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JON HUISKENS. TOM KENNER. DAVE VANDERWEL

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Hope College, Holland, Michigan

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For each of us — a new dawn to rise to,

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First it was Van Vleck — then Phelps, later Winants Auditorium, and still later Voorhees, Renovation — it seemed to be the key occupation of the campus, whether in curriculum, class hours, departments, athletics, individual organizations, or the physical buildings themselves. In fact, before the end of September, students and faculty became accustomed to the sound of hammering and the smell of wet paint.

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f y rS J v H v. A c U w t e s C o m m i t t e e , Student Congress, and the administration, W i n a n t s Auditorium new sea! in Ionian " ["".'"S 1116 7 9 Christmas break. T o assure better viewing from all seats in t h e house, a gP r nn wtl, . , t f 1 l n s t a l ! e d ' . a s w e l 1 a s a new ceiling to combat the problem of heat loss. Added to the Auditon u m was an eight-foot projection room to lessen sound and light distraction, and provide locked storage space


as we search for ourselves through those around us.

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Equally important to these types of renovation, is the "renovation" that a student undergoes within his four years in college. With fearful expectations and nervous excitement the search begins. It's not just going down new roads in new shoes â&#x20AC;&#x201D; it's creating a new value system, and coping with the uncertainty of yourself in most every area. The pressure is greater than anything encountered before, and the pressure to handle it is even stronger yet.

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Sophomore Delta Phi pledges Jane Repke, Jan Arneson and Melodie Meyer anxiously await their turn to go on stage at a pledging event.

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Senior Dave Sterk discovers the fine art of time management.

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Freshman Curt DeVette stars in " T h e Bad Banana on Broadway."

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Right: Senior Kathy Soeters investigates g r a d u a t e school materials Bellow: Freshman Harriet Korbus takes a b r e a t h e r b e t w e e n loads

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Senior Boh Bos demonstrates how to use one's time b e t w e e n classes wisely.

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Exploring what we never dared to dream before and creating what we are, and were meant to be.

By the time Christmas break arrives, you're more than anxious to go home, but sadly disappointed when you get there. Your high school friends are distant, and you find that your interests are no longer compatible with theirs. Mom casually mentions that the new beard is rather bold, and Dad maKes it clear that the phone bill is your responsibility. At the time of your second Christmas, you have aiscovered how to budget 14 Christmas gifts on a total of $50, and also found that Christmas really is the preparation of mind and spirit that you missed, because you had your mind and spirit in exam week instead.

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Paper Chase? No, Jay Lindell finds out what happens when you leave your door unlocked.


Struggling as we learn, the search continues, and exposed to life for what we make it — active or still —

On the third Christmas vacation, you have come to the realization that your values are not your parents', and that yours are right — and so are theirs. After one very long week of vacation, you are suddenly quite anxious to go back to school because you can t handle being accountable to anyone other than yourself, and worse yet, you're bored. The fourth Christmas comes much later than you wish it would, even though the semester went so quickly that you couldn't get all of your work done. And although you're broke, the old Christmas spirit has returned in full scale, since for the first time you hayen't put it into exam week instead. The four-week vacation has turned into a job hunting expedition in which you spend more time evaluating your qualifications than you do actual job hunting. Or you may have discovered that putting your life's values and world views in 500 words for graduate school applications is a much harder task than you originally thought. After two weeks you're ready to go back to school, but not ready to do the work. Your enthusiasm has lessened, just like your circle of friends. The twentyfive you were actively involved with sophomore year has now dwindled to four very close friends. The air is warmer and now you spend more time on preparing to enter the job market than you do on your books. Graduation is nearing, and reflecting on the past four years becomes a common thought. Perhaps the greatest four years in terms of inner development are those you spend in college. The struggle at times seems fruitless and the fight in vain, but the renovation that each of us undergoes as we pass through these four years together, may well be the beginning mark of what each of us can be.

T. Lamen

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We find that our journey is but a mere preparation for further travels to come. D. Wang

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Another routine day at Hope, D a v e Sackett looks for a little variation in the schedule.

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" M a r c h 13, classes are cancelled in order that students may attend the Critical Issues Symposium and workshops," â&#x20AC;&#x201D; A n d attend they did. Perhaps Hope's biggest event of the year, three national leaders gave lectures on their v i e w of the M i d d l e East crisis, after w h i c h workshops were offered to help students and c o m m u n i t y to gain a fuller understanding of the conflict in the M i d d l e East. Co-sponsored by Student Congress, Nobel Peace Prize W i n n e r in 1976, Betty Williams spoke on her struggle and role in the peace-making of Ireland.

EVENTS EVENTS EVENTS EVENTS EVENTS EVENTS EVENTS EVENTS EVENTS EVENTS EVENTS EVENTS

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But the special speakers weren't the only events of the year. There were the traditional Pull and Nykerk c o m p e t i tions, as well as Vespers, W i n t e r Fantasia, a n d M a y Day. M o s t e v e r y o n e b e c a m e i n v o l v e d in o n e t h i n g or another, including the theatre department as they produced t w o top-rate plays. The first play. Mack and Mabel

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f o l l o w e d a version of the My Fair Lady theme, but added a slightly different twist, and the second play. She Stoops to Conquer was a c o m e d y that produced more than just laughs. A year full of entertainment sponsored f r o m many d i f f e r e n t groups, sparked enthusiasm and spirit in the everyday life on campus.


Pianist T i m Clay e n t e r t a i n s W i n t e r Fantasia a u d i e n c e .

C h a p e l C h o i r p r e p a r e s f o r t h e i r t o u r t h r o u g h t h e East.

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A a r o n R o s e b a u m , d i r e c t o r o f research, A m e r i can-Israel P u b l i c A f f a i r s c o m m i t t e e , v o i c e s his o p i n i o n o n t h e C o n f i g u r a t i o n o f Peace i n t h e M i d d l e East.

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Freshman Shahnaz Kiani f r o m Iran, in her n a t i v e c o s t u m e , serves her o w n d i s h at t h e a n n u a l IRC F o o d Fair.

EVENTS


The scene, in the midst of a peaceful w o o d l a n d , is whirling with enthusiasm and extremely tense. Eighteen men, lying in what look like shallow graves, desperately clutch a line of rope with straining hands. Girls lie adjacent to each pit, constantly relaying commands and o f f e r i n g encouragement. Other team members pass up and down the line sharing strategies and giving reassurance. Periodically, the air is punctured with shouts of "Inch . . . Up . . . H E A V E ! " This is the Pull, a unique experience to newcomers and old-timers alike. The Pull is a traditional event with eighty-two contests under its name. Team members and spectators alike eagerly anticipate the event each fall. Techniques and strategies such as the "lock-ins" and the "heaves," have evolved over a long period of Hope college history. Recent changes in Pull tradition such as the new three hour time limit and the use of alternates during the stretch period added to the fresh excitement of the '79 Pull. This year's f r e s h m e n were faced with a strong s o p h o m o r e team which wrapped up the previous year's Pull in a long and hard struggle of two hours and fifty-seven minutes. The sophomore Pull team came through once again after one hour and fiftynine minutes on the rope, uprooting a fiery freshman class for a n o t h e r '82 triumph.

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F r e s h m a n A r t h u r Buys gives it all he's got as morale girl Linda Stewatt gives e n c o u r a g e m e n t .

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Before locking in, s o p h o m o r e s Lisa Cox a n d Pete White take a quick breather.


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An overall view of the "82 pit.

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Lockina-in. is f r e s h m a n Dave K e m p k e r , as Colleen Vanderhill and Jodi Vanderstel await the next c o m m a n d . '83 morale girl Kim Larson watches anxiously for the next call.

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Left to right: Dr. D Ivan Dykstra, t o r c h b e a r e r Jon R i e t b e r g , C r o s s bearer Kris D e P r e e , t o r c h b e a r e r Fred V a n D y k e , a n d D r . A n t h o n y K o o i k e r , prepare for t h e Vesper service.

G e t t i n g o n e last p r a c t i c e b e f o r e g o i n g o n stage is C h a p e l C h o i r

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H i d d e n b u t h e a r d , o r g a n i s t Elissa V a n G e n t p u t s her best i n t o t h e m u s i c .


Tradition â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Key Note to Vesper Service

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Following what general p r o g r a m m e r Roger Davis called a "process of constant slow evolution," the Vesper service followed the traditional format of anthems sung in L a t i n , G e r m a n , a n d French. Choirs p a r t i c i p a t i n g i n c l u d e d the Col-

lege Chorus, the Chapel Choir, and the C o m b i n e d c h o i r s as w e l l . M u s i c a l a c c o m p a n i m e n t and b a c k g r o u n d was furnished by the Symphonette and Brass Ensemble. Faculty member D. Ivan Dykstra read corresponding scripture. A. Buckleilner


In the Spotlight R i g h t : G e t t i n g r e a d y f o r their turn at the stage, the C o n e heads, alias Sue Richardson, M a r i a H o f f m a n , C a t h y Surr i d g e . and Barb W e e d e n , share their e x c i t e m e n t . Below: Freshman coach Sue W e e n e r and s o p h o m o r e c o a c h Sue Sharp c o n d u c t b o t h g r o u p s of w o m e n t o g e t h e r .

" T h e l i t t l e t h i n g s a r e w h a t makes i t h a p p e n , " s t a t e d c h a i r p e r s o n Sally Berger. Scheduling the C i v i c C e n t e r t o r rehearsal a n d p e r f o r m a n c e times, organizing, f i n d i n g judges, g e t t i n g p r o g r a m s a n d g e n e r a l m a n a g ing — t h e y ' r e all a l a r g e p a r t o f t h e b e h i n d t h e scenes a c t i o n in N y k e r k . Freshman S o n g c o a c h Sue W a r d c o m m e n t e d , " I t i s n ' t just t h e s i n g i n g o f a song, it's o r g a n i z a t i o n , t i m e m a n a g e m e n t , a b s e n t i s m , w o r k , — a n d m o s t i m p o r t a n t , keeping it fun, t h e latter of which, a c c o r d i n g t o many p a r t i c i pants, was v e r y w e l l a c c o m p l i s h e d . The o n l y d i s a p p o i n t m e n t in N y k e r k s t e m m e d f r o m a l i g h t i n g p r o b l e m . T h e C ivic C e n t e r , t r a d i t i o n a l l y t h e site f o r N y k e r k , w o u l d n ' t a l l o w a n y o n e t o use t h e l i g h t i n g this y e a r . A s a result, t h e s p o t l i g h t r e m a i n e d on t h r o u g h o u t t h e e n t i r e p r o d u c t i o n , a n d o r a t o r s Susan M i l l e r a n d T e r e s a R e n a u d , as well as t h e p l a y casts w e r e u n a b l e t o see t h e a u d i e n c e , a n d b a r e l y a b l e t o c h a n g e scenes in t h e d a r k . B e l i e v i n g t h a t a single t o p i c l i m i t e d t h e speakers, f r e s h m a n c o a c h e s M e g B i g g e r s t a f f a n d Lisa Raak, a n d s o p h o m o r e c o a c h e s Sue M a r v i n a n d M a r y Beth V a n Dis a l l o w e d e a c h g i r l t o p i c k her o w n t o p i c . T h e r e s u l t was t w o v e r y f i n e speeches, o n e o n h o n e s t y b y f r e s h m a n M i l l e r , a n d t h e o t h e r on narcissism b y s o p h o m o r e R e n a u d . Both p l a y p r o d u c t i o n s w e r e also f o r c e d t o d e a l w i t h t h e l i g h t i n g p r o b lem. A c c u s t o m e d t o t u r n i n g o u t t h e s p o t l i g h t in o r d e r t o c h a n g e scenes, t h e c r e w s w e r e f o r c e d t o close t h e c u r t a i n e a c h t i m e t h e y n e e d e d a s c e n e c h a n g e . It t o o k m o r e t i m e a n d on an a l r e a d y n e r v o u s a n d e x c i t e d n i g h t , a d d e d t o t h e hassle. W e worked around it; one of the little things", c o m m e n t e d Berger — a n d thus N y k e r k " h a p p e n e d " in s p i t e o f t h e s t r u g g l e , a n d o n c e a g a i n p r o v e d i t s e l f a s p e c i a l e v e n t f o r all i n v o l v e d .

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S o p h o m o r e o r a t o r Teresa Renaud gives her ideas on l o v i n g oneself.

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Left: M i n s t r e l J u d y H o o g w i n d gives her side o f the s t o r y . Below: K i m L o g i sings t h e freshman song, G r e a t Day.'"

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Freshman o r a t o r Susan M i l l e r speaks on honesty.

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The spirit of 83. a n d t h e s p i r i t t h a t won the 79 Nylcerk c u p .

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T r e n d s .

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mmm Calvin Kleins, straight-legged pants, clogs. Backgammon, raquetball, and disco â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the trend caught many, but the attitude caught more. As problems in the Nation became increasingly more d e m a n d i n g , so did the attention of the students at Hope. " A m e r i c a Held H o s t a g e " f r i g h t e n e d m a n y , and t h r e a t s of d r a f t registration f r i g h t e n e d even more. Women in the draft became a strong issue with two sides fighting one a n o t h e r ; and as t h o u g h t h i s wasn't enough, there were the Presidential campaigns. Carter, Kennedy and Reagan d o m i n a t e d the news, and advertising paraphernalia dotted the campus. As the year continued, the economy c o n t i n u e d to f a l l , and soon more students were doing less automotive travel. Coupled with the rise of prices was the tuition increase. A l t h o u g h Hope still h u n g below other GLCA s c h o o l s , t h e m o n e y became a deciding factor for many students. Even movies, radio and television echoed the attitude as the need for resolution grew more intense.

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M a r t i V a n d e n b e r g s o l e m n l y w a t c h e s as Sue A r w e takes A n n e M u l d e r ' s c o a c h i n g advice, a n d does her best to w i n at B a c k g a m m o n . J u n i o r Perry S m i t h p r e f e r s silent p a r t i c i p a t i o n .

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S i & h t s T c p ;

September

October

November

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S c u n d s

T u n e s

Sail On

Commodores

Lovin' Touchin' Squeezin'

Journey

Heartache Tonight

Eagles

Babe

Styx

Ten

Please Don't Go

K.C. and the

Dream Police

All That Jazz

Sunshine Band

Please Don't Go

Kramer Vs. Kramer The Rose

Cheap Trick December

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K.C. and Sunshine

Star Trek The Jerk

Escape (The Pina Colada Song) Rupert Holmes January

February

The Champ Rock With You

Michael Jackson

Cruisin'

Smokie Robinson

Apocolypse Now

Him

Rupert Holmes

The Prophecy

Crazy Little Thing Called Love

Oueen

Another Brick

Pink Floyd

Call Me

Blondie

The Black Stallion

Cars

Gary Numan

Lord of the Rings

Fire Lake

Bob Seger

Pilot of Airwaves

Charlie Dore

Biggest Part of Me

Ambrosia

The Fog March

April

May

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Despite Stormy Start Homecoming week bustled with activity in 1979, full of races, reunions, and rainbows. The week was full of events, beginning with a window decorating contest which resulted in multi-colored rainbows about the campus, and continuing with an ice cream study break, a bonfire at Van Raalte field, and a campus wide "Hope" shirt day. Although the lack of student participation hampered the week's activities, the major events of Homecoming occurred Saturday when parents, alumni, and students could all attend. Saturday morning began with the gathering of approximately 1,000 people to participate in the second annual Run. Bike and Swim at the Dow Physical Education Center. This event included a 10,000 meter run, 50,000 meter run, 13,000 meter bike race and an 800 or 900 meter swim (depending upon one's age). Those who finished first received an engraved wooden shoe while others finishing near the top received medals. In the afternoon, the near capacity crowd cheered the Flying Dutchman on to a 19-0 victory over the Alma Scots. The game was largely a defensive battle due to the muddy field. Hope met the challenge by sacking the Alma quarterback eleven times. During the half time activities, the Homecoming king and queen were crowned. Jane D e Y o u n g , a junior f r o m H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n and Paul

Boersma, a sophomore from Grand Rapids, Michigan reigned over the remaining Homecoming activities. Following the crowning ceremony, the Delta Phi sorority and the Arcadian fraternity were awarded academic trophies for the highest overall grade point averages. Among the most important events of any Homecoming are the reunions, and this one was no exception. Reunions for the classes of 1969 and 1974 were held. In addition, sororities and fraternities welcomed back their alumni with teas, brunches and dances. Saturday's events were brought to a close with the traditional all campus dance in the Kletz. The disc jockey, "Cat and Co." provided the music for the many who attended. Parents and alumni were invited to join the students in worship at Dimnent Chapel Sunday morning. Highlighting the service was the singing of the alumni and Current Chapel Choir members. Although Homecoming week got off to a slow start and threatened to be another unsupported event, spirit gradually picked up student enthusiasm, and therefore, Homecoming was once again able to serve its purpose for it brought together students, alumni and parents. V. Millard

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-l! Those running in the second annual Run, Bike and Swim start their jaunt around Holland


Homecoming Shines Through Kim Logie (left) hangs on tight as she waits for the signal to let them fly.

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Goshom The crowd takes a break from their cheering to wave to their friendly camera man.

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Hope stands on high ground as Alma sinks into the mud.

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j King Paul Bocrsma and Queen Jane De Young pose for one I last shot.

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Kent S c h e w e a n d B y r o n P r i e l i p p r e c l i n e w i t h r e f r e s h m e n t s .

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T h i r d f l o o r K o l l e n hosts a h a v e n o f hell-raisers.


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C o m m u n i t y members p a r t i c i p a t e in c o l l e g e j o g - a - l o n g .

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S t u d e n t s p e r f o r m the c o n t e m p o r a r y n u m b e r â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Images.

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M o d e r n dancers K a t h y Nyenhuis, Laura H o f f m a n , a n d N a n c y W o o d soak u p the sun while rehearsing. S (Joshorn

M a r y H o o g e r h y d e a n d Scott G e n s e m e r practice for their duet in the c o n t e m p o r a r y piece.

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Dance VI Variety marked the stage of the sixth annual dance concert. Including jazz, modern, contemporary and tap numbers the concert provided something for everyone. The contemporary piece proved to be the stately and more traditional number with ballet movements, while the modern piece was abstract showing a variety of size, shape, color, and style. The tap and jazz numbers were light and peppy and served to lift the spirits of all. As in previous years, the production was primarily danced, designed, lighted, costumed, and choreographed by Hope's faculty and students. Preparation for the April concert began in January with tryouts and practices beginning shortly thereafter. Students alone spent between four to seven hours a week stretching, moving and creating. This large time commitment proved necessary for it took at least two and a half hours to work out one minute of the actual number. With what seemed to be individual efforts by each group at the beginning, at last came together at the dress rehearsal. Lighting problems, costume fittings and last minute changes were made on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday while the show opened on Thursday. Joining the students, for the actual performance were special guest artists Helen Kent and Suzanne Costello. Dancer, performer, choreographer and director Helen Kent was selected for this post through her work in the fall production of "The

Tempest." She began her career under the direction of Murray Louis and Alwin Nikolais at the Henry Street Playhouse as a member of the Children's Workshop and eventually joined the Murray Louis Dance Company. In May, Kent joined Carlo Pelligrini and Robin Batteau in the debut of their threemember performing ensemble "Vertigo." Kent's partner Suzanne Costello also began with a children's theatre-dance company. She has since toured the country performing for and teaching children and adults. Being a member of the Stuart Pimsler and Dancers and the Michael Kasper Dance Company, she will next perform in a New York spring season. Together Kent and Costello performed a variety of numbers including jazz and modern movements. Their grace, charisma and ability inspired both the student dancers and the audience. The highlight of the performance was the final number "Hey Good Looking." All in all, the dance concert enhanced both the cultural aspect of Hope as well as the dance department. Through Dance VI, students developed both individually through reaching for higher and higher goals and as a group. The guest artists added the final touch for they worked side by side with students and provided another insight into the student's frame of reference. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; V. Millard

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Special guest artist Helen K e n t p e r f o r m s at the a n n u a l d a n c e concert.

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H o p e ' s d a n c e r s interpret the Olympic spirit.

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Saga Revitalized With New Cafeteria For the next three years, whenever dinnertime disappointment and indigestion run rampant among incoming Hope freshmen and other Saga initiates, some upperclassman will undoubtedly remark "Hey, this is great. You should have seen what it used to be." Indeed, 79-80 was the ultimate year of contrasts in Hope food service. With construction on a totally renovated and expanded Phelps Hall cafeteria begun in May of 1979 and not finished until January of 1980, students endured the wait by eating in Carnegie gym during first semester. While the food remained the same, students made the additional adjustments of waiting in long lines and eating off paper plates with plastic utensils. "Hopefully, we have more than compensated for the inconvenience with our new Phelps service," said Saga director Keith Browning. Second semester transferred the joys of cafeteria eating back to the building used in years past â&#x20AC;&#x201D; but that building was nothing like it used to be. A multi-level seating arrangement combined with a "scramble system" to fill one's tray made Saga a new and exciting experience in January. Waiting in line was minimized and, although a few bugs still needed some w o r k i n g out, the new o p e r a t i o n ran r e m a r k a b l y smooth. "It's a new experience for all of us, students and staff alike," noted Paul Kury, one of the many people who see to it that Hope students get fed. "The facility is about as modern as you can get in cafeteria design." However exciting it may have been to enjoy the completion of a project planned for many years, the old sayings about Saga food, in keeping with longstanding student tradition, never ceased to abound. "It really is terrific to be in this new place," commented one Hope much different." All in junior, "but that doesn't mean the food itself all, students and staff agreed that the experience of dining at Hope was greatly enhanced with the opening of the Phelps facility.

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E v e r y b o d y ' s G r a n n y , Bess Smitter c h e c k s I.D.'s a n d gives o u t smiles.

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Tired of hot d o g s a n d meat loaf, D o u g V a n W i e r e n c h o o s e s to b r i n g his o w n e n t r e e for dinner.

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' S a g a Trek: To Boldly eat w h a t no m a n has eaten b e f o r e . .

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A l t h o u g h c o n f u s i n g at first, t h e s c r a m b l e system resulted in shorter lines /

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/Viack & Mabel The stars o f the silent screen set t h e s t a g e f o r M a c k a n d Mabel, the musical fall p r o d u c t i o n o f the H o p e C o l l e g e Theatre. W o r k i n g w i t h a story of rising t o s t a r d o m a n d f a l l i n g ungr a c e f u l l y f r o m it, the show o f f e r e d the cast many o p p o r t u nities f o r g r o w t h . Through the Artist-in-Residence program, Christopher Coucill, a professional actor working in N e w York, j o i n e d t h e cast. " C h r i s was g r e a t , " c o m mented Liz D e V e t t e , w h o p l a y e d L o t t i e A m e s , "as b o t h a c r i t i c and as c o m i c r e l i e f . " M a b e l , a g i r l w o r k i n g in a delicatessen w h o is whisked t o t h e t o p o f m o v i e s t a r d o m by d i r e c t o r Mack Sennett, was p l a y e d by J u n i o r Lori M o o r e . A l o n g w i t h ' D e V e t t e , M o o r e was a nominee f o r the Irene Ryan C o m p e t i t i o n , an annual a w a r d presented t h r o u g h t h e A m e r i can C o l l e g e T h e a t r e Festival. J a n u a r y o f 1980 b r o u g h t t h e cast (including C o u c i l l ) back t o g e t h e r t o take Mack and Mabel to Akron, O h i o for the regional A m e r i c a n C o l l e g e Theatre Festival. Such an o p p o r t u nity was v e r y r e w a r d i n g , c o m m e n t e d d i r e c t o r Donald Finn, as e n t r a n c e In t h e A C T F b r i n g s national attention to guality t h e a t r e a t small c o l l e g e s like Hope. Lori M o o r e is held a l o f t d u r i n g the song, "Look W h a t H a p p e n e d t o M a b e l . " â&#x20AC;&#x201D; J. Lehman

Mack and M a b e l Eddie, the W a t c h m a n Mack Sennett Lottie Ames

Michael McFaden Christopher Coucill Elizabeth M .

DeVette Ella Sonia A n n O l s e n Charlie C h a r l e s R. Bell Wally Jamie Muggins Andy Kevin Bailey Frank W y m a n Russell M a l t l a n d Mabel Normand Lori M o o r e M r , Fox A r t h u r D. Brown Mr. Kleiman M a r v i n Frederick

Jbk

Hinga Iris, t h e W a r d r o b e M i s t r e s s Kathleen M c G o r y William Desmond Taylor Phyllis F o s t e r

Karl Van T a m m i n g a A r d i s Kelsey

Mack Sennett (Christopher Councill) frames W a l l y (Jamie Muggins) in an imaginary movie still.

26


Ar+ist-in-Residence Christopher Coucill as movie director Mack Sennett with Lori Moore as Mabel.

Liz DeVette as Lottie sings Your Troubles A w a y . "

photos by Tom Renner

The fallen Mabel (Lori Moore) with her shady mentor William Desmond Taylor (Karl Van Tar minga).

Mack ( C h r i s t o p h e r Coucill) cond u c t s s t u d i o business f r o m t h e bath.

27


SHC STOOPS TO COhQUeR The w i t of British p l a y w r i g h t O l i v e r G o l d s m i t h b r o u g h t She S t o o p s t o C o n q u e r , a c o m e d y o f m a n n e r s , t o t h e s t a g e e a r l y in t h e 18th c e n t u r y . In t h e s p r i n g o f 1980, " S h e S t o o p s " c a m e t o H o p e as t h e s e c o n d m a j o r p r o d u c t i o n o f t h e t h e a t r e season. The s t o r y o f how the f e m i n i n e wiles o f y o u n g K a t e Hardcastle, played by Senior Michelle M a r t i n , corner M a r l o w , h e r s u i t o r t o o shy t o b e s t r a i g h t f o r w a r d w i t h a l a d y , w h o w a s p l a y e d b y C h u c k Bell, t h e p l a y w a s d i r e c t e d by John Tammi. O n e of the most e n t e r t a i n i n g a s p e c t s o f She S t o o p s T o C o n q u e r , n o t e d T a m m i , " i s how the story revolving around Kate, the title charact e r , is w o v e n w i t h s e v e r a l o t h e r c o m i c p l o t s . " In t h e i n s t a n c e o f t h i s H o p e p r o d u c t i o n , t h e o l d t h e atre a d a g e , " t h e show must g o o n " never rang t r u e r .

C h u c k Bell, t h e l e a d a c t o r , b e c a m e t o o ill t o p e r f o r m f o r the t h i r d p e r f o r m a n c e , M a r c h 25. Refusing t o o p t f o r closing the show early, T a m m i a n d the t h e a t r e s t a f f c o n t a c t e d W i l l i a m Shanks, a s t u d e n t f r o m W a y n e S t a t e U n i v e r s i t y in D e t r o i t . Shanks h a d p l a y e d M a r l o w in a r e c e n t p r o d u c t i o n o f She S t o o p s T o C o n q u e r . "I w a s c l e a n i n g m y a p a r t m e n t a t t h e t i m e he c a l l e d , " S h a n k s r e m a r k e d . Less t h a n 10 h o u r s b e f o r e c u r t a i n , he a g r e e d t o f l y t o H o l l a n d a n d r e p l a c e Bell in t h e H o p e production. She S t o o p s To C o n q u e r was also a s i g n i f i c a n t a c h i e v e m e n t f o r J u n i o r J o n H o n d o r p . The e n t i r e set was d e s i g n e d b y H o n d o r p , whose a r t i s t i c w o r k a n d a t t e n t i o n t o the actual construction m e a n t full t i m e w o r k in a d d i t i o n t o b e i n g a s t u d e n t . â&#x20AC;&#x201D; J. Lehman

Scenic d esigner Jon H o n d o r p observes the progress of set construction. A c t o r to the rescue William Shanks prepares for his impromptu Hope College premi-

28


She S+oops To Conquer Mrs. Hardcastle Anne L. Pringle Hardcastle David Heusinkveld Tony Lumpkin Marvin F. Hinga Miss Hardcastle Michelle M a r t i n Miss Neville Julie Reinhardt Stingo, landlord of "The Three Pigeons" B. Robert Tanis Bet Bouncer, a barmaid Chayris Burd John Heusinkveld Dick Muggins Little A m i n a d a b Russell C . Yonkers, Jr. Jack Slang John Frazza Doog Doog Scott Ronald Sisson Diggory Roger James Milas, Jr. Thomas Mark Klein Dimple Patricia Jenkins Marlow Charles R. Bell Hastings Jamie Huggins Jeremy Russell C a m p Sir Charles Marlow Keith Doorenbos

1 David Heusinkveld and Anne Pringle contribute t o the comedy as M r . and Mrs. Richard Hardcastle.

m

Photos by J. D e N e e f

Playing the young lovers of She Stoops To Conquer were Julie Reinhardt and Jamie Huggins (rear) as Miss Neville and Hastings, and Chuck Bell and Michelle David Heusinkveld reacts as a shocked parent in the role of M r . Hardcastle.

Martin as Marlow and Miss Hardcastle. /

29

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D. W a n g

A relay runner is aided by a human starting block.

D

Todd DeYoung breaks the tape.

w

D Wang

Hamburgers relieve M a y D a y hunger pains.

ang

D Wang

Seniors Stacy Burris and Sally Berger compete for their class.

D. W a n g

Arkie Grant Miner and Frater T o m Vanderstel sail over the hurdles in unison.

30


D. W a n g

May Day Queen Sue Weener is flanked by half of her court: Jeri Wissink, Sue Ward, and Sarah Norden. Juniors Sarah Cady, Jane De Young, Jan Klomparens are not pictured.

A traditional springtime event at Hope, May Day was most students' last chance at gathering together before the onset of final exams. It began with a picnic on the grass of Smallenberg Park and while students munched on hamburgers, they were entertained by the College's stage band. Following the musical interlude was a comic presentation by New Jersey comedian Jerry Allen. He aimed his jokes toward the average college student, covering such diverse topics as jobs, pets, and vegetables. Several awards were announced May Day afternoon. The Arcadian fraternity and the Sigma Sigma sorority were this year's recipients of a plaque commending their winning of Alpha Phi Omega's blood drive. The Arkies also won the academic trophy for the highest fraternity cumulative grade point average. Hie Delta Phi women won the sorority trophy. Next in the afternoon's sequence of events was the crowning of the May Queen. Freshman women formed the daisy chain and the court was called forward. Last year's queen, J e a n n e Moore Agnew, then placed the crown on the head of the new queen, junior

Sue Weener. Track and field competition between the Greek and independent men and between the s o p h o m o r e and senior women filled the rest of the afternoon, with the indy men and s o p h o m o r e women d e f e a t i n g their o p p o n e n t s . While many people watched the sport events, others were being entertained in the Kletz. Theatre students performed a play, " T h e Owl Hoo Slept Nights," written by students Jamie Huggins and David DeWitt. The day was ended on a musical note, with a dance to the sound of Trilogy. K. Joy Nyenhuis

MAY 31


An End . . . And A New Beginning J. Hazeltamp

H o n . W e n d e l l M i l e s delivers " W i n t e r s Rules.''

J. Hazeltamp

President V a n W y l e n welcomes g r a d u a t e s , parents, and friends t o 1980 B a c c a l a u r e a t e service.

O n M a y I I, P r e s i d e n t G o r d o n V a n W y l e n d i s t r i b u t e d 4 3 3 b a c h e l o r o f a r t s a n d e i g h t b a c h e l o r o f music d e g r e e s t o t h e I 15th g r a d u a t i n g class. C o m m e n c e m e n t , w h i c h was o r i g i nally p l a n n e d t o b e h e l d o u t d o o r s a t H o l l a n d S t a d i u m , t o o k p l a c e a t t h e C i v i c C e n t e r as in t h e p a s t y e a r s . It was a disa p p o i n t m e n t t o many students that the ceremonies occurr e d inside o n c e a g a i n . A s g r a d u a t e N a n c y K e r l e e x p l a i n e d , I t h o u g h t w e w e r e g o i n g t o h a v e a f r e s h new a p p r o a c h t o g r a d u a t i o n this y e a r b y h a v i n g it ( c o m m e n c e m e n t ) o u t s i d e . " The s t a d i u m was u n d e r g o i n g d r a i n a g e c o r r e c t i o n a n d r e c o n s t r u c t i o n a n d t h e r e f o r e i t c o u l d n o t house t h e 1980 ceremony. The H o n o r a r y W e n d e l l A . M i l e s , C h i e f U.S. D i s t r i c t J u d g e f o r t h e W e s t e r n D i s t r i c t o f M i c h i g a n a n d a 1938 H o p e C o l l e g e g r a d u a t e , was t h e c o m m e n c e m e n t s p e a k e r . M i l e s s p e e c h was e n t i t l e d W i n t e r s Rules' a n d c e n t e r e d a r o u n d m o t i v a t i o n a n d n o t t a k i n g t h e s h o r t - c u t s In o n e ' s w o r k . M i l e s was g i v e n an h o n o r a r y d e g r e e o f D o c t o r o f Laws b y V a n W y l e n a n d Ekdal J . Buys, w h i c h was c o n f e r r e d b y the Board of Trustees.

J. Hazeltamp

A g r a d u a t e carries f o r t h w o r d s o f i n s p i r a t i o n .

B a c c a l a u r e a t e was h e l d in D i m n e n t C h a p e l w i t h D r . Dennis Voskuil, a s s i s t a n t p r o f e s s o r o f r e l i g i o n , l e a d i n g t h e service. U n f o r t u n a t e l y t h e c a m p u s was n o t in p e a k c o n d i t i o n f o r the visiting parents and alumni. Renovation of Voorhees, the 12th S t r e e t l a n d s c a p i n g a n d s e v e r a l r o o f i n g p r o j e c t s w e r e o c c u r r i n g along w i t h the r e - r e n o v a t i o n of Van Vleck. The f e n c e d - i n r e m a i n s o f V a n R a a l t e H a l l p r o v e d t o b e a sad a n d u n p l e a s a n t s i g h t , t o o . A c c u s t o m e d t o t h e s e s i g h ts , t h e g r a d u a t e s spirits were not d i m m e d . M a n y D e c e m b e r 1979 a n d A u g u s t 1980 g r a d u a t e s expressed a concern and d i s a p p o i n t m e n t with b e i n g placed b e h i n d t h e M a y g r a d u a t e s . W h e t h e r o n e - h a l f c r e d i t o r six c r e d i t s w e r e n e e d e d t o finish t h e i r degrees, many d i d not u n d e r s t a n d t h e l o g i c o f b e i n g s e p a r a t e d f r o m t h e i r class. 441 a d u l t s a r e n o w r e - a n c h o r i n g " t h e i r lives. S o m e a r e g o i n g d i r e c t l y t o g r a d u a t e s c h o o l in t h e f a l l w h i l e o t h e r s have chosen t o enter the w o r k i n g w o r l d i m m e d i a t e l y . Marki n g t h e e n d o f t h e i r c o l l e g e c a r e e r , t h e 1980 g r a d u a t e s w e r e a t t h e s t a r t o f a new b e g i n n i n g . â&#x20AC;&#x201D; S. A r w e

32


J. Hazekamp

Expressions of elation were seen t h r o u g h o u t the day. J. Hazeltamp

First row o f graduates listen intently t o J u d g e Miles

J. Hazekamp

J e f f W e l c h receives a c o n g r a t u l a t o r y Iciss f r o m his g i r l f r i e n d

J. Hazeltamp

Posing for m o m and d a d J i m Hawkin decides it s time t o anchor elsewhere.


Guest Speakers Betty Williams: Peace â&#x20AC;&#x201D; People A dynamic speaker, and Nobel Peace Prize winner in 1976, Betty Williams gave a personalized account of her involvement in Ireland and the religious conflict. Startled by the death of three young children from the same family in August of 1976, Williams teamed up with another woman to unite those around them in peace. "It seems to us," she stated, "that we make life, so we ought to defend it." The two women began by organizing a rally and surprised by the 10,000 protestant women that showed up in a Catholic area, Williams and her friend decided to move on in their quest for peace. Speaking to a crowded Dimnent Chapel audience, Williams stressed the need for peace in Ireland. "It is a sick society," she stated, "there is no culture, bad housing, and high unemployment." Political and Economic factors were not the only reasons given, as Williams explained the academic and environmental education the young children were receiving. Many teen-agers had known nothing else but constant fighting, and Williams emphasized the societal result of such children. "There have been changes though . . . " she added. The peace movement, according to Williams, was breaking through the "mythical reporting" and a relationship between different communities was finally developing. An emotion packed hour, Williams received a standing ovation as she explained her role and involvement in the struggle for peace in Ireland.

Poetry of Others: Leslie Ullman Recipient of the Great Lakes College Association Best Book of Poetry award in 1978, Leslie Ullman presented a very informal reading of her poetry to a small audience in Wichers auditorium. Stressing the value of looking at other people's lives for writing material instead of your own life, Ullman stated, "These poems are not me." It was only after exploring the idiosyncrasies of human nature that Ullman said she could write the award winning book of poetry. " I told literal lies in order to give emotional t r u t h s " she stated. Many of Ullman's poems are experiences she heard about and imagined the emotions that may have accompanied the experience. Reading each poem twice, and stopping for questions frequently, Ullman inspired many participants to continue writing, and entertained the rest with her poetry.

34

Mid-East Crisis "The U.S. best start choosing friends more carefully. . .

its

" Stated by Aaron Rosenbaum, the speaker representing the Arabian view at the Critical Issues Symposium.

Packed to the brim with students, f a c u l t y and c o m m u n i t y , D i m n e n t Chapel housed three speakers that turned March 13, 1980 into an eyeopening day for many Hopeites. The f i r s t s p e a k e r , Clovis Maksoud, a Permanent Observer at the United Nations for the Arab League, spoke on the views of the Palestinians on the Middle East situation. Aaron D. Rosenbaum, the second speaker, and director of Research, American-Israel Public Affairs Committee, spoke on the role of the U.S. in the Mid-East c o n f l i c t , a n d t h e American-Jewish c o m m u n i t y point of view on the American role. The last speaker was a representative of the United States, M o r r i s Draper, who is the Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Mid-Eastern and S o u t h A s i a n A f f a i r s . D r a p e r f o u n d the audience skeptical and full of questions at the conclusion of his speech. Workshops followed each of the speeches and were led by various people. J. Cotter Tharin, professor of g e o l o g y at H o p e , a n d R o b e r t Cline, also a Hope faculty member in the economics department, co-presented a talk on "Energy and U.S. Foreign Policy." Discussing needs and s u p p l i e s a n d the U.S. policy towards energy, T h a r i n and Cline opened the issue to interested participants. Lewis Scudder led the m o r n i n g w o r k s h o p on "American Church Involvement in the Arab World," followed by other workshops such as "Business Interaction" by a former Hope g r a d u a t e Peter H u i z e n g a , "Presidential Politics and the Middle East" by Peter Secchia, and "The Peace-Making Process Begun at Camp David" by Channa Palti. Other workshops were available throughout the day, helping all involved to become more aware of the critical factors in the Mid-East issue.


ifi o j> (d

X H

A Decade of Change... On New Year's Eve, glasses were raised in toasts and voices were raised in careless choruses of "Auld Lang Syne" — just as they have been for years. But this year there may have been a bit more thought in the toasts and a little deeper feeling in the choruses because this New Year's Eve saw the turning of a decade — the '7()'s. This isn't the first decade change that Hope students have seen, but it may be the most memorable. The seventies saw us through adolescence, three or four years of high school, graduation, and brought us to these halls of higher learning. They also were filled with the issues and events that we formed our first independent opinion about and which we will be reforming and reshaping our opinions and philosophies around in the 1980's. The seventies were a decade that brought out new ideas and changed old ones; it saw the end and the beginning of accepted standards; it encouraged change and perhaps more than anything else, it was ours.

'70— Kent State Tragedy '71 — Cracking the Wall; Relations between U.S. and The People's Republic of China entered a new phase after Henry Kissinger's trip to Peking. — IS year-old vote. '73 — Former President Lyndon B. Johnson died. '76 — "My name is Jimmy, and I want to be your President." — Bicentennial, United States clothed in red, white and blue. '76 — Reverend Jim Jones leads "his"people to a gory death in Guyana. — Mrs. Lesley Brown gives birth to the world's first test tube baby in Oldham, England. '79 — Pope John Paul II tours through the United States.

American Soldiers Return Perhaps the most important event of the sixties which carried over to influence the seventies, was the Vietnam war. In 1970 the anti-war protests that had been errupting on college campuses all over the country came to a tragic climax at Kent State University when national guardsmen shot and killed a student. The shooting changed the attitude of all the nation and the already unpopular war grew even more unpopular and controversial. For three years following the Kent State incident, and the ordered Cambodian invasion which motivated the incident, American servicemen fought in Vietnam. In 1973, Richard Nixon signed a peace agreement in Paris which was to bring about the end of the conflict and bring American soldiers home. However, it was not until 1975 that all the American men involved in Vietnam returned to their homeland. In a close and desperate effort the last American diplomats and servicemen were air-lifted out of the country and only slightly ahead of the angry mobs that stormed and destroyed the embassies.

Muhammed Ali Farrah Fawcett Majors O. J. Simpson John Travolta Burt Reynolds Clint Eastwood Cheryl Tiegs Mark Spitz Jack Nicholas Olga Korbut Steve Canther Henry Aaron Robert Redford Dustin Hoffman Woody Allen Marlon Brando Miss Piggy Barbara Walters Billie Jean King

35


"vou'vje c o n e a LONG W/1Y BMW"

"I'd like to thank God, because She makes everything possible." — Helen Reddy accepting

Grammy

Award.

"... wherefore Richard M. Nixon, by such conduct, warrants impeachment and trial, and removal from office." as approved tiy the — first article of impeachment, House Judiciary Committee.

"Our long National Nightmare Over."

rr

jJ

While protests of foreign policy were taking place in the country, protests and marches against domestic policies were going on too. For the first time since the early 1900's and the suffragette movement, American w o m e n took to the streets of Washington to d e m a n d their rights. The w o m e n ' s movements started with an explosion that sent phrases like "stereotyping," "sexism," and "feminist," " m a l e o-hauvinist pig, a n d " b u r n your b r a " into every home in the nation — but the dramatics that surrounded the early w o m e n ' s movement soon gave way to serious reform action. Perhaps the biggest undertaking of the w o m e n ' s movement, the Equal Rights Amendment w a s proposed as a Constitutional guarantee that the rights of men and w o m e n would be equal under the law. The seventies s a w more and more w o m e n entering professional fields t r a d i t i o n a l l y open to m e n only; w o m e n found a place in competitive athletics that w a s denied to them before — and finally this year, the first female midshipman — or person — graduated from the Naval academy.

is

— Gerald Ford.

s. c/f-ttzq Lanes, . .

1976 — a year not soon to be forgotten by anyone, no matter how scrouge-like they become about the fourth of july. On July 4, 1976, the United States celebrated 200 years as a nation with the biggest party that Americans have ever seen. For at least a year before the bicentennial, the American people were being inundated with advertisements sporting red, white and blue — or waving flags that placed patriotism high on the pedestal. But, despite all the commercialism, the Bicentennial provided a long needed reason for an outbreak of Americanism that left the United States feeling just that much better about itself. Celebrations took on almost every size and shape as m a n y special programs funded by private business provided once in a lifetime opportunities for artists of all kinds. Performances featuring American composers became the bill of fare for symphonies of all sizes, American painters were given long deserved recognition, and American dance companies were also given the spotlight. The traditional fourth of July trimmings of parades and fireworks were added too and multiplied to make that one day a very special event — and with the grand addition of the parade of ships from all over the world that filled New York Harbor, the fourth of July, 1976, marked a long birthday, but a very happy one.

36

John Wayne Elvis Presley Bing Crosby Charlie Chaplin Jack Benny Margaret Mead Agatha Christie Charles Lindbergh Vitamin C Vitamin E Health Foods Coronary Bypass Surgery Cloning DC-10 Concord Moon Walk Satellites


"Running On Empty" Amid the gaiety of the Bicentennial celebration, Americans were forced to come to terms with the depleting supply of the world's'energy supply. The situation that scientists had been mumbling about for some years finally became an unavoidable loud voice telling the country to turn their thermostats down to 68 degrees and save energy. The gas shortage that Americans had p r e v i o u s l y i g n o r e d w a s no l o n g e r put aside, as United States paid increasingly more for the use of oil, Gasahol became a real alternative as OPEC continually saw the need to raise the price of oil per gallon, and the consumer, still whirling from the 37 cents per gallon days that changed to $1.35 during the decade, paid more and used less oil. A problem that began decades ago, and will continue for decades to come, the energy crisis was finally dealt with in the seventies — and promises to be dealt with for years to come. (All '70's copy written by Ann Radtke.)

Nano — Nano Dyn-o-mite What's happening? Macho Be there, aloha It's been real Wild and crazy Ya know Go for it Disco Cellulite melt down reverse discrimination the ME generation guru May the force be with you Sexed-up skin

"Conservation Fonda — — — — — — — — — — — —

is the religion of the future." — Jane

Three Mile Island wood burning stoves electric cars long johns down jackets comforters gasahol Nuclear energy AmTrak car pools economy cars solar heating

Health! No-fault OPEC Laetril Red dye #2 Saccharin Media Gay Movement Punk Rock Cocaine Pot Speed Heroin LSD plastic styrofoam acrylic polyester

MIA bracelets digital watches T-shirts double pierced ears midis maxis string bikinis one-piece bathing suits denim back packs designer jeans jogging shorts afros cork wedgies clogs Frye boots yogurt Perrier water

/

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National Overview Oil Profits Hot Topic Salt II: U.S. Defense Tested Beginning in October, the U.S. was constantly in the thick of world affairs. Pope John Paul II made an unprecedented 7-day tour through the United States, preaching in such places as Philadelphia before a million people and on an Iowa farm, where the Pope preached a message of peace and reconciliation to a nation desperately looking for some light in the darkness of despair. He seemed to provide it as millions across the U.S. were enthralled by his presence. On a more somber note, the mood of the U.S. began to shift toward a more pessimistic attitude, bordering on resignation. The discovery of 2 , 6 0 0 Soviet combat troops in Cuba raised new fears about the security of the U.S. to respond to the Soviet military threat throughout the world. Congressional leaders bantered back and only at home, but also abroad, as to the ability of the U.S. to stand-up to the Soviet threat. The key to the debate centered around the SALT II treaty which had begun and was suddenly placed in jeopardy.

