Milestone 2006

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Student Life Academics Sports People Groups Greeks Index

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his year's t h e m e focuses on Hope's ever-growing devotion to being a part of the larger world. We have had several events, fundraisers, lectures, sermons, and student-initiated programs that have focused o u r campus m o r e a n d m o r e toward the world. We had an extensive effort to help with the Katrina Relief, a sermon series called "Growing World Christians in the Soil of Hope," an e x p a n d i n g study abroad program, a new building dedicated to global communication and multicultural life, and more students looking to make careers outside of West Michigan. O n the other h a n d , H o p e has been evaluating itself as a college. We have been redefining what we p r o m o t e and discourage as an institution. As students we have been encouraged to look at ourselves, dig deep, and grow into adults that will better the world. H o p e is p r o u d of its heritage and its traditions and is always looking at how to merge tradition with the changes that are required to keep u p with higher education. H o p e bases its practices in the doctrine of the Reformed Church in America. As one of only three colleges from this denomi-

Reaching out Looking in


The Pine Grove is the crossroads of Hope's campus. It's a haven from the rush of cars and downtown, but it's also a social gathering where students and faculty alike can stop along the sidewalks for a catch-up chat. • photo by Tally Reeverts •

Opening

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Zach Trumble spent over an hour during the final week of Spring semester in a lightning storm in order to catch just one image of the chapel with a lightning bolt in the background. • photo by Zach Trumble •

Reaching out Looking in


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nation, H o p e carries on the c o m m i t m e n t set out by the RCA as detailed at www.rca. org: "[these colleges have a commitment] to learning a n d research, scholarship and dialogue, a n d faith a n d community—all f r a m e d with the discipline of the Christian tradition." This c o m m i t m e n t has been carried out in the past by 1887 H o p e g r a d u a t e Samuel Zwemer, who took the Christian ministry to Arabia in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Zwemer, along with n u m e r ous H o p e graduates, have f o u n d their call in the world beyond the Holland city limits, the state of Michigan, a n d the b o r d e r s of the United States. O t h e r graduates were called back to serve at H o p e as professors, presidents, a n d staff m e m b e r s or within the local community. For example, Isla (Pruim) Van E e n e n a a m f r o m the Class of 1924 served H o p e as head resident of Voorhees Hall a n d then as Dean of W o m e n f r o m 1960 to 1968. T h r o u g h her involvement at H o p e as an a l u m n a a n d Sigma Sigma m e m b e r , she blazed a path for fostering strong leadership in women. As p a r t of this tradition at H o p e , the I.VE League, f o u n d e d in 1992, was

Opening

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n a m e d after such a great model. This institution with its rich history has entered into a new growing period. Within a short period, H o p e has seen the addition to the A. Paul Schaap Science Center and the building of the Martha Miller Center for Global Communication a n d the DeVos Fieldhouse. T h e college also b o u g h t m o r e land on 8th Street and began a vast r e m o d eling of Lubbers Hall. T h e changes are not only physical but also within the student body—the n u m b e r of applicants has sharply increased and the enrollment has crept u p slowly over the past several years. Exploring its direction as an academic, moral, and spiritual body, the college has f o u n d new life in the concept of an increased focus on the world while reflecting on the practices and values of the institution. In short, H o p e College has responded to the call by reaching out and looking in.

Reaching out Looking in


Jeannette Lockard and Abby Kosta enjoy some outdoor studying time. Although the library and the residence halls are popular places to study, many students venture outside when the weather warms up. • photo by Zach Trumble •

Opening-


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Pages 22-23: Critical Issues Symposium. Students listen to Fracis Bok speak about his experiences as a slave. Some students take this opportunity to get extra credit in a class, fulfill a class r e q u i r e m e n t , or learn m o r e about the issues facing oui global village, in this case model n-day slavery.

Pages 20-21: G r a d u a t i o n . Presid e n t Bultman presents the 2006 graduates with a h a n d s h a k e a n d their representative diploma. This year g r a d u a t i o n occured on a beautiful, sunny day in the Municipal football Stadium. T h e actual presentation of diplomas takes approximately an h o u r .

Pages 10-11: Orientation. T h e f r e s h m e n class of 2005 break into small g r o u p s their first few days on c a m p u s to create friendships, learn the ins a n d outs of H o p e , a n d settle into the collegiate life. As they e n t e r their s o p h o m o r e year, some of these students will participate in Orientation as OAs.


Voted Entertainer of the Year for 2006 by Campus Activities Magazine, Comedy hypnotist Frederick Winters performs his mesmerizing hypnotism on Hope students, while keeping the audience alive with his humorous comedy. Winters, an annual act at Hope, has performed over 2,000 shows while hypnotizing over 125,000 people.


Freshmen orientation welcomes over 8 0 0

I by Rachel Achtemeier It's no small task f o r H o p e

College to welcome over 800 new s t u d e n t s a n d their families to c a m p u s . It'd be h a r d to f i n d a n o t h e i college that provides m o r e services for new s t u d e n t s o n move-in day, catering not only to the n e e d s of new students, b u t p a r e n t s , families a n d siblings as well. T h i s is w h a t sets H o p e a p a r t f r o m the rest! O r i e n t a t i o n Directors Rachel Achtemeier a n d Katie R a n d a b e g a n staff selection a n d p l a n n i n g back in F e b r u a r y with high h o p e s for a n o t h e r great year. T h e y spent the s u m m e r w o r k i n g with advisor Diana Breclaw p l a n n i n g e v e r y t h i n g f r o m b a r b e q u e s to 11?

Student Life

i n f o r m a t i o n sessions, to move-in day craziness. S t a f f b e g a n trickling o n t o c a m p u s in early August to b e g i n w o r k i n g a n d t r a i n i n g for t h e big weeke n d . Finally, o n a w a r m A u g u s t m o r n i n g with t h e c a m p u s c o v e r e d in o r a n g e a n d blue, H o p e College welcomed in t h e Class of 2009! T h e O r i e n t a t i o n W e e k e n d was i h e m e d " L I V E IN •05." T h e w e e k e n d p r o v e d to b e a h u g e success t h a n k s to t h e incredible h e l p of over 20 Assistant Directors (AD's) m o r e t h a n 200 O r i e n t a t i o n Assistants (OA's), a n d m a n y faculty a n d s t a f f m e m b e r s w h o d e v o t e d countless h o u r s to m a k i n g O r i e n t a t i o n a success.


Opposite page: top to bottom, left to right: One Orientation group shares a hug at the end of one of many meetings in the Pine Grove. Hope students break out their best dance moves at the Friday night luau-this year held at DePree parking lot. An OA group enjoys another "icebreaker" game to get to know each other. This page: top to bottom, left to right: Several Assistant Directors unveil this year's Orientation banner from the top of Dewitt. Freshman Kerri Barberio makes her mark on the class of '09

"By the end of Orien tation I was almost completely, well, oriented.trAvis Love

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banner. Talking about what it means to be a Hope student is an essential part of the Orientation weekend. Liz Brichacek and Elizabeth Adenegan do the heavy lifting to ease the stress of moving to college for freshmen. • photos courtesy Public Relations •

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Everything turned upside down during O r i e n t a t i o n . I m m e d i a t e l y . I h a d to m e e t a g r o u p of p e o p l e a n d learn m o r e a b o u t t h e m quickly. B e i n g in t h e P h e l p s Scholar P r o g r a m m e a n t that t h e p r o cess of m e e t i n g p e o p l e was drastically accelerated t h r o u g h living a n d m e e t i n g with t h e s a m e s t u d e n t s . I was constantly s e e i n g familiar faces, which gave m e t h e sense t h a t H o p e really is a small college. Of course, when the upperclassmen showed up, the n u m b e r of p e o p l e on c a m p u s q u a d r u p l e d . F o r t u nately, e v e r y o n e is t o l e r a n t of f r e s h m e n , like w h e n they get lost. W e r e it n o t f o r O r i e n t a t i o n , 1 think a lot of s t u d e n t s w o u l d still b e w a n d e r i n g c a m p u s aimlessly t r y i n g to f i n d the " A n d e r s o n - W e r k m a n Financial C e n t e r " o r s o m e o t h e r o b s c u r e b u i l d i n g . Orientation I

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a Top to bottom, left to right; 09 Puller Matt Richardson features the traditional eye makeup worn by odd year. • photo by Zach Trumble * Even and odd year alumni arrive to stand at the front of the pits to cheer on this year's Pull teams. • photo by Ashley Dehudy • Julie VanLaan waits for the signal to begin. Her puller is Matt Richardson, pictured above. • photo by Zach Trumble •

"There's no way to describe what it feels like because it is so intense and is

The caller directs the moralers to signal their pullers to begin. • photo by Zach Trumble •• Nick Witkowski stands at the back of the Even year pull line: the anchor who holds the rope. • photo by Ashley Dehudy •

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r. Schock always lokl m e to m a k e work that mattered to somebody (in regards to my focus in video production). With that in mind and friend f o r m e r puller J e r e m y Cox at my side, 1 set out to m a k e a d o c u m e n t a r y o n o n e of the longest r u n n i n g college traditions in the I S. 1 he experience was a m a / i n g ! T h e r e were m o m e n t s when I felt like the 1n idge that filled tl gap between the f r e s h m e n a n :1 s o p h o m o r e rivalry. I will never forget the fi rst sere I heir reactions were oriceless . 1 imm knew that I had m a d e so ing that mattered ^ I to itte VVr

Student Life

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by Kate van Eeuwen Eighty freshmen and sophomores m e t o n o p -

a t h r e e - h o u r battle, they can b e t h e o n e s g o i n g f o r

nosite b a n k s of t h e Black River o n t h e '> O c t o b e r 2 4 t h , t h e f r e s h m e n w e a r i n g o d d yeai ct of m a r o o n a n d gold a n d t h e s c . p h o m o r e r e p r ^ e n t ing e v e n year in r e d , black, a n d white. Two d i f f e r e n t

a swim and chanting in the

teams, o n e identical a i m : to g a m m o r e o f t h e r o P e that s p a n n e d t h e river t h a n t h e o t h e r t e a m , c c o m e to t h e Pull, t h e oldest surviving t r a d i t i o n ot any college in t h e U n i t e d States, 108 years a n d m r

'09 Pull t e a m p u l l e d their h e a r t s o u t , . u t c o " ^ ^ n o t m a t c h t h e ferocity with whteh c o u n t e r p a r t s p u l l e d . W i n n i n g by a s p a n ol - 0 tee , 1 inch t h e s o p h o m o r e s w o n by t h e largest distance in five years. T h r e e weeks of b l o o d , sweat, a n d tears w e r e p o u r e d into t h e Black River as the victorious s o p h o m o r e s w e n t s w i m m i n g a n d took h o m e t h e n r o p e ; a r o p e that they waited a year to clatm.

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' For t h r e e weeks p r i o r to t h e Pull, each t e a m e n d u r e s i n t e n s e practices t h r e e h o u r s p e r day a l o n g with all-day practices o n S a t u r d a y s . Each t e a m works to r e f i n e t h e i r t e c h n i q u e s so t h a t at t h e e n d of

river; so they can h e a r t h o s e f o u r magical w o r d s . " R E E L IN Y O U R R O P E ! " ' T h i s y e a r , at t h e 108th Pull, t h e f r e s h m e n

The Pull

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From my position in the lead car, the C a m p u s Safety truck, in the h o m e c o m i n g p a r a d e , I could tell that the C a m p u s Safety officer took the j o b of leading the p a r a d e very seriously. This C a m p u s Safety officer cleared the way for the p a r a d e to follow. This "lead car" signaled those on the streets to make way for the rest of the p a r a d e a r o u n d campus. It also set the pace for the entire p a r a d e . T h e G r a n d Marshall was the next car, followed by all o t h e r floats f r o m different student organizations. Several cars with H o m e c o m i n g court couples, large floats pulled by trucks, and even a g r o u p of international students carrying flags followed the p a r a d e r o u t e laid o u t by the C a m p u s Safety truck. Even t h o u g h I didn't get to see the p a r a d e f r o m the typical point of view, it was interesting being at the front of the p a r a d e .

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r#! Left to right, top to bottom: The Dutchmen storm the field with raw enthusiasm on October 15 before they won their eighth consecutive Homecoming game. Homecoming Queen Heather Dykstra and Homecoming King Steve Haack

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"I felt very loved and honored by the Hope College community." show off the traditional wooden shoes during the halftime. Eric Bourassa broadcasts live from the Municipal Stadium for campus station, WTHS. Vikki Graudins tops the Cheerleader pyramid, which during Homecoming, also involved alumni cheerleaders. Nathan Reed and Mark Yapp wave to the crowd while on the Cosmo/Delphi float, which competed in the Homecoming Parade float competition. • photos by Tally Reeverts •

Student Life

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Homecoming is more than a football game

(which H o p e h a s a t r a d i t i o n of w i n n i n g ) . It is a scries of events c e l e b r a t i n g w h a t it m e a n s to b e a p a r t of this college c o m m u n i t y . It b e g a n Friday, O c t o b e r 14 with a k e y n o t e a d d r e s s kicking off a two-day c e l e b r a t i o n of t h e new M a r t h a Miller C e n t e r f o r Global C o m m u n i c a tion. Later t h a t n i g h t , H o p e s t u d e n t s t r a v e l e d o u t to Teusink's farm for the a n n u a l " H o m e c o m i n g Hoed o w n " c o m p l e t e with line d a n c i n g , hay rides, a n

Walk. After a p r e - g a m e s t u d e n t p a r a d e t h r o u g h c a m p u s t h a t e n d e d at H o l l a n d M u n i c i p a l s t a d i u m , H o p e played a w i n n i n g g a m e against Wisconsin L u t h e r a n College. D u r i n g halftime, seniors H e a t h e r Dykstra a n d Steve H a a c k w e r e c r o w n e d H o m e c o m ing King a n d Q u e e n . T h i s w e e k e n d also m a r k e d r e u n i o n s loi t o u i g r a d u a t i n g classes f r o m 1985 to 2000. S a t u r d a y n i g h t was t h e H o m e c o m i n g Bal , with a "Music of t h e N i g h t " t h e m e f e a t u r i n g a live b a n d , c a t e r e d f o o d , a n d lots of m e m o r i e s .

a p p l e cider. Saturday morning, the campus community p a r t i c i p a t e d in t h e 2 8 t h a n n u a l R u n - B i k e - S w n n -

by Megan Purtee

2 0 0 5 was a homecoming to remember

Above: Defense captain Matthew Erb (#96) leads the defense in a play discussion with Coach Ricketts. Below from left to right: President and Mrs. Bultman greet the parade spectators on their way to the big game. Sarah McDonald, Heather Tobert, janell Ball, Shea Turtle, Katherine Yanney, Krista Hughes, and Erin LaHotta cheer on friends who are on Court. Waiting for the parade, Sarah Rollins prepares to rock out with her mp3 player on the Alpha Gamma Phi float. Nixon Omollo leads the International Relations club in a chant as they walk down Colubmia Avenue. - Photos by Tally Reeverts*


Nvkerk is a 71-year-old H o p e C o l l e g e t r a d i -

tion w h e r e w o m e n of the f r e s h m e n a n d s o P h ^ o r e classes compete in the areas of P l a y , Song, a n d O r a tion T h o u g h the audience gets to enjoy an amazing evening of talent, they d o n ' t fully see the work d o n e by the amazing m e n and w o m e n who gave tireless ) «f their time to make this a spectacular event. T h e f r e s h m e n class began the evening with the ever-popular song "Build Me Up, B u t t e r c u p and spiced things u p with p r o p s a n d motions Freshman orator Barbra Rubio gave a c o m p e l h n g titled " T h e V oice of Libei a h Finally, the f r e s h m e n tion.

The class of 2 0 0 6 wins their second cup^

play "Do You Yabba Dabba Do?" gave a f u n n y look at H o p e College f r o m the Flintstones' point ot view. T h e '08 Song girls p r e s e n t e d a jazzy version of "Over the Rainbow" with colorful props. Sophom o r e orator A n n a West challenged the audience with h e r speech, "(Welcome to) O u r Global Neighb o r h o o d . " And t h e s o p h o m o r e play " 1 he P h a n t o m of t h e Nykerk" m a d e attendees laugh with the Kom e o a n d Juliet" twist a n d surprise characters like Britney Spears a n d N a p o l e o n Dynamite. While only o n e class could win the Nykerk C u p , everyone gained smiles, friendships, a n d memories, a n d a love for the tradition of Nykerk.

by Rachel Achtemeier

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Opposite page, top to bottom, left to right: 08 Playgirls are shocked by the Phantom's note. 09 Song prepares to begin the show. Odd year play brings the Flintstones to Holland. Morale boys provide entertainment at intermission. 09 Coaches Kristen Creshel and Ana Frikker encourage their girls

"When the curtain opens, it's this amazing f e e l j ^ k o ^ U s b y before they sing. This page, top to bottom, left to right: Props and hand motions add to each song's performance. Sophomore orator Anna West makes an emphatic point. White gloves are part of the traditional song girl uniform. Freshman Barbara Rubio speaks about liberation. Even year coaches Suzzy Lockwood and Rachel VandeGiessen make some fun motions as part of the warm-up tradition. After a month of hard work, the class of 08 is rewarded by receiving the Nykerk Cup. • photos by Zach Trumble •

Nykerk


Hope College s t u d e n t s joined t o g e t h e r in an innovative way to c o m b a t the devastating effects of H u r r i c a n e K a t n n a u p o n the Gulf Coast. "Pulling for H o p e " was a collaborative student-led effort j o i n i n g s t u d e n t l e a d e i s a n d a d m i n i s t r a t o r s in a new way. O v e r s e e n by S t u d e n t Congress, various s t u d e n t organizations c o n t r i b u t e d b o t h time a n d m o n e y to t h e cause a n d within two weeks, a week-long event was u n d e r w a y . D u r i n g the "Pulling for H o p e week, f u n d raising events i n c l u d e d collecting cans f o r t h e A m e r ican Red Cross, a Blood-Drive hosted by Alpha Phi 18

Student Life

O m e g a , a 53' semi-truck collecting f o o d a n d g o o d s hosted by V o l u n t e e r Services a n d staffed by G r e e k Life, a n d a b e n e f i t c o n c e r t with J o s h Schicker (a local H o l l a n d artist) hosted by W T H S c a m p u s r a d i o a n d t h e Milestone y e a r b o o k . Overall, t h e efforts raised over $4,000, m o r e t h a n 30 tons of f o o d a n d . o o d s , a n d 99 pints of b l o o d . H o p e College also o p e n e d its d o o r s to displaced s t u d e n t s a n d reseai c v iner g r a d u a t e s affected by t h e h u r r i c a n e . T h i s e x p e r i e n c e allowed s t u d e n t orgam/.ations to pull t o g e t h e r with t h e rest of the c o u n t r y to aid t h e victims on t h e Gulf Coast.


Opposite page, top to bottom, left to right: Haleigh Heneveld helps load the semi truck to send supplies to the victims of Hurricane Katrina. • photo by PR • Women's Issues and Environmental Issues jointly hosted a benefit concert to raise money for those along the Gulf Coast. Musician Josh Schicker also held a benefit concert, sponsored by WTHS. • photos by Ashley DeHudy • Members of Creek Life donated time loading the truck (top) and collecting donations (below).* There is no finish line... until we find a cure!

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This page: Chemistry Club members support the cause. Decorations were comon among the teams. Signs lined the path. Each group had a tent where there group kept warm throughout the night. • photos courtesy of Lelah Haggart •

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by Lelah Haggart

O n O c t o b e r 21, 2005, t e a m s f r o m H o p e o r g a n i z a t i o n s a n d r e s i d e n c e halls g a t h e r e d in the Pine G r o v e to kick off t h e 2 0 t h a n n u a l Relay for l i f e event. F o r 12 h o u r s , each of the t e a m s h a d m e m b e r s walking a r o u n d the Pine G r o v e to raise money f o r t h e A m e r i c a n C a n c e r Society's cancer r e s e a r c h . T h i s year's t h e m e was " H a w a i i a n Islands." Several activities a n d events took place t h r o u g h o u t t h e n i g h t , i n c l u d i n g a T u g of W a r , limbo c o m p e t i t i o n , o p e n mic., a n d live p e r f o r m a n c e s . T h e Relay b e g a n at 7 p m Friday with t h e o p e n i n g c e r e m o n i e s a n d victory l a p of t h e c a n c e r survivors. A s e p a r a t e c e r e m o n y h o n o r e d cancer victims, w h o s e n a m e s w e r e r e a d f r o m white bags p l a c e d a l o n g t h e sidewalk with a lit c a n d l e inside. Pulling for Hope & Relay for Life

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This page, top to bottom, left to right: Jeff Weber and Kyle Barnes smile after the ceremony. Sarah Blankenship sings the Alma Mater at the end of Commencement. The entire crowd rose and Hope students and graduates sang for their school. Before the ceremony. Erica Oosting gives a tender hug. Graduation remains a time for tearful goodbyes as Hope graduates prepare to enter life beyond college. Walking through campus is a tradition prior to the graduation ceremony. Andrew Abela and Rachel Achtemeier make their way across the stage. Diplomas are blank on graduation day, and actually received in the mail days later. A sea of caps is an unforgettable

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got the most out of my education my relationships, and my walk » with Christ/' Bcth^viy M€TT€r$ sight on this day in May. Opposite page: Digital cameras prove an invaluble asset to doting parents. Dr. Rhoda Janzen reads a poem written for the occasion. Graduates watch their friends cross the stage. Taping the tops of caps is common. Sona Smith raises her fist in joyful celebration as she receives her diploma. • photos courtesy of PR •


by Megan Purtee

U n d e r a cloudless b l u e sky o n a S u n d a y a f t e r n o o n in May, 6 2 2 g r a d u a t e s g a t h e r e d o n e last time as s t u d e n t s of H o p e College. 1 h e c o m m e n t em e n t c e r e m o n i e s w e r e h e l d at H o l l a n d M u m c p a l S t a d i u m o n S u n d a y , May 7. Family, f r i e n d s , a n d m e m b e r s of t h e H o p e College c o m m u n i t y g a ™ to c e l e b r a t e t h e c u l m i n a t i o n of t h e collegiate e d u c a tion of class ot 2006. t T h e C o m m e n c e m e n t a d d r e s s was entitle "Seeking t h e S p h e r e s , " a n d given by j a n z e n , assistant p r o f e s s o r of Englis i.

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0 stressed the importance m e t a p h o r as a g u i d e for living. I n h o n o r o t h e occasion she w r o t e a p o e m , " t h e first p o e m I h a v e ever w r k t e n specifically for 622 p e o p l e (see below

l ight for t h e last stanza of t h e p o e m ) . 8 As t h e g r a d u a t e s walked u p to receive t h e n d i p l o m a s , p a r e n t s a n d f r i e n d s c h e e r e d as they raced to c a p t u r e t h e m o m e n t on film. T h e day m a r k e d t h e 141st H o p e College commencement ceremony.

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As a s t u d e n t o n t h e C I S c o m m i t t e e , it was an h o n o r to be asked to i n t r o d u c e Paul Rusesabagina. w h o spoke o n his p e r s o n a l e x p e r i e n c e with the R w a n d a n genocide. Additionally, I t h o u g h t it would be g o o d f o r s o m e s t u d e n t s to personally talk with p e o p l e w h o have actually e x p e r i e n c e d t h e effects of g e n o c i d e a n d even slavery. So t h e evening Francis Bok spoke, t h e f o r m e r S u d a n e s e child slave a n d now antislavery activist, s o m e H o p e s t u d e n t s also h e a r d a first h a n d account of the S u d a n e s e civil war f r o m H o p e s t u d e n t Peter Pan. I would e n c o u r a g e s t u d e n t s to participate in f u t u r e C I S events because they really a r e g r e a t ways to truly learn a b o u t t h e critical issues of o u r time.

Top to bottom, left to right; Ordinary people's capacity for evil was the focus of Dr. James Waller's address. Survivors of genocide share their stories. Deb Braaksma, Ciyonna Elmore, Alfredo Gonzales, and Will Nettleton all participate in the Tuesday night keynote speaker lecture.

"I can only guess that we had nearly 2 0 0 0 for the Paul Rusesabagina Lecture." Opposite page, top to bottom, left to right: Paul Rusesabagina's pre-CIS speech was so well-attended that the overflow seating from Dimnent Chapel also filled the nearby Knickerbocker Theatre. Doris Bergen spoke about the Nazis through the perspective of their Christian roots. Students attend a lecture and take notes. Two keynote speakers graced this year's CIS, and Francis Bok, a former slave to the Arab militia, spoke on Tuesday night. • all photos courtesy Public Relations •

21

Student Life


Arab militia in S o u t h e r n S u d a n a n d w h e n h e b r o k e f r e e , e n d i n g u p in t h e U n i t e d States alone a n d s t r u g g l i n g in a new c u l t u r e . H e told s t u d e n t s to fight t h e slavery t h a t still persists in t h e w o r l d a n d to be as e d u c a t e d as possible in o r d e r to i n f o r m o t h e r s . G e n o c i d e in t h e Global \ illage. Dr. J a m e s Waller o f W h i t w o r t h College g a \ e As a lead u p to t h e discussion, C I S s h o w e d a d i f f e r e n t perspective t h a t focused o n how n o r m a l the film " H o t e l R w a n d a . " P a u l R u s e s a b a g m a , t h e p e o p l e p a r t i c i p a t e in genocide. Several o t h e r spea real-life h e r o w h o saved lives d u r i n g t h e R w a n d a n ers a d d r e s s e d their p a r t i c u l a r e x p e r i e n c e with genogenocide, s p o k e a b o u t his e x p e r i e n c e . cide H a i l e d as o n e of t h e best H o p e S y m p o s i u m s to T h e C I S c o m m i t t e e also b r o u g h t Francis Bok d a t e , t h e e v e n t allowed s t u d e n t s to focus o n a critical to D i m n e n t C h a p e l f o r t h e e v e n i n g k e y n o t e a d d r e s s . w o r l d issue a n d h o w to i m p r o v e t h e global village. Bok's story r e c o u n t e d b o t h his years as a slave to t h e

Due to the recent g e n o c i d e in S u d a n a n d t h e controversy over U . N . i n v o l v e m e n t , this serious topic b e c a m e t h e focus f o r t h e 2 0 0 5 Critical Issues S y m p o s i u m , titled " F r o m Auschwitz to D a r t u r :

by Tally Reeverts

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Dance M a r a t h o n 2006 was the most success12,6 7 ( ) .89 for t h e ^ ful in school history, raising kids of DeVos Children's Hospital ^nd C h i l d r e n s Miracle Network. This entirely s t u d e n t - r u n event is currently in its seventh year a n d has b e c o m e one ol the b l u e s t activities on Hope's campus, ' T h e " D r e a m T e a m " — t h e p l a n n i n g committee b e h i n d the event, including senior ^ as executive director, with senior J a i m e J o Sabol a junior T a r a V a n d e S t r e e k as assistant d i r e c t o r s - b e gan their work at the beginning of the fall semester, planning fundraisers, recruiting committee m e m -

bers, and interacting with the Miracle kids and their families. C a m p u s organizations, Greek Lite, a n d sports teams got to know their Miracle kids and families as well as f u n d r a i s i n g all year long. D u r i n g the m a r a t h o n , held March 10 a n d 11, the Miracle families walked a r o u n d the spacet h e m e d gym to t h a n k everyone involved. D u r i n g a dramatic reveal, the final total was a n n o u n c e d and the c a m p u s realized what a difference their m o n t h s of h a r d work h a d m a d e . Over the past seven years, H o p e College's Dance M a r a t h o n has raised ovei 32,000.


Opposite page, top to bottom, left to right: Seven years are captured in a record-breaking moment. Line-dancing throughout the night keeps the dancers awake. Nursing stduents and Miracle children bond. Missi Rossi helps lead the line dance. SIBS cheer for sisters in the lip-sync.

"Our miracle families are the reason why we have,

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This page, top to bottom, left to right: Miracle children benefit from the money raised by the Marathon, and get to hang out all night. Filling the gym floor to capacity each time the line dance is played. Students cheer for the Miracle families when they enter the Dow. Kids have as much energy as their new college friends. The inflatable slide is a hit for everyone. Students gather at several points throughout the night to listen to the families' stories. • Photos by Zach Trumble •

Dance Marathon


Over 2 4 trips leave Hope to serve. A

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by Megan Purtee and Dan Wizner

the number days r e m a i n -

ing in the school year d w i n d l e to a p r e c i o u s few, it is easy to forget t h e lessons l e a r n e d since August. For over 300 H o p e students, m a n y of t h e lessons originated d u r i n g S p r i n g Break. S t u d e n t s traveled to East Palo Alto, CA, Pomp a n o Beach, FL; C o m e r , GA; Annville a n d Hazel G r e e n , KY; Dulce, N M ; Q u e e n s , NY; Apache, O K ; Loysville a n d Philadelphia, PA; M e m p h i s , T N ; T o r o n t o , O n t a r i o ; t h e Dominican Republic; J a m a i c a ; a n d Reynosa, Mexico. O n e of the largest g r o u p s served as t h e 26:

Student Life

f o u r t h g r o u p to actively express t h e ' Pulling f o r H o p e " vision to h e l p those in t h e Gulf Coast in Gul p o r t , Mississippi. H u r r i c a n e K a t r i n a literally t o r e a p a r t t h e city of G u l f p o r t , which b e c a m e a city w h e r e acts of kin ness w e r e in a b u n d a n c e . T h i s lesson ol love is best s u m m a r i z e d by a letter f r o m W a y n e Lancaster o n e of t h e h u r r i c a n e victims (see q u o t e above right). Regardless if they traveled to O k l a h o m a , Nic a r a g u a , or did missions in H o l l a n d , S p r i n g Break p r o v i d e d m a n y H o p e s t u d e n t s with t h e c h a n c e to r e a c h o u t a n d answer their own calls to s e i \ e .


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Opposite page, top to bottom, left to right: Michelle Ellis paints walls at New Life Fellowship in Elmhurst, NY. Jordan Winfield enjoys recess between tutoring in Mississippi. • photo by Ashley DeHudy • Sarah Moore reads to a child during a tutoring session. • photo courtesy of Tally Reeverts • Hurricane Katrina's force demolished a once-beautiful pier into a pile of rubble. • photo by Ashley DeHudy • This page, top to bottom, left to right: Erica Wilson works with a young Native American boy before a pow w o w . • photo courtesy of Kim Mosley • Rachel Wells fixes a roof in East Palo Alto, CA. • photo courtesy of Tally Reeverts • Katie Josephson paints a home in Gulfport, MS. • photo by Ashley DeHudy •

"It seemed that for those few days we were all meant to be togetlWfty"€, L a m c m i L<

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Over 100 lice treatments were given to children in Nicaragua. • photo courtesy of Kristen Greshel • Hope students visit a prayer teepee in Apache, OK. • photo courtesy of Kim Mosley • Riding in a large van is common in most mission trips, as this group experienced on the way to San Fransisco. • photo courtesy of Tally Reeverts •

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A t e a m of 14 left Friday n i g h t of SpringB r e a k f o r t h e blustery city of N e w a r k , N e w J e r s e y . Led by seniors Bill Flavin a n d Amy Sisson, a n d acc o m p a n i e d by staff m e m b e r Wilma H a r t , t h e team w e n t to work with W o r l d I m p a c t Inc., a n o n p r o f i t mission o r g a n i z a t i o n . S o m e of t h e s t u d e n t s w o r k e d in classrooms at the mission school t h e o r g a n i z a t i o n r u n s while t h e o t h e r s p e r f o r m e d m a i n t e n a n c e w o r k within t h e school b u i l d i n g . T h e team also was blessed with a day off, d u r i n g which they traveled to N e w Y o r k City. F r e s h m a n J e f f Mastin said. " T h e trip was a c h a n c e to d o G o d ' s w o r k with s o m e of the most, incredible p e o p l e I h a v e m e t . " Spring Break Mission Trips

27


This page, top to bottom, left to right: Susan Krueger and Sarah Popovitch square off in a sumo wrestling battle. • photo by Ashley Dehudy • Bungee jumping was a new event at Spring Fling. Flying through the obstacle course, friends furiously race each other or sometimes hold hands down the final slide of the course. Keeping his balance on the mechanical bull, Ryan Gary figures out that it's harder than it looks. • photos courtesy of PR • The picnic featured hamburgers and ice cream treats. • photos by Ashley DeHudy • Opposite page: 360-Degree bike riding promises to

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upset some stomaches. Unlike the Pull, the Push is a light-hearted, three-lap race around the Pine Grove. Digital cameras appear in many students' hands as they race to capture the last few candids of the year. • photos courtesy of PR • After scaling the velcro wall, Megan Vivian takes a break. • photo by Ashley DeHudy •

1 S n r i n a F l i n a 'A by Megan T h e origins of S p r i n g Fling e m e r g e d decades ago as t h e college celebrated May Day. 1 aking place on t h e first day of M a y , these activities w e r e still held o u t s i d e in t h e c e n t e r of c a m p u s . O n e J u n i o r w o m a n was elected as Q u e e n of May Day a n d p r e s i d e d over a Q u e e n ' s c o u r t . Freshm e n w o m e n served as a Daisy C h a i n h o n o r g u a r d , f w hile s o p h o m o r e w o m e n p e r f o r m e d t h e traditional May Pole d a n c e . A Master of C e r e m o n y a n n o u n c e d the new m e m b e r s of M o r t a r B o a r d , while t h e college m e n participated in a track m e e t . 1 hat night t h e r e was a d i n n e r a n d a d a n c e (all i n f o r m a t i o n p r o v i d e d bv t h e 1964 Milestone yearbook).

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At the end of each school year, H o p e College s t u d e n t s a r e t r e a t e d to a n a m a z i n g e v e n t S p r i n g Fling, h e l d on t h a t Friday a f t e r n o o n which separates classes f r o m s t u d y i n g f o r finals, is s o m e t h i n g a n t i c i p a t e d t h r o u g h o u t t h e final hectic weeks of t h e s p r i n g semester. Classes c o n c l u d e at 3 p m , n u time t h e P i n e G r o v e is t r a n s f o r m e d . 1 h e c e n t e i o campus changes f r o m a tranquil m e a d o w into a tunfilled carnival a n d s u m m e r c a m p - e s q u e picnic. T h e a n n u a l P u s h race kicks oil t h e f u n with elaborately d e c o r a t e d p a r t i c i p a n t s p u s h i n g eac i o t h e r a r o u n d in s h o p p i n g carts. All over t h e G i o v e ,

Celebrating the end of classes

• • in f u n s t u d e n t s can p a r t i c i p a t e g a m e s such as s u m o wrestling, velcro walls, m e c h a n i c a l bulls, a n d bikes t h a t travel in a IOOD t h a t takes p a r t i c i p a n t s u p s i d e - d o w n . At t h e e n d of t h e clay s t u d e n t s least on h a m b u r n e r s a n d ice c r e a m b e f o r e settling d o w n to watch a "drive-in" style movie o n a p r o j e c t o r in t h e m e T r o v e T h i s day is a n o t h e r e x a m p l e of a u n i q u e H o p e College t r a d i t i o n , a n d s t a n d s as a truly g r e a t way to e n d t h e year.

Spring Fling

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T h e E n v i r o n m e n t a l Issues G r o u p at H o p e is a catalyst f o r e n v i r o n m e n t a l action in t h e College a n d H o l l a n d commuities. T h r o u g h e d u c a t i o n a n d action t h e g r o u p seeks to motivate individuals to u n d e r s t a n d , care for, a n d i m p r o v e t h e ecological conditions in t h e areas in which they live. T h e g r o u p strives to participate in events locally a n d globally t h a t m a k e t h e world a m o r e e n v i r o n m e n t a l l y f r i e n d ly place to live. E I G sponsors guest speakers, o r g a nizes t h e c a m p u s recycling p r o g r a m , takes p a r t in the I n t e r n a t i o n a l Coastal C l e a n u p a l o n g t h e s h o r e of Lake Michigan, a n d organizes E a r t h Week. Each s p r i n g they hold t h e E a r t h J a m concert o n c a m p u s in the Pine Grove. T h i s day starts with d u n e grass o r tree p l a n t i n g in the m o r n i n g followed by a n aftern o o n of local music, p o e m s a n d articles a b o u t p r e serving the e a r t h a n d o p p o r t u n i t i e s to get involved in local e n v i r o n m e n t a l activities.

.source;yhope.eou ironment This page, top to bottom, left to right: The Geology Club is one Hope group that appeared at Earth Jam. Becky Lathrop and Morgan Goersky share a laugh and Lemonjello's coffee. Joanie Coiner and Trevah Di Salvo enjoy the music. Tom Owens played at the event. J.J. Johnson

"Local bands with free organic food is a great way to love the earth." came to enjoy the music. Sarah Popovich looks on as her friend reads a book. Music, poetry, and raffles were all part of the show. Ritchie Latimore and Taylor Hughes relaxed on a blanket all afternoon. Trees were beginning to show signs of spring, which was fitting for a day celebrating the environment. Matt Rycenga and members of the Environmental Issues Group enjoy the memorable event they helped to plan. • all photos by Ashley DeHudy •

30

Student Life


Each spring, the Environmental Issues G r o u p hosts E a r t h J a m , a c o n c e r t in t h e P i n e G r o v e . T h e event takes place in April d u e to its p r o x i m i t y to E a r t h Day. F e a t u r i n g music, p o e t r y , a n d local a i t ists, this a n n u a l e v e n t also h e l p s to p u s h t h e g r o u p s agenda for increasing awareness about the environ T h i s y e a r , t h e e v e n t also f e a t u r e d tree coffee f r o m local s h o p L e m o n j e l l o ' s , o r g a n i c f o o d f r o m local bakeries, a n d a raffle that i n c l u d e d gift certificates to local businesses. It o c c u r e d a f t e r a week of events t h a t i n c l u d e d s p e a k e r s , b e n e f i t concerts, a n d

by Megan Purtee

f o r u m s to increase a w a r e n e s s a b o u t a m u l t i t u d e of issues. O t h e r environmentally-conscious groups w e r e also in a t t e n d a n c e , such as t h e Geology C l u b a n d t h e W o m e n ' s Issues O r g a n i z a t i o n . I n years past, r a i n has d r i v e n t h e celebration into t h e Kletz, b u t this year a s u n n y a f t e r n o o n with w a r m s p r i n g t e m p e r a t u r e s was t h e p e r f e c t setting f o r this r e l a x i n g day of music a n d activism.


The Theatre Department collaborated with visiting p r o f e s s o r a n d d i r e c t o r Sean Dooley, to p u t o n t h e 17th-century play, " T h e Illusion." T h . s play written by F r e n c h playwright Pierre Corneille a b o u t a f a t h e r ' s s t r u g g l e with his lost son. T h e f a t h e r . P r i d a m e n t , goes to a s o r c e r e r n a m e d A l c a n d r e a n d asks h e r to h e l p h i m find his son, C l i n d o i . T h t o u g h magic, A l c a n d r e paints t h e p i c t u r e of w h e r e his son is a n d t h e kind of mischief b e is c u r r e n t l y in. Pi idam e n t learns in t h e e n d t h a t t h e illusions h e saw w e r e

to t h e show; s o m e by s h a v i n g t h e i r h e a d s , o t h e r s by s t e p p i n g o u t of t h e i r c o m f o r t z o n e in t e r m s of cost u m e s , o t h e r s by l e a r n i n g a new, h e i g h t e n e d language. . . ^ Reggie H a n e y , a s e n i o r with a m a j o r in musical t h e a t r e , p l a y e d C l i n d o r a n d reflects b a c k o n his e x p e r i e n c e with Dooley a n d t h e show; This was a g r e a t e x p e r i e n c e . . . T h e w o r k f r o m every cast m e m b e r , every p r o d u c t i o n t e a m m e m b e r , a n d every crew m e m b e r m a d e this w o n d e r f u l p r o j e c t s p e c t a c u l a i . 1 was pleased to e n d my y e a r with this show."

b a s e d on t o p of m o r e illusions. Actors d e d i c a t e d themselves by Kat Ramsey


A c o m e d y written by William S h a k e s p e a r e , "Love's L a b o u r ' s Lost" follows t h e K i n g of Nav a r r e a n d t h e m e n of his c o u r t as they swear off all distractions (especially w o m e n ) in favor of intellectual p u r s u i t s . H o w e v e r , t h e Princess of F r a n c e a n d h e r a t t e n d i n g ladies i m m e d i a t e l y a n d as t h e m e n p u r s u e t h e m , hilarity e n s u e s . D i r e c t o r Sean Dooley told PR "I have f o u n d 'Love's L a b o u r ' s Lost' to b e t h e m o s t lighth e a r t e d of S h a k e s p e a r e ' s c o m e d i e s , o w i n g m u c h to 'A M i d s u m m e r N i g h t ' s D r e a m . ' " T h e play was set i n t h e a c a d e m i c w o r l d of t h e 1920's (see below q u o t e f o r m o r e u n i q u e touches). Says Dooley, " T h e play is filled with clowns a n d lovers w h o s e i n e p t i t u d e leads to m u c h m e r r i m e n t . "

iMffiMnnH by Megan Purtee

Opposite page, top to bottom, left to right: Kat Ramsey plays the sorcerer Alcandre. Katherine Finkbeiner as Lyse comforts Reginald as Clindor Chad Coe, playing Matamore, is wearing only one glove • photos by John Armstrong •This page, top

"Our wooing doth not end like an old play; Jack hath not to bottom, left to right: Rachel Achtemeier, as the Princess of France, leads the ladies (Kendra Stock, Jennifer Blair, and Heather Janofski) in their efforts to confuse the men. Adam Carpenter and Cody Masalkoski try to decipher the women's love notes. Dane Clark wrestles over the love notes. Jeff t a m p e n ponders his love woes. Eric Van Tassell (front) leads Jeff tampen, Adam Carpenter, Cody Masalkoski, and Jocelyn Vammer in a plot involving the women. • photos by John Armstrong •

Theater Productions

33

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Directing and acting p r o -

fessor, Daina Robins, g u i d e d f o u r y o u n g w o m e n t h r o u g h difficult roles p o r t r a y i n g two w o m e n , b o t h d u r i n g c h i l d h o o d a n d a d u l t h o o d . Actors K a t e G o e t z i n g e r (Adult Patsy), W h i t n e y T h o m a s (Francesca), L a u r a V a n Tassell ( Y o u n g Patsy), a n d Barb r a Rubio (Marie) t r a i n e d h a r d to d e v e l o p g e n u i n e c h a r a c t e r s over t h e five-week r e h e a r s a l p e r i o d , while R e a g a n C h e s n u t (Stage M a n a g e r ) h e l p e d to g u i d e and plan the entire experience. F r o m t h e first r e a d - t h r o u g h until t h e last p e r f o r m a n c e , t h e r e was a sense of love a n d com34

Student Life

m i t m e n t f o r t h e show. It was n o t u n c o m m o n to see r e m e m b r a n c e s of t h e text backstage or to h e a r t h e cast a n d crew q u o t i n g t h e lines. G u m d r o p s b e c a m e t h e favorite p r e - s h o w snack, a n d b e c a m e a cast tradition to w a r m u p with t h e h o k e y p o k e y b e f o r e eac i performance. , i• r "Perfect Pie" c o n c e r n e d t o u g h subjects ot t r a u m a , r a p e , love, a n d rejection, a n d so faculty a n s t u d e n t s c a m e t o g e t h e r a f t e r each p e r f o r m a n c e or a talk back session. T h i s p r o d u c t i o n was p r o d u c e w i t h o u t fear a n d strived to touch b o t h a u d i e n c e a n d artist alike.


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Opposite page, top to bottom, left to right: Barbara Rubio and Laura Van Tassel share stories. Kate Goetzinger, playing the adult version of Patsy, Van Tassell's character, argues with Whitney Thomas as Francesca. Barbra Rubio, as Marie, had become a world-famous opera singer. Kate Goetzinger, as Patsy, comforts Francesca, played by Whitney Thomas. All four characters wrestle each other in a powerful scene. This page, top to bottom, left to right: Kelly Sina as Madame Mathieu seduces Jon Sprik, the prince. Alyssa Garcia-Bauer and Isaac Droscha play flirtatious horses. Ritchie Latimore argues with the prince over the horse race. Ritchie Latimore and

//

The play is a beautiful story of what it means to be different."

Jeff Lampen listen to Jon Sprik, now older. Kelly Sina and Brandon Ruiter smile at the end of their love song. • photos by John Armstrong •

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v»;

'^ •

O p e n i n g t h e T h e a t e r D e p a r t m e n t ' s 20052 0 0 6 season, S t r i d e r is based on a Leo Tolstoy story of life seen t h r o u g h t h e eyes of S t r i d e r , a p i e b a l d h o r s e . C h a r a c t e r s i n c l u d e o t h e r horses in t h e stable, as well as S t r i d e r ' s m a s t e r a n d p e o p l e h e e n c o u n t e r s . T o a d d to t h e f u n , t h e m a s t e r ' s story closely r e s e m b l e s t h a t of his h o r s e . I n o r d e r f o r t h e actors to t r a n s f o r m t h e m selves i n t o horses, they s p e n t t h r e e weeks acting t h e p a r t of a n a n i m a l . T h e y c o n c e n t r a t e d o n t h e differences between horse and h u m a n movement, a n d also p l a y e d h o r s e g a m e s in t h e Pine G r o v e . . Love triangles, life h a r d s h i p s , a n d facing m o r t a l i t y wove t h r o u g h o u t t h r e e stories in this w o r k , with a realistic look o n t h e trials of love. Theater Productions

35


This page: top to bottom, left to right: Serenading from above, the chapel choir evokes a sense of grandeur in the Dimmnent Chapel. Participating students perform at all four Vespes performances. Chelsea Kramer sings in the chapel choir. Also from the balcony, members of the flute choir perform. David Lee plays the viola in the Symphonette. The chapel choir sings a Christmas carol. Opposite page: top to bottom, left to right: Candles carried by Emily Nelson and Katie Card mark

5

"A SO.

' • i

"I love the beautiful tradition that is Christmas Vespers." the beginning of the concert. Professor Brad Richmond conducts the chapel choir. Jeff Brown sings in the chapel choir. Sean Daezner plays the organ in the program. Chapel Choir sings in their traditional robes. • all photos courtesy of PR •

9

gl L o o k i n gBJ J

ource: Hooe PR

Thousands of members of the Holland and Hope communities gather for Vespers services each year. For many families, the event has been a highlight for generations. Christmas Vespers was first held in 1941. The program was sponsored, the "Anchor" noted at the time, by the college's Musical Arts club as the first of a series "designed to give music students ol Hope an opportunity to perform in public and to bring to public attention the work of the music school. Vespers today takes place on a scale that 1941 s organizers could scarcely have imagined. The college regularly starts receiving inquiries about tickets in August. Demand is so high that almost all those available to the general public are sold during the first morning they are offered in mid November. 36

Student Life

*

\


by Megan Purtee

A Hope tradition for more than 6 0 years, C h r i s t -

mas V e s p e r s takes place o v e r four c o n c e r t s 111 0 days at t h e b e g i n n i n g of D e e e m b e r . H o p e s College S

m

h o n e

e

' t l S ;

t sold

S

S

. : 1 Au-

» t h e g e n e r a l public

d u r i n g t h e firs, m o r n i n g they a r e o f f e r e d in

a l

Chorus, Chapel Choir, y P " ' organists p e r f o r m to s o l d - o u t c r o w d s in D i m n e n t Memorial Chapel. c.mrlav C h r i s t m a s V e s p e r s was first h e l d o n S u n d a y , Dec 7 1941 at 4 p . m . — o n l y h o u r s aftei 1 nese h a d a t c k e d P e a r l H a r b o r . A p p r o x i m a t e l y 500 attendeth

iu t h e m a k i n g . T h e college

h a s e x p a n d e d to

f o u r to a c — d a c e l d e m a n d o v e r half a c e n t u r y

m i d

"

m

a

s

v e s p e r s is also f e a t u r e d o n PBS

stations a n d r a d i o stations a r o u n d t h e ™ u " [ . , b r o a d c a s t r e c e i v e d a Michigan E m m y for Multiple C a m e r a Field Directing in 2004. H u n d r e d s of s t u d e n t s p a r t i c i p a t e t h r ™ 8 s i n g i n g a n d playing i n s t r u m e n t s , a n d t h u s t h e t r a d . tion lives on. Christmas Vespers

37


The warm potpourri of freshly brewed coffee and warm pastries right out of the oven fill your senses when you first walk in the door. You turn and look over your shoulder just in time to see the sun start to shine through the window to say good morning. Most people only get to experience this once in a while, but as a JP's employee, I get to experience this almost every day. JP's is a local 8th street coffee shop critically acclaimed for it's world famous coffee and baked goods. It is the place many local residents, students, and entrepreneurs come to meet, socialize, and study. JP's, along with other local coffee venders, seems to be the fuel this college and town run on. In the past decade JP's has made itself known as not only a topnotch coffee shop, but it has become a landmark, safehaven, and an absolute necessity to all departments, students, and anyone else just looking for a boost.

rv.

m s i a e 100

by Christopher Maybury

Top to bottom, left to right: Lemonjello's coffee shop opened a new addition this year. • The striped awning invites students into JPs. • Students read in the sunny Pine Grove. • Sophomore Anne Hoekstra studies for a psychology test. •

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Studying is like a party, only except totally the opposite

38

Student Life

Spanish homework occupies freshman Brittany Ryzenga in the Kletz. • Overlooking Gilmore, this rotunda is popular for study groups. • Students read for their government class. • Chemistry homework is done in a science lab. • Sophomore Rick Rivera takes a break at work to print a report for his business class. • The Science Center's couches provide downtime between labs. • Senior Bethany Metters studies while working at Student Development. • photos courtesy of Tally Reeverts & Megan Purtee •


a n d study carrols for h o u r s of r e a d i n g a n d note-takIn the midst of s t u d e n t activities, participating in sports, a n d juggling i n t e r n s h i p s with p a r t - t i m e j o )s, many H o p e s t u d e n t s barely h a v e time for their original p u r p o s e h e r e ; to learn. P r e p a r i n g for classes outside the academic setting can be difficult, a n d students o f t e n find themselves reviewing n o t e c a r d s b e f o r e chapel a n d finishing a c c o u n t i n g h o m e w o r k while a n s w e r i n g p h o n e s at work. F r e s h m e n a n d seniors alike travel outside t h e n d o r m s a n d cottages to find a place to concenti a e. Newly-opened c a m p u s facilities such as the Science C e n t e r a n d M a r t h a Miller p r o v i d e a m p l e a r m c h a i r s

Tust a few blocks f r o m c a m p u s , m a n y 8th street business offer comfortable booths a n d tables to spreac o u t (see sidebar by Chris Maybury). T h e r e c e n t additions to local coffee shops such as Lemonjello s a n d )P's have c e m e n t e d these two h a n g o u t s in the m i n d s of H o p e students as g e n u i n e study spots. H o p e College takes p r i d e in its identity as an instit u t e for h i g h e r education, a n d the students h e r e p r o v e they are serious a b o u t their classes.

Finding


In 2 0 0 5 , t h e v e r y s u c c e s s f u l Legacies: A V i s i o n o H o p e Capital C a m p a i g n c a m e to a fruitful conclusion with c o m m i t m e n t s t o t a l i n g n e a r l y $ 1 4 1 m i l l i o n , a l m ° d o u b l i n g w h a t t h e college's c a m p a i g n c o n s u l t a n t s initially t h o u g h t " m i g h t " h e possible. S e v e r a l b u i l d i n g p r o j e c t s h a v e r e c e n t l y b e e n c o m p l e t e d o n c a m p u s as a r e s u l t o that campaign.

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Years in the making, the magnificent A. Paul Schaap Science Center opened fully m the fafi o , transforming the west side of campus. A few blocks away both -he Martha Miller Center for Global Commnmcation and the Richard and Helen DeVos F.eldhouse likewise redefine the college to the east. All t h r e e p r o j e c t s w e r e c o r n e r s t o n e s ol t h e L t g a Paign'

cies c a m -

Students reap benefits of new buildings

a n d

reflects the generous support of thousands oi alumni, parents and friends ol the college. Hope College, however, is about much moie than bricks and mortar. Hope is about students who learn and grow within walls, on playing fields and the walkways in between. . .. c T h o u g h the campaign, when gauged by dollais raised was certainly a resounding success, the true measure of achievement is impact of those gifts on the lives they touch. It is an impact that will continue as the new buildings and the campaign's important enthusiasm on endowment provide space and resources that the entire Hope community can enjoy for decades.

their reallzatlon

source: Hope PR

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W h e n t h e college h i r e d t h e n e w Ticket Office & Event M a n a g e r f o r t h e new DeVos Field h o u s e , they knew w h a t they w e r e g e t t i n g . T h i s t y p e of work was n o t h i n g n e w f o r A n n e B a k k e r , a '85 H o p e g r a d u a t e w h o h a s b e e n active in t h e a r e a of s t u d e n t activities f o r m o r e t h a n 20 years. She was a d i r e c t o r of s t u d e n t activities f o r 15 y e a r s at H o p e College a n d at G r a n d Valley State University. T h e new a d d i t i o n of t h e f i e l d h o u s e to t h e college has m a d e a h u g e i m p a c t on t h e s t u d e n t s , t h e school, a n d t h e s u r r o u n d i n g c o m m u n i t y . Accordi n g to B a k k e r , she h a s h a d the privilege to o r c h e s t r a t e it all with t h e h e l p of h e r 50 plus s t u d e n t staff m e m b e r s . "I h a v e h e a r d n o t h i n g b u t g r e a t things. It, is such a h u g e i m p r o v e m e n t o v e r t h e Civic C e n t e r . P e o p l e simply love t h e b u i l d i n g , " said B a k k e r w h o coordin a t e d t h e f i e l d h o u s e s o p e n i n g c e r e m o n y on Nov. 11, 2005.

urn by Jason Cash

Opposite page, top to bottom, left to right: Media Productions II students, Kristin Rose and Jason Cash tape portions of the twice weekly live news show The Lakeshore Report, which aired on MacTV. The Fieldhouse was used for many purposes including graduation commencement practice. The jumbotron became an

//

Overall the response n has been tremendous.

attraction at the fieldhouse. Both the men's and women's basketball teams went undefeated in the fieldhouse. The Alumni Association held the Senior Celebration banquet in the fieldhouse. This page: The entrances to the new buildings greet visitors. Anchor advisor, Kathy Nathan, advises from the comfort of their new offices. The upper rotunda serves as a meeting area. Johanna Swanson works on show prep for The Lakeshore Report. Dew Crew members take ownership of the new DeVos Fieldhouse.

Devos Fieldhouse & Martha Miller Center

41


1

4>S^dte|

Pages 54-55: T h e new Martha Miller Center for Global Communication provides a new area for the International Studies Department to hold gatherings. These international students hang out in the Rotunda, a popular place for small get togethers, studying, and visiting. o

42

Academics

Pages 58-59: Theatre is a huge part of Hope's campus. T h e play "Strider" helped theatre students explore the task of becoming an animal. This play particularly moved from the "horse" world to the h u m a n world and showed the aspects of the h u m a n character.

Pages 62-63: Retiring f r o m fulltime professorship, Jack Ridl gives a poetry performance at Lemonjello's Coffeehouse as part of his new book of poems. Although Ridl is cutting back on his class load, he will still teach an advanced poetry class in the fall of 2006.


&C^d€l^«'CS

In her photography class, Laura Kinnas carefully decides which photographs to process for a project. As part of the Art Education track, Kinnas must become well-grounded in the many media of art as well as the practices and philosophies of education. • photo by PR •

•I

Divider


by Angela Saxton

T h e recently completed Martha Miller Center has been fully occupied this year. T h e building serves to house the departments of Communication, International Education, Modern and Classical Languages, and Multicultural Life. On October 14, 2005, a dedication ceremony marked the start of this collaborative effort between the four departments. They were brought together to implement a program for "Clobal Communication," which is designed to strive towards the goals of collaboration and global awareness in cultural understanding to develop student's inter-communicational skills. T h e Martha Miller Center was not only a means of department collaboration and global awareness, but for most students it is also a place to study and relax.


The M a r t h j Miller Center for Global Communication named A/ter the late Martha Miller, w h o not only a deep-ropted family foundation in the school but was a m e n d e r of the class of 1924 herself. She donated three million dollars to Hope as a "leadership gift." The building took 18 months, 12 million dollars, and 49,000 squar^ feet of premium Holland property to complete. • pho\o courtesy PR •

iHi

T h e building houses three c o n v e n t i o n a l spaces: t h e twin r o t u n d a s , located o n t h e first floor a n d s e c o n d floors, a n d t h e lounge. T h e M a r t h a Miller C e n t e r was d e v e l o p e d f o r t h e inclusiveness of H o p e College a n d to b r i n g s t u d e n t s t o g e t h e r in p r e p a ration f o r life a f t e r g r a d u a t i o n . A life h o p e f u l l y filled with t h e use of practiced a n d p e r f e c t e d c o m m u n i c a t i o n skills a n d a g r e a t e r appreciation for the differences that u n i t e us.

THE ROTUNDA The Rotunda of the Martha Miller Center is the most prominent characteristic of the building, as well as the focal point for the two wings. It also serves to accomodate the student life of the building. The tall circular rooms are home to very comfortable padded lounge chairs, a selection of hard tables, some paper easels, and even oversized bean bag chairs for the casual studier. The two-floor Rotunda is symbolically the anchor of the building, to relate the idea of four distinct departments coming together as one. Globally thinking, the Martha MillerCenter physically connects communication to international culture, student to student, and therefore student to world.

Martha Miller Center for Global Communication


The DeVos Fieldhouse is named after one of the five couples to contribute to the $22 million project. The other four couples have other various rooms named after them such as the DeYoung Volleyball Gymnasium. The wooden parquet floor is made out of maple trees from Michigan's Upper Peninsula, and actually "floats" making for a softer landing. Of the 3,200 seats, 850 of them are cushioned, and they are all as close to the floor as they can get, thanks to one of the steepest arenas around. • photo by Tally Reeverts •

I

'!!f K J i i f

iM

by Abigail Infante

Our House! "This is our house!" The words flank every entrance, shout from every speaker, and just emanate from the newly inaugurated DeVos Fieldhouse, For most attendees at the season opener for the men's basketball team, the world was orange for hours afterward. The infamous Dew Crew, sponsored by Mountain Dew, never sits down at any game and represents the spirit and the pride of the student section for Hope. With an estimated 4 0 0 members, the Dew Crew rocks the house of any team and especially their own. "Our House" always brings a sense of unity to the sporting events held there and will for many years to come.

46

Academics

T

he completion of the DeVos Fieldhouse brought many new resources to the college, all of which have contributed greatly to their respective recipients. However, the recently completed Devos Athletic Training Room has completely changed the shape of Hope's Athletic Training Program, from top to bottom. Not only has it opened the world of learning to all the students involved, but it has created a place where athletes can get the best treatment available. The new equipment has really changed the way the Certified Ath-


iMmSimh. -

letic Trainers and the Athletic Training Students can develop a rehabilitation program for an athlete. Tt keeps them active by providing cross-training in the SwimEx hydrotherapy pool, and offers diverse opportunities to perform the same exercise many different ways. T h e Training Room, located at the west end of the building on the first floor, is 3,500 square feet out of the 102,000 square feet that make up the Devos Fieldhouse. For the convenience of the Athletic

Training program and the athletes it serves, the Smith Weight Training Center is also on the first floor, adjacent to the Athletic Training room. Especially for the students, the convenience of two classrooms just upstairs from the Training Room provides the space for the classroom learning not far from the practical learning. T h e Devos Athletic Training Room has opened the door to an amazing world of learning for all of Hope College.

W

mm

WA DeVos Fieldhouse

47


Strictly speaking, the CrossRoads Project at Hope College strives to help students figure out what they want to do with their lives and how they can be of service to a much wider world. They describe their own mission as "Thinking Theologically About Career, Calling, and Life," and wish for their participants to leave the program with a better understanding of themselves, the world, and of God. Since so many students come to Hope without a vocational plan, an academic program such as CrossRoads is recieving quite a bit of business. The specific ideals expressed at CrossRoads will have many an impact for years to come.

