha 66, 67, 85, 24, 142 Taylor, Michelle 6 7 , 8 5 , 8 6 , 2 3 1 Taylor, Robert 193

TeCroney, Aaron 171, 62 Tedesco, Rochelle 237 Teerling, Ethan 193 Teerman, Kelli 234 Temple, Robert 228 Tennis 118-119 Ter Beek, Bruce 86 Terpstra, Charles 228 Terpstra, D u a n e 223 Tewinkle, Pete 101,228 Tharin, Crotter 129 Tharp, Christopher 193 Thelen, Darryl 142 Thelen, Michael 86 Theune, David 228 Thiel, Melissa 115 Thomas, Jennifer 171,243 T h o m a s , Jessica 78 T h o m a s o n , Kristen 171, 86 T h o m p s o n , Amy 70, 142 Thompson, Anderw 238 T h o m p s o n , Erin 228 T h o m p s o n , Jannah 107 T h o m p s o n , Megan 243, 193 Thorez, Beth 48 T h o m , Jenifer 94 Thorp, Danielle 31 Thorpe, Alan 228 Thorrez, Beth 230 T h u e m m e l , Kara 171 T h u e m e l , Kristina 171 Tigelaar, Darren 20 Tigelaar, Katherine 228 Timmer, Becky 107, 85, 86, 228 Timmer, Lisa 122, 123, 110, 111 Tinkelman, Lia 230, 48 Tinstra, Melinda 204 Toan,Jenny 228 Tobias, Stephen 239 Tobias, Steve 57, 193 Toburen, Michael 228 Todd, Aaron 228 Toering, Stephanie 171 Tollence, Phil 233 Tolmer, Jennifer 172 Tomer, Ellen 61, 193 Torrence, Arlene 234 Toth, A m b e r 172, 86 Track 124-127 Tracy, Angela 84 Tracy, Julie 86 Tran, Becky 228 Trantow, Heidi 172 Traver, Michael 228 Triemstra, Steve 172 Triezenberg, K i m 240 Tripoli, Josephine 172 Troeger, Terry 87 Troendly, Amy 172,236 Troxel, Erin 228 Trytko, Jeff 228, 124, 125 Tsuji, Marie 86 Tsukamoto, N a o m i 172 Tucker, Brian 7 Tuinstra, Jeremy 172 Tuinstra, Melinda 209, 17 Tuinstra, Scott 193 Tverbeg, Lois 142 Twietmeyer, Julie 229 Tyler, Jeff 142

Undergraduates Urban, George Uyl, Dave

|jjo 193 87, 121, 229

/ m

Vail, Samuel 239, 57, 210 Valdes, Kevin 87, 172 Van Ark, Laune 87 Van Ark, Laurie 87 Van Dam, Christopher 239 Van Eden, Andy 66, 193 Van Ek, Jeremy 172, 232 Van Faasen, Betsey 234 Van Fossan, Jeff 109 Van Hekken, Dan 109 Van Hoboken, Vera 24 Van Hoose, Sara 241 Van Pemis, Andrew ... 173,230 Van Soest, Mark 27 Van Tubbergen, Kathy 119, 143 Van Wieren, Glenn .... 108, 109 Van Wyk, Kristian 229 84, 85, VanAuken, Amy 24, 210 VanDam, Andrew 172 VanDam, Kip 57, 210 Vande Wege, Aaron 105 VandeBunte, Christine 173 Vandellen, Jason 57 VanDenBerg, Beth 173, 240 Vandenberg, Holly 95 Vandenberg, Zack 238 Vander Kolk, Bret 193 Vander Slice, Chris 109 Vander Woude, Jason 109 VanderBeek, Marc 210, 232 VanderBeek, Scott 173, 55, 232 VanderBorgh, Clarence 193 VanderBorgh, Nick . 44, 57,239 VanderElzen, Michael 210 VanderHeide, Derek 193, 112, 113,239 Vanderheide, Derek 57 Vanderhill, Amanda 229 Vanderhyde, James 229 VanderKamp, Bethanie 229 VanderLaan, Jeffrey 87, 229 VanderLind, Sara 86,210 Vanderlugt, Kara 210 VanderMark, Kristina 236 VanderMeer, Jim 87 VanderSlice, Christopher ... 229 Vanderspool, Shannon 173 Vandersteen, Sarah . . . . 2 3 4 , 2 1 0 VanderVelde, Jon 73 Vandervelde, Richard 142 VanderWal, Alisyn 210 VanderWal, Scott 210 VanderWeide, Susan .. 107,210 VanderWoude, Jason 193 Vander Yacht, Gordon ^7 VanderZwart, Ryan 193 Vande Wege, Aaron 86, 210 Vandrese, Kari 86, 210 VanDyke, Rebecca 173, 243 VanEngen, Anita 210 VanFaasen, Paul '^2 VanHaitsma, Bryan .... 229, 105 VanHarken, Sarah 173, 87. 236