Several senators, notably Frank Church, chairman of the senate Foreign Relations Committee, tied the passing of the treaty in the senate to the removal of Soviet troops from Cuba. It soon became clear that the Soviets were unwillina to withdraw the troops and that the U.S. did not have the influence or leverage to force their withdrawal.

American interest in the defense debate was diverted in early November as the former Shah of Iran flew to New York's Cornell Medical Center for the removal of an inflamed gall bladder. In the process, it was discovered the Shah had cancer of his lymphatic system, a fact he had kept a secret for six years. Soon it became apparent that the Shah was in the U.S. to stay â&#x20AC;&#x201D; at least for awhile. While he was treated, voices within the Carter administration questioned the decision to allow the Shah to enter the country â&#x20AC;&#x201D; but the protests were ignored.

Early November found the American public's attention focused on the issue of energy as the Nation's oil companies reported their third quarter profits for 1979. All reported record profits, some as high as 211 percent, in the case of Texaco. Public fury over rising gas prices and shortages in the face of such earnings tended to overshadow the fact that despite rising profits, oil companies were paying record taxes. Exxon, for example, paid 6.2 billion dollars in taxes for the third quarter, nearly six times the profit it made. Despite this fact, the Carter Administration aroused by the record profits, struggled to come up with a comprehen sive energy policy. President Carter keyed his policy around the implementation of a windfall profits tax, designed to sink excess profits from oil back into the U.S. economy. However, while the senate and the House of Representatives agreed that a windfall profits tax was needed, both disagreed as to the amount. Congress did, however, give the president authority to pass emergency gaso line rationing and enacted a plan to aid families on welfare with their heating bills during the winter months. For the first time the U.S. was on its way to a comprehensive energy policy.

"America Held Hostage" At this same t i m e t h o u g h , o p t i m i s m about a U.S. energy policy was somewhat dimmed by a report issued by one of the six commissions appointed to study the three Mile Island Nuclear Power Plant accident. The commission, appointed personally by Carter, and headed by Dart mouth president John Kement, reported that any new nuclear power plant construction should be halted unless the state has a nuclear accident plan; a major obstacle to any construction as only 14 states have such plans. Though the energy crunch commanded wide attention in early November, attention quickly focused back to the Middle East. Mounting demonstrations against the U.S. role in Iran and the support of the

Shah came to a terrifying head, as on a grey Sunday morning, November 4th, a demon stration In front of the United States embassy in Tehran, Iran, quickly escalated into an international incident. Students broke into the embassy compound and seized 60 American personnel, holding them hostage and asking for the return of the Shah to Iran in exchange for the hostages. The Carter Administration, reeling from its troubles with the SALT II treaties and the Soviet presence in Cuba, suddenly f o u n d itself directly confronted. The administration e x a m i n e d and rejected several response options â&#x20AC;&#x201D; including a military response.


— Crisis at Home and Abroad Spotlight on Iran; Shadow on U.S. As November wore on, the Ira nian crisis settled down to a test of wills between the proclaimed leader of Iran, the Ayatollah Khomeini and the West. The first break in the situation seemed to come with Khomeini's offer to release the women and blacks who were held hostage. This did not produce any immediate results however. The administration, believing the situation to be stabilizing, took its first definitive steps in the form of economic sanctions. President Carter ordered the immediate halt of all oil imports from Iran, and a freeze on all Ira nian assets in U.S. banks. The Ayatollah Khomeini immediately denounced these actions and the crisis continued. Speculation as to why the hostages continued to be held kept on rising as world opinion was clearly forming on the U.S. side. Even the Soviet Union made a veiled comment directed at Iran calling for "humanitarian measures." It soon became clear that despite the apparent unity over the hostage situation, Iran was in deep internal turmoil. Inflation was running at 40 percent, and unemployment at 25 percent. The internal situation was bad at best, and perhaps relying on the hostage situation to hold the country together. A slight break in the situation occurred in late November as Khomeini allowed the release of

the black and women hostages, 13 of which made it home in time for Thanksgiving. As December began, prospects for'the release of the rest of the hostages seemed dim. The opening of December bid no better for the U.S. Chants such as "death to Carter" and " k i l l the American dogs" became commonplace in other places than Iran. Violence against the U.S. was no longer limited to Iran. Violence first broke out in the country of Pakistan. As Pakistani troops looked on — an angry mob stormed the U.S. embassy, looting it and finally setting it in flames. Embassy personnel were rescued, but in the ensuing melee two U.S. marines died, becoming the first U.S. fatalities in the outpouring of Islamic anger against the U.S. Subsequent events in the Middle East such as the takeover of the Holy Shrine of Mecca by extremists signalled what seemed to be an all out offensive move against the U.S. and the West by the Islamic world. President Carter began to contemplate stronger measures against Iran in early December. After a summit meeting at Camp David, in a tersely worded, six paragraph statement, the State Department opened up the possibility of military intervention for the first time, to counter the threats of Iran to put the hostages on trial in the Spring. Immigration officials began to move through the U.S. College

campuses in an effort to register Iranian students and weed out those who were considered illegal aliens. This action raised the furor of many groups ranging from the colleges themselves, to the American Civil Liberties Union who filed suit charging that the president had no authority to deport the stu dents. The Shah, still the center of controversy, moved again to Lackland Air Force Base in Texas where he was put under armed guard. President Carter, in his first public news conference since the seizing of the embassy categorically rejected the Iranian demand to return the Shah. As December drew to a close, America found itself still "held hostage." The Iranian situation held the attention of the world. At the traditional lighting of the White House Christmas tree, the tree was topped with a single star, and 50 smaller trees representing the hostages, were lit. For the thousands of Americans, the once unfamiliar address — 260 Taleghani Avenue, Tehran, Iran — became very famil jar — as many Americans sent cards to the U.S. embassy in Tehran, showing their support of the hostages. As a fitting end for the year of turmoil, the center of the turmoil, the Shah, left the U.S. for Panama; leaving after 54 days in America that will go down in history. — D. Mulvaney


U.S. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Second Gold Rush As a r e p e r c u s s i o n to the Middle East jitters, the U.S. people watched as the price of gold steadily increased. All of a sudden in December of 7 9 , the price took a sharp incline, moving from a $ 4 0 0 mark all the way up to a $525 per ounce. When the panic set in over the Mid-East, so did the panic concerning gold and o t h e r m e t a l s . Consequently the price continued to rise until it finally sky-rocketed at $ 8 3 8 oz. In full confidence that the price would plunge equally as fast as it rose, little was done to relieve the situation â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and rightly so. With the learning of some encouraging news in Afghanistan on the eve of the same week, investors on Wall Street were already short-selling shares of stock in gold and silver mining companies.

The Continuing Crisis in Iran Designated " M a n of the Year" by Time magazine, the Ayatollah Khomeini headed up the beginning of a long new year. At 79 years old, the Ayatollah managed to shake the entire world, as he "gave the 20th century world a frightening lesson in the shattering reality of irrationality. (Time, Jan. 7, p. 9). The Ayatollah made d e m a n d s that put the U.S. in an untenable position, a s k i n g f o r none o t h e r than the return of the Shah for trial in exchange for the release of the hostages, as well as the U.S. submission to a trial of its crimes against Iran. The spread of anti-Westernism that Khomeini motivated in Iran had already tempted other MidEastern c o u n t r i e s , and as t i m e wore on, the U.S. b e c a m e well a w a r e t h a t it was d e a l i n g w i t h more than just Khomeini. Many efforts were made to settle the hostage situation, but at the end of 6 months, still no progress had been made. Kurt Waldheim, a career diplomat with the Austrian Foreign Service, made a

visit to Tehran in efforts to negotiate. But W a l d h e i m r e t u r n e d e m p t y h a n d e d . Other a t t e m p t s were met with equal receptions and finally in a moment of desperation, the U.S. sent helicopters to save the hostages. The attempt was m a d e at n i g h t , a n d in t h e process two helicopters collided, and two American men killed. In reaction Iran moved the hostages, splitting t h e m up and taking t h e m all over Iran. The hope for the release of the hostages rose and fell as President Abalhosson Bahnisadre took oath of office after being elected by a 76 percent vote. The Ayatollah still in the hospital recovering f r o m a heart attack, blessed the event. Meanwhile, the Shah requested a move to Cairo, and Anwar Sadat welcomed him with open arms. The constant debate, and victorless argument continued through the semester and on into the s u m m e r , e n d i n g the school year with little hope and confused feelings for the hostages in Iran.

Pinching Pennies unemployment Auto sales Advertising recession inflation government spending depression interest at 20% student loans

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A Three Ring Circus: Russia, Afghanistan, and the U.S. In a lightning series of unexpected events, Afghanistan's president Hafezullah Amin was suddenly overthrown, and soon after executed. In his place, Moscow installed Babrak Karmal, a former deputy Prime Minister. In between the two, Russian troops were forced to fight a sporadic series of gun battles in the streets of Kabul, Afghanistan's capital. At the close of this eventful week, the Carter administration charged that Moscow was launching an outright invasion of its neighbor with two Soviet divisions crossing the border and heading for Kabul. With no reply f r o m the Soviets, the U.S. waited to see if Moscow would take advantage of the crisis in Iran and further jeopardize the Salt II treaty. Other Nations joined the concern towards Moscow. Peking stated that " A f g h a n i s t a n ' s independence and sovereignty have become toys in Mo sco w's h a n d s " and Iran's r e v o l u t i o n a r y Council claimed that the intervention in the neighboring country was in "a hostile action" against Muslims throughout the world." U.S. officials were concerned that the Soviets would further unstabilize the region threatening Pakistan which housed an estimated 3 5 0 , 0 0 0 Afghan refugees. But the over-riding question remained, "What can the U.S. do?" In desperate action. President Carter chose to halt the grain sales, and severely curtail the Soviet fishing privileges as well as the cultural exchange program. Hinting at a Moscow Olympic Boycott, Carter hoped to lead a band-wagon of countries into open condemnation against the Soviets. British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, West German Chancellor Helmut Schmidt, Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Fraser, and even Indira Gandhi, India's newly elected Prime Minister, began to support the U.S. Yet even the pressure of these other countries failed to move the Soviets to make a favorable response. Carter began to push the registration of young American men, and for the first time, women were included in the action. After a trying two and one half months, it became clear that Afghanistan was in the midst of inner turmoil â&#x20AC;&#x201D; so much so that even Moscow admitted the state of affairs. A flicker of hope emerged as the Kremlin hinted at a compromise; saying that Soviet troops could be withdrawn from Afghanistan if the U.S. and other countries "guaranteed that all external aggression would be halted." Carter agreed with the stipulation that the troops move first. A partial withdrawal followed, and Carter still in hopes of gaining some cooperation from the Soviets, anxiously held onto the previous agreement. Another unsolved situation, the Russian invasion of Afghanistan remained a pressing issue at the close of a harried year.

The Campaign Beat Despite the turbulent events in Iran, A f g h a n i s t a n and at home, the U.S. turned its attention to another important event; the election of a new President. President Carter, seeking re-election, found that the greatest challenge of the primary race came not f r o m the Republican party, but from his own Democratic party, as Senator Ted Kennedy threw his hat into the ring. At the end of November, the Republican party flooded the American public with no less than nine challengers, and i n c l u d e d f o r m e r CIA d i r e c t o r George Bush, John Connally, Robert Dole, Phil Crane, John Anderson, and Ronald Reagan. Playing on the conservative mood of the country, Reagan stepped into the fray confident of victory and advocating a strong conservative stand. His call for a balanced budget, a cut in taxes, and a removal of government regulations, won a large majority vote, and by the end of Spring moved h i m to the top of the line along with Carter. Narrowed down to three major candidates, C a r t e r , Reagan c a m p a i g n e d with gusto closely watching the move of t h e i r t h i r d party c a n d i d a t e J o h n Anderson, who promised to rock their boats even if he didn't win. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; contributor D. Mulvaney

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W i t h the a d d i t i o n of minors in many departments, and even a new B.S. degree in chemistry, the academic scene changed its d i r e c t i o n to a more finely-tuned program. New courses were added in almost every department i n c l u d i n g a Dance Repertoire course in the dance department, and a Bio-feedback class in psychology. Requirements once again received a face-lift, w h i c h forced students to rearrange their academic careers to best accommodate the new core. The f i n e - t u n i n g of the academic scene d i d n ' t just affect the scheduling h o w ever. Students apparently began to feel the c o m p e t i t i o n of the j o b market and the demand for k n o w l e d g e in more than one area. D o u b l e majors in many departments developed, and the surge of students interested in c o m p o s i t e majors and minors grew.

ACADEMICS ACADEMICS ACADEMICS ACADEMICS ACADEMICS ACADEMICS ACADEMICS ACADEMICS ACADEMICS

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Increased faculty to meet the needs of the students and departments broadened the scope of classes available and in all but the geology department, where the oil companies offered more money than the school could. New scheduling also affected students, as classes were concentrated on Tuesday and Thursday, relieving the o v e r c r o w d i n g on M o n d a y , Wednesday, and Friday classes that once existed. Changing the first class of the day to 8 A.M. and making Chapel at 10:30 A.M. w o k e many students up an extra half hour early, and made Chapel more inviting to the interested but late sleepers. Another year of change, Hope strove to keep up w i t h the d e m a n d i n g times and offered students a selection of courses better suited to their needs.

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Brenda D i e t e r m a n a n d Lora H o f f m a n p r e p a r e for a n o t h e r day in S o c i o l o g y .

Pam Barney c o n s t r u c t s a ' h o u s e ' f o r Bill M a y e r ' s A r t class.

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D Wang

Robert Palma, professor o f r e l i g i o n . Contemplates student questions.

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T. Renner

Above: S p o n s o r e d b y t h e p o l i t i c a l s c i e n c e d e p a r t m e n t , area h i g h s c h o o l s t u d e n t s p a r t i c i p a t e in t h e a n n u a l M o d e l U.N. Opposite Page: T w y l i a Tayor, Phyllis M o n t a n a r , a n d N o r e e n W a l t e r s p r a c t i c e d u r i n g s t u d i o class.

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Art: Not for Majors Only In an effort to relieve the overcrowding in the Rusk building, the art department purchased the Sligh Furniture building on College and 12th Street. However, the need for more room is going to remain just that for about 5 years, as the department can't move in completely until Sligh is out. "We're really just trying to survive with what we have until we move into the Sligh building," says Delbert Michael, art professor. "The Rusk building looks large at first but when you begin getting all of the students inside, well . . . we really need more space." The Sligh building should be the solution to the problem as it will offer more studio space as well as give each media a specified area in which to work. Along with the newly purchased building, the art department added a club called Espirit. The word is French, meaning "the spirited," and judging by the weekly meetings, roller skating parties, and art show they put on, that's exactly what they were. The club sponsored the first art show of the year, called (I C a n ' t Get no) Respect. It was the first of its kind at Hope, and featured works in a variety of media. First place in threedimensional art, was awarded to Cathy Steiner's "J ai toute une vache a faire," which was a sculpted cow. First placed in twodimensional art was awarded to a disply of

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D. Wang

Jennifer Forton takes a break from making her sculpture to see if it will really work.

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Leslie Ortquist, Alicia Coto, Lauren Lambie draw from the model. P. Paarlbcrg

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Lisa Leventhal uses her artistic touch to make the bottles come to life.

seven photographs entitled "Travel Photos," done by Carol Anderson and Ericka Peterson. Other award-winners were "Twist," a line drawing by H e a t h e r Molnar, "Monday Morning Coming at you," an oil painting by Mike N o r t h u i s , " F l o r a l Cups," a ceramic work, and "Hungering and Thirsting R o w l e t t " a sculpture in mixed media by Virginia Ferguson. The show was held November 26-30, and jurored by Ron Pederson, a professor at Calvin College. Also deserving recognition. was Bill Mayer's Sculpture 1 class for spending the night at Lake Michigan's Ponderosa inside of their own sculptures. The assignment was to make survival sculptures using only cardboard and plastic and sleep in them for the night. Not only did the students learn to construct the sculpture, they also learned not to be afraid of the dark. Although temporarily restrained because of the lack of space in the Rusk building, the Art department continues to be active and growing in all directions. L Rietvdd

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P. Paarlberg

Virginia Ferguson adds the finishing touch to her award winning sculpture.

Tracey V a n Mouwerik experiments with color in Robert Vicker's painting class.


Biology Balances the Scales

T. La men

"77^^ Dr. Jaques, employed as temporary physiologist for 1979-80.

M a r t i n Burg studies the regulation of sodium and potassium ions in mutants of Paramecium.

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Stacy Burris checks her data while researching environmental mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. T. La men

After six years as department chairman, Eldon Greij calls it quits. 46


J. Hazekamp

J. Hazekamp

Listening to Don Cronkite's pre-lab instruction are Lora Rector and Phil Somerville.

The scanning electron microscope aids in Bill Webb's comparative study of palpal stridulating organs in male wolf spiders.

The secret of a good department is in maintaining a proper balance between faculty research and student learning. Hope's biology department accomplishes just this. Hope's biology department is extremely active in research â&#x20AC;&#x201D; more so than most small four-year colleges. Money was granted this year to Meredith Blackwell and Allen Brady from the National Science Foundation, to James Gentile from the Environmental Protection Agency, to Don Cronkite from the Research Corporation and to Harvey Blankespoor from the Department of Natural Resources. In addition to these research projects, some of Hope's biology professors traveled to different parts of the country (and the world) to participate in various conferences relating to their particular field. Gentile was invited to give a paper at an international conference in Monaco on chemical mutagens. Norman Rieck attended a NSF short course (for college teachers) on neurobiology, while Paul VanFaasen attended another NSF short course on the reproductive biology of vascular plants. Jack Schubert participated in a number of conferences both in the United States and abroad dealing with radiation and chelation therapy of heavy metals. But Hope's ever-active biology department does not spend all of its time looming over a microscope, tracking down slime molds or chasing gallinules in the marsh. This department is equally concerned with its students and what they get out of Hope's biology curriculum. One of the big changes made in the year 1979-80 was to alter the requirements for the biology major. It was decided that students need only take one year of introductory biology courses consisting of 111 (molecular biology) and 112 (survey of plants, animals, and ecology). In addition, each student must take at least one course in each of three areas: molecular biology, zool-

ogy and botany. With this change in requirements, the enthusiastic biology major is sooner able to move on to more advanced courses, and eventually (if h e / s h e wishes) to research. Those involved in research this year numbered up to twenty-two students. Although student research projects are usually funded by Undergraduate Research Participation Grants (through NSF), this summer's projects were funded by a grant from Student Originated Studies. Only two SOS grants were given in Michigan; one of these went to MSU and the other to Hope. Of course, in order to benefit from such research experiences as well as from student lab sessions, the proper equipment must be available. This year, the biology department acquired (through a N S F matching funds grant) a desk-top physiograph which students used for a variety of physiological activities. Chemist Rodney Boyer and Gentile also obtained a joint grant for an ultra-centrifuge (funded in part by the Research Corporation). Other projects u n d e r t a k e n by the d e p a r t m e n t included the hiring of Sanford Jaques as a temporary physiological fill-in (for the vacancy left by the departure of S. Krogh Derr) while lining up Chris Barney from the University of Florida as a permanent physiologist starting in the fall of 1980. The biology seminar program also continued to be very strong this year with twenty Friday afternoon seminars open to biology majors and other interested students. With the resignation of Eldon Greij after two threeyear terms as department chairman, the biology department is faced with the task of electing another chairman who can maintain an effective teaching-research balance. In this balance lies the strength of Hope's biology department: sufficient equipment, a competent, active faculty and good students willing to participate. K . Bowman

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T o m Bayer s e r i o u s l y c o n t e m p l a t e s his w o r k i n c h e m i s t r y .

Tom Kasten, senior c h e m i s t r y major, focuses i n t e n s e l y o n his p i p e t , w h i l e t h e rest o f t h e class p r o ceeds.

C i n d y N e l s o n w o r k s w i t h gas d i f f u s i o n o n t h e vacu u m l i n e in Physical C h e m i s t r y .


To New Demands

Freshman c h e m i s t , M i t c h M e n d r e k w o r k s d i l i gently o n his lab.

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)ohn Van A r e n d o n k , senior chemistry major, demonstrates the departments spectrofluorometer.

In efforts to incorporate more student involvement, the chemistry department is developing two new programs. In the final steps of completion a chemistry Bachelor of Science degree and a chemical science minor program is also being added. Professor David Klein's new Chemical Instruments class has added a new dimension to the department also. This new class gives instruction on the latest developments in chemical testing and in the use of new analysis machinery. There was, along with a student response, community involvement, with one-third of the class comprised of men from local companies. The chemistry department is a blue chip for curriculum development at Hope. According to a 1979 study conducted among liberal arts colleges across the nation. Hope's chemistry department ranked first in seven out of nine categories, and second in the remaining two. This national honor strengthens Professor Don William's view that the chemistry department brings publicity and prestige to the campus. A top national ranking, a new degree program, and new classes are just a few of the developments which have enhanced the chemistry department this year. However, what is most important in William's opinion is to continue to build a more respectable program and to maintain the high level of quality chemistry instruction. J Eickhoff

Photo credits,). Hazekamp

Senior, M a r i a n n e Rice, e x h i b i t s her skill at m a k i n g oatmeal in B i o - c h e m i s t r y . Professor M i c h a e l D o y l e assists Ron M o o l e n a a r in t h e use o f t h e s p e c t r o m e t e r .

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Communicating The communications department was alive with changes and additions, long awaited developments, and striking surprises in 1979-80. With the combined efforts of staff and students, the department was building a much more substantial program. One of the most exciting developments was the finalization of a minor in communications, providing students with several new options. Also, with the addition of Professor Ted Nielson's new advanced media production classes, a course in conflict management and non-verbal communication, and Starla Drum's new senior seminar on Interpersonal Communication from perspectives of Christianity and humanistic phychology, exciting curriculum developments took place. One surprise was the departure of Professor Jack Orr at the end of the fall semester, as he accepted the position of senior minister at a church in Wilming-

T. Lamen

Advanced media student Gene Shanahan videotapes a Hope football game.

ton, Delaware. In addition to the springtime challenge of replacing him, the department was granted permission to increase its full-time faculty from four to five members. Both staff and majors look forward to a new professor and extensive program in journalism by the fall of 1980. The communications department welcomed to campus, among others, Richard Osteling, religion editor of Time magazine, and Dr. Bobby Patton, professor of speech communication at the University of Kansas, who was on campus for a week during the spring semester, offering lectures and seminars on communication between men and women. As Professor Joe MacDoniels summed it up, the communications department was "really excited to be tailoring itself to the particular interests of Hope students."

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Karen Puschel. David Driscoll and Janet Watson enjoy the new presentation skills lab with class leader JoEllen Ming.


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Students Dave Huizen, Daven Claerbout, and Kevin VanderKolk put their broadcasting knowledge to work.

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Professor Jack Orr, an expert in persuasion and communication theory, contemplates his mid-winter farewell to Hope and a move to the East Coast.

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Burr T i l l s t r o m , visiting in F e b r u a r y , delights students with his stories of early television and his show, Kukla, Fran, and Ottie.

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Professor Ted Nielson and his media students discuss the progress of another Hope television show in the Lubbers production booth.

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The day begins for Herbert Dershem with a room full of Computer Science 120 students. Dershem teaches the first lecture module of the course, problem solving.

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P. Paarlberg

Gordi Spoelhof relaxes as he waits for Sigma Six to respond.

Ken Bekkering punches just a few leaving for his next class.

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R. Beck

Student worker, T o d d Hudson, loads a tape on the computer.

So Long Sigma Sin Yes, folks, the rumor is true, Sigma Six will soon during which students learned programming lanbe laid to rest. Throughout the year her replacement guages that would be beneficial to them in their own was carefully being selected so that the needs of stu- major field of study. Response to the new course was excellent, perhaps dents, faculty, and administrators could be better due to the fact that s t u d e n t s realized the ever met. A more efficient memory, greater terminal increasing usage of the computer in all areas of life. hook-up capacity, more up-to-date hardware and The department tries every semester to include more versatile software were but a few characterisone or more new 495 courses in addition to other tics that were being sought after in Siggie's replacecurrent courses. New classes o f f e r e d this year ment. Univac, Honeywell, Burroughs and DEC preincluded: Artificial Intelligence, a one hour collesented their systems and submitted bids for the comquim. Business Information systems. Algorithms, puter. and a micro-computer laboratory course. The microIn an attempt to provide students of all disciplines computer laboratory course utilized the ten new with a basic knowledge of today's computers and micro-computers purchased this year. To develop their languages. Computer Science 120 was offered. programs for statistical use for these computers conA grant from the National Science Foundation protinues to be a major goal of the department, this will vided Hope's professors with the funds to set up its be accomplished through research projects and indeunique course structure. The course differed from other computer science courses in that it was com- pendent studies. As the use of computers in society continues to posed of two parts, lecture and laboratory, with grow, Hope will continue to change the structure of each, being further divided into modules. Lecture the courses in this department, and as computers modules were geared to student's specific field of themselves grow more complex, Hope's computers interest, incorporating techniques of problem solving will have to keep pace â&#x20AC;&#x201D; as demonstrated by the and also topics concerning the application and retirement of the beloved Sigma Six. implications of computer usage in our society. Practical experience was gained through the laboratory.

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Dance: Growing by Leaps and Bounds Ranging from pirouettes to isolations and pointed toes, the dance department's new class. Dance Repertoire, offered upper level dance students three major forms of the art. The course studied ballet, jazz, and modern dance, and was taught as though it were a professional course in New York City. This meant that students were required to dance two hours per day, five days a week. A rigorous course; but the small size of the class gave the student individual help which compensated for the sore muscles and the large time committment that was a part of the course. While Dance Repertoire offered learning experience for a small group of upper level students, the annual dance concert provided practical experience through auditions. The performance was a major event for the department and took place in April after many hours of hard work. Also an important feature of the dance concert and the classroom experience were the professionals that periodically taught. Among a few, Margerie Barstowe, a teacher of the Alexander technique, focused her teaching at Hope on alignment and kinetic awareness. This not only exposed students to the professional world, but also enabled them to work with, and closely observe professionals in the art. The dance department has many strong points; one of which enables students to become involved through either assisting in lower level courses, participating in workshops, or even a semester in New York. One such Hope student was Cathy Handore, who was able to be directly involved with a professional Dance Company. Although the department is very active, there are presently only 14 minors, most of which will . . use their dance in their careers" according to Maxine DeBruyn, chairman of the department. Unable to offer a major's curriculum, the dance department hopes that the new Dance Repertoire class will act as a crucial step to the establishment of a major's program in the future. V. Millard

M a r y Beth Reinecke works to perfect one of many movements in a jazz routine.

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Jazz I I class strikes a pose. Cathy Hondore (bottom) spent the year in N e w York City, but returns to Hope for a week and performs with Moira Poppen (top) and Henry Loudermilk (middle).

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Maxine DeBruyn and student assistant. Kathy Nyenhuis, demonstrate a technique for the Modern I course. Pholo credits R. Beck

Instructor Rich Rahn leads students Julie Reinhardt (left) and Kathy Nyenhuis (center) through a floor exercise.

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Change Is the N ame of the Game After being "in the shop" for four years, the economics and business administration department underwent a major overhaul in efforts to update the department's goals and orient them toward student needs. Because of the increasing number of students taking their courses, the number of faculty within the department increased dramatically. Over the past four years the number of faculty doubled, with the latest addition being Dr. Robin Kendrick-Klay. Joining the department this past September, Klay, brought with her an expertise in the history of economic thought. The addition of Klay enabled the department to increase the number of upper level economic courses, thus allowing flexibility in the scheduling process for students. Not only has the staff grown, but the economics major itself has changed. Although the number of required hours for an economics major has not changed, the specific course requirements have. The new major program requires study in four areas: economic core courses, economic electives, quantitative skills courses and a senior thesis. These new requirements better prepare majors for either post-graduate work or the working world. The emphasis in the business world today is presently on the application and research relating to theory, therefore, the new major requirements include advanced mathematics and computer skill. This emphasis on the use of computer in business administration and economics resulted in the addition of a computer terminal for the department. The terminal was and will continue to be used for course work and also in research projects of both professors and students. In preparation for the upcoming senior thesis course, the library budget for the department increased. This resulted in a significant rise in library holdings for the department. In just two years time, over thirty business and economic periodicals were added. The philosophy of the department continues to be that students do not have to be in the classroom to learn. Thus, increased contacts with the outside community were fostered. The d e p a r t m e n t not only brought in speakers, but students were sent out to work and to do research for businesses. Students were encouraged to take advantage of off-campus study and work programs, to gain practical experience and to look at possible career options. Currently, the department provides the following options for this type of study: a semester in Chicago, Philadelphia, Oak Ridge, or a three hour internship course at Hope.

Due Nguyen works on an econometrics project. Econometrics is a new economics course which emphasizes practical use of economic theory.

Sidney Downey, professor in the economics/business administration department, takes time out for student feedback.


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Although this year's business club was not as active as it has been in the past, it did sponsor a trip for the department's faculty and students to the Ford Motor Corporation in Detroit. Students toured Ford's facilities — viewing the complete process of automobile manufacturing. Administrators from Ford met with students to inform them as to what goes on at Ford, job possibilities, and to talk about their marketing, accounting, accounting system and production. An accumulation of enacted plans, the economics and business administration department has geared itself and its students for the future. V Millard

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Business major Gaye Vanden Hombergh diligently tackles her accounting.

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Robin Kendricks-Klay, first year professor at Hope, leads upper level students into a discussion about the history of economic thought.

57


P. Cushman

Education majors think creatively in M a t h Lab 206 as they design math activities to be used by students individually in the classroom. Left to right: Ruth A n n Hascup, Joyce Surber, Julie Duisterhof, Jocelyn Van Heest, Linda Flanagan, Robin Steinhauser, and Pam Schmidt.

Profs Do Their Homework Too Vine-covered and decaying, Voorhees Hall, at one of an Early Childhood program to the curriculum, time a women's dorm and now the present home for and the acceptance of English/communications as a the education department, will become a dorm once composite major. The guidelines for the Spanish biagain. According to James Bultman, chairman of the lingual program is in the process of being approved education department, renovation of the old dorm is by the State Department of Education, but they do imminent, however, when asked where the education not have enough personnel at this time to get such a offices would be housed he replied, "If you find out program started. Also new this year was the requirement stating would you please let me know?" Though it was that all students wishing to apply for an education uncertain where the department would be located major must take the Sophomore Level Proficiency next year, this fact did not worry the members of the Test. This requirement was established to ensure that department too much. They kept as busy as ever, all potential teachers have the grammatical skills and as a result, they attained their main objective for necessary for teaching. The Sophomore Level Profithe 1979-1980 school year: to compile the Institutional Report for the National Council for Teacher ciency Test is a Missouri College Writing Test which Accreditation. This report was the result of a two may be taken by any student who appears to need year self-study in the areas of government, curricu- help in the area of writing, however, it is now a must lum, faculty and students, facilities, and programs at for all education majors. Because new trends in education are occurring Hope, and was submitted to the representatives of everyday, the education department also discussed the N.C.T.A. during their visit to Hope in February. Other happenings in the education department the idea of making Diagnostic Reading and Excepincluded the submission of two new proposals before tional Child required courses for the education the State Board of Education concerning guidelines major, and there is a strong possibility that this for a bi-lingual program in Spanish and the addition requirement will take effect next year. M . Webb


I HOPE COLLEGE Institutional Report

A j o b well done — Dr. James Bultman and secretary. Cheryl M c G i l l are pleased with their 373 pages of research.

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Carol Morlock takes advantage of the new audio-visual room located in Van Zoren's basement. Photo credits P. Cushman

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Once a dorm, always a dorm — with a little education in between.

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59


There and Back: Not Quite a Holiday

T . La m a n

Despite the many changes that have taken place on campus this year, the English d e p a r t m e n t has managed to remain relatively untouched by all the reconstruction. However, due to retirement and leaves, some familiar faces were absent and some new faces became familiar. One of the familiar faces missing this year was that of Henry ten Hoor, who retired after 33 years of teaching. As a result, '67 Hope graduate, John Cox, left the University of Victoria and assumed the position of resident Shakespearian, and Stephen Hemenway moved to a new office with a better view. In addition to Shakespeare, Cox taught freshmen English and world literature, and was said to be quite happy to be back at Hope. One other newcomer to the department was Myra Jordan who replaced Greta Hutchins as the department's secretary. Jordan, who worked for the art department for several years, managed to keep the department running smoothly. Leaves also took their toll on English personnel. Peter Schakel, usually teaching 18th century literature and C. S. Lewis, was away for the entire year after being awarded a grant allowing him to attend a seminar on Eighteenth Century and Romantic Literature at the University of Virgina. William Reynolds, Language scholar and Chaucer specialist, left for Cambridge, England second semester to re-acquaint himself with country whose literature he teaches, as well as do more research on an old passion, detective stories. One new course was offered as a "once in a lifetime offer," called American nobel prize winners. Nancy Taylor taught the class as a discussion-oriented class covering authors from Sinclair Lewis to Saul Bellow. Building was the focus of attention this year and the English department gave its fair share to the process by paying attention to the people side of the story.

After 13 years, John Cox is home again at Hope. A. R a d t k e

M y r a Jordan, the lady who keeps the English department humming.


English Literature students Sonja Olsen and David Heusinkveld give characters from Jane Austen's Northanger Abbey a slightly different interpretation.

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J. Hazekamp

Students Kathy Bast, Bernard Volk and Brion Brooks take down the important notes of the day.

J. Hazekamp

Stacy Burris and Diana Beyer continue their discussion of American Nobel Prize winners with Nancy Taylor.

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Getting Better All the Time

p Paarlberg Karen Hilal tries out the new language lab.

P. Paarlberg German professor, Sander D e H a a n , returns papers to his G e r m a n Literature in Translation class.

While a great many changes have taken place on Hope's campus over the past semester the department of Foreign languages has quietly been going through a renaissance of its own. The department has completely remodeled its laboratory facilities, made changes in curriculum, and added new faculty members, resulting in a language department that is better than ever. Remember when you dreaded going to the language lab because of earphones that either gave you a headache or wouldn't stay put? Not to mention the monotony of staring at a dot-covered cubicle adorned with graffiti written in a language you couldn't read. This year, because of the language lab's complete remodeling, students no longer had to suffer. The console cubicles, once arranged in rows running the length of the room, are now arranged in tiers. The cubicles now have windows which afford a better view, as well as the most modern audio equipment. The learning resource center, adjoining the lab, also received a new outfitting in visual as well as audio equipment, allowing professors and students an alternative to the regular classroom setting. This year, for the first time, beginning Spanish classes were offered in the Intensive method as well as the traditional audio-lingual method. The Intensive method, initiated by the French department in the spring of '78, allows students to attend a master drill taught by upper-level language students. Both classes meet every day, which gives students a real opportunity to learn their language. The Spanish intensive method employs a computer program designed by professor Hubert Weller, to provide students with additional grammar drills. The German and Greek departments, in conjunction with the department of interdisciplinary studies, began courses which combine language study with extensive culture study. The German course, "Two Souls of Germany," is taught by William Dornemann and the Greek course, "The Golden Age of Greece," by Ruth Todd. Also new this semester, were seminars in upper level courses which added a new dimension to literature studies. With the exception of the French department, every department added new faculty members. Ruth Todd returned to the Classics faculty, and also became chairman of the foreign language department. Sander DeHaan joined the German department in the fall, and William Dornemann in the spring of 79 to replace Alan Bedell, who left after the fall semester. Ion Agheana became the newest member of the Spanish department. The 1979-80 academic year has been one of growth and development for the language department, bringing new ideas and new enthusiasm for the years ahead.


T. La m e n

Ruth T o d d lectures while a student takes notes about the Golden Age of Greece.

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Craig Schumann takes advantage of the learning resource center for studying.

P, P a a r l b e r g

William Dornemann passes from a busy schedule to talk with students.

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Spanish professor. Ion Agheana, instructs Spanish I I students.

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63


Rocks in the Head Is Money in the Pocket

P. Paarlbcrg

Listening intently are geology students M i k e Visscher, T i m Shepard and Michele Mainwaring. T. La men

Professor Farlow gives Brian D e Roos a few pointers during an Historical Geology lab.

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Professor Tharin instructs students in Environmental Geology.

Trying to make a good impression are, left to right; Heide Burke, M a r c VanderMeulen, Deanna Palladino, Jim Vandenberg, and John Webster.

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"Geology? G o o d luck, pal." In the u n d e r g r a d u a t e years of Professor of G e o l o g y Robert R e i n k i n g , d o u b t f u l sentiments such as this abounded in the academic c o m m u n i t y ; geology majors w e r e seen as p o o r p i o n e e r s exploring an u n p r o m i s i n g field. But things change, and in the last few years, geologists have had the last laugh. O n c e the oil crunch began t o surface, the market for geologists began to bubble, and in the past six or seven years the market burst. The oil and resource crisis triggered a period of f r a n t i c c o m p e t i t i o n b e t w e e n o i l companies to hire geologists. Salaries for beginning geologists (particularly those w i t h a master's degree) became extremely high in the oil industry, and •this created a shortage of geologists e l s e w h e r e — i n c l u d i n g H o p e . Since the oil companies have scooped up so m a n y g e o l o g i s t s , H o p e has n o t yet been able to fill the vacancy in its geology department. In fact, the geology d e p a r t m e n t ' s m a i n o b j e c t i v e for the a c a d e m i c year ' 7 9 - ' 8 0 was t o stay ahead of things since the departure of Timothy Hoist. This j o b was accomplished t h r o u g h the efforts of Reinking, Cotter Tharin, and Jim Farlow — the t h r e e l o n e professors of Hope's geology department. Through a grant from the National Science F o u n d a t i o n , and u n d e r t h e

o b s e r v a t i o n of the a f o r e - m e n t i o n e d f a c u l t y , t h i s year's g e o l o g y students p a r t i c i p a t e d in a variety of research projects. Some of these dealt w i t h the p r o b l e m of c h e m i c a l seepage f r o m c o m m u n i t y land-fills, more efficient m e t h o d s of s h o r e l i n e m a n a g e m e n t , the d r a w i n g - u p of resource maps for the state, and the possibility of dinosaurs as w a r m - b l o o d e d creatures. The annual spring trip brought this year's avid geology student to central Texas on a dinosaur-hunting project. This May f o u n d Hope's geology students basking in the tropical sun of the Virgin Islands. A n d of course, here in the states, the geology enthusiast once more ascended the snow-covered peak of M t . Harvard (over 14,000 feet above sea level) in Colorado, w h i l e the more serious geology major t o o k advantage of the six-week C o l o r a d o field course to learn important techniques used by experienced geologists on the job. Though c o m p e t i t i o n in the department is always high, the many field trips and research projects help bring the students together t o form a fairly close-knit group of people. After all, w h y should they worry? Sooner or later some anxious oil company representative is b o u n d to pull t hem aside and say, " W e ' l l start you at $20,000 a year kid. What d o you say?" — K. B o w m a n


Old? . . . Maybe â&#x20AC;&#x201D; in the Past?

J. DeNeef

U.S. History professor Earl Curry looks quite at home in front of a map of Europe.

The first year under the newly revised c o r e c u r r i c u l u m provided a learning e x p e r i e n c e for history professors as well as i n c o m i n g freshmen. U n d e r t h e n e w c o r e o n l y A n c i e n t a n d M o d e r n E u r o p e a n history fulfill the Cultural History requirement. Consequently, many of the history professors were t e a c h i n g classes outside of their area of expertise. Not only U.S. history specialists w e r e required to try s o m e t h i n g new, but s o m e m o d e r n E u r o p e a n h i s t o r i a n s were telling the first part of the story. However, a c c o r d i n g to Larry Penrose, Professor of Modern History, the venture proved enjoyable and after a little practice the r o u g h spots ironed themselves out. T w o U.S. History professors, William C o h e n and David Clark, received grants from the National E n d o w m e n t for the Humanities allowing them to d o research d u r i n g the fall semester of the 1980-81 s c h o o l year. C o h e n will be w o r k ing on a book dealing with labor p r o b l e m s in the South f o l l o w i n g the Civil War. Clark's research will take him to Pullman, Illinois w h e r e he'll be studying the Pullman Railroad Company. Michael Petrovich, Professor of A n c i e n t History, will be resuming his t e a c h i n g duties in the fall after a year long sabbatical. Petrovich has b e e n in Y u g o s l a v i a a n d P a r i s w o r k i n g o n a book about 17th century Dubrovnik, a Y u g o -

slavian seaport o n c e k n o w n as a thriving t r a d e center. Professor of A n c i e n t History Albert Bell, w h o serves d o u b l e duty as a m e m b e r of the Classics department, presented t w o papers at c o n f e r e n c e s d u r i n g t h e f a l l s e m e s t e r . O n e of t h e papers, w h i c h will be published, c o n c e r n e d an a n o n y m o u s f o u r t h - c e n t u r y Christian writer w h o r e c o r d e d the Jewish w a r s of the time and w r o t e anti-Semitic p r o p a g a n d a . T h e other paper dealt with a 15th c e n t u r y Italian m a n u s c r i p t w h i c h belongs to Hope. T h e manuscript, w h i c h is written in Latin, was b r o u g h t to the c o l l e g e by a Hope g r a d u a t e w h o was stationed in Italy during W o r l d War II. T h e m a n u s c r i p t gives a certain m e r c h a n t exclusive rights to the a l m o n d t r a d e in southeastern Italy, and is s i g n e d by Q u e e n Joanna. Bell said that the m a n u s c r i p t is of little h i s t o r i c v a l u e , b u t of p a l e o g r a p h i c i n t e r e s t . Because the scribe w h o c o p i e d the m a n u s c r i p t signed it, it may be possible to trace him t o a particular teacher and a particular s c h o o l of scribes. The history d e p a r t m e n t has dispelled the d u s t - c o v e r e d aura that is so often a s s o c i a t e d with history. T h e active research and new discoveries help to illustrate what historians have been saying all along: " H i s t o r y is alive." A. Radtke


Not in a Million Years k.

T N i

A h J DeNeef

D Wang

Stephanie Klahr stops for a moment after Ancient History for a word with Professor Albert Bell

Professor of Modern History, Larry Penrose seems none the worse for wear after a semester of teaching Ancient History.

HISTORY THE NAVY NEEDS YOU!1 DONIt READ AMERICAN HISTO

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Research will take U.S. History professor William Cohen to the South for the fall semester.

P. Paarlberg

Whether or not "the Navy needs you," this poster outside the history department expresses an ongoing sentiment. 67

VI


D e v e l o p e d this y e a r , a f t e r t w o y e a r s o f p r e v i o u s w o r k i n g o u t , t h e IDS p r o g r a m a d d e d a new a l t e r n a t i v e t o t h e usual l a n g u a g e s e q u e n c e . Instead of the nine-hour p r o g r a m where a student took language, and h i s t o r y o r l i t e r a t u r e , t h e n e w IDS p r o g r a m was d e s i g n e d t o i n c l u d e h i s t o r y , culture, language, literature, and phil o s o p h y o f e i t h e r G e r m a n o r G r e e k in a t w o s e m e s t e r b l o c k . The class m e t e v e r y d a y f o r t w o hours m a k i n g t h e c o u r s e a t o t a l o f I 8 hours f o r t h e y e a r . T h e e v e r y d a y m e e t i n g was a p r o b lem f o r s o m e s t u d e n t s a n d a c h a l l e n g e f o r b o t h p r o f e s s o r s a n d s t u d e n t s as they were forced to prepare every day f o r t h e u p c o m i n g lesson. The w o r k l o a d was e q u i v a l e n t t o t h r e e courses since t h e c o u r s e was* 9 c r e d i t hours. H o w ever, a f t e r a year's trial, the G r e e k class, t a u g h t b y J a c o b N y e n h u i s , J o h n W i l s o n , A r t h u r J e n t z a n d Ruth T o d d ,

g a v e t h e c o u r s e a h i g h r a t i n g , 73 p e r c e n t a g r e e i n g t h a t t h e course was e x c e l l e n t , a n d 22 p e r c e n t f e e l i n g i t was good. T h e p r o g r a m as a w h o l e w a s designed to demonstrate that the h u m a n i t i e s a r e a u n i t y , a n d t h a t lang u a g e is an i n t e g r a l p a r t o f t h e u n d e r standing of another culture. Rather than learning about the culture t h r o u g h s e p a r a t e s t u d i e s o f a r t , language, history, philosophy, and literat u r e , this c o u r s e e n a b l e d t h e s t u d e n t t o l e a r n a b o u t t h e c u l t u r e in a c o m p r e h e n s i v e , i n t e n s i f i e d p r o g r a m o f language, culture, and literature. " I t h i n k t h a t i t is a s p l e n d i d p r o g r a m . It was an i n t e l l e c t u a l l y s t i m u l a t i n g e x p e r i e n c e t o p a r t i c i p a t e In t h e p l a n n i n g f o r t h e c o u r s e a n d t o be a p a r t o f the t e a c h i n g team,1' said Nyenhuis.

68

Team Teaching Produces Kevin C o m b e s t p r e p a r e s f o r t o m o r r o w ' s d r i l l .

A b o v e : Listening t o Dean Nyenhuis's l e c t u r e is M a r k D e p u e . Left: Explaining the f i n e p o i n t s o f t h e book is J a c o b Nyenhuis.


Three Classes Under One Title W i t h enthusiastic help f r o m assistant t e a c h e r M a r y Muyslcens, Rod Beckerink, D e b H a r v e y , J i m Eickoff a n d Paul Stevens learn f i r s t y e a r G e r m a n .

A b o v e : Rod Beckerink, J i m Eickoff, a n d D e b H a r v e y work in the l a n g u a g e lab. R i g h t : Bill D o r n e m a n hands back yesterday's assignment. (Photo credits P. Padrlberg.)

