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ARCHIVES HOPE COLLEGE


MILESTONE • 1957 PUBLISHED BY THE STUDENTS OF

HOPE COLLEGE M A N A G I N G EDITOR —JAMES EVENHUIS BUSINESS MANAGER — HENRY DOELE


Dedication At the root of wisdom is humility, the quiet power that sweetens human relationships and makes possible true communion among men. In a college environment such wisdom makes the educational venture a partnership between teacher and student. In his thirty-one years at Hope College, teaching German, English, and Latin, Professor Edward J. Wolters has become to all who know him an exemplification of a teacher, drawing his skill from conscientious scholarship, of a man, wise yet humble As a teacher, his scholarly attitude invites emulation on the part of his students. T h e ideal of a scholarly respect for the subject matter becomes a reality for those who study under him. Indeed, the subject matter becomes significant beyond the mere level of academic exercise. Yet with all his seriousness for sound learning. Professor Wolters exhibits a kindliness and affection for his students.

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As faculty advisor of the Classics Club, he has directed its growth to a point where it will soon become a local chapter of the National Honorary Classical Fraternity, Professor Wolters frequently contributes articles to such scholarly reviews as the Classical Journal. As a man of prayerful self-discipline, he shows a deep sense of responsibility in all his varied endeavors. He is active in the life and work of his Church, often a member of consistory, and he is presently on the Board of Education of the Christian Schools in Holland. A Milestone which seeks to show that the Christian Liberal Arts College is unique in its attempt to transmute the traditional academic disciplines into wisdom, tempered by Christian humility, is fittingly dedicated to Professor Edward J. Wolters, a product and a living example of such an institution. T h e class of 1958


T h e College . . . . ( )

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Activities

Organizations


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Societies

TABLE OF CONTENTS

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Classes

Sports

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President's Preface... HOPE the name of our college is descriptive of aspiration. Its symbol — the A N C H O R — is a reminder that this aspiration is grounded in conviction and faith. T h i s is a Christian college which recognizes that no college can be Christian if it is not a good college. Pious pretenses are not a cover for poor performance. We desire that more be said of us than St. Paul said to the Athenians, "I perceive that in every way you are very religious". Christian education is the education of Christian students by Christian teachers. T h e presuppositions which underlie our fellowship as faculty and students are Christian. We seek earnestly in our labor and in our leisure, in our disciplines and in our diversions, to face frankly all new frontiers, to challenge fearlessly all false philosophies, to perform faithfully all designated tasks. O u r primary goal is to provide that environment in the classroom and laboratory, on the playing field and in social relationships, which will promote the growth of mind and heart and unfolding personality into the finest flower of a liberal education — the C H R I S T I A N SCHOLAR. We lay no claim to having achieved but only seek in all our ways to acknowledge God that He may direct our paths. In placing all things in subjection to Christ we seek the release of individual talents and powers for high achievement in all our varied undertakings. We trust that the reader will find on the pages of this book a pleasant portrayal of the activities of eager, ambitious and diligent youth with a zest for life tempered by their serious concern for ultimate realities. T o the extent that this volume portrays this spirit it becomes a M I L E S T O N E on the illustrious pilgrimage of men and women of H O P E .

Irwin J. Lubbers President


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Trustees T h e private college employs quite a different form of external government than does the large state supported institution. T h e Reformed Church in America is the chief supporting body of Hope College, and governs its program through the Board of Trustees, consisting in its entirety of forty-two members including the president of the college. T h e board members, headed by President J o h n Dykstra and an Executive Board, are selected from the ranks of clergymen and laymen in the Reformed Church, and are the regularly constituted corporation under which the college acts.

Dr. John A, Dykstra has served as President of the Board of Trustees since 1939.

Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees: Front row, left to right: T i t u s W. Hager, John A. Dykstra, Mrs. George Pelgrim, Irwin J. Lubbers; Back row: Henry Steffens, Randall C. Bosch, George Peelen, Theodore Schaap.


T h e new modernistic music building provides attractive facilities for all musical activities.

Completion of Kollen Hall, with room for 300 students, has alleviated the college's shortage of housing for men.

Hope's New Look

W i t h i n the past decade, Hope's campus has become a scene of almost constant physical change. Since the completion of Durfee Hall, junior and senior women's dormitory, in 1950, planning for and the actual construction of new buildings has played a dominant role in the Hope scene. Completion this fall of a new Music Building and Kollen Hall, a men's dormitory, is physical evidence of Hope's adjustment under the guidance of the Board of Trustees to a tremendous growth in student population.


Deans t

T h e general direction of student life academically and socially is the responsibility of three deans. T h e Academic Dean is charged specifically with the task of supervising the college curriculum and dealing with any problems which may arise in the academic life of the student. T h e office of the Dean of Students is the central clearing house for all non-academic activities of the Hope student. All rules and regulations governing students on campus are u n d e r Dean Hinga's direct control. In conjunction with the Dean of Women, an attempt is made to solve the numerous practical problems which arise, and give sympathetic advice and guidance.

As Dean oÂŁ the College, William Vander Lugt directs the academic activities of the school.

Milton Hinga occupies the newly created position of Dean of Students.

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Emma Reeverts, Dean of Women, is responsible for the general welfare of all women students.


Administration T h e existence of any educational institution, regardless of size, is to a large extent dependent upon those who administrate it. T h e vast practical problems involved in the r u n n i n g of the college is the major concern of four men. Mr. Rein Visscher serves as business manager, and as such bears many of the burdens of making the college economically stable. As college treasurer, Mr. Henry Steffens maintains a close check on the college finances and budget. Registrar Paul H i n k a m p is the custodian of all records of students attending the college. Mr. Albert T i m m e r , Director of Admissions, is perhaps the first person with whom prospective students come in contact. T h e growing problem of an increased n u m b e r of applications for admission and an inadequate physical plant for a larger student body is of m a x i m u m concern to Mr. T i m m e r , as he is the man who must finally decide, in conjunction with the Committee on Admissions, who is to be enrolled in the college.

Paul Hinkamp, Registrar, places the college seal on all transscripts of records.

Business Manager, Rein Visscher, carries on much of his work over the telephone.

All new students are admitted to the college by Albert Timmer, Director of Admissions.

T h e Treasurer, Henry Steffens, is responsible for all financial negotiations.