Vanhees, James 142 VanHeukelom, Bob 142 VanHuis, Chris 87, 229 Vanlwaardem, John 142 VanKampen, Andrew 124 VanLangerlde. Heidi 118 VanLangevelde. Heide 119 VanLangevelde, Heidi 210 VanLangevelde, Stacey 193 VanLonghuyzen, Allison . . . 2 1 0 VanLonkhuyzen, Allison .... 111 Vanlonkhuyzen, Tyler 2 3 8 , 1 9 3 VanNamen, Eric 173 VanNuil, Melissa 229 VanOort, Jessica 210 Vanopstall, Michael 229 VanOstran, Kimberly 194 VanPutten, James 143 VanPutten, Sara 172 VanRavenswaay, Erich 238, 58 VanSpronsen, Sarah 229 VanTil, Cory 172 VanTimmeren, Chris 57, 239, 194 VanValkenburg, Kelly 194 VanVels, Mary 143 VanWagnen, Victoria ... 61, 194 VanWieren, Kuria 229 VanWyk, Leonard 143 VanZoeren, Bradley 210 Vashel, Scott 55 Vasicek, Todd 87 Vasisht, Munish 173 Vaughn, Greg 87 VAX 204 Veen, Michael 229 Vega, Andera 236 Vega, John 85 Velasco, Mira 237 Velazquez, Suzy 241 Velderman, Benjamin 229 Velderman, Phil 173 Veldhof, Gary 194 Veldhof, G w e n 85, 229, 39 Veltman, Jim 121 VendenBerg, Beth 52 Vendramini, Reina 210 VerBeek, Tom 194 Verduin, Kathleen 143 Verhey, Allen 143 Verhey, Kate 173 VerMeulen, Chris 238 VerMueler, Caris 58 Vcrtalka, Jonathan 229 Verwys, Leischen 234,210 Vespers 26-27 Vickers, Jared 87, 124, 242,210 Vine, Alyssa 85, 229 Vink, Kristin 173,240,52 Visser, Toni 173,240,52 Viveros, Sonia 229 Vivio, Amy 173 Vlasica, Katherine 173,243 Vlietstra, Greg 117, 210 Vlietstra, Kimberly 229 Volkers, Beth 235 Volker, J e n n i f e r . .. 69, 101, 263, Volkers, Michael 87, 194 Volleyball 94-95 Voorhees, Cynthia 174 Vos, Kathleen 194 Voskuil, Karsten 174 jVoss, Richard 229 IVoss, Trish 235, 99 Vriesenga, Matt 120, 121 Vrieze, Ross 232, 194 jVyvyan, James 143