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O n e can g e t the t o t a l picture of the culture and a deeper understanding of t h e i n t e r r e l a t e d n e s s o f t h e v a r i o u s disc i p l i n e s r e p r e s e n t e d in t h e c o u r s e . The only c h a n g e s N y e n h u i s c o u l d f o r e s e e , w e r e a s t r o n g e r e m p h a s i s in h i s t o r y in t h e b e g i n n i n g o f t h e c o u r s e , a n d a l o w e r i n g o f c r e d i t s in t h e s e c o n d s e m e s t e r d u e t o t h e c h a n g e in c o r e reguirements. Willi am Dorneman, professor of G e r m a n , a n d w h o also h e a d e d u p t h e p r o g r a m , e x p r e s s e d t h e c h a n g e in c r e d i t h o u r s a l s o , as t h e G e r m a n s e q u e n c e c h a n g e d t o a 16 c r e d i t - h o u r c o u r s e r a t h e r t h a n 18. T a u g h t by M e r o l d W e s t p h a l , professor o f p h i l o s o p h y , Paul F r i e d , p r o f e s s o r of history, J o h n W i l s o n , professor o f a r t , a n d D o r n e m a n : t h e G e r m a n class c o n c e n t r a t e d on T h e G o l d e n A g e a n d the Enlightenment. The students w h o finished the p r o g r a m r e c o m m e n d e d it

t o i n c o m i n g f r e s h m e n , b u t also c a u t i o n e d a b o u t the heavy work load. The t e a c h i n g c o n c e p t i n c o r p o r a t e d all o f t h e p r o f e s s o r s , e n a b l i n g all o f t h e m t o a t t e n d t h e classes e v e n if t h e y weren't teaching. Dorneman emphasized this as a b i g plus'' t o t h e p r o g r a m as i t b r o u g h t s t u d e n t s a n d p r o fessors closer t o g e t h e r a n d a l l o w e d f o r c l e a r c o m m u n i c a t i o n b e t w e e n all p a r ticipants. A n exciting extension of the G e r m a n p r o g r a m was t h e M a y t e r n 2 9 5 b e t t e r k n o w n as a t r i p t o G e r m a n y . P a r t i a l l y funded through a grant from the G e r m a n A c a d e m i c E x c h a n g e S e r v i c e , students were able t o travel on a r e d u c e d rate. A c c o r d i n g to Dorneman students w e r e a b l e t o see f o r t h e m s e l v e s t h e interconnections of philosophy, art, culture, language and history. A n a g r e e d success a n d a c h a l l e n g i n g p r o g r a m f o r professors and students a l i k e : t h e new IDS p r o g r a m looks t o b e one t h a t will stay on t h e s t u d e n t course list f o r y e a r s t o c o m e . 69


P Paarlberg

Professor of Mathematics John Vanlwaarden teaches 'sines" of the times.

P Paarlberg

M i k e W a l t e r s puts in some extra t i m e in Physics M a t h .

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M a t h students immerse themselves in Calculus II.

Milestone cover designer Jamie McElheny prints another sample cover using computer graphics.


I

Math Adds to "Sum" of Its Parts Ten years ago, the Hope college M a t h department taught math. Since then, the field of mathematics has grown, and g r o w i n g right along w i t h it is the Math department of Hope college. This year, in response to student needs, Hope's mathematicians taught not only math, but h o w to make use of it. The old stereotype of mathematics as n o t h i n g but t h i n k i n g and f i g u r i n g is fast d i s a p p e a r i n g . Now-a-days there is a greater demand for mathematics in the w o r l d of science and industry, government and in business. As a result, more math majors are d o u b l i n g up w i t h majors in business, economics, biology, chemistry, and c o m p u t e r science. W i t h more students going into fields other than teaching, Hope's M a t h department saw the need for more emphasis on applied mathematics. Thus, several courses w e r e a l t e r e d to i n c l u d e instruction in math applications as well as problem solving. Also featured this year were courses in Applications of Linear Algebra and Statistics for science majors.

Hope's Math department also realizes that in order to go anywhere w i t h a degree in math these days, one must have some computer k n o w - h o w . Besides e n c o u r a g i n g s t u d e n t s to take courses from the Computer Science department, the Math d e p a r t m e n t p u r c h a s e d ( w i t h aid f r o m t h e National Science Foundation) ten Radio Shack TSR80 computers w i t h black and w h i t e video output. These computers were installed in the basement of Van-Zoeren for the use of majors and non-majors alike. Throughout the semester, these instruments were used as teaching tools for the general math courses, as well as for student projects in the upper-level major classes. Although research is being done w i t h computer art, graph theory, microcomputers and Egyptian fractions, the main emphasis of the Math department is on teaching. For the academic year 197980, this meant more instruction in the are< of applied mathematics w i t h the hope of incorporating regular applied courses into the math curriculum in the years to come. K. B o w m a n

P Paarlberg

D e p a r t m e n t c h a i r m a n Eliot Tanis a n d P o w e l l Q u i r i n g e x p e r i m e n t w i t h c o m p u t e r g r a p h i cs

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"Come one, come all," might have been the slogan for the music department this year. Offering a wide variety of programs for non-music majors asf well as music majors, this department ranked third in enrollment during the fall semester (topped only by English and P.E.). Attendance at student, faculty, and guest recitals was also on the rise due to the new requirement which states that all students studying applied music must attend at least three student recitals a semester. Due to lack of attendance in the past, the department issued this requirement hot only in the hopes of increasing attendance but also as an effort to create a heightened sense of community. Among the guest performers this year were the beautiful and mysterious Zehava Gal, a mezzo soprano from Israel, and Robert Routch, a hornist. Both these musicians were sponsored by the Young Concert Artists Series and each conducted a workshop for music students following their performances. Other events sponsored by the music department included a concert by the Zurich Chamber Orchestra, and one by the University of Michigan Japanese Ensemble, and a lecture/demonstration entitled "Ancient Greek Music and Musical Instruments" by Professor Douglas Feaver of Lehigh University. The opera workshop, which was revived for the first time in ten years last spring and which proved to be a great success, was conducted again this spring. The operatic scenarios, this year, included scenes from Mozart's "The Magic Flute" and "The Marriage of Figaro," Menotti's "Old Maid and the Thief" and "The Medium," Puccini's "Gianni Schicchi," Rossini's "Barber of Seville" and ended with the glorious finale to Mascagni's "Cavalliera Rusticana," the "Regina Coeli."

On the j o b is Dorothy Pearson, the new music librarian.

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Drummer. T o m Vandenberg and homists, Jan Siems and L y n n Simmerman lead the D u t c h m a n N e t t e r s o n t o victory at the Hope-Kalamazoo game.

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Concentration is the name of the game for Sue Weener as she performs before an attentive audience.

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Collegium Musicum, Hope's madrigal group, rehearse with director Stuart Sharp (at piano). Left to right: Harvey Koedyker, M a r k DePud. John Gumpper. Bill Spagnuolo, Lena Daniels, K a t n n a Picha, Betty Peterson, Beth Botsis. Nancy MacArthur, N o r a Lee Tanis. Diane Smith, Sandy Brown, Jodi Talmadge.

Sue Edgecomb practices in the quiet of the piano lab. Photo credits P. Cushman

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The Philosophy of Change .


Logically â&#x20AC;&#x201D; There Should Be A Good Home For This Department

D i v i d e d by t h e p i n e grove, the p h i l o s o p h y department resides in the Chapel and in Lubbers Hall but does not claim either one as their home. Drs. Arthur Jentz and D. Ivan Dykstra have their offices in the Chapel, w h i l e Dr. M e r o l d Westphal, Chairman of the department, labors in Lubbers. There may be a possibility of the departm e n t m o v i n g i n t o C a r n e g i e so t h e y c a n be reunited and w o r k more closely. Even t h o u g h m o v i n g appears to be a distance away, the philosophy department has high goals and expectations. The department brought three guest speakers to campus f u n d e d by grants this year. Topics of discussion w e r e philosophy of physical sciences by Wesley Salmon, philosophy of biological sciences by W i l l i a m Wilmsatt, and philosophy of legal professions by John Smith. The first t w o lectures had a g o o d turn-out but unfortunately the last lecture by Smith lacked participants. Perhaps the biggest hallmark was the closing of Dykstra's last year as a professor at Hope. As stated by Westphal " a l t h o u g h Dykstra w i l l have successors, he w i l l never be replaced." His successor, starting next year, w i l l be Dr. Nick Paravitch f r o m University of Chicago. S. A r w e

P Paarlberg

Dr. Merold Westphal, Chairman of the department.

P Paarlberg

Senior, philosophy-theater major, Michelle Martin decides if she really wants her photo taken. ,

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Reasoning out his luck. Dr. )entz consents to a snapshot. 75


Skiing in Colorado? If you are a f r e s h m a n or even an u p p e r c l a s s m a n , l o o k i n g through this year's s c h e d u l e and f o u n d skiing in Colorado in the physical e d u c a t i o n department, you might have b e e n surprised. What is skiing in Colorado d o i n g in the physical education department? With the o p e n i n g of t h e D o w P h y s i c a l E d u c a t i o n Center last year and t h e c r e a t i o n of t h e H e a l t h Dynamics p r o g r a m , the physical e d u c a t i o n d e p a r t m e n t has made a strong c o m m i t m e n t to the entire c a m p u s to provide a w i d e range of activities, i n c l u d i n g skiing, w h i c h will benefit everybody. H e a d i n g the drive to involve the entire c a m p u s is the Health D y n a m i c s p r o g r a m , an integ r a t e d c o m b i n a t i o n of c l a s s room experience and physical activity. N o w in its s e c o n d year, the p r o g r a m is u n d e r g o i n g many c h a n g e s in o r d e r to better serve the c a m p u s . Currently t h e program is c e n t e r e d in the physical education department where both the c l a s s r o o m e x p e r i e n c e and the physical activities are easily a c c o m m o d a t e d . T h e p r o g r a m is b a s e d o n a holistic view of health w h i c h singles out four variables that c a n be a f f e c t e d : p h y s i c a l a c t i v i t y , nutrition, s u b s t a n c e use, and stress m a n a g e m e n t . P r e s e n t l y , Health D y n a m i c s has a d i r e c t effect on t h e first three. This will c h a n g e next year w h e n a new c o u r s e e n t i t l e d Jogging and Stress Management w i l l be offered, w h i c h will give the program a direct effect on the variables a f f e c t i n g health w h i c h c a n be c o n t r o l l e d . T h e effort d o e s not stop here t h o u g h . While plans are not final yet, e x t e n s i v e c h a n g e s are being discussed which would give the p r o g r a m a much broader impact on campus. A c c o r d i n g to William Vanderbilt, professor of physical e d u c a t i o n a n d c h a i r m a n of t h e d e p a r t ment, the p r o g r a m is limited by

being solely based in the physical e d u c a t i o n d e p a r t m e n t . Plans are b e i n g d i s c u s s e d w h i c h would integrate the Health D y n a m i c s p r o g r a m on a c a m p u s w i d e basis. T h e physical e d u c a t i o n d e p a r t m e n t w o u l d still be res pons i bl e for the area of physical activity, but nutrition, subs t a n c e use, and stress m a n a g e m e n t w o u l d b e h a n d l e d by d e p a r t m e n t s s u c h as t h e psychology department, and the H e a l t h C l i n i c . T h e g o a l is t o

J Hazekamp

Alan Murray and Dave Wang ride the lift up at Vail.

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Joggers get in shape on Dow's track.

J. Hazekamp

Social,

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class learn a n e w dance.


D Wang

Ballet I limbers up at the bar.

S. Parker

Wilderness skills class learns to rapell.

involve the entire c a m p u s with health e d u c a t i o n and improvement. One of the newest activities in the d e p a r t m e n t is the s p r i n g ski trip to C o l o r a d o , started by Vanderbilt last year. In 1979, 25 stud e n t s a n d f a c u l t y t r a v e l e d to Winter Park, C o l o r a d o d u r i n g spring break for a week of skiing. This year, 36 students and faculty traveled by A m t r a k and stayed in c o n d o m i n i u m s at Vail. The r e s p o n s e to the p r o g r a m has been g o o d and plans are being made to i n c l u d e skiing as a p e r m a n e n t program. Another alternative physical e d u c a t i o n course, taught in the r e c r e a t i o n d e p a r t m e n t , is Wilderness Skills. During the semester, s t u d e n t s learn various skills that are used o u t d o o r s s u c h as

View from the bottom of the ski hill at Vail.

rope skills, orienteering, (using a map and compass), and various c a m p i n g skills. The culmination of the c o u r s e is a week long c a m p i n g trip d u r i n g break, d u r i n g w h i c h , students get a c h a n c e to use the skills they have learned. This year students traveled to Eagle Village, a c a m p set on 600 acres of w o o d e d land outside of Big Rapids, M i c h i g a n . While c a m p i n g there, students got their c h a n c e to use their rope skills s u c h as rapelling and knot tying and c a m p i n g skills. T h e climax of the w e e k was a t w o day solo trip m o d e l e d on the Outward Bound Experience taken by e a c h student. Students were each given a map and c o m p a s s along with their f o o d and equipment. For t w o days, the students f o l l o w e d a c o u r s e d r a w n out by their instructor using only the map and c o m p a s s . The goal of the e x p e r i e n c e was to instill a f e e l i n g of c o n f i d e n c e a n d a c c o m p l i s h m e n t by f o r c i n g the students to rely on themselves in a wilderness setting. The ski trip and the Wilderness Skills c o u r s e are only but two of the many courses offered, but they reflect the goal of the department, to provide a coordinated program that serves all of the campus. D. Mulvaney

J Hazekamp

Two fencers square off as Joe Welch looks on.


Intersecting the Vectors — Physics Department I think the Department has become much more demanding in what we ask of students. People entering graduate school must know certain things when they get there, and know them well. If they don't, they get shot down, and we've failed. (Bryant Hichwa, professor of physics.)

The road to g r a d u a t e s c h o o l in physics is t h e sum of t w o vectors. First, majors s h o u l d c o m plete every course the d e p a r t m e n t offers, courses d e a l i n g w i t h Nature's most f u n d a m e n tal i n t e r a c t i o n s suc-h as m e c h a n i c s , e l e c t r i c i t y a n d m a g n e t i s m , a n d q u a n t u m p h y s i c s . Seco n d l y , t h e d e p a r t m e n t takes students o u t of b o o k s and i n t o t h e real w o r l d t h r o u g h u t i l i z a t i o n o f its 2.5 m i l l i o n e l e c t r o n - v o l t V a n d e Graff accelerator, a m a c h i n e w h i c h fires a beam of n u c l e o n s i n t o a t h i n metal target," i n d u c i n g nuclear reactions w h i c h are subseq u e n t l y d e t e c t e d and analyzed. " W i t h t h e Van de G r a f f , " states James T o e v s , p r o f e s s o r o f physics, " w e p r o v i d e i n v a l u a b l e e x p e r i e n c e for o u r students. T h e y learn a b o u t v a c u u m systems, r a d i a t i o n d e t e c t i o n , e l e c t r o n i c s — a n d all t h e p r o b l e m s associated w i t h t h e m . It's an excellent t r a i n i n g t o o l . " Does this c o m b i n a t i o n of class a n d lab w o r k a d e q u a t e l y prepare t h e student for p o s t - g r a d u a t e study? " I k e e p in fairly g o o d c o n t a c t w i t h o u r graduates. T h e y seem to be d o i n g p r e t t y w e l l , " says H i c h w a . N o t a l l p h y s i c s m a j o r s are g r a d - s c h o o l

Robert N o r t o n , p r o f e s s o r o f physics, takes a break f r o m class t o c a t c h - u p o n o f f i c e w o r k .

b o u n d , h o w e v e r . M a n y gear t h e m s e l v e s t o w a r d s b e g i n n i n g i n d u s t r i a l careers i m m e d i ately after g r a d u a t i o n a n d . t h e D e p a r t m e n t must therefore meet their requirements for m o r e a p p l i c a b l e courses. It was for these students that the n e w e n g i n e e r i n g science c u r r i c u l u m , u n d e r t h e d i r e c t i o n of Dr. Robert N o r t o n , was set up. As he describes it, " T h e i n i t i a l goal of t h e n e w courses was to better prepare our p e o p l e for e n t r y i n t o e n g i n e e r i n g schools o n 3-2 programs, but I t h i n k there is s o m e t h i n g m u c h m o r e i m p o r t a n t . M a n y of today's p r o b lems are s o c i o - p o l i t i c a l in n a t u r e : p o l l u t i o n and safety for example. A n e n g i n e e r today m u s t d e a l w i t h t h e h u m a n p r o b l e m in t h e a p p l i c a t i o n of t e c h n o l o g y , a n d I feel a liberal arts b a c k g r o u n d gives o n e a s u p e r i o r a p t i t u d e for d e a l i n g w i t h t h e s e . " It is t o o early t o tell if the n e w p r o g r a m is a c c o m p l i s h i n g its o b j e c tives — b u t each year m o r e physics students are e m p l o y e d w i t h various e x p e r i m e n t a l projects. The biggest w i l l be r u n n i n g the PIXE ( P r o t o n - I n d u c e d X-ray Emission) line, a very accurate t e c h n i q u e for d e t e r m i n i n g t h e c o m -


p o s i t i o n of a g i v e n sample. A n idea of PIXE's versatility is s h o w n by t h e various projects students are r u n n i n g . This s u m m e r for e x a m p l e . Bill Davros w i l l study f r e e z e - d r i e d b l o o d samples and Dai D e e Pun w i l l analyze the c o m p o s i t i o n of cosmetics. T h r o u g h c o n s u l t i n g w o r k for industry, the PIXE line w i l l also enable the accelerator lab to b e c o m e e c o n o m i c a l l y self-sufficient. A fair a m o u n t of t i m e w i l l also be spent o n the road, c o l l a b o r a t i n g w i t h scientists f r o m N o t r e D a m e , t h e U n i v e r s i t y of W i s c o n s i n , a n d Indiana U n i v e r s i t y . The f o c u s of this project w i l l be at N o t r e D a m e , w h e r e basic nuclear processes w i l l be s t u d i e d . Hope's role in the e x p e r i m e n t a l s e t - u p w i l l be the installation of the p o l a r i z e d i o n source a n d t h e b u i l d i n g of the n e u t r o n d e t e c t i o n system.

D r . )inn T o e v s a n d s e n i o r D o u g C o n g d o n w o r k o n PIXE c h a m b e r

But perhaps the most e x c i t i n g w o r k of all is that w h i c h Toevs w i l l be i n v o l v e d w i t h w h e n he takes a sabbatical leave next fall to t h e gove r n m e n t laboratories in Los A l a m o s , N e w M e x ico. " W h a t w e w i s h t o d o is m o n i t o r X-rays a n d n e u t r o n s f r o m plasma processes — i m p o r t a n t for f u s i o n research. M y r e s p o n s i b i l i t y w i l l be to d e v e l o p a very fast d e t e c t i o n system for these X-rays." Toevs means fast; the e n t i r e X-ray s p e c t r u m he must garner occurs in less t h a n a n a n o - s e c o n d ( 1 0 - 9 sec.). Light travels but a single f o o t in this t i m e span. T e a c h i n g a n d research — the t w o major facets of H o p e ' s physics d e p a r t m e n t — a d d e d to the d i m e n s i o n of h a n d s - o n e x p e r i e n c e gives a H o p e physics m a j o r a d e c i d e d edge in c o m p e t i t i o n w i t h those of o t h e r schools. — |. V a n A l s l c n

(Photo Credits P Paarlborg) Left: D r Peter l o l i v e t t e i n s t r u c t s class i n Q u a n t u m Physics.

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Politics Play Important Role

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P. Paarlberg

Renze Hoeksema explains a finer point of International Law and organization.

Local high school students acting as U . N . delegates listen to debate in the M o d e l U . N .

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W h e n walking t h r o u g h second floor Lubber's hall, one is apt to hear intense debating bordering on war, over the latest issues in the news and events in the world. While it may sound like the presidential candidates for the 1980 election squaring off, it really isn't. It is usually Jack Holmes and Renze Hoeksema airing their views to each other â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and their views are as diverse as the department. Diversity best describes what the political science d e p a r t m e n t is, a n d its goals. With the events of Afghanistan and Iran in the air, the political science department attempts to educate the students as well as the community this year. During the first semester, a group of five students organized a small issues seminar on Iran. Each student delivered a brief presentation on various aspects of the events in Iran. Students weren't the only ones. Renze Hoeksema spent several years in Iran working for the U.S. Foreign Service. Several times during the year he gave television viewers and newsp a p e r r e a d e r s his own insight on what was happening in Iran, drawing on his experience there. E m p h a s i z i n g e x p e r i e n c e and action, the department uses simulation games as a method of teaching. In courses such as Model U.N., Congress, Latin American Politics, and International Relations, students get to run and participate in mock sessions of the respective organizations. Students participating in the Model U.N., for example, organize and run a mock session of the U n i t e d Nations, using area high school students as delegates.


J. Hazekamp

James Zoeteway, Chairman of the department.

In the International Relations class, the students themselves represent various countries of the world, and are asked to respond to realistic situations in the world as the country they represent. All of these simulations give the student the o p p o r t u n i t y to see how these o r g a n i z a t i o n s actually run by doing, rather than reading about them.' O f f - c a m p u s p r o g r a m s are also stressed as an important aspect of political science education. Each spring, a g r o u p of h o n o r ' s s t u d e n t s travel to Washington D.C. to spend a semester working and studying in the nation's capital. Students participate in two, sixweek internships in various agencies and branches of government. This program is increasing in popularity every year, and thus, for the 1980-1981 semester there were well over 40 applicants for the nineteen possible spots. Other

p r o g r a m s t h a n W a s h i n g t o n include working in state offices or in local attorney's offices. Looking toward the future, the political science department worked on finalizing plans for a group of students to attend the 1980 Republican Presidential convention slated for Detroit. Students will get the opportunity to hear the candidates speak, and attend the convention itself. Courses in the future include more seminar courses such as the one on facism currently being taught by Robert Elder. Through classroom teaching and outside experience, the political science department attempted to educate its students to deal with the rapidly changing political situation in the world. D. Mulvaney

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Don Hones explains an aspect of the Iranian crisis as; Left to right: Chaplain V a n Heest, Doug Deuitch, Randy Coffill. and Charlie Ranson listen in. /

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It's Not Just for Rats Anymore

J. Hazekamp

D o u g Mulvaney works on the psychology department's mini-computer analyzing psychology data.

When the word psychology is mentioned around Hope, one invariably conjures up the image of white rats running mazes. Yes, Hope still has its rats, but it has much more than that. The field of psychology is constantly growing and moving ahead. It must keep growing and moving ahead to keep abreast of the many new developments in the field, such as bio-feedback and the use of computers. The psychology department makes use of two computers; the Sorcerer, a mini-computer, and the Sigma Six, Hope's main computer. Both computer systems are used extensively by psychology students to analyze data from experiments, and in some cases conduct the experiment itself. Also new for the department is bio-feedback research. Bio-feedback involves the monitoring of the body's involuntary functions such as pulse rate, skin temperature, and breathing rate. With the use of various monitoring devices, a person can consciously change the rate of some of his involuntary body functions. Professor James Motiff, who ran a two-part seminar first semester on stress management using bio-feedback, is doing extensive work in this area. Computers and bio-feedback are only part of the psychology department. Also offered are classroom, laboratory, and off-campus programs. Plans to revamp the experimental psychology program were finalized so that more professors would be involved in the teaching of the class. This was done so that students would have the opportunity to see how different branches of psychology view experimental

J. Hazekamp

One of the lab rats runs a maze.

PERCY J. Hazekamp

One of the many student-run experiments.


T. R e n n e r

Professor Jane Dickie looks on as Bob Synk types data into the Sigma Six terminal.

v

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* *

,

I) M u l v a n e y

Left to right: Chris Peterson and Ron Haight conduct an experiment in sensory deprivation.

psychology. A developmental psychologist for example, would stress the use of observation in experimental psychology, whereas a learning and memory psychologist would concentrate more on the use of written tests. More laboratory classes are also being considered in addition to the experimental psychology revamping. They would offer students more opportunities to conduct their own research. New o f f - c a m p u s programs are being considered. An internship at a psychiatric hospital is being planned. It would offer the student the o p p o r t u n i t y to work in a clinical psychology setting, working with the residents at the hospital. The objective of all these experiences is to give students the widest possible sampling of psychology courses and experiences ranging from computers to working with rats. D Mulvaney


A Religion Revision

P Paarlberg

Dr. Allen Verhey approaches the board ready to make his point.

A major consideration for the religion department this year was whether or not the 18-hour block religion major requirement should be revised. At the start of this year religion majors were required to take 18 hours of classes from within three of six major disciplines. But some professors felt this was too limiting and pushed for a revision of the requirement which would allow students to choose courses within any of the six areas. Allen Verhey, Assistant Professor of Religion, was the biggest advocate of this proposal. However, despite many heated debates and voting sessions the question was still undecided so the requirement remained as it was. One of the goals of the department this year was to hire an eighth person to teach Biblical study and world religions. A request for an addition to the faculty had been made, but to date no one has been hired. Other happenings within the department this year included a fall retreat for the faculty and the three student representatives and a dinner for them, at a later date, at VanRaalte Restaurant in Zeeland, the start of a department newsletter by the student reps., and a newly begun religion department faculty colloquium. The faculty colloquium began this spring in order to make members of the department more aware of their colleague's interests and ambitions in the area of religion outside the realm of teaching. The members of the faculty gathered three times during the year to hear and discuss Wayne Boulton's book on ethics, Dennis Voskuil's work on Schuller, and Allen Verhey's articles for the New International Standard Encyclopedia. Bruins felt these sessions were not only enjoyable but intellectually stimulating and hopes to continue the program next year. Among Hope's guest lecturers this year was a Danforth Lecturer, Dr. Bernhard W. Anderson, Professor of Old Testament Theology at Princeton Theological Seminary and current President of the Society of Biblical Literature. The author and editor of a dozen books as well as numerous articles, Anderson has most recently written The Eighth Century Prophets

P Paarlberg

"It's gonna be a great day!" thinks Don Hillebrands as he waits tor the start of class.

a n d The Living

Word of the Bible,

a n d his w e l l - k n o w n text-

book, Understanding the Old Testament has been a huge success in colleges and seminaries since its first publication in 1957. The title of Anderson's lecture was "The Old Testament Story and our Story." An IDS Senior Seminar was offered May term for those students interested in spending time in Scotland studying the effect of Protestant Christianity on education. The course was conducted by Boulton who had just returned from his sabbatical in Scotland where he spent time researching for his book. While the department welcomed the return of Boulton, they bid farewell to Sang Lee. Professor of Theology and a member of Hope's faculty for ten years, Lee accepted the position of Assistant Professor of Theology at Princeton Theological Seminary and will begin teaching there in the fall. M. Webb

84


P. Paarlberg

p

Paarlberg

Dr. Henry Voogd ponders a student's query.

"Whoever said Pauline Literature was boring?" â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Joel Russcher, Bryan Decker, and Judy Lanning seem to be enjoying themselves as they wave to the photographers.

P Paarlberg

Religion Department Student Representatives: Lynn Winkles, Carol Bechtel, and Joel ^/alters.

P Paarlberg

Dr. Wayne Boulton gets back into the swing of things.

85


P. Paarlberg

Don Luidens offers advice to a student.

Sociology Regains Popularity

P Paarlberg

Psych-Soc. major Laura Hoffman contemplates her notes.

The Sociology department is a relatively y o u n g d e p a r t m e n t . Its three faculty members, Ronald M u l d e r , D o n a l d Luidens, and James Piers, have c o m e to H o p e only in the past five years. This c o m p l e t e faculty turnover is the single greatest change in the d e p a r t m e n t . Changes pertaining t o course offerings and major requirements take longer, sometimes up t o ten years. Therefore, m o d i f i c a t i o n s such as raising or l o w e r i n g the level of a course, are made instead. Student interest in sociology as a major is rising. Since the Vietnam War ended, sociology has lost its previous popularity. Chairperson M u l d e r states, however, that the n u m b e r of students majoring in this field has been steadily increasing over the past three or four years. D o u b l e majors are especially evident. H o p e students are c o u p l i n g sociology w i t h psychology and economics, just to name t w o . M u l d e r feels that his department c o m p l e m e n t s other departments and students are taking this into consideration w h e n choosing a major. Piers feels that the three faculty members also c o m p l e m e n t each other well. They specialize in different disciplines â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the h e l p i n g professions as well as social research and analysis. They serve as an example and as a resource for students w h o are m a j o r i n g in sociology or c o n t e m p l a t i n g it. The faculty members are q u i t e c o m p a t i ble, according to all three, and there is a distinct sense of satisfact ion w i t h themselves and their department. K. )oy Nyenhuis


P Paarlberg

C h a i r p e r s o n Ron M u l d e r pauses in t h e m i d s t o f his social research.

y

P Paarlberg

Psych-Soc. m a j o r s Brenda H a f n e r a n d Karen N y e n h u i s discuss an i m p o r t a n t issue.

P Paarlberg

Jim Piers listens i n t e n t l y t o an advisee's d i l e m m a ,

87


i

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i

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jPik' 1*^..

John Tammi lectures zealously to interested students.

). DeNeef

Student Tim Custer bemoans the long hours necessary to complete theatre scenery. I. DeNeef

Prior to opening nights costume designer Patricia Blom thinks, talks, and dreams of costumes.

88


). DeNeef

Department chairman George Ralph encourages theatre students to express queries and insights.

Theatre Scenery is mobile C o n f i d e n t of t h e i r a m b i tions, the Theatre department wholeheartedly welcomed innovation and creativity. They began w i t h the r e - w o r k i n g of course offerings and the curriculum, and ended w i t h a return to former policy regarding m a i n s t a g e p r o d u c t i o n s . Rather than the four productions usually presented to the public, a different approach was t r i e d , e m p h a s i z i n g t h e training of the students versus the entertainment of the audience. Two mainstage productions were o p e n to all, and t w o others w e r e presented to a select audience. A l t h o u g h theatre students b e n e f i t t e d from this approach, the absence of income usually brought in by the t w o t e m p o r a r i l y a b a n doned public productions necessitated a return to the former arrangement. Newly offered courses also reflect the department's flexibility. "Play Analysis," i n t e n d e d for Theatre majors, e n c o u r a g e d s t u d e n t s t o read and analyze for performance. T w o o t h e r courses, " V o i c e " , and " M o v e m e n t " , have been integrated to become one full year course. Instead of d i v i d i n g t w o related subjects by topic and semester, the department

j. DeNeef

Stagecraft manager Todd Engles supervises students' attempts at stage design.

has i n t e r t w i n e d them, o f f e r i n g students an improved approach to the relationship of the t w o . Such i m p r o v e m e n t s a n d a d d i t i o n s are a r e f l e c t i o n of the Theatre department's eagerness to offer the best it c a n , a n d its w i l l i n g n e s s t o change w h e n necessary. K. Nyenhuis

89


Job Opening: A.B. or B.S.

Experience Required

Interning at Herman Miller, senior Mark Van M a t e r works in the M a r k e t P l a n n i n g and I n f o r m a t i o n d e p a r t m e n t . This involves research and study in sales forecasting, determining the strengtli of Herman Miller's competition and much more. Van Mater remarked that the internship made h i m " r e a l i z e the importance of communication skills necessary to being successful in the business field."

Senior Judy Cook works at coding and "de-bugging" programs at Squirt Pak.

90

If you asked yourself what the Chicago Board of Education, Herman Miller, and Representative John B. Anderson had in common, you might be hard pressed to come up with an answer.. Yet, they are common. Hope students have interned with each of these places for many years. Internships have become an integral part of Hope's academic program as the job market requires experience outside of the usual academic training. Basically, internship programs exist at two levels. One â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the programs abroad such as the Washington semester, the Philadelphia semester, the Chicago Urban semester, the Oak Ridge Science semester and the Louisville semester. Each of these programs entail living and working outside of Hope. The second level consists of the internships offered by the various departments at Hope such as the Computer Science and Business Administration departments. The Washington semester program attracts mainly those students interested in political science and business, however recent participants have included psychology, biology, and chemistry majors. The program in Washington consists of two, six-week internships in any of the different branches of the Federal government or public interest groups in Washington. In addition to the internships, students work on a major research paper and each student delivers a two-hour seminar discussing his paper. Current internships in Washington include working for the presidential campaigns of John Anderson and John Connally, and working at the wholistic Health Center in Washington. In Philadelphia, there is no one area emphasized. Students from many majors have options to pick from. Students work in one internship as well as take a seminar course taught by professors in Philadelphia. Internships in the past have ranged from writing for the Philadelphia Victorian Society to working with the emotionally disturbed. The Chicago Urban semester is very similar to the Philadelphia program in that students take one internship and take three academic classes through Trinity Christian College. Business and Communications students find Chicago particularly attractive with its many business opportunities and radio and television stations. Recent internships in Chicago have included working for the Chicago Board of Education media relations coordinator, writing press releases and assisting in the production of the Phil Donohue show for WCN Television. The Oak Ridge Science semester is aimed primarily at students in the natural, social and computer sciences as well as mathematics. Students work in collaboration with scientists at Oak Ridge as research assistants on a full-time basis. In addition to the internship, students also take two courses for academic credit. Louisville semester generally attracts psychology students. Students work at the Louisville General Hospital in the psychiatric wing and its related mental health services. Interns are usually paired with medical students on a one-to-


and Interns Have It! one basis and assist them in their rounds. Students get a chance to work directly with patients. In addition to their internship, students take a seminar course concentrating on psychiatric disorders. In addition to these major off-campus programs, several departments at Hope including the computer science, business and communication departments offer internships in the Holland-Zeeland area. Students work part-time in their internships and attend Hope. Current internships include programming computers Senior Vicki Millard works in Personnel at General Electric, and also writes copy for the company newspaper. Millard is a communications major and was also able to secure an internship with BASF during the summer of 7 9 , where she acted as the writer of the company handbook.

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â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

Senior Lynn Comstock works in Marketing Research at BASF Wyandotte Corporation, A business major at Hope, she has had the opportunity to be involved in marketing distribution studies such as the possibility of selling pigments to nail polish companies which BASF does not already do business with.

for Herman Miller and writing for General Electric. Students involved in the various intern programs all seem to agree that their experiences were well worth the time and effort. In addition to providing the student with the invaluable opportunity to put into practice their knowledge, they also give the student the chance to live and work in an environment divorced from the academic situation. It offers the student a rare perspective on life outside the bubble of Hope . . . â&#x20AC;&#x201D; D. Mulvanev

Senior communication major, Clark C r a m works at Herman Miller in the Marketing department. G r a m is primarilv involved in research studies. (Pholo credits J.Hazeknmp) 91


S. Arwe

Parisian view of the Eiffel Tower â&#x20AC;&#x201D; in the midst of the city.

D. W a n g

Nancy Torreson and Beth Latimer pose for a reminiscent picture of their semester in Vienna.

1

K. Stegenga

A countryside view of England

92


Students Abroad

Above and Below: Two views of Yugoslavia taken by senior Karl Stegenga during his fall semester visit.

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4

H o p e offers m a n y diverse a n d challenging inter-continental study programs. Yugoslavia, A u s t r i a , France, E n g l a n d , Spain, and India are just a f e w e x c i t i n g c h o i c e s . T h i s y e a r 16 s t u d e n t s traveled t o India, B e l g i u m , A f r i c a , France, A u s t r i a a n d Y u g o s l a v i a , each staying o n e semester. In most cases t h e s e students a c q u i r e d 15-16 c r e d i t hours. Q u i t e o f t e n classroom side trips to other countries were included. T h e r e are m a n y steps b e f o r e actually b o a r d i n g an a i r p l a n e and v e e r i n g t o w a r d one's n e w " U t o p i a . " First, o n e must s u b m i t an

application for acceptance for o f f - c a m p u s study. Next a very d e t a i l e d a p p l i c a t i o n m u s t be completed including recommendations, medical reports, t r a n s c r i p t s , a n d essays. A f t e r c o m p l e t i o n , a l o n g a n d anxious w a i t begins. This a p p l i c a t i o n r e v i e w n o r m a l l y takes t h r e e t o four weeks and ocasionally longer. The programs and schools in each country vary, some r e q u i r i n g m o r e f o r e i g n language skills t h a n others, j u n i o r Nancy Torreson, w h o w e n t t o V i e n n a d u r i n g t h e fall semester, said that t h e courses w e r e less c h a l l e n g i n g t h a n at H o p e , but w i t h the c o m b i n e d language and c u l t u r a l e x p e r i e n c e it was a very g o o d a n d diversif i e d s e m e s t e r . T h e classes in V i e n n a a n d Y u g o s l a v i a are taught in English but they also have intensive language i n s t r u c t i o n in t h e i r n a t i v e t o n g u e . The courses in Spain a n d F r a n c e , h o w e v e r , are t a u g h t solely in Spanish a n d French, a n d t h e r e f o r e r e q u i r e a m i n i m u m of t w o years of c o l lege language. " S e r b o - C r o a t i o n may not be u t i l i z e d in America," explained senior Karl S t e g e n g a , " b u t I l o v e d l e a r n i n g t h e language and in the f u t u r e I h o p e t o r e t u r n t o Yugoslavia to use i t . " All of the students interv i e w e d a g r e e d t h a t t h e y are m o r e m a t u r e and have g a i n e d a w i d e r , less-biased o u t l o o k t o w a r d other countries. They believe that they are n o w m o r e o p e n - m i n d e d and w i l l i n g to engage in m o r e c h a l l e n g i n g projects. Some advantages stated were travel liberties, personal f r e e d o m , e x c i t e m e n t of a n e w language, a n d the a c a d e m i c c h a n g e of pace. The disappointments expressed i n c l u d e d h i g h costs, registration confusion (abroad and o n their return) a n d t h e lack of preparatory material from H o p e , j u n i o r Beth Latimer e x p l a i n e d that " t h e h a n d b o o k was not d e t a i l e d e n o u g h a n d it should include more useful facts f o r b e t t e r c u l t u r a l s u b mersion." S. A r w e 93


Shuffling the Schedules or the Wonder of Registration â&#x20AC;&#x201D; an Interview With Dr. Jon Huisken Perhaps simply in an effort to keep students on their toes, there was a new schedule for all to adapt to during the spring of 1980. Chapel was moved from 8:00 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. on Monday, Wednesday and Friday, and a Tuesday community hour was added to match the Thursday at 11:00 a.m. schedule. The consequences were that MondayWednesday-Friday classes ended a half hour later, much to the chagrin of students with after class jobs, and that both Tuesday and Thursday classes began a half hour earlier, an apparent curse upon those students with a preference for sleeping in. Decisions involving the scheduling of academic matters evolve in the office of Jon Huisken, the Registrar at Hope. Invariably with his pipe in hand, Dr. Huisken maintains the role of both administrator and advisor, helping students determine on a semester by semester basis the course of their Hope college career. With the institution of the new schedule, the 1980 Milestone staff thought it an interesting time to tap Dr. Huisken for his views of his job and of Hope.

94

been a constant process. There is a continual in-house review going on in e v e r y d e p a r t m e n t , with a formal curriculum evaluation conducted every f e w years. It's i n t e r e s t i n g to n o t e t h a t departments initiate these r e v i e w s of t h e i r o w n v o l i t i o n . The formal review is merely an o p p o r t u n i t y to a c q u i r e s o m e objective f e e d b a c k f r o m inside and outside the college. This sort of process establishes continual refinements.

By solid I mean maintaining a firm foundation. H o p e certainly has that. You notice a distinct i v e n e s s in t h e d e f i n i t i o n s the institution p r o v i d e s c o n c e r n i n g its m i s s i o n . You n o t i c e clearly stated objectives. And you notice an orientation toward discipline.

Are you pleased with the current status of the core?

Yes, overall, I would say so. The foreign language program is an example, I think of better quality with a fewer n u m b e r of hours required. It could be argued that t h e c o r e c u r r i c u l u m c o u l d be r e d u c e d a n d still be e f f e c t i v e . However, there is the danger that if t h e c o r e r e q u i r e m e n t s w e r e reduced, the college could b e c o m e t o o v o c a t i o n a l l y oriented. Do you see the need for more changes in the curriculum?

There have been some notable changes in the core curriculum in the last year, particularly with the installation of the intensive foreign language program. What other changes are being made?

Only in the sense of these refinements which keep the programs contemporary. W e need to maintain our sensitivity to the needs of the students, for those needs can change. But, I don't anticipate any m a j o r overhauls. Radical changes are not characteristic of solid institutions.

Since I came to Hope in 1969, core revision at the college has

What is characteristic institution?

of a solid

Would you say that students' vocational orientation has increased in any way?

Yes, t h e r e h a s b e e n a m u c h h i g h e r i n c i d e n c e of i n c o m i n g freshmen having already decided on a m a j o r and a career. This is due certainly in part to the present state of the nation's economy. Inflation creates more parental pressure in the form of the statements, "If you are going to spend $20,000 of our money, you had better k n o w what you are going to do."


Registration brings many students into contact with the Registrar, as in April of 1980 when Dr. Huisken counselled freshman Kurt DeVette.

In what direction do you see the programs at Hope heading?

Certainly there will be continued strength in the sciences. Our business d e p a r t m e n t will r e m a i n strong, but I do think that the popularity of that discipline has peaked. We have very good humanities, and enrollments in those departments will remain at least steady, if they do not in fact increase.

Who is involved lum changes?

in the curricu-

The core in particular is a faculty concern. Our faculty is committed to retaining a strong liberal arts core curriculum and I do not anticipate that that will change. The motivation is not primarily esoteric, a l t h o u g h y o u c a n n o t deny that there are strong politics involved. There is a strong, genuine interest in updating the curriculum for the sake of the

s t u d e n t s a n d w h a t is good for them. Boards and committees of the College are the groups most primarily concerned with the curriculum. The Academic Affairs Board deals with this matter most often. Does student input play much of a role in such decisions? T h e r e is a p l a c e f o r s t u d e n t input, but that is not always utilized. The students' role depends a 101 on w h o is heading Student Congress. W e feel that maintaining the primacy of the faculty in such matters is a wise procedure, but t h e a d m i n i s t r a t i o n is certainly open to students' observations of the curriculum. Do you encounter much — if any — resistance to making changes in the curriculum? I would say that w h e n it comes

to changes, colleges can be the m o s t r e s i s t a n t i n s t i t u t i o n s on e a r t h . It is i n t e r e s t i n g — a n d often frustrating — to have intelligent, open-minded and politically l i b e r a l p e o p l e b e c a u s e , i r o n i c a l l y , w h e n it c o m e s to c h a n g i n g t h e i r w a y of d o i n g things, they dig in their heels and fight. If you want to work in acad e m e , y o u ' d best be a p a t i e n t person.

Academically, there are a lot of alternatives for students at Hope. Is there any area that you think students ought to take more advantage of?

Many students do not utilize the waiver program we have at Hope which allows students to test out of certain courses and requirements. The waiver system, while it is c a r e f u l l y overseen, allows students a great deal of flexibility in determining the course of their college career.

/

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D Wang

Bryant Hlchwa, professor of Physics, diligently works on Hope's accelerator.

Robert Cline Economics

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William Mayer Art

Delberl L. Michel Art

Jacob Nyenhuis Dean of Arts and Humanities

Eugene )ekel Chemistry

Sheldon Wettack Chemistry

Joseph MacDoniels Communication â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Chairman

Harold Bakker Education

Jim Bultman Education â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Chairman

Lamont Dirkse Education


Susan Mooy Education

Charles Huttar English

lames Prins English

Nancy Taylor English

Ion T. Agheana Foreign Language

Judith Vickers Eoreign Language

Sander DeHaan Foreign Language

Hubert Weller Foreign Language

Albert Bell Classics and History

David Clark History

m

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Robert Reinking Geology

|. Cotter Tharin Geology — Chairman

FACULTY 97


Behind the Scenes

Paul Fried IDSâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; History

Harry Boonstra Library Science â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Director

Diane Murray Library Science

Richard Burtt Library Science

lay Folkert Math

Frank Sherburne Math

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D. W a n g

English professor Kathy Verduin instructs her American Literature class on style of Ezra Pound.


D Wang

Robert Cline, professor of economics, demonstrates his favorite, and well known "supply and demand" curve.

Elliot Tanis Mathematics

Chairman

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Richard Vandervelde Mathematics

.f-

)ohn Vanlwaarden Mathematics

Charles Aschbrenner Music â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Chairman

Jantina Holleman Music

Terry Moore Music

D. Ivan Dykstra Philosophy

Arthur jentz Philosophy

J

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Anthony Kooiker Music


Sandy Parker Physical Education

William VanderBilt Physical Educationâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; Chairman

Richard Brockmeier Physics and Computer

Harry Frissel Physics

Robert Norton Physics

lames D. VanPutten )r. Physics â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Chairman

lack Holmes Political Science

Leslie Beach Psychology

Robert Brown Psychology

D. W a n g

Taking a break from a usually hectic schedule is Larry Penrose.

Jane Dickie Psychology


Thomas Ludwig Psychology

lames Motiff Psychology

David Myers Psychology

)ohn Shaughnessy Psychology

Phillip VanEyl Psychology â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Chairman

Elton Bruins Religion Chairman

^

I

^ Religion professor Dennis Voskuil discusses the rise of Christianity with his students

'i Sang Lee Religion

Henry Voogd Religion

Donald Luidens Sociology

lohn Tammi Theatre 101


A m i x t u r e of t r a d i t i o n a n d r e n o v a t i o n , many groups f o u n d themselves in the midst of a t ransition p e r i o d begun by their predecessors and left to c o n t i n u e through them. Black C o a l i t i o n was just o n e of these groups that for the first t i m e in many years was rea//K active, p l a n n i n g events that i n c l u d e d the e n t i r e student b o d y , a n d . c o n s e q u e n t l y b u i l d i n g themselves in r e p u t a t i o n as w e l l as n u m b e r . The Anchor also u n d e r w e n t a major face-lift. W i t h the a d d i t i o n of a lighttable, a n e w printer, and staff paste-up, the paper t o o k o n a n e w look and gave the staff greater r e s p o n s i b i l i t y and " m o r e f u n " .