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Religion and Bible In the Christian view, the embodiment of all final truth, the necessary objective of man's search for knowledge, is the God who is revealed in Jesus Christ. It is a recognition of this essential reality which the Christian Liberal Arts College attempts to instill in the student as the development of the whole of his adult personality — spiritual, emotional, mental, social, physical — is undertaken.

Henry Voogd, T h . D . Head of the Department of Religion and Bible

T h r o u g h the cultivation of knowledge and understanding of the Bible; of the basic tenets of the Christian faith in their historical development, a foundation is laid for an ability to view life and the world from the Christian prospective. T h e resulting cognizance of the purposiveness of life, of the meaning of history, and of the relevance of Christianity to every area of life is the cornerstone of the Christian Liberal Arts education.

Reverend Ponstein leads one of his classes in an orderly exploration of the Old Testament.

William J. Hilmert, B.D. Head of the Department of Religious Education

Lambert J. Ponstein, B.D.

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Philosophy T h e Department of Philosophy aims to meet the needs of three groups of students, and each has an equal claim u p o n it. T h e first are those who, in search of a sound liberal education, study philosophy as an incentive to and an attempt at acquaintance with the integration of the broad areas of h u m a n experience and learning. T h e second are those whose interest and education is in a specialized area, and for whom philosophy provides the means both of broadening interest and acquaintance and of engaging in a critical analysis of the presuppositions and principles of their specialized field. T h e third are the philosophy majors, for whom the department aims to provide an acquaintance with the perennial problems of h u m a n life, an introduction to the great traditions of thought, and a sense of the importance of sound thinking in the attainment of the objectives of good living. In its entire program, the Department of Philosophy aims at developing an awareness of problems implicit in h u m a n experience, in developing thinking skills, and in reaping the benefits of the study of intellectual history, confident that in so doing, its students, whatever their chosen task, will be better prepared for it and all of life.

D. Ivan Dykstra, Ph.D. Head of the Department of Philosophy

For the young philosophers, like Eugene T e Hennepe, many books and a quiet place for study are absolute necessities.

William Vander Lugt,

Ph.D.


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Eleanor M. De Pree, A.B. Head of the Department of Art Amateur artists get ttie teel of a new medium and strange tools.

Delicate jewelry of silver is created through the artistic use of rugged equipment.

Ah One of the primary objectives of the Liberal Arts Education is an awakening of the soul to beauty. It is often in his aesthetic nature that man can ultimately find his greatest wellspring of happiness. It is largely through that which his eye can see that a student receives his first glimpse into the realm ofÂť beauty in Art. From working creatively in art classes and individually, equipped with a knowledge and awareness of contemporary art and the past achievements of man in his attempt to express himself in various media, the student can achieve an intellectual and emotional understanding of what is the peculiar nature of a work of art.

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N o r m a Baughman

Jantina Holleman, A.M.

1 Helene Prisman Karsten

Music T h e inspiring and refreshing world of music is a vast and exciting realm to those who know and appreciate its marvelous intricacies. However, only a basic knowledge of what constitutes great music, and a broad understanding of techniques involved is sufficient to open it to all. T h r o u g h actual participation on a level equal to personal ability, many students find great pleasure in the creations of past and present master musicians.

I. Anthony Kooiker, M.M.

Morrette L. Rider, D.Ed.

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Roger J. Rietberg, S.M.M.

Musical friends discover companionable talent and organize a great variety of ensembles.

Robert W . Cavanaugh, Ed.D. in Music Head of the Department of Music


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Foreign T h e study of language is multifold in its benefits to the diligent student. From a study of the literature, art, and culture of another people inevitably encountered in the learning of a language springs a greater understanding of all literature and art, and of one's own culture. In the rather intricate rules of operation of Latin and Greek is a matchless lesson in enlarging one's understanding of the basic structure of language which is essential to the attainment of an increased ability to understand and communicate. T h e mental discipline developed in the rigorous training of conjugating verbs, translating passages, and applying rules are of great value for the development of responsible thinking.

Edward J o h n Wolters, A.M. Head of the Department of Latin Ernest E. Ellen, Ph.D. Acting Head of the Department of German

Esther Mac Farlane Snow, A.M.

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Rigid attention to the details of classical languages demonstrates the basic nature of linguistic com-


" M a n never understands his own tongue until he has mastered some foreign language." Such mastery of a modern foreign language, while involving ability in writing and comprehension, also involves to a very large extent proficiency in actual conversation. T h e consequent emphasis upon the spoken word is a u n i q u e feature of the modern language. T o develop skill in pronunciation, diction, and general speaking ability, an aural-oral technique is employed in a modern language laboratory.

Marguerite Meyer Prins, A.M. Head of the Department of French Donald F. Brown, Ph.D. Head of the Department of Spanish

Nella Meyer, A.M.

T h e use of modern electronic equipment emphasizes the c o n t e m p o r a r y i m p o r t a n c e of foreign languages.


Edward E. Brand, Ed.D.

R u t h Scudder De Wolfe, A.M.

Sara Keith, A.M.

Albert James Prins, A.M.

Clarence De Graaf, Ed.D. in English Head of the Department of English

Emma M. Reeverts, A.M.

English Joy K. Talbert, Ph.D.

Henry ten Hoor, A.M.

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Every waking moment of our lives is bound in some way to English. He speak, read, write, and think in English. It is the primary practical channel through which all our knowledge flows. T h e mechanics of the language, the basic tools of grammar, are essential to its proper and most beneficial usage, and as such cannot be denied in any educational program. Certainly, however, on the college level there is far more to be gained from a study of our native tongue than a knowledge of the language itself. T h r o u g h a controlled exposure to great literature and literary criticism, the department strives to promote reading with understanding and discrimination based upon sound thinking — the primary mark of the educated man.


Speech Today, the importance of the various forms of communication is common knowledge. Speech is, of course, an integral part of communication. T h e Speech Department of Hope College bases its educational philosophy on the belief that "Speech" is a tool to be used to aid the individual not only to adapt to social situations but also to effect progress in his society. T o these ends activities in public speaking, debate, and acting are developed both within and outside the classroom. Students who participate in these activities are under the direct guidance of full time members of the Speech Department. It is felt that this program provides for: 1) an understanding of principles of speech composition, 2) skill in the methods of delivery, 3) better standards of criticism, and 4) the development of the speech personality.

Larry Lup makes a demonstration speech, an unavoidable experience in the development of the accomplished college graduate.

Dale De Witt, A.M.

Paul E. Reid, A.M.