ROAD LESS TRAVELED

by Nikolas Burkhart

T

h e C r o s s R o a d ' s Project is a relatively new p r o -

g r a m o n H o p e College's c a m p u s t h a t focuses e x p l o r i n g vocation f r o m a theological p r o spective. T h i s p r o j e c t ' s goal is to p r o v i d e o p p o r t u n i t i e s for stu-

mi

d e n t s to e x p l o r e how faith, c a r e e r , calling, a n d life a r e r e l a t e d . In late O c t o b e r , several H o p e s t u d e n t s took a b r e a k f r o m t h e i r hectic r o u t i n e s a n d set off to C a m p H e n r y in Newaygo, MI f o r a w e e k e n d r e t r e a t . While t h e r e , s t u d e n t s j o i n e d forces with

Samantha Miller, one of CrossRoads frequent attendees, contemplates her life's upcoming challenges at a CrossRoads gathering in an on campus cottage. This I meeting was one of many on campus and off, that prepared students through open cHcussion, Biblical studi e s , prayer, and input from ^Mchers. 'photo courtesy of W i e CrossRoads Project*

l48

Academics

PI *


others f r o m Calvin a n d Alma in an effort to discern p e r s o n a l callings. T h i s w e e k e n d was espedally g e a r e d to those with possible callings to l e a d e r s h i p a n d ministry. S t u d e n t s h a d the o p p o r tunity to interact with a panel of c u r r e n t seminary s t u d e n t s and e x p e r i e n c e d pastors to h e a r how the call to ministry took shape in their lives. I n addition to this, s t u d e n t s were led in a n u m b e r of spiritual exer-

cises a n d e n c o u r a g e d to s p e n d time in personal reflection. T h e insight g a i n e d o n the r e t r e a t was n o t j u s t limited to calling. In the words of H o p e f r e s h m e n , Nik B u r k h a r t , "This r e t r e a t really h e l p e d m e realize the scope of the Christian faith—that it's not j u s t isolated to o u r c a m p u s , or o t h e r colleges, b u t is really a m u c h larger thing."


by Larissa Mariano

w.

T

h e W o m e n ' s Issues O r ganization ( W I O ) e x p e r i e n c e d a season of renewal a n d invigoration this year at H o p e . T i m m e r Cottage, t h e W I O o n - c a m p u s h o u s e , started t h e y e a r with a d o n a t i o n of n e w f u r n i t u r e f o r t h e cottage's living r o o m w h e r e W I O meets. A f t e r H u r r i c a n e K a t r i n a struck t h e Gulf Coast, W I O r e s p o n d e d by co-sponsoring a benefit concert with t h e I n d i e Music Club. T h e c o n c e r t , p l a n n e d in j u s t u n d e r a week, raised over $500, con-

Academics

t r i b u t i n g m o r e to H o p e ' s pool of d o n a t i o n s t h a n any o t h e r student organization. WIO's a n n u a l l ake Back t h e Night e v e n t d r e w large c r o w d s of students and community members this fall; t o g e t h e r , p a r t i c i p a n t s walked t h e c a m p u s to reclaim it as a safe space for w o m e n . T h i s s p r i n g , W I O o r g a n i z e d self-defense classes f o r m e n a n d wome n o n c a m p u s , p r o v i d i n g an opp o r t u n i t y f o r t h e c o m m u n i t y to c o n f r o n t sexual violence. W I O also s c r e e n e d t h e film Invisible C h i l d r e n f o r a week in W i n a n t s A u d i t o r i u m , inviting t h e c a m p u s

/


to increase its a w a r e n e s s of t h e impacts of g e n o c i d e in Africa. At the close of t h e school y e a r , m e m bers of W I O also s u p p o r t e d t h e rally p r o t e s t i n g D r . J o h n H a n son's dismissal by p r o v i d i n g m e e t ing time a n d m a t e r i a l s to m a k e signs a d v o c a t i n g diversity a n d commemorating a much-loved professor. T h r o u g h o u t t h e y e a r , m e m b e r s h i p i n c r e a s e d a n d discussion flourished, as t h e g r o u p p l a n n e d f u t u r e events, d e f i n e d l o n g - t e r m goals a n d e n j o y e d t h e o p e n , feminist c o m p a n y .

This year, one of the Women's Studies biggest events was the Invisible Children walk and camp out in downtown Grand Rapids. The event was held on Saturday, April 27, 2 0 0 5 . Freshman Hilary Pitchlynn says of her feelings on the walk; "Any action 1 can take personally that can raise awareness to end such [human rights] violations is my duty as a decent human being and Christian." A total of 5 2 , 0 0 0 people from around the world marched on one night to support the children in Uganda, to experience what it might be like to be an "invisible child."

INVISIBLE C H I L D R E N

•r- •

he Women's Studies major at Hope College prepares w o m e n for more than just the day-to-day trials they may face as a woman. It prepares them leadership in order to become active members of ir community and of the world. Also, the course uirements help bring about a new sense of self for jstudent. An understanding of the world around hat is uneqivocally begat. • photos by Zach

Women's Studies

51


by Jake Boone

led c o n c e r t consisted of works in ballet, m o d e r n , jazz, tap, a n d

h e H o p e College D a n c e Department continued

T

h i p - h o p , a n d was a t r e m e n d o u s success. The fall s e m e s t e r

to grow this year with

u s h e r e d in t h e arrival of two

over 100 s t u d e n t s e n r o l l e d .

guest teachers, J a c k i e Bird a n d

M a n y m a j o r s a n d m i n o r s took

J o n L e h r e r . Each guest t e a c h e r

u p w a r d s of six o r seven d a n c e

c h o r e o g r a p h e d a piece f o r t h e

classes, all c o u n t i n g f o r o n e credit a n d r e q u i r i n g over f o u r

n e x t concert, Dance 32. T h e a u d i t i o n e d concert, p e r f o r m e d

h o u r s of class time p e r week. As

in the DeWitt T h e a t e r , nearly

in all of t h e fine arts, d e d i c a t i o n

sold o u t all t h r e e nights. O n the

was key. T h a t dedication paid off in t h e d e p a r t m e n t ' s first con-

final night, H o p e College Dance D e p a r t m e n t a l u m gave a t r i b u t e

cert of t h e year, t h e fall S t u d e n t Dance Concert. T h e student-

to M a x i n e D e B r u y n , t h e f o u n d e r of t h e d e p a r t m e n t . Rehears-


Dance 32 is the most celebrated and anticipated dance show of the year. This year was the 32nd annual production choreographed by Hope faculty and preformed by Hope dancers. The Dance Department currently has 89 Dance majors and 33 Dance minors. Hope is only one of three liberal arts colleges in the nation that is fully accredited in Dance. •Photo by Zach Trumble*

als for t h e S p r i n g S t u d e n t D a n c e concert w e r e well u n d e r w a y shortly a f t e r t h e e n d of D a n c e 32. The second s t u d e n t - l e d d a n c e concert was especially l a r g e this year since t h e D a n c e C o m p o s i tion class consisted of o v e r 4 0 students, with each c h o r e o g r a p h ing a piece. T h i s final p r o d u c t i o n c o m p l e t e d a n o t h e r successful year for t h e D a n c e D e p a r t m e n t .

HIP HOP CLUB Hip Hop Clubber Amanda Piagnarelli only goes to Hip Hop Club because she likes to dance. This club has up to 40 attending members at a time, all of different backgrounds and majors. Other campus programs that are attended strictly for fun include the Pom Pon squad, groups such as Young Life, Student Congress, the Pull team, or Nykerk. These extra-curricular activities are great for students w h o just want to get away from their studies for awhile and meet new people. The fact that 90% of these groups do volun- , teer work says that they are working on reaching out to more than just the Hope Community.

Dance


ction of llternational students and alumni gath^i at the Inlprnational Student A l u m n i Reception. W i t h m o s l a l u m n i chocising to stay in the U n i t a l States.atlong as possible after their education a Hope, they usually love to speak w i t h the 1 c u r r e t l i t m j A a l s . • photo coutesy of International |StudiqsB|partm^nt •

•^1

by Stelios Alvarez

' M A K I N G A DIFFERENCE" With a total of 33 different countries represented in the International Studies Department, a worldly education is guaranteed. Coming from countries such as Trinidad or even Cameroon, the international students at Hope find themselves engulfed in real American culture. With little time to learn English and high expectations, Hope provides a challenging array of course options for the international student becoming domestic, or the domestic student wishing to study topics of international concern, Hope officially offers over 6 0 countries for students to study abroad in, covering every major of study. And with more than 100 off campus options on 6 continents, the International Studies Department is touching far more than the outskirts of the Earth.

T

he International Education D e p a r t m e n t is a prime e x a m p l e

of H o p e C o l l e g e ' s dedication

to multicultural e x p o s u r e and e m b o d ies the values of a liberal arts educa-

tion. With valuable and c o m m i t t e d staff m e m b e r s , this department serves as a bridge b e t w e e n cultures. The yearly show entitled " I m a g e s " highlights the cooperation between students of various horizons and d r a w s a sizeable crowd of interested Holland c o m m u n i t y m e m bers and Hope College students. T h e d e p a r t m e n t also sets itself apart f r o m

54

Academics W-

.


the strict academics in that it of-

C o m m u n i c a t i o n also stresses the

fers numerous activities and social

C o l l e g e ' s esteem for international

gatherings so that international

contact in the hope to further global

students and 'traditional' Hope

communication. Observing the

students can get together and have

changes in our global society, Hope

a great time. Whether huddled

College continues to strengthen ties

around pizza, packed in a Hope van

with global community in keeping

for a field trip, or simply relaxing in

with the mission of Hope College.

the International Lounge; students

The International Education Depart-

express their innate desire to learn

ment serves as a window of hope

from one another's cultures and

in a world that becomes closer and

points-of-view. The move f r o m the

smaller every day.

Fried International Center to the Martha Miller Center for Global


W r i t t e n by: J a i m e Richards The Pre-Professional Program at Hope is not only preparing students for their particular professional field, but also for life. With a thorough education in the sciences, english, arts, and mathematics, students wishing to go on to graduate schooling have much more of a firm basis for excellence. Whether it be is law, journalism, social work, veterinary medicine, or any of the other sixteen pre-professional programs, students leave Hope competent and compassionate people. Although the requirements for entering various professional schools differ greatly, Hope is consistently preparing pre-professional students for a much wider world.

SO SPECIALIZED

The students attempting to go on to grad school realize early on in their studies that it will lot of w o r k to get there. Most students a a professsional school, are preparing for through jobs in their intended field, ov extensive time doing summer research. Emily Southard •

56

Academics

T

h e Pre-Health Profess i o n a l p r o g r a m s at H o p e College have b e e n r a t e d as o n e o f t h e b e s t in t h e n a t i o n . S t u d e n t s i n v o l v e d in t h e p r e - p r o f e s s i o n a l p r o g r a m s at H o p e know that they have received an extensive education that has p r e p a r e d t h e m for m a n y types of professional school. Admittance into any category o f p r o f e s s i o n a l s c h o o l is v e r y high for H o p e graduates. T h e S u d e n t s involved with the pre-professional programs


a r e well i n f o r m e d a n d a d v i s e d as to w h a t c o u r s e s to t a k e , and what type of p r e p a r a tion is n e e d e d t o a c h i e v e a hiffh O score on the e n t r a n c e exam for professional school. W i t h i n t h e first y e a r at H o p e , s t u d e n t s m e e t with P r e - P r o fessional a d v i s o r D r . M u n g a l l to discuss t h e t y p e s of r e q u i r e ments and recommendations n e e d e d to h e s u c c e s s f u l in t h e s t u d e n t ' s a r e a of i n t e r e s t . W h e t h e r it is i n t h e M e d i cal, D e n t a l , P r e - V e t , L a w , o r any o t h e r p r e - p r o f e s s i o n a l p r o g r a m s at H o p e , t h e r e a r e specific g u i d e l i n e s laid o u t so

that the s t u d e n t knows what classes a r e r e q u i r e d f o r t h e n e x t level of s c h o o l i n g , a n d w h a t classes d o n o t n e e d to b e t a k e n . A l o n g w i t h class r e quirements, the students are also told w h a t e x t r a c u r r i c u l a r activities will i n c r e a s e t h e i r c h a n c e s of b e i n g a c c e p t e d to a p r o f e s s i o n a l s c h o o l , s u c h as volunteering and job shadowing. O v e r a l l t h e P r e - P r o f e s sional p r o g r a m s h e r e at H o p e a l o n g with t h e h a r d w o r k of t h e s t u d e n t s allow f o r a succ e s s f u l e x p e r i e n c e w h e n tryi n g to b e a d m i t t e d to a p r o f e s sional school.


by Whitney Thomas he whole of Hope's T h e a t r e Department de-

T

plored the world of Shakespeare's

voted hours this season to

Love's Labor's Lost.

various hard-hitting aspects of hu-

student productions this season.

m a n nature. In the first production

Coffee Bar, written by senior

of the year, students explored their

NoahDavid Lcin, launched the

animalistic side, becoming horses

audience into a world filled with

in Strider. Later in the season,

betrayal, dependence, and twisted

magic graced the stage as a cast

friendship, while Spinning Into

developed the story of T h e Illu-

Butter opened the difficult topic of

sion. In the second semester, four

racism in schools similar to H o p e

women faced difficult memories

College.

presenting plays that illuminated

and harsh realities in Perfect Pie,

The production "Strider" was put on using 10 theater majors, with their own scene, lighting, and sound crews, trained at Hope. Although the play only ran for 2 weeks with 6 showngs, there were record attendances for the year. • photos by Zach Trumble •

Academics

and a larger cast Jubilantly ex-

T h e r e were also two

T h r o u g h o u t this past


school year, the d e p a r t m e n t produced shows that push real issues into the lime light. W h e t h e r it was through a story illuminating mortality or young love, a story of d e e p friendship or the social mirages of life, students b e c a m e the story-tellers of our time.

The productions in the Theatre Department were five very powerful and controversial productions. From dealing with racism on a small college campus in Spinning Into Butter, to dealing with the sense of self in Perfect Pie, the Theatre Department showed more than their share of worldly concern. Even though the department does not directly reach out into the world through their productions, they do in a way by making their audience think about themselves seriously. Terribly graphic productions such as The Illusion, aid in this "changing the world" attitude as well. Bringing audience members out of Holland, Ml and into the real world.

PERFECT AS PIE?


Written by: Patrice Roberts

T

he 2005-06 year was a great year for Psychology d e p a r t m e n t faculty a n d students alike. Faculty members excelled in class as well as outside of class, and students worked h a r d on their research. Dr. T o m Ludwig was the recipient of the Charles L. Brewer Distinguished Teaching of Psychology award f r o m the American Psychological Foundation, which honors professors for excellence in the teaching

of psychology. Dr. David G. Myers published a book called What God Has Joined Together: A Christian Case for Gay Marriage, as well as n u m e r o u s other publications. Dr. Charlotte VanOyen-Witvliet, who does extensive research in the area of forgiveness submitted two j o u r nal articles for publication in two peer-reviewed journals, and they were published in 2005. Dr. Lorna Hernandez-Jarvis also had an article published in a peer-reviewed j o u r n a l on her family research. Dr. Charles

Academics m i i

i i —i

J


Summer independent research students Tyler Boonstra and Patrice Roberts, look over their research with Dr. Sonja trent-Brown. The professor watches over about seven students in their indepepdent research, wbich is about average for the^professors in - " " w n m e r r e ^ a r c h stuctTes. Illllll#l1

pHl0fW75yTTHTryllll3outh"ci • v

<

> : I.... -x

i

W. G r e e n was the recipient of the V a n d e r b u s h - W e l l e r Award, which is an a w a r d that h o n o r s professors for their dedication and positive impact o n students. Dr. Scott V a n d e r S t o e p was also a p p o i n t e d the new Psychology D e p a r t m e n t chair for the 2006-07 academic year. S t u d e n t achievements include f o u r MPA regional awards for the quality of their u n d e r g r a d u a t e research u n d e r the g u i d a n c e of Dr. Jarvis a n d Dr. J a n e Dickie, a n d o n e s t u d e n t received the National American Psychological Association research award u n d e r the g u i d a n c e of Dr. Dickie.

DEEPER STUDIES The students of the Psychology Department are not only majors in psychology. They are better people. Better people because of an intensive program starting with basic theories in psychology, to practical experiences in internships, and finally to faculty-involved research. Students can receive psychological expertise for use in fields such as mental health, social work, medicine, ministry, law, and education. They also can participate nationally in the honor society for psychology majors, Psi Chi. In the photo left, Patrice Roberts wraps up a day of studying sound waves for her summer research.

Psychology

61


Professor Jack Ridl, known for his love of poetry, was one of the founders of the Visiting Writer's Series in 1985 which brings other published authors to Hope College to read, speak, and share their experiences.

by Megan E. H u n t

OPUS! OPUS is a Hope College student-run literary magazine that publishes once each semester. Beyond this basic function, OPUS strives to nurture and promote an artistic community at Hope College. This involves many aspects: interacting with the greater West Michigan artistic community through both attending and hosting events such as poetry readings or art shows, bringing students together to dialogue on the personal views concerning all aspects of art, hosting workshops for student art, publishing and promoting student work biannually, providing students with an opportunity to gain experience in the industries of editing and printing, and much more.

62

Academics

Every year in the b e g i n n i n g of April, the H o p e College c a m p u s is magically blanketed with poetry overnight. Early risers can find little pieces of p a p e r taped to signs, in b a t h r o o m stalls, a n d on the backs of classroom chairs. Sometimes, m o n t h s later, those who are lucky will find a p o e m that the custodial staff missed, tucked in a c o r n e r or between the pages of a library book. When stumbling across these little pieces of literature, t h e discoverer is often perplexed. W h e r e did these poems a p p e a r f r o m ? Why are they there? April is National Poetry Month, the perfect time for poetry lovers


to share their favorite p o e m s with the rest of the s t u d e n t body. T h e s e poetry blitzers a r e comprised of c u r r e n t a n d past poetry students, their friends, and o t h e r lovers of the written word. Late at night, they stealthily go f r o m building to building, leaving b e h i n d a trail of stanzas, r h y m e s , a n d poetic lines, h o p i n g to catch the eye of an u n s u s p e c t i n g passer-by. 1 his year, the poetry blitz continued t h r o u g h o u t the entire m o n t h of April. O n c e a week, a small g r o u p of poetry s t u d e n t s met on the w e e k e n d , stacks of poetry in h a n d , to celebrate

their favorite poets a n d cover buildings on c a m p u s with small copies of their favorite pieces. Operating under pseudonyms like Mikhail Gorbachev, J u d a s , Acer, a n d Albatross, the g r o u p kept the poetry blitz alive all t h r o u g h National Poetry Month. Even t h o u g h p o e m s all over c a m p u s m i g h t not be something that everyone loves to see, most of the c a m p u s appreciates overnight delivery of a b e a u t i f u l art in written f o r m . It's an event that faculty, staff, a n d students look f o r w a r d to every year.


By; Emily Southard For an art major, studying abroad is not quite like most other majors. Where most majors require greater amounts of studying, a studio art major merely requires time, creativity, and a lot of space. Therefore, art majors must find all of those in one internship. Whether in the New York Arts Program, the Chicago Semester, the Philidelphia Center, or even a semester in Vienna or Paris, art majors find themselves delving into art of the past, present, and future. What do all of these places have in common? They all provide a kind of learning environment that cannot be found on a college campus: real, practical experience.

ABROAD ART

T

he Art and Art History Department this year has been looking in through its two student shows and faculty show in the DePree Art Gallery, as well as reaching out through the Gallery's feature of a Michigan photographer working in the Sudan and an infamous local stained glass artist. Hope is different than most of the other schools accredited by the National Association of Schools of Arts and Design because of its liberal arts education. Art majors at Hope have countless opportunities to learn about their craft from their teachers' own studios and works, as well as

tjp^imost popular classes aep ment is basic photography, which has [oiaagiFnta lo^7 far the most sought-after. TaughUb.vifirefessQn Nelson, the basic photogra|Djj^ from any feiici of study explejg creative enough to step into' and "capture." • photos countes^i ment •

64

Academics ru.v*.

•.'>I

.Q"-


through the works constantly coming through the Gallery. The liberal arts education gives students a history of their field through the twelve credits of art history they have to take, but also through the effect that the arts have had on the sciences, education, politics, or communication. Majors are also required to take almost every basic course offered, with the understanding that each course has something to benefit the next, and then up to the third course level in their chosen concentration. In every course students benefit greatly from group critiques, input from experienced but understanding

ÂŁ *

faculty, and a high creative energy that runs throughout the historically creative building that is the DePree Art Center.


M l a t you need to know about Jack Jack grew up in the worlds of sports and the circus. His father was the basketball coach at Westminster College and the University of Pittsburgh. Jack was a point guard

and a shortstop. He spent a lot of his time with his cousin who was a circus man. Jack's poems often reflect these influences, as does his teaching!

1>TrATvM There a r e s o m e p r o f e s s o r s whose classes a n d i n v o l v e m e n t m a k e H o p e College a b e t t e r place to be. English D e p a r t m e n t p r o f e s s o r a n d p u b l i s h e d poet, Jack Ridl, is o n e of those. A m e m b e r of H o p e ' s faculty since 1971, Ridl has certainly left his m a r k . I n 1985, h e was o n e of t h e f o u n d e r s of t h e Visiting W r i t e r ' s Series which b r i n g s o t h e r p u b l i s h e d a u t h o r s to H o p e College to r e a d , speak, a n d s h a r e their e x p e r i e n c e s . Ridl has received a n u m b e r of a w a r d s d u r i n g his years at H o p e : H o p e O u t s t a n d i n g Professor Educator A w a r d (1976), Michigan's P r o f e s s o r of t h e Y e a r (1996), Favorite Faculty/Staff M e m b e r (2003). H o w e v e r , m o r e i m p o r t a n t t h a n these a w a r d s is t h e fact that Ridl has b e c o m e a favorite a m o n g his s t u d e n t s . His passion f o r writing a n d his love for his s t u d e n t s a r e l e g e n d a r y . A n y o n e w h o has t a k e n o n e of his p o e t r y classes knows that it is an incredibly special e x p e r i e n c e w h e t h e r t h e y ' r e a p a r t of his May t e r m class or his b e g i n n i n g , i n t e r m e d i a t e , a n d a d v a n c e d p o e t r y classes. Ridl always has a kind w o r d a n d e n c o u r a g i n g advice to s h a r e w h e n n e e d e d . T h e r e ' s also his u n d e n i a b l e e n t h u s i a s m f o r p o e t r y a n d the process of writing. S t u d e n t s w h o have taken p a r t in his classes learn to love a n d a p p r e c i a t e t h e e n t i r e creative process t h r o u g h his g u i d a n c e a n d t h r o u g h t h e safe space that his p o e t r y classes b e c o m e . J a c k is o n e of those teachers that will b e impossible to forget.

Ridl academic

support

center

Left to right: Janet Pinkham, Jacqueline Heisler, Lisa Lampen, David James

66

g f t

art

h i s t o r Vi

Front, left to right: Kristin Van Haitsma, Jennifer Gardiner-Lam, Carol Mahson Second row: Steve Nelson, John Hanson, Bill Mayer, Pedar Dalthrop, Katherine Sullivan, Judy Hillman, Bruce McCombs

Academics . -i-nrira1-1


0 t

0

)

Front row, left to right: Joan VanHouten, Leah Chase-Waller, Christopher Barney, Aaron Best. Second row; Virginia McDonough, Kathy WinnettMurray, James Gentile, Lori Hertel, Gregory Fraley, Donald Cronkite, Timothy Evans, Debbie Swarthout, Thomas Bultman, Gregory Fraley.

Front, left t o right: Stephan Taylor, Moses Lee, Michael Seymour, Leah Chase, Elizabeth Sanford, Graham Peaslee. Second r o w : Toni Brown, Pat Ramon, Traci Smith, Nicole Brinkman, Joanne Stewart, Maria Burnatowska-Hledin, Hilary Mackay,. Third r o w : Robert Clark, Brent Kruegar, Kenneth Brown, Sheldon Wettack, Jason Gillmore, Michael Silver, T o d C u g i n o , W i l l i a m Polik,

communication

Front row left to right: Dr. Teresa House!, D a w n DeWitt-Brinks, Dr. Deirdre Johnston, Isolde Anderson. Second row: Dr. Christian Speilvogel, Dr. James Herrick. Not Pictured: Rebecca DeVries, Dr. David Schock, Rob Pocock.

crossraods

Left to right: Kristen Johnson, Dr. Charlotte VanOyen-Witvliet, Dr. Nancy Miller, Joanne Stewart, Michelle Bombe, Dr. Steven Bouma-

Left to right: Herb Dershem, Charles Cusack Ryan McFail, Matt Dejongh, M i k e Jipping.

en

n eer i n

Front row, left to right: Roger Veldman, John Krupczak. Second row: Miguel Abrahantes, Michael Misovich, Jeff Brown.

Prediger, David Cunningham.

Department Photos

67


Front row, left to right: Carla Vissers, Julie Kipp, Jennifer Young, Stephen H e m e n w a y , Jesus M o n t a n o . Second r o w : Kathleen Verduin, Heather Sellers, Peter Schakel, Maria Lunderberg, Elizabeth Trembley, Barbara Mezeske. Back row: Curtis Gruenler, W i l -

Front row, left to right: Brian Bodenbender, Suzanne DeVriesZ i m m e r m a n . Back row: Graham Peasiee, Jonathan Peterson, Edward Hansen

liam Pannapacker, Myra Kohsel, David Klooster, Rhoda Janzen, John Cox.

1St 0 r HUl'l. con H.I <

Front row, left to right: Gloria Tseng, Nokuthula Cele, Jeanne Petit. Back row: Marc Baer, Janis Gibbs, Tamara Van Dyken, Fred Johnson III, Albert Bell.

Front row, left to right: Karla Wolters, Eva Dean Folkert, Margaret Frens, John Patnott, Tonia Gruppen, Anne Bakker, Steven Smith. Back row: Richard Ray, Raymond Smith, Kirk Brumels, Kevin Cole, Mark Northuis, Michael Ricketts, Jeff Armstrong, Dean Kreps, Becky Schmidt, Leigh Sears.

Front row, left to right: Gloria Slaughter, Rachel Bishop, Pat O'Brien, Priscilla Atkins, )ane Currie. Second row: Carla Kaminski, Michelle Kelley, Jan Zessin, Patti Carlson, |ohn Hoyer, Chris Nelson, David O'Brien, Patricia Murphy. Back row: Brian Yost, Colleen Conway, John Dykstra, David Jensen.

Front row, left to right: Darin Stephenson, Elvis, Tim Pennings, John Stoughton. Back row: Nathan Tintle, Mark Pearson, Todd Swanson, Airat Bekmetjev.

68

Academics


What you need to know about Bruce

Bruce McCombs received his BFA from the Cleveland Institute of Art and his MFA degree from Tulane University. Bruce actively displays his prints and paintings nationally and internationally. Most recently, his work has [ appeared in shows in Norway, Taiwan, Columbia and Yugoslavia. Bruce's

artwork has been procured by many permanent collections both nationally and internationally, including The Cleveland Museum of Art, The Whitney Museum of American Art, the Library of Congress in Washington D.C., and the National Museum of Fine Arts in Hanoi, Vietnam,

ml

T o m a n y H o p e College s t u d e n t s , B r u c e M c C o m b s is k n o w n as t h e real realist. T o s t u d e n t s l o o k i n g f o r t h e i r g e n e r a l e d u c a t i o n credits in art, h e is k n o w n as t h e "really g o o d d r a w - e r t o f r i e n d s a n d colleagues h e is m e r e l y B r u c e . B r u c e s t a r t e d at H o p e College in 1969, a d r a w - e r , a p r i n t e r , a n d a n artist, h e quietly m a d e his way into t h e h e a r t s of his successive classes. Alter a few years as a m a s t e r p r i n t m a k e r , a n d most likely tired of t h e black a n d white w o r l d , B r u c e o p e n e d u p his "Pleasantville" eyes, to a glass of w a t e r , a new set of C o t m a n W a t e r c o l o r s , a n d a new w o r l d . H e b e g a n his j o u r n e y in w a t e r c o l o r a t t e m p t i n g to still b e involved in p r i n t m a k i n g , b u t f i n d i n g himself m u c h too d r a w n , h e leapt with faith into t h e w a t e r c o l o r w o r l d . N o t k n o w i n g if his d r a w i n g skill w o u l d c a r r y h i m as it h a d so well in p r i n t m a k i n g , h e w o r k e d a n d w o r k e d o n his c o l o r i n g skills, as well as his "wet-into-wet" t e c h n i q u e , continually w o r k i n g a n d r e f i n i n g . N e v e r h a v i n g b e e n a fan of t h e art critique, h e was p l e a s e d to f i n d t h a t m a n y p e o p l e e n j o y e d his u n i q u e perspectives o n c e r t a i n aspects of t h e i r lives t h a t they h a d m a n a g e d to overlook. F r o m cars o r trains, city-scapes o r H o p e College scapes, B r u c e M c C o m b s c a p t u r e d t h e o n l o o k e r s ' eyes a n d h e a r t s f r o m all over t h e w o r l d to r i g h t h e r e in H o l l a n d . W r i t e n by: Emily S o u t h a r d

Brucc McCoiiSiy music

Front row, I to r: Julia Randel, Margaret Kennedy-Dygas, Linda Dykstra, Andrew Le. Back row: Brian Coyle, Mihai Craioveanu, H u w Lewis, Robert Hodson, Blair Martin, Charles Aschbrenner, Richard Piippo.

n u rs i n

Front row, left to right: Catherine Clarey-Sanford, Paulette Chaponniere, Vivki Voskuil. Back row: Deb Sietsema, Amanda Barton, Tamara George, Nancy Barnum, Susan Dunn, Melissa Westerhof.

Department Photos I

69


Left to right: Jack Mulder, James Allis, Andrew Dell'Olio, Caroline Simon, Anthony Perovich, Jr.

Left to right; Peter Conthier, Mark Little, Paul DeYoung, Catherine Mader, Kevin Gardner.

o l i t i c a l

science

ochlmq

Front row, left to right; James Zoetewey, Annie Dandavati, Jack Holmes. Back row; Jeffrey Polet, David Ryden, Joei Toppen.

Dr. Patricia Roehling, psychology professor a n d d e p a r t m e n t chair, has been at H o p e since 1987. She received h e r B.A. f r o m the University of Michigan a n d h e r M.A. a n d Ph.D. f r o m Wayne State University. H e r research interests include: psychotherapy, alcohol abuse, eating disorders, a n d work a n d family issues. In 2005, h e r book T h e C a r e e r Mystique; Cracks in the American Dream was published a n d won the 2005 Award for Excellence in Professional a n d Scholarly Publishing. It was n a m e d the best book in the category of Sociology a n d Social Work. Dr. Roehling is an ad hoc reviewer for H u m a n Relations, J o u r n a l of Abnormal Psychology, J o u r n a l of Studies on Alcoohol, J o u r n a l of Occupational Health Psychology, a n d Sex Roles: A J o u r n a l of Research. She also teaches I n t r o d u c t i o n to Psychology, Behavior Disorders, Organizational Behavior a n d Clinical Psvcholosrv. Written bv: Patrice Roberts

/Vhat youabout need to know P 3.t f a ICI

70

Academics

':)a^r'c'a h a s ^ w o Alex, who is a freshman at the University of Michigan and Julia, who is a junior in high school. Her

non-academic interests include running (she completed the Chicago Marathon in 2 0 0 4 ) and other outdoor activities.


r ovo s

Left to right: M. Cristina Williams, Alfredo Gonzales, James Boelkins, Lannette Zylman.

0 I0

Front row, left to right: Scott Vanderstoep, Sonja Trent-Brown, Charlotte VanOyen-Witvliet, Brian Sims. Back row: Kathy Adamski, Jane Dickie, Patricia Roehling, David Myers, Lorna Hernandez-Jarvis, Thomas Ludwig, John Shaughnessy.

r e

Front row, left to right: Doug Dygas, Jon Huisken. Back row: Maura Reynolds, Merrie Bannick, Carol De Jong, Sharon Hoogendoorm.

SOCIO

Left to right: Donald Luidens, Debra Swanson, Lisa Lampen, Deborah Sturtevant, Melissa Villarreal, James Piers.

o n

Front row, left to right; Lynn Japinga, Boyd Wilson, Steven Hoogerwerf, Andrew Yan. Back row: Jeff Tyler, Steven BoumaPrediger, Barry Bandstra, Wayne Brouwer, Phillip Munoa, Kent Van Til.

student development

Front row, left to right; John Jobson, Matt D'Oyly, Shane Ostermeier, Richard Frost, Health Services, Dale Austin. Back row: Elissa Lappenga, Wilma Hart, Louise Shumaker, Terri Schamper, Cindy Sabo, Kristen Cray, Betsy Cibbs, Trudi Hansen, Cindy Vogelzang, Megan Niergarth, Jody Sheldon, Libby Bocks, Ellen Awad.

Department Photos

71


stand Pages 94-95: Marcus V a n d e r H e i d e shoots a t h r e e - p o i n t e r for a n o t h e r Moutain Dew bottle on the wall. T h e men's basketball team fell o n e g a m e short of playing in the Sectional C h a m p i o n s h i p . T h e Flying D u t c h m e n e n d e d their season with an impressive 28-3 record.

72

Sports

Pages 74-75; Marie DePetris overpowers h e r o p p o n e n t to gain control of the ball. In their winningest season in H o p e history, the women's soccer team m a d e it to the NCAA t o u r n a m e n t . This year, H o p e shared the MIAA title with Calvin College. H o p e gained an at-large berth in the t o u r n a m e n t .

Pages 98-99: T h e lucky n u m b e r for the men's golf team isn't 7 or 13—it's 17. This year, as in 1987, 1988 and 2000, the Dutchmen placed 17th in the Division III NCAA t o u r n a m e n t . T h e tournam e n t was held in Lincoln, Nebraska, a n d Hope's highest scorer was T o m m y Yamaoka at 36th place.


Going up for the basket, Megan Noll evades the Denison defense. Noll played 20 minutes of the Hope Dutch's 25th consecutive victory. Just the first game of the post season, the Flying Dutch went on to sweep the Division III Women's Basketball Tournament, bringing a First Place trophy to Holland.


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Senior Erica Pagorek slide tackles the ball and helps her team reach a 2-0 shut out against Saint Mary's, photo by Zach Trumble*

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team broke season^ictory record

T h e Flying Dutch started their season off with a blazing f o u r game shutout streak against Elmhurst, Illinois Wesleyan, and MIAA o p p o n e n t s Kalamazoo, and Saint Mary's. Continuing to remain s u p r e m e in the MIAA, they dominated a 2-1 victory over Alma, and swept Alma and Olivet in shutouts. T h e i r longest winning streak in history came to an end (2-0) in a showdown between arch rival Calvin, the only other unbeaten MIAA team. However, the Dutch struck back with a n o t h e r series of shutouts, this time five in a row, four of which were MIAA games. Avenging the earlier loss to Calvin, the Flying Dutch beat the Knights 2-1 tying for first place in the MIAA. T h e race for the MIAA Championship was on as H o p e posted their 16th victory tying the school record. T h e Dutch went on to break that record with 18 wins posting a MIAA record of 15-1. This record tied them

for the MIAA Championship, sharing the crown with rival Calvin. T h e Flying Dutch suffered a tough first r o u n d loss in the NCAA Division III t o u r n a m e n t to DePauw, Indiana (5-4). Both teams were scoreHope 2 Kalamazoo 0 less t h r o u g h 120 minutes of regulation and overtime forcing a one-on-one Hope 2 Saint Mary's 0 penalty kick showdown. T h r e e players were Hope 2 Albion 1 presented all-region Division III honors, Hope 4 Alma 0 d e f e n d e r Rachael Saue r m a n (07), midfieldHope 3 Olivet 0 er Ellie Tresslar (08), and goalkeeper Holly Nestle (07). This is Calvin 2 Hope 0 the largest n u m b e r of H o p e honorees in a Hope 3 Adrian 0 single season.

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Top to bottom left to right: Senior Kendall Aliber looks for a pass in a shutout against Davenport. Jumping over her opponent, Senior Marie DePetris heads the ball to Lauren Stieper. Double trouble Kristine Krcmar (#12) and Linnae Klompmaker (#13) put the squeeze on two St. Mary's players. Hope goes on to win 2-0. Negeen Masghati, team captain and midfielder, dribbles the ball down the field. • photos by Zach Trumble •

Hope 7 Tri-State 0 Hope 2 Saint Mary's 0 Hope 2 Albion 0

Front row left to right: Tricia Miedema, Kayla Fryczynski, Negeen Masghati, Rachael Sauerman, Erin Dargis, Kendall Aliber, Tess Scholtz; middle row: Elisa Tresslar, Sarah Cochrane, Lea DeWitt, Stephanie Bylsma, Holly Nestle, Lauren Peters, Stefanie Haba, Julia Fischer, Ashleigh McNeil, Lindsey Cole; back row: assistant coach Gretchen Tanis, assistant coach Kate Thayer, Lauren Stieper, Marie DePetris, Catie Neidlinger, Erica Pagorek, Kristine Krcmar, Emily Tyler, Dawn Gillam, Linnae Klompmaker, Amanda Friedline, assistant coach Lindsey Engelsman, head coach Leigh Sears

Hope 2 Alma 1 (ot) Hope 2 Olivet 0 Hope 2 Calvin 1 Hope 7 Adrian 0 Hope 3 Tri-State 0 Hope 5 Kalamazoo 0 Women's Soccer

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Top to bottom, left to right: Senior and team captain Geoff Meyer, honored as the MIAA 2005 Most Valuable Player, takes a shot. Devin McNeil, Hope's other team captain, also a senior, was named a NCAA Division III AilAmerican player. Goal keeper Kevin Butterfield blocks a shot and helps the Dutch win 9 MIAA shut-out games. Controling the ball down the field, Junior Bain Rumohr assists his team in a 2-0 victory over John Caroll. • photos by Zach Trumble • }*

Front r o w : N a t b a n a e l V a n H o r n , Kevin M c M a h o n , Jordan C o o per, D a n i e l Cbesney, Bryan Johnson, D e v i n M c N e i l , Brady Jensen,Gunnar M a r t i n . M i d d l e r o w : Karter Klingenberg, Bain Rum o h r , Kevin Butterfield, M i c h a e l A m e r m a n , M a r k D i s b n o w , Patrick M c M a h o n , Jordan G o o r h o u s e . Back r o w : C o a c h Lee S c h o p p , Kevin M c M a h o n , C o a c h Steve Smith, Ryan Robleske, John Bradf o r d , M i t c h e l l Currie, Jeff Carlson, G e o f f M e y e r , D a n Tressler, Joey O r r , Phil Lepper, Craig Root, Jack A b e , Trainer A n d r e w H i c i c k , Trainer Beth Gleason.

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Senior Karter Klingenberg shoots in a goal to assist his team to a 2-0 shut-out against John Carroll Klingenberg scored 12 goals this season tying him for league leader in goals scored. • photo by Zach Trumble

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T h e men's soccer team had a recordbreaking fall season. Led by a solid g r o u p of six seniors, die Flying Dutchmen broke the single season winning streak record of 12 wins. After starting the season with one win Hope 2, Albion 1 and two losses, H o p e won 15 straight games and clinched the MIAA championship. Hope 7, Adrian 0 Other highlights of the year included an unprecHope 1, Tri-State 0 edented 9-0 victory over league rival Kalamazoo and winning the WilmHope 3, Olivet 0 ington College soccer tournament. Hope 3, Kalamazoo 1 Not only did the team break the winning streak record, but Calvin 4, Hope 0 senior captain Geoff Meyer tied the single Hope 6, Alma 0 season assist record for

by Bain Rumohr

the MIAA with 13 assists in 14 games. Meyer also earned NCAA First T e a m All American, NCAA All Region, and was voted MIAA MVP by the league's coaches. Senior Devin McNeil earned NCAA Second T e a m All American, NCAA All Region, and MIAA First Team for the third consecutive year. Other All MIAA First T e a m members included senior Karter Klingenberg, sophomore Dan Tressler, junior Pat McMahon, and senior goalie Kevin Butterfield. Senior Bryan Johnson was voted Second T e a m All League, and Honorable Mention All League recognition was awarded to senior Phil Lepper, junior Craig Root, and junior Bain Rumohr. In a close game, the team lost in the first r o u n d of the NCAA tournament to finalist Gustavus-Adolphus, the Flying Dutchmen worked hard to improve each game, and show the nation that "Hope plays, Hope wins. Men's Soccer

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1st place - Vanderbilt Cross Country Invitational

T h e women's cross-country team had a very strong year with many great performances. T h e team, consisting of 26 women, began the season with a big win at their h o m e course, Ridgepoint Church in Holland, a n d kept the m o m e n t u m going t h r o u g h out the season. Led by Lisa Peterson, A m a n d a Huck, Leslie T a b l e m a n , and Kelli Zoellner, the team stormed t h r o u g h the mass of competitors. T h r o u g h heat and h u m i d ity, rain and m u d , frost and cold, the women kept mentally tough and

worked hard. T h e team traveled to Ohio, Wisconsin a n d other parts of Michigan to compete against a variety of strong Division T h r e e schools. T h e women placed second in the MIAA Conference a n d had seven All-Conference awards, finishing in 11th place out of 31 teams in the region.

2nd place - Aquinas Invitational

2ncl place - League Jamboree

6th place - Lansing CC Invitational

by Alison M e j e u r

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Leading the pack: H o p e runners Amanda Huck, Anne Hoekstra, Leslie Tableman lead the pack at the beginning of the race, contributing to the 2nd place finish at the Aquinas Invitational.'photo by Zach Trumble*

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9th place - Harriers Test Dill Championship

5th place - Oshkosh Invitational

2nd place - MIAA Championship

11th place - NCAA Great Lakes Regional

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Front row, left to right: Jessica Previch, Emily Wandell, Brietney Lewis, Alison Mejeur, Leslie Tableman, Heather Kamps, Natalie Dall'Olmo, Sara Omanson, Kinsi Hower, Claire Tyner; middle row: Leah Koopmans, Katie Greenland, Holly Creving, Mackenzie Snyder, Lydia Hartsell, Cayla Henn, Lisa Peterson, Barbara Schornstein, Kelli Zoellner, Anne Hoekstra, Amanda Huck; back row: Sarah Multer, Ashley O'Shaughnessey, Holly Beckerman, Kate Freshour, Katie Robinson, Andrea Costing, Laura Jackson, Britta Trepp, assistant coach Kristen Post, assistant coach Bryan VanZanten, assistant coach Rick VanderVelde, head coach Mark Northuis.

Top to bottom, left to right: Heather Kamps rounds the corner of the final stretch of the course. As a 2004 All-MIAA first teamer, Kamps brought a lot of experience to the team. Anne Hoekstra passes a struggling Albion/Alma runner. Hoekstra placed 3rd in the season opener Vanderbilt Cross Country Invitational. A pack of Hope runners pushes forward on a hot, sunny day. Nearing the end of the course, Sarah Multer finishes strong. She won All-MIAA first team honors and placed 17th at the MIAA Championships. • photos by Zach Trumble*

Women's Cross Country

79


1st place - Vanderbilt Cross Country Invitational

6th place - Aquinas Invitational

2nd place - League Jamboree

Left t o right: f r o n t r o w : M a t t Casillas, Justin Blazek, Kyle Barnes, Kyle W i l l i a m s , Tyson W a r n e r , Ryan W e a v e r , Sean D e r b y , Jeff W e b e r ; m i d d l e r o w : Jason T o d d , N i c k Z e n d l e r , B r a n d o n Theaker, Jon Kay, C o l i n Lawrence, James Ralston, Alex W o o d , Seth W e e n e r , Samuel Baker, Carl M o r r i s o n ; t o p r o w : Ryan Ritter, Robert Bailey, Paul V a n d e r V e l d e , Z a c h a r y King, D a n i e l Sultz, Sanders Frye, Ben W a l k e r , A a r o n K e n e m e r , Ryan Ter L o u w , Assistant C o a c h Brain V a n Z a n t e n , Assistant C o a c h Kristen Post, Assistant C o a c h Rick VanderVelde, Head Coach Mark Northuis.

7th place - Lansing CC Invitational

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Top to bottom, left to right: Carl Morrison (09) works hard while running up a hill while being encouraged by head coach Mark Northuis. Justin Bazek (06) steadily makes strides through the middle section of the course. Kyle Barnes (05) and Seth Weener (08), named one of the Most Improved Runners, keep pace with each other up a large hill, using the buddy system for motivation. Matt Casillas (06) focuses on the runner in front of him, looking to pass. Casillas was the top Hope finisher at Harriers Test DIM Championships Course, coming in at 53rd. • photos by Zach Trumble*

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Sports


8th place -Oshkosh Invitational

2nd place - MIAA Championships

This year's Dutchmen men's cross country team started off their season with a bang; the team won the Vanderbilt Invite, sharing the title with the women's team for the first time in seven years. T h e

9th 1place - Great Lakes Regional 0

f"" "" for the National Championship as they raced in Michigan, Ohio, and Wisconsin throughout October. Among these competitions was the Oshkosh Invite, during which the men were within striking distance of four nationally-ranked teams. In

November, they gained second place in the conference behind the defending national champions, Calvin College. Seven of the men were named to the All-MIAA team. They arrived at the regional competition with high hopes of a nationals berth, but unfortunately their top seven runners faced injuries and fatigue. In spite of the loss, the future remains bright, thanks to a group of promising underclassmen who have improved their running with leaps and bounds.

by Kyle W i l l i a m s

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Jeff Weber (06), Alex Wood (07), and Aaron Kenemer (07) run as a pack at the Vanderbilt Crown •photo by Zach Trumble

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CI by Tony Kreucher Cheerleading requires dedication, energy, and trust; this past season, Hope's team d e m o n s t r a t e d all of these qualities. During August, the team showed their dedication by attending a cheerleading camp, sponsored by Universal Cheerleading Association (UCA) at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois. H o p e competed in three competitions in the Small Coed Division while at camp. T h e y e a r n e d a first place trophy in the Cheer competition and second place trophies in the Sideline and Fight Song competitions. Lead by coaches Wes Wooley and Anne Slaughter, this past cheerleading season was the longest in four years, lasting f r o m Hope's football season in the fall t h r o u g h Hope's basketball season, ending in the NCAA t o u r n a m e n t in March. During a dramatic men's basketball game at Wit82 Sports

tenberg University, Hope's cheerleaders led their fans to overpower the h o m e crowd. With only six team members r e t u r n i n g f r o m last season, H o p e a d d e d nine new cheerleaders. Alter some roster changes d u r ing football season, captains 1 st place - Small Coed Rachel Streelman (06) and Division at Americheer WinAm a n d a Scheeringa (08) ter Open Nationals led the team to grow in skill a n d trust t h r o u g h out the basketball season. T h e f u t u r e looks great for the cheerleading team, as College Grand only two members, RaChampions Americhel Streelman and T o n y cheer Winter Open Nationals Kreucher, are graduating, leaving six freshmen and six sophomores.

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Top to bottom left to right: Tony Kreucher (06) wakes up the crowd at a Hope football game. Team captain Rachel Streelman (06) cheers for the Dutchmen at a home football game. Alicia Voyles (08) raises a sign during a basketball game in the DeVos Fieldhouse. Emily Mills (08) keeps the crowd interested during a timeout. • photos by Zach Trumble •

1 St place Cheer

- Universal Cheerleading Association Competition

Left to right; front row: Monica Martinez, Tiffany Timmer, Allison Rogowski, Stephanie Hansens, Tara Custin, Kandace VanDahm, Jenna Carlson; middle row: Karena Schroder, Lauren Oldfield, Rachel Streelman, Crystal Frost, Emily Mills, Vikki Craudins; back row: Assistant Coach Anne Slaughter, Alicia Voyles, Amanda Scheering, Tony Kreucher, Jon Wissink, Amanda Curtler, Laura Adams, Head Coach Wes Wooley.

2nd place Sideline/Fights o n g -Universal Cheerleading Association Competition

Cheerleading


Top to bottom, left to right: Placekicker Nate Barnett went 25 in a row on Points After Touchdown (PAT), extending his career total to 106. Running back TroyBlasius catches an interception against Adrian. David Booko, Running Back, fends off a tackle. Quarterback Joe Schwander wasn't afraid to run the ball and picked up 486 rushing yards this season along with 1,746 passing yards. • photos by Zach Trumble •

Front row, from left to right: Eli Cryderman, Josh DeHaan, Cabe Warren, A n d y D o u p e , Scott Creenman, Joe Schwander, Joe Diekevers, M a t t Erb, Dan Schofield, Justin Fitzgerald, A n d r e w McKay, Nate Barnett, Brady Wilson, Joe Kik, Dustin Fiddler; second row: Dave Booko, Matt Rugenstein, Brett Lucas, Colin Balas, Kevin Roschek, Lance Rogers, Jack N u m merdor, Joe Hensel, Brandon Kaiser, Kris Gillhespy, Nick Oostveen, Josh Thorington, Bobby Knight, Tim Carter, Derek Cooper; third row; Makana McCarty, M i k e Brusko, Chris Bowen, John Deuker, Jack Kiefer, Jacob Droppers, D r e w Weigl, Bryan Turner, Justing Caserta, Ryan Reynolds, Nick Crenke, Joey C o b e , D o u g VanEerden, Troy Blasius, Kevin VanderBosch; fourth row: D r e w Engels, Josh Kortas, Glenn Clarke, Josh Lanser, Josh Ullman, Jeremiah Budd, James Snyder, George Klupchak, Thad Goodchild, M i k e Kolanowski, Brent Solberg, John Noffke, Nick Florip, Brandon Clark; fifth row: Jason Copelin, Frank Felice, Joel Borst, Bobby Brown, Ben Smith, Keith Thompson, Erik George, Blake Carlson, Chris BanRyn, Jason Elzinga, Dean Klingenberg, D o u g Persondek, ChadRector, Steven Mostrom; sixth row: Ed Beyne, Casey Smith, Jeff Reardon, Josh Inman, Justin Csernai, Ryan Dykhouse, D r e w M o o r e , Ryan Costella, M a t t Diepenhorst, Tim Bassett, M a t t Glahn, M a t t Kirinovic, TJ Schutt; seventh row: Chris W e n d t , Aaron Wilson, Jeremiah Clements, Tyler Cortright, Brody Csernai, Jon O m a n , Mark Neitzel, Bryan Reiderbach, Kiel Reidenbach, Kevin Mill, M i k e Pass, M a t t Anderson, M i k e W i l b u r n ; eight row: Kyle Eurick, M i k e Mers, Luke Leinweber, Dan Salamango, Ryan Smith, Jake Manning, Greg Pavalk, Paul LaRue, Dakota Cousineau, Dan Burns, RJ Casey, Steve Stetson, Kurt Twichell, A n d y Vander Yacht; ninth row: D r e w M o o r e , Eric Ladomersky, A n d y Johansen, Zach Huizing, Sean Pope, Spencer Duits, Jono Krystiniak, Joel Wils, Joel Borst, Rick Rhodes, Andy Serrano, Jay Martello, Eric Adamczyk; back row; Dr. T o d d Harburn, trainer Kirk Brumels, student trainer All Young, student trainer Joe Banish, assistant coach Chad Miller, defensive coordinator Joe Knapp, assistant coach Chris Mendels, assistant coach Stu Fritz, head coach Dean Kreps, assistant coach Brandon Graham, assistant coach Jim D e H o r n , assistant coach D o u g VanderMeer, videographer D o u g W e h r m e y e r , e q u i p m e n t manager G o r d o n VanderYacnt, student trainers A m a n d a Friedfme, Alyssa Alsum.

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Hope 13 John Carroll 38 Hope 12 Depauw 38 Hope 7 Wheaton 48 Hope 38 Kalamazoo 7 Hope 24 Olivet 31 Hope 38 Wl Lutheran 7

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W i t h fans cheering, the Hope College football team enters the fielcr in traditional style, an intimidating wall of blue and orange. •photo by Zach Trumble •

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hi ted As 0 h € Playing As A Team T h e football t e a m e n d e d t h e i r season in s e c o n d place in t h e MIAA, with l e a g u e r e c o r d of 5-2 a n d 5-5 overall. For t h e t e n t h consecutive season, t h e D u t c h m e n w e r e .500 o r b e t t e r , a feat n e v e r m a t c h e d b e f o r e in H o p e ' s ninety-seven y e a r history of football. T h e o f f e n s e was a n c h o r e d o n t h e a r m of q u a r t e r b a c k Hope 42 Adrian 21 J o e S c h w a n d e r , a n d in t h e legs of s o p h o m o r e tailback Hope 0 Albion 34 David Booko. S c h w a n d e r finished t h e season with 1,746 y a r d s passing a n d Hope 42 Tri-State 10 4 8 6 y a r d s r u s h i n g , while Booko became the ninth tailback in H o p e history Hope 38 Alma 20 to r u s h f o r over 1,000 yards. H e also finished t h e season with a n MIAA l e a d i n g 11 t o u c h d o w n s .

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T h e s e a c c o m p l i s h m e n t s w o u l d ' v e b e e n impossible w i t h o u t t h e offensive line, lead by senior Josh D e H a a n , n a m e d for t h e second time to t h e All-MIAA First T e a m . Defensively, t h e D u t c h w e r e a n c h o r e d by All-MIAA First T e a m linebacker, j t m i o r Zach H u i z i n g , a n d s o p h o m o r e defensive e n d . Matt R e u g e n s t e i n , w h o c o m b i n e d for a n a s t o n i s h i n g 144 tackles, 12 of t h e m for a loss, f o u r sacks, t h r e e i n t e r c e p t i o n s a n d o n e f u m b l e recovery. T h e d e f e n s e also b e n e f i t e d f r o m j u n i o r Nick Oosteveen's 60 tackles a n d t h r e e interceptions, a l o n g with s o p h o m o r e T r o y Blasius' 50 tackles a n d six interceptions. For t h e special teams, senior place kicker N a t h a n B a r n e t t tied a n MIAA r e c o r d for most consecutive Points After T o u c h d o w n (PATs) with 30, a school c a r e e r r e c o r d for most PATs was 105. T h r o u g h t h e r e were m a n y individual a c c o m p l i s h m e n t s d u r i n g the 2005 season, t h e D u t c h m e n played as a t e a m , u n i t e d as one. 85 Football

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This past fall, the H o p e College W o m e n ' s Flying Dutch volleyball team posted a 27-8 record while c a p t u r i n g the MIAA league c h a m p i o n s h i p with a 16-0 league record, u n d e r the helm of secondyear coach Becky Schmidt. With a threeg a m e sweep over rival Calvin in their second match of league play, the Dutch e n d e d a 10-match winning streak held by the Knights dating back to the 2001 season. T h e Dutch c o n t i n u e d their success posting a 16-match winning streak. At o n e point they were r a n k e d f o u r t h in the Great Lakes region a m o n g NCAA Division 111 teams. O t h e r highlights included the set u p of a new t o u r n a m e n t coined the "Bord e r Battle" in which the MIAA teams of H o p e , Calvin, Alma a n d Kalamazoo

took on the NCAC teams in O h i o of H i r a m , O h i o N o r t h e r n , M o u n t St. J o s e p h a n d Wittenberg. T h e Hying Dutch were also r a n k e d sixth in fan a t t e n d a n c e in all Division H I schools. Coach Schmidt was n a m e d MIAA Coach of the Year a n d receiving All-MIAA First T e a m h o n o r s were senior Julie VanderSlice, j u n i o r A m b e r Hoezee, a n d j u n i o r Stephanie Poll. Lindsey Schaap received Coaches H o n o r able Mention a n d Shawna B u c h e received the O u t s t a n d i n g Contribution Award.

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Head coach Becky Schmidt gives the Dutch a pep talk, while also helping them correct their mistakes during a timeout. Second-year coach Schmidt was named the MIAA s Coach of the Year. • photo by Zach Trumble

Hope 3 Saint Mary's 1 Hope 3 Calvin 0 Hope 3 Adrian 2 Hope 3 Olivet 0 Hope 3 Tri-State 0 Hope 3 Calvin 1


Hope 3 Kalamazoo 0 Hope 3 Olivet 1 Hope 3 Adrian 1 Hope 3 Kalamazoo 0 Hope 3 Tri-State 0 From left to right front row: Sarah Thorne, Jami Rubin, Chelsea Schrotenboer, Katherine Chiczewski, Megan Winer; middle row: Deena Van Assen, Shawna Buche, Nora Slenk, Kim Brandes, Lindsey Schaap, Julie VanderSlice, Stephanie Poll, Amanda Novak; standing: head coach Becky Schmidt, Ashley Windemuller, Kim Cillhespy, Anna Brandes, Marianne Hinken, Courtney Galat, Amber Hoezee, Kylee Damstra, Jill Immink, Natalie Hoogeveen, Andrea Otto, manager Jen Ivanhoff, manager Sara Warner, JV coach Jean Kegerris, assistant coach Kathy Vis-Gross.

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Top to bottom, left to right: Natalie Hoogeveen watches the ball into her arms for the serve receive pass to the setter. Team MVP Julie VanderSlice blocks the rightside attack. Shawna Buche, the libera, anticipates the dig. Lindsey Schaap, a middle blocker, dominates the opposing middle hitter's spike. • photos by Zach Trumble •

Volleyball

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Hope 89 Saint Mary's 11

Hope 64 Olivet 47

Hope 124 Kalamazoo 104

Front row: Trisha Meier, Lisa Smith, Lisa Baran, Tiffany Fifer, Jennifer Carr, Brittany Reest, Katherine Mojzak. Second row: Assistant Swim Coach Jake Taber, Head Diving Coach Jim Mitchell, Lauren Reus, Lisa Ekdom, Sarah Diekevers, Carlie Annessa, Renee Sommers, Rachel Bakken, Heather Winchell, Head Coach John Patnott, Assistant Diving Coach Linsay Close. Third Row: Andrea Keller, Sarah Johnson, Laura Ansilio, Ashley Tillman, Erica VanGilder, Meghan DeWees, Meagan O ' N e i l .

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W Top to bottom, left to right: Lisa Ekdom mentally prepares herself for a race. Sarah Johnson comes up for air while s w i m m i n g the 200 Butterfly. S w i m m i n g the 500 Freestyle, Erica VanGilder pushes past the competition. Listening for the starter, Brittaney Reest takes her marks for the backstroke, ' p h o t o s by Zach T r u m b i e *

Sports


Over the whole season, Hope swam well, winning Hope 114 Albion 96 seven of their ten dual meet match ups. Led by senior captains Lisa Baran, Lisa Ekdom, Meagan O'Neil, Hope 123 Alma 104 Ashley Tillman, and Erica Van Gilder, the goal of a unified team was realized. As for invitational perforSecond Place- MIAA mances, the team finished Championships 5th in December at the Wheaton Invite and 1st at the Quad meet held here in Holland in J a n u a r y . February brought about the league meet, held at Jenison High School, where H o p e was crowned MIAA champions in six events and established two conference records set by j u n i o r Lisa Smith. Overall, H o p e took

a second-place finish to a strong Calvin team, naming many individual swimmers to the All-MIAA team, including seniors Lisa Ekdom and Meagan O'Neil, juniors Lisa Smith and Sarah Diekevers, and freshmen Andrea Keller and Brittney Reest. Continuing on to the national level, Hope's team, made u p of returnees Ekdom, Trisha Meier and Smith joined by rookies Laura Ansilio, Jenny Carr, Diekevers and Reest traveled to the University of Minnesota in March. They returned with Ail-American finishes by Smith in the 100 and 200 Butterflies; Trisha Reest in the 100 Backstroke; as well as the 400 Freestyle Relay team of Laura Ansilio, Ekdom, Meier and Smith. Hope also finished with Honorable Mentions by Smith in the 50 Freestyle and by the relay teams in the 200 Freestyle and 200 Medley Relays. by Lisa Ekdom

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IHi by Kurtis Blohm Men's Swimming enjoyed another successful season u n d e r J o h n P a t n o t t in his twenty-sixth year of coaching. A new MIAA rivalry e m e r g e d in t h e wake of H o p e ' s second-place finish to Olivet at t h e c o n f e r e n c e c h a m p i o n s h i p m e e t . H o p e was e d g e d by a score of 5 5 9 to 532, a n a r r o w m a r g i n of victory t h a t could have easily b e e n s w u n g by a single event. N e v e r t h e less, every single s w i m m e r a n d diver enj o y e d life-time bests at t h e m e e t , a n indication that t h e m e n r e a p e d t h e benefits of five m o n t h s of r i g o r o u s training. M e m o r a b l e season highlights inc l u d e d t h e m e n ' s 200 f r e e relay s m a s h i n g the t e a m r e c o r d by nearly o n e full second, a n d t h e m e n ' s 400 m e d l e y relay c o m i n g f r o m b e h i n d to beat t h e C o m e t s in a key MIAA race. T h e D u t c h m e n w e r e led by five captains, consisting of j u n i o r s J a k e H o l t o n , Kyle W a t e r s t o n e , J e f f H o l t m a n a n d Karl H o e s c h , a n d senior K u r t B l o h m , 90 Sports

t h e l e a g u e M V P a n d r e c o r d h o l d e r in t h e 50 a n d 100 freestyle. H o p e ' s NCAA qualifiers consisted of a five-man crew of B l o h m , H o l t o n , Jeff Vroegindewey, Chas Vanderb r o e k a n d Ryan Vogelzang. T h e m e n finished sixteenth overall Hope 110 Olivet 133 a f t e r several Ail-American relay p e r f o r m a n c e s i n c l u d i n g a historic consolation final in t h e 4 0 0 f r e e relay in which t h e Hope 130 Kalamazoo 105 m e n w e r e t o u c h e d o u t by t h e E m o r y Eagles. Despite m a n y pre-season d o u b t s , t h e Hope 130 Calvin 102 05-06 D u t c h m e n f o u g h t a n d e a r n e d their spot in H o p e s w i m m i n g history, a long tradition of nation6th place - Wheaton ally recognized s t u d e n t Invitational athletes. T h e b a r was set for f u t u r e H o p e swimmers.