GROUPS CROUPS GROUPS GROUPS GROUPS GROUPS GROUPS

J. DeNeef

D u e to p l e d g i n g problems, the Greeks spent some t i m e re-evaluating, r e - w r i t ing and r e - g o v e r n i n g their p l e d g i n g policies. The heated d e b a t e b e t w e e n the administrators and the Greeks o n l y gained m o m e n t u m d u r i n g the actual pledging p e r i o d , w h i l e very serious actives f o u n d it d i f f i c u l t t o impress the seriousness of the matter u p o n i n c o m i n g members. Still unsettled at the close of the year, p l e d g i n g events promise t o take a n e w d i r e c t i o n in the days ahead. W h a t was referred to as a " h o u s i n g crisis" also i n v o l v e d many of the Greeks as most c o u l d not " f i l l " their houses substantially e n o u g h to m a i n t a i n their fraternity house title. The changes w e r e m i n o r technically, but m a n y felt the loss of their house a great deal, and added to the p l e d g i n g p r o b l e m s , e n d e d their year in frustration. A starting p o i n t for next year's organizations, most groups got " t h e ball rolli n g " for the c o m i n g of September '80.

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Tom Singer and John Peachey work on plans for Homecoming during a SAC meeting

Mark Klein and Don MacDonald practice for Collegium Musicum.

P Paarlberc

P Cushman

Steve Goshorn, Anchor photographer, keeps up with the latest for (he paper.

1

S

P Paarlborg

Above: Knickerbockers, Steve Lightweis and Mark Watson prepare for another pledging event Opposite Page: Greg Geissow plays for concert band.

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In a d d i t i o n t o f o u r o n - c a m p u s p e r f o r m a n c e s t h i s y e a r , H o p e ' s orchestra was also h o n o r e d w i t h an i n v i t a t i o n t o t h e M i d w e s t e r n C o n f e r e n c e o n School V o c a l a n d I n s t r u m e n t a l M u s i c . H e l d in A n n A r b o r , M i c h i g a n , H o p e was c h o s e n by t h e M i c h i g a n School Band a n d O r c h e s t r a A s s o c i a t i o n as t h e o n l y college t o p a r t i c i p a t e in t h e c o n f e r e n c e . This is t h e t h i r d t i m e in ten years that H o p e ' s orchestra has e a r n e d this h o n o r . The i n v i t a t i o n was a special a c h i e v e m e n t t o t h e orchestra d u e t o t h e fact that 75 p e r c e n t of t h e s t u d e n t s w e r e not m u s i c majors. For these s t u d e n t s , orchestra p r o v i d e d not o n l y m u s i cal satisfaction and e n j o y m e n t , but also a c h a n c e t o meet p e o ple w h o share t h e same f e e l i n g for music but place t h e i r m a j o r emphasis o n o t h e r a c a d e m i c interests. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; K. Bowman

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Immersed in intense musical concentration is violist Nancy Ritchie.

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Rich Blake, Alice Ford, and Connie Coldzung give a low-reeding.

Front r o w , left to right: M a t t Fike, D e b W a r -

naar, Kathy Wedemeyer, Jeanne Brink, Anne Mulder, Nancy Ritchie, Fern Raima, Karyn Harrell. Second row, left to right: Nancy Kerle, Lauren Lambie, Jluia Huttar, George Wiszynski, Lisa Czanko, Linda Strouf, Donna Klein, Carol Vandenberg, Sue Ward, Nancy Tait, Benta Galland, Sarah Saddler, Vickie Wilson, Shannon MacBride, and Shou Ling Wu Third row, left to right: Sue Edgcomb, Ted Johnson, Tammy Nothdurft, Michelle Serrette, Kathy Olson, Betty Bice, Sandy Blodgett, Rich Blake, Barb Pell, Alice Ford, Connie Goldzung, Mary Soeter, Joan Oskam, and Paul Miedema Back row, left to right: Conductor Robert Ritsema, Peter Koeppe, Mike Schumaker, Laura Warnaar, Laura Press, Pam Wright, Mark Colsman, Linda Gnade, Mary Burton, Rod Matthews, Tim Lowe, Phil Rose, and Dirk Doorenbos. Not pictured are Erin Dunwiddie, Amy Glass, Kyle Chamberlain, Jane Vandenberg and Peggy Lubbers.

R Beck


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T w e n t y - e i g h t s t u d e n t s w e r e c h o s e n by a u d i t i o n f r o m t h e orchestra t o c o m p r i s e H o p e ' s 7 9 - ' 8 0 s y m p h o n e t t e . C o n d u c t e d by Robert Ritsema, H o p e ' s s y m p h o n e t t e met for t w o h o u r s each w e e k t o rehearse pieces s u i t e d for a small c h a m b e r orchestra, as w e l l as m u s i c w h i c h c o u l d be played for c h u r c h services w h i l e on tour. This year's s y m p h o n e t t e traveled t o Florida a n d t h e s o u t h e r n states for its t w e n t y - f i f t h anniversary t o u r . T h e s y m p h o n e t t e t o u r is an a n n u a l t r i p t a k e n d u r i n g s p r i n g v a c a t i o n . Besides p r o v i d i n g an o p p o r t u n i t y f o r g r o u p m e m b e r s t o see o t h e r parts o f t h e c o u n t r y , t o u r also serves as a p r o m o t i o n for H o p e . Every o t h e r year is spent t o u r i n g t h e eastern U n i t e d States, w h i l e t h e years in b e t w e e n have b e e n spent in places such as C a l i f o r n i a a n d England. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; K. Bowman

T. Renner

Front row, left to right: Matt Fike, Nancy Kerle, Deb Warnaar, Kathy Wedemeyer, Anne Mulder, Nancy Ritchie. Middle row: )ane Vandenberg, leanne Brink, )ulia Huttar, Sarah Saddler, Shou Ling Wu, Fern Palma, Karyn Harrell. Back row: Mary Burton, Laura Press, Brian Bauer, Ted lohnson. Rod Matthews, Lori Wolf, Sue Ward, Mike Elderidge, Nancy Tait, Sandy Blodgett, Betty Bice, Richard Blake, Barb Pell. Standing is Paul Miedema.

). DeNeef

Perfect form exhibited by conductor Robert Ritsema. 105


The Sounds of Hope So, y o u t h i n k y o u w o u l d like t o j o i n t h e b a n d , but aren't sure w h e t h e r they play the right k i n d of music for y o u . W e l l , set y o u r m i n d at ease because t h e m u s i c d e p a r t m e n t has s o l v e d y o u r p r o b l e m s . H o p e n o w has t h r e e bands w h i c h play d i f f e r e n t kinds of music. T r a d i t i o n a l l y , there have been three b a n d s : t h e C o n c e r t b a n d , )azz b a n d , and t h e W i n d Ensemble. T h e f u n c t i o n s of the C o n c e r t b a n d a n d W i n d Ensemble o v e r l a p p e d in that b o t h p e r f o r m e d in c o n c e r t s , but the C o n c e r t b a n d had the a d d e d r e s p o n s i b i l i t y of p l a y i n g at f o o t b a l l and basketball games. This year, h o w e v e r , t h e d e p a r t m e n t established a Pep b a n d t o play at sports events and i n f o r m a l occasions, a l l o w i n g t h e C o n cert b a n d t o be exclusively a c o n c e r t g r o u p . W i t h this c h a n g e of p r o g r a m , t h e W i n d Ensemble was d r o p p e d f r o m t h e schedule. The reason for the change was p r i n c i p a l l y t o a l l o w s t u d e n t s w h o o n l y w a n t e d t o p e r f o r m t h e m o r e classical k i n d of m u s i c w i t h o u t t h e o b l i g a t i o n of h a l f - t i m e . O f course, a s t u d e n t may play in any o n e or all t h r e e bands if he has n o p a r t i c u l a r p r e f e r e n c e . All t h r e e bands have b e e n busy this year, w i t h p e r f o r m a n c e s on and off c a m p u s . The C o n c e r t b a n d t o o k part in t h e M a r c h Eestival '80 w h i c h was s p o n sored by t h e H o l l a n d C o m m u n i t y C h o ral. T h e F e s t i v a l f e a t u r e d A m e r i c a n c o m p o s e r N o r m a n D e l l o Joio, w h o c o n d u c t e d his o w n w o r k as p e r f o r m e d by several c o m m u n i t y and H o p e groups. The Jazz b a n d gave a " b i g b a n d " atmosphere to Phelps d u r i n g d i n n e r on several occasions, as w e l l as g i v i n g perf o r m a n c e s in t h e Kletz. In a d d i t i o n t o h a l f - t i m e e n t e r t a i n m e n t at games, t h e Pep b a n d p e r f o r m e d d u r i n g S y b l i n g s W e e k e n d a n d p r o v i d e d live music for t h e SAC s p o n s o r e d E v e r y t h i n g - a - t h o n . The H o p e bands o f f e r a w i d e variety of musical e x p e r i e n c e s for p e r f o r m e r s a n d a u d i e n c e s , a d d i n g t h e extras that give H o p e a flavor all its o w n .

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Sue Edgecomb and the Pep band liven up the early morning hours of the Everything-athon.

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Left to right, front row: Brenda VanderWeerf, Linda Strouf, Sharon McKee, Sue Ward, Michael tldridge, Nancy Tait, Judy DeWeerd, Terri VanSwol. Second row: |ill Fauble, )an Johnson, Lisa Pisani, Dave Caffney, JoLynn Campbell, Doug Williams, Bruce Ulberg, Scott Whitefleet, Alice Ford, Richard Blake, Sue Edgecomb, John Seeger, Kathy Olson, Sandy Blogett, Lisa Spieldenner. Third row: Pam Wright, Laura Press, Laura Warnar, Dale Aggen, Tim Davis, Beth Schippers, Tammy Northdurft, Terry McGregor, John Masschelin, Ted Johnson, David Pater, Kurt Stork, Kim Lubbers, Jeff VerBeek, Bruce Burgess, Rodney Matthews, Bill DeWitt, Tom Keizer, David Eox, Cindy Gano, Lois Monaghan, Pat Jakeway. Last row: Greg VerBeek, Peter Koeppe, Mr. Cecil, Mike Schmuker, Bill Spagnuolo.

A. Radtke Left to right, front row; Dale Houghtaling, Chuck Bell. Second row: Marty Wick, Bryan Eucker, Brian Willenstyn, Mr. Cecil, Chris Taylor, Bruce Ulberg, Dave Caffney, Lisa Pisani, Last row: Rodney Matthews, Chuck Aardema, Mark VanMa t e r j o h n Price, Ted Johnson, Bill DeWitt.

T Renner


Singing in Every Weather The Chapel Choir's 1979-'80 season p r o v e d , not unsurprisingly, to be busy and eventful. In a d d i t i o n t o the t r a d i t i o n a l performances at C o n v o c a t i o n , H o m e c o m i n g , Vespers, a n d Baccalaureate, the Chapel C h o i r p o o l e d talents w i t h c o m m u n i t y groups for special concerts. O n e such p e r f o r m a n c e was the Festival of Hymns. U n d e r the leadership of Erik Routly, a lecturer o n h y m n music, the Chapel C h o i r j o i n e d w i t h area c h u r c h choirs and their a u d i e n c e for an old-fashi o n e d h y m n s i n g , a n d in e a r l y A p r i l , t h e C h a p e l C h o i r t e a m e d up w i t h t h e S y m p h o n e t t e to present Faure's Requiem. This year the Choir's annual t o u r t o o k t h e m t o the East Coast. Leaving o n M a r c h 27, they sang their way to N e w Jersey and N e w York, w h e r e the m a j o r i t y of their concerts t o o k place. This year the h i g h p o i n t s of the t r i p i n c l u d e d N e w Paltz, N e w York w h e r e a recent f l o o d had c o n t a m i n a t e d t h e d r i n k i n g w a t e r ; P o m p t o n Lakes, N e w Jersey w h e r e m a n y Hope graduates w e r e o n hand t o support the c h o i r ; and the piece de resistance was a o n e day stay in N e w York City w h e r e m a n y c h o i r m e m b e r s t o o k a d v a n t a g e o f several Broadway shows and Easter services c o n d u c t e d by N o r m a n Vincent Peale. O n e of the purposes of the choir's t o u r is to i n t r o d u c e and p r o m o t e H o p e to prospective students, but for many c h o i r m e m b e r s t o u r is m u c h more. "For a lot of us, our singing is a m i n i s t r y , " said c h o i r secretary Betty Person. "It's a great o p p o r t u n i t y t o share w i t h p e o p l e . "

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Chapel Choir coach, Roger Reitberg in action.

A. Radtke

T. Renner

Front row, left to right: Sally Tien, Betty Peterson, Meg Webb, Marilyn VanHouten, Norene Waters, Karen Willis, Lena Daniels, )udy Lanning, )oy Dean, Susanne Hagan, Carol Bechtel, Debbie Grimm, Elissa VanGent, Sharon McKee, Twylia Taylor, Nancy Torreson. Second row: Terri Whitney, Sue Marlie, Mary Soeter, )anis Lundeen, Leigh Boelkins, Deb Hall, Sue Weener, Lori Nevlezer, Jenny Liggett, Ruth Ann Hascup, Cheryl Sheldon, Kathryn Neevel, )ill lelving, Connie Rietberg, Sara Norden, Diana Beyer, Kim Nagy Third row:

Suzanne Caler, Mary Beth Staegeman, Nancy Moore, Roger Roelofs, Bill Langeians, Bill Spagnuolo, David Chan, Gordon Dahlgren, Matt Soeter, Ron Schutt, Brian Decker, Tom Picard, Dennis Burchett, Don MacDonald, Art Colegrove, Bill Godin, Tom Koning. Back row: Bob Bast, Jeff Krehbiel, john Tousley, Kevin Bailey, Mike Geib, Phil Herendeen, Larry Boer, David Sackett, Scott DeWitt, Doug VanderMeulen, Joel Russcher, John Byl, Jim Hoekstra, Joel Martinez, Harvey Keodyker, and Evan Boote.

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Cosmopolitan

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Front row, left to right: T o m Bigelow, Craig Schumann. Second row; Sam Aidala, Jim Kuiper, Pete V a n Eenanaam, Rocco Massimiano, A1 Kitomura, Bill Langejans, Brian Ueker, Bill Godin, Denny Griffen, D o u g Buck, D a v e "Feder. r. Third i n i r a row: c- n n s â&#x20AC;˘ Brauning, Steve Lerevre, - u a n snyd Rick K i e m a n , Jim Schipper, M i k e Shields, D o u g Braschler, Bob V a n E c k , Dave T e n H o o r , Dave Braschler, Arthur Kurtze I I I , D o u g Gebhard, Dave Kempker, John Fanthoroe. Fourth row: Jeff Wynsma, T o m Keaton, M a r k Laman, T o m Elhart, T o m G a y , Paul Lange, T o m Madden, Rich Lupkes, Chuck Winter, Jeff Vaughan, Dave V a n Hoven, M a r k Liar, John Cuti, M a t t Missad, Ron Visscher,

Despite the drastic changes that have recently taken place on Hope's campus, the men of the Cosmopolitan Fraternity continued to emphasize tradition. The alumni are very important to the f r a t e r n i t y as they remind the current members of these t r a d i t i o n s . T h i r d term President Craig S c h u m a n n explained, " O n c e a m a n becomes a Cosmo, he is always a Cosmo." This appears to be evident in the fact that over fifty Cosmo alumni attended the fall Homecoming Dance. According to many alumni, the fraternity represents their strongest link back to H o p e . Thus if the fraternity was drastically changed for any reason several of the alumni would feel alienated f r o m their A l m a Mater. Consequently, Cosmo pledging is totally oriented toward making pledges learn a great deal a b o u t the current active

108

M a r k Boundy, Joel Z . Russcher, M a r k V a n Mater, T o d d Vandenvoude, Ron Haight, Lars Jensen, Brian Dreisenga, K a r l Bierbaum. Under stairs: Kevin Tavemier, Steve Gelpi, Rich Schlott, M i k e Walters, Ron M c C u l l i c k . Behind column one: John Paul, Scott D e W i t t , M i k e Welch. Behind column two: Kelly Rollins, Steve Angle, Greg Bekius, Phil Cobb, M a r t i n Tilley, Brett M o o k . Behind curtains: Chris Morrison, Barry Neal, Jim Richards, Wesley Wilbur, Dave W i l b u r . In beer can: Bill Agnew, Brian M . Champion. Late: A r t Colgrove.

members as well as the long standing traditions. This year, like every year, the C o s m o s main goal in pledging was to develop strong actives who are capable of carrying on the fraternity traditions. Other traditional events outside of the Homecoming events included two c a n o e trips, a road rally, a hayride, numerous house parties, a rush informal, the Christmas tea, and involvement in the annual May Day activities, among other things. As third term Secretary Doug Buck expounded, "we have an incredible amount of fun, yet we try to work with both the Hope administration and the H o l l a n d c o m m u n i t y . " This seems true to fact as the Cosmos raised m o n e y for the American Cancer Society, and in May, ran concessions at a Jamboree in order to donate proceeds to the Boy Scouts. Even amid the big changes on

H o p e ' s c a m p u s , the men of Phi Kappa Alpha strove to keep the fraternity tradition alive. Kar , e.erbaum Doug Buck

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Greg Bekius and Jon Fanthorpe show their Lincoln green at the A l l College Sing.


Fraternal

This year, like all years, the Fraternal Society strove to preserve the t r a d i t i o n s of O K E . 1979-80 brought the Praters into a new decade involved in several activities and looking forward to improved relations between the Greeks and the administration. Frater events began in the fall with the H o m e c o m i n g d a n c e when they welcomed back many alumni. T h e end of the first semester brought both the frat winter formal and the annual Christmas party for underprivileged children at Lincoln School. After pledging, which the Fraters are known for, new actives enjoyed the spring formal and the a n n u a l c a n o e trip. O t h e r events were c o n c l u d e d with Swan Song, when g r a d u a t i n g Fraters were honored by their brothers as the last time that they will be together as a fraternity. 1979-80 was a typically great time for OKE.

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Bruce Caltrider, Scott Broekstra, and Greg W o o d are well dressed as they participate in the traditional Indian Ceremony before the Frater canoe trip in April.

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J. Hazekamp

Kneeling, left to right: Jamie Drew Doug Morton, T o m VanderStel, Todd Wolffis. Paul Brown, Greg Wood, Keith Von Glahn, Kevin Anderson. Second row. Craig Wolfis, John Hosta Pete White John Frazza, Randy Coffill, Mike Conti, Chris Joseph, Steve Bratschie, Doug Andrews, Bob Lamb, Dave Motz, Fred Kreusch. Jim Boengter, Jon Zoet, Jon Schwanz, Phil Rose. Third row: Dave Moored, Paul Hickman, Ron Brondvke Jay Peters, Todd DeYoung. Fourth row: Jerry Decker, Jim Hawken, Bob Poll, Bruce Caltrider, Bob Bast, Bruce Potter, George Washington, Bill Ingham, Gordon Forth Craig Anderson Jeff Pool Kevin Combes!, Tim Poel, Bruce Neely, Gary Visscher, Mike Nyenhuis, Doug Andrews, Greg Wendling, Scott Broekstra, John Vandertoll, Chuck Brooks, Fred Boylen, Randy Wheeler.


J. Hazekamp

Front row, left to right: Rich Northuis, Grant M i n e r , D o n Henevelt, Mark Van Cessel. Second row: |im Eichoff, )amie Robertson, Tim M c C e e , Jeff Van Hoeven, Dan Brauksma, Kevin Kraay, Pete Wlaenta, Ron Schut, Mark Badgema, M i k e McCarley, Third row: Chuck Aardema, Jim Hoekstra, Bill Buhrn, Bob Beckus, M i k e Schmuker, Tom Bayer, Steve Cameron, Ron Molenaar, John Moolenaar, Bob Bush, Rich Burrell, Mark Trudell, Karl Droppers. Fourth row: Evan Boote, Craig Van Arendonk, Steve Renae, Ed Stinson, Bob Dame, John Christian, Tim Taspers, John Webster, Brett Brewer, Scott Savage, Glen Bussies. Fifth row: Bill Pollock, D o u g Kelin, Jeff Hodges. Sixth row: Joel Martinus, Bill Dean, Bob D o w k e r , Mark Pearson, Bill Hoekstra, John G r i f f i n , Dave Rhem, Tim G r i f f i n , M i k e Porte, Tim Kasten, John Zendler, Kevin DeYoung. Back row: Taylor H o l b r o o k , T o m f a s t e n , Dan D e f f e n b a u g h

Arcadian

J. Hazekamp

Jamie Robertson, Bob Bush, and Jim Eickhoff scout around.

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The addition of 29 new "brothers" to the Arcadian fraternity aided significantly in the growth of the group. With a pledging p r o g r a m which strove to initiate change through the coming years, the Arkies believe to be advancing. Having a group of a significant number encouraged the Arkies to provide more group activities. A midweek dance proved to be a successful fund raiser, drawing approximately 400 people. Other dances, termed "basement bashes," provided weekend activities for the campus, as did various rush events. Eager to march on toward new horizons, the Arkies held their Homecoming and spring dances at a yet untried, but familiar, resort, the notorious Dutch Village. Good food, service and dance facilities urged them to consider utilizing the Village in the future. The new events} and activities of the 79-80 year, coupled with tradition and diversity, resulted in a year which the Arkies felt was typical yet excitingly new.


Emersonians The E m e r s o n i a n F r a t e r n i t y began t h e year w i t h Orientation w e e k e n d by helping to move the Freshmen into their dorms. The f o l l o w i n g w e e k e n d the Emersonians w e l c o m e d the campus back w i t h a basement dance on Friday, and a party on Saturday. The remainder of the semester consisted of a fall formal, more basement dances, parties, a hay ride, and an event termed " A n i m a l House." " A n i m a l House" was one of the highlights of the fall for the fraternity. It was bedlam f r o m the pre-party to the m i d n i g h t showing at Holland Theatre, a full-house event w h i c h was a

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first for the theatre. The Spring semester brought rush and pledging to the Emersonian — and rush and pledging brought the initiation of eighteen new members to the fraternity. Also d u r i n g the spring semester was the spring formal, w h i c h was held at the H o f f m a n House in Grand Rapids. The affair consisted of a fine dinner and dancing, and was the first formal event for new actives. Many of the events of both fall and spring semesters w e r e t r a d i t i o n a l , and it is these t r a d i t i o n a l events w h i c h the Emersonions believed to be enjoyable.

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Front row, left to right: Tim Keisey, Dale Zoodsma, |im M u n g e r , Bill lellison, Phil Cram, Roland Hill, Glenn Caudill, Paul Nedervelt, Pete Thinker, Greg Marshall, Steve Stallone, )oe Graves, )on Strain, Ron Garfield, Mat Pike Second row: Rick Ross, Roy Hegg, Dean Restevo, Dave Bruins, Fred Howard, Jamie Pratt, Dave

Brown, Scott Brewer, )on Schmidt, George Harper, Bob Freiling. Third row: Mark H o w a r d , Tom Keiser, Dave Gaffney, John Votaw, Phil VanderHaar, Steve Bredweg, Kevin Torren Back row: Matt V a n d e r M o l e n , Paul Toren, Eric Schaeffer, Al Smilhi Scott W h i t e f l e e t , Ted Bolema, Chris Campbell, )on M a c M i l l i n .

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III


Knickerbocker

A O n stairs, left to right; Andreas Ernst, T o m H e l m u s , Ian M a c a r t n e y , John H o l m e s , John C r o n k , Scott D e n n i son, Jim C a u l t , M a r k Laman, John V a s s a l o , Steve Kasa, M a r k D e p u e , Steve L i g h t w e i s , John H a k e n , Brian K n i f f , T o m DePree, T i m Emmet, T o m Daubenspeck, Doug Augustin, Bruce Bere, K e v i n W a t s o n , K e v i n K r a n e n d o n k . U n d e r stairs: Fred K l i n d t , M a r k V e r m e u l e n , Scott D o w , Brad A c k e r m a n , M i k e Z i n g m a n .

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Ian McCartney gives Nick R. Bocker a lift while Bruce Bere watches.

The men of Knickerbocker t o o k up residence again at 264 C o l u m b i a Avenue (Knick House). U n d e r the leadership of John Holmes, the Knicks came back into sight o n campus. Traditional fall events i n c l u d e d canoeing at the Pull, in w h i c h fraternity brothers T o m Sokolnicki and Kevin Kranendonk pulled for the '82 victors. H o m e c o m i n g saw the Knicks w e l c o m e their alumni w i t h live music at Saugatuck's Rathskellar. The annual Halloween Party was a major success and many guests dressed for the occasion. Later in the semester a Frater-bocker was held at Coral Gables in Saugatuck, in c o o p e r a t i o n w i t h the Fraternal Society. Closing out t h e semester, the Knickerbockers collected m o n e y for Muscular Dystrophy. The d o n a t i o n total f r o m an a f t e r n o o n in d o w n t o w n Holland was $270. John Hakken led the Black and Red d u r i n g the second semester. Rush was very successful as usual, h i g h l i g h t e d by the one and only " W i l d Irish Rose" party. Keep Enthusiasm G o i n g was held at the O l d e T o w n e Tavern w i t h "Blue M o n d a y " p r o v i d i n g the entertainment. A d d i n g to the excitement that night was Hope's first basketball victory over Calvin in over a decade, making it a night to be long remembered. For the Knicks, gaining 14 new members after pledging was as significant as the acquisition of C o l u m b i a Cottage. The men of Knickerbocker n o w number 29. " T h e Knickerbockers struggled for years to b u i l d a strong f o u n d a t i o n . Thanks to the decision of the Campus Life Board last spring, g i v i n g the K n i c k e r b o c k e r s C o l u m b i a C o t t a g e , t h e K n i c k e r b o c k e r f r a t e r n i t y has reached an important milestone," says Head Coach Tom Pierson.


Centurian

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Front row, left to right: Karen Cruber. Middle row: A n d y Birner, Greg Pedelty, D o u g D e u t i c h . Back row: Peter Pollnow, Brion Brooks, Nick H o d g m a n , Steve Watson, Russ Yonkers.

The Centurian fraternity has had what some might consider a major change this year. The frat is no longer governed by the campus' Inter-Fraternity C o u n c i l but is n o w under the d i r e c t i o n of ECAC. The decision, made by the Campus Life Board, was the culmination of a dispute b e t w e e n the Cents and IFC that started a couple of years ago w h e n the fraternity i n d u c t e d its first female member. The fact that the Cents have been i n c l u d i n g w o m e n ever since w o u l d lead one to believe that Centurians consider the contributions that w o m e n can make to their fraternity more important than m a i n t a i n i n g the tradition of having only men as members. Although the Centurians w o u l d have preferred to remain in the IFC they are not unhappy w i t h the decision since it d i d not change the way the frat functions. Otherwise, the Cents had a fairly typical year. There w e r e some parties and gatherings and dinners, as well as pledging (yes, there was a female a m o n g the newly inducted). Though the frat was not as active w i t h other campus organizations and people as it w o u l d like to have been, it is making plans to be more involved next year. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Karen Cruber

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Karen Cruber and Greg Pedelty share a c o u c h and a b o o k .


Interfraternity Council

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Front row, left to right: A n d y Ernst, Ian Macartney, )ohn V o t a w , Paul Toren Back row: )on Schmidt, Jim M u n g e r , Brian Driesmga, Peter Boven, )im Boerigter, Mark Schrier.

Pan-Hellenic Board

). Hazekamp

Front row, left to right: Kristina Hyde, Teresa H u r f o r d , Lynn Devendorf, Debra Sells, Beth Harvey, Jeannine Strainer. Back row; Marilyn v a n H o u t e n , Jane DeYoun, Sue Martle, Linda Scholte, Sue Williams, Rosemary.

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D. Wang

Front row, left to right: Kay Neevel, Betty Buikema, M i m i Hull, Laura Spieldenner. Second row: )ulie Kollen, Evelyn VanEyl. Thirarow: Linda Leslie, A n n Boluyt, Beth Harvey, Kari N e m m e r d o r . Fourth row: Linda Flanagan, Sue Williams, Sue Rezelman, C o n n i e Kungle Back row: Sally Manahan, Debra Sells, A l i c e Ford, Leesa Schilleman.

Throughout the 1979-1980 school year, the Sibylline Sorority w o r k e d toward further involvement in the c o m m u n i t y and college. C o m m u n i t y service projects included a collection for the American Cancer Society, a project w h i c h was integrated into the pledging program this year for the first time. The Sibs analyzed their pledging practices, in keeping w i t h their commitment to a more humane pledging period. Since their block rush in 1977, the sorority has revamped pledging and after discussing the goals of the sorority and of pledging, the g r o u p agreed o n a program in w h i c h every a c t i v i t y has a c o n s t r u c t i v e p u r p o s e . Pledging, t h e Sibs feel, is designed to bring the actives and pledges together, not build walls between them; therefore, they plan their events accordingly. In the social realm, the Sibs held their first fall informal dance this year, in addition to an annual spring formal. Funds for these events were raised through such traditional activities as Alibi Nights and car washes. W i t h only 20 members, the Sibs are one of the smaller campus sororities, yet they hope to strengthen their abilities in future years. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; B. Buikema


" F r i e n d s h i p , A n c h o r of o u r Strength" is the m o t t o of the Alpha Gamma Phi sorority and it seemed to be especially important this year as the sorority tried to establish a sense of c o m m u nity both inside and outside the sorority. The sorority u n d e r w e n t a number of changes as they strived to fulfill this aim, perhaps the most n o t i c e a b l e b e i n g the r e d u c t i o n in membership f r o m 32 girls this fall to 17 after graduation. Another change w h i c h took place was the sorority's o u t l o o k on pledging. After taking a survey to get members' reactions to last year's p l e d g i n g , t h e s o r o r i t y m a d e several m i n o r r e v i s i o n s w h i c h they felt w o u l d improve relations between the sorority a n d c o l l e g e a d m i n i s t r a t i o n as well as the Indies. For fund-raising activities, the Alpha Psis sold tickets, checked I D ' s a n d u s h e r e d at t h e h o m e football and basketball games as well as carrying out their traditional j o b of serving at the Holland C o m m u n i t y Ox Roast. As an a d d e d a c t i v i t y , t h e y also s o l d j e w e l r y t h i s s p r i n g . The A l p h a Phis also spent time w i t h the elderly at Haven Park Nursing H o m e in Zeeland h e l p i n g t h e m get into the Christmas s p i r i t by s i n g i n g carols and making simple Christmas gifts. O t h e r activities i n c l u d e d an all day canoe trip d o w n the W h i t e River last fall, a Halloween party w i t h the Arkies, and a w i n t e r formal at the Tara in Saugatuck. Rush and pledging consumed most of second semester, but the A l p h a G a m m a Phis s t i l l f o u n d t i m e for a picnic w i t h the Emersonians and a party w i t h the Knicks as well as the All College Sing. Keeping up their t r a d i t i o n o1' three's, the A l p h a Phis, first place winners of the All College Sing f o r t h e past t h r e e years, came in t h i r d place this year. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; M. W e b b

116

Alpha Gamma Phi

P. Cushman

Front row, left to right: Pam Cushman, Linda M o e r m o n d , Lynn D e v e n d o r f , M e g W e b b , M a r i l y n Van H o u t e n , Deb Fild, Linda Scholte, Kim Kooistra, Pam Schmidt, M i c h e l l e Seng, Renata Smart, A n n Hartney, Pam Nunez, Lynn Forth Back row: Lori Kanitz, Sue VanDenBrink, Diane Barr, M a r i a n n e Rice, D e b Blair, Julie Vander Ploeg, Deb Kunzi, Sue Brouwer, j u d y Cook, Pati Hill, Kathy Shiflett, D e b M e u w s e n , LuAnn Beekman, Karen Hoogerwerf, C i n d y Swart, Sheri C a f f , C r e t c h e n Keizer, Tanya Taylor. Not pictured: M a r i l a i n e Campbell, Lynn Frank, Kathy Hartger, A n n e t t e Kratzer, Gail O l b r i c h .

P. Paarlberg

Under the d i r e c t i o n of Marilyn Van H o u t e n , the Alpha Phi's sing "Consider Yourself at H o m e . "

-i


Though the Sigma Sigma sorority does several new things each year, tradition seems to be the f o u n d a t i o n u p o n w h i c h the sorority is built. The year began w i t h the traditional house party where girls came w i t h pillows and blankets to spend a f u n - f i l l e d night f o l l o w i n g one of their sorority literature meetings. O t h e r events d u r i n g the semester included a fall formal at the Finlal overlooking Grand Rapids, making banners for the football team for homec o m i n g and h o l d i n g the annual h o m e c o m i n g l u n c h e o n w h i c h took place at the Holland Literary Club and was attended by over 100 Sigma Sigma alumni. The semester came to a close w i t h the annual Sigma-Frater Christmas party w h i c h is held for underprivileged children in the Holland area and provides them w i t h an o p p o r t u n i t y for Christmas fun and frolic as they play games, their favorite being " M u s i c a l Chairs", and enjoy a visit f r o m Santa w h o distributed gifts to the little ones. W i t h the start of second semester came rush and pledging. This year's rush theme was, " W e are Family," and it appears to have been a good one for it brought the Sigma Sigmas a pledge class of 22 "very u n i q u e and strong girls." Two new activities this semester i n c l u d e d the r e m o d e l i n g of the sorority room and the construction of a banner w h i c h w i l l be a permanent part of Hope's football team starting next fall. Of course the Sigma Sigma sorority c o u l d not d o all these things w i t h o u t some sort of income, so for w o r k projects this year they held t w o car washes and served as hostesses for the Junior Welfare League Charity Ball. The new fund-raising activity for this year consisted of d i v i d i n g the sorority into " c o m petition groups" w h i c h were then responsible for b r i n g i n g in as m u c h money as they c o u l d by carrying out a w o r k project of their o w n choosing. A certain dollar amount was established as a m i n i m u m but the groups c o m p e t e d to see w h o could bring in the most money. Some groups w e r e q u i t e successful, bringing in as m u c h as t w e n t y - f i v e dollars. Though t r a d i t i o n is an important part of the Sigma Sigma sorority, so is individuality, laughter, and fun times; but most of all, as one Sigma Sigma put it, " W e are f a m i l y ! "

Sigma Sigma

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; S. Miller P Paarlberg

Rub-a-dub-dub, four girls and a Pinto? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; W o r k i n g hard at the Sigma Sigma car wash.

I Hazekamp

Front row, left to right: Sue Ver Sluis, Lisa Cox, Joanne V o k o j e , Mary Measel, Beth Bischoff, Laurie Davenport, Pam Kyros, Cathy Bast. Second row: Sara Holbrook, Kathy Brefogie, Yani Knapp, Sue Markusse, Sue Miller, D e b Ter Haar, Linda Baker, Nancy Scholten, Kris Hyde, Deb Bere. Third row: M a r i b e t h Thompson, )ulie Bodch, Leanne Fiet, Cindy Madsen, Mary Ellen Craney, Becky Goldberg, Barb Tacoma, Leslie Bethards, Jeanne A g n e w , Stacy Burris, Rosemary Christie Fourth row: Paula Nutter, Annette Piethe, Jan Tittle, Lisa Civilette, Sue Allie, M i c h e l l e W o l w o o d , Sally Tien, Carolyn Van Houten, Marcia Santefort, Ronni Nivola, Kim Cnade. Fifth row: Pam Bouma, Mary Beth Reinekie, Judy Wansor, Karen Thompson, Julie Bose, Nancy Kraph, Nancy Ten Have, Jane DeYoung, A m y Corguese, Frea Westerveld, Lynn Sorrows, Chrio Simmons, Kathy Reeder, Lisa Cidday Back row: C i n d y Paff, Barb Coon, Carole A r n o l d i n , Sara VanAnnRoy, Ellie W i n t e r , A n n Vander Borgh, Phyllis Van Tubergen, Kris Jaspers, Pam Fortuin, Linda Cnade.

117


D. Wang

Front row, left to right: Kim Osterman, Sally Berger, Sue Sharp, C o n n i e Rietberg, Barb Koeppe, A n n Helmus, D e b b i e Bussema, Lisle Westfall, Janet Lawrence, Jenny Liggett, Barb Allen, Chris Bennett, Janice Lundeen Dena D e W i t t . Second row: Karen G e n d e r , Mary Hilldore, Terri Proos, Sara Cady, Sheryl Israel, Jane Arendshorst, Lori Fox, Kris Koop, Jane W i c k e r t . Third row: M a r y Soeter, Lora Hanson, Kathy Scott, Kim Kuiper, Nancy M o o r e , Kathy Lawrence, Caye V a n d e n H o m b e r g h , Jan Klomparens, Jenny Wallgren, Cathie Christian, Carrie W a l c h e n b a c h . Fourth row: Sheryl W i l d e b o e r , Lori Visseher, Sue Heys, Bonnie DeYoung, Jane Morey, A m y Lauver, D e b b i e Gysbers, Lynn Visseher, Linnae Claerbout, Sheryl Schempers, Tish Carr, M a r i a n n e D y k e m a , Sue DeVree, Chris DeVries. Back row: Carol Janke, Janet Anneson, Sandy Bobeldyk, Janet Mountcastle, Jane Repke, Jeanne Brink, Lynn D e M o o r , Janine Lillrose, M e l o d y Myers, Lynn Bute, Karen VanderEems, Mary Sue Campbell, Theresa P e n h o r w o o d , Brenda Sucheki, Brenda Bryker.

Delta Phi

D. Wang

Seniors Jenny Liggett and Janet Lawrence.

This was an active year for the Delta Phi sorority b e g i n n i n g w i t h the reviewing of the sorority's governmental policies so that responsibilities c o u l d be delegated t o each c o m m i t t e e member. The House C o m m i t t e e was able to finalize the t w o and a half year project of securing a college cottage as a sorority house. Next fall, members of the Delta Phi sorority w i l l be m o v i n g into their desired and n e w l y acquired campus lodgings â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Crispell Cottage. D u r i n g second semester, rush and p l e d g i n g o c c u p i e d m u c h of their time. D u r i n g rush, the "1980 O l y m p i c s " t h e m e d o m i n a t e d the activities, inspiring events such as ski lodge and international nights w h e r e rushees w o r e w i n t e r wear and costumes f r o m other countries. Pledging f o l l o w e d and the sorority spent t i m e r e v i e w i n g and m o d i f y i n g the p l e d g i n g period in order that every activity had what they felt to be a purpose. The sorority was q u i t e active in the c o m m u n i t y t h r o u g h several service projects. At Thanksgiving t i m e , they made baskets for underprivileged families. They also co-sponsored a foster c h i l d w i t h the C o s m o p o l i t a n fraternity and made several visits to nursing homes p r o v i d i n g e n t e r t a i n m e n t , carols, skits and refreshments. Though changes occurred w i t h i n the sorority, they c o n t i n u e d w i t h traditional events i n c l u d i n g an alumni l u n c h e o n , a formal and informal dance, a m o t h e r - d a u g h t e r tea, a canoe trip, date-night and a pledge Initiation dinner. They also participated in all intramural sports, the All College Sing and the Creek W e e k talent show. Overall, it was a very busy, but satisfying year for the Delta Phi sorority. J. Lawrence

18


Kappa Delta Chi

D. Wang

Front row, left to right: Terri H u r f o r d , Colleen Craig, Karen Heikema, D e b Harvey Middle row: )ane VanderHaar, Cathy )ohanson, Sarah Trayser. Back row: Sue Martle, loan Dykema, Jeannine Strainer.

Along w i t h the rest of the c o l l e g e . Kappa Delta Chi underwent major reconstruction this past year and emerged better and stronger than ever. Between the rewr i t i n g of their c o n s t i t u t i o n and the gaining of five new actives, major changes were made. The old spirits of sisterhood and close friendship remained, but Kappa Chi is "Looking to the Future," as their 1980 Rush theme proc l a i m e d , and they are expecting bigger and better things for the 1980-81 school year. During Homecoming Weekend in October, Kappa Chi had a brunch for their alumni â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the first in several years. Helping w i t h Greek Week activities and holding a Christmas party were other activities. An Informal w i t h the SIBs highlighted the fall semester. Fund raising projects were also carried out d u r i n g first semester; t h e women in maroon sold caramel apples and cookies door to door, and worked for Saga banquets. W h i l e rush and p l e d g i n g commanded the majority of Kappa Chi's second semester activities, other activities also took place. A Date Night at V i l l a g e Inn was h e l d as well as a roller skating party for some of the other Creek o r g a n i z a t i o n s , and o n c e again the Informal was the high point of the semester. Next year Kappa Chi plans to continue w i t h their tradit i o n a l events and perhaps begin some new ones. Entering the Greek Week Talent Show and t h e All C o l l e g e Sing are p r e s e n t l y o n t h e agenda. An active year behind and ahead, the Kappa Chis look forward to building a stronger sorority in the coming year, ). Dykema

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Alpha Phi Omega

P. Paarlberg

Front row, left to right: Brian Hughes, Sue O ' C o n n e l l , Rick Ross, Alice Melat, Ron Bechtel Middle row: Ross Leisten, Phyllis M o n t a n a r i , Kris Dekker, Dean M o r i e r . Back row: Pete Koeppe, John Vander Ven, Cornelius Knutsen, Mark Ennis, Todd H u d s o n , Britt Bengston o n anchor. Not pictured are: Dan W o l f , Linda W a t e r m a n , Deb Liqk, Carol W o o d , Lauren O ' C o n n e l l , Jan Siems.

In a d d i t i o n t o t h e regularly s c h e d u l e d service p r o j e c t s , A l p h a Phi O m e g a increased their m e m b e r s h i p and broadened the breadth of their service endeavors this year. A strong m e m b e r s h i p program and the resulting g r o w t h of the numbers enabled Alpha Phi O m e g a to expand and have a bigger and better service program than they have had in many years. The service projects centered mainly a r o u n d raising m o n e y for charitable groups in the H o l l a n d Area. This year t h r o u g h various projects the g r o u p was able to support the " G o o d Samaritan Center," " C o m m u n i t y A c t i o n House," " T h e Salvation A r m y " and " A m n e s t y International." A l o n g w i t h these projects were the traditional b l o o d drives and the taking of ID pictures for Saga. O n e distinct i m p r o v e m e n t the Alpha Phi O m e g a made as a fraternity this year, was an increase in fraternity social activities. The increase enabled the g r o u p to be closer and w o r k more effectively on service projects. For the future. Alpha Phi O m e g a looks f o r w a r d to a bigger, stronger, and more effective fraternity! M . Ennis

P. Paarlberg

A service fraternity, Kris Dekker and Mark Ennis practice what they preach.

120


Black Coalition

P. Paarlberg

Composed of t w e n t y members. Black Coalition became a very active group this year. The Black Coalition has an enrollment of t w e n t y members w i t h fifteen w h o are active. For the past t w o years the Black Coalition was not an active group. This year the coalition attempted to become active in order to get funds f r o m the Students A p p r o p r i a t i o n C o m m i t t e e next year. The group first started by entertaining the parents of the club d u r i n g Parent's W e e k e n d . This enabled the students to meet the other parents and tell t h e m a little about the club. The week f o l l o w i n g W i n t e r Break the committees and chairpersons were busy finalizing details for the Black Experience Week. The Black Experience Week was held February 28 t h r u March 2,1980. This experience was sponsored in hopes of sharing w i t h the campus and the c o m m u n i t y the past African FHeritage and present black culture. The events that took place that week were an exhibit displaying black art, poetry, culture, and history; a f o o d fair, a gospel music concert performed by the Bethel Pentecostal Choir, of Grand Rapids, M i c h i g a n , and a dance at the Kletz. The Black Coalition also w o r k e d in c o o r d i n a t i o n w i t h the hligher Horizons Program by " a d o p t i n g " a little brother, Christopher Simpson. The group intends to plan more activities for next year in order to involve more people.

Brian M c C l e n i c w i t h dance partner Lisa Pisani slowly dance the eveni ng away. IfU \ i

L. Knight

m

J. Ha^ekamp

Pressured by school work Anna Villa c o n t i n u e s to smile.

r ). Hazekamp

Left to right: Louis Riefkohl, M i c h e l e Nutter, Anna Villa, Brian M c C l e n i c , Lera Thompson, ^eVonda Knight, Roderick Revels, Phyllis Isaac. Not pictured are Mary Jo Cray, Tony Roberts, David M c K i n n e y , Paula Nutter, Patricia Jenkins, David Seabrook, John Sutton, Robin W e b b , Walter W e b b , Clarence Townsend, Gene Gardner, Phil Summerville, Brian Leak, Steve Gelpi.

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Presenting...the Social Activities Committee $

J. Hazekamp

Front row, lefi to right: Ann Helmus. Second row: Benta Galland, Maria Vaselopolus, Susan Ward Third row: Gaye VanHombergh, Vicky Kobza, Back row: Fred Roberts, Karey Breher, Tom Singer, Tim Jenks, Dave Vanderwel, Bryan Bigelow, John Peachey, Susan White,

The Social Activities Committee (SAC) is well known to Hope students because of Friday night movies, Pit entertainers, and the Winter Formal; but there is more to SAC t h a n m e e t s the eyes a n d ears of Hopeites. B e h i n d the h a p p e n i n g s that make campus life a bit more exciting and much more enjoyable, is a group of hard-working and dedicated people. During the past year, SAC proved itself to be a highly creditable and effective organization. It presented a variety of activities and entertainment r a n g i n g f r o m the traditional events of Homecoming and May Day to the special evenings with Coffeehouse artists like Spheris and Voudouris. SAC also helped to make the holidays and breaks that had to be spent at school more festive and fun by planning and arranging for special happenings. Divided into five sub-committees, the SAC g r o u p w a s m a d e - u p of interested students and chaired by a SAC member, which were responsible for one of these specific tunc-

P Paarlberg

Sub-committees Front row, left to right: Kyle Chamberlain, Holly Cope, Benta Galland, Sue White, Sue Ward Second row: Rick Tamlyn, Jennifer Forton, David Baar, Jill Dame, Vicky Kobza, Fanny Hitt, Abby J e w e t t Judy Spreng, Dick Donahue Back row: Lynn Zimmerman, Tom Singer, Lisa Thornton, Heidi Kapischke, Brian Hughs, Karey Breherm, Tara Warren, Nancy Gibson, Gaye VanHombergh.