Wacker, Mary 229 Wacker, Mimi 99 Wagenaa, Larry 143 Wager, Robert 100 Wagner, Lara 86, 243 Wagner, Rachael 240, 210 Wagner, Robert 101 Wagner, Shane 194 Walbecq, S h a w n 194 Walk, Aaron 174 Walker, Jim 87 Wallace, Jay 117, 233 Walter, Mary 71, 194 Walvoord, A m a n d a 87 Walvoord, Derek 87, 194 Warber, Sara 123 Warburton, Peter 239, 57 Ward, Courtney 82 Ward, Jeanette 210 Ward, Nick 87, 174, 242, 56, 124, 125 Warren, Jennifer 229 Washington, Prater 238 Wasilevich, Marcus 174, 232, 55 Waterloo, Carrie 210 Watkin, Sarah 84, 194 Wattleworth, Kent 86, 87, 242, 223, 194, 38 Wawiemia, Brandy 81 Weaver, Brian 210 Weaver, Jennifer .. 50, 1 7 4 , 2 3 6 Webb, Rachel 174,231,45 Webb, Valerie 194 Webster, Gina 111 Weckwert, Arika 235 Weeldreyer, Amity 174 Weeldreyer, Misten 229 Weerstra, A m a n d a 210 Wegner, Darryl 174 Weidner, Jaime 20, 237 WeinBurger, Hans 238 Weiss, Julie 174 Weiss, Mike 56 Welch, Olivia 243, 194 Welle, Hubert 143 Weller, Herb 129 Welton, Courtney 234 Wendrick, Todd 229 Wendt, Laura 243, 210 Wendt, Stacey 174,236,50 Wentzloff, Sarah 87, 194, 38, 39 Werkman, Michelle 94, 95 Wesp, Heather 229 Wesselink, Elizabeth 87, 27 Wessman, Leslie 136 West, Molly 174 Westhus, Eric 211 Wezeman, Bethany 229 Whelan, Brandi 237 White, Daniel 174 White, David 211 White, Tyler 233 Whitefoot, Rebecca 240, 52 Whitesell, Jennifer 174,61 Whitfield, Kathryn 20, 235 Whitford, Marc .. 108, 109, 144 Whiton, Jessica 71 Whitworth, Jeremy 87 Wickmann, Diane 143 Widi, Corine 85

Wiegle, Chad 58 Wierengo, Jonathan . . . 2 1 1 , 1 1 2 , Wiesenthal, Robert 174 Wilcox, Michelle 229 Wilcox, Ryan 174 Wilderspin, A m y 211 Wilerson, Tony 67 Wilhelm, Grant 242, 56 Wilkerson, Tony .. 87, 174, 231 Williams, A i m e e 86 Williams, Brent 233 Williams, Carolyn 86 Williams, Donald 133, 143 Williams, Glynn 65 Williams, Jamie 85,211 Williams, Lindsay 98, 99 Williams, Matt 211,232 Williams, Susan 186, 143 Williams, Travis 86,87,211 Williams, Tyler 96, 97 Williamson, Natalie 211 Wilson, Boyd 186, 143 Wilson, Jennifer 236,211 Wilt, Kristen 175 Wind Symphony 39 Windaler, Jason 233 Windeller, Josh 87 Wing, Kathryn 86, 20 Wing, Katy 211 Wininger, A m a n d a 175 Winn, Janna 86,211 Winter Fantasia 64 WinterBoline, Ellie 143 Wirth, Christopher 175 Wirtz, Gayle 211 Witvoet, Tim 55 Witvoet, Timothy 175,232 Wolfanger, Gretchen . 3, 85, 211 Wolters, Karla 123, 143, 94, 95 Wolthuis, Brian 69, 85, 194, 24 Wolven, Kristie 194 W o m e n ' s Issues 71 Wonder, Stevie 217 Wondergem, Eric 229 Wong, Aaron 229 Wong, Brandon 211 Wood, Noelle 211 Woodhams, Jennifer 243 Woodstra, Lindsey 229 Woolard, Mindy 61 Wooley, Wes 93 Working, Carolyn 229 Working, T h o m 39

Workman, Les 1 ie 86 World Series 221 Wormmeester, Janay .. 1 7 5 , 2 4 3 Wormmeester, Justin ... 87, 242 Wright, Amy 235 Wright, Andrew 211 Wright, Crystal 85, 211 Wright, Jim 206 Wright, Julie 175,240 W T H S 89.9 FM 71 Wu, Harry 210 Wyatt, Andrew 211 Wyngarden, Christopher .... 175 Wysozan, Alexia 229

Yager, Kelly 229 Yao, Kun-Chun 175, 19 Yarch, Brian 69, 229 Yared, Elizabeth ... 87, 229, 102 Yared, Liz 103 Yelding, John 143 Yen, Fath 175 Yoneyoka, J.J 237 Young, Brian 69 Young, Dan 242, 56 Young, Emily 211 Young, Sarah 175, 230, 48 Young, Zac 229 Youngberg, Matt 85, 229 Yount, Michael 211 Yowler, Skipp 86, 211 Ysseldyke, Drew 239,57 Yugoslavia 207