William Schrier, Ph.D. Head of the Department of Speech

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Helen Schoon, A.M. Garrett Vander Borgh, A.M. Head of the Department of Education

Student teacher, Mary Lou Van Es, applies modern methods of teaching at Van Raalte School.

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Education T h e training of effective educators is a vital function of any college in the modern world. It is impossible to think of a culture without teachers, for they are the life's breath of a society. If the information, skills, and ideals gained in a young lifetime of schooling were not transmitted from each generation to the next, society would soon come to a standstill. Therefore, the efforts of the department of education are constantly directed toward the development of teachers of character, possessing the knowledge and skills necessary in competent instructors.

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mmmk Paddle ball is one of the many athletic activities which the physical education department provides.

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Lawrence J. Green, Ph.D. Head of the Department of Physical Education

Mary Louise Breid, M.S.

Physical Education In crowded, busy college life, many and varied continuous demands are made upon the student. Frequently, health, man's most important physical asset, is neglected only through care and education of his physical self can a student really hope to maintain the stamina college life demands. T h e skills and coordinations acquired through regular participation in sports improves mental and physical health. Releasing the excessive pressures of the responsibilities of student life is an invaluable product of physical activity.

Gordon Brewer, A.M.

Russell De Vette, A.M.

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Psychology

Robert De Haan, Ph.D. Head of the Department of Psychology

Contrary to public opinion, the student of Psychology does not begin an immediate psychoanalysis of his neighbor in the classroom. Rather, with a basic attitude of caution toward the interpretation of psychological events, psychological study is an attempt to help the student comprehend more fully his own behavior and that of others. T h i s necessitates an understanding of the basic psychological structure, concepts, and the processes involved in h u m a n experience, and the application of these concepts and processes as they are involved in his own life and experience. Study of such areas as "Motivation", "Perception", "Emotions", "the Individual and the G r o u p " , is often condemned as meaningless by some, yet through such study, the student can achieve an increasingly intelligent awareness of himself and of others — an invaluable asset in today's confused world.

Barbara C. Wilson, A.M.

In psychological case studies, Jane Knapp observes under controlled conditions, the reactions of Melba Jarrett.

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Sociology

Ethelanne Peelen and Phyllis Brink are collecting, for their social problems notebooks, contemporary evidence that our society is not without its problems.

Milton Lage Hinga, A.M.

In addition to man's position as a psychological individual is man s position as a member of society. Only in the group life of social organization is man's basic h u m a n need for a relationship with others satisfied. It is to a large extent in a life filled with daily contact with others that man must live and learn to adjust. T h u s , proper social evaluations become of importance to every human, and when viewed in the perspective of eternal truth such evaluations provide most of the necessary guides for h u m a n conduct. T h e study of man as a creature of social habit is applicable to every part of life, for he has always been and always will be in a group situation.

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Robert Clair Vanderham, A.M. Head of the Department of Sociology

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History and Political Science

James Dyke van Putten, Ph.D. Head of the Department of History and Political Science

From the study of man's past life on earth comes a comprehension of the inevitability of change accompanied by a realization that change and progress are not necessarily synonymous. A consciousness of history as the record of h u m a n effort to solve basic problems common to all better fits the student to be a citizen of the world community capable of taking intelligent action on the complex problems of the socio-political world in which he lives. " T h e past is a prologue" to the f u t u r e and, when properly viewed and understood, holds the key to the direction of the present and the future.

k Paul Fried, Ph.D.

Metta J . Ross, A.M.

Alvin W . Vanderbush, A.M.

Dr. Fried briefs the senior history majors who will assist him in teaching introductory courses.


Economics and Business Administration Man, in his development of a complex society has become keenly aware of his role as an economic creature. T o be a completely self-conscious individual, modern man needs an understanding of his economic environment, the conditions that change it, and the means by which he may successfully live in it. In the achievement of these objectives the Economics Department offers courses which aim not only at an understanding of economic theory, but also at practical preparation for careers in business.

T h o m a s E. Van Dahm, A.M.

Dwight B. Yntema, Ph.D. Head of the Department of Economics and Business Administration

J o h n Van Ingen, M.B.A.

It's the total that counts. Business administration students work intently on an accounting problem.


Mathematics In the past, society has regarded mathematics as a subject of abstractions and formalities studied as a pure abstract science separated from its natural setting. Challenged by this association on the part of the average man, mathematics has altered itself into a dynamic and functional field. Now mathematics is viewed not only as a body of rules, formulas, tables, graphs, and principles to be learned, but as a language, a method of thinking. Mastery of computational skills and tools needed in all possible fields of application cannot be neglected. T h e traditional daily individual preparation, often condemned as drudgery by the student is an integral part of the development of the mastery which is the basis for mathematical thinking.

Albert Eugene Lampen, A.M. Head of the Department of Mathematics

For engineers the translation of mathematics into concrete form is essential to professional competency.

•Hi. Charles A. Steketee, A.M.

Jay Ernest Folkert, Ph.D.

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Physics A scientific approach to an understanding of natural phenomena and the laws governing them are of great interest and importance to members of modern society. T h e development of proficiency in gathering and evaluating evidence by reason and experiment constitutes a very valuable discipline. In any field of endeavor, possession of a capacity for qualitative and quantitative accuracy, and of the power of logical analysis are invaluable. Clarence Kleis, A.M. Head of the Department of Physics

In the combined classroom-laboratory study of the basic principles of the physical laws of the universe is found a u n i q u e contribution to the development of the liberally educated individual.

Laboratory experimentation and observation, such as is involved in mapping electrical fields with oscilloscopes, is an integral part of the study of physics.

0 Harry Frissel, Ph.D.

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Phillip G. Crook, Ph.D.

Oscar Edward T h o m p s o n , A.M. Head of the Department of Biology

Biology An education of a student in the workings of his psychological nature and of the physical universe is incomplete without the inclusion of a study of man as a biological organism in his relation to other organisms. T h i s entails a thorough exploration of the main forms of life, their development, structure, functional processes and interrelationships. T h e material is vast in its scope and consequently the subject of Biology has become a highly specialized one. However, the general view of the field acquired by an average student provides sufficient basis for an attitude of inquiry concerning the natural world of living organisms which surrounds him.

Charles D. Louch, Ph.D.

Eva B. Van Schaack, Ph.D.

Under the guidance oÂŁ Dr. Crook, students become intimately acquainted with the inevitable laboratory frog.