Left; Sue Grismer and Brad Saline trip the light fantastic. Below: Flute a n d guitar d u o Burton a n d Tapper provide an evening of mellow jazz for a Coffeehouse c o n c e r t

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P Paarlberg

tions. The Entertainment Committee m a n a g e d large events s u c h as dances and concerts, the Cotfeehouse handled entertainment in the Pit, traditional Events saw to the running of the annual occurrences, Happenings took care of smaller, special activities for the holidays, and Publicity made sure the student body knew what the other committees were up to. This system proved to be efficient and effective, and also gave leadership opportunities to a greater number of people and allowed for active student involvement. Trying to keep 2,200 college students happy is a pretty demanding job that calls for some pretty special people. Under the leadership of Ann Helmus during the fall semester, and Susan Ward during the spring semester, the SAC committee became a close-knit group, enjoying the challenge and sense of accomplishment that came from making a contribution to campus life. They gave a great deal of time and energy on a completely voluntary basis and, unlike other student organizations, they received no compensation. In addition to the students who served the committee, Associate Dean of Students Dave VanderWel, Assistant Professor of Business Tim Jenks, and staff members Tom Singer and Maria Vaselopolus also worked with the committee, sharing ideas and lending support. The Social Activities Committee worked hard this year to brighten the social lives of sometimes unappreciative students â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and their efforts proved them an invaluable asset to Hope. J. Hazekamp Student Showcase M C. C h u c k Bell at his c h a r m i n g best

1

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Front row, left to right: Tim Taylor. Second row: Amy Purvis, Michael N o r r i s , Betty Buikema. Back row: Steve Muyskens, Brion Brooks.

opc collcgc

olland, The Anchor u n d e r w e n t a major p r o d u c t i o n c h a n g e t h i s year, resulting in a change of printers, and a good deal of technical work for the staff. Previously contracted with The Composing Room, a book publishing company in Grand Rapids, the Anchor staff was not responsible for the paste ups or the typesetting of the paper. However, due to an over abundance of work at The Composing Room, the Anchor was asked to take its business elsewhere. Within one week. Editor Brion Brooks arranged to have the paper printed at the Holland Sentinel, solving the previous transportation problem and dramatically cutting costs. With the change of printers, the Anchor staff became responsible for layout, paste-up and typesetting. However, after three months the Sentinel donated a light table to the Anchor staff enabling t hem to work in their office rather than transporting everything to the Sentinel. Along with the changing of printers came content and appearance changes. Due to a picture policy at the Sentinel, the Anchor was able to increase the number of photographs per page as well as decrease the number of columns on each page f r o m five to four. A new editorial policy placed restrictions on the content of the articles to Hope news; such as activities, and student concerns. Reporting practices were also revamped. Extra efforts by the staff resulted in varied articles that through indepth reporting were more detailed. Responsible for keeping the campus up-to-date, the Anchor did d o u b l e - t i m e t h i s year as they a d a p t e d to t h e i r own p r o d u c t i o n changes as well as student needs. V. Millard

Feature editor Michael for his next article.

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I

y

The new audio board and transmitter took the snap, crackle and pop out of listening to WTAS this year. The $ 4 , 0 0 0 audio board made possible the use of a combination of records, talk and tape. It s e r v e d as a m i x e r to g i v e WTAS t h e " f l o w together" sound of professional radio stations. In October, two new transmitters were installed in Phelps and Durfee in an attempt to improve reception of the station around campus. There was a noted improvement in Phelps; however, in Durfee, other mechanical problems hindered the reception of quality sound. Along with the new equipment came a relatively new staff. Many freshmen as well as a few upperclassmen joined the ranks and provided a dependable staff for the station. This increase in the number of disc jockeys enabled WTAS to expand their hours â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 7:00 a.m. to 1:00 a.m. on weekends. All in all this has been a building year for WTAS. Not only had it expanded its staff and equipment, but it increased the volume of its record selection. With these changes, WTAS hoped to increase its f o l l o w i n g , q u a l i t y and its c h a n c e s of one day becoming an FM station. V. Millard

Of 50

P. Paarlberg

S)6*Âť Hp l?ccoa<

Front row, left to right: Liz Dloughy. Second row; J o h n Holmes, Dave B r u i n s Judy Jansma. Third row: Laura Stuit, T i m E m m e l , Cindy Emig. Fourth row: John G u m m p e r , Heather Molner, Dale Agger. Fifth row: Sue Guthre, Brian Leak, Mike Brady. Back row: T i m Bell, J o h n Vassalle, Mark Bajema, Michelle Brazeau, Craig A n d e r s o n , a n d J o h n Seeger.

P. Paarlberg

Craig A n d e r s o n fills a caller's request.

P. Paarlberg

General Manager T i m E m m e t takes his t u r n r u n n i n g the show.


W i t h the Intent of emphasizing the visual arts as well as the literary, the 80 Opus staff put t o g e t h e r a d i f f e r e n t kind of magazine this year. For the first time in many years, p h o t o g r a p h y was used as a separate artistic endeavor, r a t h e r than as i l l u s t r a t i o n f o r c o r r e sponding p o e t r y . This made the magazine more than just a literary representative of the student b o d y . A l t h o u g h the staff was larger, the submissions were not s i g n i f i c a n t l y i n c r e a s e d . This r e s u l t e d in t h e f i r s t semester's magazine being entirely poetry and p h o t o g r a p h y , w i t h o u t any short-story representatives. A l o n g with the publication of the t w o magazines, the staff also coordinated periodic "Opus readings,'' featuring t w o guests, artist Nelson Oestrich and writer James Perkins. The t w o also a c t e d as the judges f o r the annual Eerdmans A w a r d . Under the d i r e c t i o n of e d i t o r John Peachey, the O p u s staff had an exciting and p r o d u c t i v e year.

Opus is

Tricia W a l k e r aids in designing posters inviting i n t e r e s t e d audiences t o an O p u s readi ng.

K. Nyenhuis

...

, .. .

J. Hazekamp W o r k s by E. E. C u m m i n g s a r e r e a d expressively by Lisa Pauker.

R. Beck

Front row, l e f t t o r i g h t ; Editor J o h n Peachey, Leah Fisher. Second r o w : D e b Hall, C y n t h i a S c h r o e d e r , D e b H o e k s e m a , M i k e Norris. Tricia W a l k e r , N a n c y Kerle. Back r o w : Rich Kuhrt, J e f f C r u m b a u g h . N o t p i c t u r e d : J e n n i f e r Elliott, G o r d o n H e r w i g , Don H o n e s . J e n n y L e h m a n .

126


A

@ ^

p * i Seated, left to right: First Vice Presl d e n t L a n a Bian, P r e s i d e n t J o n Schmidt, Secretary Deb W a l k e r . Standing, left to right: Marcia Urbanick. Donna Klein Ram W r i g h t Jeannette Eberhard. Chris Simons Rich K e n n e d y . Lora R e c t o r . Barb W e e d e n . J u d y C o r d e s . Phil Vand e r h a a r , and M a t t V a n d e r m o l e n . Back row, left t o right: Ted Bolema Bill L o k k e r , R o g e r B a k a l e L e a h Fisher, Dave Rhem, Dan 0 u n d e r s e n Paul Bosch. G e o r g e Wiszynski. Kevin Toren. N o t pictured: Second Vice President Jane Sanderson. Lisa S i d day, Suzanne G a l e r , Deb Leenhouts Tom Stackhouse. Moira Poppen. Sue Markusse, Mark Schrier, Jeff Vredeveld, Anne M u l d e r , and Teresa Renaud.

P. P a a r l b e r g

New Logo Catches Students Unaware Student Congress? Sure, 1 know what they d o ! They â&#x20AC;&#x201D; ah . . . They . . . well, you know . . . they aaahhh . . Here is a b i t of i n f o r m a t i o n which may have slipped past the majority of H o p e students. Student Congress is composed up of three elected officers, a secretary chosen by congress, and t h i r t y - t w o e l e c t e d r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s . Every other W e d n e s d a y , these students g e t t o g e t h e r t o hear reports f r o m ten committees and to d e b a t e and discuss issues they bring up. O n e of the main functions of Student Congress is t o provide s t u d e n t r e p r e s e n t a t i o n on H o p e ' s c o m m i t t e e s and boards. The three main boards are as follows: A c a d e m i c A f f a i r s Board, C a m p u s Life Board, and A d m i n i s t r a t i v e A f f a i r s Board. Each board and c o m m i t t e e is comprised of faculty, administrative and student representatives. One major concern of the 1979-80 Student Congress was how t o gain student recognition and support. This guestion was raised over and over during a never-ending struggle t o establish an i d e n t i t y . O n e of the major steps taken '.o correct this problem was the a d o p t i o n of a Student Congress logo. A special symbol was created to represent the congress, and was subseguently printed on organizational bulletins and announcements. This was done with the hope that students would become more aware of Student Congress in the future. In a d d i t i o n t o student representation, another i m p o r t a n t responsibility of Student Congress is to provide funding (through the student activities fee) for almost all campus clubs and organizations. But this year s Student Congress accomplished a little more than just d e b a t i n g , discussing, and d e a l i n g o u t m o n e y . Perhaps t h e most w e l l - k n o w n

a c h i e v e m e n t is the r e n o v a t i o n o f W i n a n t s A u d i t o r i u m . W h i l e the college p r o v i d e d money needed t o c o r r e c t a problem in heat loss. Student Congress f u n d e d the actual renovation of the theater with money f r o m the student activities fee. The interior of Winants' old lecture room was completely repainted, a new seating arrangement assured the avid moviegoer of a decent view, and a new p r o j e c t o r room reduced the chances of a blackout â&#x20AC;&#x201D; f o l l o w e d by a walkout. A c t i o n was also taken this year to fund the speaker series p r e s e n t a t i o n of B e t t y W i l l i a m s , a d y n a m i c speaker on N o r t h e r n Ireland: t o organize the M i d d l e East Symposium which o f f e r e d the A r a b , Israeli and A m e r i c a n views on the situation in the M i d d l e East; to f o r m a c o m m i t t e e t o work with Saga in order t h a t students may present problems and suggestions t o the f o o d service; t o distribute W J B L news bulletins in the dining area; and t o f o r m a judicial b o a r d for students who have complaints concerning the issuance of parking tickets. Still other issues and changes were considered for further action in the 1980-81 school year. These ideas included the possibility of a new schedule f o r next year, more long distance telephone lines, more e f f i c i e n t I.D. cards which could be used f o r official proof of identity, a new system of meal allowances, and a review of present g r a d i n g and registering procedures. If next year's Student Congress exhibits as much energy and competence as the congress of 1979-80, there w o n ' t be an identity crisis for long. K, Bo.

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Der Deutsch Club " E l C l u b de E s p a n o l " had a busy year. A great deal of energy was spent in a t t e m p t i n g t o raise funds for the club so as to be a b l e t o p r o v i d e a greater variety of cultural activities. A m o n g their endeavors were a doughnut sale and a major raffle. The prize for the latter was a dinner for t w o at Holland's Hatch. T h e m e m b e r s of t h e club enjoyed Spanish and Latin A m e r i c a n dishes w h i c h w e r e p r e p a r e d by members for c l u b dinner parties. These gatherings enabled members to converse in Spanish w h i l e d i n ing on foods of that culture. Also, this year's Spanish assistant, Claudina Figueroa, gave the group a presentation on Chile, her native land. Activities such as these enabled Spanish students to b e c o m e better acquainted w i t h the Spanish language and culture in a relaxing and enjoyable atmosphere.

El Club de Espanol

P Paarlberg

Front row, left to right; M a r i a n n e Dykema, )o Haupt, A n n Price. Middle row: A n n e Cutherl, Nan Hussey, Debbie Hoeksema, Tom Siems, Cisela Strand, D e b b i e Harvey, Jane Vander Haar Third row: M i k e Meyer, Kerin W i l son, Ken Powell, Viola W u r f e l , Sander DeHaan, Marty Musykens, Erik Ohrnberger, Steve Musykens, Ron Bechlel, Paul Stevens.

P Paarlberg

Spanish Club advisor Ion Agheana listens attentively.

German Club? Was ist das? C o n t r a r y t o t h e o p i n i o n of some, the German c l u b is more t h a n a b u n c h of r o l y - p o l y , b l o n d e - h a i r e d types w h o sit around constantly drinking beer and eating pretzels. In the '79-'80 school year the c l u b o f f e r e d m a n y e v e n t s to students interested in German and w i s h i n g t o e x p a n d t h e i r speaking ability. Events included a bratwurst picnic on the beach, c r o s s - c o u n t r y skiing, a t t e n d i n g f i l m s b o t h o n campus and in Grand Rapids, and a dinner w i t h a German m e n u a n d p e r i o d i c stammtisches (the latter event being the most likely t i m e in w h i c h to catch the club in the posit ion i d e n t i f i e d in the first few lines). The c l u b also w e n t to Benton Harbor to celebrate the German holidays of Oktoberfest and Fasching; at neither of w h i c h one needs to k n o w much German to have a good time. In general, the c l u b tried to offer a variety of events to students w h o w e r e w i l l i n g to prove " G e r m a n types" are not as typical as typified to be. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; S. Muskens

Front row, left to right: Dr. Ion Agheana, Bn gitte Espaze, Nancy Piersma, Dr. Hubert Weller Back r o w : A n n e C u t h o r l , C l a u d i n a


Organization of Classics

i P Paarlberg

Front row, left to right: Ruth W . Todd, Carol Bechtel, Kathy Brown, Amy Baker, Jane Terpstra. Back row: W i l liam Terkheurst, Erik Jul, W i l l i a m Davros, Ross Thornburg, Brent Slater, Jacob E. Nyenhuis, Albert A. Bell.

Le Cercle Francais 1 e

le Cercle Francais, H o p e ' s French C l u b , e n j o y e d a year that began w i t h a busy first semester w h i c h e n d e d w i t h fewer planned events and more spontaneous " r e n d e z vous." Le Cercle Francais sees its purpose as stimulating increased awareness, interest, and involvement in the French language and culture outside of the classroom. This year's French assistant, Brigitte Espaze, was a terrific help in offering a true French perspective and o p i n i o n to many discussions the group had. The g r o u p served a social p u r p o s e also. The w e e k s of preparation for the traditional Christmas play, the club's biggest project, brought the group closer together. Other memorable evenings were spent at attending the performance of French mime Marcel Marceau, and celebrating Mardi Gras. The meetings became more s p o n t a n e o u s as t i m e passed, w i t h m a n y W e d n e s d a y evenings b e i n g spent s p e a k i n g French at t h e Crazy Horse. These m e e t i n g s o f f e r e d an o p p o r t u n i t y for b o t h majors and n o n - m a j o r s t o b e c o m e acquainted and to practice speaking in a relaxed atmosphere. The school year passed quickly, but Le Cercle Francais benefitted by increasing both the number of non-majors participating, and the amount of time they were able to spend together as a group. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; S. VanEenanem

). Hazekamp

Front row, left to right: John Clough, Amy Baker, Richard Traylor, Cathy Steiner, Craig Schumann, Sue Van Eenanem. Middle row: Leslie O r t q u i s t , )uli Ellis, Brigitte Espaze, Sue Criesmer, Robert Wilke. Back row: Cindy Black, Brad Saline, Laurie Lambie, Sue Arwe, Phyl Cash, Maria Hoffman.

129


Biology Club Tri-Beta, the biology honors club, has become the nucleus of a larger group k n o w n as the Biology Club. In an attempt to involve more people and generate more enthusiasm, Tri-Beta ope n e d its doors and welc o m e d freshmen and sophomores to participate in the group's activities. The club was active in hosting a variety of events aimed at serving the campus as well as the c o m m u n i t y . S c i e n c e n i g h t , an e v e n i n g a f f a i r f o r f o u r t h , f i f t h , and s i x t h graders, p r o v i d e d y o u n g students the o p p o r t u n i t y to observe the college f a c i l i t i e s w i t h a d d e d attractions of a magic show, a movie, live animals, and c o m p u t e r games. The c l u b also s p o n s o r e d Dr. T i m o t h y Stulder f r o m Indiana University Northwest as a speaker for the Biology department's weekly seminars. A book sale, co-sponsoring the scientific c o m m u n i c a t i o n clinic, and various group activities rounded out the year. W i t h great appreciation, the club honored )im Gentile, professor of biology, at the spring initiation dinner for his service as the group's advisor for t h e past t h r e e years. Gentile was influential in providing and d i r e c t i n g enthusiasm along proper channels. W i t h excitement a n d a n t i c i p a t i o n t h e g r o u p also w e l c o m e d Eldon G r e i j , C h a i r m a n of the department and professor of biology, as the new advisor.

P. Paarlberg

Front row, left to right: Marty Burg, Paul Nora, Bill W e b b Second row: )anet Watson, Marianne Rice, Sue Norbury. Sue VandenBrink, Stacey Burris. Third row: Deanne Brethower, Kalhy Souders, Linda Baker, Jeannine Strainer, Marilyn Johnson, Mary Burton, Pam Wettack. Back row: Geneva Malone, Dan Kruithof, M i k e Kulesa, Beck Greene, Tim Laman, Ron Reimink.

Chemistry Club

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; R. Reimink

j. Hazekamp

Front row, left to right: Dave Brown, Vivek Bedi. Second row: Bill Londo, Dr. D o n Friedrich, Dr. M i k e Seymour, Lori Anderson, Christiane Knapp, Kris Hyde. Back row: D o u g Harris, Deb Peery, Michael Peery, M i c h a e l Porte, Joel Martinus, Roger Bakale, John Vanalsten, M i k e Walters.

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Religion Club

) Hazekamp

Front row, left to right: M i l t Sikkema Second row: Carol Bechtel, Lynn W i n k e l s . Third row: ) o h n Tousley, Kent Busman, )oel Walters, Susan H o w e l l , Dave Crooters. Fourth row: Jeff Tyler, Jon Cope, Carl Czirr, Laurie VanEenenaam, Keith Lohman. Top: Carol Jones, Dan Deffenbaugh.

Geology Club The G e o l o g y c l u b has b e e n very a c t i v e t h i s year as t h e y e n j o y e d t h e i r largest m e m b e r s h i p o f t w e n t y s t u d e n t s . First semester they held a successful car wash w h i c h helped to reduce the cost of some of the yearly a c t i v i t i e s and in O c t o b e r t h e y traveled to B l o o m i n g t o n , Indiana where they went spelunking (caving) for the second year in a row. Also, in O c t o b e r , they traveled to the Upper Peninsula to learn about N o r t h e r n M i c h i g a n Precambrian geology. Christmas time inspired the club to visit the Roger B. Chaffee planetarium for the presentation of " T h e Star of Wonder." The second semester brought the annual Regional Geological Society of A m e r i c a m e e t i n g in Bloomington, IN. Gary Foote and Dr. T i m o t h y Hoist, n o w at t h e U n i v e r s i t y of M i n n e s o t a , have been researching the orientation of j o i n t s o n M a n i t o u l i n Island and proposing a mechanism for t h e i r f o r m a t i o n . T h e result o f their research was presented by Foote at the G.S.A. in April. The club also sold Geology Tshirts w h i c h served as a n o t h e r money-making project. In addition to these major events, they had a n u m b e r o f p a r t i e s a n d other informal activities.

If there is one w o r d that summarizes the 79-'80 Religion club it is " d i v e r s i t y ! " This y e a r ' s m a j o r s hailed all the way f r o m San Jose, California to Rochester, New York, w i t h career goals ranging from a Lutheran monk to a female Baptist Greek teacher. ( N o w that's a rare a n i m a l ! ) The d e p a r t m e n t ' s t h r e e s t u d e n t r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s — Carol B e c h t e l , Lynn W i n k e l s , and Joel Walters — also d i d their utmost to a d d a dash of v a r i e t y t o t h e m o n t h l y meetings. For those of a l o f t i e r i n t e l l e c t , the r e l i g i o n c l u b sponsored such speakers as D. Ivan Dykstra on "Faith, Science, and the Future"; and for those w i t h a more adventurous bent — Rev. Kathy Jo Blaske on " W o m e n in the Minist r y . " In o r d e r t o m i n i s t e r t o t h e

needs of the " s o c i a l b u t t e r f l i e s " , (and big eaters), there were evenings of fun and frivolity at Van Raalte's Restaurant and a sleigh ride at Teusink's farm. Even though this year's b y - w o r d may have been diversity, there was also a s t r o n g f e e l i n g of " a t - o n e ness" among the majors. A c c o r d i n g to Carol Bechtel, " A n y g r o u p that can pull each other t h r o u g h Prof. Voskuil's Rise l - l l exams, hay fights, and a c u t - t h r o a t c o m p e t i t i o n for the c o v e t e d " J a w b o n e of an Ass A w a r d " has just got to develop a unique spirit of unity! In short — w e have become a family — b o u n d together by w o r k , laughter, prayer, and caring." — C. Bechtel

J. Hazekamp

Front row, left to right: Bill Davidson, Jay Peters, M i c h e l l e Carlson, M i c h e l l e M a i n w a r i n g . Second row: Paul Martens, Dan Brandsma, Sue Wiseman, Jim VandenBerg, Heidi Burke, Jill Jalving, Deanna Palladino, Dr J Farlow Third row: M i k e Visscher, Brian Bussa, Tim Shepard, John Webster, Mark VanderMeulen, Steve LeFevre, Gary Foote, Dan Hafley.

J. Peters 131


In the 1979-80 school year, the H o p e Barbell club c o n t i n u e d to improve its facilities. The Club, which is l o c a t e d in the K o l l e n basement, received a fresh coat of paint this summer, and with the addition of fluorescent lights, no longer resembled a dungeon. All r e m n a n t s of the A u d i o Visual department, the previous inhabitant, were gone and, with a little imagination, one could see a true weightlifting facility. The membership doubled from 30 to 60 and since dues also doubled, the Club was able to purchase (much) needed equipment â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 600 p o u n d s of weight, a leg press, a n o t h e r b e n c h , a s e a t e d calf machine, another Olympic bar, a wide-grip chin-up bar, a leg extension machine, a Roman chair, 3 pairs of fixed-weight dumbbells, and a speed bag. In the next two years enough equipment should be added to make the Club a first-rate lifting facility.

Hope Barbell Club

OiUMSITf

J. Hazekamp

Front row, left to right: Dave Sackett, Mike Disher, Dave Stevens, president; Jim Eikhoff, Jon Schwanz, Evan Boote, and Tony Kistler. Back row: Pat O'Sullivan, Vivek Bedi, Kurt Brinks, Doug Ruch, T i m Arnold, Bob Lamb, Mitch Mendrek, Steve Bratschie, and Paul Stevens.

D. Mulvaney

Hope's Outing Club is a relatively new organization that was founded last year by a group of s t u d e n t s a n d faculty to provide Hope's C a m p u s with alternative activities such as hiking, biking and canoeing. Rather than requiring membership, the Outing Club centers on a small group of students and faculty, who plan, organize, and run activities for the rest of the Hope campus. 1979-80 proved a busy year for the Outing Club. First semester, the C l u b took several d i f f e r e n t trips, the first of which was a canoe trip down the Rogue River near Grand Rapids. Participants started north of Grand Rapids and canoed down through Rockford, experiencing some whitewater canoeing. Subsequent trips included a bike hike, a n d a hike t h r o u g h the

Outing Club

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P. Paarlbcrg

Left to right: Dirk Doorenbos, Doug Mulvaney, and Jim Markle.

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Allegan w o o d s . the day skiing. T h e f o l l o w i n g S e c o n d semester activities weekend, a smaller g r o u p went o p e n e d (in January), with an for a day trip to Crystal M o u n overnight ski trip to Caberfae tain. M o u n t a i n . T w e n t y - e i g h t stuM a r c h featured presentations dents and faculty traveled to by p r o f e s s o r s J o e M c D o n i e l s E a g l e V i l l a g e o u t s i d e of Big and S a n d y P a r k e r , t h e O u t i n g Rapids, and spent the night in Club's advisor on their experiheated cabins. While at Eagle e n c e s in w i l d e r n e s s s k i l l s Village everyone had a courses. Mr. M c D o n i e l s s h o w e d c h a n c e to take a night hike slides on his e x p e r i e n c e in Wyot h r o u g h the w o o d s . The fol- ming with the O u t d o o r Leaderl o w i n g d a y t h e g r o u p s p e n t ship Training session, and Par-

ker s h o w e d slides and a movie on her e x p e r i e n c e s w i t h t h e Outward B o u n d c a n o e p r o g r a m in the Boundry Waters area of Minnesota. Next year the Club plans to expand its activities to include scuba diving, rock climbing, and spelunking. Plans are also being w o r k e d on to provide an Outward Bound type experience t h r o u g h the Pretty Lake Adventure Camp in Kalamazoo.

Math Club The Hope College Math Club led a very busy and active year. Meeting bi-weekly with the Math Honors society. Pi Mu Epsilon, the Club sponsored several faculty, student and guest presentations pertaining to math and its various applications. First semester was devoted largely to faculty and guest presentations. The first meeting of the year opened with a presentation by Dr. Elliot Tanis, professor of mathematics, on the Dutch artist, M. C. Escher. Tanis discussed Echer's accomplishments as an artist and mathematician. Tanis also illustrated his talk with a demonstration of the d e p a r t m e n t ' s new graphic computer, the Tektronix 4051, which simulated some of Escher's drawing. The Math Club also sponsored several guest speakers during the year. Tim Hartly of Computerland gave a d e m o n s t r a t i o n using the Apple II computer. Dr. Ruchinsky from the Ford Motor C o m p a n y Engineering Center gave two talks and spoke on the mathematical applications of Ullyses; Dr. Tucker spoke on Symmetry Groups and Dr. Feldman spoke on operations research. Second semester focused primarily on student presentations.

P. Paarlberg

Front row, left to right: Cal Folkert, Melanie Miskotten, Kathy Lowe, Dee Holly, Barb Koeppe, Paul Williams, and Ross Thornberg, Back row: Bill Terkeurst, Gary Immink, Paul Toren, Paul Hospers, Steve Aardema, Hugh Bartels, and Dr. Elliot Tanis.

Seniors Gary Immink and Bill Terkeurst spoke on "Applications and the use of Models in G e o m e t r y . " Junior Dee Holly and Senior Barb Koeppe spoke on their experience on the Oak Ridge Science Semester at Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Junior David Boundy also gave a talk on APL applications for math students. In May the Michigan Sector of the Mathematical Association of America held its m e e t i n g on

Hope's c a m p u s at which three Hope students. Seniors James McElheny and Bill Terkeurst, and sophomore Powell Quiring each delivered papers. D. Mulvaney

133


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f "' / le'' right: Leigh Boelkins, lenni Liggett, and Kayleen Slater Back row, left to right: lane Terpstra, Chaplain VanHeest, Chaplain Semeyn, Steve Smallegan and Lori W o l f .

Early in S e p t e m b e r , six students met w i t h C h a p l a i n s Semeyn and V a n H e e s t t o get t o k n o w e a c h o t h e r , to establish goals for the spiritual a t m o s p h e r e o n c a m p u s , and to inaugurate Rev. VanHeest i n t o his first full year as a " H o p e i t e . " A f t e r this, the M O C P met o n Thursday a f t e r n o o n s in t h e C h a p l a i n ' s o f f i c e for sharing, p l a n n i n g and f e l l o w ship. Lori W o l f o r g a n i z e d a creative w o r s h i p g r o u p that t r a v e l e d to c h u r c h e s in M i c h i g a n a n d Illinois for w o r s h i p services, jane Terpstra was i n f l u e n t i a l in the college's relat i o n s h i p w i t h various g r o u p s in t h e community, along with bringing

i n f o r m a t i o n on w o r l d hunger to c a m p u s , and in o r g a n i z i n g for the Staley lecturer t o c o m e t o H o p e . Leigh B o e l k i n s o r g a n i z e d c a m p u s B i b l e s t u d i e s , t h e C h r i s t m a s Tree drive and helped organize the W o m e n In Leadership c o n f e r e n c e , w h i l e Brent and Kayleen Slater represented Intervarsity's f e l l o w s h i p o n campus. Jenny Liggett a n d Steve S m a l l e g a n o r g a n i z e d a n d led t h e F e l l o w s h i p of C h r i s t i a n A t h l e t e s , w h i l e Steve also w o r k e d t o b r i n g Christian concerts to campus. T h o u g h all had v a r i o u s s p e c i f i c duties, it was o f t e n a g r o u p e f f o r t to plan t w o retreats, lectures and

assorted s p e c i a l w o r s h i p services. The g r o u p w o r k e d w e l l t o g e t h e r , e n j o y e d each other's f e l l o w s h i p and w e r e e f f e c t i v e in p r o v i d i n g a c a m p u s m i n i s t r y w i t h various g r o w t h o p p o r t u nities. W i t h five of the g r o u p g r a d u a t i n g , next year s h o u l d be e x c i t i n g as n e w ideas and e n t h u s i a s m pile i n t o t h e Chaplain's o f f i c e and m o r e students are able t o learn and g r o w f r o m w o r k i n g w i t h our excellent Chaplains. Steve Smallegan

F.C.A. W i t h prayers, hopes, and ideas, Paul Boersma, T i m Schipper, M a t t N e i l , Sue V a n [ 3 e n B r i n k , j e n n y Liggett and Steve Smallegan met t o r e o r g a n i z e a g r o u p that had steadily b e c o m e smaller over the past f e w years â&#x20AC;&#x201D; FCA or t h e F e l l o w s h i p of Christ i a n A t h l e t e s . I n s p i r e d by Ed M o o n e y , f o r m e r D e t r o i t Lion linebacker and f u l l - t i m e FCA a d m i n i s trator, the f o r m a t of t h e g r o u p was c h a n g e d . "Fell o w s h i p " b e c a m e t h e key to a year far m o r e succ e s s f u l t h a n a n y o n e c o u l d ever have i m a g i n e d . C r o u p singing, skits and " g u e s t " p e r f o r m e r s m a d e W e d n e s d a y nights in " T h e Pit" the place to be t o relax, laugh, share, see friends and to g r o w . Those a t t e n d i n g w e r e part o f " s e c r e t s e r v i c e s , " s l i d e s h o w s , p r a y e r p a r t n e r s or s m a l l g r o u p s h a r i n g , w h i l e o f t e n l i s t e n i n g t o speakers, a v e n t r i l o q u i s t or various musicians. FCA b e c a m e an i n f l u e n t i a l part of the H o p e e x p e r i e n c e this year for many p e o p l e , and promises t o c o n t i n u e t o be so in the f u t u r e . Steve Smallegan

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I P Paarlberg

Left to right are Tim Schipper, jenny Liggett, Steve Smallegan, and Paul Boersma.


i Inter-Varsity Front row, left to right: Kathy Lowe and Barb Smith. Back row, left to right: Kathy Hildebrand, Beth N o r t h r u p , Patti Hill and Kathy Doepke. P Paarlberg

The Creative Organization of Worshippers are a group of college students w h o work through the Chaplains' o f f i c e to hold services on and off campus. This g r o u p provides individuals w i t h the o p p o r t u nity t o use t h e i r G o d - g i v e n g i f t s and talents t o share w i t h o t h e r s . This year, t h e C . O . W . s w e r e i n v o l v e d w i t h m o r e c a m p u s services than in previous years, and also s p o n s o r e d a Y o u t h D a y , an informal Sunday Night in the Pit, and a m o r n i n g chapel service. O f f campus, the group performed services in the Holland area, Grandville and Kalamazoo. A Chicago w e e k e n d trip was taken in M a r c h w h e r e services w e r e h e l d at churches in M o u n t Prospect and Frankfort, Illinois. Each service was planned according to the needs of the particular c o n g r e g a t i o n . The p l a n n i n g o f C.O.W. services usually began w i t h discussing the theme of the message, a n d t h e n a s s i g n i n g e a c h member different parts of the service t o c o r r e s p o n d w i t h t h e message. Next year, C.O.W. hopes to begin planning m u c h earlier in the year for more w e e k e n d field trips and more special services on and off campus.

Creative Worship

Lori W o l f

i P Paarlberg

From left to right are Jenny Lyons, Rick Tamlyn, Lori W o l f , Nancy Brumm, Kay Vossekuil, Barb Pell, Judy DeWeerd, Heidi Perez and Paul Toren.

135


A varied year for Hope's athletics, many sports f o u n d more i n d i v i d u a l successes than team wins. Several of Hope's players placed this year, and some very p r o m i n e n t l y such as Craig G r o e n d y k e w h o became the first H o p e player in over 20 years t o receive the All A m e r i c a n Team h o n o r . Jim D e j u l i o and Gary H u t c h i n s also set records in soccer again this year. Almost an habitual affair for these t w o , D e j u l i o and H u t c h i n s made a g l i t t e r i n g exit before g r a d u a t i n g f r o m school. There w e r e also a n u m b e r of teams that d i d prove v i c t o r i o u s ; o n e b e i n g the Football team, w h i c h placed first in the M I A A c h a m p i o n s h i p for the second year in a row. The Cross C o u n t r y team also managed to capture the M I A A c h a m p i o n -

SPORTS SPORTS SPORTS SPORTS SPORTS SPORTS SPORTS SPORTS SPORTS

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ship and t i e d for first in the league. A n o t h e r surprising a c c o m p l i s h m e n t came f r o m the w o m e n ' s S w i m team. O n l y in its second year at H o p e , the w o m e n w e r e able to capture the c o n f e r e n c e championship. Perhaps the most e x c i t i n g for many H o p e fans, was the Basketball team's victory over Calvin, 65-53. A day that many Hopeites w i l l never forget, the Flying D u t c h m e n beat the Knights a d d i n g another w i n to their 10-2 season. An e x c i t i n g and c h a l l e n g i n g year for Hope's athletics, 1979-80 p r o v e d to be more than just a w a r m - u p period.

136


Jan K l o m p a r e n s m a k e s u p h e r o w n c h e e r at t h e H o m e c o m i n g game.

November's H o m e c o m i n g — a muddy >

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W a t c h i n g a n x i o u s l y f r o m t h e s i d e l i n e s , is Pat Henry

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Above: M o n i c a B o d z i c k d o e s her best t o k e e p t h e ball f r o m her o p p o n e n t Opposite Page: R u n n i n g at t o p speed. Rich K u r h t keeps t h e ball in H o p e ' s c o n t r o l .

SPORTS 137


Soccer Explodes; "A Dynamite Team" W h a t is going on when you hear the word "chemistry" to describe an intercollegiate soccer s q u a d ? Soccer is s u p p o s e d to be athletics, where students exhibit capabilities foreign to a lab or classroom. But that was a t y p i c a l d e s c r i p t i o n of t h e excitement generated by a team that coach Glenn V a n W i e r e n called the "best g r o u p of s o c c e r p l a y e r s I have ever c o a c h e d . " T h e 1979 F l y i n g D u t c h m e n were characterized by strong, diversified abilities on the field, by the kind of determination that produces an impressive record, and by a spirit of cooperation a n d personal c o m m i t m e n t r a r e in c o m p e t i t i v e sports. In short, " t h e team has chemistry." Particularly with the exceptional c o n t r i b u t i o n s of time, skill a n d talent m a d e by tri-captains G a r y H u t c h ins, G o r d i e Herwig, a n d Jim DeJulio, H o p e college soccer racked u p its third year of 10 or more wins in a season. Even with tough losses to rival Calvin, the lowest H o p e h a s ever f i n i s h e d is second in its division. M a n y players proudly consider building relationships and

Paul Fowler shows his soccer flair in a game against Michigan State,

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Bob Shoemaker plays Hope soccer with a new twist: under the lights at the new community stadium.

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Front row, left to right: D a n Brandsma. Jane Decker, Jim Kuiper. Blair Frieberg, T o d d Kamstra, Paul Fowler, John Fanthorpe, T o m Park, Chuck Yonker, Chuck Hood. Row two; Doug Johnson, Scott Savage, Milt Sikkema, Gary Hutchms, Jon Jellema, Pat Malone, Steve Sayer, Jeff VanHoeven, John DeJong, Bruce Potter, Steve Gashom, Fred W a r d Row three: Glenn VanWieren, Greg Afman, Bob Shoemaker, Gordie Herwig, John Peachey, Jim DeJulio. Jeff Vaughan. Ken Capisciolto, Rich Kuhrt, Dirk Doorenbos, Dave VanHoven.


Below: Freshman standout T o m m y Park advances the ball.

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Gordie Herwig prepares for a pass as Coach VanWieren looks on

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inspiring d e t e r m i n a t i o n as key factors in the development of this year's twenty person team. Jim DeJulio, who, along with G a r y Hutchins, started every g a m e all four years at Hope, broke records right and left, including most goals scored by one player in a single game, in a single season, a n d in a college career at Hope. Side by side with his p e r f o r m a n c e were the defensive efforts of goalie Pat Malone. H o p e soccer fans also saw fine action f r o m â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a m o n g others â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Hutchins a n d Herwig, y o u n g stand-outs Paul Fowler and T o d d K a m s t r a , and " b e h i n d - t h e scenes" m a n Milt Sikkema. Hope's soccer team in 1979 had more diversified talent than ever before, a n d a r e m a r k a b l e capacity for team work. Partly due to the " t r e m e n d o u s help" of a second coach, G r e g A f m a n , new styles seasoned H o p e soccer this year, particularly a change f r o m long to short passing. N o t e d tri-captain G o r d i e Herwig, "there is a greater challenge in the addition of this faster pace to an already exciting g a m e . " C o a c h V a n W i e r e n feels that such changes were the benefits reaped f r o m a " d y n a m i t e spirit of d e t e r m i n a t i o n . " J. Lehman

Scott Savage watches as goalie Pat Malone puts the ball back in play.

139


Par for the Course

A l l smiles f o r A l l - l e a g u e w i n n e r s ; L o u C z a n k o a n d Jamie D r e w s t a n d w i t h a p r o u d c o a c h , D o u g Peterson

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P Paarlberg

B o b Bush s w i n g s i n t o a c t i o n

T. Renner

Jamie D r e w w o r k s t o p e r f e c t his f o r m


Losing t w o e x p e r i e n c e d golfers, t h e " G o l f a g e T e a m a g e " d i d not d o as w e l l as t h e y had h o p e d to. H o w e v e r , a c c o r d i n g to Coach D o u g Peterson, in his three years here as coach, this o n e was the most f u n . The t e a m m e m b e r s had a g o o d t i m e , and t h o u g h they o n l y p l a c e d t h i r d overall in t h e M.I.A.A., t w o players â&#x20AC;&#x201D; s o p h o m o r e Jamie D r e w ( w h o is next year's captain) and senior Lou C z a n k o â&#x20AC;&#x201D; d i d make All-league. C z a n k o has m a d e A l l - l e a g u e n o w for f o u r straight years, t h e first golfer in M.I.A.A. history t o d o this. As a senior m e m b e r of the t e a m and l o o k i n g back over t h e past f o u r years, C z a n k o r e m e m b e r s m a n y g o o d experiences and f i n e f e l l o w s h i p d u r i n g those years. W h e n asked a b o u t t h e types of changes he w o u l d like t o see take place, he r e p l i e d that he h o p e d t o see t h e t e a m p a r t i c i p a t e in m o r e meets o u t s i d e t h e league. The team d i d go to O h i o this year and t h o u g h t h e i r g o l f i n g was not o u t s t a n d i n g , they g a i n e d experience. A n d , C z a n k o adds, it was a g o o d o p p o r t u n i t y f o r t h e " T e a m a g e " to meet t h e g o o d golfers f r o m o t h e r states. C z a n k o also expressed the h o p e that the M.I.A.A. w o u l d consent t o p l a y i n g in spring t o u r n a m e n t s as w e l l as t h e usual fall meets. As it stands n o w , players have t h e o p p o r t u n i t y , as i n d i v i d u a l s , t o enter meets in t h e spring, but at t h e i r o w n expense. C z a n k o stated, a n d Peterson agreed, that it w o u l d be n i c e t o have the o p t i o n t o get the w h o l e t e a m i n v o l v e d in spring t o u r n a m e n t s . As far as this year's season was c o n c e r n e d , t h e t e a m a d j u s t e d w e l l t o the n e w setup w h i c h i n v o l v e d p l a y i n g at each M.I.A.A. m e m b e r ' s h o m e course o n c e and h a v i n g all t h e teams represented t o ensure a fair game w h e r e t h e teams played o n t h e same course u n d e r the same c o n d i t i o n s . W i t h regard t o t h e f u t u r e , Peterson does plan t o e n t e r some m o r e t o u r n a m e n t s o u t s i d e t h e M.I.A.A. next year: o n e at N o t r e D a m e and possibly o n e o t h e r in Indiana. He is also c o n s i d e r i n g the p o s s i b i l i t y of e n t e r i n g t h e O h i o t o u r n a m e n t again. Peterson sees a c o m p e t i t i v e season ahead, but w i t h t w o m o r e g o o d golfers he feels t h e team w o u l d have a c h a n c e at first or s e c o n d place. M. W e b b

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Left to right: SlGV0 A n g l e , Stove O l s e n , John V o t a w , Scott Mac Beth, c a p t a i n L o u C z a n k o , Jamie D r e w , Steve Smallegan, B o b

Bush, C o a c h D o u g Peterson.


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It was a tight group that left the starting line . . . D Wang

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D a r w i n Brouwer and Dave Sterk keep a close pace as they veer toward the finish line. â&#x20AC;˘

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. . . but as the miles went by, the pack thinned out. Larry Kortering paces himself in efforts to place at a home meet.

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Still on the Winning Track It's the loneliest sport of them all, yet H o p e ' s Cross C o u n t r y team seemed to be a close-knit g r o u p of athletes. T h e togetherness must have helped, as they c a m e back f r o m a dual-meet loss to Calvin to win the M I A A meet a n d tie for first in the league. From there they went on to place 4th in the Division 111 Regionals a n d 14th in the N a t i o n a l s . Seniors Dick N o r t h u i s and Mark H o w a r d , two of the seven H o p e r u n n e r s eligible to participate in that meet, placed 63rd a n d 81st respectively. O t h e r H o p e runners were junior Larry Kortering, sophomore Mark Northuis, a n d f r e s h m e n Larry Fischer, Mike Schmaker, a n d J o h n Victor. C o a c h William Vanderbilt points out that this

year's team was the largest ever, with thirty m e m b e r s i n c l u d i n g Missy K n o p f , a w o m a n . H e a t t r i b u t e s much of the team's success to the n u m b e r of good runners. C o - c a p t a i n s N o r t h u i s a n d S c h m a k e r felt the t e a m ' s enthusiasm to be extremely low early in the season, but pointed out that the spirits began to rise after their loss to Calvin as the team b e c a m e m o r e cohesive. Another winning season, Hope's harriers combined quality, strength, a n d e n d u r a n c e to m a k e a w o r k i n g team, a n d finally an excellent '79 r u n n i n g record.

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F r o n t row: J i m S c o t t , L a r r y F i s c h e r , M a r t i n Schoenmaker, Paul T a n n e h i l l , M i k e Schmaker, Chris Fleming, Doug Cushman, John Victor. Second row; Kevin Tavernier, Thomas Anthony, M a r k H o w a r d , John V a n A r e n d o n k , Bill Pollock, Jeff

Crumbaugh, Missy Knopf, M a r k Southwell. Third row: Coach Bill Vanderbilt, Jim Shoemaker, Dave Visscher, Steve Hulst, D a r w i n Brouwer, M a r k Northuis, Richard J. Northuis, D a v i d Sterk, Bob Conklin, Marshall Davis, C o r d Arnold.

T. I a m e n

Senior H a r r i e r , Steve Hulst contributes his best towards a successful team. 143


a

One for Hockey â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Hold the Ice!

Although inexperienced, this year's field hockey team m a n a g e d to capture third place in the M I A A tourney. C o a c h A n n e Irwin was in charge of the sport for the first time, a n d j o i n e d hard work with talent to come up with a winning team. A m o n g the twenty-four w o m e n that participated, only eighteen had ever played before. W o r k i n g well together a n d having an a b u n dance of e n t h u s i a s m m a d e this inexperience a p r o b l e m easy to overcome. T w o p r o m i n e n t players, scoring nine points a piece in the M I A A , were s o p h o m o r e M a r y Lou Ireland, a n d j u n i o r Lois T a m minga. E n c o u r a g e d by a larger g r o u p of spectators this year the t e a m challenged m a n y schools, o n e of which was Olivet. H o p e ' s t e a m m a n a g e d to defeat them in the first r o u n d of the S M A I A W t o u r n a ment which sent them to the semi-finals. T h e only d i s a p p o i n t m e n t being the defeat by Albion, 4-2. Reflected by the scores as well as the enthusiasm, the '79 field hockey team proved to have an excellent season.

59

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Tricia Walker takes a swing!

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Front row: Martha Magee, Polly Tamminga, Tricia Walker, Barb Herpich, Jo Haupt. Marline Muir. Beth Harvey, Captain Monica Bodzick. Middle row: Coach Anne Irwin, Kathryn, Lois Tamminga, Captain Lois Lema, Deanne

Brethower, Gloria DeWaard, Janet Corretore, Doris Kellum, Nancy Dirks. Back row: Michele Serrette, Karen VanDerEems, Marilyn Van Houten, Janet Watson, Heather Vecker.


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M a r y Lou Ireland and Lois Tamminga scramble for control of the ball.

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Polly Tamminga awaits her turn! Photo credits D. W a n g

Racing down the field to reach the ball first is Nancy Dirkse.

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P. P a a r l b c r g

Henry Loudermilk lets one fly.