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Top to bottom, left to right: Kevin O'Brien takes one last breath before hurtling to the finish. S w i m m i n g the butterfly, Brad Lininger helps his 400 medley relay team win the heat at Albion, 'photos by PR* Kurt Blohm, an NCAA Ail-American, views Wb&SK the water as he steps up on the block. Jeff Vroegindewey taking his marks for backstroke, his leg of the 400 medley relay. • photos by Zach Trumble •

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4 Hope 1 30 Albion 92

Back Row: Abram Clas, Ron Lindow, Jeff Vroegindewey, Lucas Osterbur, Chas VanderBroek. Middle Row: Diving Coach Jim Mitchell, Austin Dreyer, Jacob Cook, Nicholas Hinkle, Thomas Akers, Wade Engers, Kyle Waterstone. Front Row: Assistant Swimming Coach Jake Taber, Brad Lininger, Joshua Delo, Gregory Reznich, Daniel Gardner head coach John Patnott, Assistant Diving Coach Lindsey Close.

Hope 110.5 Alma 83.5

2nd Place MIAA Championships

16th place NCAA Championships Men's Swimming & Diving

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Top to bottom left to right: Joanne Stewart looks for a pass at the top of the key, Megan Noll drives to the hoop against Calvin. Jennie IntVeld dribbles toward the hoop. Bria Ebels drives past a Calvin defender. • photos by Zach Trumble •

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Seated from left to right: Jordyn Boles, Brieann Bryant, Courtney Knox, Linda Ebels, Ellen W o o d , Stacy Warsen, Kate Reincke, Lindsay Lange, Julie Henderson, Becky Bosserd; standing: head coach Brian Morehouse, JV coach Colleen Corey, assistant coach Becky Sutton Klinger, Bria Ebels, Kaitlyn Kopke, Jennie Intveld, Joanne Stewart, Sarah Jurik, Megan Noll, student assistant coaches Abbey Tucker and Morgan Hughes, assistant coach Colly Carlson, assistant coach Dean Morehouse.

Hope 77 Saint Mary's 38 Hope 82 Albion 78 Hope 95 Tri-State 55 Hope 81 Adrian 47 Hope 82 Olivet 60 Hope 64 Calvin 54 Hope 76 Alma 69 Hope 69 Albion 50

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The NCAA Division III national champions celebrate their win! • photo courtesy PR

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B e f o r e t h e first g a m e of t h e 2 0 0 5 - 2 0 0 6 season, t h e H o p e College w o m e n ' s basketball t e a m sat in t h e b r a n d new locker r o o m in Devos F i e l d h o u s e a n d listened to t h e magical w o r d s of t h e Dr. Sness b o o k , " O h t h e Places You'll Go." 71 Tri-State 32 C o a c h B r i a n M o r e h o u s e envisioned a season of g r e a t n e s s f o r his t e a m , a n d his players 90 Kalamazoo 44 p r o v e d u p to t h e task. H o p e o p e n e d with 103 Adrian 67 t h r e e wins, b u t t h e n suff e r e d a n early season loss 70 Olivet 56 to W h e a t o n College. T h i s f o r c e d t h e w o m e n to 71 Calvin 46 r e f o c u s o n w h a t h a d won t h e m games: defense, rebounding, and taking 71 Alma 49 c a r e of t h e basketball. H o p e w e n t 16-0 d u r i n g 91 Saint Mary's 66 t h e league's r e g u l a r season, t h e n won t h r e e h o m e

g a m e s d u r i n g t h e MIAA t o u r n a m e n t to clinch t h e a u t o m a t i c bid to t h e national t o u r n a m e n t . T h e y f e a t u r e d t h e league's best scoring a n d r e b o u n d i n g offense, a l o n g with t h e best t e a m d e f e n s e . T h e Flying D u t c h played six g a m e s o n t h e r o a d d u r i n g their r u n to the 2006 NCAA Division III National C h a m p i o n ship. T o u r i n g t h r e e states over t h r e e w e e k e n d s , t h e Dutch battled against u n r u l y crowds, l o n g bus trips a n d s u p p o s edly h i g h e r r a n k e d o p p o n e n t s . H o p e ' s season e n d e d full of accomplishments. T h e D u t c h won t h e r e g u l a r season l e a g u e title, a l o n g with t h e MIAA t o u r n a m e n t c h a m p i o n s h i p . Coach M o r e h o u s e was h o n o r e d as t h e W B C A Division I I I C o a c h of t h e Year. H o p e tied t h e rec o r d f o r m o s t wins in a season (33) while b r i n g i n g h o m e t h e ultimate h a r d w a r e . T h e t e a m ' s d e f e n s e continually shut d o w n Ail-Americans f r o m o t h e r teams. Women's Basketball

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This year, H o p e College's basketball teams finally h a d a place to call their own - the new Devos Fieldhouse. Led by senior captains Andy Phillips, G r e g I m m i n k , a n d Jeff Carlson, the Flying D u t c h m e n went u n d e f e a t e d on their new h o m e couVt. Supp o r t e d by their h o m e victories, the Dutchm e n finished with a 28-3 record, setting a new school record. T h e D u t c h m e n finished second in the MIAA r e g u l a r season to rival Calvin College. Revenge was e a r n e d , t h o u g h , when the D u t c h m e n won the MIAA t o u r n a m e n t with a 68-55 victory over Calvin in G r a n d Rapids. H o p e a n d Calvin played again a week later in the NCAA t o u r n a m e n t w h e r e H o p e forced a last-second miss to win by t h r e e points. H o p e ' s season e n d e d at Witt e n b e r g University in Ohio, w h e r e an amazing comeback a t t e m p t fell short in an NCAA "Sweet Sixteen" m a t c h u p against the Wittenberg Tigers. Andy Phillips of White

Pigeon, Mich., a n d G r e g H o p e 78 Kalamazoo I m m i n k became the 28th a n d 29th players to score 1,000 or m o r e points H o p e 78 Olivet finishing with 1,200 a n d 1,113 points respectiveH o p e 58 Albion ly. Phillips a n d I m m i n k j o i n e d senior t e a m m a t e H o p e 73 Calvin Eric Voisin of Suttons Bay, Mich., on the AllMIAA first team. H o p e 77 Adrian T h e Flying Dutchm e n r e t u r n 12 varsity playH o p e 85 Alma ers for next season, including starters S t e p h e n C r a m e r (07) a n d Marcus V a n d e r h e i d e H o p e 75 Tri-State (08). T h e next season will be coach Glenn Van Wieren's 30th as h ead coach. T h e team a n d coaches would like to t h a n k their fans, especially the Dew Crew, for the s u p p o r t they have given t h r o u g h o u t the season.

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H o p e 91 Kalamazoo 63 H o p e 75 Olivet H o p e 74 A l b i o n 55 H o p e 58 Calvin 59 H o p e 79 Adrian 61 -•

H o p e 90 A l m a 46

Front row from left to right: Jeff Carlson, Scott Richardson, Patrick Woolpert, Stephen Cramer, Greg Immink, Tim Partridge, Brett Jager, Tyler Wolfe, Ryan Klein; back row; head coach Glen Van Wieren, coach Craig Kopas, coach Matt Neil, coach Tom Davelaar, Evan Hare, Andy Phillips, Eric Voisin, Marcus Vanderheide, Dan Holt, student asst. Mike Aldrich, trainer Danielle Constantin, trainer Alyssa Aslum, manager Rob Sterken.

H o p e 66 Tri-State 54

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Top to bottom left to right: Forward and captain Jeff Carlson (06) looks to pass into the lane. Carlson was one of four seniors to finish their college basketball careers in the inagural season at the DeVos Fieldhouse. Guard Stephen Cramer (07) dunks on a break away durring the first game of the season. Cramer went on to lead the Dutchmen in scoring at 11.8 points per game on the season. Marcus Vanderheide (08) goes up for a three-point shot over a defender's head. Vanderheide shot over 58% from the three point line, a team best. Brett Jager (07) drives to the paint past a Calvin defender, aiding the Dutchmen to a home win, a feat they accomplished all season long. • photos by Zach Trumble •

Men's Basketball

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13th place - Laker Fall Classic CVSU 3rd place - MIAA Jamboree at Calvin 4th place - Olivet women's Invit. 3rcl place - MIAA Jamboree at Olivet 3rcl place- MIAA Jamboree at Adrian 5th place - Manchester Invit. Left t o right: head c o a c h Eva D e a n Folkert, Brittany Philo, Kristi Y a m a o k a , H o l l y Sneller, Julie H o o g e r h y d e , Tarin Coulas, Julie Pol lock, Cassie H i l d e b r a n d t , Brittany Posma, Kim Harrison, Vanessa Phan.

1st place - Hope/Calvin Fall Invit.

Top to bottom left to right: In her senior year, Julie Pollock provided a huge lift for the women's golf team as a returning letterwinner and co-captain. Brittanny Philo, carefully lines up for a putt. Julie Pollock receives some coaching from head coach Eva Dean Folkert before teeing off. As the team's other co-captain and also a returning letterwinner, Brittanny PhiJo ended her college career with avengence.* photos courtesy PR •

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Success on the golf course entails not only skills with the clubs but 3rd place - MIAA Championship strength of m i n d a n d character. The women's 4th place - Saint Mary's/Bethel golf team exhibited all Invitational of these characteristics t h r o u g h o u t the season. 2nd place - K-zoo Spring Tour. U n d e r the direction of a new coach, Eva Dean Folkert, the Dutch succeeded 3rd place - Hope Invitational with a comeback year on the golf course. After finishing 7th the previous year in MIAA standings, the team e n d e d the 2005 fall season in 3rd place, only 13 strokes b e h i n d the leader. Co-captain Brittanny Philo e a r n e d All-MIAA 1st team recogni-

tion, averaging 86.0 strokes; f r e s h m a n Kristi Yamaoka started off h e r career with an average of 88.4 strokes, placing h e r on the All-MIAA 2nd team. T h e spring 2006 season, a l t h o u g h short, p r o d u c e d 2nd, 3rd, a n d 4th place finishes. Not only did the Dutch have a good season on course, they enjoyed time as a team. "I couldn't think of a better g r o u p of ladies to s p e n d my senior year playing golf with. T h e y truly are incredible people," said Julie Pollock, co-captain. T h e practices included h a r d work, mental motivation, a n d laughs. T h e t o u r n a m e n t s consisted of long car rides, beautiful courses, a n d the e n j o y m e n t of playing golf in the sun. Despite the typical frustrations golf cultivates, the attitude of the team can be s u m m e d u p in o n e w o r d — e n j o y m e n t .

by Julie Pollock

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Teammates Kristi Yamaoka and Julie H o o g e r h y d e j o i n each o t h e r in a golf cart d u r i n g a t e a m practice. • photos courtesy PR •

Women's Golf

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President Bultman and Athletic Director Ray Smith present the MIAA Trophy to the men's golf team. • P h o t o by Zach T r u m b l e •

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Realized with a MIAA Cha by Nate Golomb T h e H o p e M e n ' s Golf T e a m , a g r o u p with n o seniors c o a c h e d by Bob Ebels, c a p t u r e d its sixth MIAA C h a m p i o n s h i p in t h e last seven years in r e c o r d f o r m . The D u t c h m e n , led by f o u r t a l e n t e d s o p h o m o r e s a n d j u n i o r captain N a t e G o l o m b , set a n MIAA season r e c o r d f o r t e a m scoring an a v e r a g e 296 strokes p e r r o u n d . T w o H o p e golfers c a p t u r e d m e d alist h o n o r s in c o n f e r e n c e play as well— Matt L a p h a m o n c e a n d T o m m y Y a m a o k a twice. H o p e placed all five m e m b e r s o n the MIAA All-Conference T e a m s . First Teamers included Yamaoka, Lapham, a n d Ryan Sheets while N a t e G o l o m b a n d Steve M a r t i n d a l e c a p t u r e d Second T e a m honors. T h e highlight of t h e season was not w i n n i n g a n o t h e r MIAA C h a m p i o n s h i p

however. T h e D u t c h m e n ' s s t r o n g play in t h e fall a n d s p r i n g e a r n e d t h e m a selection to play in t h e NCAA Division I I I National C h a m p i o n s h i p s 1 st place - Olivet Comet in Lincoln, N e b r a s k a , f o r t h e Classic f o u r t h time in school history. With probably t h e y o u n g 4th place - at Albion est t e a m in t h e field, H o p e finished 17th place o u t of 1st place - at Olivet 23 teams at t h e National T o u r n a m e n t , won by host 1st place - Red Poling Classic N e b r a s k a Wesleyan. It was a l e a r n i n g e x p e r i e n c e a n d a g r e a t c h a n c e for 13th place - GVSU Invit. t h e golfers to b o n d , build memories, and prepare 1st place - at Kalamazoo f o r n e x t year's u n d e n i ably high expectations as 2ncl place - at Tri-State e v e r y o n e will r e t u r n .

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Top to bottom left to right: Steve Martindale heads to the tee. Teammates and good friends Ryan Otto (left) and Nate Colomb (right) prepare to tee off for the Dutchmen. Team captain Nate Colomb drives the ball with ease, setting the tone for the team. Matt Lapham watches his ball after he hits off the tee box. • photos courtesy PR •

2nd place - at Hope 1 st place - at Adrian 2nd place - at Calvin

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Front row, left to right; Matt Lapham, Tommy Yamaoka, Steve Martindale, Rob VanDette, Scott Peterson; back row: head coach Bob Ebels, Donald Scholten, Dan Oumedian, Ryan Otto, Nate Colomb, Ryan Sheets.

2nd place - Siena Heights Tournament 4th place - Ohio Tournament 3rd place - Spring Arbor Tournament 1st place Furniture City Classic 17th place NCAA Div. Ill Championships Men's Golf

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Top to bottom, left to right: Erin Bradley high fives a fellow teammate. Three t i m e returning letterwinner and team co-captain, Anneliese Fox, smiles after w i n n i n g a match. Freshmen Kim Coleman talks to Coach Karen Page. Amy Norris returns the ball after a strong serve. • photos by Zach Trumble •

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o> Front row left to right: Kimberly Coleman, Ashley Leary, Christine Garcia, Amy Norris; back row: head coach Karen Page, Anneliese Fox, Lauren Field, Samantha Stille, Erin Bradley, coach Tiger Tuisink

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Hope 9, Adrian 0 Hope 9, Olivet 0 Kalamazoo 6, Hope 3 Hope 9, Tri-State 0

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Freshmen Kim Coleman, w h o attended Forest Hiils Northern High School in Grand Rapids, serves the ball at a match held at Hope's DeWitt Tennis Center. • photo by Zach Trumble •

Fox makes history in MIAA tournament by Ashley Leary Led by seniors a n d co-captains, Anneliese Fox a n d Erin Bradley, t h e D u t c h o p e n e d their season with a series of m a t c h e s against t o p r a n k e d Calvin 5, Hope 4 Midwest teams. They b e g a n t h e o u t d o o r season with t h e i r S p r i n g Break Albion 6, Hope 3 trip to Hilton H e a d Island, S o u t h C a r o l i n a . Despite t h e rain a n d cold, t h e w o m e n Hope 9, Alma 0 k e p t their spirits high with H o p e College p r i d e . T h e 3rd place - MIAA experience b o n d e d the t e a m a n d allowed t h e Tournament D u t c h to play m a n y outdoor matches. After Spring Break, t h e D u t c h focused o n t h e MIAA c o n f e r e n c e . Fox led

t h e singles l i n e u p at # 1 f o r h e r 4th season followed by S a m a n t h a Stille, Ashley Leary, Bradley, Amy Norris, a n d C o l e m a n . R e t u r n i n g MIAA # 2 d o u b l e s c h a m p i o n s , Bradley a n d N o r r i s t e a m e d u p again until a n i n j u r y cut N o r r i s ' season short. Freshm a n L a u r e n Field s t e p p e d in n u m e r o u s times f o r t h e D u t c h . T h e Dutch qualified f o r t h e Midwest Regional in Madison, Wisconsin, f o r t h e first time since 2000. H o p e College hosted t h e MIAA t o u r n a m e n t at H o l l a n d H.S. M a k i n g history, Fox c a p t u r e d t h e # 1 singles a n d won 1st t e a m all-conf e r e n c e for h e r 4th year a n d received the MIAA MVP. Stille won t h e # 2 singles title f o r H o p e at h e r old high school. Leary took 2 n d at # 3 singles a f t e r a h a r d f o u g h t m a t c h . T h e t e a m finished in 3 r d place at the conference tournament. Women's Tennis

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r T h e H o p e Men's Tennis team e n d e d their season in Kalamazoo. T h i s year, t h e Flying D u t c h m e n h a d a t a l e n t e d crew of 5 seniors, six f r e s h m a n , a n d o n e j u n i o r . Led by Senior captains A n d y R u e m e n a p p a n d Robert Dody, t h e D u t c h m e n e n d e d their season with a second place finish in t h e MIAA; d e f e a t i n g Calvin a n d Albion at t h e c o n f e r e n c e t o u r n a m e n t in Kalamazoo. T w o - s p o r t s t a n d o u t A n d y Phillips finished second in t h e t h i r d singles flight as did f r e s h m a n J o h n Scholtz in t h e sixth flight. All t h r e e H o p e d o u b l e s t e a m s a d v a n c e d to t h e c h a m p i o n s h i p finals b e f o r e b o w i n g to Kalamazoo. I n his 11 th year as h e a d coach, Steve G o r n o p r o v i d e d l e a d e r s h i p in practices a n d m a t c h e s assisting t h e D u t c h m e n to achieve their goals as a t e a m . T h e t e a m

had an outstanding Spring Break season in Hilton H e a d , d e f e a t i n g a few h i g h e r r a n k e d regional opponents. R u e m e n a p p was n a m e d to t h e All-MIAA first t e a m while A n d y Phillips a n d S t e p h e n Malvitz received second t e a m h o n o r s . R u e m e n a p p was t h e corecipient with J u l i a n Seelan of K a l a m a z o o of t h e Stowe S p o r t s m a n s h i p Award while Dody was p r e s e n t e d the Lawr e n c e G r e e n Scholarship which h o n o r s t h e m e m o r y of t h e late L a w r e n c e "Doc" G r e e n , l o n g t i m e H o p e coach.

Hope 8 Alma 1 Hope 6 Adrian 3 Hope 9 Tri-State 0 Hope 2 Kalamazoo 7

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The Hope College Men's Tennis Team warms u p before a match with some agility warmups. • photo courtesy PR •

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Calvin 5, Hope 4 Hope 6, Albion 3 2nd Place MIAA Tournament at Kalamazoo

Front r o w left t o right: Z a c h H u b e r , M a r k Johnson, Tyler D e p k e , A n d y R u e m e n a p p , Stephen M a l v i t z ; Back r o w : C a m e r o n D e H a a n , N a t e Reed, Travis Kingma, John Schlotz, A n d y Phillips, Z a c h H o e r n s c h e m e y e r , Robert D o d y , head c o a c h Steve C o r n o

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Top to bottom left to right: Zach Huber (06) reaches for the ball. He finished his first season with 14 single wins. Andy Phillips (06) smashes the ball over the net finishing his season with 40 total career wins in singles matchups. Robert Dody (06) returns the ball and finished his season with 19 wins in singles matchups and 32 wins in doubles matchups. Andy Ruemenapp (06) puts some muscle into his return finishing his season with 55 career singles wins and 51 doubles wins. • photos courtesy PR •

Men's Tennis

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Hope 107 Albion 82 Hope 165 Tri-State 7 Hope 131.5 Alma 56.5 Calvin 124 Hope 67 Hope 137 Adrian 15

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Front row, left to right: Rebekah Woods, Katie Greenland, Leslie Tableman, Molly Nyboer, Erin Webster, Sara Omanson, second row: Laura Schaedig, Cory Warner, Jessica Previch, Denay Kippley, Nora Kuiper, Mackenzie Snyder, Kate Freshour, Sarah Multer, Britta Trepp, Laura Jackson, third row: Coach Kevin Cole, Coach Mark Northuis, Rachel Wendt, Christine Weber, Kelsey Browne, Elizabeth Kreuze, Laura Borovsky, Leah Koopmans, Christina Lis, Sarah Kibbey, Anna Brandes, Ashley O'Shannessy, Coach Henry Chen, Coach Walt Kooyer, Coach Joel Teft, fourth row: Maureen Warfield, Mishelle Scott, Barbara Schornstein, M o n i q u e Hoyle, Lissa Moore, Emily VanderMeer, Yvette Wisner, Rebekah Shyne, Sarah Quesada-Lubbers, Viktorija Craudins

Hope 124 Olivet 57

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Top to botom, left to right: Kaitlyn Kopke participates in the 4x100 meter relay. Lissa Moore enjoyed a successful season, especially on the 100 meter hurdles. Monique Hoyle contributed in the 1500 meter run. Jennifer VanderMeer went to nationals for pole vaulting and achieved Ail-American honors for the third consecutive year. • photos by Zach Trumble •

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T h e Flying Dutch crowned two Ail-Americans at the 2006 NCAA Division III T r a c k a n d Field C h a m p i onships. J u n i o r J e n n i f e r 4th place-WMU Invitational V a n d e r M e e r was hono r e d for finishing sixth in 2nd place -MIAA Field Day at the pole vault by clearing Albion 12-2 1/2 while S o p h o m o r e Lindsay L a n g e was h o n 33rd place - NCAA Division III o r e d for finishing third in Championships the seven-event h e p t a t h l o n with 4,790. Lange won two of the seven events, the 100m e t e r hurtles a n d the 200m e t e r dash. V a n d e r M e e r a n d Lange were h o n o r e d for the third a n d second year, respectivly. Seniors M a u r e e n Warfield a n d L a u r a Borovsky also c o m p e t e d at the NCAA

Division 111 track a n d field championships in the pole vault. T h e y finished 13th (11-6 1/2) a n d 15th (11-6 1/2) respectively. T h e Flying Dutch o p e n e d the o u t d o o r season with a spring break trip to Orlando, FL with stops at the Shamrock Invitational at Coastal Carolina University a n d the Emory Invitational at Emory Universty. Four athletes achieved All-MIAA honors at the 115th Annual MIAA Field Day hosted by Albion college. J u n i o r Leslie T a b l e m a n a n d Lindsay Lange were hono r e d for the second consecutive year, while J u n i o r Michelle Scott a n d F r e s h m a n N o r a K u i p e r were h o n o r e d for the first time. T h e Flying Dutch finished second as a team.

By: Scott Langille

,411-American performances at Championships

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Distance runners, Aaron Kenemer and captain Jeff Webber, both proved to be assets to the team as Kenemer clocked in an 800-meter season best and Webber returned once again to the NCAA All-Ameri cans in the 1,500-meter run. • photo courtesy PR •

Distance runners perform at NCAA Championships By: Scott Langille

Junior Ryan T e r L o u w achieved NCAA Ail-American h o n o r s in the 15()0-meter r u n for a second consecutive year by finishing fifth in the event with a time of 3:51.72 at the 2006 NCAA Division III Track, and Field C h a m p i o n s h i p s . T e r Louw also set school records in the 3000 a n d the 5000-meter r u n s . T h e team o p e n e d the o u t d o o r season with a spring break trip to O r l a n d o , FL with stops at the Shamrock Invitational at Coastal Carolina University a n d the Emory Invitational at Emory Universty. T h e Flying D u t c h m e n finished third as a

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team at the 115th Annual MIAA Field Day hosted by Albion College. Four Flope athletes achieved All-MIAA H o n o r s . Senior Jeff Weber (800m and 1500m) a n d j u n i o r Scott Langille (pole vault) were h o n o r e d for the second consecutive year, while senior Matt Svoboda (jumps a n d hurdles) a n d Ryan T e r l o u w (800m a n d 1500m) were h o n o r e d for the first time.

Albion 110.5 Hope 81.5 Hope 140 Tri-State 47 Calvin 119.5 Hope 72.5 Hope 155 Alma 28 Hope 133 Adrian 40 Hope 114.5 Olivet 77.5


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Top to bottom, left to right: Joe Seymour displays his running abilities by competing in the 100 meter dash. Team captain Matt Svboda participates in the 100 high hurdles. Despite an ailing injury, Mike Wilborne contributed to the 200 meter dash. Jason Todd runs the 400 meter but competed in the 800 meter as well. • photos by Zach Trumble •

Front row; left to right: Sean Bergsma, Rob Shooks, Mike Wilburn, Matt Svoboda, Forrest Cordon, Nick Zendler, Zach King; Second row; Nate Vandeguchte, John Kay, Kyle Barnes, Jade Anderson, Jason Todd, Karl Morrison, Sam Baker, Scott Langille, Jeff Layman; Third row; Head coach Kevin Cole, Coach Mark Northuis, Jeff Weber, Sandy Frye, Paul VanderVelde, Joe Seymour, Rob Bailey, Ryan Terlouw, Aaron Kenemer, Coach Henry Chen, Coach Walt Kooyer, Coach Joel Teft; Fourth row; James Ralston, Seth Weener, Jon Narlock, Blake Carlson, Eric George, Andrew Denninger, Dean Klingenberg, Andrew Filler

3rd place - W M U Invitational 3rd place - MIAA Field Day at Albion 50th place - NCAA Dill National Championships

Men's Track


Top to bottom left to right: Emily Adams (06) makes a diving stop and throws the ball in. Kelsey Guisbert (06) pitches during the MIAA Tournament held at Hope. Student assistant and team manager, Nicole Izenbaar, celebrates with the team. Kelli Duimstra (09), 1 st base, stays alert durring the MIAA Tournament held at Hope. • photos courtesy PR •

Front row, left to right; Emily Adams, Kelsey Guisbert, Libby Hammon, Becky Whitman, middle row; Erika Guijarro, Becca Baker, Kylee Brouwer, Laura Tanouye, Jessica Regnerus, Angie Randall, Amanda Guijarro, Lauren Kucera, back row; head coach Karla Wolters, student assistant/manager Nicole Izenbaard, Maddie Garcia, Kelli Duimstra, Katie Immink, Meagan VanderMaas, Casey Feltner, assistant coaches Deb Sleeman, Matt Sleeman

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Hope 5 Kalamazoo 1 Hope 6 Kalamazoo 0 Hope 5 Saint Mary's 2 Hope 0 Saint Mary's 1 Hope 8 Adrian 0 Hope 5 Adrian 1 Hope 5 Alma 2 Hope 4 Alma 3 Hope 5 Olivet 0 Hope 12 Olivet 1

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^ i/' •*?' MIAA Champions! For the first time in a decade, the Flying Dutch were the championships of the MIAA! • photo courtesy PR • " ""

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W h a t a p h e n o m e n a l year the 2006 Flying Dutch softball team h a d . T h e y started off the season by setting a new record for t he n u m b e r of games won in Florida, 9- 2, t o p p l i n g the competition a n d d o m i n a t i n g the Rebel Games (8-0). T h e Flying Dutch took the MIAA by storm. T h e y d e f e a t e d all of their MIAA o p p o n e n t s except for a split with St. Mary's. Albion 0 T h e Flying Dutch conAlbion 6 cluded league play with a r e c o r d of 15 wins a n d Calvin 0 o n e loss, thus claimCalvin 0 ing t h e m the MIAA Tri-State 3 League C h a m p i o n s . T h e y finally were Tri-State 3 able to play in f r o n t of their h o m e crowd a n d p u t on a t r e m e n d o u s show for the fans d u r i n g the MIAA

T o u r n a m e n t . A victory over Olivet a n d St. Mary's automatically placed the Flying Dutch in the C h a m p i o n s h i p g a m e against d e f e n d ing MIAA c h a m p i o n s , the Alma Scotts. l he Flying Dutch pulled off the victory to assert s u p r e m a c y over the MIAA as the League a n d t o u r n a m e n t champions. T h e Flying Dutch ( # 7 seed) took the "WE R U N T H I S " attitude to Rock Island, 111. w h e r e they began the NCAA regional t o u r n a m e n t with a 5-2 victory over Augustana ( # 2 seed) a n d a 2-0 victory over the University of Chicago ( # 6 seed).The two victories again placed the Flying Dutch in the C h a m p i o n ship bracket. However two losses, o n e to top-seeded UW-Eau Claire 1-0 a n d the o t h e r to Coe, Iowa 3-1 e n d e d their r u n in the NCAA t o u r n a m e n t . Although t h e r e was no Cinderella story for the Flying Dutch softball team, their accomplishments this past season, including having the winningest season in school history (32-14), m a d e the 2006 season o n e to r e m e m b e r .

Softball


Rick H u i s m a n , the H o p e pitching coach, was correct in his prediction at the b e g i n n i n g of the 2006 baseball season. He told all the players that he would thoroughly enjoy this year's Flying D u t c h m e n C h a m p i o n s h i p T e a m . Sure e n o u g h , winn i n g 19 of their last 21 games, the baseball team was crowned C o n f e r e n c e C h a m p s . In pre-season action, H o p e came away f r o m their a n n u a l trip to Florida with a 5-5 record, a n d the players soon realized they n e e d e d a challenge. H e a d Coach Stu Fritz focused on each individual for the u p c o m i n g 28-game league schedule because every m e m b e r of the team would be n e e d e d to win the championship. H a l f w a y t h r o u g h the year, H o p e was r a n k e d 4th in the MIAA standings. However after sweeping Kalamazoo, TriState, a n d rival Calvin, the D u t c h m e n sat

in 2nd place. In the last series of the season the D u t c h m e n took t h r e e f r o m the Olivet Comets to tie the Adrian Bulldogs for the top spot in the league. Five o u t s t a n d i n g seniors led H o p e for the 2006 season: J o n E d m o n d son. J o s h H u n d t , C e o r d i e MacKenzie, Nate B r a n d s o n , a n d Mike Howes. T h e f o r m e r t h r e e led with a strong offensive year—the latter two posted respectable pitching records, often shutting down o p p o n e n t s . Each not only led with the respect a n d p r i d e of a t r u e D u t c h m a n , b u t they also led with their play on the field.

Alma 5, Hope 4 Hope 13, Alma 2 Adrian 15, Hope 1 Hope 2, Adrian 1 Adrian 6, Hope 1 Adrian 10, Hope 4 Hope 5, Albion 2 Albion 3, Hope 2 Hope 10, Albion 5 Albion 6, Hope 3 Hope 6, Alma 1 Hope 5, Alma 3 Hope 12, Kalamazoo 0 Hope 9, Kalamazoo 4

by Matt Richardson

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Matt Vanbeek (07) gets congratulated by his team mates after coming in from the f i e l d . ' p h o t o by Zach Trumble*

Sports

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Hope 5, Kalamazoo 4 Hope 9 Kalamazoo 0 Hope 8, Tri-State 0 Hope 6, Tri-State 4 Hope 9, Tri-State 1 Hope 3, Tri-State 2 Hope 13, Calvin 4 Hope 2, Calvin 0 Hope 10, Calvin 9 Hope 9, Calvin 1 Olivet 9, Hope 7 Hope 11, Olivet 9 Hope 5, Olivet 3 Hope 9, Olivet 0

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Left to right, top row: Coach Mike VanBeek, Coach Boeve, Mike VanderVelde, Matt Sattler, Tom Plasman, Dustin Wuis, M i k e Howes, Nate Brandsen, Anthony Pastrick, Kurt DeHorn, Jon Moerdyk, Scott Sommavilla, Coach Rick Huisman, Coach Stu Fritz; middle row: Andrew Bedan, Joey Coeb, Bart Bultman, Justin Pratt, Bill Lutke, Brian Cuerrerio, Matt VanderVelde, Matt VanBeek, Paul Neumann, Matt Richardson, Coach Rich Hayes; front row; M i k e Rogers, Jeff Ichesco, Josh Hundt, Tim Judson, Jon Edmondson, Brett Kingma, Ceordie Mackenzie, Ben Strong

Top to bottom left to right: Pitcher Mike Howes (06) throws a strike. Matt VanderVelde (07) makes a solid hit. He batted .387 this season. Scott Sommavilla (08) batted a .341 this season with two home runs. Catcher Bill Lutke (07) stays on top of the ball. • photos by Zach Trumble •

Baseball


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Page 150: D u r i n g nice weather, the benches outside the Van Wylen Library become a great spot to have a conversation after class or people watch.

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Page 201: Orientation's PlayFair is a frenzy of f r e s h m e n a n d Orientation Assistants in the Dow Center. This is p e r h a p s Hope's largest "mixer" d u r i n g the entire year. After PlayFair, students also enjoy a Luau in which students can dance, grab snacks, a n d meet their new classmates.

Page 127: T h e White Cross Project took place on c a m p u s for the first time this spring. Late on a stormy Sunday night, Residential Life staff p o u n d e d 1,700 wooden crosses into the g r o u n d to represent the n u m b e r of alcohol-related deaths p e r year a m o n g college-aged people.

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,'% Longtime Dew Crew member Billy Statema cheers on the Dutchmen in the new DeVos Fieldhouse, sporting a popular Dew Crew t-shirt. The Dew Crew sold over 700 shirts, a record number for the men's basketball student section. • photo by Zach Trumble*

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Addressing envelopes, senior Lisa Baran works for Conference Services, which operates during the summer months. Although Baran walked across the stage at Graduation, she has a semester of student teaching left, ' p h o t o by Tally Reeverts •


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Rachel Achtemeier

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Heather Amundson

A r t - S t u d i o Art

Nursing

D u b u q u e , IA

Eau Claire, W l

Rebecca Anderson

Katherine Arnold

Biology/German Education

Psychology/Spanish

Midland, M l

Sawyer, M l

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People

Steven Augustin Chemistry/Japanese

Clarkston, M l

Whitehall, M l

Emily Ausema

Lisa Bailey

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Cook Hall above was completed at the e n d of the year after almost a year's worth of construction. T h e addition a d d e d over 60 beds to Cook. Lubbers Hall went u n d e r construction a couple of m o n t h s before the e n d of the year, starting with small projects like moving professors to new offices. After students moved out, the construction workers moved in a n d began ripping walls out. • photos by Tally Reeverts •

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Laura Arpke Management/French

Psychology

Psychology

Grand Rapids, M l

Holland, M l


1

Lindsey Baird

Daniela Banu

Lisa Baran

Jessica Barker

Kyle Barnes

Nursing

M a t h / C o m p . Sci./French

English—Secondary Education

Chemistry/Spanish

Physical Education

Grant, M l

Holland, M l

South Lyon, M l

Ada, M l

Easport, M l

Brian Barry

Amanda Best

Autumn Bills

Jennifer Blackman

Sarah Blankenship

Spanish/International Studies

Spanish/International Studies

Psychology/Computer Science

Political Science/Sociology

Music Education—Vocal

Plymouth, IN

G r a n d Rapids, M l

Flushing, M l

Chicago, IL

H o f f m a n Estates, IL

IB

0 MMJljLj Emily Blauw

Kurtis Blohm

Ashley Boer

James Boerkoel

Jennifer Boone

Psychology

Engineering—Chemical

Art—Studio Art

A r t - S t u d i o Art

Music E d u c a t i o n - V o c a l

Holland, M l

Wilmington, O H

M o d e s t o , CA

Fennville, M l

Wyoming, M l

Rachel Borgeson

Laura Borovsky

Erin Bradley

Derek Brown

Katherine Brown

Public A c c o u n t i n g

Exercise Science

Music Performance/Jazz Studies

A r t - S t u d i o Art

Livonia, M l

Hastings, M l

Lakeview, M l

Macomb, M l

Public A c c o u n t i n g Crass Lake, M l

Seniors

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Zachary Bush

Erika Byker

Adriana Canche

Lynn Cargill

Biology/Religion

Music E d u c a t i o n - V o c a l

Art Education

Chemistry-ACS

Physics

Ludington, M l

Hudsonville, M l

Tegucigalpa, Honduras

Hart, M l

The Woodlands, TX

Meredith Carlson

Megan Chambers

Kelly Charland

Lori Clark

Adam Claus

Special E d u c a t i o n - L D

Language Arts Composite

Psychology

Comm./Poli SciTWomen's St.

Psychology/Religion

Deerfield, IL

Adrian, M l

Naperville, IL

Kalamazoo, M l

Ada, M l

Elizabeth Carlson

-

Rachel Cochrane

Emily Cornell

Jeremy Cox

Religion

Political Science/Comm.

Communications

Watertown, W l

Grapevine, TX

Crosse Pointe Farms, M l

People

Kyle Cox

Jennifer Crisman

Sean Daenzer

Chemistry

Math—Secondary Education

Music Performance

Marshall, M l

Downers Grove, IL

M o u n t Clemens, M l


Elizabeth Darrow

Joshua DeHaan

Laura DeHaan

Jamie DeVries

Melissa DeYoung

History

Chemistry

English-Elementary Education

Spanish/Management

Biology Education

Cheboygan, M l

Fremont, M l

Mattawan, M l

Dewitt, M l

Mattawan, M l

Ana Diaz

Jessica DiBernardo

Jennifer Diekevers

Allison Dishnow

Michael Dominiak

Psychology

Art Education

Phsyical Education

Language Arts Composite

Theatre

Zeeland, M l

Western Springs, IL

Hudsonville, M l

Saline, M l

Dearborn, M l

I

In a crowded gym, Kurt DeHorn takes a shot in a korfball match against a European team, which took place November 1, 2005, in the D o w Center. This year Coach Karia Wolters introduced korfball to West Michigan and to Hope College as a class. Several Hope College students and alumni joined together as Hope's team that learned the sport over the 2005-2006 academic year. New to the sport, the Hope team took some pointers from the visiting team, which had several nationalities represnted, many from the Netherlands. After the spring semester, the Hope team traveled to Europe to play some matches and to train with the European teams. Korfball is popular sport in Europe and is the only co-ed sport in the world. It's a mix of basketball and Ultimate Frisbee rules, ' p h o t o courtesy PR*

Korfball

From Holland ^ to Holland Seniors

119


Mark Dondero

Taryn Drost

Katie Dunkin

Ann Durham

Holly Dustin

Biology

Psychology

Management

Special E d u c a t i o n - L D

French/Art-Studio Art

Ada, M l

Charlevoix, M l

Columbus, O H

Fremont, M l

Contoocook, N H

Heather Dykstra

Elise Edwards

Jamie Elliott

Nichole Ellis

Lauren Engel

Nursing

International Studies/French

W o m e n ' s Studies/Exercise Sc.

W o m e n ' s Studies/Religion

Poll. Sci./lnternational Studies

Crandville, M l

Elgin, IL

M o u n t Morris, M l

Rochester, N H

Traverse City, M l

Candice Evenhouse

Jessica Everett

Shawn Evers

Dustin Fiddler

William Flavin

German Education

Biology Education

Management/Economics

Art Education

Religion/Communications

Lombard, IL

Okemos, M l

Cedar Lake, IN

Ada, M l

Palos Heights, IL

People


Left to right: John Rodstrom takes a big bite out of a burger at Spring Fling. • photo by Ashley D e H u d y • Rachel Cochrane tries her hand at operating a lathe in Scotland. She was abroad during the Fall semester, " p h o t o courtesy Sara Pillow• Pat Ratliff, well-known for his balloon skills, distributes clusters of balloons across campus in preparation for parents and freshmen flooding the campus, ' p h o t o by PR* Amy Sisson, Dance Marathon Director of Public Relations, celebrates at the revealing of the total, • p h o t o by Zach Trumble*

Ink.

Rebekah Fleck

Anneliese Fox

Kathryn Frens

Jennifer Gable

History

Psychology

Biology

Psychology

Spanish

Lancaster, KY

Alma, M l

Holland, M l

Cedarburg, W l

Upland, CA

Alain Galindu

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Amanda Gardynik

Julie Gezon

Brenna Giacherio

Elizabeth Gibson

Ashley Glickman

Dance Education

Psychology/Sociology

Physics

Language Arts Composite

English-Secondary Education

Howell, M l

Jenison, M l

Englewood, O H

A v o n Lake, O H

Western Springs, IL

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Matthew Goetz

Paula Grahmann

Michelle Graves

Christina Griggs

Steven Haack

Engineering—Chemical

Chemistry/Dance

Dance Performance/Choreo.

Social W o r k Ada, M l

Arlington Heights, IL

Holland, M l

Verona, W l

Flushing, M l

Communication

Seniors

121


Stefanie Haba

Gabriel Hall

jillian Hamlin

Kara Harden

Kelly Hargrove

Biology/Psychology

Religion

Communication

Language Arts/Psychology

Management

Clarkston, M l

Coopersville, M l

Clinton, N)

South Haven, M l

M c H e n r y , IL

Marie Hempel

Jesse L. Higgins

Jessica Higgins

Kelly Hill

Katie Hinkle

Spanish

Classical Studies

English—Elementary Education

Management

Chemistry—ACS

Saint Joseph, M l

Holland, M l

Baraboo, W l

Ada, M l

Cadillac, M l

Brian Holda

Rachel Holmes

Natalie Hoogeveen

Elizabeth Horstman

Michael Howes

Language Arts Composite

English—Writing/Management

Chemistry-ACS

Psychology

Management

Dewitt, M l

Round Lake Beach, IL

Orange City, IA

Grand Rapids, M l

Alma, M l

C\ I

I

Elizabeth Huizenga

Melissa Ipema

Brian Isherwood

Ryan Jackson

Language Arts/Spanish

Language Arts Composite

Psychology

Religion/German

Zeeland, M l

H o m e r Glen, IL

Christiansted, Virgin Islands

Canton, M l

People

A Sarah Jeltes

Social Studies-Elem, Education Ada, M l


Bryan Johnson

Mark Johnson

Julia Jones

Sara J. Jongekryg

Math--Secondary Education

Communication

Special Education--EI

Math—Sec. Educ./Pscyhology

Psychology

Portage, M l

Marne, M l

Scottville, M l

West Olive, M l

Beaverton, M l

Elizabeth Jorgensen

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Li A Christina Judson Music Performance/Fine Arts H o f f m a n Estates, IL

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Laura Kadzban Social W o r k Grandville, M l

Gracia Kamps Fine Arts Composite

T h e b r a i n child of Tally Reeverts, Beverly R u d o l p h (Reeverts' m o t h e r ) , a n d W i l m a H a r t , t h e H o p e C o l l e g e - t h e m e d quilt given to D i a n a Breclaw took a t e a m of p e o p l e to c o m p l e t e . Reeverts p r o p o s e d t h e idea a n d h e r m o t h e r a n d H a r t m e t to finalize design ideas. R u d o l p h m a d e the q u i l t o v e r a w e e k ' s t i m e a n d s e n t it t o R e e v e r t s . H a r t t h e n m a s s e m a i l e d s t u d e n t s , f a c u l t y , a n d s t a f f w h o k n e w D i a n a well. W h i l e D i a n a w a s o u t o f t h e o f f i c e f o r m e e t i n g s . H a r t h a d p e o p l e c o m e t o a s m a l l o f f i c e in S t u d e n t D e v e l o p m e n t to sign t h e b o r d e r of t h e quilt. W i t h t h e quilt. H a r t also h a d a m e m o r i e s b o o k a v a i l a b l e f o r p e o p l e t o w r i t e n o t e s o r p u t in l e t t e r s . At D i a n a ' s g o i n g - a w a y p a r t y , f r i e n d s o f D i a n a p r e s e n t e d t h e q u i l t t o h e r . S u r p r i s e d a n d appreciative, Diana, t h r o u g h tears, t h a n k e d the p e o p l e p r e s e n t f o r p u t t i n g so m u c h e f f o r t i n t o a v e r y s p e c i a l q u i l t .

Hudsonville, M l

Seniors

123


Rachel Kapenga

Neal Karsten

Special E d u c a t i o n - L D

Psychology/Management

Hamilton, M l

Zeeland, M l

Utsab Khadka

Karter Klingenberg

Physics

Management

Holland, M l

Holland, M l

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Perhaps Lubbers is not the first place students think of as a warm and dry haven from the cold, but during December the heated building and bright lights gave a great contrast from the cloudy and dreary days.

Frisbcc Bethany Klunder

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Anthony Kreucher

Communication

Religion

Caledonia, M l

O r c h a r d Lake, M l

Amy Kurkiewicz

Erin 1/ Hotta

Music Education-Instrumental

Communication

Rochester Hills, M l

W i n f i e l d , IL

People

In the fall and spring months, Frisbee golfers can be seen across campus. The popular passtime had a few adjustments to make during the year. In November, the tree that served as a hole was taken down by a wind storm. Also, the flag pole by Dimnent Chapel was also taken down. To top off the year. Lubbers Hall went under intense remodeling, thus remov ing the hole near Durfee to be shut down lest a frisbee be lost. But for these diehard frolfers, it's all about making adjustments to keep enjoying their sport. • p h o t o by ZachTrumble*


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Heather Lam

Heidi Lam

Corissa Lamphear

Landon Lapham

Aaron Laraway

Nursing

Language Arts Composite

Chemistry--Biochemistry

Nursing/Biology/Psychology

Communication/Spanish

Portage, M l

Portage, M i

Grand Rapids, M l

Whitehall, M l

Allegan, M l

H I

I Katherine Larsen

Eric Laug

Jamie Leeuwenburg

NoahDavid Lein

Philip Lepper

English

Social W o r k

English—Secondary Education

Psychology/Management

Lake Bluff, IL

Spring Lake, M l

Language Arts Composite Grandville, M l

Kewadin, M l

Midland, M l

Jack Lin

Michael Litteral

Adam Locker

Noree Logsdon

Erin Lokers

Religion

Public A c c o u n t i n g

Music

Poli. Sci./lnternational Studies

English—Secondary Education

Jackson Heights, NY

Jackson, M l

South Haven, M l

D i x o n , IL

Grandville, M l

r

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Dana Long

Brian Lowell

Crystal Lucas

Kathleen Ludewig

Benjamin Manting

Biology/Psychology

Management

Language Arts Composite

C o m p . Sci./lnt'l Studies/French

Social Studies-Sec. Ed/Spanish

South Lyon, M l

Grand Rapids, M l

Kalamazoo, M l

Ithaca, NY

Spring Lake, M l

Seniors

125


Lauren March

Cathy Martyn

Negeen Masghati

Meghan McCambridge

Sarah McDonald

Fine Arts Composite

'Social W o r k / W o m e n ' s Studies

Sociology/Psychology

Management

Language Arts Composite

Lafayette, IN

W h e a t o n , IL

Naperville, IL

Northville, M l

East Lansing, M l

Christopher Meeusen

Amy McEwan

Kathryn McGrath

Katie McKee

Patrick Mears

Physical Education

Psychology

Social Studies—Elem. Education

Physics

Chemistry

Canajoharie, NY

Fremont, M l

W h i t e Pigeon.MI

Des Plaines, IL

Grand Haven, M l

Bethany Metters

Kimberly Meulenbelt

Elizabeth Mickalich

Julia Miller

Emily Mills

Social W o r k

Communication

Psychology/Chemistry

Religion

Political Science

Bloomfield Hills, M l

Holland, M l

Shelby Township, M l

Petoskey, M l

Hudsonville, M l

r:

Dana Moes

Sarah Mol

Kimberly Mosley

Wesen Mulat

Stephen Murphy

Social Studies-Elem. Education

Spanish

Engineering-Mechanical

SociologyAVomen's Studies

Communication

Highland, IN

Wyoming, M l

Hillsdale, M l

Holland, M l

Evanston, IL

People


Darren Murrey

Sayaka Nakatsuji

Biology

Japanese St./Psych./Philosophy

Accounting

Schoolcraft, M l

Holland, M l

Saginaw, M l

Jonathan Narlock

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Tasuku Nishino Chemistry/Japanese Studies Holland, M l

Top to bottom: Rosie Barton-Devries and Trygve Johnson have a candid conversation about the role of alcohol in life during Monday chapel. Wooden crosses filled the Pine Grove, surprising students and raising questions. The crosses stayed out all day, sending a powerful message across campus, •photos courtesy PR*

J by Matthew D'Oyly

Amy ( T C o n n e l l Communication/Poli. Science Westfield, NY

Ashley Oberg Special Education-El Haslett, M l

I n April, t h e Residential Life a n d H o u s i n g P r o g r a m m i n g C o m m i t t e e , c h a i r e d by M a t t h e w D'Oyly, Residential Life C o o r d i n a t o r of Kollen Hall, p r e s e n t e d t h e W h i t e Cross Project, a t h r e e day look at t h e role alcohol plays in t h e lives of college s t u d e n t s . T h i s was a p r o g r a m in p a r t n e r ship with C a m p u s Ministries, t h e Dean of S t u d e n t s Office, Creative D i n i n g a n d t h e C o u n s e l i n g C e n ter. 1,700 crosses w e r e placed in the Pine Grove, each cross r e p r e s e n t i n g t h e d e a t h of a college-aged s t u d e n t , r e l a t e d to alcohol last year. T h e placing of t h e crosses was d o n e d u r i n g t h e night, so s t u d e n t s w e r e faced with a spine-tingling i m a g e t h e next m o r n i n g . Events c o n t i n u e d t h r o u g h o u t t h e week, with chapel services, conversations in resident halls a n d a mocktails n i g h t in Maas, to p r o m o t e safe a n d r e s p o n s i b l e d r i n k i n g . T h e t h r e e - d a y long event o c c u r r e d t h e week b e f o r e S p r i n g Break, r e m i n d i n g s t u d e n t s to h a v e a safe a n d sober o n e . Seniors 127


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Erica Oosting

Victoria Orefice

Elizabeth Otton

Chemistry

English-Elementary Education

Political Science/Management

Fremont, M l

Grand Rapids, M l

Grand Rapids, M l

Emily Owens

David Pate

Juliann Peterson

Nursing

Political Science

Special Education--EI

South Haven, M l

Sierra Vista, AZ

Livonia, M l

Vanessa Phan

Bnttanny Philo

Megan Pincombe

Science Composite

Psychology

Dance Performance/ Choreo

Wyoming, M l

Greenville, M l

Fair Grove, M O

Erin Poll

Joseph Pitcher

Kirsten Pless

Biology

Theatre-Art Composite

Psychology

Gowen, M l

Rockport, M A

Holland, M l

People

Top to bottom: The doors from the student lounge to the DeWitt patio usually bear a lot of beating, but on a November Sunday afternoon, a windstorm was too much for the hinges. The breaking of the hinges cracked the glass, and the wind picked up the shards and blew them around the patio. That same afternoon, the wind took down the beloved golf hole next to Voorhees. Hope's electrician had to fix the electrical box, which controls a good portion of Hope's electricity. Voorhees residents also went without electricity for the afternoon. • photos by Tally Reeverts •


Julie Pollock

Kevin Pomeroy

James Post

Leah Post

Michael Poublon

Chemistry--ACS

Management

C o m p u t e r Science

Special Education--EI

C o m p u t e r Science

Midland, M l

Rudyard, M l

Bloomfield Hills, M l

Palos Heights, IL

Hemlock, M l

hi! H Ill ill I MfHMI Aaron Powell

Joshua Powell

Elizabeth Preston

Sarah Quesada

Allison Quigley

A u d i o Rec.-Comm. Composite

Psychology

Social Studies--Elem. Education

Communication/French

Fine Arts Composite

Palos Heights, IL

Palos Heights, IL

Quincy, M l

Athens, C A

Holland, M l

Carrie Reif

•

Kathryn Randa

Stefan i Raterink

Nathan Reed

Sarah Reese

English

Nursing

Exercise Science

French

Spanish

Naperville, IL

Coopersville, M l

Glen Arbor, M l

A n n Arbor, M l

Saint Joseph, M l

mast

Jamie Reitsma

Jennifer Richardson

Kristi Richardson

Andrea Ritter

Abigail Rockwood

Language Arts Composite

Social W o r k

English/Political Science

Special E d u c a t i o n - L D

Music Performance

Dyer, IN

Lawton, M l

Cadillac, M l

Geneva, IL

Holland, M l

Seniors


John Rodstrom

Rebecca Rooy

Andrew Rose

Maureen Rosner

Amber Ross

Biology

English/Political Science

Management

Psychology/Sociology

Communication

M o u n t Vernon, O H

Shelby, M l

Rochester Hills, M l

Mattawan, M l

Mooresville, NC

Rachelle Ruark

Kellyn Rumpsa

Audrey Ryckman

Alana Sabene

Jaime Sabol

Social Studies--Elem. Education

Special Education--EI

Chemistry/Management

Science Composite

Accounting

Canton, M l

Holland, M l

Lancaster, O H

Crandville, M l

Novi, M l

1 k

Courtney Saltarski

Kye Samuelson

Chiara Savage

Lindsey Schaap

Jessica Schmidt

Biology

Communication/Spanish

Music Performance

English-Secondary Education

German/English

Kentwood, M l

Saint Paul, M N

Kailua, HI

Holland, M l

Portage, M l

Susan Scholten

Kathleen Schonfeld

Amy Schuster

Anne Schuster

Matthew Schwabauer

Political Science

Psychology

Economics

Classical Studies

Theatre/English-Writing

Allendale, M l

Howell, M l

Schaumburg, IL

Dublin, O H

Rohnert Park, CA

People


The Senior Art Show, "Wherefore Art," took place in the DePree Art Gallery during the last month of school. The Studio Art majors presenting included Rachel Achtemeier, Amy Back, Amanda Berlinski, Ashley Boer, Katherine Brown, Adriana Canche, Jessica DiBernardo, Holly Dustin, Dustin Fiddler, Rob Fron, Kent Osborn, Alexandra Snyder, Lindsay Strahle, Sandie Timmer, and Jonathan White. Anne Bast also presented for Art History, ' p h o t o courtesy PR*

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Keirsten Schwanbeck

David Sedjo

Elizabeth Shaw

Emily Shebak

Rebecca Shubert Special E d u c a t i o n - L D Novi, M l

Music Performance

Economics

Communication

Communication

Williamsport, PA

Spring Grove, IL

Tulsa, O K

Northville, M l

Elizabeth Shuter

Rebekah Shyne

Katherine Skaff

Biology Educ./Spanish Educ.

English-Secondary Education

Muskegon, M l

Flint, M l

mm

Jennifer Shuck

Andrew Shults

Social Studies--Elem. Education

Psychology

Creencastle, IN

Grand Ledge, M l

Naperville, IL

Seniors


Jenny Slager

Corrie Smith

Kevin Smittie

Alexandra Snyder

Psychology

English-Writing

English-Writing/Psychology

Spanish/Art-Studio Art

Biology

Portland, ME

Holland, M l

South Haven, M l

Northport, M l

Portage, M l

Lori Sullivan

Allison Stewart

• Lauren Stieper

Kyle Stob

Rebecca Strutt

Margaret Stuart

German

Management

Social W o r k

Psychology/Women's Studies

Pscyhology

Dearborn, M l

Alsip, IL

West Des Moines, IA

Rockford, M l

River Forest, IL

Johanna Swanson

Robert Sweas

Audrey Tetro

Tisa Thompson

Ashley Tillman

Communication

Spanish/Management

Social W o r k

Poll. Sci/lnt'l and Japanese Stud.

Science Composite

Lawton, M l

West Chicago, IL

Jenison, M l

Reed City, M l

Birmingham, M l

Scott Travis

Allison Trotter

Cassandra Tubbs

Shea Tuttle

Ashley VanArkel

Management

Nursing

Special Education—El

Religion

Language Arts Composite

Hamilton, M l

Haslett, M l

Holland, M l

Aurora, IL

Grand Haven, M l

People

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Shelby VanArkel

james Van De Wege

Stephanie VanDeBurg

Kerry Van Laan

Stephanie Van Stee

Language Arts Composite

Management

Psychology

Political Science/Management

Management/Communication

Grand Haven, M l

Holland, M l

Holland, M l

Caledonia, M l

Crandville, M l

Eric Van Tassell Theatre Spencer, IA

Anna Van Wyck Psychology/Communication Mears, M l

Rachel VandeGiessen Special Education--EI Flemington, N)

Before being released into the "real world," Hope College seniors prepare for the end-of-the-year ceremonies. Top to bottom: Seniors enjoy a banquet in the DeVos Fieldhouse, courtesy of Alumni Relations. Seniors received food, a few party gifts, and information on how to stay in contact after graduating. Practice makes perfect for Graduation. Seniors practiced commencement inside, but the weather held out and it took place in the Municipal Stadium, ' p h o t o s courtesy PR*

Seniors

1^3^


Top to bottom; Rachel Achtemeier, Jennifer Shuck, and Jason Cash make sure the Orientation events are going as planned. The Student Union Desk serves as Orientation headquarters. Jaime Sabol leads a group of freshmen in some ice breaker activities. Although they may seem a bit childish, these activities help bring new students out of their shells. Katie Randa applaudes the efforts of new students as they finish up a game. Seniors, though they are conditioned veterans by their fourth move back to campus, still participate in Orientation because they love helping new students adjust to college. They pass their knowledge to the new class. • Photos by PR •

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People

Danae VanderLaan

Jeffrey Vandlen

Social W o r k

Psychology/Management

Jenison, M l

Kalamazoo, M l

Erica VanGilder

Abigail VanKempen

Biology

Psychology/Political Science

Scarborough, ME

Holland, M l

Mary VerHeulen

Megan Vivian

Chemistry

Engineering—Mechanical

Grand Rapids, M l

M c Bain, M l

Rachel Voorhees

Lisa Walters

Management

Music Education-Vocal

Manasquan, NJ

Channahon, IL


Maureen Warfield

Christine Weber

Devin Wehrmeyer

Jonathan White

Spanish Educ./English—Sec. Ed.