Eugene C. Jekel M.S.

J . Harvey Kleinheksel,

Chemistry T h e universe in which man lives is God's creation, and in it he occupies a u n i q u e position as a created creator. As such, he is charged with responsibility for knowing its nature, to the end that he may make creative use of its resources. Inquiry into chemistry and allied fields is inquiry into the very composition of the universe. T h r o u g h the comprehensive study of the elements in their totality and complexity comes an appreciation of the beauty of organization, structure and functioning of the natural world. Man's finite mind, applying the principles of experiment and observation involved in the scientific method, can comprehend and appreciate the cosmic order as exemplary, not of man's genius, but rather of the fundamental unity of the power working in the natural world.

Gerrit Van Zyl, Ph.D. 11. Head of the Department of Chemistry A

Maurice Loomans takes down his observations from his experiment in Organic Synthesis.


Dr. Van Zyl and student assistants observe a phase of their experiment in thiophene sponsored by the Research Corporation.

Faculty Projects In September of 1953 Dr. Ernest E l l e n of the German Department established a u n i q u e program of foreign language study in Holland grade schools. Initially German instruction was given to a small group of fourth grade students who responded enthusiastically. At present, however, instruction in German and Spanish is given to over three hundred children in the fourth through the seventh grades. Contrary to general opinion, a great n u m b e r of mentally retarded children w h o a r e n o t e d u c a b l e are trainable. Such children are the concern of Miss Mary Rhoades, a senior psychology student, who is the director of Prestatie Huis, Achievement House, a day care center for trainable mentally retarded children from the Holland area. T h e school is staffed entirely by Hope student volunteers. Although the Psychology Department uses this project as a workshop for its students, the major aim of the school is to help the children learn to utilize their capacities to their fullest extent through training in self-help.

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Mr. Stekette measures the rainfall and provides a statistic of general interest.


In addition to the actual class hours spent in contact with the student, many members of the faculty are involved in various study projects in a particular area of their field. Such special projects allow a professor to explore his subject more fully and maintain a vital interest in it. In the chemistry department Dr. Gerrit Van Zyl heads an exemplary research program which is carried on largely during the summer months by senior chemistry majors and former students who have completed one or more years of graduate work. For the past ten years the research has been supported by grants from the Research Corporation of New York. Many papers resulting from this research program have been recognized by publication in the J o u r n a l of T h e American Chemical Society. In recent years Dr. Folkert and Mr. Steketee of the Mathematics Department have acted as U. S. W e a t h e r Observers in keeping a continuous record of the local daily m a x i m u m and m i n i m u m temperatures and of the a m o u n t of rainfall and snowfall. T h e readings of the station are important mainly for their use in the establishment of normals in temperature and precipitation for the local area. Dr. Ellen pioneers in the teaching ot German to elementary school pupils.

Mrs. Wilson, professor of psychology, lends a hand at the sand box at the Prestatie Huis

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Library

Mildred E. Singleton, M.S. Librarian

M. Lois Bailey, B.S. in L.S. Reference Librarian

Students retreat to the quiet of the library for solid studying.

Jean Van Ingen, A.B. Library Assistant

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Enlarged resources and a tremendously increased circulation have earmarked a new look about the library. T h e wide variety of subject matter in the present curriculum has necessitated the purchase of many new books answering todays questions and the new thorough organization of older books to facilitate research into past developments. As a result of such acquisition of additional books and more complete classification and cataloguing of all library resources to render more books accessible, the library has become an invaluable source of information to the student. T h e recognition of the learning process as essentially one of self education in which the learner is integrally involved, is a major development of the thought of modern educators. In such an educational process, the well equipped and organized library plays an invaluable role.

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Kay Peelen and Lois Bos are locating books in the stacks, which are open to all students.

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Howard Zanbergen M.S. in L.S. Assistant Librarian in Charge of Cataloging

Irene Ver Beek, A.B. Circulation Assistant

Joyce Leighley discharges books to two successful seekers.


Clyde Geerlings, A.B. Director of Alumni and Public Relations • V

.H Janet Mulder, A.B. Archivist

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Marian A. Stryker, A.B. Editor, Alumni Magazine Secretary of Alumni Association

Alumni and Publicity T h e Hope College Alumni and Publicity Office is the medium between the college, its 7,000 alumni and former students, the community of Holland and the hometowns of the students.

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T h e Alumni Association, comprised of four officers and sixteen directors, meets twice a year to enact policies and promotional procedures which must be administered by the Alumni Office. T h e r e are 14 area H o p e College Clubs and two interest Chapters which meet each year with the assistance of the A l u m n i Office. Keeping track of the 7,000 men and women who have attended the college is a time-consuming duty of the office. T h e Association, through the A l u m n i Office, publishes the " A l u m n i Magazine", a quarterly, which aims to promote good will between the college and its alumni. T h e n too there are Homecoming activities in the fall, and Alumni Day reunions in J u n e to organize and promote. T h e Publicity arm of the office aims to keep H o p e College before the public by preparing news releases on the growth of the college, the accomplishments of the various departments, as well as the individual undertakings of the students.

Art Martin operates the newly purchased addressograph.

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Students assist in the Alumni and Publicity office in sending out copies of the A N C H O R with the A L U M N I MAGAZINE.

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Secretaries

Seated: J, Poest, T . Akker, D. Walters, C. Mulder, J. Pourings, D. Mokma, H. Beukema, M. Aitcheson, J. Buteyn. Standing: J. Ver Meer, J. Huenek, P. Graham.

W i t h o u t the constant din of the ring of of typewriter bells signifying administrative secretaries hard at work, the first floor of Van Raalte Hall would scarcely be recognizable. In each of the offices there can be found at least one of these women who somehow manage to carry out their numerous secretarial duties in spite of the numerous interruptions of inquiring students.

T h e trials and tribulations of the housemother are almost legendary. T h e tasks involved in maintaining order in an efficiently r u n residence hall range from inspecting rooms regularly to lending a sympathetic ear to homesick freshmen. T h e countless major and minor crises which constantly arise in the community living of the dormitory are met with calm and understanding by the housemother.

Housemothers

From left to right: Mrs. DeWoIf, Mrs. Tellman, Mrs. Steinenger, Mrs. Boeskool.

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Front Row: Henry Kleeves, Gay Zylman, Burt Scholten. Back Row: Jack Steketee, Ed. Averse, Piet Janpelt.