Gentlemen, this is a football

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T. Renner

Front row: Ross N y k a m p , Perry Paganelli, John Frazza, Brian Leak, Steve Bratschie, Doug Andrews, Craig Groendyk, Scott VanderMeulen, M a r v i n Hinga, Chuck Brooks. Second row: M i k e Disher, Jon Veldman, Keith Nelson, Brian Driesenga, Jim VanVliet, Greg Wendling, M a r k Spencer, Steve C a m eron, M i k e Nyenhuis, T o d d DeYoung. Third row: T o d d Wolffis, Scott D e W i t t , T o d d Geerlings, Ed Cain, M a r k Candey, Craig Gould, Steve Gelpi, G a r y DeKoekkoek, T i m Lefley. Jim Hawken. Fourth row: Peter Rink, D a n Molenaar, Walter Webb, M i k e LePres, John Hosta, Greg Bekius, H e n r y Loudermilk, Steve D e L o o f , Andy Hamre, M a r k Thompson. Fifth row: D a n Heneveld, K a r l Droppers, Jim Lever, Mark VanGessel, Doug Braschler, Ron Arnold, Craig Wolffis, Paul D a m o n , BTStinson, Jeff Boeve, Dave Braschler. Sixth row:

146

Fred Boylan, M a r c Florian, Rick VanEngen, Rich Gordon, Jeff Shipman, M a r k V a n N o o r d , Jerome Jelinek, Art Klein, Garry Visscher, T i m Slack. Seventh row: Dave Driscoll, M i k e Andrusiak, T i m Dawes, Randy Klingenberg, Jim Eickhoff, Andy Gustafson, T o m Stackhouse, Keith Mulder, T o m Plaut. Eighth row: Gordon Forth, T o m Conroy, T o d d Holstege, Kurt Brinks, Carl Thorsberg, Jeff Brueck, Evan Boote, T i m Sale, Rich Burrell. Brian Janes. Ninth row: Kent Smith, Kevin Lang, Glen Blumer, M a t t Rose, Greg Bowersox, John Schwanz, Robert Carlson, Steve Bell. Jeff Whiting, T i m Arnold, T i m Tietz. Back row: Student Trainer Ken Austin, Trainer Lawrence ( D o c ) Green, Coach Doug Smith, Coach Russ Devette. Coach George Kraft, Coach Jim Bultman, Head Coach Ray Smith, and equipment manager N o r m (Bunko) Japinga.


Dutchmen Make It Two in a Row

D. W a n g

Quarterback Pete Rink aims for Paul D a m o n 86.

T. Laman

Touchdown, Paul D a m o n !

P. C u s h m a n

Left to right: Ross N y k a m p and Steve Bratschie take a breather during the Alma game.

In a season which was labeled a rebuilding year by m a n y , the Flying D u t c h m e n c a p t u r e d a n u n p r e c e d e n t e d second M I A A c h a m p i o n s h i p in a row. Led by s o p h o m o r e q u a r t e r b a c k M a r k Spencer, w h o again led the M I A A in passing, the D u t c h m e n compiled a 4-0-1 record in League play, a n d a 7-1-1 record overall. 1979 was a season m a r k e d by several milestones. C o a c h Ray Smith b e c a m e the coach with the most wins in H o p e Football, a massi ng 65 victories in nine years as head coach. It was the first time H o p e h a d won two consecutive M I A A c h a m p i o n s h i p s . It was a season that saw the first H o p e player in over twenty years to be selected by the AllAmerica T e a m . T h e F l y i n g D u t c h m e n o p e n e d t h e i r h o m e s e a s o n in t h e l o n g awaited, new, H o l l a n d Municipal Stadium. Playing b e f o r e a capacity crowd, H o p e defeated the Little G i a n t s of W a b a s h , who, last year, h a n d e d H o p e their only defeat. H o p e lost their only g a m e of the year to D e P a u w , I4-I I, in a heartbreaker, but went u n d e f e a t e d the rest of the season. Senior Craig G r o e n d y k was elected to the All-America T e a m for his a c c o m p l i s h m e n t s on the playing field, the first H o p e player in over twenty years to receive this honor. He was f u r t h e r h o n o r e d for his academics off the field. H e is the recipient of the All-America scholarship also. In addition to G r o e n d y k a n d Spencer, two other H o p e players also led the League in their respective specialty areas. J u n i o r H e n r y Loudermilk led the M I A A in punting, with an average of 37.8 y a r d s per kick, a n d J u n i o r G r e g Bekius led the League in scoring with 24 extra points a n d five field goals. Despite the fact he is losing eleven starters next year. C o a c h Smith is highly optimistic a b o u t next year's schedule, which toughens u p with the addition of two larger, Division II schools. G r a n d Valley a n d Franklin of Indiana. Asked to c o m m e n t on his success at H o p e College in amassing the longest winning total of any football coach, 65 victories in 9 years. C o a c h Smith share the credit, attributing his success to "talented players a n d continuity of the coaching staff." D Mulvaney


I

J. H a z e k a m p

J. H a z c k a m p

Going up for a beautiful set is Elsie Jerez.

A low save by Jos M a n d with Joce VanHeest looking on.

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P. P a a r l b e r g

Kay VanDerEems sends a spike over a crowded net. 148

A quick reaction by Sue Williams leads to a defensive bump observed by Jos M a n d .


Hope Spikers Place Second F a n s flocked f r o m the far corners of c a m p u s to witness the best season ever in the history of H o p e volleyball. T h e 1979 w o m e n ' s volleyball team finished with a record of forty-seven wins a n d twenty-two losses. D u e to a m o r e experienced team m a d e - u p of players f r o m the previous year, H o p e claimed an early v i c t o r y o v e r a t o p - r a n k e d Adrian team. U n f o r t u n a t e l y however, the w o m e n setters lost to A d r i a n l a t e r in t h e s e a s o n ; a n d after an unexpected loss to Albion, Hope placed second in the M I A A play-offs. Though the team had trouble with t h e s t a t e t o u r n a m e n t s , t h e women c a m e in first in the Muskegon Invitational. Record audiences turned out time after time to show their support of the '79 spikers â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a n d the n u m b e r of a d m i r e r s is b o u n d to increase next year as most of this year's m e m b e r s (including a p r o m ising J V t e a m ) a r e p l a n n i n g o n returning for the 1980 season. T h e o n l y d e f i n i t e e x c e p t i o n is t h i s year's senior captain, Jos M a n d . Next year's c a p t a i n will be Elsie Jerez w h o was voted most valuable player this year, as well chosen as a m e m b e r of the all league team.

T. R e n n e r

Front row, left to right: Captain Jos M a n d , Sue Williams, K a y VanDerEems, and Joce VanHeest. Back row: M a n ager A n n Boluyt, Coach Sandy Parker, Elsie Jerez, A n n Hartney, Faye Berens, Barbara Coon.

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Joce VanHeesl slams a spike over her opponents.

Jos M a n d reaches up to block a strong spike from her opponent


J. Hazekamp

Olivet t e a m m e m b e r struggles under Kevin A n d e r s o n ' s v i g o r o u s attack

Wrestling for the Individual

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C o a c h Harrington participates from the sidelines.

Few people attend wrestling matches. Very few people hunt for wrestling scores in the weekly Anchor. Even fewer people wrestled this year. Yet despite the seemingly apathetic reaction to the sport, the archaic uniforms and the b o r r o w e d socks (did you know that the socks wrestlers are given for their tournaments are the same ones the football team used for practices?), and although only five members finished the season, wrestling at Hope has improved this year. The determining factor behind the improvement was a new coach, Bruce Harrington. A Holland High and Michigan State graduate, and former c o a c h of wrestling at Grand Valley State College, Harrington differed from former c o a c h Kraft in a major way: Harrington c o m p e t e d in wrestling matches, while Kraft's experience with wrestling was a result of his being a physical education teacher, not an ex-wrestler in school sports. Harrington's philosophy regarding getting in shape differed also; a difference w h i c h resulted in a new system of training. Both running and weight lifting were cut, and calisthenics were reduced. Practice time was spent doing a few loosening-up drills and then wrestling the remaining time. Team members got both weight lifting and technique instruction while wrestling, rather than breaking up the time into separate, areas. Harrington's skill in wrestling added to his new philosophy regarding training, resulted in the re-learning of wrestling for some team members. This gave the participants the necessary ability to improve in their prospective weight classes. Overall the team did not do well, a direct result of so few team members w h i c h caused them to forfeit in three weight classes. However, individually the team members won 60 to 70 percent of their matches. Involvement of the c o a c h included acting as a wrestler during practice sessions, and providing team members with the challenge of g o o d competition. This added dimension aided each member in improving his skill as a wrestler. K. Nyenhuis

150


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Alma S c o t s m a n fights for f r e e d o m f r o m Peter White.

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Mike Sutton t a c k l e s his f o e full strength.

J Hazekamp

Olivet wrestler tries to crawl away f r o m senior Mike Sutton.

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To the amazement of all, our women swimmers turned the tide of events at the exciting Kalamazoo meet w h e n they w o n the meet w i t h a score of 74-56 and went on to finish the season as conference champs. Placing third in conference last year this f o u r t e e n - m e m b e r team, though twice as big as last year, was not expected to do m u c h l i e t t e r this year. However, through hard work and support from the other MIAA, the underdogs came out on top. Though this was only the second year for Hope's swim teams, the w o m e n , w h i l e lacking in experience, obviously had the drive it takes to b e c o m e n u m b e r one. The women are not to get all the c r e d i t , h o w e v e r , for they could not have gotten where they did without their coach, John Patnot. It was he, they said, w h o brought out their potential. Patnot joined the coaching staff last fall and has since coached both the swim and diving teams. The team members hold him in awe, and perhaps it was this fact which inspired them to do so w e l l . At any rate, as team member Linda Leslie put it, " H e c o u l d n ' t have d o n e it without us and we couldn't have done it without him." The w o m e n f i n i s h e d the season w i t h a record of 9-2 in dual meets and 4-1 in the MIAA; and four swimmers — Leslie Bethards, Nancy Scholten, Ann Stone, and Nancy VandeWater — and two divers — Lynn Bufe and Deanna Palladino^— made Nationals. L o o k i n g ahead to next year, Patnot intends to use a little more psychology w i t h the w o m e n ' s team and explain the reasoning behind what is done. O u r w o m e n may also lie w e a r i n g new suits as they aim for the MIAA Conference Champion once again.

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Front row, left to right: C o a c h j o h n Patnot, Fern Palma, Carrie D e W i t t , C l a i r e )elensperger, A n n Stone, D e a n n a Palladino, Kathy B r e y f o g l e , Lisa C i d d a y , Leslie Bethards. Back row; l o a n W i l t e r d i n k , Beth B i s h o f f , L i n d a Leslie, Lynn Bufe, N a n c y S c h o l t e n , N a n c y V a n d e W a t e r .


Ends With a Splash D i v i n g , t h o u g h it appears to be a s e p a r a t e e n t i t y , is a c t u a l l y another event in a s w i m meet; therefore, the scores r e c e i v e d by the divers d u r i n g c o m p e t i t i o n are a part of t h e t o t a l meet score. D i v i n g for the D u t c h m e n this year w e r e Lynn Bufe a n d D e a n n a Palladino for t h e w o m e n and Roy Davis for t h e m e n . C o a c h e d by John Patnot, t h e divers p r a c t i c e d o n c e a day in t h e a f t e r n o o n (except d u r i n g C h r i s t m a s break w h e n t h e y p r a c t i c e d m o r n i n g s as well), b e g i n n i n g their w o r k o u t s on the t r a m p o l i n e . The p u r p o s e of t h i s w a s t o w a r m u p a n d strengthen t h e i r leg muscles and to w o r k out d i f f i c u l t i e s in their dives b e f o r e t h e y p r a c t i c e d o n the boards. A f t e r t h e w a r m u p , the divers w o r k e d t h r o u g h their list of dives, d o i n g as m a n y as 60100 dives a day.

T h o u g h , in c o m p a r i s o n w i t h the w o m e n , t h e m e n d i d not s w i m as w e l l , they d i d attain their goal of p l a c i n g t h i r d in d u a l meets and c o n f e r e n c e , a great i m p r o v e m e n t over last year's f i f t h place. N o o n e m a d e Nationals this year; h o w e v e r it is b e l i e v e d that if Pat Nelis s w i m s next year he has a g o o d c h a n c e of m a k i n g it. At t h e awards c e r e m o n y o n M a r c h 4, Nelis was n a m e d M o s t V a l u a b l e S w i m m e r and T i m Jaspers received t h e M o s t Inspirational S w i m m e r ' s award. ( N o w o m e n received such h o n o r s since t h e team d e c i d e d that t h e season was t h e result of a t e a m effort.) The fact that the men's t e a m d i d not place a b o v e t h i r d this season may stem partly f r o m t h e fact that Craig Stevens b r o k e his j a w early in t h e season and c o u l d not s w i m for several weeks. H o w e v e r , this d i d not prevent t h e t e a m f r o m w o r k i n g hard and p r o v i d i n g t h e o t h e r teams w i t h some g o o d c o m p e t i t i o n . Perhaps t h e best and most e x c i t i n g meet was the o n e against Alma. A c c o r d i n g t o some team m e m b e r s , t h e losing of the first relay p u l l e d the team t o g e t h e r m a k i n g the rest of t h e meet a team e f f o r t w h i c h e f f e c t e d the first v i c t o r y of the season.

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Front r o w , left to right; C o a c h | o h n Patnot, Roy Davis, D a r r y l Elzinga, Beck G r e e n e , M a r k T r u d e l l , M i k e S c h m u k e r , D a v e M o o r e d , T i m jaspers Back row: Pat Nelis, Bill Lydens, C r a i g A n d e r s o n , T i m Davis, lack Heising.

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153


A Year for the Dutchmen O n l y o n e year ago t h e final r e c o r d for the varsity basketball t e a m was a d i s a p p o i n t i n g 2 w i n s and 10 losses in t h e M I A A . But the 7 9 - ' 8 0 season b r o u g h t t h e D u t c h t o a fantastic reversal of 10 w i n s a n d 2 losses, o n e o f t h e m o s t s u r p r i s i n g records in the league, and, a l o n g w i t h it, b r o u g h t a spirit to H o p e that w i l l be l o n g r e m e m b e r e d . " W e had n o t h i n g s h o r t of a t e r r i f i c y e a r , " remarked head c o a c h G l e n n Van W i e r e n . " T h e e f f o r t o u r players put f o r t h was o u t s t a n d i n g . W e had a real t e a m c h e m i s t r y a n d really had f u n playing t h e game. A n d w e w e r e successful." I n d e e d , j u n i o r guard Scott Benson, averaging an impressive 16.8 p o i n t s a g a m e , was n a m e d t o t h e first team of the a l l - M I A A squad, w i t h s o p h o m o r e f o r w a r d M a t t N e i l a c h i e v i n g t h e s e c o n d squad roster. Senior t e a m c a p t a i n Loren S c h r o t e n b o e r a n d j u n i o r John S u t t o n w e r e g i v e n h o n o r a b l e m e n t i o n s . " I t was great to see," s m i l e d Van Wieren, " s u c h exciting talent and dedicated t e a m w o r k c o m b i n e to h e l p us d o as w e l l as w e have d o n e in a l o n g t i m e . " Even t h o u g h t h e season i n c l u d e d m a n y e x c i t i n g w i n s over several strong o p p o n e n t s and t h e possib i l i t y of a t w o w e e k t e a m t r i p to M e x i c o in M a y ,

February 6, 1980 w i l l l o n g r e m a i n a particularly m e m o r a b l e date in the m i n d s of H o p e players and fans. A f t e r 11 years, the Flying D u t c h m e n , b e f o r e a p a c k e d house, d e f e a t e d the Calvin Knights 65 to 53 in o n e of the most e x c i t i n g a t h l e t i c m a t c h - u p s ever p l a y e d by H o p e . R e m a r k e d C o a c h Van W i e r e n , " I had f o r g o t t e n h o w noisy t h e H o l l a n d Civic C e n t e r c o u l d b e ! " The H o p e - C a l v i n rivalry, o n e of t h e strongest in M i c h i g a n basketball, had been d o m i n a t e d by Calvin for so l o n g that, as j u n ior f o r w a r d T o m V a n d e r Stel remarked, t h e v i c t o r y this season " w a s all t h e m o r e s w e e t . " " D u r i n g the e n t i r e season, t h o u g h , " r e m i n d e d Van W i e r e n , " w e w o r k e d hard and i m p r o v e d in many areas. Q u i c k n e s s and an a b i l i t y to r e b o u n d w e r e keys t o o u r success." Strong d e f e n s i v e support was p r o v i d e d by starting center Schrotenboer, the team's l e a d i n g r e b o u n d e r , and s o p h o m o r e f o r w a r d T o n y Roberts. A l o n g w i t h Benson and Neil, t h e r e was e x c i t i n g o f f e n s i v e skill o f f e r e d by Sutton a n d senior guard )ohn V a n d e C u c h t e . " I t is hard to say," n o t e d Van W i e r e n , " w h o m a d e the major c o n t r i b u t i o n s because whenever we b r o u g h t s o m e b o d y o u t o f t h e g a m e , w e sent s o m e b o d y just as g o o d back i n . " . Lehman

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First row: ) o h n V a n d e C u c h t e , T o m V a n d e r S t e l . Second r o w : M a r k C a n d e y , T o n y Roberts, Grain V a n A r e n d o n k , Loren S c h r o t e n b o e r , D a v e Broersma, M a t t N e i l , trainer D o c G r e e n Third row: Scott B e n s o n , D a l e W o l f e , G o a c h G l e n n V a n W i e r e n , Rick Reece, John S u t t o n .


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C a p t a i n A n n e M u l d e r , w h o b r o k e the M I A A rebound record tries for two.

"Believe!" T h a t was new coach J a n Ossewaarde's key to success for the '80 w o m e n ' s basketball season. A '79 g r a d u a t e of G r a n d Valley State College, O s s e w a a r d e f o u n d it difficult to coach w o m e n the same age as herself, although it was obvious f r o m the team's enthusiasm that she did an excellent j o b . In a see-saw season a c c o r d i n g to the scoreboard, the girls sought to m a t c h their physical s t a m i n a to their highly charged emotions. C a p tain A n n e M u l d e r aided the team in these efforts by e n c o u r a g i n g good physical condition as well as by a d d i n g emotional support. M o r e than a leader, M u l d e r was a p p r o p r i a t e l y a w a r d e d the Barbara Ellen Geeting A w a r d for her abilities. " C o n s i d e r i n g the great potential of the team this year, a n d realizing that there was only one senior," said s o p h o m o r e J o d y Foy, "next year S. Arwc promises to be a l o o p e r ! " Front row, left to right: C a r o l M i k n i s , Lynn Frank, Deb Fild, Anne Mulder, Pat Henry. Back row; Faye Berens, Jody Foy, L o r a H a n s o n , M a r g i e D e c k a r d , Elsie Jerez, Coach Jan Ossewaarde. Missing; Heidi Burke, M a r y Stewart.

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Cheerleaders Reach New Heights A c c o r d i n g to Coach Maxine DeBruyn, this year's c h e e r l e a d i n g squad was the most t a l e n t e d , i n v e n t i v e , and strongest ever t o grace H o p e college. W h i l e insprring c r o w d spirit a n d e n t h u s i a s m , the cheerleaders used a series of new mounts, including the highest a n d m o s t d a n g e r o u s t h e y have ever t r i e d . B e g i n n i n g in A u g u s t f o r t h e f o o t b a l l season, t h e c h e e r l e a d e r s m e t t h r e e or four times weekly throughout the f o o t b a l l and basketball seasons. Each session was d e v o t e d to d e s i g n i n g and p e r f e c t i n g m o u n t s , some of w h i c h reached heights of 25 feet. D e B r u y n said t h a t t h e s q u a d

w o r k e d t o w a r d a goal of m e e t i n g or e x c e e d i n g last year's N a t i o n a l Cheerleading champions, Michigan State University. In DeBruyn's eyes they succeeded. The H o p e squad was c h o s e n by o t h e r squads in t h e M I A A c o n f e r ence as t h e t e a m most w o r t h y of c o m p e t i t i o n in t h e N a t i o n a l Cheerleading Championships. However, due to Hope's division III r a n k i n g in t h e N C A A , t h e i r a p p l i c a t i o n t o c o m p e t e in t h e Nationals was not a c c e p t e d by t h e N a t i o n a l C h e e r l e a d i n g Asso-

ciation. O f f the field and court, the cheerleaders occupied themselves by h o s t i n g a c h e e r l e a d i n g c l i n i c for area h i g h school cheerleaders. The c l i n i c d r e w over 300 cheerleaders, and according to many, was very successful. In a d d i t i o n t o t h e c h e e r l e a d i n g c l i n i c , t h e cheerleaders w o r k e d w i t h t h e A l u m n i O f f i c e for coll e g e p r o m o t i o n by a t t e n d i n g A l u m n i O f f i c e hosted b a n q u e t s and talking w i t h a t t e n d i n g Alumni. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; D. M u l v a n e y

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Top to bottom: Edna Cuellar, Kris Koops, Sara Cady, M a r c i a Santeford, Art Colegrove, Chris Brauning, )an K l o m p a r e n s , Sam Aidala Not pictured: Tisch Carr, Leslie Bethards, Jane D e Y o u n g , Art Kurtze, Mark Van Mater.


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Kevin K r a n e n d o n k gives Kelle M a l k e w i t z a l i f t - u p .

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I g n o r i n g the c o l d w e a t h e r , Edna Cuellar, Tisch Carr, M a r k Van M a t e r a n d Art C o l e g r o v e team u p t o support w h o ' s " n u m b e r o n e . "

The 1979-80 Basketball Cheerleaders: Top to b o t t o m : K e l l e M a l k e w i t z , Sara C a d y , f a n e D e Y o u n g , Jan K l o m p a r e n s , A n n Carey, Tisch Carr, John Fanthorpe, )ulie Bosch, Mark B o u n d y , Kris Koops, Art Kurtze, Kevin Kranend o n k , a n d Chris Brauning.

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Right: Jim G o o r h o u s e t h r o w s a fast o n e Below: W a t c h i n g anxiously f r o m sidelines, are Perry Paginelli, Jeff S h i p m a n , Gary H u t c h i n s , a n d John V a n d e G u c h t e .

First row, left to right: Keven M a l k e w i t z , D a n M o l e n a a r , Jeff W e l c h , Rick Z o u l e k , Gary H u t c h i n s , Perry Paginelli, ) o h n V a n d e G u c h t e , Kevin W a t s o n , Peter Rink. M i d d l e row: M a t t B ult m an, C o a c h B ul t m a n, Jim G o o r h o u s e ,

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Jack VanderMaas, M a r k T h o m p s o n , Jamie Robertson, Jim V a n d e G u c h t e , jay Norris, T i m Y o u n g , C o a c h Ray Smith Back row: Bob Paul, Jeff Shipman, John M o o l e n a a r , Dale W o l f , Jeff Meyers, Carl Thorsburg, a n d Ed Stinson.


Tough Season for Baseball Saving t h e t e a m f r o m an o t h e r w i s e h o m e r u n , is B o b Paul.

A n unsuccessful season a c c o r d i n g t o t h e scoreboard, H o p e ' s baseball t e a m had m o r e individual accomplishments than team. Perry Paginelli, n a m e d most valuable player, was also d e s i g n a t e d All M I A A , first t e a m hitter, w i t h a b a t t i n g average o f .351. Jim G o r h o u s a n d Jeff W e l c h w e r e also d e s i g n a t e d All M I A A s e c o n d team, as t h i r d and first basemen respectively. The A q u i n a s t o u r n a m e n t , w h i c h involves four teams, p r o v e d to be o n e o f t h e h i g h p o i n t s of the season, as H o p e placed first. The o t h e r h i g h - p o i n t was t h e final game of t h e year, w h e n H o p e beat c o - c h a m p i o n s A l m a C o l l e g e in a d o u b l e header, 12-11, a n d 10-9. It t o o k an extra i n n i n g in b o t h games m a k i n g for an e x c i t i n g m a t c h for spectators as w e l l as team m e m b e r s . A l t h o u g h the team is losing m a n y g o o d players next spring, c o a c h Jim B u l t m a n looks f o r w a r d t o next year, w i t h hopes of w o r k i n g o n the p i t c h i n g â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and s o m e g o o d i n c o m i n g players.

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K e v i n W a t s o n a n d Gary H u t c h i n s share j o k e s a l o n g w i t h w a r m - u p s .


A Season of Ups D e n i s e L e v e t o v m a k e s p i t c h i n g l o p k easy.

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It was a g o o d year for t h e w o m e n ' s softball t e a m d e s p i t e the fact that t h e y placed f o u r t h in t h e league. W i t h e i g h t n e w m e m b e r s , seven of t h e m f r e s h m e n , and seven g o o d r e t u r n i n g players, H o p e had a very strong team. A c c o r d i n g to Coach A n n e I r w i n , t h e p r o b l e m was not t h e players themselves, but w i t h t h e mechanics of team w o r k and t h e i n c o n s i s t e n c y of the weather. In her f o u r t h year of c o a c h i n g Softball here at H o p e , I r w i n said this was t h e first year w i t h a d e f i n i t e c u t . In past y e a r s , w o m e n trying out were cut simply because it was not possible for e v e r y o n e t o play. This year, h o w e v e r , five r e t u r n i n g players, w h o w e r e very g o o d , w e r e c u t t o make r o o m for some i n c o m i n g f r e s h m e n w h o w e r e better. W i t h a g o o d team under her, I r w i n a n t i c i p a t e d a great season. Things started o u t w e l l as t h e team c o m p e t e d in sunny Florida, but as they r e t u r n e d n o r t h , the w e a t h e r g r e w w o r s e and the t e a m d i d , too. They e n d e d t h e season w i t h a record of 4-12.

In spite of t h e p o o r season, t h e w o m e n d i d have some very impressive games. In a t o u r n a m e n t against Q u i n c y College, a D i v i s i o n II school and t h e state c h a m p i o n s of Illinois, H o p e beat t h e m in o n e game o u t of three. A n o t h e r t i m e , w h e n p l a y i n g G r a n d Valley — D i v i s i o n II state c h a m p i ons — H o p e w o n 4-2. I r w i n feels these are great a c c o m p l i s h m e n t s w h i c h i n d i c a t e t h e true strength of this year's team. A n d w i t h t h e g o o d f o u n d a t i o n b u i l t this year, I r w i n sees a p r o m i s i n g season ahead. T h o u g h all t h e players this year w e r e equal in t h e sense that they w e r e all strong in a particular area, t w o i n d i v i d u a l s s t o o d o u t ; s o p h o m o r e Faye Berens, w h o w a s v o t e d most valuable player by her teamm a t e s , a n d also r e c e i v e d t h e A l l State A w a r d f o r t h e s e c o n d t i m e , an h o n o r given to o n l y ten of t w o h u n d r e d girls f r o m D i v i s i o n II s c h o o l s ; a n d H e a t h e r Uecker, w h o received M o s t I m p r o v e d Player, was t h e o t h e r a w a r d w i n n e r . I r w i n felt b o t h of these girls w e r e very d e s e r v i n g of their awards. — M. Webb

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Front r o w , left t o right: Faye B e r e n s , L y n n B u f e , L y n n F r n a k , Julie ) o h n s o n , T r i s h W a l k e r , L y n n D e B r y a n , Susie T a g u e Back r o w : C a r r i e Israel, l o d y Foy, Pam C u s h m a n , N a n c y K r o p f , F l e a t h e r U e c k e r , Sue V a n K l e y , M a s c o t , Sue A l l i e , Liz G r i m e s , Coach Anne Irwin.

T h i n g s are s t a r t i n g t o l o o k - u p f o r t h e t e a m as c a t c h e r , M a r y L o u l o h n s o n a t t e m p t s t o m a k e the play. (Photo credits Pam Cushman.)

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Front row, left to right; Sharon M c K e e , Karline M u i r , Cheryl Kiel Back row: C o a c h M a r y G r o n d i n , Carol Ryskamp, Brad

Lambrix, M e l o d y H e n r i k s o n , Leah Fisher, W e n d y Hansen.


Archers Come in W o m e n ' s archery had an e n t i r e l y n e w l o o k for the 1980 season. For the first t i m e , t h e w o m e n w e r e s h o o t i n g i n d o o r s . T r a d i t i o n a l l y archery has been an o u t d o o r sport, but the u n p r e d i c t a b i l i t y of early spring w e a t h e r always p r o v e d t o be as big a challenger to t h e w o m e n as t h e o p p o s i n g teams. The m o v e i n d o o r s e l i m i n a t e d t h e p r o b l e m s of r a i n , s n o w , w i n d , a n d c o l d a n d a l l o w e d for better s h o o t ing and m o r e e n j o y a b l e meets. H o w e v e r , even w i t h the i m p r o v e d s h o o t i n g arrangements, t h e squad's final record was 2 a n d 4. C o m p e t i t i o n f r o m Kalamaz o o , A l b i o n , and A l m a p r o v e d stiff for t h e H o p e w o m e n , s o m e of w h o m w e r e m a k i n g t h e i r d e b u t s as archers. Some of t h e girls m a k i n g u p the squad w e r e seasoned veterans but others got t h e i r i n i t i a l i n t r o d u c t i o n t o t h e b o w a n d a r r o w at t h e i r first practice. B e i n g e x p e r i e n c e d i s n ' t necessary t o b e c o m e a m e m b e r of t h e team, but h a v i n g an interest is. As a m a t t e r of f a c t , o n e y o u n g m a n , Brad L a m b r i x , s h o w e d an interest in s h o o t i n g just t o keep in practice and was a d o p t e d as an u n o f f i c i a l m e m b e r of the team. Because t h e archery squad is n o n - c o e d . Brad c o u l d n ' t c o m p e t e in meets, but he p r a c t i c e d w i t h the team every day and lent moral s u p p o r t d u r i n g meets. The e n d of t h e year c r u n c h caused some p r o b lems for t h e t e a m as study t i m e i n t e r f e r e d w i t h practice t i m e . H o w e v e r , f r o m the talent d i s p l a y e d this year, next year looks to be p r o m i s i n g . â&#x20AC;&#x201D; A. Radtke

Photo credits P. Paarlberg.

W e n d y H a n s e n prepares t o t a k e her t u r n at s h o o t i n g

From the Cold . . .

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H o p e ' s largest men's track t e a m ever, the 4 5 - m a n c r e w w o r k e d hard t o c a p t u r e t h i r d place in t h e seasonal standings, t o p p e d o n l y by Calvin, and A l b i o n . A c c o r d i n g to Coach G o r d o n Brewer, t h e d i s t a n c e runners w e r e the s t r o n g p o i n t of the team. M a n y of t h e m had run Cross C o u n t r y in t h e Fall, and m a d e an o u t s t a n d i n g s h o w i n g o n the track t e a m in the Spring. In p r e v i o u s years, the sprinters at H o p e w e r e t h e w e a k p o i n t of the team. This year, w i t h t h e h e l p of t e a m captains Steve H u l s t , G l e n n L u t h e r , a n d John V a n A r e n d o n k , t h e sprinters, relay racers, p o l e vaulters and hurdlers i m p r o v e d t r e m e n d o u s l y , a i d i n g in t h e final 3rd s t a n d i n g at t h e e n d of t h e season. The c o m b i n a t i o n of abilities f r o m p r e v i o u s s q u a d m e m bers and i n c o m i n g f r e s h m e n that s h o w e d p r o m i s i n g a b i l i t y , p r o v e d to be t h e key t o a successful season.

T. Lamen

T h e e n d o f a l o n g race â&#x20AC;&#x201D; l o n g d i s t a n c e r u n n e r M a r t i n S c h o e n m a k e r expresses his s e n t i m e n t s .

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; L. K n i g h t

H u r d l e r s , ) o h n V a n A r e n d o n k , Joel M a r t i n u s , a n d Randy Beck, s t r u g g l e t o k e e p u p w i t h K a l a m a z o o C o l l e g e .

166


On the Winning Track . . . V W

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Far Left: B r e a k i n g t h e r i b b o n , G l e n n Luther proves H o p e a n d h i m s e l f v i c t o r i o u s Left: D a v e M c K i n n e y does his best in relay racing. T. Lamen

T. Lamen

T Renner

Front row, left to right: John V i c t o r , M a r t i n Schoenmaker, Rod A r n o l d , | o h n V a n A r e n d o n k , Randy Beck, Scot Van Der M e u l e n , D i c k N o r t h u i s , )oel M a r tinus, D a r w i n B r o u w e r , Dan Rink, Steve Sayer Middle row: Dave Sterk, Mark S o u t h w e l l , Rich C o r d o n , Bill Hoekstra, G r e g Sturrus, | o h n C o u g h e n o u r , Steve D e V e t t e , M a r k T. H o w a r d , Chris Fleming, Kevin Tavenier, Mark

N o r t h u i s , Paul D a m o n , j i m Schumaker. Back row: Coach W i l l Root, C o a c h Russ D e V e t t e , j o h n Lunderberg, Rich Burrell, Steve VerHulst, G l e n n Luther, D a v i d M c K i n n e y , T o m H o p , Steve C a m e r o n , Steve W i s s i n k , D o u g Cushman, Steve Huggins, Fred W a r d , C o a c h G o r d o n Brewer, C o a c h T o m Pierson. /

167


Team's Low Score Hampers Individual Wins Perhaps best d e s c r i b e d as a frustrating season, Hope's w o m e n ' s track team d i d its best, o n l y t o s h o w success in i n d i v i d u a l w i n s rather t h a n the final o u t c o m e . " W e had some excellent athletes . . . just not t h e d e p t h , " said c o a c h Sandy Parker. The t e a m d i d have some o u t s t a n d i n g athletes. M a r g i e D e c k e r t , w h o ran t h e 100 m e t e r hurdles p l a c e d first in almost every meet, along w i t h Gloria D e W a a r d w h o d i d place first every t i m e in t h e 1500 meter. Missy K n o p f w h o ran the t w o - m i l e usually placed first and D e b Bussema p l a c e d first or

s e c o n d in every meet, r u n n i n g t h e 100 and 200 meter. In f i e l d e v e n t s . Sue W i l l i a m s a n d C a r o l y n M i k n i s p r o v e d s u c c e s s f u l as W i l l i a m s usually p l a c e d first in discus t h r o w i n g , a n d M i k n i s p l a c e d first in t h e l o n g j u m p at t h e c o n f e r e n c e meet. Yet even these e x c e p t i o n a l m e m b e r s c o u l d not p u l l t h e t e a m o u t of a 2-3 season, a l t h o u g h t h e t e a m d i d manage to place s e c o n d in the league. A r o u g h , but overall successful season, H o p e ' s w o m e n l o o k f o r w a r d to b e t t e r i n g t h e i r skills a n d t h e i r scores next spring.

......

T. Lamen

A b o v e : M a r g i e Deckert moves ahead t o m a i n t a i n her lead over Kalamazoo. Right; R u n n i n g t h e 1500 meter is Gloria D e W a a r d .

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168

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K i m B r o w n a n d Brenda V a n d e r w e r f put their best foot f o r w a r d Below: Melissa K n o p f a n d A n d r e a Ehm ann pace themselves for the j o u r n e y ahead

Front row, left to right; Nancy Ritchie, Suzanne DeVries, Gloria D e W a a r d , Brenda V a n d e r w e r f , Val M a t t h e w s , |oy Dean. Middle row: Barb H r u b e s h , Beth B i s c h o f f , Patti Bolman, C a r o l i n e )ones, Melissa K n o p f , D e b b i e Bussema, K i m B r o w n , Nancy D e W i t t e , Coach Sandra Parker Back r o w : Barb K o e p p e , Sue W i l l i a m s , A n d r e a Ehmann, Chris Stegehuis, M a r g i e D e c k a r d , Pat Vandermeulen.

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169


T. Laman

T w o d e t e r m i n e d centers prepare to compete.

Lacrosse Club

T. Laman

D a n Heneveld carries the ball between two o p p o n e n t s .

T. Laman

Kevin Worley makes an attack shot on the goal.

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T, L a m a n

Front row, left to right: K e v i n W o r l e y , Brad C o o k , J o h n C r o n k , D a v i d V a n E e n e n a a m , M a r k L a m a n , Scott D o w , D e n n y G r i f f e n , G r e g Bekius, T i m Ireland. Second row: S c o t t D e W i t t , M i k e M c C a r l e y , R a n d y K l a s i n g , G e o r g e C a r a v e l l a , J o h n P e a c h e y , C r a i g G a r f i e l d , T o m K e a t o n , M i k e L a p r e s , Kevin M a r i a n i , D o u g H e n e v e l d , M a r k V a n G e s s e l .

T h e H o p e Lacrosse C l u b is j u s t that â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a club. It is loosely structured a n d , in m a n y ways, lacking a certain formal discipline, but m a y b e this self-governing group f u n c t i o n s so well because it is its own m a n a g e m e n t . Lacrosse at H o p e is more casual than a school sport. The club m e m b e r s practice with scrimmages â&#x20AC;&#x201D; mock games rather than with repetitive drills. T h e r e is n o active recruiting for m e m b e r s h i p in the club. R e t u r n i n g players talk it up a r o u n d c a m p u s a n d interested novices can " a u d i t i o n " a n d try out their hands, a n d sticks, at the game. Scott DeWitt says that the g a m e is easy a n d quick to learn. "It took me three or four weeks to learn," he stated, "I wasn't the best out there but I did o k a y . " Tri-captain T o m K e a t o n a r r a n g e d the club's s c h e d u l e t h i s y e a r by c o n t a c t i n g o t h e r c l u b teams. T h e club had an even win-loss record this s e a s o n , w i t h f i v e g a m e s in e a c h c a t e g o r y . I m p r o v e m e n t can be seen, however, in the fact that the Lacrosse club won four of its last five confrontations. K. Joy Nyenhuis D e n n y G r i f f e n fights f o r possession of t h e ball.

/

171


It Takes Something It was an e x c i t i n g year f o r t h e w o m e n ' s t e n n i s t e a m as they w o n the M I A A Champio n s h i p a n d the state t o u r n a m e n t f o r D i v i s i o n III schools. It was also a great season for Alices Droppers, the new women's tennis coach, w h o b e g a n her c o a c h i n g career this year w i t h t h e w o m e n ' s t e a m . D r o p p e r s , a 1978 g r a d u a t e of H o p e , b e g a n her c o l l e g e career at t h e U n i v e r s i t y o f M i n n e s o t a but transferred to Hope, and p l a y e d o n t h e t e n n i s t e a m , her s e n i o r year. As t h e n e w w o m en's c o a c h . D r o p p e r s set h i g h b u t realistic goals f o r t h e t e a m a n d t h r o u g h hard w o r k , lots o f concentration, and a condit i o n i n g p r o g r a m these goals i.e., first in C o n f e r e n c e , w e r e met. A l t h o u g h D r o p p e r s felt practice was important, she e x p l a i n e d t h a t 99 p e r c e n t o f t e n n i s is m e n t a l a n d t h e r e f o r e p l a c e d a lot o f e m p h a s i s o n t h e d e v e l o p m e n t of a g o o d m e n t a l a t t i t u d e . T o a c h i e v e this a t t i t u d e , D r o p p e r s said it was n e c essary f o r t h e t e a m t o be p h y s i cally fit. T h e r e f o r e , she b e g a n a conditioning program which consisted of warm-up stretches, j u m p i n g rope and r u n n i n g sprints or distances for t h e first 15-20 m i n u t e s of pract i c e . This p r o g r a m w a s s o m e thing n e w for the w o m e n , but t h e y t o o k it in s t r i d e a n d D r o p pers felt t h e p r o g r a m c o n t r i b u t e d t o t h e w i n n i n g season. Despite a good competitive season, it was a h a r d year in t e r m s o f i n j u r i e s . Five o u t of the ten team members experie n c e d s o m e sort o f i n j u r y a n d w e r e u n a b l e t o p l a y at o n e t i m e or a n o t h e r ; a n d n u m b e r one player. T a m m y Paauwe, was o u t at t h e start o f t h e season d u e t o a leg i n j u r y . H o w ever, as a result o f g o o d t e a m d e p t h , this y o u n g t e a m , c o n sisting of f i v e f r e s h m e n , t h r e e sophomores, and t w o juniors, was a b l e t o e n d t h e season v i c toriously. — M. Webb

172

Right: N a n c y lanelli, a m e m b e r of this year's State C h a m p i o n s h i p team, reveals t h e e m o t i o n a l side of w o m e n ' s tennis. Below: A n n Stauffer makes a d y n a m i c return.

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Front row, left to right: Jane D e c k e r , Sally C e t m a n , A n n Stauffer Back row: Lynne D e M o o r , Kelly H o g a n , Tammie D i e m e r , N a n c y lanelli, Kathy K o z e l k o , C o a c h Alices D r o p p e r s .


More Than Practice Ending the season w i t h a strong s e c r n d and even t h o u g h they d i d n ' t take the desired first, Coach G r e e n was not displeased. " W h e n the season began, I was c a u t i o u s l y o p t i m i s t i c , " said G r e e n , but by the e n d of t h e season he felt the t e a m had w o r k e d hard, " t h e y w e r e a very c o n s c i e n t i o u s g r o u p , " a n d had d o n e very w e l l . Coach Green's n u m b e r o n e goal is " a l w a y s t o w i n as m u c h as possible," and in o r d e r t o d o this G r e e n feels it is i m p o r t a n t to not o n l y practice but to play c o m p e t i t i v e l y . That was the reason for their t w e l v e - d a y t r i p south, d u r i n g Spring break, w h e r e they c o m p e t e d in 10 matches, i n c l u d i n g o n e in Nashville and A t l a n t a a n d o n e at W a b a s h College in Indiana o n t h e w a v home. As far as facilities go. G r e e n was pleased w i t h the fact that t h e H o l l a n d Tennis C l u b was very g e n e r o u s in l e t t i n g i n d i v i d u a l team m e m b e r s practice there o n t h e i r o w n . He also felt that D o w e n h a n c e d practices by e n a b l i n g t e a m m e m b e r s t o practice i n d i v i d u a l l y against the back walls at almost any t i m e of t h e day or night. A n d t h e n e w w a r m - u p s , g i v e n by some H o p e a l u m n i , d i d m u c h to boost team morale. Overall, G r e e n was satisfied w i t h the w a y the season w e n t . G r e e n felt that part of the reason t h e t e a m d i d not live u p to his e x p e c t a t i o n s was that they put academics first; but G r e e n was really q u i t e pleased a b o u t this, as he boasted t h e fact that m a n y of his players w e r e science majors and m a i n t a i n e d h i g h G.P.A.'s. Because the team was such a y o u n g o n e , (one j u n i o r , f o u r s o p h o m o r e s , and the rest f r e s h m e n ) . G r e e n t h i n k s the team has great p o t e n t i a l and p r o v i d e d that most of t h e m r e t u r n next year, he believes they have a g o o d chance at b e a t i n g Kalamazoo! â&#x20AC;&#x201D; M. W e b b

i ). Hazekamp

T y p i c a l o f t h e '80 M e n ' s t e n n i s t e a m , R o n McKay makes a c o n f i d e n t and d e t e r m i n e d effort.

K

T. Renner

Above: Front row, left to right: D o u g Ruch, John Christian, Paul Lubbers, Mark Schrier, T i m e Custer, Ron McKay Back row: |eff W y n s m a , M a r k l o h n s o n , j i m Zandee, l e r o m e l e l i n e k . Bill Boersma, Coach ( D o c ) Green ). Hazekamp

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PEOPLE PEOPLE PEOPLE PEOPLE PEOPLE PEOPLE PEOPLE PEOPLE PEO PLE

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" U - H a u l " in a c t i o n .

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H e i d i Perez e n t e r t a i n s i n t h e PIT.

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W i n t e r Fantasia in D e W i t t

R Beck

T. Lamen

S o p h o m o r e Song g r o u p l o o k s o n t h e i r play cast, as all e x c i t e d l y a w a i t t h e j u d g e s d e c i s i o n .

PEOPLE 175


A n d e r s o n , Elizabeth A n d e r s o n , Ingrid Arneson, Janet Baar, Sheryl Back, Lisa B a r n a b y , Lisa

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Baar, David Barthel, T o m Beck, R a n d y Beckwith, Amy Begly, A d a m Berndt, Kris

Bieri, Bob Boonstra, J e a n

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Boote, Evan Bosche, Julie

Bouma, Pamela Brink, J e a n n e

G r e g VerBeek. Jim Kuiper, a n d Tim Tietz, practice W a t e r g a t e tactics in Kollen

Brown, A n n e Bruck, Chris Brumm, Nancy Bullard, K a t h y Burd, Chayris Byer, C r a i g

Callender, G r a c e C a m p b e l l , J o Lynn Campbell, M a r y Sue Carey. Anne Cassell, Mary Christian, J o h n

176

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J. Hazekamp

Dave V a n e e n e h a a m c o m m e n t s a b o u t studying on weekdays. Civilette, Lisa Conroy, T h o m a s Conser. J o h n Cordes, J u d y Craig. Colleen Crooks. M e r r i a m

C u s h m a n . Douglas Custer. T i m Cuti, J o n a t h o n Dahlke. Kim D a m e . Jill Daniels. Patricia

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:ur Davis, Christie Davis. T i m o t h y Dawes. Tim Dean. Eva Deckard. Margie Denkas. Lori

177


Defreese, Marcia D e n e k a s . Lori

D e n H a r t o g , Daniel DeWeerd. Judy

D e W o l f f . Dea D l o u g h y . Elizabeth

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Bob Dame gets the point of the chapter.

Driesenga, Kim D o o r n b o s , Lisa D u i s t e r h o f , Julie Dykstra, Mary E f f e n s , Linda Eggebeen, Deborah

/ sKi i m r Fanthorpe. John Fiet, L e a n n e Fikse, D a v i d Fleming, Carol Forton, Jennifer Frank, Lynn

F r i e b e r g , Blair G a f f , Sherri Garfield, Ronald Gargano. Anne Glass, Amy G n a d e , Linda

Goldzung, Constance Greene, Tamara Hanson, Wendy Harrison, Gregory H a r t j e , Linda Harvey, Debra

178

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Haskins, Scott Hilal, K a r e n Hoeksema, Deborah H o f f , Brian H o g a n , Kelly Holm, Melody

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Holm, Susan Hood, Chuck Hoogerhyde, M a r y K a y e Hoyes, L e a n n e Hui, Mo-Sze H y m a , Lorraine

I h r m a n , Claire Jensen, Lars Johanson, Cathy J o h n s o n , Julie Johnson, Mark Jones, C a r o l i n e

Kapischke, Heidi Kasa, Stephen Keil, Cheryl Keizer, G r e t c h e n K e n n d y , Rich Kisken, Pete

Klaasen, Hialrie Kleinheksel, Kevin Knight, L e V o n d a Knittel, Bridgette Knoebber, Tom Kollen, Julie

Pa a rl b e r g

Kraay, K a r e n

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Karen T h o m p s o n a n d her " d a t e " await the j u d g e s decision on their Halloween costumes.