Language Arts Composite

English

Art—Studio Art

Adrian, M l

O a k Forest, IL

Holland, M l

Holland, M l

Carrie Whitfield

Erin Wickens

Jennifer Wierenga

Katherine Winkle

History Education

Communication

Social W o r k

Management/Spanish

Bingham Farms, M l

Clinton Township, M l

Holland, M l

Allegan, M l

Daniel Winter

Leanne Wisner

Katherine Yanney

Ryan Zietlow

Biology

Spanish

Social W o r k

Stevensville, M l

M i d d l e b u r g h , NY

W h e a t o n , IL

Science Composite Muskegon, M l

" fter"

Perhaps second to the Tulip Time parades in popularity, the Memorial Day parade brings several excellent marching bands as well as many boyscout troops and other veterans out to the streets of Holland. Starting promptly at 9:30 am, the parade started on College Avenue and ended in the Municipal Football Stadium, purposefully passing by the patriotically decorated cemetaries. • photo by Tally Reeverts •

Seniors

135



An underclassmen strums his guitar in the Pine Grove during the early warm weather in March, ' p h o t o by Zach Trumble*

UndÂŤ-rclassmen


r

Ayannah Abiade, '09 Kalamazoo

Scott

Lauren Adams, '07 Central, IN

College East

Sam Adams, '07 Fort W a y n e , IN

Voorhees

Amanda Allen, '07 Naperville, IL

Kappa Chi

Victoria Allen, '09 Wllliamston

Scott

Jeff Ambrose, '08 Midland

Phelps

Jennifer Amisson, '09 H o p e w e l l Jctn., NY

Voorhees

Sommer Amundsen, '07 C o o n Rapids, M N

Brumler

il Monica Anaya, '09 Holland

Scott

Caitelen Anderson, '07 Albuquerque, N M

Schrier

Sarah Anderson, '08 El Paso, TX

Voorhees

Daryl Andresen, '09 Park Ridge, IL

Wyckoff

Valerie Arnold, '07 Midland

Pieters

Victoria Baar, '09 Holland

Phelps

Benjamin Bach, '09 Missoula, M T

Kollen

Branden Bacon, '07 Sheboygan, W l

Wyckoff

Samuel Baker, '09 Grand Rapids

Durfee

Rachel Bakken, '07 Golden, C O

Dykstra

Steven Barbachyn, '07 Kalamazoo

Kollen

Ashley Barbieri, '09 Haslett

138

People

Dykstra


Students relax and do homework in the Kletz in front of the big screen television. Here students can get something to eat, grab some coffee, or listen to great music every Wednesday night. During the lunch hour, students will turn on a baseball game or midday programming for a quick break between classes. Over Easter, the Kletz provided prizes in a school-wide Easter egg hunt. Mark Humberstone was the winner of an iPod Nano. • photo by Tally Reeverts •

)ustin Barigian, '09 Coarsegold, CA

Scott

Jonathan Barrus, '09 Midland

}

Durfee

Timothy Bassett, '09 Phelps

Gladstone

Rachel Bazydlo, '09 Chelsea

Lichty

Stephanie Beach, '07 Bridgman

Deutsches Haus

Meghan Beachum, '09 Lowell

Voorhees

Nikeata Bechtel, '09 Plainwell

Dykstra

ennifer Beck, '09 M o u n t Vernon, O H

Dykstra

Underclassmen

139


Kaitlyn Becker, '09 St. Joseph Dykstra

Brianna Bedsole, '09 Rochester

Dykstra

Holly Bekius, '08 Spring Lake

Cook

Stephanie Poll '07 Grandville

Sligh

i Jeannette Benner, '09 Kentwood

Scott

Catherine Bennett, '09 Arlington, TX

Voorhees

Nicole Bennett, '09 Trenton

Dykstra

Jonathan Berghorst, '09 Zeeland

Durfee

Justin Berry, '08 Carlock, IL

College East

Jessica Biniecki, '09 Athens

Scott

Lauren Blews, '07 Dewitt

Welmers

Taylor Blom, '09 Holland

Durfee

Jennifer Bockstege, '09 Mims, Ft

Dykstra

Brent Boersma, '09 Holland

Durfee

Abigail Bolkema, '07 Flushing

Schrier

Timothy Boman, '09 Rochester Hills

Kollen

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Rebecca Bombard, '07 Batavia, IL

College East

Tyler Boonstra, '07 Fennville

Cook

Lisa Borton, '09 Hudson

Dykstra

Amanda Bos, '09 Grand Rapids

Dykstra

liiwii' 140

People


Brandon Bosch, '09 Hudsonville

Durfee

Amanda Boss, '08 Charlevoix

Cook

Eric Bourassa, '07 Charlevoix

Kleinheksel

Morgan Boyle, '08 Delton

Cilmore

Carolyn Brandis, '08 Gansevoort, NY

Cook

Erica Brandt, '08 West Bloomfield

Cook

Lindsay Bransen, '07 Park Ridge, IL

Sib Cottage

Elizabeth Brichacek, '07 Carol Stream, IL

Kooiker

Holland State Park, conveniently located 10 minutes from campus, is a great place to hang out with friends, enjoy a day at the beach, or even go sailing. Student relish the free off-season parking to go see the ice formations over the pier or take a chilly walk along the beach. • photo by Tally Reeve its •

Underclassmen

14^


Camden Brieden, '09 Rockford

Durfee

A d a m Brink, '08 Holland

Wyckoff

Elizabeth Brooks, '09 Rising Fawn, CA

Lichty

Emily B r o w n , , '07 Dunlap, IL

Parkview

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Jeff Brown, '07 Colts Neck, NJ....Yellow Duplex

Kelsey Browne, '09 Birmingham

Dykstra

John Bruggers, '09 Lima, Peru

Voorhees

John Bruinsma, '08 South Bend, IN

Wyckoff

by Tally Reeverts

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The long time Director of Student Activities and Assistant Dean of Students, Diana Breclaw, decided to leave her position at Hope College, which took effect after Fall Break. She began at Hope in July of 1999 and stayed through the end of Orientation 2005. Many students were surprised at her resignation, but Diana was well supported in her decision to move back to her hometown of Glen Ellyn to start a business. As a token of appreciation, Student Development sponsored a going away party for all students, faculty, and staff who wanted to say thanks to Diana for the hard work, dedication, and enthusiasm she put into her job. Several people came through the Kletz to talk, take pictures, and hang out. Diana, though she knew it was time to leave, had a difficult time saying goodbye to her co-workers, students, and her favorite college. Top to bottom, left to right: Dean Frost and Diana pose for a last picture at her party in the Kletz. A g r o u p of students close to Diana get together for a quick candid before surprising her with a signed blue and orange quilt. Diana talks to Rachelle Ruark, an Orientation Assistant Director for 2005. Diana as director of Orientation w e l c o m e d seven classes to Hope College. • photos by Tally Reeverts •

142

People

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mmm Brieann Bryant, '09 Farwell

Lichty

Emily Budge, '09 Portage

Dykstra

Katie Bultema, '09 Hudsonville

Dykstra

Bart Bultman, '09

i

Hamilton

Phelps

Kathleen Burkhardt, '08 M u n c i e , IN

Phelps

Nikolas Burkhart, '09 Brutus

Phelps

Isaac Bush, '09 Muskegon

Phelps

Monica Calhoon, '09 Dearborn

Scott

Daniel Callam, '09 Holland

Voorhees

Kathryn Campbell, '09 Traverse City

Dykstra

Katherine Card, '09 Clare

Dykstra

Julie Cardella, '08 Long Grove, IL

Kollen

Did you know? Graham Carlson, '09

• 3 , 1 4 1 students were enrolled at Hope in Fall 2005

La Grange, IL

Phelps

Bryn Carter, '08 Rockford, IL

Gil more

R) Casey, '09 • Hope offers 8 0 majors

Naperville, IL

Kollen

Jason Cash, '07 Brighton

Belt

Emily Chapman, '09 Flushing

Lichty

Jaclynn Cherry, '09 Rochester Hills

Dykstra

Vanessa Claus, '08

IT

Grand Rapids

Cook

Underclassmen

143


Hope offers a w i d e variety of options for students to become involved in the H o p e c o m m u n i t y . Groups try to recruit new students by showing w h a t & particular organization does and inviting t h e m to sign up. Some organizations use free t-shirts and goldfish to attract students. H o p e offers some unique opportunities not offered in high school.

Croups such as CASA, the Milestone, SAC, WTHS, various sororities and fraternities. Lacrosse, and the Chess Club all set up stands on the Dewitt patio on a warm late August evening for students to check out their clubs, • p h o t o by Tally Reeverts*

Amie Clay, '09 Mattawan

Van Vleck

Shannon Clement, '08 Hudsonville

Kollen

Melissa Clutters, '09 Des Plaines, IL

Scott

Katie Colegrove, '09 St. Ignace

Gil more

Jenni C o m p t o n , '09 M c Bain

Dykstra

Kimberly Conger, '09 Clarkston

Dykstra

Paul Connelly, '09 Lower Waterford, VT

Scott

Audrey Converse, '07 Lowell

Jr*

Poll

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Laura Coombs, '09 Muskegon

Dykstra

Beth A n n e Cooper, '09 Bardonia, NY

Dykstra

Christine Corbin, '07 Holland

Holland

Tarin Coulas, '08 Lansing

Cilmore

Carolyn Courtade, '09 Jenison

Phelps

Kariayne Cozzie, '09 Evergreen Park, IL

4

Scott

Shannon Craig, '09 Naperville, IL

Voorhees

Edleda Crawford, '09 Madison, T N

Scott

Benjamin Crumpler, '08 Nashville, T N

Voorhees

Darcy C u n n i n g h a m , '07 Interlochen

Doesburg

Micaela Cypher, '09 Coarsegold, CA

Van Vieck

A m a n d a Dale, '09 Crinnell, IA

Wyckoff

James Daly, '08 Chelsea

Voorhees

Trevor Daly, '08 Trinidad

Voorhees

Nazly Damasio, '09 Crand Haven

Voorhees

Evelyn Daniel, '08 Dearborn

Voorhees

A m a n d a Danielson, ' 0 7 Alto

Patterson

Kristi Dannenberg, '09 Zeeland

Cilmore

Joel Darin, '09 W h i t e Lake

Durfee

Tiffany Day, '09 Zeeland

Zeeland

\

Underclassmen

145


Sarah Dean, '09 Sewanee, T N

Dykstra

Julia Defoe, '09 Springfield, IL

Voorhees

C a m e r o n D e H a a n , '09 Cadillac

Kollen

Daniel D e H a a n , '09 Mattawan

Durfee

Ashley D e h u d y , '07 N o r t o n Shores

Gazelle

Jason De Jong, '09 Holland

Phelps

Christpher Dekker, '08 Jenison

Cook

Jennifer Delasko, '09 Ortonville

Cilmore

l

Hillary Delhagen, '09 Pultneyville, NY

Voorhees

Arianna Della-Coletta, '09 Portage

Dykstra

Josh Delo, ' 0 9 Holland

Kollen

A n d r e w Denninger, '08 W i n f i e l d , IL

Durfee

Sheila D e n O u d e n , '07 Paramount, CA

College East

Tyler Depke, '09 Grayslake, IL

Scott

Ashley De Vecht, '09 Byron Center

Dykstra

Neal D e V o i d , '07 Lowell

College East

Abigail DeVuyst, '08 Webster, NY

Lichty

Meghan DeWees, '09 Bay Village, O H

Scott

David D e W i t t , '08 Sioux Falls, SD

Durfee

Richard Dewitte, '09 Santa Fe, N M

People

Wyckoff

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Relaxing under a shady tree, Erin Poll reads for class while soaking up the great weather. Students, in their free time, walk through the Pine Grove, sketch for art class, lay out on blankets, or play the immensely popular Frisbee golf. At the first peak of sun and a w a r m breeze, students stream from the residence halls to take advantage of the wonderful space. • photo by Ashley D e H u d y *

Staphanie Dewitte, '08 Penfield, NY

Van Vleck

Mark Dishnow, '08 Durfee

Saline

Petya Dodova, '07 Sofia, Bulgaria

DuBois

Hilary Doenges, '08 Lichty

Fort Wayne, IN

Megan Dougherty, '07 Fishers, IL

Doesburg

Kelly Doyle, '09 Tinley Park, IL

Dykstra

Abigail Drake, '09 Portage

Dykstra

Rachel Driscoll, '09 Fishers, IN

Dykstra

Underclassmen

147


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Shayna Drost, '08 Charlevoix

Kollen

Jennifer Duesterdick, '09 Niskayuna, NY

Dykstra

John Dulmes, '08 Oostburg, W l

Wyckoff

Derek Duncan, '08 Morrow, O H

Voorhees

f'

Samantha Dunmire, '09 Sarasota, FL

Dykstra

John Dusenbery, '09 Geneva, IL

Scott

Esther Dwyer, '08 Granville, O H

Gilmore

Carleen Dykstra, '09 Hudsonville

Hudsonville

Kathleen Eagen, '07 Lake Bluff, IL

Kappa Chi

Marti Ebert, '07 Springfield, IL

Mandeville

A d a m Eidson, '09 Grand Haven

Durfee

Brian Eisinger, '08 Grand Blanc

Durfee

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Kelly Ellis, '09 Maple City

Scott

Michelle Ellis, '09 Muskegon

Gilmore

M a t t h e w Ellison, '09 Midland

Durfee

Cray Emerson, '09 Holland

Scott

Brian Emling, '07 Oxford

Mulder

Dan Emmendarfer, '08 Muskegon

Kollen

Erika English, '09 Waukesha, W l

Dykstra

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Chris Erickson, '09 Madera, CA

People

Kollen

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Heather Esfandiari, '09 Rochester, NY

Scott

Meghan Estochen, '08 M a r i o n , NY

Phelps

Kyle Eurick, '09 Davisburg

Scott

Kara Evans, '09 Marshall

Dykstra

HQpr Jennifer Fait, '09 San Diego, CA

Dykstra

Patrick Feder, '09 Grand Rapids

Kollen

ulian Feick, '08 Dowagiac

Hawkinson

Lindsey Ferguson, '09 Fredonia, NY

Dykstra

Top to b o t t o m : Over the summer, the Martha Miller Center w e n t f r o m a hole in the ground to a completely finished building. Students enjoy its nice facilities, especially the Rotunda, w h i c h provides an excellent study area. The DeVos Fieldhouse was in the midst of construction w h e n students migrated back to campus. The Fieldhouse was mostly completed before basketball season, and the minor details were w o r k e d on throughout the rest of the year. The Kinesiology Department, including Athletic Training, were able to move into their new facilities at DeVos during Christmas Break.

Underclassmen

149


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TX A J. T d v j n

Sarah Fetter, '09 Dykstra

St. Jacob, IL

Jessica Fezzey, '09 Dykstra

Farmington

Lauren Field, '09 Kollen

Grand Rapids

Tiffany Fifer, '09 Voorhees

Niles

At

Alison Fineout, '07 Zeeland

College East

Abigail Finn, '09 Midland

Phelps

Roxanne Fishnick, '09 Zeeland

Dykstra

Meghan Florian, '07 Kalamazoo

Welmers

The beautiful fall weather encourages students to take time to talk and relax on the benches outside the library. W i t h the Peale Science Center in full use, the space between the Vanderplex and Science Center become grounds for socialization between classes and a quick short cut to the popular Centennial Park. • photo by Ashley DeHudy*

People

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Susan Flower, '07 South Haven

South Haven

Jason Folkert, '09 Hudsonville

Kollen

M i c h a e l Forbes, '07 Lone Tree, IA

Zwemer

Daniel Forro, '09 Tawas City

Phelps

A n n e Foster, '09 Holland

Cook

Valerie Foster, '09 West Chicago, IL

Kollen

Stephanie Fowler, '09 Silverthorne, C O

Dykstra

Aarthi Francis, ' 0 7 A n n Arbor

Cook

Sarah Franks, '07 Sturgis

Lampen

Kate Freshour, '09 Bloomington, IL

Dykstra

Ana Frikker, '07 Troy

Blue

Margaret Fylstra, '07 Hinsdale, IL

French House

A n n a Gagliardi, '09 Midland

Phelps

Sarah Call, '08 Franklin Park, NJ

Cilmore

April Gamble, '09 Cadillac

Voorhees

John Ganta, '09 N. Chubra, O m a n

Wyckoff

Christine Garcia, '08 Battle Creek

.. Phelps

M a d e l e i n e Garcia, '09 Reno, NV

Phelps

Tracy Garcia, '09 Holland

Dykstra

Heather Garrett, '09 Climax

Dykstra

Underclassmen


Top to bottom, left to right: Bultman's Backyard Barbeque offers a free meal to all students in the Pine Grove w i t h e x c e p - ' tional entertainment provided. Eric Hutchinson fans show o f f ' their new vibrant green t-shirts. The popular Eric Hutchinson is "pretty g o o d " according to his t-shirt, but he is talented enough to be a favorite live performer at Hope.

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Megan Cebraad, '08 Grandville

Kollen

Stephanie Giegler, '09 Brighton

Lichty

Amy Giles, '09 W a u c o n d a , IL

Phelps

Scott Claser, '08 A n n Arbor

Durfee

David Cleason, '08 Lisle, IL

Voorhees

Amanda Glennon, '09 Manhattan, IL

Dykstra

Michael Golden, '09 Crystal Lake, IL

Kollen

Amarisa Gombis, '07 Countryside, IL

Schrier

Speech

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People


Forrest C o r d o n , ' 0 9 Rockford

Cook

T o m m y C o r d o n , '08 Ada

Kollen

Tonisha C o r d o n , '09 Grand Rapids

Scott

Jennifer Crasman, '09 Byron Center

Dykstra

Viktorija Craudins, '08 Kalamazoo

Kollen

Kate C r e e n w a d e , ' 0 7 Owosso

Fried

lillian Creshel, ' 0 9 Trenton

Cilmore

Alex Criffith, '09 Naperville, IL

Durfee

Allyson Crinage, ' 0 9 Centennial, C O

Scott

Krista Crodus, '08 Zealand

Van Vleck

Ashley Cronevelt, ' 0 9 Holland

Van Vleck

Daniel C r u b e n , ' 0 9 W h e a t o n , IL

cook

Ashley Cruenberg, ' 0 9 East Lansing

Phelps

Lauren C r u m m , ' 0 7 Grand Rapids

College East

Ashlea Cuernsey, '08 Greenville

Voorhees

Brian C u e r r i e r o , '09 Clare

Kollen

Nicole C u g i n o , '07 Holland

Ross

Vanessa C u g i n o , ' 0 9 Holland

Dykstra

Leah Cuttersen, ' 0 9 Ada

Dykstra

Daniel C u y , ' 0 9 Kalkaska

Cook

Underclassmen

153


Allison Haan, '09 Lansing, IL

Dykstra

Ruth Hagan, '09 Caylord

Dykstra

Lelah Haggart, '08 Clare

Phelps

Leah Halsey, '09 Rochester, NY

Scott

Jennifer Hansen, ' 0 7 West Olive

West Olive

Stacey Harburn, ' 0 9 Okemos

Voorhees

Laura Hargrove, ' 0 9 Palatine, IL

Dykstra

Lisa Harkes, ' 0 7 Crandville

Dykstra

Emily Harper, '07 Holland

Fried

Jamie Harrington, '09 Zeeland

Lichty

Jonathan Hatfield, '09 Holland

Durfee

Laura Hauch, '08 Three Oaks

Cook

Allison Hawkins, '09 Palm Beach Gardens, FL

Phelps

M i c h a e l Headley, ' 0 9 Grand Ledge

Kollen

Brian H e i m , '09 W h e a t o n , IL

Kollen

Nathan Hein, '09 Greenville, O H

Durfee

Edward Helderop, '09 Grand Rapids

Scott

Margaret Hellner, '08 Stevensville

Van Vleck

Kendra H e l m k a m p , ' 0 8 LaGrange, IN

Lichty

Karla Helvie, '08 A n n Arbor

154

People

Phelps


Richard and Helen DeVos traveled a long way f r o m the beautiful Florida sun to the snowy winter of Michigan, yet their faces were beaming w i t h smiles The weather outside may have been frigid, but there was plenty of w a r m t h to go around in the newly dedicated Richard & Helen DeVos Fieldhouse on the campus of H o p e College. " H e l e n and I are h o n o r e d to be a part of this," said 4 Richard DeVos, the co-founder of Alticor, the holding c o m p a n y for several by Jason Cash firms including A m w a y Corp., w h i c h he also is a co-founder. " W e ' v e alwa

DeVos I

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loved H o p e . " The DeVoses' $7.5 million donation that led the fundraising effort for the 102,000-square-foot fieldhouse that o p e n e d in November, 2005 on Fairbanks Avenue between 9th and 11th Streets. Richard DeVos spoke to the large audience in the Fieldhouse, made up of students, faculty, staff, and donors, and thanked the Lord for his heart transplant in 1997. He said good architects designed the fieldhouse but said he's thankful for "the great architect w h o has his hand on this school,"a c o m ment in reference to God. The DeVoses were very pleased w i t h the end result of the fieldhouse, as they were a large part of the planning. "This is a day w e have long anticipated," H o p e College President James Bultman said before the ribbon-cutting ceremony. " W e ' r e so grateful to so many different people w h o allowed this project to c o m e to fruition. W e w a n t to thank the DeVoses for their leadership gift." The fifth annual Celebration of Undergraduate Research and Creative Performance was held in addition to the dedication at the fieldhouse. A b o u t 200 H o p e students presented the findings of their 138 research projects, ' p h o t o by Zach T r u m b l e *

Tara Henderson, '08 Wheaton, It

Cilmore

Courtney Hansen, '09 H o p e w e l l )ctn., NY

Kollen

Sarah Herington, '08 G r a n d Rapids

Voorhees

Amanda Herron-Wheeler, '09 Holland

Holland

Clayton H e y l m u n , '09 Petoskey

Koilen

Stephen Hile, '07 Monroe

Dosker

Nova H i n m a n , '09 Portage

Dykstra

Anne Hoekstra, '08 Kalamazoo

Phelps

Underclassmen

155


Jacob Hoekstra, ' 0 9 Grandville

Kollen

Rob Hoff, '09 Clarkston

Cook

Hilary H o l b r o o k , '09 H o p e w e l l Jctn., NY

Dykstra

Katie H o l m , ' 0 9 Naperville, IL

Dykstra

1 Ashley Holtgrewe, ' 0 7 St. Peters, M O

Columbia

M i c h e l l e Holthaus, ' 0 9 Pella, IA

Dykstra

Maya Holtrop, '08 Beverly Hills

Voorhees

Peter Holzinger, ' 0 9 Racine, W l

Kollen

Krista H o m a k i e , ' 0 9 Cass City

Dykstra

Amy Howard, '09 East Lansing

Phelps

Becky Hughes, ' 0 8 Paw Paw

Phelps

Zac Huizing, '07 Grand Rapids

Holland

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Russalle Hull, ' 0 9 Ludington

Dykstra

Megan H u n t , ' 0 9 Santa Maria, CA

Voorhees

Megan H u n t e r , '09 St. Ignace

Dykstra

David H u n y a d i , ' 0 9 Kalamazoo

Kollen

Lydia Hussey, ' 0 8 M a r i o n , NY

Cilmore

A m a n d a Hutchins, ' 0 9 South Haven

M m

Katie I m m i n k , ' 0 8 Hudsonville

Cilmore

Ruth Ippoiiti, '07 Carmel, IN

Cook

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156

People

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Dykstra

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Jennifer Ivanoff, '08 Flushing

Kraker

Christen Jackson, '09 Park Ridge, IL

Dykstra

Laura Jackson, '09 Allen Park

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Dykstra

Brett Jager, '07

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Kalamazoo

Riepma

Brittney Jatzo, '09 Iron River, W l

Dykstra

Jessica Joe, '09 Gallup, N M

Cook

Andrea Johnson, '08 West Chicago, IL

Van Vleck

Garran Johnson, '08 Lansing

Vennema

Coach Michael Ricketts gives directions to the defense at the H o m e c o m i n g game against Wisconsin Lutheran College. Aside from the game, a dedication for the new Martha Miller Center for Global Communication, an exhibition of paintings of the H o p e campus, the 28th annual Run-BikeSwim-Walk, and reunions for four graduating classes from 1985 through 2000 all help H o p e celebrate its tradition w i t h current students and alumni, • p h o t o by Zach Trumble*

Underclassmen

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Kathryn Johnson, '09 W h e a t o n , IL

Dykstra

Kristin Johnson, '07 Big Rapids

Strong

Jessica Jones, '09 Mequon, W l

Dykstra

Anna Jonkman, '08 Grand Rapids

College East

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Christopher Jordan, '09 Pilesgrove, NJ

Kollen

Ashley Joseph, '08 Naperville, IL

Kollen

Kathryn Josephson, '09 Ada

Dykstra

Michael Kaffka, '08 Naperville, IL

Durfee

Students gather to listen to a speaker at the Critical Issues Symposium. This year's symposium on genocide in the gobal c o m m u nity was one of the most well-attended in recent years. • photo by Zach Trumble •

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Deanna Kalafut, ' 0 9 Justice, IL

Dykstra

D a n Kalleward, ' 0 8 Portage

Kollen

Bethany Katerberg, '07 Grand Rapids

College East

C o u r t n e y Kauffman, '09 Sturgis

Voorhees

Laura Kawiecki, ' 0 7 Midland

Kuizenga

Jonathan Kay, '08 Three Rivers

Durfee

Shova KC, '07 Kathmandu, Nepal

Kooiker

Hayley Keeler, '07 Plainwell

Beck

Gretchen Keillor, '09 Ravenna, O H

Dykstra

Lauren Keiser, '09 O t t e r b e i n , IN

Van Vleck

A n d r e a Keller, ' 0 9 Kokomo, IN

Dykstra

Ricky Kelley, ' 0 9 Burton

Kollen

Colleen Kelly, ' 0 8 Naperville, IL

Cilmore

Aaron Kenemer, ' 0 7 Zeeland

Belt

Alex Ketchum, '09 Woodland

Wyckoff

George Khoury, ' 0 9 Jerusalem, Israel

Voorhees

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Sarah Kibbey, ' 0 9 M a p l e City

Cilmore

Melissa Kilbourn, '09 Suttons Bay

Kollen

Joshua Kinder, ' 0 8 M c H e n r y , IL

Kollen

Jeremy Kingma, ' 0 9 Beverly Hills

Durfee

Underclassmen

1


In Dimnent Chapel, siudt-nls and community members sil back and relax .is ihey listen to the acoustic melodies of |osh Shicker. In an act of generosity, Shicker agreed to donate some of his concert's proceeds to Pulling for I lope, I lope's I lurricane Katrina Relief effort, Shicker worked wilh Jason ( ash and )on Ornee to coordinate the benefit concert. Al this concert Shicker also released his newly recorded album, 'photo by Tally Reeved s*

Travis Kingma,'()') Mattawan

Sarah Kirby, '07 Nnpervllle, II Meagan Kisller, '08 I udinnlnn

Durfee

Dorian Phelps

(laudia Klimkowski, '08 Carmel, IN Phelps

George Klupchak, '08 Naperville, II

Ross Knoll, '08 Grand I laven Courtney Knox, '09 Lawton

Durfee

Phelps Cilmore

Mari jo Koedyker, '09 Grand I laven

People

Cilmore

J


Daniel Koenig, ' 0 9 Midland

Phelps

Jillian Koestner, '07 Phoenix, A Z

College East

Kimberly Koetje, ' 0 8 Chicago, IL

Delphi

M i c h a e l Koets, ' 0 9 Crandville

Kollen

Sarah Koon, ' 0 9 Columbus, O H

Cilmore

Jonathan Koopmans, '09 Holland

Durfee

A b b y Kosta, ' 0 7 Crandville

Pieters

M a r i n a Kovalyuk, ' 0 8 M o s c o w , Russia

Scott

Melissa Kowalk, '09 Eaton Rapids

Dykstra

Rachelle Kreuze, ' 0 9 Kalamazoo

Dykstra

Elizabeth Krohmer, '09 G r a n d Rapids

Dykstra

Brendan Krueger, '09 Canton

Wyckoff

Nora Kuiper, ' 0 9 Dykstra

Kalamazoo

Ryan Kullavanijaya, ' 0 9 Phelps

Clarendon Hills, IL ....

A m y Kunzi, ' 0 9 Dykstra

Hudsonville

Allison Kurtze, '07 Delphi

Carson City

Caitlin Lamade, '09 W h e a t o n , IL

Cilmore

Brenna Lamphear, ' 0 9 Grand Rapids

Dykstra

Elise LaRoche, '09 Dykstra

Rachel Larson, ' 0 9 South Bend, IN

Dykstra

Underclassmen


M a l i n d a Lasater, '08 C o d d a r d , KS

Champion

Ritchie Latimore, ' 0 9 Dayton, O H

Wyckoff

Caitlin Lautz, '09 W h e a t o n , IL

Van Vleck

M i r i a h Lawrence, ' 0 9 Sterling, NY

Voorhees

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James Leadley, ' 0 9 Dexter

Kollen

A n d r e w Lee, '09 Fair Lawn, NJ

Kollen

M i r i a m Lee, ' 0 7 Allen Park

Brumler

M i c h a e l Leman, ' 0 9 Elmhurst, IL

Durfee

Sarah Lemieux, ' 0 9 Lake Bluff, IL

Voorhees

Liana Lemke, ' 0 9 Caylord

Dykstra

Chris Lewis, ' 0 9 Troy

Phelps

A n d r e w Liang, '08 Holland

Centurian

M o l l y Lien, '07 Midland

Voorhees

Kristina Lilly, '07 M o u n t Pleasant

Sligh

M i c h e l e Lindstedt, '09 St. Charles, IL

Dykstra

Brad Lininger, '09 Kalamazoo

Kollen

Christina Lis, '09 Nov!

Dykstra

Daniel Lithio, '09 D o w n e r s Grove, IL

Phelps

Megan lobe, '08 Marshall

Kollen

Jeannette Lockard, ' 0 7 Clinton Township

162

People

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not all work... Top to bottom, left to right: Giving the Bayshore Christian Ministries van a bath, Cara Schrotenboer, Sarah M o o r e , and Katie M u n z also manage to get w e t in the process. In East Palo Alto, California, washing vans was one of many w o r k projects for this H o p e College mission trip team. Joel Pierson, Dave Nyitray, and Jeff Ambrose stop to get a little climbing in at the W i l l i e " W o o W o o " W o n g Playground w h i l e visiting Chinatown in San Francisco during Spring Break. Beth Krohmer and Sarah M o o r e enjoy some Starbuck's coffee after a long day w o r k i n g on their mission trip to East Palo Alto.

Bradley Lockwood, '08 Palatine, IL

Centurian

Leanna Longwell, '09 Homer

Van Vleck

Travis Love, '09 Scott

Livonia

Kali Ludwig, '08 Hinsdale, IL

Kollen

Karen Luidens, '09 Altamont, NY

Scott

Jean Daniel Lussier, '08 Lenixville, Canada

Durfee

Jacob Lyons, '09 Lake O r i o n

Voorhees

Stephanie Machiela, '09 Zealand

Phelps

Underclassmen

E


Shanna M a c k , ' 0 9 Allegan

Lichty

Jacqueline M a i u r i , ' 0 7 Rochester

Phelps

Laura Malpass, '08 Roanoke, VA

Scott

Jaclyn M a m m o s e r , ' 0 9 Prospect Heights, IL ..Van Vleck

A n d r e w M a r i n , '09 Scuttons Bay

Kollen

Shauna M a r k b y , '09 Hartland

Lichty

1

Melanie Marod, '07 Grand Haven

Cilmore

M o n i c a Martinez, '09 Holland

Kollen

f C o d y Masalkoski, ' 0 7 Lansing

Oggel

Sonya Masghati, ' 0 9 Naperville, IL

Kollen

Jennifer M a s t e n b r o o k , '08 Kalamazoo

Cilmore

Katherine Masterton, '08 Grand Rapids

College East

fJN.J "Trick or Treat!" Enthusiastic kids from the Holland area came to H o p e for a safe and fun evening of candy, and lots of it. Students loved seeing all the creative costumes and festive children. Residence halls w e r e o p e n to the c o m m u n i t y all evening. Decoration contests w e r e held and students, too, c o u l d n ' t resist the chance to dress up themselves and get candy from their peers. The w i d e array of creative outfits covered everything f r o m pirates to The Spice Girls. • photos by Heather Garrett •

164

People


Summer t u t o r i n g programs start u p after most H o p e students leave. In the library, this tutor plays a game w i t h a student a r o u n d the fun three dimensional chalkboards, ' p h o t o by Emily Southard*

Underclassmen

165


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> The d o w n t o w n shopping is not only extremely popular w i t h tourists, students and their parents enjoy strolling up and d o w n the q u a i n t streets, w i n d o w shopping or grabbing a c u p of coffee and a seat for some good conversation. • p h o t o by Tally Reeverts •

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Shauna Masura, ' 0 9 Rolling M e a d o w s , IL

Phelps

Chris M a y b u r y , ' 0 8 Holland

Durfee

M a r j o r i e M c B r i d e , '09 Sparta

Phelps

M a t t M c C a b e , '08 Brighton

Kollen

Erin M c C a r t h y , '09 St. Charles, M O

Dykstra

M a k a n a McCarty, ' 0 9 Kurtistown, HI

Kollen

Emily M c C o n n e l l y , '08 Arlington, V A

Voorhees

Megan M c C o r m i c k , '08 Davison

Cilmore

Christopher M c C e h e e , '09 Kalamazoo

Kollen

Margaret M c g u r n , '09 Traverse City

Dykstra

Colleen M c K i n n i e , ' 0 9 Sterling Heights

Van Vieck

Evan M c L e a n , ' 0 9 Crystal Lake, IL

Durfee

Bryan M c M a h o n , ' 0 9 East Tawas

Phelps

l o h n M c Nutt, '09 Elgin, IL

Kollen

Nikolas McPherson, '07 Rochester Hills

Wyckoff

Underclassmen


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s s t u d e n t s c o n t i n u e to reach out in an effort to c h a n g e the world for better, several students b r o u g h t the issue of N o r t h e r n U g a n d a ' s d i s a p p e a r i n g youth. For 20 years the Lord's Resistence A r m y has b e e n participating in a war w h e r e the LRA has resorted to a b d u c t i n g children in o r d e r to increase their n u m b e r of soldiers. In o r d e r to escape this, children have b e e n c o m m u t i n g f r o m the r u r a l areas of U g a n d a to large cities w h e r e they can safely sleep at night. T h e film, "Invisible C h i l d r e n , ' was shown for a week on H o p e ' s campus, a n d students were e n c o u r a g e d to join the Global Night C o m m u t e in G r a n d Rapids on Saturday, April 29, 2006. As p a r t of a larger effort internationally to b r i n g awareness, 136 cities across the globe participated with 29,000 Americans p l e d g i n g to participate. T h e participants also took p a r t in a letter writing c a m p a i g n to i n f o r m politicians of this crisis. H o p e students m a d e a large sacrifice in time since the C o m m u t e took place the weeke n d b e f o r e finals. T h e focus on Africa within the s t u d e n t body c u l m i n a t e d at the e n d of the semester with this final p u s h for awareness b e f o r e students left for the s u m m e r .

O n a fall evening, some students choose to enjoy the sunset f r o m the dunes o n the coast of Lake M i c h i gan. • photo by Zach Trumble •

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Provost James Boelkins speaks to new students at the N e w Student O p e n i n g Session, w h i c h marks the official begining of the n e w school year. The Provost serves as the chief academic officer and thus helps coordinate and advocate for ail activities related to faculty and the academic program.

Samantha Miller, '09 Caylord

Scott

Alison Mills, '09 M L Vernon, O H

Voorhees

Emily Mills, '08 Marshall

Kollen

M a t t h e w Minkus, '09 Zeeland

Durfee

Allison Mirek, '08 Oakland

Cilmore

Jonathan M o e r d y k , '08 Paris

Kollen

Margaret M o h r , '09 Reed City

Wyckoff

Ellen Molenaar, '09 Protage

Wyckoff

John Molenhouse, '08 Holland

J

Phelps

Sarah M o o r e , '09 East Lansing

Cilmore

Steven M o o r e , '07 Crandville

Tree House

Laura Morningstar, '09 Fishers, IN

Dykstra

fllMlll Underclassmen


Some diehard H o p e students back up their teams w i t h unending support. Hope's Hockey fans prepare to take the extra step, even if that involves standing in an ice arena for hours. O n a cold winter w e e k e n d night, students drive d o w n US 31 to The Edge arena in order to watch the Hockey team smash their opponents into the boards. The HopeCalvin rivalry especially brings in standing room-only crowds, w h o wave w h i t e towels and fill the arena w i t h chants and enthusiasm. These dedicated fans cheered on the Hockey team throughout their 24-8-2 record. This was the team's fifth straight trip to the American Collegiate Hockey Association's tournament where they faced sixteen other teams. The team was rewarded for their season of hard w o r k w i t h a fifth-place finish. • photo by Ashley D e H u d y •

A n d r e w Mead, '09 Orange City, IA

Durfee

Shannon Mee, '08 Brighton

Cook

Lindsay Meek, '08 Bowling Green, O H ... Parkview

Michael Mers, '09 Metamora

Scott

Hillary M i e d e m a , '07 Grandville

Lampen

Tricia M i e d e m a , '08 Caledonia

Van Drezer

Jamison M i l b u r n , '07 Marengo, IL

Kappa Chi

Brian McLellan, '09 Fort W a y n e , IN

People

Kollen


M a n y s t u d e n t s r e c o u n t s t u d y i n g a b r o a d as o n e of t h e best e x p e r i e n c e s of their college careers, a n d they usually c h o o s e to take a s e m e s t e r a b r o a d d u r i n g e i t h e r t h e i r s o p h o m o r e o r j u n i o r year. H o p e p r o v i d e s o p p o r t u nities across b o t h stateside a n d across seas. F r o m S o u t h Africa to L o n d o n , f r o m J a p a n to Chile, s t u d e n t s n o t only l e a r n in t h e i r classes, they also b e c o m e e x p e r t s in a new l a n g u a g e a n d a d i f f e r e n t c u l t u r e . O n e of t h e best o p p o r tunities of s t u d y i n g a b r o a d is t h e ability to travel to new areas. F o r t h o s e s t u d e n t s w h o can't a f f o r d to take a sem e s t e r off o r w h o love b e i n g o n c a m p u s d u r i n g t h e school y e a r , V i e n n a S u m m e r School o r o t h e r s u m m e r t e r m s p r o v i d e t h e e x p e r i e n c e w i t h o u t t h e h u g e time committment. Thea Neal, Liz Otton, Sarah Baumgartner, and Mackenzie Smith pose for a shot in front of the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial in Washinton, DC. They took their homework-free day to see the sites in the capital while on a tour of many memorials during Cherry Blossom Festival. • photo provided by Thea Neal • Where the sea meets the land, Nicole Brace and Alyssa Johnson explore the area near a Scottish castle during a weekend trip. Brace and Johnson were just a few of many Hope students w h o studied abroad in Aberdeen, Scotland, during the Fall semester. • photo provided by Sara Pillow • Hope students studying in Vienna, Austria attend the opening dinner celebrating the programs 50th year. • photo courtesy of Megan Purtee •

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Underclassmen


Sometimes t h e r e is virtue in necessity. In t h e early summ e r of 2006, a delivery truck mistakenly backed into the " H o p e College" arch that stands facing College Ave n u e in f r o n t of Graves Hall, d a m a g i n g both t h e metal arch itself a n d the brick pillars that hold it. After five weeks away for repair, the arch r e t u r n e d better t h a n ever. In fact, w h o knew? It t u r n e d out that the letters in H o p e College" were m a d e of brass, a quality h i d d e n

Kendra Neil, '09 Holland

Phelps

Elise Nelson, '07 A r d e n Hills, M N

Cook

Riley Nelson, '09 Bloomington, M N

Kollen

William Nettleton, '07 Battle Creek

Cook

Wade Neucks, '09 Indianapolis, IN

Voorhees

Christy Nitz, '07 Bridgman

Kappa Chi

John Noffke, '08 Naperville, IL

Durfee

Ryann Norris, '09 Farmington Hills

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by decades of w e a t h e r i n g a n d long lost to institutional m e m o r y . Cleaned a n d polished a n d now protected by a coating that should insure that they maintain their brilliance for years to come, they again shine brightly in the sun. While away following the mishap, the metal arch that s u p p o r t e d the letters was sandblasted a n d r e p a i n t e d . Repair work also included casting new cem e n t caps to go a t o p the brick pillars a n d replacing


bricks t h a t w e r e d a m a g e d in t h e accident. T h e pillars were d o n a t e d by t h e Class of 1912 as t h e " f r o n t e n trance" to c a m p u s in t h e days w h e n H o p e was largely b o u n d e d by College a n d C o l u m b i a a v e n u e s a n d 1 Oth and 12th streets. T h e a r c h was a d d e d in 1940, given by t h e college's c h a p t e r of t h e n a t i o n a l Blue Key h o n o r society. C u r r e n t l y , t h e c a m p u s o c c u p i e s s o m e 120 acres, a l t h o u g h n o t all c o n t i g u o u s , r a n g i n g f r o m

C e n t r a l A v e n u e to t h e west past F a i r b a n k s A v e n u e to t h e east, f r o m E i g h t h S t r e e t to t h e n o r t h to 15th Street to t h e s o u t h . Even so, t h e a r c h c o n t i n u e s to serve as a l a n d m a r k . It c a n ' t h e l p b u t d o so, b o t h as a distinctive c a m p u s f e a t u r e in its o w n r i g h t a n d s t a n d i n g as it d o e s s u r r o u n d e d by historic s t r u c t u r e s like Graves, D i m n e n t M e m o r i a l C h a p e l a n d V o o r h e e s Hall, a n d by relative n e w c o m e r s like t h e V a n W y l e n L i b r a r y a n d t h e A. Paul S c h a a p Science C e n t e r . • c o u r t e s v of H o p e PR •

Carl Morrison, '09 Pickford

Scott

Carolyn Morse, '08 Naperville, IL

Phelps

Kyle Mosher, '08 Oakhurst, CA

Durfee

Nicole Moss, '08 Battle Creek

Cilmore

Jenna Mulder, '08 Queensbury, NY

Sutphen

Keith Mulder, '08 Portage

Phelps

Nicole Mulder, '08 Jenison

Cilmore

Sarah Multer, '09 Piainwell

Gil more

rtPElHS

Underclassmen

173


The $22 million DeVos Fieldhouse, which opened October 2005, already received a facelift. Stairs at the new facility were replaced because they failed to meet building code requirements. "It was determined that some, not all, were approximately one-sixteenth of an inch from meeting the minimum recjuirement for a stair width - from front to back of the step," said Tom Renner, Hope College spokesman. Only the stairs in the 11 single-seat aisles were affected. The steps went from a three-step to a two-step design between the rows both to comply with the code and enhance safety, Renner said. Cost of the changes were minimal and were shared between the college, contractor, and architects. The job was completed in time for Tulip Time.

DÂŤmn People


David Nyitray, '08 Holland

Durfee

Katherine Nykamp, '07 G r a n d Haven

Vennema

Ben Oegema, '09 Durfee

Lawton

Jonathan Oegema, '08 Lawton

Durfee

Erika Oglesby, '08 Castro Valley, CA

Voorhees

Lauren Oldfield, '08 Glen Ellyn, IL

Kollen

Kelli Olender, '09 Tustln

Kollen

Rebecca Olsen, '09 Traverse City

Voorhees

Elisabeth Oosterhouse, '07 Byron Center

Collge East

Matthew Oosterhouse, '09 Holland

Kollen

Rachel Oosting, '09 Alma

Dykstra

Lucas Osterbur, '09 Greenville, O H

Kollen

Allison Overway, '09 Holland

Dykstra

Katie Oxendine, '09 Sterling Heights

Dykstra

Kevin O'Brien, '08 Battle Creek

College East

Chris O'Dea, '09 Lake O r i o n

Durfee

Ashley O'Shaughnessey, '07 Elk Rapids

Beck

Kathryn O'Connell, '09 Minnetonka, M N

Dykstra

Shane Pageau,'09 Lombard, IL

Phelps

Matt Palkowski, '07 Portage

Brumler

Underclassmen

1


Peter Pan, '08 Crandville

Cook

Mark Panaggio, '09 Muskegon

Voorhees

Emily Papple, '08 Holly

Dykstra

Laurie Parker, '07 Shelby Township

Parkview

Amber Parmelee, '09 Leslie

Dykstra

Jonathan Parrish, '08 Pinconning

Durfee

Megan Patterson, '08 Lake Bluff, IL

Cook

Greg Pavlak, '09 Hopkins

Voorhees

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Can you do a handstand? Climb a tree? Seniors David Boersma and Jon White sure can as they relax in the warm sunshine in the Pine Grove, and if you're lucky they may even show you how it is done. • photo by Ashley DeHudy •

People


«.JJa* I Jeffrey Payne, '09 N e w Baltimore

Scott

Joshua Payne, '07 N e w Baltimore

Kleinheksel

Kelly Payne, '09 Ada

Kollen

Stephen Pels, '08 Flossmoor, IL

Sweet

i\ Amanda Penar, '07 Lake Zurich, IL

Brownstone

Anna Pentiuk, '09 Leland

Dykstra

Laura Peterson, '07 Bay Villiage, O H

Welmers

Lia Peterson, '08 Holland

Lichty

Odd Year Moralers prepare for the Pull. Girls gathered in the third floor of Dykstra Hall to decorate white sweat pants in their year's colors. Walking up the stairs, one would turn into Cluster 3-2 and see a sea of girls, spread out with paint in hand. The girls brought out a computer to play music, and spent time together laughing and talking while showing their team spirit. • photo by Heather Garrett •

/ Underclassmen

177


Originally started as a light-hearted take on the Pull, The Push has evolved into a race involving shopping carts and elaborate costumes. Students line the course throughout the Pine Grove (see photo, right), eagerly awaiting the moment when this year's outlandish costumes will be reavealed (below). Here Ronnie Friend pushes Brad Houzenga along the sidwalk. Both team members wear roller skates as part of their groups costume. • photos by Megan Purtee •

Scott Peterson, '09 Seattle, W A

Durfee

Alisha Philo, '08 Greenville

Cook

Lani Pickard, '09 Shorewood, M N

Dykstra

Tracy Piersma, '09 Rochester Hills

Dykstra

Joel Pierson, '07 Traverse City

Kraker

Anna Pillot, '09 State College, PA

Scott

Sara Pillow, '07 Elkhart, IN

Boers

Dyiana Pinter, '08 M u n d e l e i n , IL

Cook

LnilWUi 178

People


Tamara Pischke, '09 M a p l e City

Scott

Thomas Plasman, '09 D o w n e r s Grove, IL

Kollen

Izumi Pointer, '08 A n n Arbor

Cook

Nikita Pointer, '09 A n n Arbor

Voorhees

Rebecca Pommerening, '09 Zealand

Phelps

Amanda Pontier, '09 Kijabe, Kenya

Van Vleck

Kelly Post, '09 Hudsonville

Dykstra

Kristen Post, '07 Peoria, IL

Schrier

Underclassmen

179


Brent Potts, '07 Hudsonville

Hudsonville

Meredith Praamsma, '08 Holland

Phelps

Martha Precup, '08 Boyne City

Cilmore

Jessica Previch, '09 Adrian

Dykstra

Amy Prutzman, '07 W h e a t o n , IL

Vennema

Grant Prutzman, '09 W h e a t o n , IL

Kollen

Angela Pschoika, '09 Stevensville

Kollen

Megan Purtee, '07 N o r t h Muskegon

DeCraaf

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People

In the final minutes of the Pull, each team's banners are ripped d o w n . N o longer does Even Year see only their colors of red and white, nor does O d d Year only focus I on maroon and yellow. For the first t i m e in the competition, the teams can nearly look each other in the eye across the churning waters of the Black River. Coaches, Pullers and Moralers, both the current ones and those from years past, stand at the head of the line and encourage the Pullers and Moralers to hang on until the end. • photo by Megan Purtee •


Christian musician and guitarist M a t t W e r t z has played on Hope's campus every year for three years in a row. • photo by Ashley D e H u d y •

Laura Purves, '08 Gibsonia, PA

Phelps

Emilie Puttrich, '09 Arlington, IL

Dykstra

Jennifer Pyle, '07 Hinsdale, IL

Fried

Tyler Racey, '08 Ludington

Wyckoff

Gloria Rak, '07 Geneva, IL

Schrier

James Ralston, '09 Holly

Durfee

Kendall Ramsden, '08 G r a n d Haven

Kollen

Megan Rapelje, '08 Petoskey

Cook

Underclassmen

181


Jonathan Rau, '07 Brighton

College East

Tally Reeverts, '07 Colchester, IL

Boers

Cody Reed, '09 Caledonia

Cook

Rachel Rees, '09 Fishers, IN

Dykstra

The newly named A. Paul Schaap Science Center gives Hope College one of the nation's premiere undergraduate science education facilities. Hope has been recognized multiple times nationally as a leader in undergraduate science education and for its emphasis on research-based learning. Most recently, the 2006 edition of the "America's Best Colleges" guide published by "U.S. News and World Report" included Hope in its listing of colleges and universities that are outstanding in their emphasis on undergraduate research or creative projects. Although the schools on the list have been unranked numerically in recent years, Hope was tied for fourth place in the U.S. when the category debuted in 2002. In May, 2006, the center was named in honor of alumnus A. Paul Schaap '67. • photo by Ashley DeHudy •

Brittaney Reest, '09 Holland

Kollen

Katie Reincke, '09 Eaton Rapids

Dykstra

Lauren Reus, '09 Olympia, W A

Kollen

Rosie Rexford, '07 Newport

182

People

Vander Borgh

/


Greg Reznich, '08 Alma

College East

Richard Rhodes, '09 Commerce Township

Kollen

Erin Richards, '09 Clarkston

Dykstra

Bethany Richardson, '08 Staunton, VA

Voorhees

.'ri

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Brent Boersma ar Oegema c o m p e t e in 'The Push' dressed as Fruit of the Loom fruits during Spring Fling • photo b y . Heather Garrett

fi

M a t t Richardson, '09 Scott

Elizabeth Richert, '08 Lichty

Valerie Rideout, '09 Fishers, IN

Dykstra

Jillian Rink, '09 Holland

Holland

Underclassmen


Ashleigh Rios, '09 South Haven

Lichty

Ryan Ritter, '09 Maumee, O H

i

Wyckoff

Allison Rivers, '09 M o u n t Prospect, IL

Lichty

Anna Roberts, '09 Metamora

Scott

:

Courtenay Roberts, '07 Cleveland, O H

Cook

Leticia Parker, '09 Holland

Scott

Lindsay Roberts, '09 Manistee

Dykstra

Julie Robinson, '08 Warsaw, IN

Brownstone

Did you know? /

Laura Robinson, '08 Barrington, IL

Van Vleck

Katie Robrahn, '08 Grand Rapids

Wyckoff

Stephen Rodriguez, '07 Macomb

College East

Andrew Rogers, '09 Sheridan

Wyckoff

Jerusha Rogers, '07 Fort Kent Mills, ME

Welmers

Laura Rojeski, '07 M o u n t Pleasant

Poll

Diego Romero, '09 Holland

Scott

Katie Ross, '09 St Louis Park, M N

Dykstra

Samuel Rossman, '09 Belmont

Kollen

Barbra Rubio, '09 Holland

Scott

Carmen Ruffino, '09 Holland

People

Scott

Hope has students from 43 states and territories and 32 foreign countne


Students made difference with film about missing woman In 1974, H o p e College s t u d e n t J a n e t C h a n d l e r d i s a p p e a r e d o n e w i n t e r ' s n i g h t while w o r k i n g h e r job as a desk clerk at t h e B l u e Mill I n n . H e r b o d y was found the next day along a highway. H e r m u r d e r went unsolved for m o r e t h a n a q u a r t e r c e n t u r y — until a H o p e College d o c u m e n t a r y film d i r e c t e d by H o p e p r o fessor, Dr. David Schock, d r e w o u t m o r e witnesses. "It's a r a r e c h a n c e to b e in a position w h e r e you can d o s o m e t h i n g t h a t will r e s u l t in justice," said p r o lessor David Schock. "I'll tell you w h a t — it's h u m b l i n g . It'll knock you to y o u r k n e e s . " Schock got t h e idea to m a k e a m o v i e a b o u t t h e 1979 case a f t e r talking with a r e t i r i n g H o l l a n d police

c a p t a i n w h o r e m a i n e d t r o u b l e d by t h e lack of a resolution. His class p r o d u c e d a n 8 0 - m i n u t e d o c u m e n t a r y , " W h o Killed J a n e t C h a n d l e r ? " which a i r e d o n a G r a n d R a p i d s public television station in J a n u a r y 2004. It h e l p e d r e n e w public interes t a n d g e n e r a t e d n e w leads f o r investigators to follow, r e s u l t i n g in a n arrest of R o b e r t Michael Lynch, 66, of T h r e e O a k s , Michigan a c c o r d i n g to A t t o r n e y G e n e r a l Mike C o x d u r i n g a news c o n f e r e n c e at H o l l a n d police h e a d q u a r t e r s . Lynch was a r r a i g n e d in H o l l a n d o n two c o u n t s of felony m u r d e r a n d o n e c o u n t of p r e m e d i t a t e d m u r d e r in t h e s t r a n g u l a t i o n d e a t h of 23-year-old J a n e t C h a n d l e r .

Underclassmen

185


Elizabeth Rypma, '09 Whitehall

Dykstra

Alice Ryskamp, '08 Grand Ledge

Cook

Jessica Sabon, '08 Rockford

Cook

Nathan Sayer, '08 East Stroudsburg, PA

Kollen

Stephanie Schaap, '08 Hudsonville

Cilmore

Kelly Schaefer, '09 Fenton

Dykstra

John Schaftenaar, '09 Holland

Durfee

Amanda Scheeringa, '08 Schererville, IN

Kollen

1 All spiffed up and ready to go, Hope students attend the annual Winter Fantasia dance put on by the Social Activities Committee at the Amway Grand in downtown Grand Rapids, •photo by Tara Fisher*

People


Rob Schellenberg, '09 Phelps

Jenison

Kara Scheuerman, '08 N e w Freedom, PA

Van Vleck

John Schlotz, '09 Kirkwood, M O

Kollen

Eric Schmidt, '09 Kalamazoo

Phelps

Jessica Schmidt, '09 St. Joseph

Dykstra

Caitlin Schrock, '09 Crandville

Dykstra

Karena Schroeder, '09 Byron Center

Scott

Nick Schroen, '09 Portage

Scott

A relaxed Hope student enjoys a good read during the Earth Jam festivities held in the Pine Grove. • photo by Ashley D e H u d y •

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Underclassmen


Rev. Trygve Johnson endured his first full school year on campus as the newest Dean of the Chapel. Johnson has been credited with breathing a breath of fresh air through Campus Ministries. Meanwhile, weekly Chapel services and "The Gathering" continue to be enormously popular on campus. • photos by Tally Reeverts and Public Relations •


Chelsea Schrotenboer, '09 Zeeland

Cilmore

Christine Schultheis, '09 Fowlerville

Lichty

Randall Schultz, '09 Grand Haven

Voorhees

Erin Schumaker, '08 B o w l i n g Green, KY

Gilmore

Diana Schwab, '09 West Bloomfield

Scott

Lynde Seaver, '08 Grand Haven

Voorhees

Emily Seib, '09 Waukesha, W l

Cilmore

Meghan Servais, '09 Grosse Pointe W o o d s

Scott

Joseph Seymour, '08 Holland

Durfee

Kathleen Shannon, '09 O l d Lyme, CT

Dykstra

Laura Shears, '09 Normal, IL

Dykstra

Jason Shirk, '08 Muskegon

Cook

Jessica Shugart, '08 Traverse City

Lichty

Trevor Shull, '08 Macomb

Cook

Kevin Sietsema, '09 Byron Center

Cook

Christopher Sikkema, '09 Rochester, M N

Phelps

Kelsey Silver, '09 Holland

Scott

Heidi Simmons, '08 Brookfield, IL

Cook

Matt Simon, '07 Grand Rapids

Belt

Kelly Sina, '07 Watertown, W l

Kollen

Underclassmen

189


Jennifer Skoog, '09 Grand Rapids

Dykstra

Mark Slotman, '09 Cedar Grove, W l

Durfee

Laura Smallegan, '09 Zeeland

Gilmore

Amy Smith, '09 Grand Rapids

Lichty

Ashley Smith, '07 Lancaster, PA

Welmers

Ben Smith, '08 Vermontville

Phelps

Brandon Smith, '09 Kokomo, IN

Durfee

Casey Smith, '08 Holland

J>P

People

Durfee


Opposite page: Students stream out f r o m chapel on a cloudy, snow-dreary day. The m o n t h of December t o p p e d the charts for snowfall. After Thanksgiving, it snowed all the way through the e n d of the semester. This page: This student just got out of his last final for the semester. In celebration, he takes a dive into snow.

Courtney Smith, '08 Hudsonville

Kollen

M o l l y Smith, '09 Urbana, IL

Dykstra

Robyn Smith, '09 Brown City

Van Vleck

Trevor Smith, '09 Holland

Durfee

James Snyder, '09 Pickford

Scott

Mackenzie Snyder, '09 Paw Paw

Wyckoff

Zachary Snyder, '08 G r a n d Rapids

Kollen

Kari Soderstrom, '07 Madison, CT

Kuizenga

Underclassmen

191


Sarah Sosolik, '09 Oswego, IL

Dykstra

Anna Southwell, '07 Suttons Bay

College East

Amy Speelman, '09 Darien, IL

Dykstra

Sarah Sprick, '09 Hudsonville

Dykstra

Samuel Adams diligently practices the piano in one of the private practice rooms available for music students in Nykerk Music Hall. • photo by Ashley DeHudy •

Nicole Stegenga, '09 Saline

Phelps

Andrew Steiger, '09 Arlington Heights, IL

Phelps

Carol Beth Steiner, '07 Rochester

Patterson

Emily Sterley, '08 Zionsville, IN

192

People

Gilmore


Sara Stevenson, '08 Three Rivers

Dykstra

Alexander Stack, '09 Scott

Cabool, M O

Brian Straw, '09 Kollen

Arlington, VA

Katherine Stuit, '09 Grand Rapids

Dykstra

to campus. • photos by Zach Trumble •

Erin Sundberg, '09 Kollen

Grand Rapids

Paul Swan, '09 Kollen

Zanesville, O H

Melanie Sweedyk, '09 Dykstra

Jeffrey Swift, '09 Milwaukee, W l

Wyckoff

•Aiisia Underclassmen


Windmill Island is the location of many events both in the community and for campus activities, including the Hope College sponsored "Community Day." A beautiful spot to play "tourist," the island was also the destination for the Annual Run-Bike-Swim-Walk. • photo courtesy Public Relations •

Kara Tabor, '09 Hanson, M A

Dykstra

Melyn Tank, '09 Midland

Lichty

Sean Tarnas, '09 West Bloomfield

Phelps

Alexander Taylor, '08 Burlington, W l

Wyckoff

I i

Joy Taylor, '09 Hudson, FL

Dykstra ^

Allison Templeton, '09 Appleton, W l

Scott

Katie Terpstra, '09 Zeeland

Cilmore

Derek Terrell, '09 Lexington, KY

194

People

Scott

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Scott Teusink, '07 Fremont

Cook

Tiffany Thaler, '08 Middleville

Lichty

Ronald Thebo, '09 Wayland

Phelps

Whitney Thomas, '08 Granville, O H

Phelps

Esther Thompson, '09 A v o n , NY

Dykstra

Keith Thompson, '08 Muskegon

Phelps

Sarah Thorne, '09 Big Rapids

Dykstra

Julie Tillman, '08 Dearborn

Cilmore

The Orientation Assistants get the first taste of Phelps Dining. After a couple of months at Phelps, freshmen come to get the hang of the "scramble" system as well as get to know the staff members that make Phelps run efficiently. Over the past few years, Phelps has made several improvements to meet student demands. Management added a few waffle makers, which are especially popular during weekend meals. A few extra stations are the hot sandwiches and the "blue plate meals that take dining oft the beaten path. • photo courtesy Public Relations •

Underclassmen

195


Part of the "joys" of college is buying books. M a n y students race to the HopeGeneva Bookstore upon their arrival on campus in an attempt to get a first crack at the 'used' book selection, all in hopes to save a few valuable dollars. • photo courtesy Public Relations •

Emily Timmons, '07 Kalamazoo

Parkview

Ashley Timpner, '09 Rochester Hills

Dykstra

Emily Tipton, '07 Battle Creek

Kooiker

Jason Todd, '08 Durfee

Niles

Zach Trumble, '09 Jenlson

Voorhees

Kyle Tuinstra, '09 Rockford

Kollen

\

Chris Turbessi, '08 Nunica

Voorhees

W a n d a Turner, '09 Holland

Dykstra

Sara Tyler, '09 N e w Mi l ford, CT

Voorhees

Claire Tyner, '07 A n n Arbor

Beck

Kimberly VanBronkhorst, '07 Zeeland

Steffens

Ben VanArendonk, '09 Bigfork, M T

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Durfee

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Underclassmen

19


Allison Van Beek, '09 Libertyville, IL

Dykstra

Kandace Van Dahm, '09 Riverside, IL

Dykstra

Melissa Van Dahm, '09 Schaumburg, IL

Dykstra

Rob VanDette, '09 Rochester Hills

Scott

Corey Van Dyke, '08 H i c k o r y Corners

Wyckoff

Evan Van Heukeiom, '09 Zeeland

Kollen

Julie VanLaan, '09 Grand Rapids

Dykstra

Kylee Van Oostendorp, '09 Zeeland

Cilmore

Jacklyn Van Prooyen, '09 O r l a n d Park, IL

Voorhees

Laura Van Tassell, '09 Spencer, IA

Voorhees

Mari von Websky, '09 Holland

Durfee

Lyndsey Van Wyk, '09 Bloomingdale, IL

Dykstra

Jonathan Van Wyngarden,'09 Holland

Kollen

Sarah Van Zanten, '09 Hudsonville

Dykstra

Matt VandeGuchte, '09 Hamilton

Kollen

Nate Vande Guchte, '08 Hamilton

Durfee

J Andrea Vandenburgh, '08 Jackson

Gilmore

Sarah Vander Heide, '09 Grand Rapids

Dykstra

Anna Vander Zouwen, '07 Midland

Pieters

Megan Vandermaas, '09 Hudsonville

198

People

Dykstra


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The final celebration at Dance Marathon consists of the unveiling of the total money donated to the Devos Children s Hospital, a huge balloon drop from the ceiling of the D o w Center, and lots of cheering by all involved. Pat Ratliff, Event Management Director, coordinated the balloon drop. There were approximately 800 balloons put into the net which all had to be blown up and tied by hand. Moralers j u m p up and d o w n on their last legs, thinking about the end of the 24 hours on their feet. The miracle children and siblings consider the balloon drop the cherry on top of the entire event, •photos by Zach Trumble*

Underclassmen

199


Leah Verkade, '08 Grand Rapids

Lichty

Victoria Vicencio, '09 Holland

Scott

Jeremiah Vipond, '08 Williamsburg

Wyckoff

Katherine Visscher, '09 Holland

Dykstra

Karly Visser, '08 Jenison

Van Vleck

Ryan Vogelzang, '09 Holland

Kollen

Emma Vought, '09 Plymouth

Van Vleck

Alicia Voyles, '08 Fremont

Phelps

1 Registration can be a daunting task when embarking on a journey through college. Scheduling classes seems difficult at first, if not overwhelming, but caring professors and advisers from the Registrar's Office take time to work students through the process. They help students consider their major or interests and couple those with classes they will need in order to graduate. Here Maura Reynolds highfives Stephanie Hansens after a successful registration.

200

People


Did you know? Hope has 11 residence halls, 15 apartment complexes, and 72 cottages on campus.

Amy VanDerMeulen, '08 Marshall

Cilmore

Matt VanderVelde, "09 Grandville

Kollen

Molly VanDeursen, '09 Sullivan, IL

Dykstra

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Rebecca VanGessel, '09 Grandville

Dykstra

Brooke Van Hoven, '09 Hudsonville

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Dykstra

Elissa Van Nest, '08 Ferndale

Van Vleck

Daniel Vasko, '07 Camden

Kollen

PlayFair is a huge event taking elements of icebreakers, mixers, and motivational activities, which creates a unique atmosphere in the D o w Center. Freshmen and Orientation Assistants gather to do back-to-back dances, find groups of people with the same birthday, and learn a lot of new faces and names. Left to right: The Orientation Assistants start PlayFair by drumming the gym floor and then forming a human tunnel for the freshmen to run through. Approximately 700 students congregate to bond as a class and to meet new people.