Jake Havinga and Ernest VVehrmeyer outline their work for the day.

Maintenance Staff Left to Right: F. Lighthart, E. Wehrmeyer, D. Poppema, J. Steketee, O. Charley, A. Klienjan.

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Clink Clinic and infirmary care is offered to every enrolled student in the Student Health Clinic. Free clinic service consists of an examination by a physician and the administration of ordinary medicines. Students who become ill can not remain in the dormitories but are required to enter the infirmary, where they can receive additional professional care in pleasant surroundings.

Student nurses, Jane Knapp, Henrietta Ket, and Evelyn Zylstra, play an important part in the functioning of the clinic.

Miss Meyer, head of the clinic, attends to many minor emergencies which occur throughout the weeks.

John De Fouw uses the clinic's health lamp to soothe an old football injury.


Mealtime Every day approximately 500 boarding students must be fed in the three campus dining halls. For the many cooks and the baker this means much time and planning to provide a balanced diet. Employment of students as dishwashers, waitresses and waiters provides,an opportunity for many to supplement slim living allowances. One of the essentials of student happiness is much good food.

T h e social atmosphere of the dining hall improves even good food.

Many students piece out their spending money by doing necessary chores.


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ACTIVITIES The liberally educated person is perpetually attuned to his environment. This attunement is m a d e more nearly complete by his participation in the m a n y activities which are available both on the campus a n d in the community. Through participation the student becomes increasingly a w a r e of the values of friendship a n d devotion.


Freshman In the early months of every academic year, a traditionally green species known as the Freshman gradually becomes a bonafide member of college society. T h e process is carefully planned by the student council through its i n i t i a t i o n program and by the faculty through its special Freshman counseling system. However, the true initiation of the college freshman occurs within each individual when, as he struggles through a hectic first year, his vague conceptions of college life become meaningful realities. Students and belongings seem to come in every conceivable shape and size.

T h e arrangement of a schedule is a confusing procedure without the aid of a counselor.

T h e Y Beach Party offers new students a chance to relax and meet new friends.

Convocation represents the beginning of the serious academic activities. *

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Orientation T h e first week of adjustment to new surroundings and friends, is invariably one of physical turmoil. T h e Freshman's schedule is kept full with counselling sessions, the Y beach party and the formal faculty reception. But after a week of catering to the lowly Frosh, upperclassmen take the reins at the All-College Mixer and distribute the traditional green pots, symbols of humiliation. And so Kangaroo Court sessions and the cry "Pot,Frosh!" become a part of fall life at Hope. T h e Freshmen, thus, bound together by a common burden and a common cause, become a unified class ready to assume their place in the college.

With expectations high, f reshmen greet their new roommates.

Registration day is a hectic time for all "wearer^ of the green".

Besides filling out blanks Freshmen pose for identification photos.

Kangaroo Court teaches Freshmen the meaning of submission.

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Toy soldiers and dolls began to march as the Freshmen women sang.

T h e Sophomore play showed that anything can happen at a ladies meeting.

Enthusiastic Freshmen coeds huddle about the coveted Nykerk Cup.


Freshmen morale girls bandaged blisters and administered smelling salts.

Meanwhile the Sophomores expressed tasted victory.

their exuberance as they

T h e tug oÂŁ war spelled a dip of Black River for the "green" and victory for the Sophomores.

Weary Minds. . . ... Weary Muscles j-*' •jJn* T h e freshman is slowly integrated into the college community by means of two traditional contests between freshman and sophomore classes. Competing in three fields, drama, musical production and oratory, for the coveted Nykerk C u p is a timeand effort-consuming task for the women of the two classes. In the few weeks preceding the contest, freshman and s o p h o m o r e g i r l s are spirited, determined groups. T h i s year, in accordance with the outcome of the two previous years, the jubilant victors were the girls of the Freshman Class. While the women devote themselves to more aesthetic pursuits it) the Nykerk C u p Contest, the men of the two rival classes resolutely spend their time and muscles in preparation for the annual Pull across Black River. Coached by upperclassmen, each team of your stalwarts conditions itself in grueling practice sessions for the exhausting struggle of the Pull. T h i s year saw a resounding sophomore victory over an inexperienced freshman team.


Students chatted with their families over a meal served "collegiate style".

Parents Arrive At open house parents were given the opportunity to i n s p e c t their daughter's room.

Hy

46

In spite of the numerous college activities which fill the life of the average Hopeite, there remains a strong bond between student and family. Letters home, filled with news of college life, reflect a desire to share the college experience to some extent with Mom and Dad. T h r e e years ago, in recognition of this, the first Mom and Dad's Day was held. Hailed as a great success, the special day has been held in each succeeding year. T h i s year a Saturday afternoon football game, dinner in Durfee Hall, student programs in the new Music Building, and open house in all the dormitories made the day a busy and enjoyable one for Mom's, Dad's and students alike.


WHI C

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d ) ^ •Liij.iylWtiJ Homecoming fans were treated to a very exciting afternoon as Hope defeated Adrian 25-7.

As Do Alumni Competition is keen among societies to produce a winning float.

T o alumni, old and new, there is one day in the Fall calendar reserved for reminiscing and a renewal of old friendships — Homecoming. T h e event is as inherently a part of H o p e as is graduation, by which students become alumni. T h i s year, as every year, the college welcomed and entertained its alumni with a full schedule of events. Dorm decorations, a parade with fraternity and sorority floats, a football game, class reunions, and a Sunday vesper service combined to make Homecoming the biggest social weekend of the year.

47


Jocelyn Fryling

Homecoming Queen and Court


Norma Damstra

Ethelanne Peelen

J a n e Klaasen

Susan Graves

Norma Peck

Virginia Vanderborgh

Marylin Boughton


T h e Hope Memorial Chapel is an inspirational setting for a early morning service.

Organ music and chimes create a worshipful atmosphere for morning meditation.

50


Chapel Meditations A new day, when viewed by a mind not yet burdened with the cares of the world, is a creation worthy of man's praise. Each morning, before the actual start of the academic routine, students and faculty alike pause for a brief chapel meditation. T h e typical service is simple in form and aims primarily to bring those present to a moment of earnest prayer and worship. T o the sincere student, a quiet moment for meditation in inspiring surroundings can be a meaningful experience.

A view from the narthex provides an impressive sight.

After a 20 minute worship service, the academic activities of the day begin.

51


Dorm Life

Kollen Hall residents mull over the happenings of the day.