Krahe, Diana Kreche. Kathryn K uiper , Jim K u y e r , Susan Kyros, Pamela L a m a n , Tim

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L a n d o n , Carla Larson. K i m m Lein, J o n a t h o n Lewis, Len Lewis, R e n e e Lillrose, J a n n i e

Logie, Kim Lohmann, Uwe

J. Hazckamp

Lubbers, Kimberly Mackinnon, Cyndee

M a r e m a , Dave Masschelin, J o h n

Sarah H o l b r o o k pauses to give the c a m e r a m a n a smile.

M c D o w e l l , Carol M c R o b e r t , Cindy Miller, Cheryl Miller, Linda Miller, Stacey

M i n n e m a , Julie Moolenaar, John M o r k , Brian Mountcastle, J a n e t Nicholas, M a n a N o r t h o u s e , Molly

180

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N u m m e r d o r , Kari O'Donnell, Kathy Olson, K a t h y Ott, Linda Ozinga, K a r e n

Powe, Barb Paauwe, Lisa Faff, Cindi Park, T h o m a s Paterra, R h o n d a Pease, D o n n a

% Pisani, Lisa Pluister, Carol

Pollock, William Pringle, A n n e

Puckett, D u n c a n P u t n a m , Kristina

P. P a a r l b c r g

Posing as penguins, D i a n e Bos a n d Lynn D e B r y a n try out a new goblin image R a a b e , David Raak, Christine Ramano, Cynthia Ramel, L a u r a Rawlmgs, Julie Ream, Linda

R e d m o n d , Danielle Reeder, K a t h y Repke, J a n e Reynolds, D e L y n n Rietburg, R o b b i Rietveld, Lisa

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181


Rogers. Brian R o m a n o , Cynthia Rupright, Gregory Schemper, Cheryl Scott, J a m e s Shively, Linda

Shum, C h i u H u n g Southwell, M a r k Spruit, Susan Stallone, Steven Stauffer, A n n

Stegenga, Lynn Steghuis, Christine Stewart, B a r b a r a Stone, A n n Straw, Lydia Strouf, Linda

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Stuglik, Angie Suchecki, Brenda Tague, Suzanne T a n n i n g a , Polly Tanis, N o r a Lea T a v e m i e r , Kevin

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TenPas, Richard TenHoeve, Tom

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182

In an effort to escape the noise of his room, M a r t i n Buhl moves to the hall to talk on the p h o n e . . . only to find that it's noisy there too.


Thompson, Karen Thompson, Karen

Tucker, Ashley Tuttle, D a w n M a r c h a n d

VandeGuchte, James VanderHaar, Jane

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Chris Jasperse displays her new technique for playing volleyball. VanderKuy, Cathy V a n d e r W e r f f , Brenda V a n E e n e n a a m , Peter VanSweden, Bryan VerBeek, G r e g VerSteeg, Kristen

Viqansky, G e r a l d Visscher, Lori Visser, Peggy W a n g , Linda Weeber, N a n c y Weidenfeller, J o h n

Wester, M a r y J o Wre, Shori Ling White, Susan Winter, Ellen Wiseman, Susan Wissink, Brian

1

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183


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Beck, M a r y Beckerink, Rod Beckus, Bob Berens, Faye Bergy, Gail Bethards, Leslie

I

Beuker, Melissa Bian. Lana Black. Cindy Boersma, Paul Bolema, Ted Bolman, Patti

184

L


Borr, Bradley Bourn, K a r e n B r a n d s m a , Daniel Brinks, M a r y Brouwer, L i n d a Brower, Paul

1 Bryant, Marshall Bufe, Lynn Buikema, Betty C a m p , Russell Carr, Tish Claerbout, Linnae

C o o k , Brad Corretore, J a n e t

Cortes, Veronica Cronk, John

* Dahlgren, G o r d o n DeVree, Susan

I f A

DeVries, Chris DeWitt, Bill

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Paula Miller irons in the most p o p u l a r place for such chores â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the b a t h r o o m .

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Emig, C i n d y Feenstra, R u t h

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P. P a a r l b e r g

Jeff Krehbiel sings at a s t u d e n t showcase F l a n a g a n , Linda F o r t h , Lynn Gaffney, Matthew G a l l a n d , Benta G e u r k i n k , Susan G i d d a y , Lisa

G n a d e , Kim G u n d e r s e n , Daniel Gysbers, D e b b i e H a n s o n , Lora H a s b r o u c k , Fitch H e i k e m a , Karen

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186

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H e r e n d e e n , Philip H o f f m a n , Maria H u r f o r d , Teresa J a k e w a y . Patrick Jelensperger, Claire Jerez, Elsie

Jewett, A b b y J o h n s o n , Denise Johnson, Doug J o h n s o n , Mark Kalee, D e b K a l m b a c h , Steven

Kennedy, Karen Klahr. Stephanie

Klein, D o n n a Klein, Douglas

K n o p f , Melissa Koedyker, Harvey

i

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D e b b i e Webster with a true N y k e r k smile at '82 Song practice. Koning, T h o m a s Krafft. Kathy Krehbiel, Jeff Kuiper, Kimberly Lawrence, K a t h y LeKobza, Victoria

Leslie, Linda Lohman, Ronna M a r c e n y , Suzanne Marsh, N a n Martinez, Joel Miknis, Patricia

187


M o n a g h a n , Lois

M o o k , Brett

Moore, Nancy

Morey, Jane

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R o d A r n o l d (left) a n d D a v e P a t e r (right) in d i v i n g u n i f o r m s f o r t h e K o l l e n d o r m O l y m p i c s .

Moner, Dean Muir, Karline Muyskens, Mary Neivel, Kay Niel, M a t t Nguyen, Thuy

O'Brien, Karen O o m k e s , Sheryl Pell, B a r b a r a Penhorwood, Teresa Porte, M i c h a e l Purvis, A m y

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188


Quiring. Powell R e d m o n d , Molly Reiss, Rick Rezelman, Sue Ellen Rhem, D a v i d Ryskamp. Carol

Sanderson, J a n e Santefort, Marcia Schippers, Beth Schrier, M a r k Scott, K a t h y Seitz, Kevin

Seitz, Kimberly Sloan, Jayne

i Smith, Albert Smith, S a n d r a

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Sandy Smith spies a prospective f r e s h m a n in Felicitations.

189


Surridge. Cathy Tait. N a n c y Tavakola, Zahra Taylor, Tim VanBeveren, Joy V a n D e n O e v e r . Lori

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H o H o H o — P a m F o r t u i n a n d K i m Seitz reflect the 3rd floor Kollen C h r i s t m a s spirit. V a n d e r H o e k . Michael V a n d e r L a a n , Jim V a n d e r M e u l e n . Patricia V a n d e W a g , Jim V a n D i s , Laura V a n H a a f f e n . Mark

V a n H o u t e n , Marilyn Vanlwaarden, John VanVerst, Scott Vredeveld. Jeff VanWieren, Doug VanWyk, James

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190


J

V o n E h r , Pat Vosteen, M a r y

Walker, J o n a t h a n Walters, N o r e e n

W a r d , Fred Webster, D e b o r a h

Wedemeyer, Kathy White, Peter

P. P a a r l b e r g

Phil H e r e n d e e n searches in vain for something other than c o b w e b s in his mailbox, as Jim V a n d e r l a a n looks on.

Williams, D e b b i e Williams, D i a n e Williams, Susan Williamson, Sarah Wilterdink, J o a n Wisneski, S u z a n n e

Wiszynski, G e o r g e Wolfe, D a l e Wvestnick, Earl

191


Allen, Barbara Allie, Susan A n d e r s o n . Kevin Arwe, Susan Bailey. A u d r e y Baird, Debra

Baxter. R o b e r t a Beam. Earl Beck. K a t h y Bechtel. Carol Bengston. Britt Blair. D e b o r a h

Boeve. Sue Bohn. Jeff

P. C u s h m a n

Bosch. Paul Brouwer. Charla

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Bill G o d i n takes time to smell the flowers Buck. D o u g Burgess. Bruce Burton. Mary Bussies. G l e n n C a d y , Sarah Carlson, Michelle

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192

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JUNIORS

A. Murray

Nancy Torreson, M a t t Haradon, Steve Sayer, and Beth Latimer, display their reactions about eating other than Saga food.

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Cowley, Steve Davros, Bill Dean, William Decker, Jane Decker, Kris D e M a a r , Phil

DeYoung, M a r y Disher, Michael Doorenbos, Dirk Dorow, Roberta Dykema, Joan Dykema, Marianne

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193


Gallagher, Jolene G a y l o r d , Pete

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G e l p i , Steve G i d d a y , Lisa

G i r o d , Carol Granger, Ronda

A Murray N a n c y Edwards settles back after a day in chemistry lab.

Grant, j i m G r i f f i n , Dennis Gruber, Karen G u m p p e r , John H a g a n , Susanne H a r v e y . Beth

4 Haskins, Scott H a v e n , Sue Hellenga, Brenda Hendrickson, Eric Henry, Craig Herpich, Barbara

Hildebrand, Kathy H i l l , Patience Hilldore, M a r y Hodges, Jeff H o f f , Brian H o f f m a n , Sarah

Hoisington, L i z Hoopingarner, K i r k Hornecker, Kenneth Houston, Jeryl H o w a r d , Fred Howard, Mark

194

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Kitchens. G w e n Klein. M a r t i n Klomparens. Jan Knutsen. Cornelius Komejan, Kent Kortering. Larry

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Kraay. Kevin Kronquist, Lisa Kuhrt, Richard Kunzi, D e b Laman. M a r k Langehans. William

A. M u r r a y

Laning. Patricia Lanning. Judy

Larsen. Tracy LeFevre. Steve

Leisten. Ross Leland. Burton

V As a valid alternative to attending class. M a t t Soeter donates blood.

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195


Lootens. Janet Lowe, Kathy Lydens. William Lyons, Jennifer Malewitz, Debbie M a r e m a , David

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M a r k l e James Martle, Sue Masghatei, Masoomeh Matthews, Rodney Matthews, Valerie McMurray, Kirk

T

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M o o i , Kimberly Molenhouse, Bob

\ Moolenaar, Ron Morrow, Nola

n Weather like this makes M i k e Shields think about Spring break.

Munger, James Nielsen, Diane Nieuwkoop, David Norden, Sarah Nevlezer, Lori Nelis, Pat

Nattress, Karen Olsen, Steve Overway, Roxanne Peterson, Betty Petty, Karen Piatt, Nancy

196


Picard. Thomas Poel, T i m Prielipp, Byron Proos, T e r r i Pyle, R u t h Raak. Melissa • / r ' i

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Radtke, A n n Rathbun, R a y m o n d Ream, Linda Rector, Lora Ritchie, N a n c y Roberts, F r e d

J, M c t l h e n y

Russcher, Joel Sadler, D i a n e

Sayer, Steve Schmidt, Jon

Schmidt, Pamela Seeger, John

Ronda Granger demonstrates her attitude toward breaks.

Sells, Debra Shanley, Susan Sheldon, Cheryl Shields, M i c h a e l Shoemaker, Bob Shum, C h i u H u n g

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, "/-N.1 Sievert, Lori Sims, Jim Smant, K a r e n Soeter, M a t t Stearns, Robert

197


J. H a z e k a m p

T i m Jasperse watches the continued action of the men's swim meet.

Strain, John Strainer, Jeannine Stratton, Kathy Tague, Suzanne Tairdyn, Richard TenHave, Garret

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TenHave, Nancy Thiel, Winifred Thompson, Lora Thornburg, Ross Tienstra, Yolanda Tilley, Martin

Tucker, Gary Vandenberg, Carol V a n D e n B r i n k , Sue VandenHombergh, Gaye VanderHaar, Phil VanderHoek, M i k e

198

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V a n D e r M e u l e n , Scott VanderMolen. M a t t VanderVen, John

VanderWerp, Sally V a n D y k e , Sheri VanNostrand, Virginia

mm V a n W y k , Karen VerBeek. Jeff Vossekuil, Kay

Votaw, John Walker, Patricia W a r d , Susan

Waterman, Linda Webb, Nancy Webster, John

D. W a n g

Terri Turpin gives a salute with her fork.

Weener, Susan Wettack, Pam Whitney, T e r n Wickert, Jane Williams, Diane

& Wilson. Vickie Winkels, Lynn Wissink, Jerri Wolffis, Marcia

199


SENIORS I

200

Charles). Aardema Psychology

) e a n n e A. A g n e w Special E d u c a t i o n Higher Horizons, Sigma Sigma

W i l l i a m F. A g n e w Business A d / R e c r e a t i o n C o s m o p o l i t a n , Pull C o a c h

Samuel K. A i d a l a Biology Cosmopolitan, Cheerleading

Barbara A n n A l l a n Mathematics |.V. Basketball, D e l t a Phi

Lori )ean A n d e r s o n Chemistry Chemistry Club, Sunday M o r n i n g Choir

JM Dave Wang

Pat W a l k e r â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a t y p i c a l l y p r o d u c t i v e s e n i o r .

Peter B. A r n o u d s e Chemistry C h e m i s t r y C l u b , Resident Assistant

Karen L y n n B a b i n e c Special E d u c a t i o n I n t e r n a t i o n a l Relations C l u b

I


V i c k i Lynn Bailey Elementary Education

Linda Baker Biology Tri-Beta, Sigma Sigma

Kari Kaye Bearss Learning Disabilities

K e n n e t h L. B e k k e r i n g C o m p u t e r Science

D i a n e L y n n Barr Psychology/Sociology A l p h a G a m m a Phi, Psychology C l u b

G e o r g e K. B a u m g a r t n e r Biology I n f o r m a t i o n Services Photographer

P Paarlberg

Lynn C o m s t o c k a n d f r i e n d s e n j o y a Kletz c o n c e r t

Kristin Bennett Language Arts C o m p o s i t e Delta Phi

Sally )o Berger Special E d u c a t i o n D e l t a Phi, Pan H e l l e n i c Board

I

201


Betty Bice Instrumental Music Symphonette, Orchestra

Leigh A. B o e l k i n s Psychology/Psychology â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sociology C h a p e l C h o i r , M o r t a r Board

Rod B o l h o u s Business A d . / C o m m u n i c a t i o n I n t r a m u r a l Sports, T.V. C r e w

Karl B i e r b a u m Communication/English Cross C o u n t r y , Track

Beth M . B i s c h o f f Physical E d . / R e c r e a t i o n Sigma Sigma, S w i m T e a m

D Wang

Jeanne A g n e w a n d C a r o l y n V a n H o u t e n o n a W e s t M i c h i g a n w i n t e r day.

K a t h r y n Jo B o o h e r Business A d . Business C l u b , D o r m C o u n c i l

Beth A n n Botsis Music C h a p e l C h o i r , Pres. o f D e l t a Omicron

Sandra B l o d g e t t I n s t r u m e n t a l M u s i c Ed. Symphonette, Orchestra

A n n Boluyt Sociology Sigma lota Beta, M g r Volleyball

Kelly A n n e B o w m a n Biology/English I n t r a m u r a l Sports, Band


Steven E d w a r d Bratschie Business A d . / E n g l i s h F o o t b a l l , Fraternal

M a r t i n C . Burg Biology/Chemistry Beta-Beta-Beta, Pull

Deanne Brethower Biology Field H o c k e y , I n t e r n a t i o n a l Relations C l u b

D a v i d L. Bruins P o l i t i c a l Science Emersonian, WTAS

Cheryl Lynn Burchett Special E d u c a t i o n

Stacy Ellen Burris Biology Nykerk Coach, M o r t a r Board

Krysten )oy Bush Elementary Ed. Higher Horizons, Cheerleading

Sheryl B u s m a n Mathematics

D e b o r a h K. Bussema Special E d u c a t i o n D e l t a Phi, Track

P Paarlborg

Brenda D i e t e r m a n a n d j o h n M a c K i n n o n r e m i n i s c e o v e r P h i l a d e l p h i a semester


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) o h n V i c t o r Byl Business A d . C h a p e l C h o i r , French C l u b

H e n r y C. C a m p b e l l Biology Emersonian

D a v i d P. C h a n Chemistry Chapel Choir

T h o m a s )ames C h a n d l e r C o m p u t e r Science Tennis Team, A C M

Rosemary C h r i s t i e Biology Sigma Sigma

S t e p h e n C. C h a p p e l l Psychology S. Coshorn

H o m e c o m i n g c e r e m o n i e s b r i n g e x c i t e m e n t a n d f u n f o r Sue Sharp.

Randy C o f f i l l Political Science Fraternal

204

D o u g l a s D. C o n g d o n Physics A l p h a Epsilon D e l t a , C o n c e r t Band

j u d i t h A. C o o k C o m p u t e r Science A l p h a G a m m a Phi, A C M

Edna R. C u e l l a r Special E d u c a t i o n D e l t a Phi, C h e e r l e a d i n g


Louis Joel C z a n k o Physical E d u c a t i o n Captain of Golf Team, Intramural Director

Leslie Lena D a n i e l s Vocal â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Music C h a p e l C h o i r , Sigma l o t a Beta

Brian C r a i g D e R o o s Biology E m e r s o n i a n , I M Sports

"V.

Carey L. D e W i t t Psychology/Sociology Track, S w i m T e a m

Dena D e W i t t e Business A d , D e l t a Phi

Lynn D e v e n d o r f Psychology/Sociology A l p h a G a m m a Phi, Pan Hellenic Council

v>

Lori Sue D e W i t t Communication

Kevin DeYoung Psychology Psi C h i , A r c a d i a n

Patricia A. D r a k e Political S c i e n c e / P h y s i c a l Ed

S Goshorn

A n n - M a r i e H e l m u s surveys t h e Pull as an 82 M o r a l e C o a c h


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Nancy loan Durband Business A d .

D o u g l a s S. D y k s t r a P o l i t i c a l Science Chapel Choir

Susan E d g c o m b Music

l e n n i f e r L. Elliott English Yearbook Editor, A n c h o r

M a r k W i l l i a m Ennis Sociology A l p h a Phi O m e g a , P u b l i c Safety

S h a r o n Eelton Biology College Chorus

R. Scott F l e t c h e r Biology Knickerbocker

Cindy L Cano Psychology/Sociology

Suzanne G r e u l i c h Elementary Ed. Nykerk, Higher Horizons

T i m o t h y C. G r i f f i n Chemistry Arcadian, American Chemical Society

P Paarlberg

D o u g M u l v a n e y in s e n i o r t e r r i t o r y : t h e Kletz.

i 206


R o d n e y Lee G r i s w o l d Biology

D e b r a L y n n Hall English Chapel Choir, Nykerk Committee

C r a i g A. C r o e n d y k Mathematics/Business Ad. F o o t b a l l , M o r t a r Board

Anneliese Cuthorl English IRC, G e r m a n C l u b

Brenda Joyce H a f n e r Psychology/PsychologySociology Psi C h i , P s y c h o l o g y C l u b

David Hammar Biology D Wang

D a v e C h a n c a u g h t in t h e act at V i l l a g e I n n

V Karyn A. Harrell Biology Orchestra, Symphonette

Paul K e n n e t h H a r t j e Business A d . I n f o r m a t i o n Services P h o t o g r a p h e r , C o n c e r t Band

Ruth A n n e Hascup Special E d u c a t f o n Chapel Choir

Roy H e g g Business A d .


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P. Cushman

Ruth H a s c u p creates m o r e t e a c h i n g aids in an e d u c a t i o n class.

Taylor W . H o l b r o o k Political Science S t u d e n t Congress, A r c a d i a n

Paul L. H o l d e m a n , )r. Chemistry

C o r d o n B. H e r w i g Psychology/Mathematics Soccer, O p u s

A n n L. H i l b e l i n k Education

Karen H o o g e r w e r f Psychology/PsychologySociology A l p h a G a m m a Phi, H i g h e r Horizons

Carla H o o v e r Economics M o r t a r Board, I n t e r - V a r s i t y

I'Wii Paul Hospers Mathematics/Computer Science

208

Barb H o u t m a n Physical Ed. Swim Team

M a r k Taif H o w a r d Chemistry Cross C o u n t r y , Track

Susan )ane H o w e l l Religion N y k e r k , All C o l l e g e Sing


Gary Lee I m m i n k Mathematics M a t h C l u b , Basketball

C o n n i e Isley Political S c i e n c e

W i l l i a m R. ) e l l i s o n Business A d , Emersonian

Pamela A n n l o r d a n Geology/PsychologySociology Geology Club, Higher Horizons

)ohn Kadow Chemistry Chemistry Club

T h o m a s Kasten Biology/Chemistry AED, Arcadian

Thomas B, Keizer C o m p u t e r Science Emersonian, |azz Band

D o r i s B. K e l l o m C o m p u t e r Science A C M , Field H o c k e y

N a n c y E l i z a b e t h Kerle Psychology Psychology Club, O p u s

I Hazekamp

K e i t h Reschke; M r . S o p h i s t i c a t i o n

Scott Kiel Business A d

209


Paul Rene K n o l l Chemistry/German Cosmopolitan, German Club

f

Peter A. K u i k e n Psychology I . M . Sports

). McElheny

A n n e M u l d e r s t u d i e s o v e r a c u p o f Kletz c o f f e e .

/

A r t h u r G. K u r t z e , III Mathematics/Science Composite Cosmopolitan, Cheerleading (Captain)

)anel H. L a w r e n c e Language A r t s C o m p o s i t e D e l t a Phi, V o l l e y b a l l

lennifer Lehman English/Communication/ Psychology Yearbook

l e n n i f e r F. Liggett Business A d . C h a p e l C h o i r , D e l t a Phi

D e b r a Link Special Ed. Sigma lota Beta, A l p h a Phi Omega

l o r d o n lames L o c h Business A d .

lanis L y n n L u n d e e n P s y c h o l o g y / E l e m e n t a r y Ed. C h a p e l C h o i r , D e l t a Phi

Laura Beth M a a t m a n Language Arts C o m p o s i t e


Karen M a l m q u i s t Special Ed.

Geneva Malone Biology Tri-Beta, IMykerk

Mary Manahan

Sally). M a n a h a n M u s i c Ed I n s t r u m e n t a l Band, W i n d Ensemble

Lynne Renee M a x w e l l Humanities Composite Band, W i n d Ensemble

Paul T. M c C u l l o u g h C o m p u t e r Science ACM

lames K e i t h M c E l h e n y Mathematics M a t h C l u b , Phi M u i Epsilon

Pamela G a i l M e y e r English

s

l o c e l y n Louise M a n d Psychology V o l l e y b a l l , M o r t a r Board

Susan M a r v i n Psychology Psychology C l u b , N y k e r k Play

I McElheny

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Randy C o f f i l l in t h e l i b r a r y : w h e n s t u d y i n g is a must

211


Vicki Millard Communication Assistant Y e a r b o o k Editor, Nykerk

tk

Robert L. M i l l e r , )r. Communication

M e l a n i e Elayne M i s k o t t e n Mathematics Nykerk, M a t h Club

L i n d a K. M o e r m o n d Biology A l p a G a m m a Phi

Carol M o h r l o c k Special E d u c a t i o n Special Ed. M i n i s t r y , B i b l e S t u d y Leader

Marie Montanari Music A l p h a Phi O m e g a , M E N C

Ann Marie Moored Humanities H i g h e r H o r i z o n s , Field Hockey

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212

Chris G o l d s c h m i d t b r o w s e s t h e b o o k s t o r e .

A n n e E. M u l d e r Biology Basketball, S y m p h o n e t t e

Barbara). M u l d e r Psychology/Sociology

Stephen Muyskens Political Science M o r t a r Board, C h a p e l C h o i


D o u g l a s A. M u l v a n e y Political S c i e n c e / P s y c h o l o g y O u t i n g C l u b , Y e a r b o o k Staff

N a n c y A. Nearpass Recreation FCA, I n t r a m u r a l s

J. McElheny

Paul N o r a : " I ' l l get y o u f o r t h a t ! "

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Paul D o u g l a s N e d e r v e l t Physics Emersonian

Paul D . N o r a Biology Beta Beta Beta, C h e m i s t r y Club

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R o n n i e C. Nivala Theatre/English

Due Nguyen Business A d . / E c o n o m i c s I n f o r m a t i o n Services Photography

Pamela L y n n N u n e z Communication

Paula D i a n e N u t t e r Psychology Sigma Sigma, H i g h e r Horizons

Samuel Paul N o o r d h o f f Business A d . / E c o n o m i c s

N a n c y J. N y d a m P o l i t i c a l Science


I

S. C o s h o r n

Karen )oy N y e n h u i s Psychology/Sociology

K a t h y Jean N y e n h u i s Language A r t s / D a n c e Track, D a n c e C o n c e r t

C o a c h L u A n n e Ramaccia a n d s e n i o r - s o p h o m o r e c r o w d c h e e r Pull v i c t o r y .

214

Ross A l a n N y k a m p Mathematics F o o t b a l l , FCA

Pamela Jeanne Pater Sociology/Psychology Sunday m o r n i n g Choir, College Chorus

W i l l i a m E. Patterson P o l i t i c a l Science Y o u n g R e p u b l i c a n s , SAC

G r e g o r y Pedelty Psychology Nykerk, Psychology Club

Barbara Pell Education/Humanities

M a r y Peterson Political Science

lack Petiet Chemistry Volleyball Club, Chemistry Club

D a v i d Petty Business A d . Lacrosse, U l t i m a t e Frisbee


Kathleen M , Plesuchenko Psychology/Sociology

Bruce E. O s b e c k Elementary E d u c a t i o n

Klmberly Osterman Special E d . / P s y c h o l o g y D e l t a Phi, H i g h e r H o r i z o n s

A m y Rathbun Business A d .

Keith Robert Reschke Biology A r c a d i a n , Inter Fraternity Council

M a r i a n n e Rice Biology A l p h a G a m m a Phi, Beta Beta Beta

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At the c o n c l u s i o n of m a n y i n t e r v i e w s , it was easy t o see that t h e a c c o m p l i s h m e n t s of t h e Van Raalte staff d o not cease at their j o b d e s c r i p t i o n s . A m a j o r i t y of t h e m carry heavy loads and reach out t o h e l p o n e a n o t h e r . O n e look at Van V l e c k , W i n a n n t s or V o o r h e e s w i l l tell y o u that; not t o m e n t i o n Phelps d i n i n g hall. Bill A n d e r s o n , vicepresident of business and f i n a n c e , e x p l a i n e d a p o r t i o n of the system. " I t is a l o n g - t e r m p l a n n i n g sort of t h i n g , s o m e t i m e s as far ahead as t e n years." The a d m i n i s t r a t i o n is c o n t i n u o u s l y i n i t i a t i n g n e w

projects w h i l e f i n a l i z i n g others. Presently, the Sligh f u r n i t u r e b u i l d i n g , 12th Street, Carnegie, and the Chapel are in the process of renewal. Every aspect of r e n o v a t i o n i n c l u d e s paper w o r k , frustrat i o n , t i m e , p r o m o t i o n a n d f i n a n c i n g . The major p o r t i o n o f t h e f i n a n c i a l b a c k i n g is a c h i e v e d t h r o u g h f u n d raising w h i c h falls i n t o Bob DeYoung's responsibility. W h e n a s k e d h o w he j u g g l e s t h e m o n e y , D e Y o u n g said that H o p e w o r k s t h r o u g h goals and o b j e c t i v e s . O n e o f t h e t a r g e t s is o p e r a t i n g an


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annual f u n d , w h i c h keeps a stead 1 i n f l o w of m o n e y . Capital need such as b u i l d i n g s and e q u i p m e n serve as means for f i n a n c i a l out f l o w . T w o other aims of f u n d rais i n g are p r o g r a m m a t i c f u n d s a m e n d o w m e n t s , w h i c h enable Hope to m a i n t a i n its b u i l d i n g s and c o n tinue renovation. G i f t s a n d d o n a t i o n s are also < large part of f u n d raising. As a nev a d d i t i o n to the p u b l i c relation d e p a r t m e n t , Kurt V a n G e n d e r e r concentrates o n p l a n n e d giving. H( w o r k s closely w i t h John Grelle w h o also deals w i t h estate planning and taxes. President Van W y l e n alsc w o r k s w i t h f u n d raising activities.

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This year he w e n t t o Florida w i t h the "Signs of H o o e " p r o m o t i o n a l f i l m and general c a m p a i g n i n g . The f u n d raising c o n t i n u e s t h r o u g h o u t t h e acad e m i c year, even d u r i n g t h e s u m m e r m o n t h s , by r e n t i n g b u i l d i n g s a n d facilities w h i c h are used by c o n f e r e n c e and c h u r c h groups. Since t h e r e n o v a t i o n is i m p l e m e n t e d by t h e m o n e y f r o m these f u n d s and d o n a t i o n s , H o p e claims t o have t h e lowest t u i t i o n rate in t h e GLCA. H o u s i n g is partially f i n a n c e d t h r o u g h gifts a n d pledges but it is also a i d e d by t u i t i o n . Bruce Johnston, assistant dean of students, was in charge of h o u s i n g t h i s y e a r b e c a u s e Elaine V a n L i e r e m o v e d t o a d m i s s i o n s . A l t h o u g h there was not s u f f i c i e n t t i m e t o hire a r e p l a c e m e n t , Johnston and M i c h a e l Gerrie, d e a n o f students assumed t h e a d d e d w o r k load. " S t u -

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dents d o not realize t h e a m o u n t of w o r k that goes i n t o a s i m p l e r o o m c h a n g e , or w o r s e yet a roommate change," Johnston stated. The f u l l - t i m e j o b that he i n h e r i t e d w a s n e s t e d a t o p his present position. Nevertheless, the p o s i t i o n of D i r e c t o r of Students w i l l be o p e n as o f this summer. It w i l l i n c l u d e t h e organizat i o n and o p e r a t i o n of cottages, dormitories, and supervision of Resident Assistants. M a n y m o r e s t u d e n t s residences were acquired for the 1979-80 school year t o a c c o m m o date the increasing n u m b e r of students living on campus. Hope's purchases and rentals i n c l u d e d four cottages and t w o a p a r t m e n t houses. Johnston surmises that t h e increase in n u m ber of students v o l u n t e e r i n g t o reside on c a m p u s results f r o m t h e rising cost of living.

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R e m a i n i n g a t t r a c t i v e t o present and i n c o m i n g students has been a m a i n o b j e c t i v e of H o p e College; and appears to have been a c c o m p l i s h e d t h r o u g h e f f i cient f a c i l i t a t i o n of d o n a t i o n s , gifts, and f u n d raising. I

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225


SEASONAL

FOOTBALL 1. Hope 2. Adrian 3. Albion 4. Kalamazoo 5. Alma 6. Olivet

SOCCER 1. Calvin 2. Hope 3. Kalamazoo 4. Alma 5. Albion 6. Olivet

FIELD H O C K E Y 1. Albion 2. Calvin 3. Hope 3. Adrian 3. Alma 6. Olivet 7. Kalamazoo

CROSS C O U N T R Y 1. Calvin 2. Hope 3. Albion 4. Alma 5. Kalamazoo 6. Olivet 7. Adrian

GOLF 1. Olivet 2. Alma 3. Albion 4. Hope 5. Kalamazoo 6. Adrian 7. Calvin

VOLLEYBALL 1. Adrian 2. Hope 3. Albion 3. Calvin 5. Kalamazoo 6. Olivet 7. Kalamazoo

ARCHERY 1. Kalamazoo 2. Albion 3. Alma 4. Hope

WRESTLING 1. Olivet 2. Kalamazoo 3. Alma 4. Adrian 5. Calvin 6. Hope

M E N ' S BASKETBALL 1. Calvin 2. Hope 3. Olivet 4. Albion 5. Alma 6. Adrian 7. Kalamazoo

> 226


STANDINGS

W O M E N ' S TRACK 1. Calvin 2. Albion 2. Hope 4. Adrian 4. Alma 6. Kalamazoo

SOFTBALL W O M E N ' S BASKETBALL 1. Adrian 2. Calvin 3. Alma 4. Albion 4. Hope 6. Olivet 7. Kalamazoo

1. Calvin 2. Olivet 3. Adrian 4. Hope 5. Albion 5. Alma

MEN'S TRACK 1. Albion 2. Calvin 3. Hope 4. Olivet 5. Alma 6. Adrian 7. Kalamazoo

M E N ' S TENNIS

WOMEN'S SWIMMING 1. Hope 2. Kalamazoo 3. Albion 4. Alma 5. Adrian 5. Calvin

1. Kalamazoo 2. Hope 3. Alma 4. Calvin 5. Albion 6. Adrian 6. Olivet

W O M E N ' S TENNIS

MEN'S S W I M M I N G 1. Kalamazoo 2. Albion 3. Hope 4. Alma 5. Calvin 6. Adrian

1. Hope 2. Albion 2. Calvin 2. Kalamazoo 5. Alma 6. Adrian 7. Olivet

BASEBALL 1. Alma 2. Calvin 3. Kalamazoo 4. Olivet 5. Albion 6. Hope 7. Adrian

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i t ' s /i hot Tifiein th€ a c towm..: FIRE! W i t h sirens s c r e e c h i n g a n d t i r e s s q u e a l i n g I n t o t h e n i g h t o f J a n u a r y I I t h , f i r e f i g h t e r s r u s h e d t o Klels c o t t a g e on H o p e ' s c a m p u s . By t h e t i m e t r u c k s a r r i v e d , t h e house was f u l l y e n g u l f e d In f l a m e s . F i r e m e n f o u n d t h a t It was p r o b a b l y s t a r t e d b y a c i g a r e t t e as It s t a r t e d In a d i n i n g r o o m s o f a . The f i r e c a u s e d e x t e n s i v e d a m a g e t o t h e b u i l d i n g , w h i c h was b u l l d o z e d d o w n a n d c a r r i e d a w a y a t t h e close o f t h e y e a r . S i n c e t h e s e v e n w o m e n w h o l i v e d t h e r e w e r e h o m e on C h r i s t m a s break, none w e r e hurt, b u t much of t h e i r belongings w e r e d e s t r o y e d . T h r e e t i m e s t h i s f i r e a l a r m has s o u n d e d a t H o p e this y e a r — sending shudders of fear and excitement t h r o u g h everyone. O n A p r i l 21st, t h e 123 y e a r - o l d V a n V l e c k r e s i d e n c e hall f o r w o m e n was n e a r i n g c o m p l e t i o n o f Its r e s t o r a t i o n . Sudd e n l y t w o c o l l e g e e m p l o y e e s saw s m o k e c o m i n g f r o m t h e b u i l d i n g a n d i m m e d i a t e l y n o t i f i e d t h e f i r e d e p a r t m e n t . The f i r e b l a z e d f o r hours e v e n t h o u g h s t u d e n t s a n d m e m b e r s o f t h e c o l l e g e s t a f f assisted f i r e f i g h t e r s . T h e 33 w o m e n w h o l i v e d In t h e house w e r e e v a c u a t e d s a f e l y . Four f i r e m e n h o w e v e r , s u f f e r e d m i n o r Injuries. Fire d a m a g e was l i m i t e d t o t h e r o o f , a t t i c , a n d p o r t i o n s o f t h r e e r o o m s on t h i r d f l o o r . The rest o f t h e b u i l d i n g s u f f e r e d w a t e r a n d smoke d a m a g e . M a n y students and faculty were proud of the revival of t h e s t a t e l y e l e g a n c e r e a p p e a r i n g a t V a n Vleck as r e c o n -

228

s t r u c t i o n was n e a r i n g c o m p l e t i o n . It h e l d m e m o r i e s f o r m a n y a n d was a real shock t o see It h a r m e d . R e l i e f c a m e f o r m a n y as t h e a n n o u n c e m e n t was m a d e t h a t It w o u l d a g a i n b e r e s t o r e d w i t h i n t h e c o m i n g weeks, and the rededication ceremony previously planned for May 10, w o u l d still t a k e p l a c e . H a r d l y o v e r t h e shock f r o m t h e V a n Vleck f i r e , t h e a l a r m s o u n d e d a g a i n in t h e e a r l y hours o f A p r i l 2 8 t h . S t u d e n t s r u s h e d t o t h e i r w i n d o w s s l e e p y - e y e d a n d saw an u n b e l i e v a b l e s i g h t b e f o r e t h e m . Fire a g a i n ! This t i m e , a m a j o r f i r e a t V a n R a a l t e , t h e c e n t r a l a d m i n i s t r a t i o n b u i l d i n g . The f i r e s p r e a d q u i c k l y a n d was so Intense that many nearby d o r m buildings were evacuated. A h u g e c r a n e p r o b e d t h r o u g h t h e h o t a n d s m o k i n g ruins t h e same d a y and picked up several file cabinets f r o m which i m p o r t a n t papers were salvaged although many were damaged. For t h e s e c o n d t i m e t h e c o l l e g e ' s S a g a f o o d s e r v i c e a n d t h e H o l l a n d S a l v a t i o n A r m y " c a t e r e d ' meals t o f i r e f i g h t e r s a n d v o l u n t e e r s . M a n y c o m m u n i t y folks, s t a f f a n d s t u d e n t s worked feverishly with f i r e m e n t o bring the flames under c o n t r o l a n d s a l v a g e w h a t t h e y c o u l d . O t h e r s s t o o d in t h e c r o w d w a t c h i n g in silent h o r r o r , s o m e In t e a r s , o t h e r s v e r y v i s i b l y d i s t r a u g h t a t t h e t h o u g h t s o f w h a t was h a p p e n i n g t o their campus.


Days l a t e r , s m o l d e r i n g ruins w e r e all t h a t was l e f t o f t h e 7 8 - y e a r - o l d b u i l d i n g . A t t h e close o f t h e y e a r i t still h a d n o t b e e n d e t e r m i n e d as t o t h e c a u s e o f t h e f i r e w h i c h h a d s t a r t e d in s e v e r a l p l a c e s t h r o u g h o u t t h e building. D a m a g e d b e y o n d r e o a i r , w r e c k i n g ball crews w e r e

soon k n o c k i n g d o w n w h a t was l e f t , a n d b r i c k s w e r e b e i n g s t a c k e d t o sell. A l l t h a t r e m a i n e d w e r e t h e a r c h e s : l e f t as a m e m o r i a l o f t h e o r i g i n a l b u i l d i n g . . . b e g i n n i n g s o f a p l a n t o r e b u i l d in t h e n e a r anc| future.

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W a n g . Not pictured: j e n n y L e h m a n , Pam C u s h m a n , T i m Lamen, Lisa Rietv e l d , a n d John D e N e e f .


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i The Longest Mile. N o w t h a t t h e y e a r has c l o s e d a n d H o p e c o l l e g e has t u r n e d i n t o a n e s t i n g g r o u n d f o r c o n s t r u c t i o n crews a n d t o u r i s t s , t h e Milestone csSy " f i n a l l y call i t q u i t s a n d g o h o m e . It's n o t t h a t t h e y e a r has f i n i s h e d — just t h a t w e h a v e . L o o k i n g back, I see t h a t since S e p t e m b e r I have disc o v e r e d m a n y t h i n g s : one, t h a t w h a t o t h e r s .call, t h e " c r e a t i v e h o u r s " ( b e t w e e n 2 a . m . a n d 5 a!m.) a r e ' d e e p i n g hours f o r m e — a n d w h a t w r i t ers have r e f e r r e d t o as " i n s p i r a t i o n " really is just sweat, no m a t t e r w h a t t i m e o f t h e d a y or n i g h t it is. It s e e m e d , a f t e r w r i t i n g this " e d i t o r ' s lett e r " numerous times, t h a t p r i n t i n g " A m e n " would be most a p p r o p r i a t e — b u t , h o w e v e r a p p r o p o s t h a t s t a t e m e n t m i g h t be, a n d h p w e v e r insignificant an " e d i t o r ' s letter" probably is — I put the old thinking cap on, a n d d i d my b e s t t o c o m e up w i t h s o m e t h i n g m o r e a c c e p t a b l e . M y f i n a l c o n c l u s i o n r e s u l t e d in t h e t h o u g h t 1 h a d t o r e m i n d m y s e l f o f t h r o u g h o u t t h e y e a r ; a n d t h a t is — t h a t t h e real a c c o m p l i s h m e n t is n o t w h a t is p r i n t e d b e t w e e n t h e f r o n t a n d b a c k ^ c p v e r s o f t h e book,, b u t r a t h e r e v e r y t h i n g t h a t isn't r e c o r d e d . W h a t s h o u l d really c o u n t ( p a r d o n t h e cliche) is t h e r o a d we t o o k — n o t t h e p r o b l e m ? w e e n c o u n t e r e d (or d o d g e d ) or t h e p h y s i c a l result. ' A h yes — b u t I know b e t t e r t h a n t h a t . There, now t h a t I have d o n e m y b e s t a t f i l l i n g t h e r e q u e s t e d bill, I w o u l d like t o t a k e this o p p o r t u n i t y t o e x t e n d my h e a r t y thanks t o all o f y o u s t a f f m e m b e r s . I really was a w a r e t h a t » a i l o f y o u w e r e v o l u n t e e r s a n d t h a t y o u never had t o d o t h e w o r k t h a t ' y o u w e r e issued. M y a p p r e c i a t i o n is q u i t e sincere, e v e n if a t t i m e s all t h a t was expressed was exasperation. A n d — f o r t h e rest o f y o u r e a d e r s — w h o migtTt b e w o n d e r i n g a b o u t t h e s i g n i f i c a n c e o f t h e p i c t u r e g h o s t e d b e h i n d t h i s l e t t e r — it has s o m e t h i n g t o d o w i t h t h e r o a d I t o o k . L e t s |ust leave i t a t t h a t . I think t h a t ' s e n o u g h . I t r u s t t h e s t a f f m a n a g e r s a l r e a d y u n d e r s t a n d my thanks. Best wishes t o e a c h o f y o u ;

^LK/JL^JU, photo by J. Hazekamp

I

231


Sigma Gamma Epsilon Sue Boundy Dan Brandsma Michelle Carlson Bill Davidson Gary Foote Dan Hafley Pam Jordon Deanna Palladino Tim Shepard Marc Vander Meulen James Farlow J. Cotter Tharin Robert Reinking Pi Delta Phi Maria Hoffman Marilyn Pool Robert Wilkie M. Susan McCarthy Eta Sigma Phi Amy Baker Carol Bechtel Kathy Brown Mary Cassell Bill Davros Eva Dean Brenda Jenks Erik Jul Kimberly Logie Larry Mannino Susan Marvin Paula Nelson Martin Novak Brent Slater Steven Smallegan Bill Terkeurst Jane Terpstra Ross Thornburg John Tyler Ruth W. Todd Delta Phi Alpha Ron Bechtel Sue Haven Nan Hussey Paul Knoll Mary Muyskins Moira Poppen Ken Powell Gisela Strand

Honorary Societies Sigma Delta Phi Julia Perez Nancy Piersma Connie Wehner Kerrin Wilson Ion T. Agheana Antonia I. Searles Hubert P. Weller Pi Mu Epsilon Steve Aardema Hugh Bartels David Boundy Calvin Folkert Patricia Hasbrouck Demetra Holly Paul Hospers Gary Immink Barbara Koeppe Scott Lokers Kathryn Lowe James McElheny Melanie Miskotten William Terkeurst Ross Thornburg Paul Toren Paul Williams Elliot Tanis Pi Sigma Alpha Ronald Bechtel Nan Bian David Bruins Steve Cochrun Kevin Deighton Doug Dykstra Steven Maas Doug Mulvaney Steve Muyskens

Psi Phi Deborah Blair Robert Bos Lynn Devendorf Bonnie DeYoung Kevin DeYoung Mark Douma Marianne Dykema Brenda Hafner

Gordon Herwig Laura Hoffman Elizabeth Hoisington Jeff Holm Karen Hoogerwerf Philip Johnson Pamela Jordon Nancy Kerle Alan Kieda Carol King Nancy Kropf Deb Kunzi Jocelyn Mand Susan Marvin Douglas Mulvaney Sarah Norden Sonja Olsen Kim Osterman Katrina Picha Moira Poppen Laura Press Sharon Roseboom Lynn Schack Barb Schang Jonathan Schmidt Cindy Schroeder Sue Schuurmans Sue Sharp Yolanda Tienstra Nancy Torreson Matt Vander Molen Elissa Van Gent Ruth Van Slooten Linda Waterman Janet Watson Jeff Wetherbee Daniel Wolf Nancy Wood Tim Wood Bruce Csbeck Mary Peterson Karen Puschel 0 James Sims, III Karl Stegenga Mary Van Dis Jeffrey Welch Robert Elder Renze Hoeksma Jack Holmes James Zoetewey

I

II


Index Austin, Rodney; 146 Aardema, Charles; 106,110, 200 Aaron, Kathy; 184 Ackermann, Brad; 112 Afman, Greg; 138 Aggen, Dale; 106,125,184 Agneana, Ion; 63,97,128 Agnew, Jeanne; 117, 200,202 Agnew, William; 108,200 Aidala, Samuel; 108,159,200 Allan, Barbara; 118,192,200 Amaya, Edna; 117,192

Beckus, Robert; 184

Blom, Patricia; 88

Boven, Peter; 114

Beckwith, Amy;176

Blumer, Glen; 146

Bowersox, Greg; 146

Baar, David; 122,176

Bedi, Vivek; 130

Bobeldyk, Sandra; 118

Bowman, Kelly; 202

Baar, Sheryl; 176

Beekman, Lu; 116

Bodzick, Monica; 137,144

Boylen, Frederick; 109,146

Babinec, Karen; 200

Begley, Adam; 176

Boelkins, Leigh; 107 134 202,217

Brady, Mike; 125

Back, Lisa; 176

Bekius, Gregory; 108,146

Bailey, Audrey; 192

Bekkering, Kenneth; 52,201

Bailey, Kevin; 107

Bell, Albert; 67,97,129

B

Bailey, Vicki; 201

Bell, Charles; 106,123,146

Baird, Debra; 192

Bell, Timothy; 125

Bajema, Mark; 110,125,184

Bengtson, Britt; 120,192

Bakale, Roger; 127,130

Bennett, Kristin; 118, 201

Boer, Larry; 107

Brandsma, Daniel; 131,138 185

Boerigter, James; 109,114

Braschler, Dave; 108,146

Boersma, Paul; 19,134,173, 184 Boeve, Jeffrey; 146 Boeve, Sue; 192

Braschler, Douglas; 108,146 Bratschie, Steve; 109,146 147,203 Brauksma, Dan; 110

Bohn, Jeffrey; 192

Brauning, Christopher; 108, 159 Brazeau, Michelle; 125

Baker, Amy; 129

Benson, Scott; 155

Anderson, Craig; 109,125, 153

Baker, Linda; 117,130,201

Bere, Bruce; 112

Bolema, Theodore; 111, 127, 184

Anderson, Ingrid; 176

Bakker, Harold; 96

Bere, Debra; 117

Bolhous, M. Rodrick; 202

Anderson, Elizabeth; 176

Barnabay, Lisa; 176

Berens, Faye; 149,157,184

Bolman, Patti; 184

Anderson, Kevin; 109,150, 192

Barr, Diane; 116,201

Berger, Sally; 118,201

Boluyt, Ann; 115,149,202

Brethower, Deanne; 130, 144,203

Anderson, Lori; 130,200 Anderson, Williams; 225 Andrews, Douglas; 109,146 Andrusiak, Michael; 146 Angle, Steven; 108,141 Anthony, Thomas; 143 Arendshorstjane; 118 Arneson, Janet; 3,118,176 Arnold, Cordon; 143 Arnold, Rodney; 146,188 Arnold, Timothy; 146