Underclassmen

201


As far as records show, this p o w - w o w is Hope's first ever on campus. Native Americans and students gathered on campus, first in the Pine Grove and then in Maas Auditorium due to rain. To aid in the celebration, Phelps Dining served food typical to Michigan tribes. • photo by PR • a** .

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Camaron Voyles, '07 Fremont

Cook

Lara Wagner, '07 Northville

DeCraaf

Meghan Wahl, '09 Defiance, O H

Dykstra

Verena Walter, '09 Neustadt, Germany

Poll

Kensley Walters, '08 Allendale

Phelps

Joshua Warner, '08 H u n t e r t o w n , IN

Cook

Kyle Warner, '07 W . Bloomfield

Vander Borgh

Ronna Warner, '09 Plainwell

Kollen

Audrey Wasielewski, '09 Traverse City

Dykstra

Ailie Weaver, '09 Grand Ledge

Phelps

Samantha Webbert, '09 Holland

Gilmore

Amy Weber, '09 H o f f m a n Estates, IL

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Dykstra

Sara Webster, '09 Kalamazoo

Phelps

Heidi Weir, '08 Dearborn

\

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Cook

Rachel Wendt, '08 Hanover Park, IL

Kollen

Ashley Westcott, '09 Newaygo

Voorhees

Andrew Westra, '09 Spring Lake

Kollen

Paul Whalen, '09 Wescosville, PA

Scott

Leah Wicander, '07 M o u n t Pleasant

Pieters

Brian Wiest, '07 Fargo, N D

Oggel

Underclassmen

203


Nykerk coaches and executive board members man the Nykerk table, christened by the Nykerk Cup, at the Activities Fair during Orientation Weekend. • photo courtesy PR •

Theresa Wigton, '09 M a p l e City

Scott

Alexa Williams, '09 Kalamazoo

Dykstra

Morgan Willming, '09 South Haven

Dykstra

Emily Wilson, '07 Cedarburg, W l

Brumler

Erica Wilson, '09 A u b u r n , IN

Phelps

Jonathan Wilson, '09 Grand Rapids

Kollen

Derek Wimbley, '09 Detroit

Scott

Heather Winchell, '08 Rochester, NY

204

People

Cilmore


Hope students have traditionally been good at aiding others in their time of need. The campus proved this once again with the victims of Hurricane Katrina, pulling together resources and food items to send to those in need through the all-campus effort called 'Pulling for Hope.' Here Jennica Skoug and Lauren Engel sort through the last few items to go into the truck. • photo by Ashley DeHudy •

Meghan Winer, '09 Ada

Dykstra

Jacob Wingate, '09 Tustin

Durfee

Yvette Wissner, '09 Sebewaing

Phelps

Matthew Wixson, '08 Albion

Durfee

Dan Wizner, '07 Hemlock

Smith

Joseph Woldring, '09 Hamilton

Kollen

Scott Wolf, '09 Bath

Kollen

Rebekah Woods, '09 Lowell

J

Dykstra

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Underclassmen

205


Marisa Wortley, '09 Haslett

Cilmore

Leah Wyatt, '09 Colts Neck, N |

Dykstra

Brianna Wynne, '09 Holland

Scott

Tommy Yamaoka, '08 Zeeland

Durfee

Mark Yapp, '08 A n n Arbor

Kollen

Emilie Yatzek, '09 Morenci

Phelps

Brent Younglove, '09 Rockford

Scott

Yuliya Canenko, '09 Holland

Scott

Daniel Zarzynski, '09 Buffalo Grove, IL

Phelps

Andrew Zendler, '09 Flint

Phelps

Jon Zita, '08 Darien, IL

Durfee

Nick Zupancich, '09 Grand Haven

Cook

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Dave VandeWaa talks with Professor Kathleen Verduin after his 11:00 am British Literature II class in Lubbers Hall. For VandeWaa, British Literature II is not only enjoyable but also fulfilling a requirement for his English minor. • photo by Heather Garrett •

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206

People


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When the President's away the squirrels will play. The tree outside President and Mrs. Bultman's house houses several squirrels. O n a warm and sunny afternoon, the squirrels were caught chasing each other. • photo by Tally Reeverts •

Underclassmen

207


olav Page 230: A CASA volunteer makes a craft with a local student who participates in the CASA p r o g r a m . CASA volunteers work either Mondays a n d Wednesdays or Tuesdays and Thursdays, according to their schedules. The experience impacts both the young student a n d the college student. 208

Groups

Page 235: Erika Oglesby and Megan Purtee, both V a n d e r p r o v members, act out a scene that is part of a game. Audience m e m b e r s can choose the circumstances of the scenes, which leads the way to inevitably hilarious improvisation. V a n d e r p r o v draws capacity crowds to their shows.

Page 216: .Nicholas Engel, the C a m p u s News Editor for Hope's newspaper The Anchor, checks over his layout in the newspaper's new office, which habitates the southwest c o r n e r of the Martha Miller Center for Clobal Communication. This year also marked a new style for the p a p e r .


Stephen Pels takes his place in front of the goal during the pre-game warm-up. In this January 29 home match against Calvin, the Flying Dutchmen took the victory 5-0. • photo by Zach Trumble •

Divider


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O p e r a t i o n ; Live I n Oh-Five. T m i n u s t h r e e m o n t h s , two d i r e c t o r s w e r e h a r d at work. I n a d d i t i o n to interviewing a n d selecting t h e staff d u r i n g t h e s p r i n g , they s p e n t t h e i r e n t i r e s u m m e r vacation w o r k i n g in t h e b a s e m e n t of DeWitt, a t t e n d i n g countless m e e t i n g s , s c h e d u l i n g h u n d r e d s of spectacular events, organizing t h e small a r m y of s t u d e n t s w h o r u n o r i e n t a t i o n in t h e fall, a n d a n y o t h e r o d d s a n d e n d s to m a k e orie n t a t i o n all it can be. T m i n u s two weeks, twentyfive assistant d i r e c t o r s a r r i v e d on c a m p u s a n d s p e n t f o u r t e e n h o u r s a day until school b e g a n finishing all t h e p r e p w o r k , w r a p p i n g u p loose e n d s , t r a i n i n g t h e o r i e n t a t i o n assistants, a n d ultimately r u n n i n g t h e actual o r i e n t a t i o n . T m i n u s f o u r days, two h u n d r e d o r i e n t a t i o n assistants m o v e d in, b e g a n t r a i n i n g a n d got psyched f o r t h e largest i n c o m i n g class ever. T h e y w e r e t h e first faces of H o p e these new families saw in just a few short days. T m i n u s zero, over f o u r t h o u -

210

Groups

s a n d first y e a r s t u d e n t s , transfers, p a r e n t s , siblings, and friends descended upon Hope's campus. T h e o r i e n t a t i o n staff m e t t h e caravans at t h e sidewalks a n d p a r k i n g lots, u n l o a d e d , a n d delivered everyt h i n g to t h e r o o m s for t h e families m a k i n g m o v e in a b r e e z e ; they lead t h e small g r o u p s t h r o u g h o u t t h e w e e k e n d , familiarizing t h e new s t u d e n t s with H o p e , f r o m t h e n u a n c e s of e a t i n g in Phelps to n e v e r picking u p a stray Frisbee in t h e Pine Grove; they a t t e n d e d all of t h e f u n a n d exciting events with t h e s t u d e n t s ; they w e r e t h e f r i e n d l y face a n d t h e c a r i n g h e a r t these stud e n t s d e s e r v e in this new a n d s o m e t i m e s challenging a d v e n t u r e called college. O r i e n t a t i o n , in all its glory, n o m a t t e r h o w spectacular, w o u l d be n o t h i n g without t h e g r o u p of s t u d e n t s t h a t sacrifice m u c h to m a k e others' first e x p e r i e n c e b e t h e best it can be. •article by Ryan Lincoln • p h o t o s courtesy of Public Relations^


Residential

"Each and every staff member can be seen providing assistance to students in many different methods... T h e Residential Life a n d H o u s i n g staff at H o p e College a r e all d e d i c a t e d to e n h a n c i n g a s t u d e n t ' s total e d u c a t i o n a l e x p e r i e n c e by p r o v i d i n g a n d facilitating a n e n j o y a b l e o n - c a m p u s living e x p e r i e n c e . Living on c a m p u s is a n i n t e g r a l p a r t of a s t u d e n t ' s total e d u c a t i o n a n d can b e a n exciting a n d r e w a r d i n g e x p e r i e n c e . Residents m e e t new p e o p l e , a r e e x p o s e d to new ideas, cultures, a n d d e v e l o p f r i e n d s h i p s t h a t can last a lifetime. T h e Residential Life a n d H o u s i n g staff a r e h i g h ly visible in Residential Halls, cottages, a n d a p a r t m e n t s . Each a n d every staff m e m b e r can b e seen p r o v i d i n g assistance to s t u d e n t s in m a n y d i f f e r e n t m e t h o d s , f r o m p r o v i d i n g i n f o r m a l c o u n s e l i n g , to r o o m m a t e m e d i a t i o n , to a h e l p i n g h a n d with moving, a n d g e t t i n g a c q u a i n t e d with H o p e College. Residential Life a n d H o u s i n g staff p r o v i d e d m a n y u n i q u e a n d new l e a r n i n g o p p o r t u n i t i e s d u r i n g t h e

2 0 0 5 - 2 0 0 6 school year. T h e y i n c l u d e d e v e r y t h i n g f r o m t h e W h i t e Cross Project; giving s t u d e n t s a n iny o u r - f a c e look at t h e a m o u n t of alcohol r e l a t e d d e a t h s in o n e year, to a n e v e n t a b o u t e a t i n g d i s o r d e r s called .Andrea's Voice, a f o u n d a t i o n s t a r t e d by Doris a n d T o m S m e l t z e r , to t h e S t u d e n t L e a d e r s h i p T e a m plann i n g a n I r o n C h e f - H o p e Style. L e a r n i n g o p p o r t u n i ties c o n t i n u e d in each c o m m u n i t y , such as Kollen a n d C o o k halls, f u n d r a i s e r f o r D a n c e M a r a t h o n called "Did you h e a r t h e BUZZ a b o u t D a n c e M a r a t h o n ? " T h e y raised m o n e y by s h a v i n g t h e i r h e a d s . I n Wyckoff a n i g h t of " H e said S h e said," o r in Dykstra a r e s i d e n t s h a r i n g h e r o w n e x p e r i e n c e w h e n it c a m e to d r i n k ing. L e a r n i n g o p p o r t u n i t i e s c o m e in m a n y u n i q u e a n d d i f f e r e n t ways, a s t u d e n t can always find s o m e t h i n g exciting g o i n g o n in a residential hall, cottage o r a p a r t m e n t c o m p l e x , •article by M a t t h e w D'Oyly*

Orientation Staff / Residential Life

211


T h i s is a w o n d e r f u l y e a r f o r t h e Social Activities C o m m i t t e e (SAC). SAC is c o m p r i s e d of a b o u t thirty s t u d e n t s w h o love to h a v e f u n a n d a r e c o m m i t t e d to e n s u r i n g t h e rest of t h e c a m p u s has f u n too. T h i s y e a r SAC o r g a n i z e d a n d s p o n s o r e d over two h u n d r e d events! For e x a m p l e , t h e a n n u a l L a b o r Day Picnic p r o v i d e d s t u d e n t s t h e p e r f e c t o p p o r t u n i t y to e n j o y s o m e delicious f o o d , g r e a t music, musician Eric Hutchinson, and beautiful weather together after a f a b u l o u s s u m m e r a n d kick t h e school y e a r off r i g h t . In a d d i t i o n to t h e n u m e r o u s movies, c o m e d i a n s , a h y p n o t i s t a n d o t h e r artists b r o u g h t to c a m p u s n e x t year, t h e c o m m i t t e e d e c i d e d to screen Crash f r e e of c h a r g e in the Kletz with pizza a n d p o p . After t h e provocative, real life d r a m a d e p i c t i n g r a c e relations in t h e city of Los Angeles c o n c l u d e d , SAC held a r o u n d table discussion c o m p r i s e d of H o p e

faculty a n d staff to d e b r i e f a n d discus t h e i m p o r tant issues t h e film a d d r e s s e s . S t u d e n t s w e r e able to ask t o u g h q u e s t i o n s a n d discuss o p e n l y . T h e film p r o v e d to b e a g r e a t s p r i n g b o a r d into t h e discussion, a n d t h e event was a t r e m e n d o u s success. SAC also h o s t e d Mini C a m p s , a first G e n e r a t i o n P u e r t o Rican i m m i g r a n t s i n g e r / s o n g writer, a n d T h e a M o n y e e , a n a w e s o m e A f r i c a n - A m e r i c a n slam poet. These a m a z i n g w o m e n c h a l l e n g e d a n d ins p i r e d t h e a u d i e n c e with t h e i r w o r d s a n d t r e m e n d o u s talent. S p r i n g Fling w r a p p e d u p t h e year as usual with a carnival-style celebration i n c l u d i n g a B B Q , h u g e b l o w - u p activities, a n d festive 80s/90s rock music. T h e d e d i c a t e d s t u d e n t s sacrificed m a n y l o n g w e e k e n d nights to e n s u r e all these great events w e r e a sucess. •article by Ryan Lincoln*

Social

ir Some of the events planned by SAC include Spring Fling. They coordinated Bull Riding, Sumo Wrestling, and a giant Velcro Wall. SAC also provides all kinds of food for the Spring Fling BBQ. 'photos courtesy of Public Relations*

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M


T h e last school year has p r o v e n successful for t h e

m e m b e r s a t t e n d i n g the meetings on a weekly basis.

club d u e to the efforts of h a r d w o r k i n g m e m b e r s ,

Using the past for an example, the H o p e College

club leadership, a n d c a m p u s staff m e m b e r s . T h e

Business G r o u p h o p e s to create a clear picture of

Business Club u n d e r w e n t m a n y changes a n d has

w h e r e the organization is going a n d what it will

evolved quite well. Last year, the club was a very dif-

look like w h e n we get there. T h e r e are several

ferent organization. T h i s year they c h a n g e d its n a m e

key el em en t s that create the vision of the Busi-

f r o m Synergy Business G r o u p to the Business Club,

ness G r o u p ' s f u t u r e including: networking, real

and r e v a m p e d with new l e a d e r s h i p a n d a new vision.

world experience, e n t r e p r e n e u r s h i p , service, a n d

T h e club started m e e t i n g weekly to discuss business

campus

enrichment,

'story

by

Brad

Matson*

news a n d topics, listen to business leaders, a n d plan several c a m p u s events a n d g r o u p trips. In this evolution process, t h e m e m b e r base increased o u t s t a n d ingly to forty, with a n y w h e r e f r o m seven to fifteen

"There are several key elements that create our vision, entrepreneurship, service, and campus enrichment."


For those involved in the oldest continual collegiate athletic event in the nation, the Pnll really is what life is about. Those three weeks in September take on a particularly unusual energy, where, for the individuals involved, life is "pulled" into a dimension of new parameters. Realworld events exhibit a foggy, m u t e d quality, as friends and classes, studying, social work - a n d s l e e p - go into standby mode. As with all preceding Pnll seasons, this year began with two teams, each committed to emerging as the victor. Once again, the even/odd aggravation rubbed old scars raw, and became simply a matter of "getting even." Last year created heartbreak for the 08 team, as they gave too much rope to the '07 victors. What was given away last year by a narrow margin was not about to be given away this year by any length, ft sounds simple... Recruit the best pullers. Ferret out the best moralers. Train hard. Bond. Practice hard. Practice long. Practice h a r d e r and longer. Bond more. Strategize. Motivate. Unify. Show up, pull hard. Win. What do you say to engage a team of individuals into giving more physically than they are capable of offering? How do you motivate and encourage each individual to death-grip a pipe of grimy h e m p for three hours, when every fiber of

their beingsays "let go?" Pull was a war of mental magnitude. O n September 24, 20 pullers and 20 moralers, along with their 11 steadfast coaches, gathered on the north ^ shore of the Black River to face the other side. Havnessed into custom "vests" with a king's ransom of duck ' tape, the pullers positioned themselves in their pits c one final time, with their loyal moralers at their sides, i i It was time to "Get Even." It was the time to be Even, v Heave by heave, inch by inch, minute by minute. The or- | ange rope mark progressed through pit one, then pit two, almost to three. With endurance beyond measure, minutes t u r n e d to hours and inches to feet. Sweat turned pits to mudbaths, and bodies steeled into frozen contortions. It was 1 time. Vibrant banners, once landscape billboards blocking 1 view of the south shore, sailed in shreds against the fall sky, ' revealing the battle-worn opposition. Frenzied last calls ral- t lied a final heave, and then it was over. Even got Even. By 1 20', 1", revenge was realized. Two teams, a chunk of rope, , • a dirty river, and a perfect fall day. T h e spirit of T h e Pull e n d u r e d . This year, it was about "Getting Even." • article by Tisa T h o m p s o n • photos courtesy of Matt McCabe •

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o A l n K n o l l " J u m p " , H a h n " A r o u n d " ; y : K a M e w a r d " b i g " , S m i t h " K e d " ; T U t w y n s " M a s o c n i s t i c , i n a i e r " M e r c e n a r i e s ; 11 : / v i c c a D e • L a u s i i c , u g i o u -

"Commotion";12:Kaffka"Money",Osborne"Baby";13:Vapp"Puppy",Delaney"Bloodtnirsty";14:Bruner"Accipiter",Edwards"Capitalis";14Alt:Reen"Aec|uitas Rice "Veritas"; 15:Frazier "Rocky", Smith "Bullwinkle"; 16:Haynes "Delirious", Cardella "Uproar"; 17:Ganapini "Gun", Ryan "Show"; Anchor: Witkowski "Free dom",Weingartner"Finem";Coaches:{Reps) O'Brien & Anderson, (Anchor) Sedjo&VanDam,Tamminga, Thompson, Rooy,DeKoster,DeBoest, Jackson, SHaacle

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T h e cool silence of t h a i S e p t e m b e r S a t u r d a y e x p l o d e d with the arrival of the 2009 Pull T e a m u p o n the b a n k s of the Black River, w h e r e they climbed into their pits clad in m a r o o n a n d gold, r e a d y to r e p r e s e n t O d d Year for the 108th Pull of H o p e College history. T w e n t y first-year m e n a n d twenty first-year w o m e n spent t h r e e weeks testing the limits of their bodies a n d m i n d s in the sweltering S e p t e m b e r heat, steeling themselves against the f o r m i d a b l e class of 2008, a n d p u s h i n g each other to new heights of competition in the most taxing, strategic, a n d l o n g - s t a n d i n g tug-of-war tradition in America. T h e i r efforts were valiant, a n d a l t h o u g h the s o p h o m o r e s ultimately prevailed, the f r e s h m e n team exemplified t h e tenacity a n d resilience that their coaches h a d stressed t h r o u g h o u t their training. "I can't express how p r o u d 1 a m of the 09 Pull T e a m , " says coach J o e Albers. " T h e y pulled until the e n d , a n d

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i

they never gave u p . I know for a fact that next year this loss will be a s t r o n g asset in re t a k i n g o u r rope." T h e 09 Pull T e a m overcame m a n y obstacles along the r o a d to S e p t e m b e r 2 4 t h — i n c l u d i n g shifting practice fields, low participation n u m b e r s , a n d distant training areas that n e e d e d to be r e a c h e d o n foot—but they arrived on Pull Day as a unified body, p r e p a r e d to should e r the O d d - Y e a r tradition with the vigor a n d kinship of the c e n t u r y of pullers which h a d passed b e f o r e t h e m . " T h o s e t h r e e weeks show you who you are," says Zach H o e r n s c h e m e y e r , Pit # 2 . "You realize that it's not a b o u t you. It's a b o u t a team, a n d a b r o t h e r h o o d , a n d a family." In time, the yells of Pull Day f a d e d , the m u d of the Black River washed away, a n d the r o p e b u r n s h e a l e d , b u t each m e m b e r of the 09 Pull T e a m h a d learned lessons that would stay with t h e m for a lifetime, •article by Christian Piers " p h o t o s by Zach T r u m b l e *

'Pit 1: Mast Iron , Hagen Fist ; 2 Hoernschemeyer "Bullet", Sweas "Fatal"; 3: Richardson "Prosecutor", Vantaan "Judge"; 4: Talsma "Damage", Thomas "Severe"; 5: Legan "Apocolypse", Fetter "Inevitable"; 6: Fahnstrom "Ignite", Evans "Spark"; 7: Westra "Dragon", Benjamin "Komodo"; 8: Kinsey "Raptor", Hoppen "Veioce" 9: Jordan "Hammer", Ciegler "Nails"; 10: Krueger "Omega", Sullivan "Alpha"; 11: Prutzman "Bombtrack", Baars "Blitz"; 11 Alt: Tuinstra "Chainsaw", Homakie "Destruction"; 12: Swan "Reeper", DeVecht "Grim"; 13: Nelson "Butcher", Heeren "Bloody"; 14: Brieden "Ghost", Watters "Midnight"; 15: Kelley "Phantom", Holbrook "Shadow"; 16: Depke "Slayer", Barbieri "Savage"; 17: |Gilliland "Hades", Kunzi "Persephone", Anchor: Griffin "Shock", Stille "Electric"; Anchor Alt: Neucks "Colossus",Thompson "Titan"; Coaches: (Reps) Specht & Mignin, (Anchor) Betke & Sedjo, Dejong, Blacquiere. Piers, Hancock, Munk, & Albers*


Amnesty p u t e r n a i n d e p e n d e n t huirHHriphts^SPiilliJrt 1961 by British lawyer Peter Benenson, Heals with issuj such as genocide, torture, death p e n a l t " child s o l d i e r " the arms trade, forced prostitution, a n d AIDS. T h e H o p e College c h a p t e r was f o u n d e d in 2001 and became an official student organization in 2002. D u r i n g the 2005-2006 year, the n u m b e r of events a n d m e m b e r s has increased significantly. This was most likely d u e to the Critical Issues Symposium topic of Genocide in the Global Village. Weekly meetings consisted of education t h r o u g h film showings and guest speakers, in addition to r e s p o n d i n g to U r g e n t Actions. U r g e n t Actions usually concern violations of f r e e d o m of speech, f r e e d o m to peacefully assemble, or right to d u e process. T h e s e are cases that Amnesty/ International believes merit ,u.r gOe n t response a n d for which they e n c o u r a g e letter writing to g o v e r n m e n t officials to enforce c u r r e n t pertinent legislat i o n . O n e of the m e m b e r s j o k e d , "1 wrote a letter to Ayatollah Khomeini today. W h a t did you do?" T h e s e letters, combined with those of other AI chapters, create piles of letters that have in fact released prisoners who were unjustly imprisoned. O n e of the most successful events this year was the Focus Week on H u m a n Trafficking. F o u r speakers spoke about the thriving market of m o d e r n slavery and informed m e m b e r s that in some countries h u m a n trafficking is m o r e profitable t h a n drugs. At two out of f o u r events, there were over twenty-five people. Although O AI discussed some difficult issues this \ ear, m e m b e r s believe that one person and one letter can in fact make a difference, •article bv Kathleen Ludewig* 216 Groups

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g * e # 3 v e s o e t » r d e r ' s H o p e chapter t a w i » e c ^ B i r K f ® i a C h a p t e r of EWB-USA in the spring of K)05. T h e goal of the organization is to p a r t n e r with developing communities to improve quality of life t h r o u g h engineering projects. T h e s e projects are implemented throughout the world and r a n g e f r o m water purification systems to bridge design and construction. There are approximately 25 m e m b e r s involved, as well as three advisors who are H o p e faculty and staff. A major focus of EWB-Hope's efforts in the last year was obtaining their first international e n g i n e e r i n g project t h r o u g h EWB-USA. After an extensive application process, EWB-Hope was given the task of finding potable water for a community of approximately 300 people in the West African country of C a m e r o o n . Over Spring Break, f o u r team m e m b e r s and one faculty advisor traveled to the community of Nkuv for a site assessment trip in o r d e r to take water samples and to u n d e r s t a n d the problem better. For two weeks in May, m e m b e r s r e t u r n e d to N k u v to i m p l e m e n t a pilot system for the community. T h r o u g h o u t the school year, the g r o u p was involved in extensive fundraising and engineering design for finding the best solution. Peter Njodzeka, a local villager in Nkuv, has said that "so manv things in o u r province have been abandoned. Engineers Without Borders - H o p e is s t r i v i n g to make a difference in this a b a n d o n e d c o m m u n i t y by bringing to them a basic luxury - clean water, •article bv Kim Mosley*


Sacred Jmmce Miiiistry is an organization (Sdiwit A to ing d . ' u l ( e f s Y o r s h i n f T ^ s J a i approximately thirtwlancers of ail dirferent dance background dedicated themselves to Bible study ; worship, and rehearsal every Saturday morning. Each dancer is placed in a small group with a student choreographer work on a dance piece for a semesCD to ter or the entire year. Dancers then O perform at church services or Hope's c chapel or Gathering. These groups foster personal and community CD also spiritual growth and explore impro- ^ J Q visational dance as worship. Sacred Dance sponsors the ^ Spring Worship Service that brings CD " O all the pieces together into a worship /—>> CD service in Dimnent Chapel. Another ^ ^ from this year was the eve- en CJ highlight ning Advent Service held at nearby O 0 3 Pillar Church during the fall. This service followed a more traditional format with dance, music, scripture, sermon, and prayer fully integrated. T h r o u g h choreographed and improvisational dance, the dancers, choreographers, and congregation learn not only to see how different people worship, but often about the gifts of God's grace and truth. Sacred dance is a prayer, a story, a song, a lesson, and so much more, 'article by Sommer Amundsen*

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Gos (> cumc togei her lipn den all dr erenl backgrouiffls, culp denominations to tures, glorify God throiudi worship in a variety of Gospel and Contemporary Christian music styles. T h e Gospel Choir started in 1970 as an extension of C D the Black Student Union, for- /y>v malizing in 1992 u n d e r the codirection of Vanessa Allen and rrK Pastor Darnisha Taylor. T h e new Gospel Choir director, Bryan Lowe, joined the Choir CL in the fall of 2005 and brought ) new excitement to the organi- I ^— zation. T h e Choir worships C D with many area churches throughout the year, and also joins the Hope College Cha- c o pel Band in Dimnent Memorial Chapel. Members sing in many of the Chapel ami Gathering services during the school year. T h e choir can also be found worshipping with other West Michigan college/university campus choirs d u r i n g Gospel Fest and other celebrations during the year, •article by Sarah Loomis*

A stu(lent-run organization, ' arted in 1996. Memivmemn J|gn language for praise iidworshfp songs, and these songs are performed at local churches, Hope's chapels and Gatherings. American Sign Language (ASL) is a way to communicate not only the true meaning of the song to the deaf community but also as an alternate form of worship for team members. Meetings occur once a week on campus, and leaders teamteach each song sign-bv-sign to the rest of the group. A Holland-area ASL interpreter serves as a mentor for the group us year. Silent Praise deThis y cided to hold a weekend retreat at a local church both semesters. T h e group played games, learned conversational sign language, and got to know each other better. T h e young group consisted mostly freshmen and sophomores. Some of the members ot the group were able to take an ASL class in order to learn more sign language outside of the weekly meetings. Tin-ee members served at a deaf school in Montego Bay, Jamaica, over Spring Break. Every year, Silent Praise tries to expand its view on deaf culture and branch out. •article by Erica Oosting* 217 Group Spotlight


Co-Editor, Jason Cash talks with new students at the Activities Fair in September. Meghan Beachum, Groups section editor, and Megan Purtee, Student Life editor, find inspiration from past Milestones, jason Cash spent countless hours proofing the book before being sent to the publisher. Emily Mills, Greek section editor, researched to find alumni from each greek organization, ' p h o t o s courtesy of the Milestone staff 4

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D e c i d i n g h o w to s h a p e t h e history of a n e n t i r e school year is a difficult task. T h e n t a k i n g that a n d t u r n i n g it into a b o o k takes h a r d w o r k a n d creativity. J a s o n Cash a n d Tally Reeverts, CoEditors in Chief, tackled this task f o r a second year a n d i n t e r p r e t e d t h e t h e m e f o r t h e y e a r as " R e a c h ing O u t , L o o k i n g I n . " F r o m this s t a r t i n g p o i n t . Cash a n d Reeverts chose d e s i g n t h e m e s , h i r e d editors, a n d b e g a n t h e actual process of g a t h e r i n g pictures a n d i n f o r m a t i o n . Despite a fairly y o u n g t e a m of e d i t o r s a n d v o l u n t e e r staff, t h e y e a r b o o k f l o u r i s h e d with new v o l u n t e e r s , FYS s t u d e n t s , a n d interest. T o kick off t h e year, t h e editors p u t o n a " Y e a r b o o k Blitz Day" to i n t r o d u c e t h e school to t h e 2 0 0 5 y e a r b o o k . .After d i s t r i b u t i n g t h e b o o k , staff c o n c e n t r a t e d on g a t h e r i n g p h o t o s a n d stories about t h e m a n y events o n c a m p u s . T h i s always

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poses a c h a l l e n g e f o r t h e staff a n d t h e e n d of t h e y e a r p r o v i d e s a f r a n t i c search for m o r e i n f o r m a tion. D u r i n g May T e r m , s o m e of t h e editor s a n d staff stayed o n c a m p u s to finish u p t h e finals details of t h e b o o k . I n a look back at t h e Milestone's past, t h e y e a r b o o k is i m p r o v i n g each year in quality of design, p h o t o s , a n d copy, •article by Tally Reeverts • Milestone Staff: J a s o n Cash (Co-Editor in Chief), Tally Reeverts (Co-Editor in Chief), M e g a n P u r t e e ( S t u d e n t Life Editor), Emily Mills (Greeks Editor), Emily S o u t h a r d (Academics Editor), Fleather G a r r e t t (People Editor), M e g h a n B e a c h u m ( G r o u p s Editor), Zach T r u m b l e (Sports a n d P h o t o g r a p h y Editor), L a r a W a g n e r (Copy Editor), Ashley DeH u d y ( P h o t o g r a p h y Editor).


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Reaching out of DeWitt... WTHS planner for a landmark move in the fall of 2 0 0 6 . W T H S b e g a n t h e l o n g a n d difficult p r o c e s s of r e a c h i n g o u t of its l o n g t i m e h o m e , t h e DeWitt C e n ter, a n d l o o k i n g into its n e w location in t h e M a r t h a Miller C e n t e r f o r Global C o m m u n i c a t i o n . U n d e r t h e direction of G e n e r a l M a n a g e r A n n e S c h u s t e r , W T H S took o n a new d i r e c t i o n a n d b e g a n p l a n n i n g f o r t h e future. A n n e a n d h e r t r u s t w o r t h y Executive B o a r d staff h e l p e d revitalize W T H S a n d sent a b r e a t h of f r e s h air t h r o u g h t h e station's i n t e r w o r k i n g r e m i n i s cent of its h e y d a y in t h e 1980s a n d early 90s. A visual r e p r e s e n t a t i o n of this b e g a n d u r i n g O r i e n t a t i o n w h e r e m e m b e r s h a n d e d o u t b r i g h t l y c o l o r e d t-shirts a d v e r t i s i n g t h e station. A l t h o u g h W T H S was not able to b e g i n b r o a d casting f r o m t h e M a r t h a Miller C e n t e r d u r i n g t h e 2 0 0 5 - 2 0 0 6 school year, p r e p a r a t i o n s w e r e u n d e r w a y

to a c c o m m o d a t e t h e ' N e w W T H S ' a n d its Executive Staff. Fiber-optic wires w e r e r u n u n d e r g r o u n d conn e c t i n g t h e n e w studios to t h e a n t e n n a t o w e r t h a t rem a i n e d located h i g h a t o p t h e DeWitt C e n t e r . Automation software f r o m Southfield-based E N C O Systems Inc. was p u r c h a s e d for t h e new studios, p r o v i d i n g t h e station with a c o m p l e t e a u d i o b r o a d c a s t a u t o m a t i o n a n d c o n t r o l system. T h e syst e m ' s rich f e a t u r e set will e n a b l e W T H S b r o a d c a s t e r s to e n s u r e reliable, a c c u r a t e delivery of all a u d i o content o n time, every time. T h e station was also b u d g e t e d f o r n u m e r o u s staff positions t h r o u g h o u t t h e s u m m e r , allowing t h e station to stay fully f u n c t i o n a l y e a r - r o u n d , a task t h a t is new to t h e station, •article by J a s o n C a s h ' p h o t o s c o u r t e s y of Public Relations, J a s o n Cash, M e g a n P u r t e e , a n d Michael K a f f k a •

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N y k e r k is a n age-old t r a d i t i o n t h a t occurs annally at H o p e College. It is a g r e a t o p p o r t u n i t y f o r w o m e n ol' t h e f r e s h m a n a n d s o p h o m o r e classes to m e e t new p e o p l e a n d c o m p e t e against t h e o p p o s i n g class. Each of t h e t h r e e d i f f e r e n t categories (Song, Play, a n d O r a t i o n ) Each has a d i f f e r e n t p u r p o s e , a n d t h e p a r t i c i p a n t s all try to w o r k t o g e t h e r to achieve t h e u l t i m a t e goal: T h e N y k e r k C u p . T h e " S o n g girls" p e r f o r m e d t h e s o n g " O v e r t h e R a i n b o w . " T h e y practiced for two h o u r s each day while t h e "Play girls" r e h e a r s e d a n a m a z i n g d r a m a c r e a t e d by t h e s t u d e n t coaches called " T h e P h a n t o m of t h e N y k e r k . " T h e p e r f o r m a n c e i n c l u d e d p o p u l a r t h e m e s of today, inc l u d i n g T h e P h a n t o m of t h e O p e r a , N a p o l e o n Dyn a m i t e , a n d B r i t n e y Spears. T h e o r a t o r p r o v i d e d t h e a u d i e n c e with a s t r o n g p e r f o r m a n c e speech o n t h e topic "Gifts of C h a n g e . " F o r new m e m b e r s of t h e t e a m , they w e r e u n s u r e of w h a t to expect, b u t they m e t a m a z i n g p e o p l e a n d d e v e l o p e d skills t h a t will last t h e m a lifetime. N y k e r k is a t r a d i t i o n at H o p e similar to T h e Pull,

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a n d a l t h o u g h it d o e s n o t r e q u i r e as m u c h physical s t r e n g t h , it is a m a j o r c o m m i t m e n t a n d d e v e l o p i n g c o m p e t i t i o n . As N y k e r k p a r t i c i p a n t s , t h e w o m e n fulfilled m a j o r . " S o n g girls" w e r e r e q u i r e d to match perfectly, h a v e their h a i r all t h e s a m e way, a n d sit completly still with a smile g l u e d to their faces for t h e e n t i r e t h r e e - h o u r p e r f o r m a n c e . At t h e e n d of the c o m p e t i t i o n , they w e r e i n s t r u c t e d to wait until they h e a r d t h e m o t glorious w o r d s of all, " S o n g girls, you m a y n o w relax." At. that time, t h e e n t i r e b l e a c h e r of w o m e n sighed a n d s l u m p e d d o w n into a c o m f o r t a b l e position. All of t h e h a r d w o r k a n d d e d i c a t i o n paid off. T h e c o m p e t i t i o n was e x t r e m e l y close, b u t at the e n d of t h e day, t h e even year class of 2 0 0 8 took h o m e t h e N y k e r k t r o p h y yet again. T h e feeling was surreal. F o r most, it was a m i x t u r e of e m o t i o n s because m a n y will not b e able to go t h r o u g h the N y k e r k e x p e r i e n c e again n e x t year. W i t h o u t all t h r e e categories, Nykerk w o u l d not b e t h e s a m e . Each year, e v e r y o n e works tog e t h e r to win t h e t r o p h y a l t h o u g h t h e r e a r e separate categores. •article by C h a n a Ritsema*

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Calista Peterson and Bryn Carter prepare for the big competition by dressing in their cos4 tumes. The cup was secured ^ after much deliberation; the class of 2 0 0 8 was well deserving. Even Year Song performed the Rainbow." H p p f ine classic, "Over c^ver the uie i\airiuow. Erika Oglesby, Play p a r t i c i p a n t ^ " and '10 Play Coach is excited it * about the win. 'OB Play stole the fi show with their very own ver- * Mf f sion of the "Phantom of the Op- i , S era." •photos courtesy of Zach Trumble and Erika Oglesby^

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T h e Nykerk competition was started by Dr. John Nykerk in 1935. T h e 71-year tradition was continued as the f r e s h m a n Class of 2009 put forth an ext r a o r d i n a r y effort to win the Nykerk C u p . Practices started o n O c t o b e r 12 a n d j u s t t h r e e weeks later, on N o v e m b e r 5, the f r e s h m e n displayed their talents. T h e competition o p e n e d with O d d Year Song. Flowers p o p p e d u p , m u s t a c h e masks a n d baseball caps were worn, a n d m a n y impressive m o v e m e n t s were p e r f o r m e d as the O d d Year " S o n g girls" sang "Build Me U p B u t t e r c u p . " T h e y were led by their coaches Kristen Greshel a n d Ana Frikker; Kristen was t h e musical director a n d Ana c h o r e o g r a p h e d the motions. T h e O d d Year Play was entitled "Do You Yabba Dabba Do?" It was written a n d directed by Play Coaches J e n n i f e r Stults a n d L a u r e n G r u m m . T h e play told the story of the V a n d e r S t o n e a n d VanRubble family. T h e a u d i e n c e watched as Bam Bam Van Rubble a n d Cal f o u g h t for the love of Pebbles VanderStone.

I n accordance with the oration t h e m e , "Gifts of C h a n g e , " f r e s h m a n o r a t o r B a r b r a Rubio eloquently delivered h e r speech " T h e Voice of Liberation." She spoke a b o u t the i m p o r t a n c e of accepting others a n d abolishing stereotypes by relating to t h e audience h e r own experiences with these topics. Barbra was coached by Lara W a g n e r a n d D e b o r a h O'Connell. T h r o u g h o u t the entire Nykerk process, the girls were constantly e n t e r t a i n e d a n d s u r p r i s e d by their s u p p o r t i v e "Morale boys." G u i d i n g the m e n of 2009 were Song Morale Coaches Daniel Wizner, Matthew Boote, a n d Billy Statema a n d Play Morale Coaches A d a m C a r p e n t e r , Matt D a n n e n b e r g , a n d j o s h Payne. T h e m e n p r o v i d e d comic relief t h r o u g h skits a n d e n c o u r a g e m e n t t h r o u g h notes a n d candy after the girls finished their often stressful daily practices. T h o u g h the Class of 2009 did not win the Nykerk C u p in the 2005 competition, t h e r e is h o p e for an O d d Year victory next year, •article by Stacey Harburn •

"Though the Class of 2009 did not win the Nykerk Cup in 2005..., there is hope for an Odd Year victory next year."


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D a n c e M a r a t h o n is H o p e College's largest s t u d e n t - r u n p h i l a n t h r o p y . O v e r 700 s t u d e n t s w e r e involved this year in o n e way o r a n o t h e r , w h e t h e r it b e t h r o u g h d a n c i n g , m o r a l i n g , o r t a k i n g p a r t o n a c o m m i t t e e . D a n c e M a r a t h o n is a y e a r - l o n g f u n d r a i s i n g e n d e a v o r for DeVos C h i l d r e n ' s Hospital t h a t is t o p p e d off with a 2 4 - h o u r o n - y o u r - f e e t event. Local b a n d s a n d e n t e r t a i n e r s k e e p all p a r ticipants enthusiastic while "Miracle Families" f r o m t h e hospital c o m e a n d speak to k e e p t h e d a n c e r s motivated. T h r o u g h o u t t h e year m a n y events a r e h e l d in a n e f f o r t to raise a w a r e n e s s a n d m o n e y f o r t h e hospital. S o m e events i n c l u d e a d a t e a u c t i o n , blitz week, a n d a "Giving H o p e to Kids" a u c t i o n t h a t f e a t u r e s a r t work, jewelry, crafts by t h e kids, a n d m a n y o t h e r g r e a t items f r o m local businesses. H e l d o n M a r c h 10-11, 2006, this year's M a r -

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a t h o n , in t h e s p a c e - t h e m e d Dow C e n t e r , m a r k e d H o p e ' s seventh M a r a t h o n , a n d it p r o v e d to b e ano t h e r r e c o r d b r e a k i n g year, raising $112,670.89. T h i s b r i n g s t h e seven y e a r total to nearly $500,000. T h e m o n e y raised f u n d s f o r p r o g r a m s at DeVos C h i l d r e n ' s Hospital directly t h r o u g h t h e C h i l d r e n ' s Miracle N e t w o r k such as Child Life, Poison C o n trol, Child A b u s e a n d P r e v e n t i o n , Safe Kid, a n d many more. T a r a V a n d e s t r e e k , o n e of this year's Assistant Directors, h a d this to say a b o u t t h e 2006 D a n c e M a r a t h o n , "It has b e e n a n a m a z i n g e x p e r i e n c e bei n g involved in this event. I take a lot of p r i d e in t h e success of this year's M a r a t h o n , a n d it t o u c h e s my h e a r t to k n o w t h a t I a m t a k i n g p a r t in h e l p i n g t h e lives of t h e kids a n d families at DeVos." •article by J a i m e J o Sabol •

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The Sigma Sigma Sorority raised over $12,000 to benefit DeVos Children's Hospital. Over the course of the year, Hope students raised $112,670.89. Every penny helps to comfort the patients and families at the Hospital. Seeing the smiles on the faces of the children makes dancers forget about the time they have been on their feet. Tommy Gordon spends time on the dance floor w i t h the miracle child sponsored by the Emersonian fraternity.

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I n t h e s u m m e r of 2005, as t h e early m o r n ing s u n a r o s e b e h i n d t h e h a l f - c o n s t r u c t e d D e V o s Fieldhouse, t h e r e w e r e a l r e a d y p l a n s in t h e works to c r e a t e a s e c t i o n ~ a section t h a t was to b e m u c h d i f f e r e n t f r o m t h e rest of t h e F i e l d h o u s e . T h e m e n in c h a r g e k n e w that a h o m e h a d to b e m a d e that w o u l d a c c o m m o d a t e t h o s e i n f a m o u s f a n s t h a t p r o u d l y call t h e m s e l v e s . . . t h e Dew C r e w . T h i s exclusive section is t h e r e to serve o n e p u r p o s e a n d o n e p u r p o s e a l o n e . . . to c h e e r . F r o m t h e m o m e n t the Crew first set foot in t h e d o o r , they m a d e t h e m selves r i g h t at h o m e a n d e v e n c h r i s t e n e d t h e c o u r t with a bottle of M o u n t a i n Dew. T h e Dew C r e w has b e e n a h u g e p a r t of H o p e Basketball. "It's b e e n c o n t a g i o u s , it g e n e r a t e s a n d invigorates t h e s t u d e n t s . T h e s e kids a r e connected to t h e players. T h e y a r e with t h e m in classes a n d in t h e d o r m s a n d now, t h e y h u d d l e with t h e m

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b e f o r e t h e g a m e , " said C o a c h Neil, f o u n d e r of t h e Dew C r e w . T h i s year was n o e x c e p t i o n . With b o t h t h e m e n ' s a n d w o m e n ' s t e a m s g o i n g u n d e f e a t e d at h o m e , t h e Dew C r e w really h a d s o m e t h i n g to c h e e r about. T h i s year's crew p r o v e d t h a t they n o t only w e r e able to c h e e r H o p e o n t o victory at h o m e , b u t they also traveled in h u g e packs, m u c h like t h e arctic c a r i b o u , to m a n y of t h e away g a m e s a n d even t h e t o u r n a m e n t g a m e s t h a t w e r e h u n d r e d s of miles away, n o t to m e n t i o n all of t h e crazy outfits a n d p a i n t e d faces t h a t a c c o m p a n i e d t h e m . F r o m "Painting t h e D e V o s O r a n g e " a n d d o i n g " T h e W a v e " to c h e e r i n g o n t h e M e n ' s t e a m while they c r u s h e d all of Calvin's d r e a m s a n d c h e e r i n g o n t h e W o m e n ' s t e a m in S p r i n g f i e l d , MA, this year, was a y e a r t h a t will b e r e m e m b e r e d . . . f o r all time, •article by C h r i s M a y b u r y * p h o t o s by Zach T r u m b l e *

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Dew Crew members join the huddle to spark enthusiasm before a big game. Brandon Smith painted 5 his face to show his true colors: or^ ange and blue. What is Dew Crew I without the Dew? Mt. Dew is passed out at every halftime to reenergize the crowd for the second half. Longtime MIAA basketball referee Ernie Cryer performs his traditional pre-game stretch for the last time as he was honored by Hope and the MIAA for his retirement. Matt Simon celebrated the opening of the DeVos Fieldhouse at the Dew Crew Tailgate Party.

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> Social security reform] fired up many Hope College Republicans as it directly affected them and others in their age bracket." T h e 2 0 0 5 school y e a r was a n exciting o n e f o r t h e H o p e College R e p u b l i c a n s . In t h e first few m o n t h s back o n c a m p u s , they h a d t h e o p p o r t u n i t y to s p e n d t h e w e e k e n d o n Mackinac Island f o r t h e Michigan R e p u b l i c a n L e a d e r s h i p C o n f e r e n c e . T h e r e t h e biggest n a m e s in statewide a n d local races m e t to n e t w o r k a n d e x c h a n g e t h e i r ideas a n d goals f o r t h e u p c o m i n g elections. T h e H o p e College Republicans talked to p e o p l e such as Mitt R o m n e y , t h e G o v e r n o r of Massachusetts, a n d T e r r i L y n n L a n d , a H o p e College A l u m n u s a n d Michigan Secretary of State. T h e t h e m e of t h e first s e m e s t e r was Social Security r e f o r m a n d f i n d i n g solutions so those c u r r e n t l y p a y i n g Social Security m i g h t receive it in t h e f u t u r e w h e n they retire. T h i s topic fired u p m a n y H o p e College Republicans as it directly affected t h e m a n d

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o t h e r s in their age b r a c k e t . T h e H o p e R e p u b l i c a n s kicked off t h e s p r i n g sem e s t e r with a visit f r o m G u b e r n a t o r i a l c a n d i d a t e Dick DeVos a n d U.S. S e n a t e c a n d i d a t e Rev. Keith Butler. T h e e v e n t h a d live m e d i a c o v e r a g e f r o m News 8 and was t h e first college visit by Mr. DeVos. Later that sem e s t e r , fellow College Republicans at W e s t e r n Michigan University invited t h e H o p e College Republicans to h e a r New York T i m e s Bestseller A n n C o u l t e r as a guest s p e a k e r at their c a m p u s . O n e of t h e last big n a m e s to visit H o p e ' s c a m p u s was Michigan R e p u b lican Party C h a i r m a n , M r . Saul Anuzis, w h o gave an insightful b r e a k d o w n of t h e forecast for Michigan c a n d i d a t e s in t h e G u b e r n a t o r i a l a n d U.S. Senate races, ' a r t i c l e by K e r r y V a n L a a n ' p h o t o s courtesy of Kerrv VanLaan*


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Hope T h i s y e a r served as a y e a r of c h a n g e for t h e H o p e D e m o c r a t s . T h o u g h o n e of t h e m a i n focuses of the o r g a n i z a t i o n will always b e t h e election of D e m o cratic c a n d i d a t e s to public office, t h e g r o u p has a d d e d an additional goal. W e believe t h a t a m a j o r p r o b l e m t h r o u g h o u t t h e c o u n t r y is a lack of i n f o r m a t i o n o n the p r o b l e m s t h a t e v e r y o n e faces. I n t h e s p r i n g semester of 2 0 0 6 t h e o r g a n i z a t i o n a t t e m p t e d to r e a c h across partisan b o u n d a r i e s a n d e x a m i n e t h e issues facing this c o u n t r y . As t h e w a r in I r a q has b e e n a very divisive issue in America, t h e H o p e D e m o c r a t s felt t h a t it was a n i m p o r t a n t issue to a d d r e s s . T h e I r a q issues w e e k suecessfully p r e s e n t e d t h e p r o b l e m a n d t h r o u g h a n u m ber of s p e a k e r s allowed a f u l l e r a n d m o r e diverse dis-

cussion of t h e issue. O n t h e m o r e p a r t i s a n side of things, t h e H o p e D e m o c r a t s h o s t e d a m e e t i n g with M a r k B r e w e r , t h e c h a i r of t h e Michigan D e m o c r a t i c Party, as well as M a r a V a n d e r s l i c e a n d Eric S a p p of C o m m o n G o o d Strategies. T h i s m e e t i n g allowed H o p e S t u d e n t s to s p e a k directly to l e a d e r s within t h e D e m o c r a t i c Party r e g a r d i n g t h e role of religion in politics. All t h i n g s c o n s i d e r e d , this was a very successful year u n d e r t h e able l e a d e r s h i p of Amy O ' C o n n e l l , L a u r a Stark, A n n i k a C a r l s o n , B r i a n Straw, S h a n n o n Craig, a n d Danielle Revers. T h o u g h t h e o r g a n i z a tion s t r u g g l e d t h r o u g h o u t t h e first half of t h e year t h e H o p e D e m o c r a t s truly w e n t o u t o n a high note, •article by B r i a n Straw*

Hope Republicans / Hope Democrats

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Jenna Witten, backed by the rest of the squad, executed their program during halftime of a football game. GuyGirl Pom is a highlight of the year for team members and the audiences alike. Kristin Rose and Erica Hess were so pumped to perform at a Detroit Pistons Pre-season game. Danielle Johnson danced her way through the routine. The highlight of every halftime, whether its football or basketball is the Pom Squad.

«-•> • '5 -p.'

226

T h e H o p e College Pom Pon S q u a d successful-

T h e s q u a d has p e r f o r m e d f o r m a n y H o p e s t u d e n t s ,

ly finished a n o t h e r y e a r of h a l f t i m e e n t e r t a i n -

professors, a n d s u p p o r t e r s , b u t this y e a r it was in-

m e n t . F o r m e d f o u r years a g o by H e a t h e r Q u a l -

vited by H o p e A l u m n u s Paul R a b a u t to p e r f o r m

m a n a n d Elizabeth T y n d e l l , t h e s q u a d has since

at t h e F e b r u a r y 8th Pistons p r e - g a m e show at t h e

b e c o m e s o m e t h i n g that is anticipated at s p o r t i n g

Palace of A u b u r n Hills. " W e anxiously awaited t h e

events t h r o u g h o u t t h e year. T h i s year t h e s q u a d

Pistons p e r f o r m a n c e f o r t h r e e m o n t h s , so we h a d

was led by Erica Hess, Kristin Rose a n d S t e p h a n i e

plenty of practice b e f o r e t a k i n g c e n t e r c o u r t , " said

Zmyslo f o r b o t h football a n d basketball seasons.

C o - C a p t a i n Kristin Rose. " T h e actual p e r f o r m a n c e

There

the

was completely s u r r e a l a n d will h o p e f u l l y b e re-

year for this s q u a d f r o m Pom C a m p to P o m

p e a t e d n e x t year." ' a r t i c l e by Erica Hess • p h o t o s

Pon

social events to t h e

courtesy of Kristin

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iG team magaged to record just eight losses, two ties, and 2 4 wins." For the fifth straight year the H o p e College hock- ries over teams such as Ferris State (DII) and the ey team m a d e its presence felt in the AC HA D i l i eventual national champion Wright State UniverNational T o u r n a m e n t . After starting the p r o g r a m sity. Players receiving First T e a m All-Conference only 10 years ago, the hockey team has become a for the Dutchmen included George Dickinson and well-known contender at the national level. Dur- Jeff Guy. At the national tournament Jeff Guy and ing the 2005-2006 season the team managed to re- Peter Vollbrecht received 2nd team all-tournament cord just eight losses, two ties, and 24 wins. Starting honors. Guy also received 1st team Ail-American the first week of school with tryouts and ending the honors, while Vollbrecht and Dickinson received national t o u r n a m e n t just into March, the commit- 2nd team All-American honors. Guy and Vollbrecht ment of the players and coaches cannot be doubt- were joined by linemate Kenny Cooke as Academic ed. This commitment showed t h r o u g h d u r i n g the Ail-Americans. T h e season proved to be a success national tournament, where the team's only loss as the team ended the year with a fifth place finish came in overtime to the eventual national champi- at the national t o u r n a m e n t while entering the tourons. T h e regular season was highlighted by victo- nament as a 10 seed, 'article by Peter Vollbrecht*

Pom Pon Squad / Hockey Club

227


I m p r o v e m e n t . A l t h o u g h t h e w o m e n ' s Flyi n g Dutch Lacrosse t e a m won only two g a m e s , t h e t e a m ' s skills steadily i m p r o v e d a n d led to t h e i r first win of t h e season at h o m e against Ferris State. T h e s e c o n d win c a m e t h e following w e e k e n d at a t o u r n a m e n t at Calvin w h e r e t h e girls d o m i n a t e d W e s t e r n Michigan. Ashley Smith h a d a n incredible first season as goalie. T h e o f f e n s e was lead by j u n i o r Chelsea S h o r t , with an a p p r o x i m a t e twenty-six goals. O t h e r l e a d i n g scorers w e r e Allison Pautler a n d T r a c y B e n j a m i n . T h e Lady D u t c h h a d to say g o o d - b y e to their o n e senior, Elizabeth Bramley, w h o was also a t o p scorer. F o r this t e a m , t h e n u m b e r of wins a n d losses did not m a t t e r . It was a b o u t h a v i n g f u n a n d loving t h e g a m e of lacrosse. C o n d i t i o n i n g b e g a n t h e week a f t e r C h r i s t m a s B r e a k a n d practices in t h e DeWitt T e n nis C e n t e r started several weeks later. W h y practice

f o r m o n t h s f o r a t h r e e week season? Sydney K o n n y , p r e s i d e n t of t h e Lacrosse C l u b T e a m , gave t h e exp l a n a t i o n : " W e practice t h r o u g h o u t t h e school year f o r a t h r e e - w e e k season. W e love to play a n d that's why we practice." •article by H e a t h e r G a r r e t t * 2 0 0 5 / 2 0 0 6 T e a m ; (2) Caitie Leads, (3) Ashley T i m p n e r , (4) Sydney K o n n y , (7) Elizabeth Bramley, (9) C o u r t n e y Miller, (10) Chelsea S h o r t , (11) Jacq u e l i n e Maiuri, (12) C a r o l y n C o u r t a d e , (14) T a r a h F r o n , (15) Nicole K l u n d e r , (16) S t e p h a n i e Machiela, (17) T r a c y B e n j a m i n , (18) Erin Richards, (19) H e a t h e r G a r r e t , (20) Kristen J o h n s o n , (21) J a m i e H a r r i n g t o n , (23) Ashley Smith, (24) Kayla Katterh e i n r i c h , (25) Allison Pautler, (26) Amy H o w a r d , (27) Erica Quigley, (28) S a r a h T h o r n e , (30) M e a g a n Kistler, (31) Colleen Kelly, (32) Ashley B a i n b r i d g e , (33) L a u r a C o o m b s , (34) Nicole G u g i n o , (38) Christy Nitz*

Women's Lacrosse

Tarrah Fron caught the ball on the run, looking to assist in a goal. Elizabeth Bramley runs to defend her opponent. She went on to make the stop. The team is growing in numbers; they had twenty-eight members this season. Many of the women had never played competitive lacrosse before. The women huddled to discuss game strategy. Tracy Benjamin stuck it to her opponent as she scored the winning goal.'photos courtesy of Heather Garret*


If you have a c o m m e n t o r c o n c e r n a b o u t H o p e College's c a m p u s , w h o d o you direct it to? O n e of the ways is directing it to S t u d e n t Congress. Student Congress is a collection of elected r e p r e sentatives f r o m a r o u n d c a m p u s b r o u g h t t o g e t h e r to effectively protect the rights of students. S t u d e n t C o n g r e s s m e t o n T u e s d a y evenings b u t was also involved in various c a m p u s governance b o a r d s a n d committees o n c a m p u s as well. A few of these b o a r d s a n d committees included C a m p u s Life B o a r d , Extra C u r r i c u l a r Activities Committee, Administrative Affairs B o a r d , and Residential Life C o m m i t t e e . A few of the initiatives that S t u d e n t Congress worked on i n c l u d e d an e n v i r o n m e n t a l proposal, a c a m p u s aesthetics proposal, a day of racial awareness seminars called " T e a c h i n g H o p e , " a n d

creating a mascot. Most of these initiatives w e r e s p a w n e d f r o m s t u d e n t concerns or c o m m e n t s b r o u g h t to the full congress or to the individual representatives. The S p eak er Series was also a little different this year because, instead of having just o n e s p e a k e r . S t u d e n t Congress b r a n c h e d out o u r efforts a n d b r o u g h t in two speakers. T h e first was Robert Bullard who spoke on e n v i r o n m e n t a l justice, a n d the second speaker was Cleve J o n e s who e n l i g h t e n e d us on the g r o w i n g problem of AIDS/ H I V in the United States a n d globally. By w o r k i n g effectively with the administration a n d p r o v i d i n g innovative p r o g r a m s for the students, S t u d e n t Congress was able to fulfill its role on c a m p u s , "article by L a u r e n E n g e l * p h o t o s courtesy of Sara Pillow*

"Student Congress is a collection of elected rep resentatives from around campus brought togetn er to effectlivlv orotect the rinhts of students.'


In the CASA t u t o r i n g p r o g r a m , students f r o m local Holland schools in g r a d e s o n e t h r o u g h five met with H o p e College s t u d e n t tutors twice a week after school. H o p e tutors were expected to p r o v i d e each CASA student with academic assistance while making l e a r n i n g f u n a n d exciting. O n e m a j o r goal was to help each s t u d e n t develop a passion for r e a d i n g . A n o t h e r goal was to i n t r o d u c e CASA students to the college e n v i r o n m e n t . T u t o r s were expected to be good role models, p r o v i d i n g CASA students with positive e n c o u r a g e m e n t a n d h e l p i n g t h e m establish a n d accomplish goals. A typical session b e g a n with a snack, which gave students a n d tutors a few m i n u t e s to talk a n d catch u p . Academic tasks were next on the priority list. Students r e a d aloud, practiced their spelling words a n d completed h o m e w o r k a n d worksheets. At

//

the conclusion of each session, students a n d tutors h a d time for e n r i c h m e n t activities. From football to flashcards, t h e r e were m a n y different options for enr i c h m e n t time. Looking back on the year, several highlights include p u m p k i n carving, a St. Patrick's Day party, the Holiday celebration a n d painting windows in the Cook Hall lounge. D u r i n g the last week of school, tutors, students a n d families were invited to an end-of-the-year party w h e r e they j o i n e d together to celebrate. S t u d e n t s sorted t h r o u g h h u n d r e d s of f r e e books a n d chose their favorites to take h o m e . Families a n d tutors h a d time to visit a n d enjoy food b e f o r e saying goodbye for the s u m m e r . Overall, the year was a success. T h e students a n d tutors both look f o r w a r d to being r e u n i t e d next fall, "article by J e n nifer Harris*

...Tutors were expected to provide each student with academic assistance while making learning fun...


Volunteer Services kicked off the year by College Community t h r o u g h g r o u p and individassisting with Orientation and A T i m e to Serve. ual volunteer work. T h r o u g h this work the g r o u p Students also participated in Make a Difference hopes to instill a life-long dedication to service and Day, volunteering at Holland Rescue Mission and volunteerism. helping to p r e p a r e the thrift stores for the holiCo-Directors Jess DiBernardo and Sarah day season. During a monthly event, 30 students Pratt were the student directors of Volunteer Serspread Christmas cheer with the residents of Rest- vices and enjoy connecting H o p e Students and haven Care Community and enjoyed baking cook- student groups with community organizations. ies and caroling. "The two hours we spent at Rest- This year, the City of Holland and Volunteer Serhaven m a d e my day," said f r e s h m a n Claire Nicely. vices have connected, working together for many "Spending time with the people there was a blast. events in the community including the Children's It helped me realize how special a n d fun seniors Advocacy Center's Chili Cook-off and the Culinary are!I" Cabaret benefiting the Community Health CenVolunteer Services is open to all students ter. T h r o u g h community and campus outreach. and is committed to serving needs on campus and Volunteer Services strives to positively impact the in the community. T h e g r o u p strives to provide Holland community and its residents, "article by a means of cultivating volunteerism in the H o p e Sarah Pratt •

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Vol M wtcerjSjEjivioEs

Shana Mack and Matt Rich ardson weeded gardens in a nearby neighborhood dur ing A Time to Serve, which draws several students out on the first Saturday of Fall semester. One student spent time cleaning a kitchen. Allison Mills touched up the paint outside. Jenny Schwartz and a friend did landscaping around a house. Others planted flowers in a yard.'photos courtesy of Public Relations*


leges rrom an over tne nation travel to over zdu affiliates and raise over 1.2 million dollars annually." H o p e College's Habitat for H u m a n ity c h a p t e r became official on c a m p u s d u r i n g 1993. Since the n, it has b e e n active in the Holland c o m m u n i t y , w o r k i n g o n various houses as well as f u n d r a i s i n g a n d building a h o u s e on the c o r n e r of 19th Street a n d Columbia Avenue in 1996. O n e of the m o r e p o p u l a r projects has b e e n a S p r i n g Break trip to various parts of the country. D u r i n g the spring semester of 2006 the H o p e College Habitat for H u m a n i t y took a g r o u p of twenty-two students a n d o n e faculty advisor on a mission trip to S u m t e r , South Carolina. "It was a great experience," said L a u r a

^ 2

Groups

Buck, '07. T h e team worked primarily on putting u p vinyl siding, an o n g o i n g h o u s i n g project, as well as installing the d o o r s a n d windows. T h e g r o u p was h o u s e d in the Alice Drive Baptist C h u r c h , a n d was facilitated by their Americorps representative, Simon Lank, as well as the Sumter Habitat for H u m a n i t y f o r e m a n , affectionately known as "Bob the Builder." This mission trip c o n t i n u e d the H o p e College Habitat for H u m a n i t y ' s a n n u a l participation in the collegiate challenge p r o g r a m in which colleges f r o m all over the nation travel to over two h u n d r e d a n d fifty host affiliates a n d raise over 1.2 million dollars annually, •article by Danilton Clarke*


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Megan Beggs, Bethany Katerberg, and Lauren Adams sort donated items at a Holland area Salvation Army. Amanda Allen and Sheila DenOuden volunteered to prepare a meal at the Ronald McDonald House. APO members chatted about

I

their experiences around a campfire. Among them was Ellen ArellanoSoriano, who recently accepted an invitation to become an honorary member of APO and is an advisor for the chapter. Katey Masterson and Bethany Katerberg manned the , 2 canteen station during a blood drive ^ held by APO.