T h e r e are few experiences in life which quite compare with living in a college dormitory. T h a t which a student can learn from living in a community with his fellow students is perhaps the most valuable single contribution of college to the development of his total personality. In the famed "bull session", the backbone of dormitory living, thoughts, ideals, and basic attitudes are freely discussed. From participation in such discussions comes much of the stimulus for maturation of thought which is basic to a true adaptation to the responsibilities of living independently away from home. T h e binding ties of childhood, dependence upon parents and home can never be completely discarded, yet after breathing the atmosphere of self-assertion and responsibility present in the college dormitory, the student must at least begin his development into an adult.

T h e day always arrives when the laundry bag is stuffed full.

Left; Phone booths are jammed as students call home. Below: Personal devotions provide a fitting end to a busy day.

4

52


Commuter Life T o the c o m m u t i n g student, campus life is only a part of a busy double life as he plays a dual role of family member and college student. Unable to completely detach himself from his home, he must remain a member of his family as well as of the college community. T h i s can mean helping Mom with the dishes, or taking time out for a little sister. U n h a m p e r e d by the distractions of a noisy or a visiting dorm neighbor, the commuter can study in places and at times of his own choosing. His is a busy life of travel to and from the campus, studying and participation in family and college activities with equal vigor.

m Television in the home helps the commuter get little or nothing done and enjoy it.

__ x Stacks of dishes await their scrubbing after every meal. Right: T h a t good old home cooking always holds appeal. Below: Chapel starts at 8:00 and commuters must rise early to make it.

w

53


T h e Penny Carnival attracts many couples who wish to try their luck at the various booths.

The Lighter Side Any worthwhile education must consist to a large extent of intensive study. However, a college existence concerned solely with learning from books cannot provide the perspective necessary to an adequate appreciation of life. Recreation provides the vital balance of relaxation to the strenuous mental activity involved in the process of learning. Inevitably, on the co-educational college scene, formal means of diversion include the American custom of dating. A date at Hope can range from a fraternity formal to a quiet evening of television in Durfee lounge. Often, however, merely setting aside studies to talk with roommate or friend provides refreshing relief from the strain of study. Movies and popcorn are more fun than ever.

54


T h e lounge is an inevitable place for a coed to entertain her date.

Couples glide back and forth on the crowded floor at the All College Formal.

All it takes for a pizza date is a moment of weakness and a little suggestion.


T h e joy that comes from peace and good will found its expression as the college musical organizations performed "The Messiah".

"Messiah" at Christmas Dr. Robert Cavanaugh chats backstage with the guest soloists.

Every year, shortly before Christmas, Hope students thrill to Handel's Messiah. T h e special Messiah chorus, directed by Dr. Robert Cavanaugh, consists of the combined Chapel and Chancel choirs and other students who desire to sing. For the many who actually participate, the presentation is an inspiration rarely experienced. T o the majority of students who witness its performance, the Messiah is the culmination of personal preparation for the Christian observance of the birth of Christ.

56


Service on Sunday T h e Reformed Church in America plays a dominant role in the religious life of H o p e College and of her students. T h e majority of the students are members of Reformed churches in various parts of the country, and upon entering the college soon affiliate with one of the congregations of the Holland area. In addition to attending Sunday services, some students teach Sunday School classes, sing in church choirs, and participate in youth groups. Such students find great satisfaction in maintaining an active interest in a church away from home.

Holland's churches welcome students to their services each Sunday.

Many students participate actively in the worship services of local churches.

Teaching children Bible stories can be a rewarding experience.


Special dorm devotions were held during the inspiring week.

Rev. DeVries was available to counsel all those desiring his help.

T h e philosophy of Hope College is rooted in the basic tenets of the Christian faith. T h e r e f o r e the entire curriculum and scope of activities is influenced by an attempt to create a truly Christian atmosphere on campus. Every effort is made to awaken the student to the truth of Christianity, but he is neither coddled nor coerced into his beliefs. T o the end of greater inspiration and spiritual stimulation of the busy collegian, a week of activities concerned with religion is sponsored each year by the Y organizations. During this week, mid-morning chapel services are conducted by a guest minister who serves as a major participant in the seminars and group discussions, which are the important events of the week.

58


A Week of Religious Inspiration

Afternoon seminars emphasized various aspects of religion.

A "Y" sponsored panel discussed the true meaning of Religious Emphasis Week.

h'


T h e crisp singing of the Tuscon Boy's Choir captured the audience completely.

lUft: M r s . E d i t h S a m s o n w a s t h e H a w k i n s o n Memorial Lecturer. Right: T h e Boris Goldovsky's Opera theatre presented "Secret Marriage".


A Varied Cultural Diet Fully to achieve its educational purpose, any college must supply the student with an opportunity to attend events of a more broadening nature than classroom lectures. T w o major contributions to an increased cultural understanding are found in concerts and frequent guest lecturers. In conjunction with the Holland Civic Music Association, H o p e sponsors a concert series to which students may subscribe. T h e artists who appeared this season provided varied musical programs. D u r i n g the year, the campus played host to many excellent speakers. Foremost among these were Mrs. Edith Samson, the Ella M. Hawkinson memorial lecturer, and Frederick Schuman , author and professor from Williams College. T h e role which such lecturers play cannot be underestimated, for they are often a source of views and information to which the student would not otherwise be exposed.

T h e Vienna String Symphony captivated everyone with the nostalgia "alt Wien".

Robert Hladky, a noted 'cellist, presented a recital with Mr. Anthony Kooiker.

Dr. Fredrick Schuman was the keynote speaker of the I R C Midwest Conference

61


Jean K r o m a n n

Ann Bloodgood

Senior Recitals

James Kranendonk

Shenvood Hazelton


Charles Lindahl

Robert Ritsema

Senior Recitals

Anita Van Lente

Harold Ritsema

Gordon Meeusen

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Intoxicated with the victory, the Dorians rejoice.

All-College Sing Societies practice long and hard to capture the coveted cup.

V

Although Hope numbers among the smaller liberal arts colleges, there are surprisingly few times d u r i n g the school year when the entire student body assembles for a social evening. T h e night of the Sing is one such occasion when a spirit of unity brings into harmony the relatively small student population in a truly all-college event. Sing competition is on a fraternity and sorority basis with each organization responsible for rendering a song of its own choice. In recent years the calibre of the competition has been especially high, with each fraternity and sorority striving to outdo the other. T h i s year's victors were the Cosmopolitans with "Oklahoma", and the Dorians with " T h u m b e l i n a " .