Zachman, Chris

Zanin, Gina 123 Zawadzka, Anna 175 Zayaz, Jessica 229 Zeerip, Jen 52 Zeerip, Jennifer 240 Zegerius, Rachel 211 Zeh, Darcy 229 Ziegler, Marcia 194 Ziegler, Marcy 86, 87, 38 Zimdahl, Kristin 237 Zirbel, Cynthia 236 Ziter, Jason 232 Zoeteway, James 143 Zolnierowicz, Michael 229 Zondervan, Eric 55 Zondervan, Josh 105, 7 Zorc, Anthony 239 Zork, Tony 57 Zoulek, Keith 120, 121 112, 113 Zupancic, Joe Zupancic, Joseph 211 Zwart, David 143 Zwart, Derk 69, 231 Zwart, Monica 191 Zwart, Monika 243 Zweering, Kelly 86, 229 Zwiesler, Julie 86, 194 Zwyghuizen, Andrew .. 86, 229 Zylstra, Jeffrey 211

211

Index 255

1 3 0 -


COLLEGE

HOPE

Voorhees Haunted House . . .

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Sophomores Brad "the experiment" Anderson and Eric "mad Scientist" Westhuis act out their dream science project at the Voorhees Haunted House. The haunted house is easy on students budgets, costing only two dollars with a costume

Providing Halloween scares for or three dollars withou, the students and community. If you thought the place was strange during the day, the residents are the things that go bump in the night in a Voorhesian tradition. The Voorhees Haunted house is an annual event initiated and run by the residents of Voorhees Hall. The idea was proposed by a resident assistant as a dorm event and it immediately grew in to a fund-raiser for a new hall television. Since that first year in 1992, the haunted House has become a large production with an income large enough to support the purchase of items for the hall such as a ping-pong table, a forty-five gallon aquarium, not to mention numerous smaller items. The residents cooperate to put on one of the best haunted houses in West Michigan. Some people the toured last year came from as far as Grand Rapids, Kalamazoo, and Muskegon. The residents hope this tradition will be continued by all Voorhesians.

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A l u m n i often come back to work during the Halloween event. Craig Maloney ('94) stirs up his favorite recipes as the Kitchen Surgeon.

continued from page 40 by senior art students. The multi-talented Aronson, who displayed her mixed media work said, "It was weird to see the peak of the work you're doing. As artist, it is good for you to experience the euphoria of having your work shown and the letdown of realizing this is the end," Students are encouraged at Hope to realize and expand their creativity. An open learning environment allows this to happen throughout the year. It is through the commitment of time and energy of those who organize the Visiting Writers' Series and the De Free Gallery that the various forms of art become a means of expression and learning for the Hope College Community.

BY cunanda black -^3^)

continued from page 17 to see Adena Box my friend out of the ring. It was hilarious," laughed Hancock. Jackson had fun time boxing bur her favorite May Day event was the hypnotist. "It was out of control. He had the whole audience captivated and laughing out of control." This year Jackson was only a member of the audience because so many people wanted to get hypnotized. She hopes next year on May Day she won't have to sit in the audience through the show. Another popular May Day event was the frisbee painting. At times the wait was a half hour to paint a frisbee with spin art. Although this was longer than the boxing line, Hancock did test out her artistic talents. "Maybe now I will learn how to play frisbee

golf," Hancock said as her frisbee was drying. As the games closed down, and the buses left for the concert, many students head out for the activity the college doesn't sponsor. More than a month before May Day, rumors began to surface about extra police officers being brought to campus to keep drinking and partying under control. Many residence halls posted signs reminding students of the possible consequences of May Day actions. In an Anchor article printed just days before the festivities, rumors of the increased patrols were confirmed false. Hope College Public Safety did inform the Holland Police Department of the upcoming festival and invited the city officers to freely walk around campus as a precautionary action.

Regardless of whether the rumors were true or false, many students felt they should be cautious. Many freshmen commented about the reputation of May Day as an excuse to drink and be lazy, and how that quickly changed. Many students made plans to headed off campus for the evening when the rumor of the extra security surfaces. Some believe this is the reason for the poor turnout at the Blessid union of Souls concert. The 1996 Spring Festival brought a lot of controversy and even more fun times. The controversy may or may not by back next year, but the traditional fun will be. No matter what happens, students agree that Spring Fling is one of the best days of the year.

BY shannon gould

"" Haunted 256 1



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