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Alph& Ph "A co-ed fraternity? How does that work?" have been the questions many members of the Alpha Phi Omega have to answer. "That's right," we say. "We're an international co-ed service fraternity. That's how we roll." Alpha Phi Omega is based on the principles of friendship, leadership, and service. T h e g r o u p meets weekly to coordinate service events within the community and to help out in whatever ways they are able. They also do various social events and even won a prize this year for their volleyball team that competed d u r i n g Intramurals. T h e organization also hosted the first ever "Ugly Contest" to raise money for Dance Marathon. In the contest, various professors dressed up and advertised themselves in an attempt to win the title of "Ugliest Professor." Students and faculty throughout the campus were encouraged to vote with their change, and at the end of the contest. Alpha Phi

Omega f o u n d that poetry professor Jack Ridl (bearing a goofy grin and a T o m Cruise mask) won the title. More importantly, the contest raised h u n d r e d s of dollars for the children in DeVos Children's Hospital. In addition to the "Ugly Contest." Alpha Phi Omega ran the campus-wide blood drives, volunteered at Ronald McDonald House, the H u m a n e Society, Warm Friend, and various other organizations within the community. "This year has been so great for us," says Katey Masterton, long-standing member of the group. "We've grown a lot and we're really excited about what more we'll be able to do this coming year." T h e g r o u p has high ambitions for reaching out to do more service, and they're always looking for willing people to come and contribute to the fun! •Article by Bethany Katerberg • photos courtesy of Branden Bacon*

Habitat for Humanity / Alpha Phi Omega

233


As Treasurer Jordan Siemon read a poem of inspiration, Christian Piers & Maggie Machledt are inducted onto the leadership board. Lea Blackney & Alyssa Alsum talk to some parents of graduating seniors. Mortar Board sells flowers at Graduation as a fundraiser for the organization and as a service for parents. New Mortar Board members participate in the induction ceremony that took place in the late spring. These juniors will go on to lead Mortar Board in the fall.

« " • >

I

-1

Mort&r Bo&r<J M o r t a r B o a r d , a national senior h o n o r society with c h a p t e r s at 218 d i f f e r e n t colleges a n d universities, is an o r g a n i z a t i o n d e d i c a t e d to scholarship, l e a d e r s h i p a n d service. H o p e College's Alcor C h a p t e r , c u r r e n t l y in its 4 4 t h year, manifests these characteristics as its 35 m e m b e r s o f f e r t h e i r time a n d talents in b o t h t h e p l a n n i n g a n d i m p l e m e n t a t i o n of a variety of service projects. T h i s year's M o r t a r B o a r d , a l o n g with advisors N a n c y Portfleet a n d Mrs. B u l t m a n , m e t every o t h e r week to discuss a n d plan u p c o m i n g events, which r a n g e d f r o m a H o m e c o m i n g book d r i v e to b e n e f i t schools f l o o d e d by h u r r i c a n e K a t r i n a to t h e a n n u a l " W e a r ing of the Blue Breakfast" in h o n o r of high-achieving f r e s h m e n a n d s o p h o m o r e s . M o r t a r B o a r d ' s spirit is c a p t u r e d in t h e quality with which every task is u n d e r t a k e n , a n d in t h e o w n e r s h i p a n d d e d i c a t i o n with which m e m b e r s plan a n d p a r t i c i p a t e in service events. Relay f o r Life's " T e a m M o r t a r B o a r d " was h e a d e d by Becca Schewe a n d Erica V a n G i l d e r ; this e v e n t 234

Groups

raised m o n e y a n d a w a r e n e s s f o r c a n c e r prevention a n d t r e a t m e n t . T h e M o r t a r B o a r d t e a m ended t h e 1 2 - h o u r t a g - t e a m walking m a r a t h o n with fervor, e a r n i n g t h e a w a r d for t h e highest f u n d r a i s i n g team. In F e b r u a r y , Lisa Wisniewski a n d Lisa B a r a n organized a V a l e n t i n e ' s Day D a n c e f o r People with Disabilities - one of t h e o r g a n i z a t i o n s m o s t affable a n d well-attended activities. M o r t a r B o a r d m e m b e r s b o o g i e - w o o g i e d the even i n g away in Maas A u d i t o r i u m with p a r t i c i p a n t s of Hoil a n d ' s Special Ed Ministries - it was i n d e e d a celebration! M o r t a r B o a r d was also involved with Blood: W a t e r Mission's " 1000 Wells Project." O r g a n i z e d as a collaborative activity - with o r g a n i z a t i o n s such as Acting on AIDS and A m n e s t y I n t e r n a t i o n a l - p a r t i c i p a n t s "fasted" f r o m all b e v e r a g e s o t h e r t h a n water for two weeks, a n d donated w h a t they w o u l d h a v e s p e n t o n o t h e r b e v e r a g e s towards t h e c o n s t r u c t i o n of a clean-water well in C h u r o , Kenya. O v e r $ 1700 was raised t o w a r d s the project's $ 6 0 0 0 goal, •story by J e n n i c a S k o u g # p h o t o s courtesy Sara Pillow*

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VAndcrProv

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[It's] similar to MTV's "Wildin' O u f ^ m ^ W N ^ e Line Is it Anyway?" but... with a Dutch twist.

Vanderprov: they're funny. Or so their t-shirts say.

T h e comedy act ended the year with a competi-

Hope College's Improvisational Group, Vander-

tion with rival, Calvin's improv team in Wichers.

prov, kept Hope students laughing all year long

Members

with their performances in Wichers Auditorium.

school year included: Senior Christina Judson;

of

Vanderprov

for

the

2005-2006

Vanderprov's performances consisted of head-to- Juniors Ashley DeHudy, Andrew Liang, and Mehead competitive improv formatting with an or- gan Purtee; Sophomores Jeffrey Ambrose, Kaange team and a blue team battling for the audi-

tie Cornell, Jenni DeRuiter, Calista Peterson, and

Jason Shirk; Freshmen Justin Barigian and Grasimilar to MTV's "Wildin' Out" and "Whose Line ham Carlson. President for the year was sophoIs it Anyway?" but of course, with a Dutch twist. more Erika Oglesby. 'story by Erika Oglesby

ence's laughter. Games performed at shows were

Mortar Board / Vanderprov

235


" T h e Evil Dancenator is at it again! Stealing the Elements of Dance, the Evil D a n c e n a t o r is on the verge of P e r f o r m a n c e Destruction land Total Dance Dominance! Can h e r Evil plot be stopped? Only the Dance T e a c h e r , with the help of his Clever F r i e n d Dr. Physics, can stop her! S u p e r Heroes, Desperate Dancers, a n d Marvelous M o v e m e n t b r i n g a fast paced a n d f u n d a n c e expe rience to children K-6, as the Dancers seek to outwit the wily Evil D a n c e n a t o r . O! Will t h e r e ever be a Finale G r a n d e ? You'll find yourself d a n c i n g with delight at the s u r p r i s e ending!" ~ Linda G r a h a m Strike T i m e Dance C o m p a n y is a H o p e - b a s e d c o m p a n y that tours e l e m e n t a r y schools teaching kids about d a n c e t h r o u g h a f u n interactive dance-play. This year the t h e m e was d a n c e a n d physics. T h e kids l e a r n e d the t h r e e elements of dance: space, time a n d energy, as well as f o u r of the main d a n c e forms; ballet, tap, jazz, a n d m o d e r n . In addition, h u m o r a n d

d r a m a was used to help the kids u n d e r s t a n d that the science of physics is p e r t i n e n t in everyday life, especially dance. T h e physics concepts of force balance, gravity, energy transfer, a n d m u c h m o r e were exp l o r e d t h r o u g h o u t the show. Directed by Maxine D e B r u y n a n d Linda Grah a m , Strike T i m e t o u r e d on twelve school days and p e r f o r m e d thirty shows, each an h o u r long. It makes for long a n d e x h a u s t i n g days, b u t the m e m b e r s of the c o m p a n y all a g r e e that t h e smiles of the children m a k e it all w o r t h it. ' a r t i c l e by S o m m e r A m u n d s e n * Cast: Evil D a n c e n a t o r : J o a n n a L e e m a n ; Dr. Physics: S o m m e r A m u n d s e n ; Dance T e a c h e r : J o n a t h a n Rau; Whiney Ballet Dancer: H e a t h e r Robertson; Perky Ballet Dancer: Robyn A n d e r s o n ; Matter of Face Ballet Dancer: Carrie Brandis; Captain Space: Jamie T h o m p s o n & Pamela Rexius; Captain T i m e : Ashley Perez; Captain Energy: C o u r t e n a y Roberts; Directed by Maxine D e B r u y n a n d Linda G r a h a m •

Strike Tiiviâ‚Ź A The group poses for a picture after a dress rehearsal. Strike Time members let their personalities shine through their costumes. The children really come alive w i t h the interactive program. 'Photoscourtesy of Strike Time and Public Relations*

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Hope's Asian Perspective Association (HAPA) is an organization dedicated to promoting cultural awareness on Hope's campus. T h e goal of this year was to expand beyond Hope and begin networking with other Asian student unions at nearby colleges. HAPA's executive board members participated in the Mid-West Asian American Student Union (MAASU) Conference at Michigan State in the fall. "MAASU really encouraged us as an organization. "We all got to attend several different workshops and speakers and then come back to Hope equipped with new ideas and leadership skills," said Vice-President Amanda McConnell. HAPA had the opportunity to strengthen relationships with the Asian Student Union at Grand Valley State during their annual Spring Festival. President Xing Wen Wu and Treasurer Shova KG remarked, "It has been a memorable experience meeting and working with Asian students from Calvin College and Grand

Valley State University. Knowing that there are other groups that are dedicated to the same goals as we are has strengthened us. We plan to continue supporting each other in the future." HAPA has several traditional events that it participates in every year. Along with the Black Student Union and La Raza Unida, HAPA helps decorate a float and walk in the Homecoming Parade. Images is always a popular event and HAPA spends hours practicing for their performance. This year, members choreographed a dance to the song "Chamma Chamma" from the movie China Gate. HAPA hosts karaoke nights during the year and also helps organize, run, and cook for the International Food Fair. In addition to these events, this year executive board member Natalie Grand put together a workshop on Affirmative Action. A huge success, several students attended not only to express their opinions,, but also willing to learn more about this controversial issue, •article and photos by Elizabeth Brichacek*

"We all ot to attend several different workshops an speakers, and then [returned] to Hope equipped with new ideas and leadership skills."

Vi Andrew Lee, Derek Terrell, Sarah Brower, Angela Matusiak, and Shova KC cook for a Korean BBQ. Karaoke night at the Kooiker Cottage with a few of the Phelps Scholars: Debby LL Sarah Brower, Lindsey Hall, and Amanda McConnell. In the new Martha Miller Center, Shova KC and Amanda McConnell watched a DVD of an international student's home. Matua Kobia, Vidhan Rana, Xing Wen Wu, Kevin Smittie, Thomas Matthews play Monopoly at the annual Spaghetti and Game night.

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A l u m n a Darcy Quick '06 died on Friday, J u n e 16, 2006, as the result of a tragic hiking accident at Mount Rainier National Park. A 2006 g r a d u a t e , she h a d b e e n w o r k i n g as a seasonal employee at the National Park Inn in L o n g m i r e , Washington, in addition to leading Bible studies with co-workers a n d participating in a Christian ministries program. Twenty-two years old, she h a d grown u p in the Pacific Northwest, g r a d u a t i n g f r o m La Salle H i g h School in Milwankie, O r e g o n . More recently h e r family has lived in Winfield, Illinois. She m a j o r e d in social work at H o p e , a n d h e r f u t u r e plans included social work a n d ministry. H e r activities as a student included the Alpha Phi O m e g a national service organization, t u t o r i n g with the Child r e n ' s After School Achievement (CASA) p r o g r a m , Dance M a r a t h o n , Relay for Life, participating in the spring b r e a k mission trip p r o g r a m , the U n i o n of Catholic Students a n d the O u t d o o r A d v e n t u r e Club. " T h e c a m p u s c o m m u n i t y is deeply s a d d e n e d by the news of Darcy Quick's tragic death," said President J a m e s B u l t m a n '63. "Darcy was a s t u d e n t who took 238

In Loving Memory

Q u i c k full a d v a n t a g e of the academic a n d co-curricular prog r a m s at H o p e . She e n g a g e d in m a n y service activities at t h e college a n d the c o m m u n i t y that distinguished h e r a t t e n d a n c e h ere. Darcy was highly respected, even a d m i r e d , for h e r positive influence on others. She was e d u c a t e d a n d p r e p a r e d to m a k e a difference in the lives of o t h e r s with h e r d e g r e e in social work." " T h e senior body m o u r n s the d e a t h of Darcy Quick, a beloved m e m b e r of t h e H o p e community," said Bradley Matson, a senior f r o m T r a v e r s e City. "Darcy was known for h e r cheerful character, a friendly attitude, a n d an o p e n personality. Darcy has been a valuable m e m b e r of the H o p e c h u r c h body; actively participating in the bible studies, p r a y e r meetings, and mission trips. T h r o u g h h e r d e g r e e in social work and h e r biblical study she was well p r e p a r e d to be a blessing to the world; however, we may take comfort knowing that she is now in a better place. She was a d e a r friend to many, including me, a n d I thank God for the time we h a d with her, d u r i n g late night bible studies and mission trips. Darcy will be missed a n d a d m i r e d for what she a d d e d to the H o p e community." "article courtesv of Public Relations*

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"Darcy was a student who took full advantage of the academic and co-curricular programs at Hope. She engaged in many service activities at the college and the community that distinguished her attendance here."

"Darcy was highly respected, even admired, for her positive influence on others."

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"Often, while sitting at my desk d r o n i n g over a p a p e r or r e a d i n g assignment, I would be delighted to hear a knock on the door and smell the a r o m a of Darcy's h a n d - b a k e d cookies. T h o u g h sometimes slightly b u r n e d , those cookies were the best because of the love that s h o n e t h r o u g h Darcy's smile as she held out the u n e x p e c t e d treat. She absolutely loved people and she would visit t h e m any chance she got j u s t to show t h e m . How she f o u n d the time to b u m b l e t h r o u g h the d o r m s , sit down and actually have full-length conversations d u r i n g stressful weeks, bake goodies (even t h o u g h she was allergic to a good n u m b e r of the ingredients), selflessly volunteer with Alpha Phi O m e g a , a n d still be p r e p a r e d for h e r classes is astonishing. 1 couldn't help b u t smile w h e n e v e r I saw her, a n d H o p e will not be quite the same without h e r infectiously s p u n k y attitude." ' b y Bethany Katerberg* Darcy Quick

239


"We mourn the tragic death of Paul Baeverstad. He was a beloved student full of so much promise for the future. Our thoughts and prayers are w i t h his parents, Mark and Katie, and sister, Katrina." •President B u l t m a r v

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B & c v c r s f & d

T h e tragic loss of a d e a r f r i e n d is s o m e t h i n g very difficult to deal with, b u t Paul Baeverstad will forever live on in o u r hearts. Paul h a d the u n i q u e ability to touch a n d connect with everyone h e met. T h a t speaks volumes to his character. Paul was a confident individual who knew exactly w h o he was. His o n e of a kind laugh, quirky h u m o r , a n d unforgettable smile are some characteristics that m a d e u p his personality. His love for the o u t d o o r s allowed Paul to experience new things a n d face new challenges. H e was a strong m a n with a soft heart. Paul f o u n d a way to b r i g h t e n every day a n d p u t o t h e r people before him-

self. Paul was an e n g i n e e r i n g m a j o r at H o p e College who loved b e i n g active as well. O n e could find Paul on the Frisbee golf course, at the soccer field, skiing d o w n a m o u n t a i n , or simply h a n g i n g out a n d being the great f r i e n d he was. Paul was a serving officer of the Cosmopolitan Fraternity a n d an excellent leader, U n d o u b t e d l y he will be missed a n d o u r sympathies go out to his family a n d a n y o n e who had the privilege to meet him. Memories of Paul will forever be engrained in o u r hearts a n d minds. This loss is troublesome but the m e m o r i e s of such a great m a n will help carry on the legacy of Paul Eric Baeverstad for all of time.

• M a t t Moorehead, Brian Charlton, and Scott Neckers on behalf of the Cosmopolitan Fraternity*

240

In Loving M e m o r y


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Pages 248-249: Aside f r o m service o p p o r t u n i t i e s , f r a t e r n i t i e s also foster f u n . I n t h e case of J a s o n D e j o n g a n d Billy V a l e n t i n e , they [ e n j o y a little cool d o w n via w a t e r at t h e C o s m o f o r m a l . After p o u r i n g all t h e water, D e j o n g ' s shirt was totally soaked t h r o u g h .

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Pages 252-253: G r e e k organizations a r e highly involved in o n e of H o p e ' s largest o r g a n i z a t i o n s . D a n c e M a r a t h o n . Addison H a y n e s a n d a Miracle Child take a d v a n t a g e of t h e 96 crayon o p t i o n s to w o r k o n a p r o j e c t at t h e crafts table.

Pages 264-265: New K a p p a Chi members enjoy some outdoor iceskating. D u r i n g New M e m b e r E d u c a t i o n , t h e b o n d i n g that occurs b e t w e e n t h e new m e m b e r s as well as a m o n g all sisters is an i m p o r t a n t p a r t of sorority life. T h e f r i e n d ships f o r m e d d u r i n g this p e r i o d will last a lifetime.


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Part of Hope's Greek tradition involves a week of sports-related competition, called Creek Week. SIB Allison Trotter plays Powder Puff football off campus. Although this competition is not school-affiliated, winning, as the Kappa Chis did this year, is still important.


T h i s year has b e e n a n exciting a n d captivating e x p e r i e n c e f o r the 42 m e n of t h e beloved F r a t e r n a l Society. T h e values of f r i e n d s h i p , love, a n d t r u t h inspired t h e F r a t e r m e n to be b e t t e r individuals n o t only on camp u s b u t off as well. M e m b e r s a r e involved with Lacrosse, Hockey, Baseball, Football, a n d Soccer.

kinson's Association t h r o u g h t h e Stu Post Parkinson's Raffle. T h e Society held events to h o n o r t h e professors t h a t give t h e m a g r e a t Christian e d u c a t i o n and also held a CASA p a r t y f o r t h e H o l l a n d ' s u n d e r privileged y o u t h . S o m e of t h e m e m b e r s were also involved in t u t o r i n g for p r o g r a m s such as LEAP, a C o r e City t u t o r i n g p r o g r a m . M e m b e r s of t h e F r a t e r n a l Society have a SO Set U 1 hese m e n thrive within t h e Fra- Q M I C R O N K A P P A £ P S I L O N ' P c h e c ^ s a n c ^ balances to mainternity a n d as l e a d e r s in their tain t h e i r g r a d e s , a n d they also have had a respective sports. c o n s i d e r a b l e a m o u n t of m e n sign a pledge Aside f r o m sports, m e m b e r s to speak o u t against t h e m i s t r e a t m e n t of held positions r a n g i n g f r o m 1FC presiw o m e n . T h e society is c o m m i t t e d to keeping d e n t to D a n c e M a r a t h o n D r e a m T e a m to such values a p a r t of their now o n g o i n g tradition Baker Scholars. 1 he F r a t e r n a l Society raised m o n e y that has lasted 172 years. for b o t h D a n c e M a r a t h o n a n d t h e West Michigan Par• w r i t t e n by M a t t h e w Wilkins*

Matt Wilkens

T h e n Dr. James Bultman President "Being a member of the Fraternal Society was helpful with connections and lasting friendships. I'll always remember the Friday night literary meetings that produced so much laughter. When I see current actives wearing the fraternal letters, I'm reminded of our common heritage at Hope."

244

Greeks

Management/Chemistry Major "My favorite part of Greek Life at Hope is being part of something larger than myself. Being Greek is not only being a part of an organization, it's being part of a family."

Now


!

T H E FACTS The Fraternal Society Founded: 1834 Colors: Blue and Gold Motto: The Few and Chosen Number of Actives:42 Sister Sorority: Sorosis Society Service Projects: Dance Marathon Stuart Post Parkinson's Raffle Professors' Brunch CASA

Opposite page: Steve Martindale, Chad Schwabauer, and Matt Wilkens spend time at Hog Bash, the fraternity's date night/camping trip, shooting potatoes into the lake with their potato cannon. This page: top to bottom, left to right: Even in the winter, members of the Fraternal Society manage lo surf. One of the Fraternal member's favorite times of the year is Hog Bash. Nick Wycowski, Jordan Windfield, Ben Rinker, and Matt Churchill huddle together in the back of a car to keep warm. Chad Schwabauer hangs out at a friend's house talking to his fraternity brothers after a Rush

event.

1st Row: Brian Gatliff, Adam Magoon, Scott Rynbrandt, Patrick M c M a h o n 2nd Row: Cullen Kronemeyer, Jack Abe, R. Todd Ricksen, Dan Tobert, David Sedjo, Dan Winter, Peter Spina, Matt Wilkens, Ryan Payne, Chad Shwabauer, Ben Rinker, Jeff Guy, Brett Schlender, DJ Scholten, Jacob Droppers, Karter Klingenberg, Daniel Keogh, Kyle Manny 3rd Row: Mitch Curry, Matt Anderson, Brett Kingma, Jordan Cooper, Matt Churchill 4th Row: Dan Chesney, Ryan Kelly, Kevin McMahon, Kevin Burnham, Tim Judson, Seve Martindale, Andrew Bedan, Nick Witkowski, Jon Shaver, Jordan Winfield

O m i c r o n Kappa Epsilon

24^


T H E FACTS The Sorosis Society Founded: 1905 Colors; Red and White Motto; Strength and Honor Flower; Yellow Rose Jewel; Pearl Number of Actives; 53 Brother Fraternity; Fraternal Society Service Projects; Dance Marathon, Relay for Life, Harbor House, Nykerk Breakfast.

1st Row: Courtney Saltarski, Molly Caesar, Katie Schonfeld, )aime )o Sabol, Kylee Tamminga, Alesha Ruscett, Leah Post, Amie Ecker, Amanda Gonzales, Julie Miller, Katie Winkle. Missing from Photo: Chanel Duval, Katie Taylor, Amber Hauptman, Marti Anderson, Elizabeth Blosh, Megan Courtney, Betsy DeKleine, Libby Klooster, Kate Stacey 2nd Row: Amanda Scheeringa, Meggan Delmonico, Brittany Berry, Summer Pickhover, Tarah Kapinga, Emily Mills, Laura Johnson, Kali Hess, Chelsea Stephenson, Val Foster, Laura Rojeski, Shauna Markby, Beth Krohmer, Katie Rhem, Jess Stokes 3rd Row: Niki Pointer, Kendall Ramsden, Kelly Sina, Erika Oglesby, Lauren Oldfield, Julie Marie Carrico, Meghan Beachum, Ali Spears, Jen Westrate, Michelle Merlihan, Amanda Gurtler, Niki Moss, Chelsea Lynes, Morgan Bole, Danielle Warren 4th Row: Sarah VanderHeide, Sarah Vernon, Christie Carrier,

246

Greeks

Opposite page: Meggan Delmonico, Chelsea Stephenson, and Laura Rojeski prepare for their sub sale early on a Sunday morning. These subs go to students during exam week to help them through the stress. This page: top to bottom, left to right. Chanel Duval, Jordan DeVries, and Amanda Gonzales enjoy the weather on Spring Fling. Niki Moss, Morgan Boyle, and Emily Mills help Amanda Scheeringa pick out a dress for the spring formal. Showing compassion for her ill sister, Kelly Sina plays nurse for Jess Stokes. Marti Anderson and Kendall Ramsden help out with Habit for Humanity.


T h e Sigma Sigma Sorority celebrated 100 years the Sigmas welcomed their nineteen new m e m b e r s into the of sisterhood this fall with H o m e c o m i n g festivities that sorority. brought back a l u m n i f r o m all over the world! Entire T h e Sigmas revived an old tradition by hosting a pledge classes r e t u r n e d to g a t h e r with o t h e r Sigma a l u m n i Spring Retreat at the cottage of one of )f the m e m for a literary meeting, b r u n c h , a n d the H o m e c o m i n g hers. After grilling h a m b u r g e r s a n d hot dogs, parade. Alumni b r o u g h t old p h o t o albums a n d several w o m e n gave talks on issues such each decade shared tidbits about their experias spirituality, sexual assault, a n d addicences of being a Sigma Sigma. Following that, tions. There was o p e n discussion after the active m e m b e r s talked a b o u t their cureach set of talks, allowing the Sigmas rent involvements on c a m p u s a n d what has to talk openly a n d honestly about the changed in the sorority over the years. way that these issues have impacted During the fall, not only did the Sig- + % ^ * m * ^ ^ A A a their own lives. This m e a n i n g f u l mas c o m m e m o r a t e their 100 years, b u t they S I ^ S IO retreat won the " O u t s t a n d i n g Sisteralso carried on traditions such as the formal ^ h o o d Event" award given out at the in Chicago and date nights. S p r i n g semester Greek Awards C e r e m o n y . brought diligent p r e p a r a t i o n for Dance MaraAs always, the Sigmas divided their thon, a 24 h o u r event that raises m o n e y for DeVos energies this year between c o m m u n i t y Children's Hospital. T h e Sigmas raised m o r e t h a n any service, fundraising, special events such as the other student organization with over $12,000. After a sue informal in Cadillac, a n d time spent cherishing the friendcessful Rush p r o g r a m that included line d a n c i n g a n d hay ships that bind t h e m together. rides at Tuesink's f a r m , as well as bowling a n d karaoke, •written by Laura J o h n s o n *

Kylee Tamminga Special Education for Emotional Impairments

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"When I see a faculty member that was part of Sigma Sigma, I think how awesome it is that this organization has been around for over 100 years! Even throughout the years Sigmas have held onto many values and traditions that this organization is based on. No matter when they were active, they still feel like sisters. It is always fun to sit and talk about then and now."

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Jan DeWeert Zessin Media Services/ Library

"Being a Sigma definitely enhanced my organizational and leadership skills. I feel a sense of pride when I see the current Sigma actives wearing thier red sweatshirts."

Now Sorosis Society

247


1 st Row: Joey Orr, Oliver O'Brien, Adam Ringnalda, Grant Wenster, David Visintainer, Mike Kelly, Mark Yapp, pCharles Knooihuizen, Steve Schuiling, Steve Frazier 2nd Row: Grant Prutzman, Maris VonWebsky, Randall Johnson, Lance Postma, Daniel Koenig, Alex Behm, Jeff Slaughter, Nate Dejong, Michael DeYoung, Jordan Timmer, Mike Amerman, Joel Evenhouse, Phillip Lepper, Daniel Tressler, Jesse DeBoest 3rd Row: Nathaniel VanHorn, Nate Reed, Chase Morris 4th Row; Matthew Moorehead, Daine Doctor 5th Row: Ben Bradley, Jason Dejong, William Valentine, Ryne Wilson, Paul Baeverstead, Cam Dehaan, Christian Piers

The Cosmopolitan Fraternity Founded: 1890 Colors: Lincoln Green

and Peari White

Motto: Unity through Diversity Number of Actives: 4 9 Sister Sorority: Delphi Sorority Service Projects: Relay fro Life Dance Marathon Beach Clean Up AIDS walk Heal with Teal Earth Day Awareness

THE FACTS , .......

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Top to bottom, left to right; Nick DeKoster, Jesse DeBoest, Cam Schuler, and Mike DeYoung enjoy some good Cosmo bonding time. Scott Neckers and Mike DeYoung work as a team in order to win the foozball match. Helping his brother cool off after some dancing at the formal dinner, Billy Valentine takes the opportunity to pour a bottle of water over Jason Dejong's head. Paul Baeverstead and Oliver O'Brien give a group hug to Matt Moorehead as part of his birthday celebration. Anytime Phelps is open, a large group of Cosmos can always be found at their table. They take this opportunity to bond together as a fraternity.


Now Christian Piers

English, Chemistry, S Biology Major "Cosmopolitan has been both a tool and a guiding force in my three years at Hope, offering opportunities for leadership and service, as well as

J i m Boelkins Provost "The best part of Greek life was the organizational structure which provided opportunities for both social activities and learning life skills of leadership and service. Being a member of a Greek organization taught me a number of leadership skills that were helpful in various postgraduate positions. Its also provided me with a group of lifelong friends."

ideals of morality and intellectual selfactualization for me to aspire to in my life and work. Cosmo is a group of men w h o have offered love and support in my falls, encouragement in my successes, and through it all, a new perspective on the concept of life in brotherhood."

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T h e Cosmopolitan Fraternity is drawing to the Sexual Assault. Nick was also awarded Greek Man of end of its 116th year on campus with nine new memthe Year. bers and an eye to the f u t u r e . T h e fraternity particiIn addition to their involvements on pated in many campus activities this year, including campus, the Cosmos enjoyed the traditional Mortar Boara, the Pull, tennis, soccer, a n d outdoor activities that characterize their Spring Break mission trips. Cosmo athletes fraternity, including Spring and Fall included Ist-singles tennis player, senior Canoe Trips, respectively on the Manistee and Pine Rivers of MichiAndy R u e m e n a p p , and second-team gan, and Cosmo Ski Trip to SteamAll-American soccer player, senior Devin boat Springs, Colorado, (open to McNeil. Cosmos were recognized for the entire campus) over Christmas holding the highest fraternity GPA and ^, ,, .. Break. Many Cosmos also took for being the "Most Spirited"* at Relay for P r f I K A P P A to the woods d u r i n g Spring Break, Life—both for the second year r u n n i n g — with nine men hiking through the and were distinguished a m o n g Greeks with Great Smoky Mountains, and six others an Outstanding Brotherhood Event Award. camping in Kentucky. "The ice-storms in Junior Christian Piers organized "Greek Men the Smokies pushed us to our limits," said j u n i o r Jeff Take a Stand," a g r o u p of 120 fraternity men pledged Slaughter. "There's nothing like ice, bears, and the against sexual harassment, a n d senior Nick DeKoster coordinated the Heal with Teal 5K r u n with the Cenwilderness to bring brothers together." 'written by ter for Women in Transition to raise awareness about Christian Piers Piers* _ _

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249


Ellen Tanis Awad Coordinator of Student Activities and Greek Life , "While a student at Hope, I loved being involved not only in my sorority, but also active within the larger Greek community. As I work with Greek Life at Hope currently, it is exciting to see women continuing the traditions of not only my sorority, but each sorority at Hope. I think it is a valuable experience and am happy to be able to support current Hope Greek students."

Now Amanda Piagnerelli

Dance Major "I chose to join a Greek organization because I thought that it would give me a chance to meet a lot of people as well as get involved in Hope College events on campus. I think that being a member of a Greek organization is going to prepare me for the future because it has taught me a lot of responsilities as well as people skills."

T h i s year, t h e sisters of Delta Phi have p r o v e n a n d d a t e nights. that t h e i r navy b i n e sweatshirts a r e not what m a k e T h i s s p r i n g , t h e Delphis w e l c o m e d into the t h e m u n i f i e d , b u t their d e d i c a t i o n to t h e sorority e i g h t e e n new m e m b e r s , w h o have brought sorority. Each week at business meeta significant a m o u n t of e n t h u s i a s m a n d spirit to ings, t h e Delphis s p e n d time plant h e o r g a n i z a t i o n . T h e Delphis w e r e sad to say n i n g f u t u r e social a n d service g o o d - b y e to their g r a d u a t i n g seniors, but events. Despite busy schedules, t h e k n o w t h a t t h e sixteen of t h e m have amazm e m b e r s of Delta Phi placed g r e a t i n g m e m o r i e s to take with t h e m . T h e s e i m p o r t a n c e o n service. T h e Delg r a d u a t i n g seniors left with t h e assurance phis w e r e enthusiastically involved P H | t h a t w h e n e v e r they step foot o n H o p e ' s with such activities as Relay for Life c a m p u s in t h e f u t u r e that t h e Delphis will a n d Dance M a r a t h o n . O t h e r service w a r m l y w e l c o m e t h e m back. F r o m t h e new projects i n c l u d e d p a i n t i n g nails at m e m b e r s to t h e u p p e r c l a s s m e n . Delta Phi local n u r s i n g h o m e s a n d h e l p i n g o u t at was u n i f i e d by traditions, m e m o r i e s , a n d genut h e n e a r b y C r i t t e r B a r n . Delphis not only ine d e d i c a t i o n to t h e sorority a n d each o t h e r . s p e n t their time v o l u n t e e r i n g b u t socializing at f o r m a l s • S t o r y by Ashley J o s e p h *

DELTA

UNIFICATION THROUGH SERVICE

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Opposite page: Kim Koetje and Claire March listen intently to Jess Gibson tell a story. Gibson served as the Delphi cottage spring RA. This page top to bottom, left to right; Kari Zwingelberg watches as her teammate fjoes up to bat for the annual Greek Week wiffleball tournament. Talking to a friend at the Cosmo Date Night is Missi Rossi. Amanda Piagnerelli, li Jess Gibson, and Russalle Hull enjoy a night of dancing together. Leah Guterson pitches for the Delphi wiffleball team to win the Greek Week tournament

1st Row: Nicole Pack, Kim Meulenbelt, Jilian Mikols, Stefanie Haba, Kelli Smith, Ashley boer, Allison Pawlowski, Stacey VanDam, Karla bylsma, Rachel Borgeson, Mandy Smits, Lindsey Kennedy, Laura Rippberger 2nd Row: Beth Lautz, Becca Peckenpaugh, Missi Rossi, Amy Prutzman, Kim Koetje, Merideth Mast, Amanda Piagnarelli, Allison Kurtze, Amy Hipps 3rd Row: Krista Gier, Ashley Joseph, Kate Van Eewen, Kristina Kurtz, Bryn Carter, Courtney Smith, Andrea DeKock, Jeanine Shultze, Kari Zwingleberg, Emily VanWieren, Jen Bouman, Claire March, Emily Wegemer, Meghan Wolthuis, Jenny Birkenholtz, Ellie Tresslar, Anna Roberts, Haleigh Heneveld, Rachel Ferrera, Kara Gier, Kali Ludwig 4th Row: Jess Stentz, Russalle Hull, Amanda Bos, Lindsey Van Wyk, Kelly Payne, Jackie Peckenpaugh, Becca Olsen, Kelly Post, Katie Wilber, Leah Guterson, Britney Posma Missing from Photo: Lauren Field, Molly Miller, Ashley DeWitt, Jenny Hospers, Brittney Doty, Jenna Geerlingsjess Gipson, Breanna Gomez, Melissa Haligas, Ashley Johnson, Joelle Mikols, Mary Claire Miller, Lauren Mueller, Brynne Shoaf, Andrea Winn, Sarah Jones, Amy Lomasney, Chiara Savage.

The Delphi Sorority Founded; 1910 Colors: Navy Blue and Gold Motto: Unity Makes Strength Number of Actives: 72 Brother Fraternity: Cosmopolitan Service Projects: Dance Marathon Relay for Life Walk for Warmth Freedom Village

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I he Emersonian fraternity, b o n d e d together by their m u t u a l study of Ralph Waldo E m e r s o n , was f o u n d e d in 1919 as the E m e r s o n i a n Literary Society. T h e Greek letters Phi T a u Nu stand for Philius (love), T e m e (honor), a n d Nike (success). T h e s e are the principles that best describe their philosophy. T h e spirit of the Emersonian fraternity can be capt u r e d in p a r t by the words of the Emersonian President of 1924: "To foster the literary capacity of the individual student; to m a k e him m o r e proficient in his p r e p a r a t i o n for his vocation; to m a k e h i m m o r e at ease socially; to develop his moral sense of values; a n d , above all, to

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Doug Vandyken

Business Services "he'll e-mail me his quote."

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a d d those qualities which m a r k him as a m a n and a Christian g e n t l e m a n — t h e s e are the ideals which we hold u p b e f o r e us as we a r e b a n d e d together under the n a m e of E m e r s o n . Success t h r o u g h love and h o n o r - this is E m e r s o n i a n . " T h e E m e r s o n i a n s are involved in Dance M a r a t h o n , I n t r a m u r a l Sports, Orientation, H o p e Food Drive, Varsity Soccer, Varsity T r a c k , Varsity Football, PULL, Relay for Life, Habitat for H u m a n i t y , Ski Club, I n t e r f r a t e r n i t y Council Executive Council, a n d Mr. Dutch Pageant. T h e m e n of E m e r s o n i a n are experiencing a rekindling of spirit in recent years and are striving to r e t u r n to their roots of strong b r o t h e r h o o d a n d unity. ' P a u l Carollo*

Paul Carollo Management Economics Major "Originally I thought I would never join a greek organization at Hope, but after seeing the friendships and brotherhood that only a fraternity could give me, I knew I had found something I wanted to be involved in. My favorite part of Greek Life at Hope is the countless ways it offers you to get involved and really make a difference."

Now Greeks

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T H E FACTS The Emersonian Fratumity Founded: 1919 Colors: Maroon and White Motto: Love, Honor, Success Number of Actives: 32 Sister Sorority: Sibylline Sorority Service Projects: Relay for Life Hope Food Drive Dance Marathon

Opposite page: Addison Haynes takes time at Dance Marathon to get to ^novv one of the Miracle Children by coloring together. Paul Corollo and Brian Hiem enjoy the friendly competition as they wait for the next ball to hit at the annual Greek Week wiffle ball tournament. Competing in 'he Mr. Dutch competition are Paul Corollo, Tommy Gordon, and Brady lensen. Jake Gilliard walks past Kollen while breathing a big sigh of relief a'ter finishing exams. The week of exams was above 70 degrees almost every day and students took advantage of the warm weather to study outside. Talking on his cell phone, Andy Crowder takes a timeout during the wiffleball game.

1st Row: Matt McCabe, Matt Griffin, Paul Carollo, Andy Crowder, Addison Haynes, Ricky Rhodes, Brady Jensen 2nd Row: Matt Rugenstein, Tommy Gordon, Elliott Mast, Alex Greczek, Pete Holden, Sam Arens, Pete Nyberg, Jon Barrus, Jake Gilliland, Steve Mostrom 3rd Row: Brian Heim, RJ Casey, Ryan Specht, Eric Bouwman 4th Row: Andy Westra, Dave Betke, Paul Swan, Zach Snyder, Dan Kalleward Not Pictured: Scott Ibbotson, ForrestPowers, Andrew Radler, Jon Mu n k , Riley Nelsen, Dan Leppink.

Phi Tau Nu

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T H E FACTS The Sibylline Sorority Founded: 1919 Colors: Chaste Grey and Sky Blue Motto: Friendship, Love, and Loyalty Flower: Yellow Rose Jewel: Pearl Number of Actives: 81 Brother Fraternity: Emersonian Service Projects: Relay for Life Dance Marathon Nursing Flomes

Front Row: Megan Werley, Jennie Rice, Megan McCormick, Kaitlyn Becker, Julie Cardella, Heather Mandel, Jenna Tremuth, Stephanie Poll, Monica Martinez, Leah Dejonge. Second Row: Amy Evenhouse, Angela Pschoika, Nikki Leger, Mollie Payne, Kristen Hutchins, Marissa Grott, Andi Prater, Emily Griffin, Anne Lockwood, Kim Coleman, Allison Adams. Third Row: Lauren Reus, Shanda Lockhart, Erin Sundberg, Ellen Kleiman, Beth Gleason, Jenna Coffaro, Deena VanAssen, Nora Slenk, Colleen Sullivan, Kendall Aliber, Sarah Mignin, Ruth Hagen, Betsy Scott. Fourth Row: Sarah Shaheen, Emily Sterley, Melissa Kilbourn, Eden Jager, Melissa Sapp, Dani VanderLugt, Megan Sedjo, Libby Cassell, Jenna Grove, Rachael Sauerman, Jami Rubin. Fifth Row: Christine Moore, Lauren Harmer, Cara Brondyke, Abby Joyce, Elly Blacquiere, Kristen Rose, Sarah Wright. Top Row: Audrey Tetro, Emily Shebak, Katie Eisenga, Lori Sullivan, Lori Clark, Kate Dunkin, Allison Trotter, Jillian Hamlin, Emily Ausema, Liz Gibson, Mandy Best, Jes Werp, Liz Mickalich, Katie Wright, Erica Hess Missing from Photo: Claire Keon, Audrey Laatman, Meagan O'Neil, Becca Warber, Lindsay Bransen, Danielle Constantin, Megan Faust, Tina Lilly, Katie Matre, Chrissie Tedesco, Deena Van Assen, Trisha Meier, Allie Watters, Jessica Fezzey.

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Opposite page: A few SIB sisters enjoy the sun at Spring Fling where many students say good-bye for the year. This page: t o p to bottom, left to right: Some of the new members perform in the lip sync at Dance Marathon. It's tradition that the new members of each sorority and fraternity put on a lip sync. Despite the camo, a SIB sister spots Emily Griffin in the Pine Grove. This year the SIBs celebrated Spring Fling by making their o w n t-shirts. Jenna Grove joins in the dancing at Dance Marathon. Dancing at the Cosmo formal, Stephanie Poll and Megan Werley show off their moves in the late night hours.


NEW S VITAL VOLUNTEERISM

This year was an amazing one for the Sibylline sorority, which was quite active a r o u n d campus during the Fall semester. T h r e e Sib sisters led the O d d Year Pull T e a m as Morale Coaches, while many Sibs participated in the campus-wide Relay for Life. In o r d e r to get excited for the Relay and raise money for the cause, the Sibylline sorority put on the first ever Raffle for Relay. T h e fundraiser was held behind the Sibylline and Emersonian c o t - J v tages and included activities and games, such as a pie-in-the-face stand. T h e main attraction of the event, however, was a threeon-three basketball tournament. In the Spring, the Sibylline sorority was fortunate enough to welcome twenty-five new amazing women into their organization. This put the total

Katie Wright Language Arts Composite Major "I love being Greek at Hope when everyone comes together for a common goal. Take Relay for Life or Dance Marathon for example: look at the phenomenal things we can accomplish when we work together."

Now

n u m b e r of active Sibs to eighty-one women. The spring held many incredible times for the organization. Aside f r o m informals and formals, the girls participated in Dance Marathon, raising money for Devos Children's Hospital in Grand Rapids. Also, the spring semester marked a new step for the Sibylline Sorority. O n e of their latest o l u n t e e r i n g activities has been with Nursing Homes in the Holland area. T h r o u g h o u t the school year, the members of the Sigma Iota Beta sorority continually demonstrated their motto of friendship, love, and loyalty, both to one another and to their community, ritten by Christina Tedesco"

Then Courtney Childs Assistant Director of Admissions "I really enjoyed rush. Meeting future SIBs with new energy and spirit always brought the organization closer together. Knowing the ideals of the sorority are being carried on by young women is exciting. I feel honored to be a part of the Greek tradition at Hope."

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3rd Row: Andrew Schueneman, Shaun Smith, Brandon Teets, Matt Timmons 2nd Row; Patrick St. John, Robert Hoff, Darren Murrey, Matt Bauer, Colin Fenton, Cabe Macias, Matt Cowie, Jon Ploch, Shawn Evers 1st Row: Trevor Kierczynski, Chris Gates, Brian Bussema, Kyle Warner, David Leland

This page: top to bottom, left to right: Serenading some friends, Jon Ploch shows off his electric guitar skills. Shaun Smith demonstrates his acrobatic abilities outside of Kollen. Brian Bussema, Shawn Evers and Shaun Smith watch their teammates during the annual wiffleball tournament. Sending the wiffleball off into left field, Andrew Schueneman scores an RBI for his team. Opposite page: Patrick St. John enjoys the weather as he gets some last minute studying in before exams start.

The Aracadian Fraternity Founded: 1946 Colors: Blue and White Motto: Service Love Wisdom m.

Number of Actives: 2 4 Service Projects: Dance Marathon Book Drive Canned Food Drive Relay for Life

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Wes Wooley Graphic Designer/Cheerleading Coach "My favorite part of greek life was feeling connected to an organization that stood for something and had a history that I would be a part of. Today, when I see the boys in blue sporting Chi Phi Sigma around campus, I have a

Gabe Macias

real sense of pride that something that meant

Management Major "I will always remember the traditions that the Arcadians had w i t h other sororities, but especially the ones w i t h my brothers."

so much to me while I was at Hope is being sustained by the next generation. And, hopefully, in some small part, I helped to create and preserve a meaningful legacy to others, now and in the future."

T h e Arcadian Fraternity began in 1946 and was bnilt on three life skills: service, love, and wisdom. For service, the Arcadians provided for others in need by contributing work to community projects. T h e love and respect of the members and alumni create a bond that has brought the brothers together as more than a g r o u p but a family. T h e Arkies take the commitment to wisdom seriously because they dedicate themselves t o ^ 1 ^ 1 ' the outstanding education they receive at Hope. These three things together provide a good outline for the brothers in the Arcadian Fraternity and helps each m e m b e r carry out p r o p e r actions. This year has been full of excitement and work

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as the Arcadian Fraternity allowed two new classes into the system. With lower numbers coming into this year, the Arkies had a fall and spring Rush, which b r o u g h t in some great new members who now shape a large proportion of the fraternity. With numbers at a higher level, the Arkies had members in Relay for life. Dance Marathon, Football, Basketball, Baseball, Lacrosse, and many campus jobs that provide a service to the students at H o p e College. This year was a great success for the men of Arcadia, and they look forward to the f u t u r e to see what challenges and accomplishments arrive for them. • written by Matthew Cowie*

CHI PHI SKJMA


Mary DeYoung Associate Professor of Math "When I see today's Alpha Phis wearing thier green sweatsirts, the word "sisters" comes to mind-that and the words to some pretty crazy sorority songs! I am still connected to some of my Alpha Phi friends in deep ways. Even when we don't see each other often, we are still able to support each other through some of life's difficulties."

Now#, Larissa N. Mariano Political Science Women's Studies Major "My favorite part about being a part of Alpha Gamma Phi is that I am able to be real and very honest with some of the most phenomenal women which I am honored to call sisters. They all love me unconditionally and accept me for who I am and where I am in life/'

T h c v i T h e w o m e n of t h e A l p h a G a m m a Phi Sorority e m b r a c e d their s t r o n g sense of sisterhood this year. T h e year b e g a n with a b a r b e q u e , a n d t h e p r e s i d e n t , Emily Liang, started with a new c o n c e p t of a sorority goals meeting. T h e r e was a r e c e n t a d d i t i o n of a sisterly b u d d y system w h e r e every week each sister s p e n t time with a d i f f e r e n t w o m a n f r o m t h e A L P H A q A M o r g a n i z a t i o n . At H o m e c o m i n g , the sorority h a d a blast d a n c i n g o n their float. D u r i n g their fall i n f o r m a l , they got t u r n e d a r o u n d in a c o r n m a z e at C r a n e ' s A p p l e O r c h a r d . O n d a t e night, t h e sorority c o o k e d d i n n e r t o g e t h e r a n d t h e n w e n t laser tagging a n d cosmic m i n i a t u r e golfing. The W i n d -

mill o n 8th St. p r o v i d e d a place for b r u n c h a n d lots of laughs, a n d at night d a n c i n g at t h e d a n c e clubs of G r a n d R a p i d s c o n t r i b u t e d to w e e k e n d entertainm e n t . A f t e r a successful Rush, we e x t e n d e d bids to five p h e n o m e n a l w o m e n w h o would "" greatly c o n t r i b u t e t h e s is ter hood of Alpha G a m m a Phi. S p r i n g f o r m a l served as a f u n e v e n t for t h e sisters a n d their dates, M A P H I At g r a d u a t i o n , t h e sorority tearfully said g o o d - b y e to t h r e e seniors, Kat Ramsey, Chrissy W a h l s t r o m , a n d Emily Liang, all d e s t i n e d for g r e a t things in this world. T h e sisters of A l p h a G a m m a Phi have flourished a n d g r o w n i m m e n s e l y s t r o n g e r as individuals and as sisters. • w r i t t e n by Larissa M a r i a n o '

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This page: top to bottom, left to right: Stephanie Hansens demonstrates her flexibility at Dance Marathon. Hilary Pitchlynn eagerly awaits the ball in the outfield at the wiffleball tournament. Alpha Phis win first place in the Lip Sync competition at Dance Marathon, which took place in the early hours of the morning. Reading from a journal, Kat Ramsey wows her sisters with her diction. Opposite page: Emily Liang, caught in midswing, cranks one past the short stop at the annual Creek Week wiffleball tournament.

1st Row: Sarah Popovich, Megan Dougherty, Karis CranbergMichaelson, Anna Pillot, Emily Hunt, Rachel Dorr 2nd Row: Mia Rizzo, Katharine Ramsey, Monica Calhoon, Christine Wahlstrom, Emily Liang. Not Pictured: Larissa Mariano, Hilary Pitchlynn

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The Alpha Phi Sorority Founded; 1957 Colors: Forest Green and Gold Motto: Friendship, Anchor of our Strength PPjjlLwSKii

Flower: Yellow Carnation Number of Actives: 16 Service Projects: Relay for Life Dance Marathon aiding AIDS walk

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T H E FACTS

Alpha Gamma Ph


The m e m b e r s of Alpha T h e t a Chi h a v e m a i n nity has p a r t i c i p a t e d in f u n d r a i s i n g f o r t h e American tained their p r e s e n c e on H o p e ' s C a m p u s f o r twenty C a n c e r Society t h r o u g h t h e Relay f o r Life Foundation, consecutive years. T h e fact that its legacy c o n t i n u e s raised f u n d s for c h i l d r e n in n e e d of medical attention is d u e to t h e fact that C e n t u r i a n s believe in t h r o u g h D a n c e M a r a t h o n , a n d l a b o r e d to i m p r o v e a d m i t t i n g new C e n t u r i a n s every year that H o l l a n d ' s n a t u r a l habitat at t h e D e C r a a l N a t u r e have consistently displayed e x e m p l a r y C e n t e r . A n o t h e r i m p o r t a n t service project c h a r a c t e r a n d e n t h u s i a s m not only t h a t t h e C e n t u r i a n s h a v e c o n c e n t r a t e d on towards Alpha T h e t a Chi, b u t for this year is a p e n - p a l p r o j e c t , set u p by G r e e k life o n t h e whole. T h i s year A l p h a T h e t a Chi s own J e f f r e y Brown, to was n o d i f f e r e n t . T h e C e n t u r i a n s p r o v i d e positive r o l e - m o d e l type leadernow n u m b e r twenty-nine a n d they ship to e l e m e n t a r y school c h i l d r e n in the have b e e n able to accomplish g r e a t H o l l a n d a r e a w h o a r e c o n s i d e r e d at-risk. things in their g r o w i n g n u m b e r s . A ID I-IA THETA CHI T h e C e n t u r i a n s feel that, by writins; and C e n t u r i a n s all firmly believe t h a t c o m m u n i c a t i n g with c h i l d r e n in Holland, they a r e d e f i n e d by these t h r e e they can m a k e a vital i m p r o v e m e n t in the w o r d s : B r o t h e r h o o d , Service a n d lives of H o l l a n d ' s i m p r e s s i o n a b l e youth. This C h a r a c t e r . Each of these t h r e e values has b e e n a year in which A l p h a T h e t a Chi has lends m e a n i n g to t h e o t h e r . Service is t a k e n initiative a n d played an influential role a n essential p a r t of t h e o r g a n i z a t i o n a n d is within t h e H o l l a n d c o m m u n i t y . pivotal in the d e y e l o p m e n t of p e r s o n a l c h a r a c t e r of • S t o r y by Bradley L o c k w o o d * its m e m b e r s . T h i s year alone, t h e C e n t u r i a n f r a t e r -

Bradley Lockwood

T h e n Scott Wolterink

Vice President for College Advancement "It's always great to see current students proudly wearing the Centurian letters. It's a reminder of the comradery and friendship I developed while at Hope."

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Psychology Major "I chose to become a Centurian to get involved on Hope College's campus and to meet people. The comradery that exists between the brothers of Alpha Theta Chi is something that I will remember forever. The feeling of being a part of something worthwhile is a rewarding part of Greek life for me."

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THE FACTS The Centurian Fraternity Founded: 1966 Colors; Red and Black Motto: The Strength of Brotherhood is the Unity of Diversity Number of Actives: 2 9 Sister Sorority: Dorian Sorority Service Projects: Relay for Life, Dance Marathon, DeGraaf Nature Center, Pen-Pal Project

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Opposite page: Cents and Dorians wave to the crowd along the Homeoming parade route. This page: top to bottom, left to right: Greeting , each other, Matt Kryger and Ryan Jackson go in for the chest bump. Cents enjoy cooking and eating a meal together at their cottage. Adam W i t t takes a seat before going to the Dorian formal. Chris Riley plays the guitar lor some late night entertainment. 1

1st Row: Keith Fraass, Mike Vanderwheele, John Canta, Brandon King, Nathan Sayer 2nd Row: Justin Subania, Zach Cray, Ken Underwood, Andrew Abala, Bradley Lockwood 3rd Row: Brian Wyns, Andrew Liang, Peter Mattson. 4th Row: David Weatherly, Matt Kryger, David Rawlinson, Jeff Brown, Jonathon VonKoenig.

Alpha Theta Chi

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THE FACTS The Dorian Sorority Founded: 1921/1988 Colors; Lavender and Gold Motto: Simplicity of Manner, Strength of Purpose, Beauty of Character Flower: Yellow Rose Number of Actives: 3 8 Brother Fraternity: Centurian Service Projects: Relay for Life Dance Marathon Jingle Bell Ball at Warm Friend

1st Row: Jamie DeVries, Stephanie Kay Van Stee, Jessica Everelt, Ashley Oberg, Casie Tubbs, Candice Evenhouse, Megan Lhambers, Devin Wehrmeyer. 2nd Row: Marie Graves, Lauren Halvorson, Rachel Le, Stefanie Greybar, Bethany Wallin, Bethany Lieberman, Shannon Harburn, Elisa Ortega, Caroline Coleman, Jennifer Thompson, Elissa Preseau. 3rd Row: Malory Lynch, Kristin Johnson, Kristen Gruenberg. 4th Row: Meg Estochen, Stphanie Pasek, Julie Tillman. 5th Row: Ashley Gruenberg, Stacey Harburn, Emily Owens, Abby Drake, Heidi Weir, Emily Donahue.

Greeks

Opposite page: The Dorians enjoy dancing at their spring formal. This page: Top to bottom, left to right: Sporting all Dorian Purple, Candice Evenhouse hangs out with her sisters before the Homecoming Parade gets started. New members perform a lip sync dance on the Dance Marathon stage. Bowling at the Dorian's 80's themed Date Night is Stephanie Van Stee. Kristen Johnson, dressed as a butterfly, hangs out in front of some stage scenery.


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T h i s year, t h e K a p p a Beta Phi sorority t h r i v e d once a g a i n — e v e n in West M i c h i g a n ' s winter! I his g r o u p of y o u n g w o m e n d e l i g h t e d in serving others, a n d so they c o n t i n u e d t h e p h i l a n t h r oop y project for this y e a r , c h a l l e n g i n g t h e m selves to raise m o n e y f o r a f u n d f o r Holland H i g h a n d Z e e l a n d East H i g h School students w h o n e e d h e l p with e x t r a c u r ricular e q u i p m e n t costs. I n c o n j u n c t i o n with H o p e College's values as a C h r i s t i a n college, they h a v e also s t a r t e d a n all-inclusive Bible S t u d y f o r o u r sorority. T h e p u r p o s e of G r e e k societies has o f t e n been q u e s t i o n e d at H o p e , a n d o n t h e n a t i o n a l level as well. As a n o r g a n i z a t i o n , t h e D o r i a n s feel t h a t G r e e k

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life at H o p e is u n i q u e , a n d richly c o m p l e m e n t s t h e aca d e m i c excellence t h a t this college is k n o w n for. T h e sorority p r o v i d e s a n outlet for o u t s t a n d i n g i n v o l v e m e n t with Relay for Life, D a n c e M a r a t h o n , local n u r s i n g h o m e s , a n d H a b i t a t for H u m a n i t y . As they c o m p l e t e a n o t h e r w o n d e r C T A . O L J I f u l year, t h e D o r i a n s will miss t h e r n I ( : j e a r seniors as they g r a d u a t e , b u t they feel c o n f i d e n t t h a t t h e l e a d e r ship, t e a m w o r k , a n d h e a r t - t o - h e a r t f r i e n d s h i p f o u n d in K a p p a Beta Phi will bless t h e i r j o u r n e y s f o r e v e r . Article by C a r o l i n e C o l e m a n *

KAPPA BE"

Candice Evenhouse German for Secondary Education Major "The friendships I've made within my own sorority as well as others is something that I'll always remember. I joined because it seemed like a fun way to get to know people. 1 had no idea the positive effect it would have on my life."

Now

T h e n Stephanie Greenwood Director of Parent Relations "My favorite part of belonging to a sorority was building close friendships that are still strong today. Seeing current Dorians wear their letters brings back great memories. It's wonderful to see all Hope's Greek organizations so involved in service projects to benefit the community."

Kappa Beta Phi

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1st Row: Megan lobe, Lara Wagner, Kristi Orange, Alicia Patten, Kayla Henn, Elise Nelson. 2nd Row: Megan Kaliszewski, Nichole Ellis, Merry Roberts, Joanna Hull, Devin Boyles, Lelah Haggart, Karla Helvie. 3rd Row: Kaytie Haskamp, Tessa Bekema, Kara Henderson, Rachel Cindor, Katie Nelson, Erin Sanborn. 4th Row: Amber Ross, Kelly Charland, Annie Schuster, Amanda Allen, Christy Nitz, Jamie Milburn, Liz Darrow, Laura Borovsky.

The Kappa Chi Sorority Founded: 1962 Colors; Maroon and White Motto: Pledging Honor, Giving Friendship Flower: White Rose Number of Actives: 3 0 Brother Fraternity: none Service Projects: Dance Marathon Relay for Life CWIT Homeless Count

THE FACTS i j p n j j

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This page: top to bottom, left to right: Elise Nelson and Lara Wagner dance the night away at their first Kappa Delta Chi formal, dubbed "Arabian Nights," in Canada. A few Kappa Chis make it around the ice rink in Grand Rapids on a cold winter afternoon. After the two-week long New Member Education, old members activate the new members. At the end of the event, new members can relax and enjoy wearing their letters. Two Kappa Chis socialize at a bowling party. Rush events such as bowling help interested w o m e n find the sorority that best fits their personality. Opposoite page: The Kappa Chi sisters gather around the dining room table to decorate ornaments for a Christmas tree decoration night.


Now Laura B o r o v s k y

Melissa Villarreal Professor of Social Work "In all, the sorority provided with incredible life long friendships; opportunities to grow emotionally, spiritually and professionally; links for network-

Accounting Major

ing throughout the United States; a

"I will always remember the friend-

lot of meaningful experiences; and several cherishable, fond memories.

ships both inside and outside of my organization that resulted from being

Even though I am an alumna, I still

Greek at Hope. I will always also

take a strong interest in keeping in

remember the pride I had w h e n I

touch w i t h the younger generations

wore my letter, and the love I had for my sisters and the future of Kappa

because my t i m e with the Kappa Delta Chi Sorority was exceptionally ^

Delta Chi."