Before the Sing all groups anxiously await the beginning of the contest.

T h e Cosmopolitan Fraternity proudly clasps the cup of victory.


3

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As Winter Yields to Spring . . . In the closing months of the second semester, Spring, the most welcome of all the seasons, gradually displaces Holland's notoriously stubborn winter weather. In view of the stirring renaissance in nature, resolutions to study effectively pale into insignificance and to all appearances Spring becomes the master of all. T h e first days of S p r i n g a t H o p e are traditionally marked by the May Day celebration. Women's athletic competition dominates the morning scene, while men's track and field events are held in the afternoon. T h e celebration is climaxed by the selection of a Q u e e n of the May who reigns as campus queen for the coming year.

T h e pageantry of the occasion was apparent as the girls flitted about the May Pole,

Ethelanne Peelen is crowned the Queen of May.

T h e day is also packed with athletic competition.

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67


Ethelanne Peelen

May Day Queen and Court


R u t h Bruins

Judy Rypma

Mary Lou Van Es

Norma Damstra

Barbara Klomparens

^ â&#x20AC;˘ 1

Carol Matheis

69


' The Lure of Europe

T h e Eiffel Tower is a tourist attraction few miss.

Larry Siedentop, Student Ambassador to France, eagerly views the exotic sights of Paris.

T h e r e are many picturesque views of the countryside.

70


Gibraltar offered an impressive introduction to the European world. Few Hope tourists will ever forget the trips with the Volkswagens.

Eating is a pleasure with scenery like this.

Life in the United States is hectic and confusing,filled with a plethora of social responsibilities and pressures. T o find secure cultural roots in a vacillating culture is frequently difficult for the student. Perhaps it is for this reason that the old world of Europe possesses such charm and fascination for the American. On the continent, founded in countless generations of intellectual, spiritual, and political development, is a stability of purpose and certainty of basic goals which are so illusive in our own country. T h e r e is much to be learned from an intimate contact with the thought and personality of Europe. Last year the college initiated a summer study tour program. Under the direction of Dr. Donald Brown and Dr. Paul Fried, groups of students spent the summer months abroad. O n e group traveled largely in Spain studying Spanish u n d e r Dr. Brown, while the other spent several weeks in Austria studying German civilization, and the history of Europe since 1918, with Dr. Fried. Another member of Hope's student body, Larry A. Siedentop, spent the summer months in France as Holland's Community Ambassador. While living with a French family, Larry grew to know the French mind and way of life intimately.

*1


ORGANIZATIONS Study a n d classroom activities alone are ina d e q u a t e means of d e v e l o p i n g the liberally e d u c a t e d person.

For this reason Hope Col-

lege maintains m a n y campus organizations which allow students to pursue i n d i v i d u a l interests a n d to d e v e l o p new skills.


Front Row: Mary Lou Van Es, Ann Bloodgood, Dorothy Hesselink, Sue Underwood. Second Row: J a n e Gouwens, Jini VanderBorgh, Jane Klaasen, Isla Van Eenenaam, Mrs. Stryker, Dr. Talbert, Mary Alice Ferguson, Anita Van Lente, Rosemarie Kish, Lois Thorns. T h i r d Row: Mr. Ver Beek, Bob Lesniak, Art Martin, Holly Meyer, Gord Hondorp, John De Vries, Martin Riekse, Jim Evenhuis, Chuck Hesselink, Carl Ver Beek, Peter V. DeMoya, Leonard Rowell, Gene T e H e n n e p e , Nate VanderWerf.

^ 7

HOLLAND

INPIANAPOLIS LOUISVILLE

Y.M.CA.

& Y.W.CA. T o b u i l d a f e l l o w s h i p of all t h e s t u d e n t s , t o f u r t h e r s t u d e n t a c t i v i t i e s , a n d t o t r a i n s t u d e n t s f o r f u t u r e res p o n s i b i l i t i e s â&#x20AC;&#x201D; t h e s e a i m s lie w i t h i n t h e p u r p o s e of t h e H o p e C o l l e g e Y's, a l o n g w i t h t h e d e s i r e t o r e a l i z e a f u l l a n d c r e a t i v e l i f e t h r o u g h a g r o w i n g k n o w l e d g e of G o d a n d t o m a k e this life p o s s i b l e f o r all p e o p l e , w h i l e seeking to u n d e r s t a n d Jesus a n d to follow h i m .

W h o will win the race? Mary Lou Van Es and Gord Hondorp, Mission Drive co-chairmen, adjust the positions of the cars as money comes in to fill the quota for Brewton.

74


Y members anxiously await the cars which will take them to the fall State V Conference.

In traditional activities that range from a Freshman Beach Party which welcomes new-comers to campus, to a Mission Drive which this year benefited the Southern Normal School at Brewton, the Y works toward its purpose. As an innovation in preparation for the Y-sponsored Religious Emphasis Week, several outside speakers on related subjects were brought to campus d u r i n g the first semester. A basic concern, making Christianity pervade all of life, was treated in a series of Tuesday night meetings on "Living Christianity", as well as at the State Fall Conference â&#x20AC;&#x201D; " T h e Christian in Politics". As the year closes, the Y's are re-evaluating and repurposing, in an effort toward more effective operation.

Francis Helen Maines, field representative for the National Y.W.C.A., discussed long range aims and objectives for our YM and YW organizations at a joint cabinet meeting in January.

75


Alphi V

Chi

Front Row; Ron Stockhoff, Russ Yonkers, Dave De Ruiter, Chuck Hesselink, Martin Riekse, Don Lindskoog, Milford Decker Second Row: Ron Lokhorst, Stuart Wilson, George Magee, Wayne Vissers, Dick Rhem, Mel Van Hattem, Bob VanderAarde, Verne Hoffs, Sheryl Schlafer, Larry Izenbart.

Alpha Chi is composed of pre-seminary students and those who intend to enter full-time Christian service. T h e group meets once a month for fellowship, devotions, and discussion of problems which may face them when engaged in their vocations. T h e women at H o p e planning to enter full-time Christian service have organized Kappa Delta to share their common interest. At group meetings the members may hear of the experiences and ideas of former members who have already begun their post-college activities.