Bredweg, Steve; 111 Breher, Karena; 122

Barthel, Thomas; 176

Bergy, Gail; 184

Booher, Kathryn; 202

Brewer, Brett; 110

Bast, Cathleen; 61,117

Berndt, Kristine; 176

Boonstra, Harry; 98

Brewer, Gordon; 167

Bast, Robert; 107,109

Bethards, Leslie; 117,152, 158,159,184

Boonstra, Jeanne; 176

Brewer, Scott; 111

Beuker, Melissa; 184

Boote, Evan; 107,110,146 176

Breyfogle, Kathy; 117,152

Beyer, Diana; 61,107

Borr, Bradley; 185

Brink, Jeanne; 104,105,118, 176

Bauer, Brian; 105 Baumgartner, George; 201 Baxter, Roberta; 192 Bayer, Thomas; 48,184 Beach, Les; 100 Beam, Earl; 192 Bearss, Kari; 201 Bechtel, Carol; 107,129,131

Bian, Lana; 127,184

Bos, Darcia; 181

Brinks, Kurt; 146

Bice, Betty; 104,105,202

Bos, Robert; 4

Brinks, Mary; 185

Bierbaum, Karl; 108,202

Bosch,Julie;117,159,176

Brockmeirer, Richard; 100

Bieri, Robert; 176,

Bosch, Paul; 127,192

Broekstra; Scott; 109

Bigelow, Bryan; 122

Bose, Julie; 117

Broersma, David; 155

Bigelow, Thomas; 108

Botsis, Beth; 73,202

Brondyke, Ronald; 109 Brooks, Brion; 61,113,124

Arnoldink, Carol; 117

Bechtel, Ronald; 120,128, 184,192

Birner, Andrew; 113

Bou ma, Pame la; 117,176

Arnoudse, Peter; 200

Beck, Kathy; 192

Bischoff, Beth; 117,152,202

Boundy, Mark; 108,159

Brooks, Charles; 109,146

Arwe, Susan; 16,129,192

Beck, Mary; 184

Black, Cynthia; 129,184

Bourn, Karen; 185

Brouwer, Charla;192

Aschbrenner, Chas; 99

Beck, Randall; 110,176

Blaif, Deborah; 116,192

Ashtari, Hamid; 184

Becker, Nick; 112

Blake, Richard; 104,105,106

Beckerink, Rodney; 184

Blodgett, Sandra; 104,105, 106,202

Augustin, Douglas; 112

233


Index Brouwer, Darwin; 142,143 Brouwer, Linda; 185 Brouwer, Susan; 116 Brower, Paul; 185 Brown, Anne; 176 Brown, David; 111,130,192 Brown, Kalhy; 129 Brown, Paul; 109,192 Brown, Robert; 100 Brown, Sandra; 73 Bruck, Christine; 176 Brueck, Jeffrey; 146 Bruins, Dave; 111, 125, 203 Bruins, Elton; 101 Brumm, Nancy; 135,176 Bryant, Marshall; 185 Bryker, Brenda; 118

Cecil, Robert; 106

Cordes, Judy; 127,177

Davis, Marshall; 143

Caudill, Glenn; 111

Corretore, Janet; 144,185

Davis, Roy; 153

Chamberlain, Kyle; 122

Cortes, Veronica; 185

Davis, Timothy; 106,153,177

Chan, David; 107,204,207

Coto, Alicia; 44

Davros, William; 129,193

Chandler, Thomas; 204

Cowley, Steven; 193

Dawes, Tim; 146,177

Chappell, Steve; 204

Cox, John; 60

Dean, Eva; 177

Christian, Catherine; 118

Cox, Lisa; 10,117

Dean, Joy; 107

Christian, John; 110,176

Craig, Colleen; 119,177

Dean, William; 110,193 Debruyn, Lynn; 181

Bussies, Glenn; 110,192

Christie, Rosemary; 114,117, 204

Cram, Phil; 111 Cronk, John; 112,185

DeBruyn, Maxine; 55

Buys, Arthur; 10

Civilette, Lisa; 117,177

Crooks, Merriam; 177

Deckard, Marjorie; 157,177

Byer, Craig; 176

Claerbout, Daven; 51

Crumbaugh, Jeff; 126,143

Decker, Gerald; 109

Byl, John; 107, 204

Claerbout, Linnae; 118,185

Burton, Mary; 104,105,130, 192 Burtt, Richard; 98 Bush, Krysten; 203 Bush, Robert; 110,140,141 Busman, Kent; 131 Busman, Sheryl; 203 Bussa, Brian; 131 Bussema, Deborah; 118,203

c Cady, Sarah; 118,158,159, 192

Cline, Robert; % , 99

Cain, Edward; 146

Cobb, Philip; 108

Callender, Grace; 176

Buhl, Merlin; 182

Bultman, James; 58, % , 146 Burchett, Cheryl; 203 Burchett, Dennis; 107

Curry, Earl; 66 Cushman, Douglas; 143,177

Deffenbaugh, Daniel; 110 131

Cushman, Pam; 116

Defreese, Marcia; 178

Custer, Tim; 88,177

DeHaan, Sander; 62,97,128 Dejong, John; 138

Camp, Russell; 185

Cohen, William; 67

Czanko, Lisa; 104

Dejulio, James; 138, 217

Campbell, Henry; 111, 204

Colegrove, Art; 107,108,158

Czanko, Louis; 140,141, 205

DeKoekkoek, Gary; 146

Campbell, Jolynn; 106,176

Colsman, Mark; 104

Czirr, Carl; 131

DeLoof, Stephen; 146

Campbell, Mary; 118,176

Combest, Kevin; 109

Candey, Mark; 146,155

Comstock, Lynn; 201

Dahlgren, Gordon; 107,185

DeMoor, Lynne; 118

Capisciolto, Kenneth; 138

Congdon, Douglas; 204

Dahlke, Kim;177

Denekas, Lori; 178

Carey, Anne; 159,176

Conklin, Robert; 143

Dame, Jill; 122,177

DenHartog, Daniel; 178

Carlson, Michelle; 131,192

Conroy, Thomas; 146,177

Dame, Robert; 110,178

Dennison, Roberts; 112

Carlson, Robert; 146

Conser, John; 177

Damon, Paul; 146,147

DePree, Kris; 12

Carr, Letitia; 18,118,158,159, 185

Conti, Michael; 109

Daniels, Leslie; 73,107,205

DePree, Thomas; 112

Cook, Brad; 185

Daniels, Patricia; 177

DePue, Mark; 73,112

Cook, Judy; 116

Daubenspeck, Tom; 112

DeRoos, Brian; 64,205

Coon, Barb; 117,149

Davenport, Laurel; 117

Dershem, Herbert; 52

Cope, Holly; 122

Davidson, William; 131

Deuitch, Douglas; 81,113

Cope, Jon; 131

Davis, Chrystal; 177

Devendorf, Lynn; 114,116,

D

Burg, Martin; 130, 203 Burgess, Bruce; 106,192

Burrell, Richard; 110,146 Burris, Stacy; 61,117,130,203

Decker, Kristin; 120,193

Cuti, Jon; 108,177

Burd, Chayris; 176

Burke, Heidi; 64,131

Decker, Jane; 138,193

Coffill, Randall; 81,109, 204, 211

Buikema, Betty; 115,124,185 Bullard, Kathy; 176

Clough, John; 129

Cuellar, Edna; 158, 204

Cameron, Stephen; 146

Buck, Douglas; 108,192 Bufe, Lynn; 118,152,185

Clark, David; 97

Cash, Phyllis; 129 Cassell, Mary; 176

DeMaar, Philip; 193


Index 205

Elliott, Jennifer; 206

DeVette, Kurt; 3,167 DeVree, Susan; 118,185

Ellis, Julie; 129 Elzinga, Darryl; 153

Griffin, John; 110

Hartje, Linda; 178

Geerlings, Todd; 146

Grimes, Liz; 163

Hartje, Paul; 207

Geib, Michael; 107

Grimm, Deborah; 107

Hartney, Ann; 116,149

194

DeVries, Chris; 118,185

Emig, Cynthia; 125,186

Geurkink, Susan; 186

Grismer, Sue; 123

DeWaard, Gloria, 144

Emmet, Timothy; 112,125

Gibson, Nancy; 122

Griswold, Rodney; 207

Harvey, Beth, 114,115,149, 194 Harvey, Debra; 119,128,178

DeWeert, Thomas; 178

Ennis, Mark; 120, 206

Groendyk, Craig; 146,207

Hasbrouck, Fitch; 186

DeWeeru, )udy; 106,135

Ernst, Andreas; 112,114

Gidday, Lisa; 117,152,186 194 Girod, Carol; 194

Grondin, Mary; 164

DeWitt, Carey; 152,205

Espaze, Brigitte; 128,129

Hascup, Ruth Anne; 58,107, 207,208

Glass, Amy; 178

DeWitt, Lori; 205 DeWitt, Scott; 107,108,146

F

DeWitt, William; 106,185

Fanthorpe, John; 108,138, 159,178

DeWitte, Dena;118, 205

Fauble, Jill; 106

DeWitte, Nancy; 185

Feder, David; 108

DeWolff, Dea; 178

Feenstra, Ruth; 186

DeYoung, Bonnie; 185 DeYoung, )ane; 19,114,117, 158,159 DeYoung, Kevin; 110,205 DeYoung, Mary; 193 DeYoung, Todd; 109,146

Felton, Sharon; 206 Ferguson, Virginia; 45 Fiet, Leanne; 117,178,186 Figueroa, Claudina; 128 Figueroa, Mervyn; 193

Gnade, Kimberly; 117,186 Gnade, Linda; 104,117,178 Godin, William; 107,108,192 Goldberg, Rebecca; 117 Goldschmidt, Chris; 212 Goldzung, Constance; 104, 178 Gonder, Karen; 118 Gordon, Richard; 146

Grooters, David; 131 Gruber, Karen; 113,194

Haskins, Scott; 194

Gumpper, John; 73,125,194

Haupt, Josephine; 128,144

Gundersen, Daniel; 127,186

Haven, Susan; 194

Gustafson, Andrew; 146

Hawken, James; 109,146

Guthoerl, Anneliese; 128, 207

Hazekamp, Jeffrey Hegg, Roy; 111,207

Guthrie, Susan; 125

Heikema, Karen; 119,186

Gusbers, Debbie; 186

Hellenga, Brenda; 194

Hafley, Daniel; 131

Helmus, Ann Marie; 118, 122,205 Helmus, Thomas; 109

Goshorn, Steven; 138

Hafner, Brenda; 87,207

Hendrickson, Eric; 194

Gould, Craig; 146

Hagan, Susanne; 107,194

Heneveld, Daniel; 110,146

Graney, Mary Ellen; 117

Haight, Ron; 83,108

Henrikson, Melody; 164

Gorguze, Amy; 117

H

Dieterman, Brenda; 203

Fike, Matthew; 104,105, 111, 186

Dirkse, Nancy; 144,145

Fikse, David; 178

Granger, Ronda; 194,197

Hakken, John;112

Henry, Craig; 194

Disher, Michael; 146,193

Fild, Deborah; 116

Grant, James; 194

Hall, Debra;107,126, 207

Henry, Patricia; 157

Dloughy, Elizabeth; 178

Fischer, Larry; 143

Graves, Jon; 111

Hammar, David; 207

Doepke, Kathryn; 135,186

Fisher, Leah; 126,127

Green, Lawrence (Doc); 173

Hamre, Andrew; 146

Herendeen, Philip; 107,187, 191

Domkowski, Donna; 186

Flanagan, Linda; 58,115,186

Greene, A. Beck; 130,153

Hanson, Lora; 118,157,186

Donker, Robert; 186

Fleming, Carol; 178

Greene, Tamara; 178

Hanson, Wendy; 178

Donohue, Richard; 122

Fleming, Christopher; 143

Greij, Eldon; 47

Haradon, Matthew; 193

Doorenbos, Dirk; 104,138, 193

Fletcher, R. Scott; 206

Greulich, Suzanne; 206

Harper, George; 111

Florian, Marc; 146

Griesmer, Susan; 129

Harrell, Karyn; 104,105, 207

Foote, Gary; 131

Griffin, Dennis; 108,194

Harris, Douglas; 130

Ford, Alice; 104,106,115

Griffin, Timothy; 110,206

Harrison, Gregory; 178

Doornbos, Lisa; 178 Dorow, Roberta; 193 Dornemann, William; 69 Dow, O. Scott; 112 Dowker, Bob; 110 Drake, Patricia; 205 Drew, )ames; 109,140,141 Driesenga, Brian; 108,114, 146 Driesenga, Kimberly; 178

Forth, Gordon; 109,146 Forth, Lynn; 116,186 Forton, Jennifer; 44,122,178 Fortuin, Pamela; 117,190 Fowler, Paul; 138 Fox, David; 106 Fox, Lori; 118,193

Driscoll, David; 50,146

Foy, Jody; 157

Dropper, Alice; 172

Frank, Lynn; 157,178

Droppers, Karl; 110,146

Frazza, John; 109,146

Duisterhof, Julie; 58,178

Frieberg, Blair; 138,178

Dunkle, Lynn; 186

Frieling, Bob; 111

Durband, Nancy; 206 Dykema, )oan; 119,193

c Gaff, Sherri; 116,178

Dykema, Marianne; 118,128, 193

Gaffney, David; 106, 111

Dykstra, D. Ivan; 74

Gaffney, Matthew; 186,193

Dykstra, Douglas; 206

Galer, Suzanne; 107,193

Dykstra, Mary; 178

Gallagher, Jolene; 194

Dykstra, Sandra; 193

Galland, Benta; 104,121,122, 186

E

Gano, Cindy; 106,206

Ebbens, Linda; 178

Gardner, Eugene; 121

Eberhard, Jeannelle; 127,193

Garfield, Ronald; 111, 178

Edgcomb, Susan; 73,104. 106, 206

Gargano, Anne; 178

Edwards, Nancy; 194

Gault, Jim; 112

Eggebeen, Deborah; 178

Gay, Thomas; 108

Eickhoff, James; 110,146

Gaylord, Peter; 194

Eldndge, Michael; 105,106

Gebhard, Douglas; 108

Elharl, Thomas; 108

Gelpi, Steven; 108,121,146,

Herpich, Barbara; 144,194 Herwig, Gordie; 138, 208 Heusinkveld, David; 61 Hickman, Paul; 109 Hilal, Karen; 62 Hilbelink, Ann; 208 Hildebrand, Katherine; 135, 194


Index Hill, Patience; 116,135,194

Howard, Susan; 131, 208

Jensen, Lars; 108

Kennedy, Karen; 187

Lambie, Lauren; 44,104,129 Lang, Kevin; 146 Lange, Paul; 108

Hill, Roland; 111

Hudson, Todd; 53,120

Jentz, Arthur; 75

Kennedy, Richard; 127

Hilldore, Mary; 118,194

Hughes, Brian; 120,122

Jerez, Elsie; 148,149,157,187

Kerle, Nancy; 104,105,126, 209

Hinga, Marvin; 146

Huisingh, Jack; 153

Jewett, Abigail; 122,187

Hitt, Fanny; 122

Huizen, David; 51

Johanson, Cathy; 119

Hodges, jeffrey; 110,194

Hull, Meredith; 115,195

Johnson, Denise; 187

Hodgman, Nicholas; 113

Hulst, Steven; 143

Johnson, Douglas; 138,187

Hoeksema, Deborah; 126, 128

Hurford, Teresa; 114,119, 187

Johnson, Janice; 106

Hoekslra, James; 107

Hussey, Nan; 128,195

Hoekslra, Bill; 110

Hutchins, Gary; 138

Hoff, Brian; 194

Huttar, Julia; 104,105

Hoffman, Laura; 86

Hyde, Kristina; 114,117,131

Hoffman, Maria; 14,129,187

i

Johnson, Julie; 195 Johnson, Marilyn; 130,195 Johnson, Mark; 187 Johnson, Philip; 195 Johnson, Ted; 104,105,106 Jolvette, Peter; 79

Hoffman, Sarah; 194

Immink, Gary; 209

Jones, Carol; 131

Hoisington, Elizabeth; 194

Ingham, William; 109

Jordan, Pamela; 209

Holbrook, Sarah; 117

Ireland, Mary; 145

Holbrook, Taylor; 110, 208

Irwin, Anne; 163

Holdeman, Paul; 208

Isaac, Phyllis; 121

Holmes, john; 112,125

Isley, Connie; 209

Holstege, Todd; 146

Israel, Sheryl; 118,195

Hood, Charles; 138 Hoogerwerf, Karen; 116, 208 Hoogewind, Judith; 15

J Jacques, Sanford; 47 Jakeway, Patrick; 106,187

Hoopingarner, Kirk; 194

Jalving, Jill; 107,131

Hoover, Carla; 208

Janes, Brian; 146

Hornecker, Kenneth; 194 Hospers, Paul; 208

Janke, Carol; 118 Jansma, Judy; 125

Hosta, John; 109,146

Jasperse, Kristin; 117,183

Houghtaling, Dale; 106

Joseph, Christopher; 109

Kerr, Alyca; 195

Langejans, William; 107,108 195

Kiani, Shahnaz; 9

Laning, Patricia; 195

Kiel, Cheryl; 164

Lanning, Judith; 107,195

Kiel, Scott; 209

Lapres, Michael; 146

Kiernan, Richard; 108

Larsen, Tracy; 195

King, Roxane; 195

Larson, Kimberly; 11

Kitamura, Alan; 108

Latimer, Elizabeth; 92,193

Kitchens, Gwendolyn; 195

Lawrence, Janet; 118,210

Klahr, Stephanie; 67,187

Lawrence, Kathryn; 118,187

Klein, Arthur; 146

Leak, Brian; 121,125,146

Klein, Donna; 104,127,187

LeFevre, Stephen; 108,131, 195

Klein, Douglas; 110,187 Klein, Martin; 195 Klindt, Frederick; 112

Jul, Erik; 129

K Kadow, John; 209

Klingenberg, Randy; 146 Klomparens, Janice; 118,159, 195

LeLand, Burton; 195 Lema, Lois; 144

Knapp, Christiane; 117,130

Kamstra, Todd; 138

Kniff, Brian; 112

Kanitz, Lori; 116,195

Knight, Levonda; 121

Kapischke, Heide; 122

Knoll, Paul; 210

Liggett, Jennifer; 107,118, 134,210

Kasa, Stephen; 112

Knopf, Melissa; 143,187

Lightweis, Stephen; 112

Kasten, Thomas; 48,110, 209

Knutsen, Cornelius; 120,195

Lillrose, Jannie; 118

Kasen, Tim; 110

Kobus, Harriet; 4

Lindell, Jay; 5

Keast, Cathy; 195

Kobza, Victoria; 122

Link, Debra; 210

Keaton, Thomas; 108

Koedyker, Harvey; 73,107, 187

Loch, Jordon; 210

Jelensperger, Claire; 152,187

Keizer, Thomas; 106, 111, 209

Howard, Frederick; 111, 194

Jelinek, Jerome; 146

Kellom, Doris; 144, 209

Howard, Mark; 111,208

Jellema, Jonathan; 138

Kelsey, Tim; 111

Kollen, Julie; 115

Howard, Mark T.; 143,194

Jellison, William; 111,209

Kempker, Daniel; 108

Komejan, Kent; 195

Howard, Victoria; 195

Jenkins, Patricia; 121

Kempker, David; 11

Koning, Thomas; 107,187

Keizer, Gretchen; 116

Koeppe, Barbara; 118 Koeppe, Peter; 104,106,120

Leslie, Linda; 115,152,187 Leventhal,.Lisa; 45 Lever, James; 146

Logie, Kimberly; 15,19 Lohman, Keith; 131 Lohman, Ronna; 187 Lokker, William; 127 Londo, William; 130 Lootens, Janet; 1 %

Kooistra, Kimberly; 116 Koop, Kristin; 118,158,159 Kortering, Larry; 142,195

u-

LeKobza, Victoria; 187

Klungle, Constance; 115

Houtman, Barbara; 208

I

Leisten, Ross; 120,195

Kalmbach, Otto; 187

Jasperse, Timothy; 110,153, 195,198

\

Lehman, Jennifer; 210

Kalee, Debra; 187

Houston, Jeryl; 194

iir!

LeFley, Tim; 146

Kraay, Kevin; 110,195 Krafft, Kathryn; 187 Kranendonk, Kevin; 112,158

Loudermilk, Henry; 55,146 Lowe, Kathryn; 135,1% Lowe, Timothy; 104 Lubbers, Kimberly; 106 Lundeen, Janis; 107,118,210 Lupkes, Richard; 108

Krehbiel, Jeffrey; 107,186, 187

Lydens, William; 153,1%

Kreusch, Fred; 109

Lyons, Jennifer; 135,1%

Kronquist, Lisa; 195

M

Kropf, Nancy; 117

Maatman, Laura; 210

Kuhrt, Richard; 126,138,195

MacArthur, Nancy; 73

Kuiken, Peter; 210

MaCartney, Ian; 112,114

Kuiper, James; 108,138,176

MacBeth, Scott^ 141

Kuipers, Kimberly; 118,187

MacBride, Shannon; 104

Kulesa, Michael; 130

MacDonald, Don; 107

Kunzi, Debra; 116,195

MacKinnon, John; 203

Kurtze, Arthur; 108,158,159, 210

MacMillan, Jon; 111

Kyros, Pamela; 117

Madden, Tom; 108 Madsen, Cynthia; 117 MaGee, Martha; 144

Laman, Mark; 108,195

Mainwaring, Michele; 64, 131

Laman, Mark; 112

Malewitz, Debra; 1 %

Laman, Timothy; 130

Malkewitz, Kelle; 158,159

Lamb, Robert; 109

Malmquist, Karen; 211


Index Malone, Geneva; 211

Meyer, Melody; 118

Mountcastle, Janet; 118

Northuis, Mark; 143,167 Northuis, Richard; 110,143, 167

Malone, Patrick; 138

Meyer, Michael; 128

Muir, Karline; 144,188

Manahan, Mary; 211

Meyer, Pamela; 211

Manahan, Sally; 115, 211

Middleton, Kimberly; 1 %

Mulder, Anne; 16,104,105, 157, 210,212

Mand, Jocelyn; 148,149,211

Miedema, Paul; 104,105

Marceny, Suzanne; 187

Miknis, Patricia; 157,187

p Paarlberg, Paul; 230 Paauwe, Lisa; 181

Norton, Robert; 78,100

Paff, Cindi; 117,181

Mulder, Barbara; 212

Nothdurft, Tammy; 104,106

Mulder, Keith; 146

Nummerdor, Kari; 115,181

Mulvaney, Douglas; 82, 206, 213

Nunez, Pam; 116,213

Palladino, Deanna; 64,131, 152

Marema, David; 1%

Millard, Vicki; 212 Miller, Paula; 185

Munger, James; 111,114,1%

Nutter, Michelle; 121

Palma, Fern; 104,105,152

Markle, James; 1%

Nutter, Paula; 117, 213

Palma, Robert; 43

Nydam, Nancy; 213

Park, Thomas; 138,181

Nyenhuis, Jacob; 68, % , 129

Parker, Sandra; 140,149,169

Nyenhuis, Karen Joy; 87,214, 230

Pater, David; 106,188

Nyenhuis, Kathy; 30, 55,214, 230

Paterra, Rhonda; 181

Markusse, Susan; 117

Miller, Robert; 212

Murray, Alan; 76

Marsh, Nanette; 187

Miller, Susan; 117,196

Muyskens, Mary; 128,188

Marshall, Greg; 111

Miller, Susan; 15

Martens, Paul; 131

Miner, Grant; 110

Muyskens, Stephen; 124, 128,212

Martin, Michelle; 75

Ming, Joellen; 50

Martinus, Joel; 107,110,130, 166,187

Miskotten, Melanie; 212

Martle, Susan; 107,114,119, 196 Marvin, Susan; 211 Masghati, Masoomeh; 1 %

N Nagy, Kim; 107 Nattress, Karen; 1 %

Missad, Matthews; 108 Neal, Robert; 108 Moermond, Linda; 116, 212 Mohrlock, Carol; 59,212 Molenaar, Daniel; 49,146

Nearpass, Nancy; 213

Paganelli, Perry; 146

Pater, Pamela; 214

Patnott, John; 152,153 Nyenhuis, Michael; 109,146 Nykamp, Ross; 146,214 o

Nedervelt, Paul; 111, 213

Patterson, William E.; 214 Pauker, Lisa; 126 Paul, John; 108 Peachey, John; 105,122,126, 138

Neeley, Bruce; 109

O'Brien, Karen; 188

Molenhouse, Robert; 1 %

Neevel, Kathryn; 107,115, 188

O'Connell, Sue; 120

Molnar, Heather; 125

Matthews, Rodney; 104,105, 106,1%

Neil, Matt; 155,188

Monaghan, Lois; 106,188

Nells, Patrick; 153,1%

Matthews, Valerie; 1 %

Montanarie, Marie; 212

Nelson, Cynthia; 48

Maxwell, Lynne; 211

Montanari, Phyllis; 120

Nelson, Keith; 146

McCarley, Mike; 110

Mooi, Kimberly; 1 %

Nevlezer, Lori; 107,196

Olson, Kathleen; 104,106, 181

McClenic, Brian; 121

Mook, Brett; 108,188

Nguyen, Due; 56,213

Oomkes, Sheryl; 188

Penhorwood, Teresa; 118, 188

McCullick, Ron; 108

Moolenaar, John; 110

Nguyen, Thuy; 188

Orr, Jack; 51

Penrose, Larry; 67,100

McCullough, Paul; 211

Moore, Lori; 188

Nielsen, Diane; 1 %

Ortquist, Leslie; 44,129

Perez, Heidi; 135,175

McElheny, James; 70,211

Moore, Nancy; 107,118

Nielsen, Jennifer; 215

Osbeck, Bruce; 215

Peters, Jay; 109,131

McGee, Tim; 110

Moored, Ann; 212

Nieuwkoop, David; 1 %

Oskam, Joan; 104

Peterson, Betty; 73,107,1%

McGregor, Terry; 106

Moored, David; 109,153

Nivala, Ronni; 117,213

Ossewaarde, Jan; 156

Peterson, Chris; 83

McKee, Sharon; 106,107

Morey, Jane; 188

Noordhoff, Samuel; 213

Morier, Dean; 120,188

Nora, Paul; 130,213

Osterman, Kimberly; 118, 215

Peterson, Mary; 214

McMurray, Kirk; 1 % Measel, Mary; 117

Morrison, Christopher; 108

Norbury, Susan; 130

O'Sullivan, Donall; 132

Petiet, Jack; 214

Meeuwsen, Debra; 116

Morrow, Nola; 1 %

Norden, Sarah; 107,1%

Ott, Linda; 181

Petty, David; 214

Melat, Alice; 120

Morton, Douglas; 109

Norris, Mike; 124,126

Overway, Roxanne; 1 %

Piatt, Nancy; 1%

Mendrek, Mitchell; 49

Motz, David; 109

Northrup, Beth; 135

Ozinga, Karen; 181

Masschelin, John; 106 Massimiano, Rocco; 108

Molenaar, Ron; 110,1%

O'Donnell, Kathy; 181 Ohrnberger, Erik; 128 Olsen, Sonja; 61 Olsen, Steven; 141,1%

Pease, Donna; 181 Pearson, Mark; 110 Pedelty, Gregory; 113,214 Peery, Deb; 130 Pell, Barbara; 104,105,135, 214

Peterson, Richard; 140,141


Index Picard, Thomas; 107,197

Raak, Christine; 181

Rietberg, Roger; 107

Schack, Lynette; 216

Sims III, James; 197

Picha, Katrina; 73

Raak, Melissa; 197

Rietveld, Lisa; 181

Schaeffer, Eric; 111, 216

Slack, Tim; 146

Piers, James; 87

Radtke, Ann; 197, 230

Rink, Daniel; 11,167

Schemper, Cheryl; 118,182

Slater, Brent; 129

Piersma, Nancy; 128

Ralph, George; 89

Rink, Peter; 146,147

Schilleman, Leesa; 115

Slater, Kayleen; 134

Piethe, Annette; 117

Ramaccia, Luanne; 214

Ritchie, Nancy; 104,105,169, 197

Schipper, Jim; 108

Sloan, Jayne; 189

Pisani, Lisa; 106,121,181

Ramel, Laura; 181

Schipper, Tim; 134

Plaut, Thomas; 146

Ranson, Charlie; 81

Schippers, Beth; 106,189

Smallegan, Steven; 134,141, 217

Plesuchenko, Kathleen; 215

Rathbun, Raymond, 197

Schlott, Richard; 108

Smant, Karen; 197

Schmidt, Jonathon; 111,114, 127,197

Smart, Renata; 116, 217

Roberts, Nancy; 215 Robertson, Jamie; 110

Schmidt, Pamela; 58,116

Ritsema, Robert; 104,105 Roberts, Anthony; 155 Roberts, Fred; 122,197

Pluister, Carol; 181

Rawlings, Julie; 181

Poel, Tim; 109,197

Raymond, Carolyn; 181,197

Poll, Robert; 109,161

Recknagel, Jeffrey; 47,127, 197

Roelofs, Roger; 107

Redmond, Danielle; 181

Rogers, Brian; 182

Redmond, Molly; 189

Rogers, Paul; 108

Pollnow, Peter; 113 Pollock, William; 110,143, 181

Schmuker, Michael; 104,106, 143,153 Schoenmaker, Martin; 110, 143,167

Reece, Richard; 155

Rollins, Kelly; 108

Scholte, Linda; 114,116

Poppen, Moira; 55

Reeder, Kathleen; 117,181

Romano, Cynthia; 182

Scholten, Nancy; 117,152

Porter, Mike; 110

Reimink, Ronald; 130

Root, William; 167

Schrier, Mark; 114,173,189

Pothoven, Ronald; 130,188

Reinecke, Mary; 54,117

Rose, Philip; 104,109,146

Schroeder, Cynthia; 126

Potter, Bruce; 109,138

Reinhardt, Julie; 55

Ross, Eric; 120

Powe, Barbara; 181

Reinking, Robert; 97

Ross, Rick; 111

Schrotenboer, Loren; 154, 155

Pool, Jeffrey; 109

Schultz, Catherine; 216

Smith, Diane; 73 Smith, Doug; 146 Smith, Gail; 223 Smith, Julie; 217 Smith, Kathleen; 217 Smith, Kent; 146 Smith, Raymond; 146 Smith, Robert P.; 16 Smith, Sandra; 108

Powell, Kenneth; 128

Renae, Steve; 110

Rozeboom, Sharon; 215

Pratt, Jamie; 111

Renaud, Teresa; 14

Ruch, Douglas; 132,173

Schumann, Richard; 63,108, 129, 216

Soeter, John; 107,195,197

Press, Laura; 104,105,106

Repke, Jane; 3,118,181

Rupright, Gregory; 182

Schut, Ronald; 107,166

Price, Anne; 128

Resche, Keith; 209,215

Russcher, Joel; 107,108,197

Schuurmans, Sue; 216

Soeter, Mary; 104,107,118, 189

Price, John; 106

Restevo, Dean; 111

Ryskamp, Carol; 164,189

Schwanz, Jon; 109,132,146

Prielipp, Byron; 20,197

Revels, Roderick; 121

Pringle, Ann; 181

Reynolds, Delynn; 181

Sackelt, David; 7,107,132

Scott, Kathy; 118,189

s

Scott, James; 143,182

Somerville, Philip; 47 Sorrows, Lynne; 117 Souders, Kathy; 4,130, 217

Prins, James; 97

Rezelman, Sue; 115,189

Saddler., Sarah; 104,105

Seabrook, David; 121

Proos, Terri; 118,197

Rhem, David; 110,127,189

Sadler, Diane; 197

Seeger, John; 106,125

Puckett, Duncan; 181

Spagnuolo, Achilles; 73,106, 107

Rice, Marianne; 49,116,130, 215

Sale, Timothy; 146

Segwitts, Ronda; 162

Spencer, Jeffrey; 146

Saline, Bradley; 123,129

Seitz, Kevin; 189

Spieldenner, Linda; 115

Sanderson, lane; 189

Seitz, Kimberly; 189,190

Spieldenner, Lisa; 106

Riefkohl, Louis; 121

Sanlefort, Marcia; 117,158, 189

Sells, Debra; 114,115,197

Spoelhof, Donald; 52

Rietberg, Constance; 107, 118,215

Savage, Raymond; 138

Semeyn, Pete; 134

Spreng, Judith; 122

Seng, Michele; 116

Rietberg, Jon; 12

Sayer, Steven; 38,167,193, 197

Spruit, Susan; 182

Sentiff, Anne; 216

Staat, Alison; 217

Serrette, Michele; 104,144

Stackhouse, Thomas; 146

Seymour, Michael; 130

Stallone, Steven; 111,182

Shanahan,Eugene; 50

Stauffer, Ann; 172,182

Shanley, Susan; 197

Stearns, Robert; 197

Sharp, Stuart; 73

Stegehuis, Christine; 169, 182

Puschel, Karen; 50

Richards, James; 108

Putnam, Kristina; 181

Richardson, Sue; 14

Pyle, Ruth; 197

Q Quiring, Powell; 71,189 R

Rietberg, Roberta; 181

Raabe, David; 181

Schaap, Thomas; 216

Sharp, Susan; 14,118, 204, 216 4

\

*â&#x20AC;˘ * r m v-,

i %

f â&#x20AC;˘

J i s

.-t

i

Southwick, Joanne; 189

Stegeman, Marybeth; 107

Shaughnessy, John; 101

Stegenga, Lynnette; 182

Sheldon, Cheryl; 107,197

Steiner, Catherine; 129

Shepard, Timothy; 64,131, 216

Steinhauser, Robin; 58

Shields, Michael; 108,1%, 197

m

Sterk, David; 3,142,143,167 Stevens, David; 132

Shiflett, Kathy; 116, 216

Stevens, Paul; 69,128,132

Shimmin, Janet; 217

Stewart, Barbara; 182

Shipman, Jeff; 146,160

Stewart, Linda; 10

Shively, Linda; 182

Stewart, Mary; 189

Shoemaker, Jim; 164

Stinson, Edward; 146,166

Shoemaker, Robert; 138,143, 197, 217

Stokes, James; 218

Shum Chiu Hung; 182,197 Siems, Jan; 73,128 Sievert, Lori; 197 Sikkema, Milton; 131,138 Dimmons, Christine; 117, 127

238

Smith, Albert; 111, 189 Smith, Barbara; 135

Stone, Ann; 150,182 Stork, Kurt; 106 Strain, John; 111, 198 Strainer, Jeanne; 114,119, 130,198 Strand, Gisela; 128


Index Straaton, Kathy; 198

Taylor, Twylia; 43,107,218

Vanderborgh, Ann; 117

Vanderwep, Sally; 199 Vanderwoude, Todd; 108

Straw, Lydia; 182

TenHave, Garrett; 198

Trayser, Sarah; 119

Vandereems, Karen; 144

Strengholt, Marc; 218

TenHave, Nancy; 117,198

Trudell, Mark; 153,166

Vandereems, Kathryn; 118, 148,149

Strouf, Linda; 104,106,182

TenHoeve, Thomas; 182

Tucker, Ashely; 183

Stuglik, Angie; 182

TenHoor, David; 108

Tucker, Gary; 198

Stuit, Laura; 125

Tenpas, Richard; 182

Turpin, Terri; 199

Sturrus, Rachelle; 189

TerHaar, Deborah; 117

Tuttle, Dawn; 183

Suchecki, Brenda; 118,182

Terkeurst, William; 129,133, 218

Surber, joy; 58 Terpstra, Jane; 129,134 Surridge, Catherine; 14,190

u Decker, Bryan; 106,107,108

Theil, Winifred; 198

Uecker, Heather; 163

Thinker, Pete; 111

Ulberg, Bruce; 106

Thomas, John; 182

Urbanick, Marcia; 127,218

Sutton, Michael; 150

T Taguchi, Jun; 218 Tague, Suzanne; 164,182, 198 Tait, Nancy; 104,105,106, 190 Tailmadge, Jody; 73 Tammi, John; 88,101

Thompson, Karen; 183 Thompson, Karen R.; 117, 183 Thompson, Lera; 121,198 Thompson, Maribeth; 117 Thompson, Mark; 146 Thornburg, Ross; 129,133, 198 Thornton, Elizabeth; 122

Tamlyn, Richard; 122,135, 198

Thorsburg, Carl; 146

Tamminga, Lois; 144,145

Tienstra, Yolanda; 198

Tamminga, Polly; 144,145, 182 Tanis, Elliot; 71,99,133 Tanis, Nora Lea; 73,182 Tannehill, Paul; 143 Tavakoli, Zahra; 190 Tavenier, Kevin; 108,143, 167,182 Taylor, Catherine; 182

Tien, Sally; 107,117

Tietz, Timothy; 146,176 Tilley, Martin; 108,198 Tittle, Janet; 117 Todd, Ruth; 63,129 Toevs, James; 79 Toren, Kevin; 111, 127 Toren, Paul 111,114,133. 135,218

Vanderhaar, Philip; 111, 127, 198

Tyler, John; 131

Sutton, john; 121,155

Tacoma, Barbara; 117

Vanderhaar, Jane; 119,128, 183

Vanderhill, Colleen; 11

Thar in. Cotter; 64,97

Swart, Cynthia; 116

169,183

Traylor, Richard; 129

v VanAlsten, John; 130 VanAnrooy, Sarah; 117

Vanderhoek, Michael; 190, 198 Vanderkolk, Kevin; 51 Vanderkuy, Catherine; 183

Vandenberg, James; 64,131 Vandenberg, Jane; 105 Vandenberg, Martha; 16 Vandenberg, Mary; 218

Vandis, Mary; 219 VanDyke, Fred; 12 VanDyke, Sheryl; 199 VanDyken, David; 219

Vaneenenaam, David; 108, 177,183

VanderMeulen, Marc; 64, 131

Vaneenenaam, Lori; 131

VanderMeulen, Patricia; 169, 190

VanEngen, Rick; 146

VanderMolen, Matt; 111, 127,199

Vandenberg, Carol; 104,198

Vandis, Laura; 190

VanderMeulen, Douglas; 107,219

VanArendonk, John; 154, 216,218

Vandeguchte, John; 154,216, 218

Vandezande, Kathleen; 219

VanEck, Robert; 108

VanderMeulen, Scott; 146, 199

Vandeguchte, James; 183

Vandewater, Nancy; 152

Vanderlaan, James; 190,191

VanArendonk, Craig; 155,66

VanBeveren, Joy; 190

Vandewaa, James; 190

VanderPloeg, Julie; 116 Vanderstel, Jodi; 21 Vanderstel, Thomas; 109, 154,155 Vandertoll, John; 109 VanderVelde, Richard; 99 VanderVen, John; 120,199

Vaneenenaam, Susan;129

VanEyl, Christina; 115 VanEyl, Evelyn; 219 VanEyl, Philip; 101 VanGent, Elissa; 12,107,219 VanGessel, Mark; 110,146 VanHaaften, Mark; 190 VanHeest, Gerard; 81,134 VanHeest, Jocelyn; 58,148, 149 VanHoeven, Donald; 166

VanderWel, Dave; 122

VanHouten, Carolyn; 117, 202

VanderWerff, Brenda; 106,

VanHouten, Marilyn; 107,

Vandenberg, Tom; 73 Vanderbilt, William; 100,143 Vandenbrink, Suzanne; 16, 130,198

Taylor, Nancy; 61,97

Torreson, Nancy; 92,107,193

Taylor, Tanya; 116,182

Tousely, John; 107,131

VandenHombergh, Gaye; 57,118,122,198

Taylor, Timothy; 124,190

Townsend, Clarence; 121

VandenOever, Lori; 190

i i m n )'i isi usasi- miiiiiiumf

239


Index 114,116,144 VanHoven, David; 108,138, 190 Vanlwaarden, John; 190 Vanlwaarden, John; 70,99 Vankley, Susan; 163 VanLiere, Elaine; 223

VerHulst, Thomas; 167

Walwood, Machelle; 217

Wettack, Pamela; 130,199

Wolf, Lori; 105,134,134, 221

VerMeulen, Mark; 112

Ward, Susan; 104,105,106, 122,199

Wettack,'Sheldon; %

Wolfe, Dale; 155,191

Wheeler, Randy; 109

Wolffis, Craig; 109,146

White, Brenda; 218,221

Wolffis, Marcia; 199

Warnaar, Laura; 104,106

White, Peter; 10,109,150, 191

Wolffis, Todd; 109,146

Warren, Tara; 122

White, Susan; 122,183

Waterman, Linda; 199

Whitefleet, Scott; 106, 111

Waterstonejeff; 223

Whiting, Jeffrey; 146

Wright, Pamela; 104,106, 127,183

VerSluis, Sue; 117 VerSteeg, Kristen; 183 Vickers, Judith; 97 Vicyor, )ohn; 143,167 Vigansky, Gerald; 183

VanMaler, Mark; 90,106, 108,219

Villa, Anna; 121,128

VanMouwerik, T racy; 45

Visscher, David; 143

VanNoord, Mark; 146

Visscher, Garry; 109,146

Van Nostrand, Virginia; 199

Visscher, Lori; 118,183

Van Putten, lames; 100

Visscher, Michael; 64,131

VanSlooten, Ruth; 219

Visscher, Ronald; 108

Ward, Wilfrid; 138,167 Warnaar, Deborah; 104,105

Watson, Janet; 130,144

Whitney, Terri; 107,199

Wu, Shou Ling; 104,105,183

Wick, Martin; 106

Wuerfel, Viola; 128,183

Watson, Steven; 113,161

Wickert, Jane; 118,199

Wuertz, David; 183

Webb, Nancy; 107,116,199, 230

Wilbur, David; 108

VanSweden, Bryan; 183

Visser, Margaret; 183

Webb, Robin; 121

Vonehr, |ohn; 191

Webb, Walter; 121,146

Vantubergen, Phyllis; 117

VonGhahn, Keith; 109

Webb, Willim; 47,130

VanVerst, Scott; 190

Vonk, Bernard; 61 Voogd, Henry; 101

VanWyk, james; 190

Vos, Valerie; 220

VanWyk, Karen; 199

Voskuil, Dennis; 101

VanWylen, Gordon; 224

Vossekuil, Kay; 135,199

Vasselopus, Maria; 122 Vaughan, leffrey; 108,138 V e l d m a n j o n ; 146 VerBeek, Greg; 106,176,183

Willemstyn, Brian; 106

Webster, Bruce; 220 Williams, Debra; 191 Webster, Deborah; 187

Wedemeyer, Katherine; 104, 105,191

Williams, Paul; 133

Williamson, Abigail; 221 Williamson, Sarah; 191

Walenta, Peter; 166

Welch, Jeffrey; 35

Walker, Deborah; 127,220

Welch, Joseph; 220

Walker, Jonathon; 191

Welch, Michael; 108,221

Walker, Patricia; 126,144, 163,199

Weller, Hubert; 97,128

Walters, Michael; 130 Walters, Michael G.; 70,108 Walters, Norene; 43,107 191,220

Wendling, Gregory; 109,146 Werkman, Barry; 224 Wester, Mary )o; 183 Westerveld, Frea; 117 Westfall, Lisle; 118,221 Westphal, Merold; 75

Zendler, John; 110 Zimmerman, Lynn; 73,122 Zingman, Michael; 112 Zoet, Jon; 109 Zoetewey, James; 81

Wilson, Kerrin; 128

Zoodsma, Dale; 111

Wehner, Connie; 220 Weidenfeller, John; 183

Zandee, Jim;173

Willis, Karen; 107 Weerstra, Jill; 220

Walchenback, Carrie; 118

z

Williams, Douglas; 106

Weener, Susan; 14,73,107, 199

Walters, Joel; 131

Yonkers, Russell; 113,138 Young, Bruce; 183

Weeden, Barbara; 14,127

Wallgren, Jennifer; 118

Yntema, Jayne; 183

Williams, Diane; 199 Webster, John; 64,131,110, 199

Vredeveld, )eff; 190

w

Y

Wilkie, Robert; 129

V o t a w j o h n ; 111,114,141, 199

Vukoje, Joanne; 117

Wuestnick, Earl; 191 W y n s m a j e f f ; 108,173,183

Wildeboer, Sheryl; 118

Weeber, Nancy; 183

VerBeek, )eftrey; 106,199 Verduin, Kathy; 98

Wilbur, Wesley; 108

Williams, Susan; 114,115, 148,149,169,191

Vosteen, Mary; 191

Wood, Nancy; 30

Watson, Kevin; 105,112

Vanswol, Terri; 106

VanWieren, Glenn; 138,155

Wood, Gregory; 109

Wilson, Victoria; 104,199 Wilterdink, Joan; 152,191 Winkels, Lynn; 131,199 Winter, Charles; 108 Winter, Ellen; 177,183 Wiseman, Susan; 131,183 Wisneski, Suzanne; 191 Wissink, Brian; 183 Wissink, Jeri;199 Wissink, Steven; 167,221 Wiszynski, George; 104,127, 191

ERECTED BY PIONEER CONST-



Milestone 1980