Chartered in 1962, this forty-fourth year of sisterhood has been wonderful for the Kappa Delta Chis. T h e Kappa Chis are a diverse g r o u p of women who come from a variety of backgrounds. They pride themselves on the many unique personalities within the organization and on developing strong friendships. This year, Kappa Chi has participated in Dance Marathon, Relay for Life, and the Center for Women in Transition (CWIT) Homeless Count. T h e Kappa Chis had a wonderful Rush this year a n d gained seven new members. T h e r e were many fun events such as baking

meaningful."

cookies for CWIT, ice skating in Grand Rapids, bowling trips, a n d Parents' Brunch. T h e r e have been other great events such as a formal in Windsor, Canada, a n d date nights. At the Greek Awards this year, Kappa Chi was presented an award for having the highest cumulative GPA average of any sorority at 3.49. This has been fun year for the Kappa Chis, and they hope to continue the tradition of friendship and sisterhood. •written by Megan Kaliszewski*

KAPPA DELTA CHh

DEVELOPING FRIENDSHIPS

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National Fraternity in Local Greek Life The Phi Sigma Kappa Fraternity was founded at the Massachusetts Agricultural College. The original suggestion for a new fraternity came from Jabez William Clay, a giant from "a hearty Green Mountain family." In 1873, Clay along with a group of five oth'ers who came from "varied backgrounds, ages, abilities and goals in life," came together to try to form a "society to promote morality, learning and social culture." The creed was writen 51 years later in 1934. "Though the admonition against 'bigness for bigness' sake' was always there, the demand to serve campuses wherever they might be was equally loud." Phi Sigma Kappa now has 7 9 chapters with over 2 , 0 0 0 actives. Hope's Tau Septation Chapter was chartered on September 20, 2003, with appearances from "brothers" around the area. Soon after, they began preparation for Rush followed by a New Member Education, consisting of reviewing the last meeting, discussing the book "Hills and a Star," having new member mixers, learning history, and singing songs. "Tau Septation now has 2 6 actives but also considers these other 2,000 members they are yet to meet "brothers." (Info from Phi Sig Hope website and www.phisigmakappa.org)

H e r e Nicholas Oostveen Business Management Major "I believe that being a part of a Greek Organization will help my future career because there is a large responsibility of all the members to set and achieve goals."

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H o p e ' s Phi Sig c h a t e r h a d a b a n n e r year in 2005-2006. M e m b e r s s t a r t e d t h e year by m a k i n g a t r i p to t h e Phi Sigma K a p p a National C o n v e n t i o n in Las Vegas in A u g u s t w h e r e over 100 c h a p t e r s w e r e r e p r e s e n t e d . Fall s e m e s t e r highlights i n c l u d e d v o l u n t e e r i n g at Windmill Island's a n n u a l H o l l a n d - o - W e e n festival, w h e r e t h e b r o t h e r s h e l p e d local c h i l d r e n carve p u m p k i n s PHI and presented trick-or-treating safety tips; o r g a n i z i n g H o p e ' s largest G r e e k - s p o n s o r e d event, t h e T h i r d A n n u a l Fall Bash, in N o v e m b e r with t h e SIBs; a n d v o l u n t e e r i n g at a senior citizens C h r i s t m a s d a n c e in D e c e m b e r . In t h e s p r i n g , t h e c h a p t e r initiated the largest

p l e d g e class in its history, took a b r o t h e r h o o d ski trip to Cadillac, fielded two i n t r a m u r a l softball teams, o r g a n i z e d a golf o u t i n g for b r o t h e r s and their f a t h e r s , a n d p a r t i c i p a t e d in D a n c e M a r a t h o n . A s o b e r i n g o c c u r r e n c e was t h e d e a t h of t h e f r a t e r n i t y ' s D r e a m Child, Travis Hulsm a n , a few weeks p r i o r to D a n c e Marathon. A few b r o t h e r s w e r e at a Phi Sigma Kappa Regional Conclave in Milwaukee when they received w o r d that Travis' condition had w o r s e n e d . A f t e r p r e s e n t i n g this information to t h e r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s of t h e o t h e r chapters at a Conclave m e e t i n g , t h e m e n gave $500 o u t of p o c k e t i m m e d i a t e l y . T h i s m o n e y went to a s c h o l a r s h i p f u n d , s t a r t e d by Travis' p a r e n t s in his memory and Dance Marathon. • w r i t t e n by T h a d G o o d c h i l d *

siqMA KAPPA


This page: top to bottom, left to right: Phi Sigs work together on a construction project. Batting for the Phi Sigs a brother cracks one to the outfield, contributing to their very successful IM softball season. Phi Sigs work together to move a couch. Dalen Mendiola helps a young Holland community member cut a jack-o-lantern at their annual Holland-o-Ween service project. Opposite page: Checking the schedule, a few Phi Sigs make sure their Holland-o-Ween event runs smoothly.

1st Row: Nick Oostveen, Andy VanderYacht, Andy Johansen, Thad Goodchild, JT Schutt, Dan VanStedum, Bobby Knight, Steve Stetson, Dan Zarzynski, Eric Pfropper. 2nd Row: Eric Adamczyk, Jack Nummerdor, Mike Billingsley, Bob Drexler, Joe Banish, Ryan Storr. Not Pictured: Bryan Kinsey, Ryan Smith, Dalen Mendiola, Frank Felice, Nick Grenke, Matt Schriebers, Nate Barnett, James Grandstaff.

Phi Sigma Kappa Founded Nationally; 1873 Tau Septaton initiated at Hope: 2 0 0 3 Colors: Red and Silver Motto: The Golden Rule Flower: White Carnation and White Tea Rose Number of Actives: 2 6 Service Projects: Dance Marathon, Relay for Life, Holland-oween. Hurricane Katrina Relief Truck, Travis Hulsman Scholarship fund. Church Clean up

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Delta Sigma Theta


ENRICHING HOPE'S CAMPUS

Delta Sigma T h e t a Sorority, I n c o r p o r a t e d is a national, historically black o r g a n i z a t i o n that was f o u n d e d in 1913 by twenty-two collegiate w o m e n d e d i c a t e d to sisterhood, scholarship, a n d service. T h e T a u Psi C h a p t e r , Delta Sigma T h e t a ' s 9 7 5 t h c h a p t e r , was c h a r t e r e d at H o p e College o n April 24, 2005. T a u Psi o p e n e d u p t h e year with t h e first a n n u a l CTenesis: A C r i m s o n a n d C r e m e D r e a m ball f u n d r a i s e r . D u r i n g DELTA S K M A t h e terrible events of h u r r i c a n e K a t r i n a a n d a f t e r h e a r i n g stories of m a n y displaced Delta sisters, a H u r ricane K a t r i n a Relief f u n d r a i s e r was c o o r d i n a t e d . T a u Psi has w o r k e d very closely with t h e Office of M u l t i c u l t u r a l Life a n d m a n y s t u d e n t o r g a n i z a t i o n s in p u t t i n g o n v a r i o u s Black History M o n t h events a n d t h e Latin A m e r i c a n s

National Sorority in Local Greek Life

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"Delta Sigma Theta Sorority was founded on January 13,1913, by twenty-two collegiate women at Howard University. These students wanted to use their collective strength to promote academic excellence and to provide assistance to persons in need. The first public act performed by the Delta Founders involved their participation in the Women's Suffrage March in Washington DC, March 1913." "The Tau Psi Chapter at Hope College was initiated as the 975th chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Incorporated on April 24, 2005." (Info found at www.hope.edu Delta Sigma Theta page)

Greeks

U n i t e d f o r P r o g r e s s (LAUP) f u n d r a i s e r , which was a h u g e success. T a u Psi was also very active in the M a r t i n L u t h e r K i n g week c e l e b r a t i o n by hosting the Affirmative Action L u n c h e o n a n d t h e Diversity in t h e W o r k p l a c e N e t w o r k i n g S e m i n a r and Reception. T a u Psi has t a k e n a p e r s o n a l interest in s p r e a d i n g H I V / A I D S a w a r e n e s s by participating in a H I V / A I D S walk in G r a n d R a p i d s , h a v i n g weekly W o r l d Aids Day events in t h e m o n t h of N o v e m b e r leadin T H E T A u p t o W o r l d A I D S Day, a n d l e a d i n g HIV A I D S C a m p a i g n s in G r a n d Rapids with o t h e r Deltas. T a u Psi has g a i n e d so m u c h f r o m H o p e a n d has greatly e n r i c h e d H o p e s c a m p u s in r e t u r n . T h e C h a r t e r m e m b e r s of t h e T a u Psi c h a p t e r of Delta Sigma T h e t a are t h a n k f u l to e v e r y o n e w h o h e l p e d m a k e this d r e a m a reality! • S t o r y by S o n a S m i t h *

Patrice L Roberts Psychology Major "I chose to join a Greek Organization because I love the fact that they stand for community service. Also, some organizations are founded on Christian principles, and I like the feeling of closeness and sisterhood among the organizations. I also like the atmosphere of pride among Greeks. Everyone proudly represents their organization and takes their missions and goals seriously."

H e r e


THE FACTS Delta Sigma Theta Tau Psi initiated at Hope: 2 0 0 5 Colors; Crimson and Creme Motto: Intelligence is the torch of Wisdom Flower: Violet Jewel: Pearl Number of Actives: 6 Service Projects: Hurricane Katrina Relief, Black History Month events, LAUP fundraiser, MLK Celebrations, HIV/AIDS walk

Opposite page: Members of both Hope's and Grand Valley's Delta Sigma Theta Chapers enjoyed a formal called Genesis: Crimson and Creme Dream. Jennifer Blackman and Jessica Rankins spend time studying together. A tradition of the Deltas, the Hope chapter members perform 3 step show outside the stairway to the Dewitt Center. Sona Smith and Samara Webb spend some time together after the chaos of Rush and New Member Education. Performing in a step show, Sona Smith and members of the Grand Valley Delta Sigma Theta Chapter take part in well-attended performance at Grand Valley.

1st Row: Jennifer Blackman, Sona Smith 2nd Row: Erin Taylor, Jessica Rankins, Patrice Roberts Not Pictured: Elizabeth Adenegan.

Phi Sigma Kappa

269


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i Top to bottom, left to right: After a long travel by plane, the Dutch set down their bags while they wait to check in. The bench, a key factor in the team's success, jumps up as the clock runs out. The team lifts up the trophy in triumph while the media soak up the intense emotion. Bria Ebels , Linda Ebels, and Coach Morehouse talk with reporters at a press conference. A circle is a significant symbol in this team's success. Everyone contributed and made a differ-

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Congratulations, H o p e College w o m e n ' s basketball t e a m . T o d a y is y o u r d a y . Y o u ' r e n a t i o n a l c h a m p i o n s . N o o n e s t a n d s i n your way. Dr. Seuss, a u t h o r o f t h e " O h . t h e P l a c e s Y o u ' l l G o " b o o k t h a t motivated y o u , w o u l d b e so p r o u d . Y o u c a m e t o t h e b i r t h p l a c e of that n o t a b l e a u t h o r a n d h a d e v e r y o n e o f y o u r f a n s c h e e r i n g l o u d . You p l a y e d w i t h c o u r a g e . Y o u h a d b o u n c e i n y o u r f e e t . Y o u dribbled away w i t h t h e Division I I I t r o p h y b e c a u s e y o u w o u l d n o t accept d e f e a t . Oh t h e p l a c e s y o u w e n t ! M a s s a c h u s e t t s . I n d i a n a a n d O h i o . M i l e s a n d miles, y o u d e f i n i t e l y t r a v e l e d f o r a w h i l e . You h a d t o s l e e p i n h o t e l s . Y o u h a d t o fly i n p l a n e s a n d r i d e t h e bus. B u t y o u d i d n ' t c a r e , y o u d o n ' t m a k e a f u s s . Still, y o u l o o k e d u p a n d d o w n t h e c o u r t w i t h n o f e a r . W h e n t h e so-called e x p e r t s f a v o r e d o t h e r t e a m s e a r l y , y o u l u r k e d i n t h e rear. O p p o n e n t s , s o m e o f t h e b e s t i n t h e n a t i o n , fell one by o n e a l o n g t h e p a t h . D e n i s o n . C a p i t a l . Washington-St. Louis. D e P a u w . S c r a n t o n . S o u t h e r n M a i n e . All o f t h e m y i e l d e d t o y o u r wrath. During the N C A A t o u r n a m e n t , wild, crazy things c a n h a p p e n -- a n d f r e q u e n t l y d o . J u s t watch " S p o r t s c e n t e r " t h e s e d a y s . U p s e t s p o p up anywhere, a n y t i m e , a g a i n s t t e a m s e v e n as talented as y o u . But e v e n as t h e M a r c h M a d n e s s r e a c h e d a f e v e r pitch, y o u d i d n ' t f r e t . Y o u u n d e r s t o o d y o u h a d t o b e c o o l w h e n the h e a t o f t h e m o m e n t m a d e y o u s w e a t . Unlike o t h e r s , it's d e f i n i t e l y t r u e , h a n g u p s a n d h a n g u p s d o n o t bother you. Like y o u r c o a c h , y o u f o l l o w e d y o u r g u t . Y o u p e r s e v e r e d e v e n d u r i n g t o u g h t i m e s w h e n it s e e m e d y o u w e r e s t u c k i n a r u t . ^ou played h a r d . You p l a y e d s m a r t . A f t e r a gutsy N C A A t o u r n a ment r u n , n o o n e c a n e v e r q u e s t i o n y o u r h e a r t . Joints h a d t o b e s c o r e d . G a m e s h a d t o b e w o n . Y o u d i d n t m i n d , you d i d w h a t it t o o k t o b e N o . 1. ^ou never lagged b e h i n d b e c a u s e you h a d t h e most speed. O n c e you p a s s e d t h e w h o l e g a n g , y o u n e v e r s u r r e n d e r e d t h e l e a d . You s h o t , a n d y o u p a s s e d . W i t h s o m a n y p l a y e r s p e r f o r m i n g s o well, n o w o n d e r y o u l e f t o p p o n e n t s g a s s e d . All t h e m a g i c a l t h i n g s y o u d i d w i t h t h a t b a l l m a d e y o u t h e w i n n i n g e s t w i n n e r o f all. ^ ith t r o p h y in h a n d , y o u ' r e c o m i n g h o m e w i t h a f u l l h e a d o f steam. R e a d y for a n y t h i n g , e v e n a r e p e a t , b e c a u s e y o u ' r e t h a t special o f a t e a m . So ... b e y o u r n a m e E b e l s o r W o o d o r H e n d e r s o n . O r N o l l o r Boles o r e v e n W a r s e n . ^ ou r e a w o n d e r f u l g r o u p w h o ' s g i v e n y o u r f a n s m u c h f u n . G o en j o y the m o m e n t . T h e title h a s b e e n w o n .


A W M M e e t i n g - J a n u a r y 15, 2 0 0 6 It is a sad h o n o r to eulogize m y colleague and friend, Janet A n d e r s e n , w h o w a s killed in an a u t o m o b i l e collision this past T h a n k s g i v i n g Day. M a n y of you,#nay have k n o w n Janet t h r o u g h t h e A W M , or through Project N e X T (she was a mentor), or through the fevaMiBstates Science and M a t h e m a t i c s T o n s o r t i u m (she ha,4 directed it since 2002). You m a y k n o w her f r o n j her textbooks: Projects for Precalculus written with Todd S w a n s o n and Bob Keeley which received an M A A a w a r d f o f f T n n o v a t i v e P r o g r a m s using T e c h n o l o g y . " S h e and Todd also wrote Precalculus: A Study of Functions and their Applications and the recently published U n d e r s t a n d i n g O u r Q u a n t i t a t i v e World. But even if you k n e w all of that about her, you k n e w just the tip of the iceberg. J a n e t c a m e t o H o p e C o l l e g e in 1991 and took the institution b y storm. T h e r e is literally no c o m e ยง o f it that she has not influenced. She directed our newly d e s i g n e d c a m p u s - w i d e G e n e r a l Education P r o g r a m for f o u r years. S h e directed pur natural science G E M S program ' s t a n d s for U e n e r a n i d u c a t i o n - Math and Science) for five years. She e v e n single-handedly r e v a m p e d tjje pledging system f o r our G r e e k p r o g r a m . If Janet s a w s o m e t h i n g that could be d o n e b e t t e r ^ s h e 3 i 3 il. She n e v e r asked h o w m u c h work it w o u l d take. T h u s her days o f t e n started by 8:00 a.m. and lasted until midnight. H e r teaching m e t h o d s w e r e totally innovative - leading to the P r o v o s t ' s Award for E x c e l l e n c e in Teaching. This past semester, for e x a m p l e , she taught Abstract A l g e b r a . M a n y of you k n o w the challenge of teaching an upper-level math class c o m p r i s i n g students with a wide r a n g e of abilities. Janet's solution: To get a C in her class, students had to successfully solve routine h o m e w o r k p r o b l e m s . To get a B, they had to solve m o r e substantial p r o b l e m s on tests. To get an A the student had to d o t w o original projects - s o m e t h i n g that applied the A l g e b r a or e x t e n d e d what w a s d o n e in class. Great idea - but obviously lots of work. She also had an active research p r o g r a m - actually t w o of t h e m - both in collaboration with biologists f r o m H o p e College and applied m a t h e m a t i c i a n s f r o m a r o u n d the country (such as J i m K e e n e r f r o m T h e University of Utah). Grad students are said to turn c o f f e e into theorems. At the local c o f f e e shop Janet turned discussions o v e r tea into grants, research p r o g r a m s , and c o n f e r e n c e s . A n y t h i n g worth doing w a s worth doing with at least six m o r e p e o p l e - either faculty or students. Next semester she w a s planning to teach for the second time a M a t h - B i o course - c o n c e i v e d and co-taught with a biologist - in w h i c h m a t h and biology students need to interact with each other to build and understand the models. If you d o n ' t k n o w Janet, the a b o v e description m a y lead you to think she w a s hurried or hectic. N o t at all. We will miss her the m o s t for her b a r e f o o t strolls d o w n the hallway - stopping into o f f i c e s to chat. In m a n y w a y s she w a s a m o t h e r to our students and to us in the d e p a r t m e n t - s y m p a thetic, ready with good advice, a l w a y s willing to listen, never in a hurry to leave. It is c u s t o m a r y to close a eulogy with a m o m e n t of silence. But Janet w a s not about silence. S h e was about building c o m m u n i t y . So let m e suggest instead that w e h o n o r her by taking a m o m e n t to greet those around you. If a friendship or collaboration results - it will be a fitting tribute to Janet. M a y her influence live on. T h a n k you.

In Loving Memory

" W h i l e I d i d not get to say goodbye, I feel somewhat comforted k n o w i n g that I d i d have the chance to tell her h o w she's impacted my life. I may not walk into class barefoot everyday like she did, but her influence will be felt in my life forever." Mark Thelen "I will always remember Janet fondly. She was a difficult teacher, but I learned more f r o m her than words can express." Rhonda Kuiper Pardue


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Killed in a car accident on the morning of Thanksgiving Day, November 24, 2005.

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m o s t of M$ wi live in 94 vc^rs.' Bri^vi Ywr Tm really going to miss talking to her and having her around as a constant inspiration for the type of educator I would like to be in the future." Michael Cortez "Your syllabus, almost long enough to be its own textbook, showed that you really cared about whether your students were learning something they could take with them, not just memorizing enough facts to pass the exam. And it showed you wanted your students to really care, too. You are not defined by a grade. In my opinion, your worth is defined by being a creation of God. How

many math professors write that in their syllabi?" Jennica Skoug "It is common when someone dies to overdo the eulogy, so I will say briefly that there were things Janet did that drove me crazy. Her take home exams were far too hard; I remember celebrating when I got a 70%. Her insistance that I should take Mathematical Biology knew no bounds, but of course we all know now that is where the money is.... She was fun, passionate, knowledgeable and a little bit crazy which is everything a good math teacher should be." Andrew Wells

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I'm really going to miss

talking to her and having her around as a constant inspiration for the type of educator I would like to be in the future."

)ane^ Anderaeri

"What a pleasure it was to work with her, to fathom her fascina- _ tion, to mitigate her fear, and to see her find God in the talents that she had been given as a teacher and role model for students. I shall miss her willingness to share and to experiment." Stephen Hemenway "I have never known anyone quite like Janet. She laughed a lot, throwing herself totally into that too. She spoke big.... All of Janet was wrapped up in every conversation, so that even if it was a little thing, she made me feel that I was in on something big. This conversational style mixing together volume, thoughtfulness, periodic emphasis and care for the one she was talking with was absolutely unique." Donald Cronkite "Janet was an incredible person. At last Tuesday's faculty meeting she spoke so eloquently to the truth that all faculty are responsible for trying to make Hope College, and the world, a better place, where all people are treated humanely. I will never forget the tremor in her voice—she felt so strongly, and was willing to speak up." Priscilla Atkins

"One of Janet's best questions during our frequent discussion about teaching and learning was always "So where is the learncaptures ing? That 1 nat question qi TO all what she really wanted for students all the time. She helped all of us who knew her become better teachers and learners." Mary DeYoung

Michael Cortez Janet Anderson

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This page: top to bottom, left to right: Bruce and Bonnie with their motorcycle. Bonnie remembers " O n e of our favorite pastimes in the summer & fall was riding our ColdW i n g [motorcycle]. W e did this as often as we could." Posing for a candid picture around the house, Bruce loved time with his family. His kids, Tim, Tammy, Dennis, Darin, say of his dad, "Dad was a great man w h o left a legacy behind for the rest of us to model our lives. 'Based in Faith.'" Of Bruce's and Bonnie's pride and joy, Bonnie relates "God blessed us with four wonderful children w h o have blessed us with eleven beautiful grandchildren, and number 12 on the way. Our tradition in the summer was to go for a long weekend to Traverse City. W e had so much fun." •photos provided by Bonnie Rietman* Steve DeRidder and Bruce Rietman are all smiles for their move into the new portion of the Peale Science Center in 2003. ' p h o t o provided by Chris Barney*

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f -1 In Loving Memory


A As part of the day shift, Bruce Rietman was always on campus early in the morning. Before most students were even thinking of getting up, Campus Safety and EMTs were called to the Science Center on February 8, 2006, at 6:15 a.m. Bruce had a heart attack in his office at the Science Center and, despite everyone's best efforts, he passed away. Even though many people were shocked to hear of his death, Bruce is r e m e m b e r e d more for the amazing person he was than for his death. T h e building services manager not only p e r f o r m e d his job well, he also loved the people with whom he worked. Melanie Mason said, "I sure r e m e m b e r Bruce's special laugh!... How often do you get a boss that you can brag about, what a nice guy Bruce was." Mary V a n K l o m p e n b e r g

This page: top to bottom, left to right: With an impressive fish in hand, Bruce shows off his catch to his grandkids. His grandkids remember, "Grandpa liked to fish. One day he put his fishing pole in the water and pulled out a 37" inch pike. W o w did that ever impress us. Of course he let it go because he wanted one of us to catch it. Of course that hasn't happened yet." Walking down the aisle, Bruce and Bonnie express their commitment to each other with a fitting ceremony. "Bruce surprised me on our 30th wedding anniversary. He walked into our office & asked me if I would marry him again. Of course I said "yes!" Everything was set up in the VanAndel Plaza. And of course, being custodians, the arch back was made up of mops. It was also Bruce's 50th Birthday. God blessed us with 37 years together." •photos provided by Bonnie Rietman* On any given day during the lunch hour, Bruce and Tony Van Houten could be seen playing cribbage. As a remembrance of this, Tony put together this picture, ' p h o t o by Tony Van Houten*

a d d e d "I r e m e m b e r the time he caught a bat in the basement of VanVleck, what a riot!"' More importantly, Bruce was a family man. His grandkids explain, " G r a n d p a was great. He always played with us and made the best pizza. Bruce's other half, Bonnie, who also works for Physical Plant, r e m e m bered, "When we recently had a baby shower for our son and his wife, one of our g r a n d d a u g h t e r s said 'Make sure you tell them about Grandpa.' T h a t says it all. We love you Grandpa!" Bruce was a God fearing man: living a life in line with 1 Cor. 13. This along with the unconditional love he gave his wife, children, an gradndchildren is his legacy. Bruce Rietman

V, ?75


Index A A. Paul Schaap Science Center 144 Aardema, Curt 224 Abala, Andrew 29 Abe, Jack 245, 76 Abela, Andrew 20 Abiade, Ayannah 100 Abrahantes, Miguel 67 Achtemeier, Rachel 116, 131, 134, 20, 33 Activities Fair 166 Adamczyk, Eric 35, 84 Adams, Allison 254 Adams, Emily 108 Adams, Laura 83 Adams, Lauren 233, 100 Adams, Sam 100, 154 Adamski, Kathy 71 Adenegan, Elizabeth 11, 37 Akers, Thomas 91 Albers, Joe 215 Aldrich, Mike 95 Aliber, Kendall 254, 75 Allen, Amanda 233, 32,

100 Allen, Vanessa 217 Allen, Victoria 100 Allis, James 70 Alsum, Alyssa 234, 84 Alumni Relations 133 Ambrose, Jeff 38, 100, 125, 235 America's Best Colleges 144 American Collegiate Hockey Association 132 Amerman, Michael 76, 248 Amisson, Jennifer 100 Amundsen, Sommer 217, 236, 100 Amundson, Heather 116 Amway Grand 148 Anaya, Monica 100 Andersen, Janet 273 Anderson, Caitelen 100 Anderson, Isolde 67 Anderson, Jade 107 Anderson, Krissy 214 Anderson, Marti 246 Anderson, Matt 245, 84 Anderson, Rebecca 116 Anderson, Robyn 236 Anderson, Sarah 100 Andresen, Daryl 100

Annessa, Carlie 88 Ansilio, Laura 88, 89 Arellano-Soriano, Ellen 233 Arens, Sam 253 Armstrong, Jeff 68, Arnold, Katherine 116 Arnold, Valerie 100 Arpke, Laura 116 Aschbrenner, Charles 69 Aslum, Alyssa 95 Athletic Training 111 Atkins, Priscilla 273, 68 Augustin, Steven 116 Ausema, Emily 116, 254 Austin, Dale 71 Awad, Ellen 250, 71

B Baar, Victoria 100 Baars, Kallie 215 Bach, Benjamin 100 Back, Amy 131 Bacon, Branden 233, 100 Baer, Marc 68 Baeverstead, Paul 248 Bailey, Lisa 116 Bailey, Rob 107 Bainbridge, Ashley 228 Baird, Lindsey 117 Baker, Becca 108 Baker, Matt 214 Baker, Sam 107 Baker, Samuel 100 Bakken, Rachel 88, 100 Bakker, Anne 68 Ball, Janell 15 Bandstra, Barry 71 Banish, Joe 35, 84 Bannink, Merrie 71 Banu, Daniela 117 Baran, Lisa 115, 117, 234, 88, 89 Barbachyn, Steven 100 Barberio, Kerri 11 Barbieri, Ashley 215, 100 Barigian, Justin 235, 101 Barker, Jessica 117 Barnes, Kyle 107, 117,

20, 80 Barnett, Nate 35, 84, 85 Barney, Christopher 67 Barnum, Nancy 69 Barrus, Jon 253 Barrus, Jonathan 101 Barry, Brian 117 Barton, Amanda 69 Barton-DeVries, Rosie 127 Bassett, Tim 84, 101 Bast, Anne 131 Bauer, Matt 256 Baumgartner, Sarah 133

Reaching Out Looking In

Bayshore Christian Ministries 125 Bazek, Justin 80 Bazydlo, Rachel 101 Beach, Stephanie 101 Beachum, Meghan 218, 246, 288, 101 Bechtel, Nikeata 101 Beck, Jennifer 101 Becker, Kaitlyn 254, 102 Beckerman, Holly 79 Bedan, Andrew 111, 245 Bedsole, Brianna 102 Beggs, Megan 233 Behm, Alex 248 Bekema, Tessa 32 Bekius, Holly 214, 102 Bekmetjev, Airat 68 Bell, Albert 68 Benjamin, Tracy 13, 215, 228 Benner, Jeannette 102 Bennett, Catherine 102 Bennett, Nicole 102 Bergen, Doris 22 Berghorst, Jonathan 102 Bergsma, Sean 107 Berlinski, Amanda 131 Berry, Brittany 246 Berry, Justin 102 Best, Aaron 67 Best, Mandy 117, 254 Betke, Dave 215, 253 Beyne, Ed 84 Billingsley, Mike 35 Bills, Autumn 117, 219 Biniecki, Jessica 102 Bird, Jackie 50 Birkenholtz, Jenny 251 Bishop, Rachel 68 Blackman, Jennifer 117, 37 Blackney, Lea 234 Blacquiere, Elly 215, 254 Blair, Jennifer 33 Blankenship, Sarah 117, 20 Blasius, Troy 84, 85 Blauw, Emily 11 7 Blazek, Justin 80 Blews, Lauren 102 Blohm, Kurt 90, 91, 117 Blom, Taylor 102 Blosh, Elizabeth 246 Bocks, Libby 71 Bockstege, Jennifer 102 Bodenbender, Brian 68 Boelkins, James 71, 131, 249 Boer, Ashley 117, 131, 251 Boerkoel, James 117 Boersma, Brent 102, 145 Boersma, David 138 Boeve, Ron 111 Bok, Francis 8, 22, 23 Bole, Morgan 246

Boles, Jordyn 92 Bolkema, Abigail 102 Boman, Timothy 102 Bombard, Rebecca 102 Bombe, Michelle 35, 67 Booko, David 84, 85 Boone, Jennifer 117 Boonstra, Tyler 59, 102 Boote, Matthew 221 Borgeson, Rachel 117, 251 Borovsky, Laura 104, 105, 117, 32, 33 Borst, Joel 84 Borton, Lisa 102 Bos, Amanda 251, 102 Bosch, Brandon 103 Boss, Amanda 103 Bosserd, Becky 92 Bouma-Prediger, Steven 67, 71 Bouman, Jen 251 Bourassa, Eric 14, 219, 103 Bouwman, Eric 253 Bowen, Chris 84 Bowman, Tim 232 Boyle, Morgan 103 Boyles, Devin 32 Braaksma, Deb 22 Brace, Nicole 133 Bradford, John 76 Bradley, Ben 248 Bradley, Erin 100, 101, 117 Bramley, Elizabeth 228 Brandes, Anna 104, 87 Brandes, Kim 87 Brandis, Carolyn 103 Brandis, Carrie 236 Brandsen, Nate 110, 111 Brandt, Erica 103 Bransen, Lindsay 254, 103 Breclaw, Diana 123, 104 Brichacek, Elizabeth 237, 103 Brichacek, Liz 11 Brieden, Camden 104, 215 Brink, Adam 104 Brinkman, Nicole 67 Brondyke, Cara 254 Brooks, Elizabeth 104 Brouwer, Kylee 108 Brouwer, Wayne 71 Brower, Sarah 237 Brown, Bobby 84 Brown, Derek 117 Brown, Emily 104 Brown, Jeff 29, 36, 67, 104 Brown, Katherine 117, 131 Brown, Kenneth 67 Brown, Toni 67 Browne, Kelsey 104, 104 Bruggers, John 104

Bruinsma, John 104 Brumels, Kirk 68, 84 Bruner, Joel 214 Brusko, Mike 84 Bryant, Brieann 92, 105 Buche, Shawna 86, 87 Buck, Laura 232 Budd, Jeremiah 84 Budge, Emily 105 Bullard, Robert 229 Bultema, Katie 105 Bultman, Bart 111, 105 Bultman, James 15, 244, 8, 98 Bultman, Mrs. Marti 15, 234 Bultman, Thomas 67 Bultman's Backyard Barbeque 114 Burkhardt, Kathleen 105 Burkhart, Nikolas 47, 105 Burnatowska-Hledin, Maria 67 Burnham, Kevin 245 Burns, Dan 84 Bush, Isaac 105 Bush, Zachary 118 Bussema, Brian 256 Butterfield, Kevin 76 Byker, Erika 118 Bylsma, Karla 251 Bylsma, Stephanie 75

c

Caesar, Molly 246 Calhoon, Monica 259, 105 Callam, Daniel 105 Campbell, Kathryn 105 Canche, Adriana 118, 131 Card, Katherine 36, 105 Cardella, Julie 214, 254, 105 Cargill, Lynn 118 Carlson, Annika 225 Carlson, Blake 107, 84 Carlson, Colly 92 Carlson, Elizabeth 118 Carlson, Graham 235, 105 Carlson, Jeff 76, 94, 95 Carlson, Jenna 83 Carlson, Meredith 118 Carlson, Patti 68 Carollo, Paul 252, 253 Carpenter, Adam 221, 33 Carr, Jennifer 88, 89 Carrico, Julie Marie 246 Carrier, Christie 246 Carter, Bryn 220, 251, 105 Carter, Tim 84 Caserta, Justing 84


Casey, R| 253, 84, 105 Cash, Jason 134, 218, 219, 288, 105, 122 Casillas, Matt 80 Cassell, Libby 254 Cele, Nokuthula 68 Centennial Park 112 Chambers, Megan 118, 30 Chandler, Janet 147 Chapman, Emily 105 Chaponniere, Paulette 69 Charland, Kelly 118, 32 Chase-Waller, Leah 67 Chen, Henry 104, 107 Cherry, Jaclynn 105 Cherry Blossom Festival 133 Chesney, Dan 245 Chesney, Daniel 76 Chesnut, Reagan 34 Chiczewski, Katherine 87 Childs, Courtney 255 Churchill, Matt 245 Cindor, Rachel 32 Clarey-Sanford, Catherine 69 Clark, Brandon 84 Clark, Dane 33 Clark, Lori 118, 254 Clark, Robert 67 Clarke, Danilton 232 Clarke, Glenn 84 Claus, Adam 118 Claus, Vanessa 105 Clay, Amie 106 Cleary, Sarah 232 Clement, Shannon 106 Clements, Jeremiah 84 Close, Lindsey 91 Close, Linsay 88 Clutters, Melissa 106 Cochrane, Rachel 118, 121 Cochrane, Sarah 75 Coe, Chad 33 Coffaro, Jenna 254 Cole, Kevin 104, 107, 68 Cole, Lindsey 75 Colegrove, Katie 106 Coleman, Caroline 30 Coleman, Kim 100, 101, 254 Coiner, Joanie 30 Community Day 156 Compton, Jenni 106 Conger, Kimberly 106 Connelly, Paul 106 Constantin, Danielle 254, 95 Converse, Audrey 106 Conway, Colleen 68 Cook, Jacob 91 Cooke, Kenny 227 Cook Hall 116 Coombs, Laura 228, 107 Cooper, Beth Anne 107 Cooper, Derek 84

Cooper, Jordan 245, 76 Copelin, Jason 84 Corbin, Christine 107 Corey, Colleen 92 Cornell, Emily 118 Cornell, Katie 235 Cortez, Michael 273 Cortright, Tyler 84 Costella, Ryan 84 Coulas, Tarin 96, 107 Courtade, Carolyn 228, 107 Courtney, Megan 246 Cousineau, Dakota 84 Cowie, Matt 256 Cox, Jeremy 118, 12 Cox, John 68 Cox, Kyle 118 Cox, Mike 147 Coyle, Brian 69 Cozzie, Kariayne 107 Craig, Shannon 225, 107 Craioveanu, Mihai 69 Cramer, Stephen 94, 95 Crawford, Edleda 107 Crisman, Jennifer 118 Critical Issues Symposium 120 Cronkite, Donald 273, 67 Cross, Patricia 214 Cross, Tricia 12 Crowder, Andy 253 Crumpler, Benjamin 107 Cryderman, Eli 84 Cryer, Ernie 223 Csernai, Brody 84 Csernai, Justin 84 Cunningham, Darcy 107 Cunningham, David 67 Currie, Jane 68 Currie, Mitchell 76 Curry, Mitch 245 Cusack, Charles 67 Cynar, Paul 227 Cypher, Micaela 107

D D'Oyly, Matthew 71, 127, 211 Daenzer, Sean 36, 118 Dale, Amanda 107 Dall'Olmo, Natalie 79 Dalthrop, Pedar 66 Daly, James 107 Daly, Trevor 107 Damasio, Nazly 107 Damstra, Kylee 87 Dance Marathon 121, 161 Dandavati, Annie 70 Daniel, Evelyn 107 Danielson, Amanda 107 Dannenberg, Kristi 107

Dannenberg, Matt 221 Dargis, Erin 75 Darin, Joel 107 Darrow, Elizabeth 32, 119 Davelaar, Tom 95 Day, Tiffany 107 Dean Folkert, Eva 68, 96, 97 DeBoest, Jesse 214, 248 DeBruyn, Maxine 236, 50 DeHaan, Cam 103, 248 DeHaan, Josh 84, 85, 119 DeHaan, Laura 119 DeHorn, Jim 84 DeHorn, Kurt 111, 119 DeHudy, Ashley 108, 218, 235, 288 Dejong, Jason 242, 248 Dejong, Karalise 215 Dejong, Nate 248 Dejonge, Leah 254 Dejongh, Matt 67 Dekker, Christpher 108 DeKleine, Betsy 246 DeKock, Andrea 251 DeKoster, Nick 214 Delaney, Tiffani 214 Delasko, Jennifer 108 Delhagen, Hillary 108 Dell'Olio, Andrew 70 Della-Coletta, Arianna 108 Delmonico, Meggan 246 Delo, Josh 91, 108 Denninger, Andrew 107, 108 Den Ouden, Sheila 108, 233 DePetris, Marie 72, 75 Depke, Tyler 103, 215, 108 Derby, Sean 80 Dershem, Herb 67 DeRuiter, Jenni 235 Deuker, John 84 DeVecht, Ashley 215 DeVoid, Neal 108 DeVos, Helen 117 DeVos, Richard 117 DeVos Children's Hospital 161 DeVos Fieldhouse 111 DeVries, Jamie 119, 30 DeVries, Rebecca 67 DeVries-Zimmerman, Suzanne 68 DeVuyst, Abigail 108 DeWees, Meghan 88, 108 DeWitt, Ashley 251 DeWitt, David 108 DeWitt, Lea 75 DeWitt-Brinks, Dawn 67 Dewitte, Richard 108 Dewitte, Stephanie 109 DeWitt patio 128 DeYoung, Mary 258, 273 DeYoung, Melissa 119

DeYoung, Michael 248 DeYoung, Paul 70 De Jong, Carol 71 De Jong, Jason 108 De Vecht, Ashley 108 Diaz, Ana 119 DiBernardo, Jessica 119, 131,231 Dickie, Jane 59, 71 Dickinson, George 227 Diekevers, Jennifer 119 Diekevers, Sarah 88, 89 Diepenhorst, Matt 84 Dishnow, Allison 119 Dishnow, Mark 76, 109 Di Salvo, Trevah 30 Doctor, Dane 214, 248 Dodova, Petya 109 Dody, Robert 102, 103 Doenges, Hilary 109 Dominiak, Michael 119 Donahue, Emily 30 Dondero, Mark 120 Dooley, Sean 32 Dorr, Rachel 259 Doty, Brittney 251 Dougherty, Megan 259, 109 Doupe, Andy 84Doyle, Kelly 109 Drake, Abigail 30, 109 Drexler, Bob 35 Dreyer, Austin 91 Driscoll, Rachel 109 Droppers, Jacob 245, 84 Droscha, Isaac 35 Drost, Shayna 110 Drost, Taryn 120 Duesterdick, Jennifer 110 Duimstra, Kelli 108 Duits, Spencer 84 Dulmes, John 110 Duncan, Derek 110 Dunkin, Kate 120, 254 Dunmire, Samantha 110 Dunn, Susan 69 Durham, Ann 120 Dusenbery, John 110 Dustin, Holly 120, 131 Duval, Chanel 246 Dwyer, Esther 110 Dygas, Doug 71 Dyken, Tamara Van 68 Dykhouse, Ryan 84 Dykstra, Carleen 110 Dykstra, Heather 120, 14, 15 Dykstra, John 68 Dykstra, Linda 69

E Eagen, Kathleen 110

Earth Jam 149 Ebels, Bob 98, 99 Ebels, Bria 92, 270 Ebels, Linda 92, 270 Ebert, Marti 110 Ecker, Amie 24, 246 Edmondson, Jon 110, 111 Edwards, Elise 120 Edwards, Rachel 214 Eidson, Adam 110 Eisenga, Katie 254 Eisinger, Brian 110 Ekdom, Lisa 88, 89 Elliott, Jamie 120 Ellis, Kelly 110 Ellis, Michelle 27, 110 Ellis, Nichole 120, 32 Ellison, Matthew 110 Elmore, Ciyonna 22 Elvis, The Dog 68 Elzinga, Jason 84 Emerson, Gray 110 Emling, Brian 110 Emmendorfer, Dan 110 Engel, Lauren 120, 19, 167 Engel, Nicholas 208 Engels, Drew 84 Engelsman, Lindsey 75 Engers, Wade 91 English, Erika 110 Erb, Matthew 15 Erickson, Chris 110 Esfandiari, Heather 111 Estochen, Meghan 30, 111,232 Eurick, Kyle 84, 111 Evans, Kara 215, 111 Evans, Timothy 67 Evenhouse, Amy 254 Evenhouse, Candice 120, 30, 31 Evenhouse, Joel 248 Everett, Jessica 30, 120 Evers, Shawn 120, 256

F Fahnstrom, Brett 215 Fait, Jennifer 111 Farrar, William 227 Faust, Megan 254 Feder, Patrick 111 Feick, Julian 111 Felice, Frank 35, 84 Feltner, Casey 108 Fenton, Colin 2 5 6 . Ferguson, Lindsey 111 Ferrera, Rachel 251 Fetter, Sarah 215, 112 Fezzey, Jessica 254, 112 Fiddler, Dustin 120, 131, 84

Index


Field, Lauren 100, 101, 251,112 Fieldhouse, DeVos 136 Fifer, Tiffany 88, 112 Filler, Andrew 107 Fineout, Alison 112 Finkbeiner, Katherine 33 Finn, Abigail 112 Fischer, Julia 75 Fishnick, Roxanne 112 Fitzgerald, Justin 84 Flavin, William 120 Fleck, Rebekah 121 Florian, Meghan 112 Florip, Nick 84 Flower, Susan 113 Folkert, Jason 113 Forbes, Michael 113 Forro, Daniel 113 Foster, Anne 113 Foster, Valerie 113, 246 Fowler, Stephanie 113 Fox, Anneliese 100, 101, 121 Fraass, Keith 29 Fraley, Gregory 67 Francis, Aarthi 113 Franklin Delanor Roosevelt Memorial 133 Franks, Sarah 113 Frazier, Steve 214, 248 Frens, Kathryn 121 Frens, Margaret 68 Freshour, Kate 104, 79, 113 Friedline, Amanda 75, 84 Frikker, Ana 17, 221, 113 Frisbee Golf 124 Fritz, Stu 110, 111, 84 Fron, Rob 131 Fron, Tarah 228 Frost, Crystal 83 Frost, Richard 71, 104 Fryczynski, Kay la 75 Frye, Sanders 80, 107 Fylstra, Margaret 113

G Gable, Jennifer 121 Gagliardi, Anna 113 Galat, Courtney 87 Galindo, Alain 121 Gall, Sarah 113 Gamble, April 113 Ganapini, Vincent 214 Ganenko, Yuliya 168 Ganta, John 29, 113 Garcia, Christine 100, 113 Garcia, Madeleine 108, 113 Garcia, Tracy 113 Garcia-Bauer, Alyssa 35

Gardiner-Lam, Jennifer 66 Gardner, Daniel 91 Gardner, Kevin 70 Gardynik, Amanda 121 Garrett, Heather 218, 228, 288,113 ÂŤ Gary, Ryan 28 Gates, Chris 256 Gatliff, Brian 227, 245 Gebraad, Megan 114 Geerlings, Jenna 251 Gentile, James 67 George, Erik 84, 107 George, Tamara 69 Gezon, Julie 121 Giacherio, Brenna 121 Gibbs, Betsy 71 Gibbs, Janis 68 Gibson, Elizabeth 121 Gibson, Liz 254 Giegler, Stephanie 215, 114 Gier, Kara 251 Gier, Krista 251 Gillam, Dawn 75 Gilles, Amy 114 Gillhespy, Kim 87 Gillhespy, Kris 84 Gilliland, Jake 215, 253 Gillmore, Jason 67 Gipson, Jess 251 Glahn, Matt 84 Glas, Abram 91 Glaser, Scott 114 Gleason, Beth 254, 76 Gleason, David 114 Glennon, Amanda 114 Glickman, Ashley 121 Goad, Mary 232 Goeb, Joey 84, 111 Goersky, Morgan 30 Goetz, Matthew 121 Goetzinger, Kate 34 Golden, Michael 114 Golomb, Nate 98, 99 Gombis, Amarisa 114 Gomez, Breanna 251 Gonthier, Peter 70 Gonzales, Alfredo 22, 71 Gonzales, Amanda 246 Goodchild, Thad 35, 84 Goorhouse, Jordan 76 Gordon, Forrest 107, 115 Gordon, Tommy 13, 214, 253, 115 Gordon, Tonisha 115 Gorno, Steve 102, 103 Graham, Brandon 84 Graham, Linda 236 Grahmann, Paula 121 Granberg-Michaelson, Karis 259 Grand, Natalie 237 Grandstaff, James 35 Grasman, Jennifer 115 Graudins, Vikki 14, 83, 104, 115

Reaching Out Looking In

Graves, Marie 30 Graves, Michelle 121 Gray, Kristen 71 Gray, Zach 29 Greczek, Alex 253 Green, Aaron 230 Green, Charles 58 Green, Lawrence 102 Greenland, Katie 104, 79 Greenman, Scott 84 Greenwade, Kate 115 Greenwood, Stephanie 31 Grenke, Nick 35, 84 Greshel, Jillian 115 Greshel, Kristen 17, 221 Greving, Holly 79 Greybar, Stefanie 30 Griffin, Emily 254 Griffin, Matt 215, 253 Griffith, Alex 115 Griggs, Christina 121 Grinage, Allyson 115 Grodus, Krista 115 Gronevelt, Ashley 115 Grott, Marissa 254 Grove, Jenna 254 Gruben, Daniel 115 Gruenberg, Ashley 30, 115 Gruenberg, Kristen 30 Gruenler, Curtis 68 Grumm, Lauren 221, 115 Gruppen, Tonia 68 Guernsey, Ashlea 115 Guerriero, Brian 111, 115 Gugino, Nicole 228, 115 Gugino, Tod 67 Gugino, Vanessa 115 Guijarro, Amanda 108 Guijarro, Erika 108 Guisbert, Kelsey 108 Gurtler, Amanda 246, 83 Gustin, Tara 83 Guterson, Leah 251 Guttersen, Leah 115 Guy, Daniel 115 Guy, Jeff 227, 245

H Haack, Steve 14, 15, 121, 214 Haan, Allison 116 Haba, Stefanie 122, 251, 75 Hagan, Ruth 116, 215, 254 Haggart, Lelah 3 2 , 1 1 6 Hahn, Brittany 214 Haligas, Melissa 251 Hall, Gabriel 122 Hall, Lindsey 237 Halsey, Leah 116

Halvorson, Lauren 30 Hamlin, Jillian 122, 254 Hammon, Libby 108 Hancock, Andrew 215 Haney, Reggie 32, 33 Hansen, Courtney 117 Hansen, Edward 68 Hansen, Jennifer 116 Hansen, Trudi 71 Hansens, Stephanie 83, 162 Hanson, John 49, 66 Harburn, Shannon 30 Harburn, Stacey 211, 221, 30, 116 Harburn, Todd 84 Harden, Kara 122 Hare, Evan 95 Hargrove, Kelly 122 Hargrove, Laura 116 Harkes, Lisa 116 Harmer, Lauren 254 Harper, Emily 116 Harrington, Jamie 228,

116 Harris, Jennifer 230 Harrison, Kim 96 Hart, Wilma 123, 288, 71 Hartsell, Lydia 79 Haskamp, Kaytie 32 Hatfield, Jonathan 116 Hauch, Laura 116 Haulenbeek, Carrie 214 Hauptman, Amber 246 Hawkins, Allison 116 Hayes, Rich 111 Haynes, Addison 214, 242,253 Headley, Michael 116 Heeren, Stacey 215 Heim, Brian 253, 116 Hein, Nathan 116 Heisler, Jacqueline 66 Helderop, Edward 116 Hellner, Margaret 116 Helmkamp, Kendra 116 Helvie, Karla 32, 116 Hemenway, Stephen 273, 68 Hempel, Marie 122 Henderson, Julie 92 Henderson, Kara 32 Henderson, Tara 117 Heneveld, Haleigh 19, 214, 251 Henn, Cayla 32, 79 Hensel, Joe 84 Herington, Sarah 117 Hernandez-Jarvis, Lorna 58, 71 Herrick, James 67 Herron-Wheeier, Amanda 117 Hertel, Lori 67 Herzog, Anna 30 Hess, Erica 226, 254 Hess, Kali 246

Heylmun, Clayton 117 Hicock, Andrew 76 Higgins, Jesse L. 122 Higgins, Jessica 122 Hildebrandt, Cassie 96 Hile, Stephen 117 Hill, Kelly 122 Hillman, Judy 66 Hinken, Marianne 87 Hinkle, Katie 122 Hinkle, Nicholas 91 Hinman, Nova 117 Hipps, Amy 251 Hodson, Robert 69 Hoekstra, Anne 38, 78, 79, 117 Hoekstra, Jacob 118 Hoernschemeyer, Zach 103, 13, 215 Hoesch, Karl 90 Hoezee, Amber 86, 87 Hoff, Rob 118, 256 Holbrook, Hilary 215, 118 Holda, Brian 122 Holden, Pete 253 Holland State Park 103 Holm, Katie 118 Holmes, Jack 70 Holmes, Rachel 122 Holt, Dan 95 Holtgrewe, Ashley 118 Holthaus, Michelle 118 Holtman, Jeff 90 Holton, Jake 90 Holtrop, Maya 118 Holzinger, Peter 118 Homakie, Krista 215, 118 Hoogendoorn, Sharon 71 Hoogerhyde, Julie 96, 97 Hoogerwerf, Steven 71 Hoogeveen, Natalie 122, 87 Hope-Geneva Bookstore 158 Hope Hockey 132 Hoppen, Abby 215 Horstman, Elizabeth 122 Hospers, Jenny 251 Housel, Teresa 67 Howard, Amy 228, 118 Hower, Kinsi 79 Howes, Michael 110, 111, 122 Hoyer, John 68 Hoyle, Monique 104 Huber, Zach 103 Huck, Amanda 78, 79 Hughes, Becky 118 Hughes, Krista 15 Hughes, Morgan 92 Hughes, Taylor 30 Huisken, Jon 71 Huisman, Rick 110, 111 Huizenga, Elizabeth 122 Huizing, Zac 84, 85,118 Hull, Joanna 32 Hull, Russalle 2 5 1 , 1 1 8


Humberstone, Mark 101 Hundt, Josh 110, 111 Hunt, Emily 259 Hunt, Megan 118 Hunter, Megan 118 Hunyadi, David 118 Hurricane Katrina 167 Hussey, Lydia 118 Hutchins, Amanda 118 Hutchins, Kristen 254 Hutchinson, Eric 114

Ibbotson, Scott 253 Ichesco, Jeff 111 Immink, Greg 94, 95 Immink, Jill 87 Immink, Katie 108, 118 Inman, Josh 84 IntVeld, Jennie 92 Invisible Children 130 lobe, Megan 32, 124 Ipema, Melissa 122 Ippoliti, Ruth 118 Isherwood, Brian 122 Ivanoff, Jennifer 87, 119 Izenbaard, Nicole 108

J Jackson, Christen 119 Jackson, Laura 104, 79, 119 Jackson, Rob 214 Jackson, Ryan 122 Jager, Brett 95, 119 Jager, Eden 254 James, David 56 Janofski, Heather 33 Janzen, Rhoda 20, 68 Japinga, Lynn 71 Jatzo, Brittney 119 Jeltes, Sarah 122 Jensen, Brady 253, 76 Jensen, David 68 Jipping, Mike 67 Jobson, John 71 Joe, Jessica 119 Johansen, Andy 35, 84 Johnson, Alyssa 133 Johnson, Andrea 119 Johnson, Ashley 251 Johnson, Bryan 123, 76, 77 Johnson, Danielle 226 Johnson, Fred 68 Johnson, Garran 119 Johnson, J.J. 30 Johnson, Kathryn 120

Johnson, Kristen 228, 67 Johnson, Kristin 30, 120 Johnson, Laura 232, 246 Johnson, Mark 103, 123 Johnson, Randall 248 Johnson, Sarah 88 Johnson, Trygve 127, 150 Johnston, Deirdre 67 Jones, Cleve 229 Jones, Jessica 120 Jones, Julia 123 Jones, Sarah 251 Jongekryg, Sara J, 123 Jonkman, Anna 120 Jordan, Christopher 120, 215 Jorgensen, Elizabeth 123 Joseph, Ashley 251, 120 Josephson, Katie 27, 120 Joyce, Abby 254 Judson, Christina 123, 235 Judson, Tim 111, 245 Jurik, Sarah 92

K Kadzban, Laura 123 Kaffka, Michael 214, 219, 120 Kaiser, Brandon 84 Kalafut, Deanna 121 Kaliszewski, Megan 32 Kalleward, Dan 214, 253, 121 Kaminski, Carla 68 Kamps, Gracia 123 Kamps, Heather 79 Kapenga, Rachel 124 Kapinga, Tarah 246 Karsten, Neal 124 Katerberg, Bethany 233, 121 Katterheinrich, Kayla 228 Kauffman, Courtney 121 Kawiecki, Laura 121 Kay, John 107 Kay, Jon 80 Kay, Jonathan 121 KC, Shova 237, 121 Keeler, Hayley 121 Kegerris, Jean 87 Keillor, Gretchen 121 Keiser, Lauren 121 Keller, Andrea 88, 89, 121 Kelley, Michelle 68 Kelley, Ricky 215, 121 Kelly, Colleen 228, 121 Kelly, Mike 248 Kelly, Ryan 245 Kenemer, Aaron 106, 107, 80, 81, 121 Kennedy, Lindsey 251

Kennedy-Dygas, Margaret 69 Keogh, Daniel 245 Keon, Claire 254 Ketchum, Alex 121 Khadka, Utsab 124 Khoury, George 121 Kibbey, Sarah 104, 121 Kiefer, Jack 84 Kierczynski, Trevor 256 Kik, Joe 84 Kilbourn, Melissa 254, 121 Kinder, Joshua 121 Kinesiology Department 111 King, Brandon 29 King, Zach 80, 107 Kingma, Brett 111, 245 Kingma, Jeremy 121 Kingma, Travis 103, 122 Kinnas, Laura 43 Kinsey, Bryan 35, 215 Kipp, Julie 68 Kippley, Denay 104 Kirby, Sarah 122 Kirinovic, Matt 84 Kistler, Meagan 228, 122 Kleiman, Ellen 254 Klein, Ryan 95 Kletz 101 Klimkowski, Claudia 122 Klingenberg, Dean 107, 84 Klingenberg, Karter 124, 245, 76, 77 Klompmaker, Linnae 75 Klooster, David 68 Klooster, Libby 246 Klunder, Bethany 124 Klunder, Nicole 228 Klupchak, George 232, 84, 122 Knapp, Joe 84 Knight, Bobby 35, 84 Knighton, Aaron 214 Knoll, Jackson 13, 214 Knoll, Ross 122 Knooihuizen, Charles 248 Knox, Courtney 92, 122 Kobia, Matua 237 Koedyker, Mari Jo 122 Koenig, Daniel 248, 123 Koestner, Jillian 123 Koetje, Kim 123, 251 Koets, Michael 123 Kohsel, Myra 68 Kolanowski, Mike 84 Konny, Sydney 228 Koon, Sarah 123 Koopmans, Jonathan 123 Koopmans, Leah 104, 79 Kooyer, Walt 104, 107 Kopas, Craig 95 Kopke, Kaitlyn 104, 92 Korfball 119 Kortas, Josh 84 Kosta, Abby 7, 123

Kovalyuk, Marina 214, 123 Kowalk, Melissa 123 Kramer, Chelsea 36 Krcmar, Kristine 75 Kreps, Dean 68, 84 Kreucher, Tony 82, 83, 124 Kreuze, Elizabeth 104 Kreuze, Rachelle 123 Krohmer, Beth 246, 123, 125 Kronemeyer, Cullen 245 Kruegar, Brent 67 Krueger, Brendan 215, 123 Krueger, Susan 28 Krupczak, John 67 Kryger, Matt 29 Krystiniak, Jono 84 Kucera, Lauren 108 Kuhnlien, Tara 214 Kuiper, Nora 104, 105, 123 Kullavanijaya, Ryan 123 Kunzi, Amy 215, 123 Kurkiewicz, Amy 124 Kurtz, Kristina 251 Kurtze, Allison 251, 123

L L~ Hotta, Erin 15, 124 Laatman, Audrey 254 Ladomersky, Eric 84 Lake Michigan 130 Lam, Heather 125 Lam, Heidi 125 Lamade, Caitlin 123 Lampen, Jeff 33, 35 Lampen, Lisa 66, 71 Lamphear, Brenna 123 Lamphear, Corissa 125 Lange, Lindsay 105, 92 Langille, Scott 106, 107 Lank, Simon 232 Lanser, Josh 84 Lapham, Landon 125 Lapham, Matt 98, 99 Lappenga, Elissa 71 Laraway, Aaron 125 LaRoche, Elise 123 Larsen, Katherine 125 Larson, Rachel 123 LaRue, Paul 84 Lasater, Malinda 124 Lathrop, Becky 30 Latimore, Ritchie 30, 35, 124 Laug, Eric 125 Lautz, Beth 251 Lautz, Caitlin 124 Lawrence, Colin 80

Lawrence, Miriah 124 Layman, Jeff 107 Le, Andrew 69 Le, Rachel 30 Leadley, James 124 Leads, Caitie 228 Leary, Ashley 100, 101 Lee, Andrew 237, 124 Lee, David 36 Lee, Miriam 124 Lee, Moses 67 Leeman, Joanna 236 Leeuwenburg, Jamie 125 Legan,Jonathan 215 Leger, Nikki 254 Lehrer, Jon 50 Lein, NoahDavid 125, 56 Leinweber, Luke 84 Leland, David 256 Leman, Michael 124 Lemieux, Sarah 124 Lemke, Liana 124 Lepper, Phil 76, 77, 125, 248 Leppink, Dan 253 Lewis, Brietney 79 Lewis, Chris 124 Lewis, H u w 69 Li, Debby 237 Liang, Andrew 235, 29, 124 Liang, Emily 258, 259 Lieberman, Bethany 30 Lien, Molly 124 Lilly, Kristina 124 Lilly, Tina 254 Lin, Jack 125 Lincoln, Ryan 210, 212 Lindow, Ron 91 Lindstedt, Michele 124 Lininger, Brad 91, 124 Lis, Christina 104, 124 Lithio, Daniel 124 Litteral, Michael 125 Little, Mark 70 Lockard, Jeannette 7, 124 Locker, Adam 125 Lockhart, Shanda 254 Lockwood, Anne 254 Lockwood, Bradley 28, 29, 125 Lockwood, Suzzy 1 7 Logsdon, Noree 125 Lokers, Erin 125 Lomasney, Amy 251 Long, Dana 125 Longwell, Leanna 125 Loomis, Sarah 217 Love, Travis 11, 125 Lowe, Bryan 217 Lowell, Brian 125 Lubbers, Sarah Quesada 104 Lubbers Hall 116 Lucas, Crystal 125 Ludewig, Kathleen 125, 216

Index

2 ^


Ludwig, Kali 251, 125 Ludwig, Thomas 71 Ludwig, Tom 58 Luidens, Donald 71 Luidens, Karen 125 Lunderberg, Maria 68 Lussier, Jean Daniel 125 Lutke, Bill 111 Lynch, Malory 30 Lynch, Robert Michael 147 Lynes, Chelsea 246 Lyons, Jacob 125

M Machiela, Stephanie 228, 125 Machledt, Maggie 234 Macias, Gabe 256, 257 Mack, Shanna 126, 231 Mackay, Hilary 67 Mackenzie, Geordie 110,

111 Mader, Catherine 70 Magoon, Adam 245 Mahson, Carol 66 Maiuri, Jacqueline 228, 126 Malpass, Laura 126 Malvitz, Stephen 102, 103 Mammoser, Jaclyn 126 Mandel, Heather 254 Manning, Jake 84 Manny, Kyle 245 Manting, Benjamin 125, 219 March, Claire 251 March, Lauren 126 Mariano, Larissa 258, 259 Marin, Andrew 126 Markby, Shauna 246, 126 Marod, Melanie 126 Martello, Jay 84 Martha Miller Center 111, 119 Martin, Blair 69 Martin, Gunnar 76 Martindale, Steve 245, 98, 99 Martinez, Monica 254, 83,

126 Martyn, Cathy 126 Masaikoski, Cody 33, 126 Masghati, Negeen 126, 75 Masghati, Sonya 126 Mason, Melanie 275 Mast, Elliott 215, 253 Mast, Merideth 251 Mastenbrook, Jennifer 126 Masterton, Katey 126, 233 Masura, Shauna 129 Matre, Katie 254

230

Matson, Brad 213 Matthews, Thomas 237 Mattson, Peter 29 Matusiak, Angela 237 Maybury, Chris 129 Mayer, Bill 66 , McBride, Marjorie 129 McCabe, Matt 214, 253, 129 McCambridge, Meghan 126 McCarthy, Erin 129 McCarty, Makana 84, 129 McCombs, Bruce 66, 69 McConnell, Amanda 237 McConnelly, Emily 129 McCormick, Megan 254, 129 McDonald, Sarah 126, 15 McDonough, Virginia 67 McEwan, Amy 126 McFall, Ryan 67 McGehee, Christopher 129 McGrath, Kathryn 126 Mcgurn, Margaret 129 McKay, Andrew 84 McKee, Katie 126 McKinnie, Colleen 129 McLean, Evan 129 McLellan, Brian 132 McMahon, Bryan 129 McMahon, Kevin 245, 76 McMahon, Patrick 76, 245 McNeil, Ashleigh 75 McNeil, Devin 76, 77 McPherson, Nikolas 129 Mc Mutt, John 129 Mead, Andrew 132 Mears, Patrick 126 Mee, Shannon 132 Meek, Lindsay 132 Meeusen, Christopher 126 Meier, Trisha 254, 88, 89 Mejeur, Alison 79 Memorial Day Parade 135 Mendels, Chris 84 Mendiola, Dalen 35 Merlihan, Michelle 246 Mers, Michael 84, 132 Metters, Bethany 126, 20, 38 Meulenbelt, Kim 126, 251 Meyer, Geoff 76, 77 Mezeske, Barbara 68 Mickalich, Liz 126, 254 Miedema, Hillary 132 Miedema, Tricia 75, 132 Mignin, Sarah 215, 254 Mikols, Jilian 251 Mikols, Joelle 251 Milburn, Jamie 32, 132 Mill, Kevin 84 Miller, Chad 84 Miller, Courtney 228 Miller, Julia 126, 246 Miller, Mary Claire 251

Reaching Out Looking In

Miller, Molly 251 Miller, Nancy 67 Miller, Samantha 46, 131 Mills, Alison 131, 231 Mills, Emily 126, 218, 246, 288, 83, 131 Mirek, Allison 131 Misovich, Michael 67 Mitchell, Jim 88, 91 Moerdyk, Jon 111, 131 Moes, Dana 126 Mohr, Margaret 131 Mojzak, Katherine 88 Mol, Sarah 126 Molenaar, Ellen 131 Molenhouse, John 131 Montano, Jesus 68 Moore, Christine 254 Moore, Drew 84 Moore, Lissa 104, 28 Moore, Sarah 27, 125, 131 Moore, Steven 131 Moorehead, Matthew 248 Morehouse, Brian 92, 93 Morehouse, Dean 92 Morningstar, Laura 131 Morris, Chase 248 Morris, Jill 288 Morrison, Carl 80, 135 Morrison, Karl 107 Morse, Carolyn 135 Mosher, Kyle 135 Mosley, Kim 216 Mosley, Kimberly 126 Moss, Niki 135, 246 Mostrom, Steven 84, 253 Mueller, Lauren 251 Mulat, Wesen 126 Mulder, Jack 70 Mulder, Jenna 214, 135 Mulder, Keith 135 Mulder, Nicole 135 Multer, Sarah 104, 79, 135 Mungall, Dr. 55 M u n k , Jon 253 M u n k , Jonathan 215 Munoa, Phillip 71 Munz, Katie 125 Murphy, Patricia 68 Murphy, Stephen 126 Murrey, Darren 127, 256 Myers, David 58, 71

N Nakatsuji, Sayaka 127 Narlock, Jonathan 107, 127 Neal, Thea 133 Neidlinger, Catie 75 Neil, Kendra 134

Neil, Matt 223, 95 Neitzel, Mark 84 Nelsen, Riley 253 Nelson, Chris 68 Nelson, Elise 32, 134 Nelson, Emily 36 Nelson, Katie 32 Nelson, Riley 215, 134 Nelson, Steve 62, 66 Nestle, Holly 74, 75 Nettleton, Will 22, 134, 229 Neucks, Wade 215, 134 Neumann, Paul 111 New Student Opening Session 131 Nicely, Claire 229, 231 Niergarth, Megan 71 Nishino, Tasuku 127 Nitz, Christy 228, 32, 134 Noffke, John 84, 134 Noll, Megan 73, 92 Norris, Amy 100, 101 Norris, Ryann 134 Northuis, Mark 104, 107, 68, 79, 80 Novak, Amanda 87 Nummerdor, Jack 35, 84 Nyberg, Pete 253 Nyboer, Molly 104 Nyitray, David 125, 137 Nykamp, Katherine 137 Nykerk 166 Nykerk, John 221

0 O'Brien, David 68 O'Brien, Kevin 91, 137 O'Brien, Oliver 214, 248 O'Brien, Pat 68 O'Connell, Amy 225 O'Connell, Deborah 221 O'Connell, Kathryn 137 O'Dea, Chris 137 O'Neil, Meagan 254, 88, 89 O'Shaughnessey, Ashley 79, 104, 137 Oberg, Ashley 30 Oegema, Ben 137 Oegema, Jon 137, 145 Off-Campus 133 Oglesby, Erika 17, 208, 214, 220, 235, 246, 137 Oldfield, Lauren 246, 83, 137 Olender, Kelli 137 Olsen, Becca 137, 251 Oman, Jon 84 Omanson, Sara 104, 79 Omollo, Nixon 15

Oosterhouse, Elisabeth 137 Oosterhouse, Matthew 137 Oosteveen, Nick 85 Oosting, Andrea 79 Oosting, Erica 128, 20, 217 Oosting, Rachel 137 Oostveen, Nick 24, 35, 84 Orange, Kristi 32 Orefice, Victoria 128 Orientation 134, 157, 163, 166 Ornee, Jon 122 Orr, Joey 248, 76 Ortega, Elisa 30 Osborn, Kent 131 Osborne, Rachel 214 Osterbur, Lucas 91, 137 Ostermeier, Shane 71 Otto, Andrea 87 Otto, Ryan 99 Otton, Elizabeth 128, 133 Oumedian, Dan 99 Overway, Allison 137 Owens, Emily 128, 30 Owens, Tom 30 Oxendine, Katie 137

P Pack, Nicole 251 Page, Karen 100 Pageau, Shane 137 Pagorek, Erica 74, 75 Palkowski, Matt 137 Pan, Peter 138 Panaggio, Mark 138 Pannapacker, William 68 Papple, Emily 138 Parker, Laurie 138 Parker, Leticia 146 Parmelee, Amber 138 Parrish, Jonathan 138 Partridge, Tim 95 Pasek, Stephanie 30 Pass, Mike 84 Pastrick, Anthony 111 Pate, David 128 Patnott, John 68, 88, 90 Patten, Alicia 32 Patterson, Megan 138 Pautler, Allison 228 Pavlak, Greg 84, 138 Pawlowski, Allison 251 Payne, Jeffrey 139 Payne, Josh 221, 139, 229 Payne, Kelly 251, 139 Payne, Mollie 254 Payne, Ryan 245 Peale Science Center 112 Pearson, Mark 68


Peaslee, Graham 67, 68 Peckenpaugh, Becca 251 Peckenpaugh,Jackie 251 Pels, Stephen 209, 227, 139 Penar, Amanda 139 Pennings, Tim 68 Pentiuk, Anna 139 Perez, Anthony 288 Perez, Ashley 236 Perovich, Anthony Jr. 70 Persondek, Doug 84 Peters, Lauren 75 Peterson, Calista 220, 235 Peterson, Jonathan 68 Peterson, Juliann 128 Peterson, Laura 139 Peterson, Lia 139 Peterson, Lisa 78, 79 Peterson, Scott 99, 140 Petit, Jeanne 68 Pfropper, Eric 35 Phan, Vanessa 128, 96 Phillips, Andy 102, 103, 94, 95 Philo, Alisha 140 Philo, Brittanny 128, 96, 97 Piagnarelli, Amanda 251, 51 Piagnerelli, Amanda 250 Pickard, Lani 140 Pickhover, Summer 246 Piers, Christian 215, 234, 248, 249 Piers, James 71 Piersma, Tracy 140 Pierson, Joel 125, 140 Piippo, Richard 69 Pillot, Anna 259, 140 Pillow, Sara 234, 140 Pincombe, Megan 128 Pinkham, Janet 66 Pinter, Dylana 140 Pischke, Tamara 141 Pitcher, Joseph 128 Pitchlynn, Hilary 259, 49 Plasman, Thomas 111, 141 PlayFair 163 Pless, Kirsten 128 Ploch, Jon 256 Pocock, Rob 67 Pointer, Izumi 141 Pointer, Niki 141, 246 Polet, Jeffrey 70 Polik, William 67 Poll, Erin 128 Poll, Stephanie 254, 86, 87, 102 Pollock, Julie 129, 96, 97 Pomeroy, Kevin 129 Pommerening, Rebecca 141 Pontier, Amanda 141 Pope, Sean 84

Popovich, Sarah 28, 30, 259 Portfleet, Nancy 234 Posma, Brittany 96, 251 Post, James 129 Post, Kelly 251, 141 Post, Kristen 79, 80, 141 Post, Leah 129, 246 Postma, Lance 248 Potts, Brent 142 Poublon, Michael 129 Pow-wow 164 Powell, Aaron 129 Powell, Joshua 129 Powers, Forrest 253 Praamsma, Meredith 142 Prater, Andi 254 Pratt, Justin 111 Pratt, Sarah 213, 231 Precup, Martha 142 Preseau, Elissa 30 Preston, Elizabeth 129 Previch, Jessica 104, 79, 142 Prutzman, Amy 251, 142 Prutzman, Grant 215, 248, 142 Pschoika, Angela 142 Pscholka, Angela 254 Pulling for Hope 167 Purtee, Megan 208, 218, 219, 235, 288, 142 Purves, Laura 143 Puttrich, Emilie 143 Pyle, Jennifer 143

0

Qualman, Heather 226 Quesada, Sarah 129 Quigley, Allison 129 Quigley, Erica 228

R Rabaut, Paul 226 Racey, Tyler 143 Radler, Andrew 253 Rak, Gloria 143 Ralston, James 107, 80, 143 Ramon, Pat 67 Ramsden, Kendall 246, 143 Ramsey, Kat 258, 33, 259 Rana, Vidhan 237 Randa, Katie 129, 134 Randall, Angie 108 Randel, Julia 69 Rankins, Jessica 37

Ransom, Travis 214 Rapelje, Megan 143 Raterink, Stefani 129 Rati iff, Pat 121, 161 Rau, Jonathan 236, 144 Rawlinson, David 29 Ray, Richard 68 Reardon, Jeff 84 Rector, Chad 84 Reed, Cody 144 Reed, Nate 14, 103, 129, 248 Reen, Marc 214 Rees, Rachel 144 Reese, Sarah 129 Reest, Brittaney 88, 89, 144 Reest, Trisha 89 Reeverts, Tally 123, 218, 288, 144 Registrar's Office 162 Registration 162 Regnerus, Jessica 108 Reidenbach, Kiel 84 Reiderbach, Bryan 84 Reif, Carrie 129 Reincke, Kate 92, 144 Reitsma, Jamie 129 Reugenstein, Matt 85 Reus, Lauren 254, 88, 144 Revers, Danielle 225 Rexford, Rosie 144 Rexius, Pamela 236 Reynolds, Maura 71, 162 Reynolds, Ryan 84 Reznich, Greg 91, 145 Rhem, Katie 246 Rhodes, Rick 84,145, 253 Rice, Jennifer 214, 254 Richards, Erin 228, 145 Richardson, Bethany 145 Richardson, Jennifer 129 Richardson, Kristi 129 Richardson, Matt 111, 12, 215, 231, 145 Richardson, Scott 95 Richert, Elizabeth 145 Richmond, Brad 36 Ricketts, Coach 15 Ricketts, Michael 68, 119 Ricksen, R. Todd 245 Rideout, Valerie 145 Ridl, Jack 233, 42, 60, 66 Rietman, Bonnie 274 Rietman, Bruce 275 Riley, Chris 29 Ringnalda, Adam 248 Rink, Jillian 145 Rinker, Ben 245 Rios, Ashleigh 146 Rippberger, Laura 251 Ritsema, Chana 220 Ritter, Andrea 129 Ritter, Ryan 146 Rivera, Rick 38 Rivers, Allison 146 Rizzo, Mia 259

Roberts, Anna 251, 146 Roberts, Courtenay 236, 146 Roberts, Lindsay 146 Roberts, Merry 32 Roberts, Patrice 36, 37, 59 Robertson, Heather 236 Robinson, Julie 146 Robinson, Katie 79 Robinson, Laura 146 Robleske, Ryan 76 Robrahn, Katie 146 Rockwood, Abigail 129 Rodriguez, Stephen 146 Rodstrom, John 121, 130 Roehling, Patricia 70, 71 Rogers, Andrew 146 Rogers, Jerusha 146 Rogers, Mike 111 Rogowski, Allison 83 Rojeski, Laura 246, 146 Rollins, Sarah 15 Romero, Diego 146 Root, Craig 76, 77 Rooy, Rebecca 130, 214 Rose, Andrew 130 Rose, Kristin 226, 254 Rosner, Maureen 130 Ross, Amber 130, 32 Ross, Katie 146 Rossi, Missi 25, 251 Rossman, Samuel 146 Ruark, Rachelle 130, 104 Rubin, Jami 254, 87 Rubio, Barbra 16,17, 221, 34, 146 Rudolph, Beverly 123 Ruemenapp, Andy 102, 103 Ruffino, Carmen 146 Rugenstein, Matt 253 Ruiter, Brandon 35 Rumohr, Bain 76, 77 Rumpsa, Kellyn 130 Run-Bike-Swim-Walk 119, 156 Ruscett, Alesha 246 Rusesabagina, Paul 22, 23 Ryan, Katie 214 Rycenga, Matt 30 Ryckman, Audrey 130 Ryden, David 70 Rynbrandt, Scott 245 Rypma, Elizabeth 148 Ryskamp, Alice 148 Ryzenga, Brittany 38

s

Sabene, Alana 130 Sabo, Cindy 71 Sabol, Jaime Jo 130, 134, 24, 246

Sabon, Jessica 148 Salamango, Dan 84 Saltarski, Courtney 130, 246 Samuelson, Kye 130 Sanborn, Erin 32 Sanford, Elizabeth 67 Sapp, Melissa 254 Sattler, Matt 111 Sauerman, Rachael 254, 74, 75 Savage, Chiara 130, 251 Sayer, Nathan 29, 148 Scatterday, Emily 229 Schaap, Lindsey 130, 86, 87 Schaap, Stephanie 148 Schaedig, Laura 104 Schaefer, Kelly 148 Schaftenaar, John 148 Schakel, Peter 68 Schamper, Terri 71 Scheeringa, Amanda 246, 82, 83, 148 Schellenberg, Rob 149 Scheuerman, Kara 149 Schewe, Becca 234 Schicker, Josh 19, 122 Schlender, Brett 245 Schlotz, John 103, 149 Schmidt, Becky 68, 86, 87 Schmidt, Eric 149 Schmidt, Jessica 130, 149 Schock, David 12, 67, 147 Schofield, Dan 84 Scholten, DJ 99, 245 Scholten, Donald 99 Scholten, Susan 130 Scholtz, John 102 Scholtz, Tess 75 Schonfeld, Katie 130, 246 Schopp,Lee 76 Schornstein, Barbara 104, 79 Schriebers, Matt 35 Schrock, Caitlin 149 Schroeder, Karena 83, 149 Schroen, Nick 149 Schrotenboer, Cara 125 Schrotenboer, Chelsea 87, 151 Schueneman, Andrew 256 Schuiling, Steve 248 Schultheis, Christine 151 Schultz, Randall 151 Schumaker, Erin 151 Schuster, Amy 130 Schuster, Anne 32, 130, 219 Schutt, JT 35, 84 Schwab, Diana 151 Schwabauer, Chad 245 Schwabauer, Matthew 130 Schwanbeck, Keirsten 131 Schwander, Joe 84, 85 Schwartz, Jenny 231


Scotland 121 Scott, Betsy 254 Scott, Mishelle 104, 105 Sears, Leigh 68, 75 Seaver, Lynde 151 Sedjo, David 131, 214, 245 Sedjo, Megan 215, 254 Seelan, Julian 102 Seib, Emily 151 Sellers, Heather 68 Serrano, Andy 84 Servais, Meghan 151 Seymour, Joe 107, 151 Seymour, Michael 67 Shaheen, Sarah 254 Shannon, Kathleen 151 Shaughnessy, John 71 Shaver, Jon 227, 245 Shaw, Elizabeth 131 Shears, Laura 151 Shebak, Emily 131, 254 Sheets, Ryan 98, 99 Sheldon, Jody 71 Shirk, Jason 235, 151 Shoaf, Brynne 251 Shooks, Rob 107 Short, Chelsea 228 Shubert, Rebecca 131 Shuck, Jennifer 131, 134 Shugart, Jessica 151 Shull, Trevor 151 Shults, Andrew 131 Shultze, Jeanine 251 Shumaker, Louise 71 Shuter, Elizabeth 131 Shwabauer, Chad 245 Shyne, Rebekah 1 0 4 , 1 3 1 Siemon, Jordan 234 Sietsema, Deb 69 Sietsema, Kevin 151 Sikkema, Christopher 151 Silver, Kelsey 151 Silver, Michael 67 Simmons, Heidi 151 Simon, Caroline 70 Simon, Matt 223, 151 Sims, Brian 71 Sina, Kelly 246, 35, 151 Sisson, Amy 121 Skaff, Katherine 131 Skoog, Jennifer 152 Skoug, Jennica 234, 273, ' 167 Slager, Jenny 132 Slaughter, Anne 82, 83 Slaughter, Gloria 68 Slaughter, Jeff 248, 249 Sleeman, Deb 108 Sleeman, Matt 108 Slenk, Nora 254, 87 Slotman, Mark 152 Smallegan, Laura 152 Smit, Corrie 132 Smit, Robyn 153 Smith, Amy 152

282

Smith, Ashley 228, 232, 152 Smith, Ben 84, 152 Smith, Brandon 223, 152 Smith, Casey 84, 152 Smith, Courtney 23 4, 251, 153 Smith, Kelli 251 Smith, Lisa 88, 89 Smith, Mackenzie 133 Smith, Molly 153 Smith, Ray 68, 98 Smith, Ryan 35, 84 Smith, Shaun 256 Smith, Sona 20, 37 Smith, Steve 68, 76 Smith, Traci 67 Smith, Trevor 153 Smits, Mandy 251 Smittie, Kevin 132, 237 Sneller, Holly 96 Snyder, Alexandra 131, 132 Snyder, James 84, 153 Snyder, Mackenzie 104, 79, 153 Snyder, Zach 153, 210, 214,253 Social Activities Committee 148 Soderstrom, Kari 153 Solberg, Brent 84 Sommavilla, Scott 111 Sommers, Renee 88 Sosolik, Sarah 154 Southard, Emily 218, 288 Southwell, Anna 154 Spears, Ali 246 Specht, Ryan 215, 253 Speelman, Amy 154 Speilvogel, Christian 67 Spina, Peter 245 Sprick, Sarah 154 Sprik, Jon 35 Spring Fling 121, 145 St. John, Patrick 256 Stacey, Kate 246 Stack, Alexander 155 Stark, Laura 225 Statema, Billy 113, 221 Stegenga, Nicole 154 Steiger, Andrew 154 Steiner, Carol Beth 154 Stentz, Jess 251 Stephenson, Chelsea 246 Stephenson, Darin 68 Sterken, Rob 95 Sterley, Emily 254, 154 Stetson, Steve 35, 84 Stevenson, Sara 155 Stewart, Allison 132 Stewart, Joanne 67, 92 Stieper, Lauren 132, 75 Stille, Samantha 100, 101, 215 Stob, Kyle 132 Stock, Kendra 33

Reaching Out Looking In

Stokes, Jess 246 Storr, Ryan 35 Stoughton, John 68 Strahle, Lindsay 131 Strauss, Chris 227 Straw, Brian 225, 155 Streelman, Rachel 82, 83 Strong, Ben 111 Strutt, Rebecca 132 Stuart, Margaret 132 Stuit, Katherine 155 Stults, Jennifer 221 Sturtevant, Deborah 71 Subania, Justin 29 Sullivan, Colleen 215, 254 Sullivan, Katherine 66 Sullivan, Lori 132, 254 Sultz, Daniel 80 Sundberg, Erin 254, 155 Sutton Klinger, Becky 92 Svoboda, Matt 106, 107 Swan, Paul 215, 253, 155 Swanson, Debra 71 Swanson, Johanna 132 Swanson, Todd 68 Swarthout, Debbie 67 Sweas, Karen 215 Sweas, Robert 132 Sweedyk, Melanie 155 Swift, Jeffrey 155

T Taber, Jake 88, 91 Tableman, Leslie 104, 105, 78, 79 Tabor, Kara 156 Talsma, Cole 215 Tamminga, Kylee 214, 246, 247 Tanis, Gretchen 75 Tank, Melyn 156 Tanouye, Laura 108 Tarnas, Sean 156 Taylor, Alexander 156 Taylor, Darnisha 217 Taylor, Erin 37 Taylor, Joy 156 Taylor, Katie 246 Taylor, Stephan 67 Tedesco, Chrissie 254 Teets, Brandon 256 Teft, Joel 104, 107 Templeton, Allison 156 Terpstra, Katie 156 Terrell, Derek 237, 156 Ter Louw, Ryan 80, 106, 107 Tetro, Audrey 132, 254 Thaler, Tiffany 214 Thayer, Kate 75 Theaker, Brandon 80 Thelen, Mark 272

The Edge Arena 132 the Pull 142 Thomas, Rachel 215 Thomas, Whitney 34 Thompson, Ali 215 Thompson, Jamie 236 Thompson, Jennifer 30 Thompson, Keith 84 Thompson, Tisa 132, 214 Thorington, Josh 84 Thome, Sarah 228, 87 Tillman, Ashley 132, 88, 89 Tillman, Julie 30 Timmer, Jordan 248 Timmer, Sandie 131 Timmer, Tiffany 83 Timmons, Emily 158 Timmons, Matt 256 Timpner, Ashley 228, 158 Tintle, Nathan 68 Tipton, Emily 158 Tobert, Dan 214, 245 Tobert, Heather 15 Todd, Jason 107, 80, 158 Toppen, Joel 70 Travis, Scott 132 Trembley, Elizabeth 68 Tremuth, Jenna 254 Trent-Brown, Sonja 59, 71 Trepp, Britta 104, 79 Tresslar, Ellie 251, 74, 75 Tressler, Dan 76, 77, 248 Trojniak, Keith 214 Trotter, Allison 132, 243, 254 Trumble, Zach 218, 288 Tseng, Gloria 68 Tubbs, Casie 30, 132 Tucker, Abbey 92 Tuinstra, Kyle 215 Tuisink, Tiger 100 Turbessi, Chris 158 Turner, Bryan 84 Turner, Wanda 158 Tuttle, Shea 132, 15 Twichell, Kurt 84 Tyler, Emily 75 Tyler, Jeff 71 Tyler, Sara 211, 158 Tyndell, Elizabeth 226 Tyner, Claire 79, 158

u

Ullman, Josh 84 Underwood, Ken 29

V

Valentine, Billy 242, 248 Vammer, Jocelyn 33 VanArendonk, Ben 158 VanArkel, Ashley 132 VanArkel, Shelby 133 VanAssen, Deena 254 VanBeek, Matt 110, 111 VanBeek, Mike 111 VanBronkhorst, Kimberly 158 VanDahm, Kandace 83 VanDam, Stacey 214, 251 VanDeBurg, Stephanie 133, 25 VandeGiessen, Rachel 133, 17 VandeGuchte, Matt 160 Vande Guchte, Nate 107, 160, 211 Vandenburgh, Andrea 160 VandenOever, Kenny 219 VanderBosch, Kevin 84 VanderBroek, Chas 90, 91 VanderHeide, Marcus 72 Vanderheide, Marcus 94, 95 VanderHeide, Sarah 246 VanderLaan, Danae 134 VanderLugt, Dani 254 VanderMaas, Meagan 108 Vandermaas, Megan 160 VanderMeer, Doug 84 VanderMeer, Emily 104 VanderMeer, Jennifer 104, 105 VanDerMeulen, Amy 163 Vanderplex 112 VanderSlice, Emilie 36 VanderSlice, Julie 86, 87 VanderStoep, Scott 59, 71 VanderVelde, Matt 111, 163 VanderVelde, Mike 111 VanderVelde, Paul 107,

80 VanderVelde, Rick 79, 80 Vanderwheele, Mike 29 VanderYacht, Andy 35 VanderYacht, Gordon 84 Vander Heide, Sarah 160 Vander Yacht, Andy 84 Vander Zouwen, Anna 160 VandeStreek, Tara 24 VanDette, Rob 99, 160 VanDeursen, Molly 163 VandeWaa, Dave 168 Vande Guchte, Nate 211, 160 Vandlen, Jeffrey 134 VanDyke, Corey 160 Vandyken, Doug 252 VanEerden, Doug 84 VanEeuwen, Katie 214 VanGessel, Rebecca 163 VanGilder, Erica 134, 234, 88


VanHorn, Nathanael 76, 248 VanHouten, Joan 67 VanKempen, Abigail 134 VanLaan, )ulie 12, 215, 160 VanLaan, Kerry 224 VanOyen-Witvliet, Charlotte 58, 67, 71 VanRyn, Chris 84 VanStedum, Dan 35 VanWieren, Emily 251 VanZanten, Brian 79, 80 Van Assen, Deena 254, 87 Van Beek, Allison 160 Van Dahm, Kandace 160 Van Dahm, Melissa 160 Van De Wege, James 133 Van Eenenaam, Isla (Pruim) 5 Van Eewen, Kate 251 Van Gilder, Erica 89 Van Haitsma, Kristin 66 Van Heukelom, Evan 160 Van Houten, Tony 275 Van Hoven, Brooke 163 Van Laan, Kerry 133 Van Nest, Elissa 163 Van Oostendorp, Kylee 160 Van Prooyen, Jacklyn 160 Van Stee, Stephanie 30, 133 Van Tassell, Eric 133, 33 Van Tassell, Laura 34, 160 Van Til, Kent 71 Van Wieren, Glen 94, 95 Van Wyck, Anna 133 Van Wyk, Lyndsey 160, 251 Van Wyngarden, Jonathan 160 Van Zanten, Sarah 160 Vasko, Daniel 163 Veldman, Roger 67 Verduin, Kathleen 168 VerHeulen, Mary 134 Verkade, Leah 162 Vernon, Sarah 246 Vicencio, Victoria 162 Villarreal, Melissa 33, 71 Vipond, Jeremiah 162 Vis-Gross, Kathy 87 Visintainer, David 248 Visscher, Katherine 162 Visser, Karly 162 Vissers, Carla 68 Vivian, Megan 134, 28 Vogelzang, Cindy 71 Vogelzang, Ryan 90, 162 Voisin, Eric 94, 95 Vollbrecht, Peter 227 VonKoenig, Jonathon 29 von Websky, Maris 160, 248 Voorhees 128 Voorhees, Rachel 134

Voskuil, Vivki 69 Vought, Emma 162 Voyles, Alicia 83, 162 Voyles, Camaron 165 Vroegindewey, Jeff 90, 91

w

"Wherefore Art" 131 " W h o Killed Janet Chandler?" 147 Wagner, Lara 218, 221, 32, 288, 165 Wahl, Meghan 165 Wahlstrom, Chrissy 258 Wahlstrom, Christine 259 Walker, Ben 80 Waller, James 22, 23 Wallin, Bethany 213, 30 Walter, Verena 165 Walters, Kensley 165 Walters, Lisa 134 Wandell, Emily 79 Warber, Becca 254 Warfield, Maureen 104, 105, 135 Warner, Cory 104 Warner, Joshua 165 Warner, Kyle 256, 165 Warner, Ronna 165 Warner, Sara 87 Warner, Tyson 80 Warren, Danielle 246 Warren, Gabe 84 Warsen, Stacy 92 Wasielewski, Audrey 165 Waterstone, Kyle 90, 91 Watters, Allie 215, 254 Weatherly, David 29 Weaver, Ailie 165 Weaver, Ryan 80 W e b b , Samara 37 Webber, Jeff 106 Webbert, Samantha 165 Weber, Amy 165 Weber, Christine 104, 135 Weber, Jeff 106, 107, 20, 80, 81 Webster, Erin 104 Webster, Sara 165 Weener, Seth 107, 80 Wegemer, Emily 251 Wehrmeyer, Devin 135, 30 Wehrmeyer, Doug 84 Weigel, Resl 219 Weigl, Drew 84 Weingartner, Emily 214 Weir, Heidi 30, 165 Wells, Andrew 273 Wells, Rachel 27 Wendt, Chris 84 Wendt, Rachel 104, 165

Wenster, Grant 248 Werley, Megan 254 Werp, Jes 254 Wertz, Matt 143 West, Anna 16, 17 Westcott, Ashley 165 Westerhof, Melissa 69 Westra, Andrew 13, 215, 253 Westra, Timothy 165 Westrate, Jen 246 Wettack, Sheldon 67 Whalen, Paul 165 White, Jon 131, 135, 138 W h i t e Cross Project 127 Whitfield, Carrie 135 W h i t m a n , Becky 108 Wicander, Leah 165 Wickens, Erin 135 Wieren, Glenn Van 94 Wierenga, Jennifer 135 Wiest, Brian 165 Wigton, Theresa 166 Wilber, Katie 251 Wilburn, Mike 107, 84 Wilkens, Matt 244, 245 Williams, Alexa 166 Williams, Kyle 80 Williams, M . Cristina 71 Willming, Morgan 166 Wils, Joel 84 Wilson, Aaron 84 Wilson, Boyd 71 Wilson, Brady 84 Wilson, Emily 166 Wilson, Erica 27, 166 Wilson, Jonathan 166 Wilson, Ryne 248 W i m b l e y , Derek 166 Winchell, Heather 88, 166

••191

Windemuller, Ashley 87 Windfield, Jordan 245 W i n d m i l l Island 156 Winer, Meghan 87, 167 Winfield, Jordan 245, 27 Wingate, Jacob 167 Winkle, Katie 135, 246 W i n n , Andrea 251 Winnett-Murray, Kathy 67 Winter, Dan 135, 245 Winters, Frederick 9, 155 Winter Fantasia 148 Wisner, Leanne 135 Wisner, Yvette 104 Wisniewski, Lisa 234 Wissink, Jon 83 Wissner, Yvette 167 Witkowski, Nick 12, 214, 245 Witten, Jenna 226 Wixson, Matt 167, 211 Wizner, Dan 167, 221 Woldring, Joseph 167 Wolf, Scott 167 Wolfe, Tyler 95 Wolterink, Scott 28 Wolters, Karla 108, 119, 68 Wolthuis, Meghan 251 W o o d , Alex 80, 81 W o o d , Ellen 92 Woods, Rebekah 104, 167 Wooley, Wes 257, 82, 83 Woolpert, Patrick 95 Wortley, Marisa 168 Wright, Katie 254, 255 Wright, Sarah 254 W u , XingWen 237 Wuis, Dustin 111 Wyatt, Leah 168

• •

Wynne, Brianna 168 Wyns, Brian 214, 29

Y Yamaoka, Kristi 96, 97 Yamaoka, Tommy 72, 98, 99, 168 Yan, Andrew 71 Yanney, Katherine 135, 15 Yapp, Mark 14, 214, 248, 168 Yatzek, Emilie 168 Yost, Brian 68 Young, Ali 84 Young, Jennifer 68 Younglove, Brent 168 Yurk, Brian 273

Z Zarzynski, Dan 35, 168 Zendler, Andrew 168 Zendler, Nick 107, 80 Zessin, Jan 68, 247 Zietlow, Ryan 135 Zita, Jon 168 Zmyslo, Stephanie 226 Zoellner, Kelli 78, 79 Zoetewey, James 70 Zupancich, Nick 168 Zwemer, Samuel 5 Zwingleberg, Kari 251 Zylman, Lannette 71


Closing


Looking at the entirety of Hope's j o u r ney, the academic year of 2005-2006 looks like jnst another tick m a r k on the line of time. In many ways this year was yet another cycle of the Pnll and Nykerk, midterms and finals, spring break and Spring Fling. Yet to those of us who have experienced this year as part of o u r college career, it remains unique and special—a part of our growing and developing as individuals. This was the year we finally brought home a women's Division III basketball championship after several good runs. Tins was the year the Martha Miller Center for Global Communication was first open for classes. This was the year we lost four members from the H o p e family; two students, one faculty and one staff m e m b e r passed away. As time passes, the year will fail to be as sharp and memorable as it is in 2006. For each student, faculty member, staff member, and anyone who observed Hope, this year marked the end of a tough f r e s h m a n year or the unforgettable experience of studying abroad. Some of us got accepted into our d r e a m graduate school

Reaching Out Looking In

285


2005L

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and others of us are taking paths we never imagined when we arrived d u r i n g Orientation. Many of us learned what friendship really means a n d j u s t how m u c h we really don't know about the world and ourselves. As a matchless milestone in each of our different lives, this year is significant in that we were constantly reaching out to a neighbor, a stranger, ideas, and causes. We reflected, looking back on ourselves as individuals and as a collective, learning that support makes all the difference and we have a strength that was there the entire time. As unique as each of o u r experiences were, we had equally similar and shared experiences—traversing campus d u r i n g a huge snow storm and staying u p 'til 4 am to finish a 10page p a p e r and two pots of coffee. In o u r actions and thinking this year, we contributed to H o p e in two very i m p o r t a n t ways: we changed H o p e as an anomalous g r o u p of people and we carried Hope's traditions on to the next successors. In o u r work as individuals, classes, students, professors, clubs, athletes, and discoverers, we put our specific stamp on H o p e by...

H C b

Reaching Out and Looking In. 286

Closing


Reaching Out Looking In

287


The 89th Volume of the Hope College Milestone Yearbook was printed by Walsworth Publishing Company, 306 North Kansas Avenue, Marceline, M O 64658. The 288 pages were submitted through PDF's on Walsworth's Yearbook Connect Uploading system. Pagination was completed on a six Power Macintosh computer network using Adobe InDesign CS. Our proofs were disposable Laser Pro. Our cover is litho white linen four color, designed by Jason Daum, Walsworth Publishing Company. All pages were printed on 80-pound Legend Matte. Binding is 9x12 Smyth Sewn. Portraits were taken by Appleyard Photography of South Haven, Ml. Digital images were taken on a Canon Digital Rebel EOS. Body copy was set in AWPC Baskerville. Headlines were set in Reliq STD. Captions were set in AWPC Optima. Folios and Subheadlines were set in District Thin. Anthony Perez was our Publishing Representative and Jill Morris was our Customer Service Representative at Walsworth Publishing Company. Our advisor was Wilma Hart, Office of Student Development, Hope College. The 2005 Milestone was honored by The Columbia Scholastic Press Association with a Gold Medalist Certificate given at Columbia University in the City of New York, in its Annual Critique for 2005. Second year Co-Editors in Chief, Jason & Tally, would like to thank their hardworking staff, awesome advisor, amazing sales representative, helpful customer service representative, and of course the supportive Student Development Office at Hope College. W e hope you enjoy the 2006 Milestone. For more information, visit our web-site: milestone.hope.edu.

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national/world news

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A - D S t o r m surge The 2005 hurricane season led to bp*" a record 27 named storms - 14 •F"- • of them hurricanes - with several ^ of them striking the U.S. Gulf and Atlantic coasts. Losses were ; • , estimated at $57.6 billion in the U.S. from hurricanes Katrina, Rita and t t : I Wilma, with those first two storms throwing more than 500,000 people out of work. Here's a breakdown of some of the damage: • Katrina struck the tip of Florida before making a beeline for Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama on Aug. 29, destroying homes and businesses and taking more than 1,200 lives. • New Orleans flooded after levees broke, leading to many rooftop rescues. More than 25,000 people, including the 23,000 who fled to the New Orleans Superdome, were sent to Houston's Astrodome for temporary shelter. • The Mississippi coast took a direct hit, with high winds and 20-foot high waves leveling buildings and even moving casinos off their moorings. • About 372,000 children from all three states started school in different cities or were being home-schooled; and approximately 18,000 college students from Louisiana spent the fall semester at other universities. • Rita struck three weeks later in Louisiana and Texas. In one of the largest evacuations ever, 2.8 million people in southeast Texas, including Houston and Galveston, struggled to leave. • Arlene hit Mississippi and Alabama, while Dennis struck Alabama and Florida. Ophelia stayed offshore of the Oarolinas and Virginia and pummeled the area with heavy rains.

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E. Hurricane t r a g e d i e s w i d e s p r e a d Wilma hit Mexico first, stranding tourists and damaging Mexico's resorts and economy. The tragedy was much greater in Guatemala following heavy rain from Hurricane Stan. More than 650 people died and more than 370 were missing after massive landslides there buried communities. Mexico, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Honduras and Costa Rica also reported deaths and damage from Stan. Have you made any type of donation to the hurricane relief efforts along the U.S. Gulf Coast?

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YES 5 7 . 7 % NO 4 3 . 3 % Survey results compiled from responses of 2,000 high school students across the nation. Photo credits: N

I i i i i i i i i i i i11 i i Former Iraqi President Saddam Hussein went on trial for crimes against humanity.

A three-day transit strike In New York City stranded 7 million people before Christmas.

Angela Merkel became Germany's first woman chancellor.

Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf became president of Liberia and Africa's first elected female head of state.


F. N e w day in Iraq Coalition troops, mostly from the U.S., remained in Iraq to put down insurgents as the citizens continued their quest for democracy. Iraqis approved a new constitution in October and their Parliament in December, in an effort to set up their new government.

Photo credits: AP/Wide World Photos

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G. N e w t e r r o r i s t a t t a c k s London felt the wrath of Islamic extremists when four bombs went off July 7, killing 56 people and injuring 700. Alarming was the fact that the four suicide bombers were Britons. An attempted attack on July 21 was thwarted and the suspects were caught. Bali, Indonesia, was the site of a suicide bombing again following one in 2002, and three suicide bombers attacked three hotels in Amman, Jordan. H. M o r e of M o t h e r Nature's w r a t h A severe drought provided kindling for wildfires that consumed hundreds of thousands of acres and hundreds of homes and businesses in ' Texas, Oklahoma, New Mexico, Arkansas and Colorado. *

I. Palestinians e l e c t c h a n g e Members of the Hamas organization, which calls for the destruction of Israel, won a majority of the seats in the Palestinian Parliament in January. The United States, the European Union and Israel have labeled Hamas a terrorist group, and were carefully watching the change of government. J. Top court s huffle Two vacancies were filled on the U.S. Supreme Court. John G. Roberts became the new chief justice, replacing William Rehnquist after his death. Samuel Alito took the seat of Sandra Day O'Connor, who retired.

K. M a t r i a r c h s pass on Rosa Parks and Coretta Scott King, two 1 leaders of the civil rights movement, died within a few months of each other. Parks was i' ill if remembered for refusing to give her bus seat - to a white man in Montgomery, Ala., in 1955. King was the wife of slain civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr., and she founded the | King Center for Nonviolent Social Change in Atlanta to carry on his work.

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L. Gas, oil prices h e a t up High gasoline prices increased even more following hurricanes Katrina and Rita, which damaged oil refineries in the Gulf region. Prices were up already because of increased summer demand, higher crude prices and less refining capacity worldwide. Winter heating bills also surged as oil companies tried to repair damage and restore production.

OPEN 24 HOURS i p i H I Peter Jennings, anchor of ABC's World News Tonight for 22 years, died of lung cancer.

Western Union discontinued all telegram services after 150 years.

High school senior Michael Sessions was elected mayor of Hillsdale, Mich., beating the incumbent as a write-in candidate.

W. Mark Felt, a 91 -year-old former FBI official, revealed he was Deep Throat of the Watergate scandal.


national/world news

YEAR IN REVIEW 2006

M. Mountain tragedy A massive earthquake in the mountains of the Kashmir region of Pakistan in October killed more than 79,000 people, injured almost as many, and left about 3.3 million homeless as winter approached. Donations were lacking and relief supplies were slow in reaching the needy. N. N e w Pope Joseph Ratzinger, a 78-year-old German cardinal, was installed as Pope Benedict XVI. Benedict, who now leads the world's 1.1 billion Catholics, worked closely in the Vatican with his predecessor, Pope John Paul II.

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O. Flu scare for t h e birds Medical officials put the world on notice after a strain of avian flu was detected in some isolated human cases in China and Hong Kong. After more cases popped up elsewhere, the World Health Organization urged countries to prepare for a possible pandemic. There were concerns not only about migratory birds spreading the disease, but commercial fowl shipped for consumption. P. Nuclear c o n c e r n s The U.S., Great Britain, France and Germany continued to pressure Iran to reduce its nuclear activities, and wanted the United Nations security council to impose sanctions. Q. Should t h e y listen in? The National Security Agency came under fire for using electronic eavesdropping without warrants. The practice began after the 9/11 attacks to fight terrorism, and while the Bush administration, including Attorney General Alberto Gonzales, defended the practice, others argued it was illegal.

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R. Mining t r a g e d i e s Sixteen West Virginia coal miners died in separate accidents in January, as did one miner in Kentucky. In the first accident at the Sago mine in West Virginia, a terrible miscommunication led the families to believe the men were alive after a 41-hour

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The U.N. sought more international aid for Africa, where conflicts and food shortages continued.

Economists estimate China is the world's fourth-largest economy.

Leyan Lo, 20, spent only 11.13 seconds solving • the^iubik's Cube puzzle, setting a new record.

* I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby, an ^ aide to Vice President Dick Cheney, was indicted in the investigation into who leaked a, CIA officer's name.

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Are you concerned about a possible worldwide outbreak of a deadly strain of the "bird flu?" YES 7 4 . 4 % ( E Photo credits: AP/Wide World Photos

NO 2 5 . 6 % H I Survey results compiled from responses of 2.000 high school students across the nation.

S. S t r o k e a f f e c t s e l e c t i o n Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon suffered a massive stroke three months before March elections. Sharon had formed a new political party, Kadima, and was seeking support at the polls as he attempted to reach a peace agreement with Palestinians.

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T. Tsunami recovery Tourists began returning to areas in Asia where a tsunami swallowed people, towns and livelihoods on Dec. 26, 2004. Aid came from across the globe to the dozen countries that were hit. In the U.S., the relief effort was headed by an unlikely pair - former presidents George H.W. Bush and Bill Clinton.

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U. Paris a b l a z e France endured 18 nights of rioting that started in the poor suburbs of Paris. The arsons and other acts of destruction began after the accidental electrocution of two teens who thought police were chasing them, and turned into protests against the government for racial discrimination and unemployment. j/*' ^ f ''

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V. A n e w m o n e y m a n ® e n Bernanke was apT y pointed by President Bush to be the new chairman * of t h e Federal Reserve j board, a position that diJ rects monetary policy for V Q l the U.S. and affects your wallet. Bernanke, chairman of the President's Council of Economic Advisers, replaced Alan Greenspan, who was the much-watched Federal Reserve chairman for 18 years. a

W. ARRGG! An old-fashioned battle of the sea was won with today's technology. Pirates attacked the Seabourn Spirit cruise ship off the coast of Somalia with grenade launchers and machine guns, but never got close enough to board. The cruise ship crew used a sonic device to send an ear-splitting noise toward the pirates, then shifted to high speed and changed course.

More thdn 1.200 people died when an€gyptian ferry 1 sank in th^ Red Sea.

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Dr. Michelle Baohelet, jailed under a previous dictatorship, was elected president of Ghile. r • i «ii

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Ted Koppel, who started ABC's Nightline, stepped down after 25 years.' .

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Cindy Sheehan, who^^oldier son was killed in Iraq, launched protests near President George W. Bush's Texas ranch.


sports

I YEAR IN REVIEW 21

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A - E G a m e s of Turin Turin, Italy stepped onto the world stage and played host to the Winter Olympics for two weeks In February. It was the largest Winter Olympics ever, with 2,500 athletes representing 82 countries competing In 84 events. Long-track speedskatlng turned Into one of the American team's best events. Shanl Davis (A) won the Gold medal In the men's 1,000 meters and became the first African-American champion In Winter Olympics history. Former inline skating champion Chad Hedrlck became an Olympic speedskatlng champion In the men's 5,000 meters just three years aftertaking the Ice In the sport for the very first time. They were joined at the top of the podium by teammate Joey Cheek, who sprinted to Gold In the men's 500 meters. Snowboardlng was also ruled by the U.S. Shaun White (B), nicknamed "The Flying Tomato" for his bright red hair and acrobatic moves on the extreme sports circuit, won the Gold medal in the Men's Halfpipe. The 19-year old White showed nervousness when he fell during qualifying, but he recovered to win the Gold with a flourish In the finals. Other American winners included Hannah Teter In the Women's Halfpipe and Seth Wescott in the Men's Cross. Ted Ligety (C) gave the U.S. ski team a boost by winning the Alpine Combined. It was the first Olympic appearance for the relatively unknown Ligety. He b e c a m e only the fourth American male to win an Alpine Olympic Gold medal. i . w : '• 'tk. It was not all positive news <, *1 f G H R V w l for the U.S. Snowboarder .» T M l j P ® Llndsey Jacobellls (D) ,7 w poignantly s u m m e d up the highs and lows of the Olympic journey. Jacobellls / •'' T M was to victory in the finals of the Women's Cross when she threw too much style into an aerial and crashed. Jacobellls was unable to recover In time to keep her lead, and she was forced to settle for the Silver medal. Figure skater Michelle Kwan (E) was forced to withdraw because of Injury. Several other U.S. stars, Including skiers Bode Miller, Daron Rahlves and figure skater Johnny Weir turned In disappointing performances. Figure skater Sasha Cohen, a Gold medal favorite for the U.S., stumbled to a Sliver medal after falling during the Ladles free skate. (E? Photo credits: AP/Wide World Photos

After 36 years on ABC, Monday Night Football left the network and moved to ESPN.

Jimmie Johnson won the 2006 Daytona 500.

Tiger Woods won his 10th major championship, taking the British Open for the second time.


Photo credits: APAA/ide

F. M e n of S t e e l The Pittsburgh Stealers capped an improbable championship run by defeating the Seattle Seahawks in Super Bowl XL, 21-10. Pittsburgh was the last team to qualify for the AFC playoffs, and the Steelers made it to the title game by becoming the first team in NFL history to win three straight playoff games on the road. Wide receiver Hines Ward was chosen Super Bowl MVP after he grabbed five catches for 123 yards, including the game-clinching 43-yard touchdown in the fourth quarter. G. W h i t e Sox c h a m p s again...finally The Chicago White Sox eased the pain of long-suffering Windy City baseball fans by winning their first World Series title in 86 years, sweeping the Houston Astros in four games. Chicago was dominant in the playoffs with an 11-1 record.

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H. B a c k on t h e ice After losing an entire season to labor strife for the first time in league history, NHL owners and players settled their differences and returned to the rink. The new season arrived with a slew of rule changes as well, designed to speed up the game.

Anmka Sorenstam remained the top female golfer, winning 10 times on the LPGA tour.

The Los Angeles Galaxy won their second MLS Gup title with a 1 -0 overtime victory over the New England Revolution.

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sports

YEAR IN REVIEW

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I. Danica in t h e driver's s e a t Danica Patrick was not the first woman to ever race in the Indy Racing League, but she might have made the biggest splash, qualifying and finishing fourth at the Indy 500, the highest finish ever by a rookie driver. The 23-year-old Patrick went on to win IRL rookie of the year after several top 10 finishes. J. A bumpy ride Cyclist Lance Armstrong pedaled his way through another newsworthy year, winning the Tour de France for a record seventh consecutive time, then retiring from the sport, announcing his engagement and break-up to rock star Sheryl Crow and again being forced to respond to doping allegations from the French media.

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K. O n e for t h e a g e s I Stk USC's Heisman Trophy teamK mates, running back Reggie Bush B and quarterback Matt Leinart, M f K were not quite good enough to win a third straight college football national title, as the Trojans fell to Texas, 41 -38, in the dramatic championship game at the Rose Bowl. Texas quarterback Vince Young stole the show, scoring the game-winning touchdown with 19 seconds left.

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L. No m o r e T.O. Just one year after helping the Philadelphia Eagles reach the Super Bowl, wide receiver Terrell Owens got suspended from the team in mid-season, due to his detrimental conduct. The problems started when the outspoken and controversial Owens got upset that the team would not re-negotiate his contract.

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M . Sensational S t e w a r t • Behind a season that included five wins and 24 top 10 finishes, NASCAR • driver Tony Stewart won his second Nextel Cup championship. Often referred to in the past as the bad boy of racing due to his short temper, Stewart joined Jeff Gordon as the only multiple Cup winner among active drivers.

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Photo credits: AP/Wide World Photos

Hurricane Katrina forced many New Orleans sports teams, including the NFL's Saints and NBA's Hornets, into playing long stretches on the road.

New studies showed that the high school sport with the largest increase in participation was bowling.

The first World Baseball Classic took place in the spring.


Photo credits: AP/Wide World Photos

N. Golden r e t i r e m e n t Considered by many the greatest golfer of his time, Jack Nicklaus decided to retire from competitive golf at the age of 65. Nicklaus won 18 major championships in his career, more than anybody in history. in his final round at the British Open, Nicklaus ended in style by sinking a 15foot birdie on the final hole. O. Two of a kind The San Antonio Spurs and Detroit Pistons, respective winners of the previous two NBA championships, continued their domination. The two teams met in the 2005 NBA Finals, with the Spurs winning in seven games. Both rolled along during the 2006 season, compiling two of the best records in basketball by the AllStar Break. P. C l e a n i n g up t h e g a m e Baseball's steroid use scandal continued, with many high-profile players even testifying at Congressional hearings. Baltimore Orioles star Rafael Palmiero denied use, then tested positive and was suspended during the season. After the 2005 season, Major League Baseball instituted a stricter steroid testing policy.

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USC running back Reggie Bush won the Heisman Trophy in a landslide vote.

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Swiss tennis star Roger Federer stayed number one in the world by winning Wimbledon, the U.S. Open andJhe Australian Open.


science/technology

YEAR IN REVIEW

A. Shuttle back in orbit Two years after the Columbia tragedy grounded NASA's manned space flight program, space shuttle Discovery returned NASA to outer space with a successful two-week mission. However, anxious moments came after foam insulation knocked loose on take-off caused a two-day delay in Discovery's return to Earth. B. S c i e n c e or religion? Communities and school districts ferociously debated the merits of Intelligent Design, a concept that asserts certain aspects of the living world seemed to be caused by an intelligent source, rather than a random process such as natural selection. Opponents claimed it was religion masquerading as science, while proponents insisted it should be a respected point of view. C. S p a c e tourist American scientist Gregory Olsen paid $20 million for a 10-day trip to the International Space Station. Olsen, the co-founder and chairman of his own fiber-optics company, made the trip aboard a Russian rocket and became only the third civilian to become a "space tourist."

INTELLIGENT

D. 3 6 0 around t h e w o r l d Microsoft released its newest gaming system, Xbox 360, just in time for the holidays and prompted shoppers to camp out in lines to gobble them up. The consoles were also launched with a new expanded service from Microsoft that allowed gamers worldwide to play one another. E. Generation M y S p a c e Teens continued becoming more immersed in the internet. MySpace.com, an online social community geared toward young adults and musicians, became one of the fastest-growing websites on the internet. Just two years old, MySpace's membership approached 50 million users and began getting more hits than Google and AOL. Elsewhere, popular online encyclopedias like Wikipedia started to be viewed as viable reference tools, despite debates regarding its accuracy.

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Photo credits: AP/Wide World Photos; F) Conservation International

F. Lost World Conservation groups on an expedition into the remote tropical jungles of Indonesia discovered dozens of new animal and plant species. The scientists reportedly found up to 20 new types of frogs and a species of tree kangaroo (pictured) that was previously thought to be extinct. G. P a r k for f r e e Salt Lake City joined a growing list of American cities that began offering free metered downtown parking for more environmentally friendly vehicles. To qualify, cars needed to get at least 50 miles to the gallon or be a hybrid powered by an alternative fuel. Other cities that offered similar programs included Austin, Texas and New Haven, Conn.

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H. L a n d m a r k surgery Doctors in Miami successfully removed a 16-pound tumor from the face of Marlie Casseus, a 14year-old Haitian girl suffering from a rare genetic disorder. Casseus was brought to the United States for the procedure after aid workers in Haiti discovered her case. Donations from all over the world helped Casseus' family pay the medical bills.

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I. M o n k e y business A group of Amei scientists announc that they successfully decoded the DNA of the chimpanzee, considered the closest relative humans in comparing DNA to human the d o c t o r s discover the roots various diseases.

What is your favorite website? Myspace.com 2 5 . 7 % Google 1 1 . 5 % Xanga.com 5 . 7 %

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entertainment

I YEAR IN REVIEW2006

Photo credits: A) Universal Pictures: B) Warner Independent Pictures; C) Univereal Pictures; D) LtJcasfilm, LTD.; E) ABC

A. By George, a great y e a r Already one of America's most popular movie stars, George Clooney added critical acclaim to his resume by earning two Oscar nominations. ^^*4 Clooney received a Best Supporting Actor nod for his role as a CIA spy in the thriller Syriana, and a Best Director i. "^>4/ nomination for the Edward R. Murrow M j H v biopic Good Night, and Good Luck, ^ which also was nominated for Best ^ Picture. ||i^l B. A slice of real life Li The films honored with Best Picture B Oscar nominations relied heavily on real events. Munich told the story of fallout from the terrorist attacks at the 1972 Olympics, Good Night, and Good Luck focused on 1950s TV journalist Edward R. Murrow, and Capote examined the life of famed writer Truman Capote. Other Best Picture nominees included Brokeback Mountain and Crash.

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C. King of t h e m o u n t a i n An updated version of the classic tale of King Kong made it into theaters around New Year's. The big-budget, special effects blockbuster once again told the story of the giant ape discovered on a mysterious tropical island, who is brought to Depression-era New York as a sideshow act. D. May t h e force be w i t h you... always The long-awaited final movie in the Star Wars saga, Revenge of the Sith, dominated the box office and became one of the highest grossing films of all-time, earning nearly $400 million. Despite the critical and financial success of Sith, series creator George Lucas vowed the story was over and no more Star Wars movies would be made. ^ 9

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a E. Not Lost on t h e a u d i e n c e Lost. ABC's adventure series about a group of people stranded on a mysterious island after a plane crash, won Best Drama Series at the Emmy Awards and continued to attract nearly 20 million viewers each week.

Joaquin Phoenix and Reese Witherspoon both got Oscar nominations for playing Johnny and June Carter Cash in Walk the Line.

Popular children's tale. Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, was made into a hit movie.

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What is your favorite type of music? Rap/Hip-hop - 2 7 . 9 % Rock - 26.5% I I I I I I I H I Country - 1 5 . 8 %

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F. B a c k in t h e spotlight After her career seemed derailed due to a series of highly publicized emotional troubles, R&B singer Mariah Carey staged a huge comeback when her new album, The Emancipation of Mimi, ended up as the highest seller of the year. The record earned Carey three Grammy awards. "

G. C a n ' t g e t e n o u g h CSl TV viewers continued to be infatuated with CBS' batch of crime dramas. OS/ was still the most watched show on network TV. CSl: Miami and CSl: New York also drew huge ratings.

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H. 5 0 C e n t w o r t h millions Rapper 50 Cent put out another hit album, with The Massacre selling more than 5 million copies. He also starred in the hit movie Get Rich or Die Tryin, which was loosely based on his life story. I. P o t t e r m a n i a r a m p a n t again Release of the sixth book in the popular Harry Potter series created quite a stir. Harry Potter and the Half-blood Prince sold more than 10 million copies, and author J.K. Rowling stunned many readers by killing off one of the story's main characters. The latest Harry Potter movie (based on the fourth book), Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, ruled the box office in the fall.

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J. Familiar f a c e s Ratings showed that several familiar TV shows continued to be big hits with the young teen audience. Gilmore Girls, The OC, Smallville and Veronica Mars were among those that stayed popular. K. Penguins e v e r y w h e r e Documentary film March of the Penguins drew in nearly $80 million at the box office, a previously unheard of figure for its genre. Critical praise and positive word of mouth helped the movie, which fascinated millions with its story about the mating rituals of penguins at the South Pole.

1Š, Photo credits: G) CBS/Landov; F, H, I, J, K) AP/Wide World Photos

r r ^ Wedding Crashers was the comedy hit of the year, raking in more than $200 million.

Gwen Stefani released her first solo album, which included number one hit song "Hollaback Girl,"


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YEAR IN REVIEW 2006

entertainment

L. Whole n e w idols Carrie Underwood won the fourth season of musical reality TV show American Idol. By the spring, 24 new hopefuls were picked as finalists for the fifth season. Meanwhile, past winners Kelly Clarkson and Fantasia became the first Idol alums to earn Grammy nominations.

Photo credits: AP/WiaikWorld Photos

M. Womack wins Straying away from the trend of pop-infused country music, Lee Ann Womack was rewarded with three wins at the CMA Awards. Womack's traditional country record, There's More Where That Came From, won Album of the Year and her ballad "I May Hate Myself in the Morning" won Song of the Year.

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N. The first lady So when will the U.S. have a female president? In the world of fictional TV, it happened this year. ABC's Commander In Chief cast Geena Davis in the role of the president, and the drama series became the highest-rated new show on the air. O. Gone, but not forgotten Famed American comedian Richard Pryor died after a long battle with multiple sclerosis. Other noteworthy entertainers to pass away included R&B singer Luther Vandross, actresses Anhe Bancroft and Shelley Winters, and actor Pat Morita, the beloved Mr. Miyagi from The Karate Kid movies.

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P. 8 is enough On the 20th anniversary of his famous charity concert Live Aid, music producer Bob M Geldof reprised the event by staging Live 8, a series of charity concerts that took place in eight countries during the first week of July. Estimates indicated that more than one million people attended and more than 1,000 musicians performed at Live 8.

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•iiiiiei Q. Good w o r k s r e w a r d e d U2 lead singer Bono received another prestigious honor, but this one had nothing to do with his music. Bono, along with Microsoft founder Bill Gates and his wife, Melinda, were chosen Persons of the Year by Time magazine for their global charitable efforts to fight poverty and disease. R. K a n y e k e e p s up Controversial rapper Kanye West made headlines for his music, with his latest album Late Registration earning eight Grammy nominations, and for his mouth after he criticized President George W. Bush's handling of Hurricane Katrina. S. A n e w job w i t h Disney Steve Jobs, co-founder and GEO of Apple Computers, strengthened his status as a pop culture icon after his Pixar Animation Studios, the creator of popular computer animated movies like The Incredibles and Toy Story, agreed to a merger with longtime partner Walt Disney Pictures. In the process. Jobs became the largest shareholder in Disney. T. A million questions Author James Frey garnered critical acclaim for his best-selling self-help memoir A Million Little Pieces, which told the story of how he overcame a life of crime and drug addiction. However after much public scrutiny, Frey admitted that large portions of the book were exaggerated and embellished.

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U. Back on t h e air A grassroots fan movement, driven largely by DVD sales, prompted Fox to bring back animated comedy series Family Guy. The show, centered on the wild antics of an off-the-wall Rhode Island family, a diabolical one-year old baby and their talking dog, had been cancelled by Fox in 2002.

Photo credits: AP/Wide World Photos

Popular Newiyweds Jessica Simpson and Nick Lachey called it quits.

Oprah Winfrey celebrated the 20th anniversary of her popular daytime talk show.

Five movies starring 11 -year old actress Dakota Fanning were released, including War of the Worlds.


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Photo credits: A) Coutesy of Apple; B-G)AP/Wide World Photos

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YEAR IN REVIEW

A. I w a n t m y iPod TV When Apple Computers developed the latest generation of its popular IPod digital music player, users were thrilled to find they could now download video files. In the first three weeks of the new service, iPod users bought more than one million video podcasts. B. Movies a t h o m e Box office numbers were down and movie theaters 4 sold fewer tickets, but many industry analysts said W the decline was due to the growing number of people with high-tech home theaters simply choosing to wait a few months for films to go to DVD. C. A chip in poker c r a z e While some analysts think poker peaked in popularity, the card game remained a pastime, with some teens holding supervised games at home and watching tournaments on television. Some adults spoke out against teens playing poker, since it is gambling. ^ D. Digital revolution Downloadable digital music continued to drastically alter the recording industry. Studies showed that the sales of CDs and albums were down eight percent over the previous year, while sales of digital singles increased 150 percent.

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E. Play for w o r k It's not just fun and games. More colleges began offering courses and degrees related to video games as the industry becomes serious business. The colleges are feeding a demand for skilled developers and technicians.

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F. Blog this A study showed that half of all teens and 57 percent of teens who use the internet have created a blog or website or posted something online. The study by Pew Internet and American Life Project was conducted to look at falling newspaper readership. G. Shrug it off For dressing up this year, shrugs and gauchos were the rage for girls of all ages, while other students who wanted to dress down did not even bother with regular clothes - they just wore their PJs to school.

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© 2006 Walsworth Publishing Company. All rights re





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