Front Row: Yoshie Ogawa, J a n Owen, Judy Mulder, Lois Hoeksema, Elaine Halbersma, C a r o l y n DeYoung, Betty Vander Jagt, Verna La Grande, Cynthia Vandermyde, Donna Jurries. Second Row: Judy Olson, Mary Ann Klaaren, Carol De Vries, Adele Dingee, Dot Preston, Marilyn Scudder, Carol T e n Haken, Carol Rylance, Marna Vander Hart, Henrietta Ket.

Kapp a Delta /

76


Seated: Mary Alice Ferguson, Sue Underwood, Jean Kromann, Anita Van Lente, Ann Bloodgood. Standing: Nate Vander Werf, John DeVries, Dave Van Eenenaam, Dick Rhem, Howard Harrington, Gordon Hondorp, Larry Siedentop. Missing: Lois Hoeksema.

Vacuity Honors Faculty honors are bestowed each year on a small group of distinguished seniors who are selected by the faculty as representing the highest achievement in scholarship and service. T h e honor students are recognized and awarded citations of achievement at an honors convocation near the end of the year and are entertained at luncheon as guests of the faculty. T o a large extent Hope College's reputation in academic circles depends upon there graduates and their subsequent achievements.

A n n Bloodgood

Jean Kromann

J o h n DeVries

Richard Rhem

Mary Alice Ferguson

Larry Siedentop

Howard Harrington

Suzanne Underwood

Lois Hoeksema

Nathan Vander Werf

Gordon H o n d o r p

David Van Eenenaam

Anita Van Lente

77


Left to Right: Lois Hoekscma, Evon Southland, Betty Burnett, Ann BloodgoocI, Norma Damstra, Sue Underwood, Anita Van Lente, Mary Lou Van Es.

D u r i n g the late-afternoon May Day ceremonies come those suspenseful moments when an honored n u m b e r of junior women are tapped for Alcor, senior women's honorary society. Selecting its members for their excellence in scholarship, leadership, character, and service, Alcor aims to stimulate the cultural, academic, and social life of the college.

Alcor invites students on the Dean's List to an annual Honors Tea.

H/ Pood! Wednesday night rolls around again and with it comes Alcor girls with a basket of good things to eat.

Alcor 78

Ti


Blue Key Larry L u p does a routine task of a Blue Key member, assisting in the management of the book store.

Blue Key members check over an athletic program to be distributed at the next big game.

A

Every September, the members of Blue Key, after being chosen the previous May, step into their responsibilities as bookstore personnel, compilers of the Student Guide, and ushers at various college events. Service, scholastic achievement, and character are the bases for election to this national honor fraternity for senior men.

Front Row: Bob Ritsema, Howard Harrington, Gordon Winter, Marlin Vander Wilt, Larry Lup^ Nate Vander Werf.

Hondorp, Harold Ritsema. Second Row: Larry Siedentop, John De Vries, Bob

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Phi Alpha Theta Front Row: Dave Van Eenenaam, John De Vries, Dave Bosch, Jack Walchenbach, Gord Hondorp. Second Row: Dr. Ellen, Walter Francke, Mary VanderHoven, Larry Schut, Norma Damstra, Dr. Fried.

Gamma Chi, Hope College chapter of Delta Phi Alpha, is an honorary German scholastic fraternity, recognizing excellence in the study of German and providing an incentive for higher scholarship. Meetings of the group are designed to promote interest in various aspects of Germany and her language.

T h e presence of a guest historian enhances the annual initiation of the Gamma Omicron chapter of Phi Alpha T h e t a . T h i s national honorary fraternity gives recognition to students with high scholastic attainment particularly in the field of history. Members quarterly receive The Historian, a scholarly journal of history.

Seated: Barb Van Putten. Left to Right: Carl De Vree, Lois Hoeksema, Phil Hesselink, Miss Ross, Dr. Fried, Larry Siedentop.

Delta Phi Alph a

80

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Beta Beta Beta

Seated; Evon Southland. Marlin Vander Wilt.

Left to Right: Gord Hondorp, Evelyn Zylstra, Norma Damstra, Dave Van Eenenaam,

Beta Beta Beta, national honorary biological fraternity, has three major aims: development of sound scholarship, dissemination of scientific truth, and promotion of research. Alpha Eta chapter, whose members are either bio majors or premed students, this year presented several medical films and also made a field trip to Cook County Hospital.

T h e Student Affiliates of the American Chemical Society provided an excellent series of talks, demonstrations, and field trips for the students planning to make chemistry their profession. T h i s extra-curricular approach helped the members to gain knowledge of many phases of chemistry not covered by class work.

Front Row: Mr. Jekel, J i m Cook, John Van Dyke, Sally Schneider, Howard Harrington, Loraine Pschigoda, Dick Wyma, Gary T e r Haar, Dr. Kleinheksel. Second Row: Dennis Camp, Victor Heasley, Don De Jongh, Corwin Bredeweg, Gary Dalman, Ev Nienhouse, Maurice Loomans, Phil Staal, Ralph Korteling, Louis Stegink, Don De Vries.

Chemistry

Club

1


v " r French Club

Front Row: Carol T e n Haken, Jocelyn Fryling, Evalyn Carter, Sheryl Yntema, Mary Oosting, Jan Abma, Carol Luth. Second Row: Deanna Deas, Carol McCahan, Lois Thorns, Patti Knoll, Harold Knoll, Walter Francke, Dave Dethmers, T e d d a De Vries, Hetty Vos, Miss Meyer.

T h e French Club welcomes all students of second year level, and interested in French, to monthly meetings designed to extend the member's knowledge and interest beyond the study of the language alone into the art, culture, life, and thought of France and her people.

El Club espanol congregates at the home of el professor Brown. T h e club is open to second year Spanish students who wish to meet with other students interested in the Latin way of life. Movies and slides of Spanish scenes shown to the accompaniment of anecdotes of traveling members, a Christmas party, and the traditional spring picnic were the highlights of Spanish Club this year.

Front Row: Lois Hoeksema, J a n Peck, Dr. Brown, Ken Scudder, Steve Van Grouw, Carol Vander Meer. Second Row: Carol Paeon, Aileen McGoldrick, Don Scott, Rog Garvelink, John Heins, Mary Kay Diephuis.

Spanish

Club V V


Classics Club

Front Row: Bev Bootsman, Nella Swart, Sue Klyn, Lorraine Hellenga. Second Row: |oc Woods, Jim Evenhuis, Holly Meyer, Nate VanderWerf.

T h i s year the Classics Club, an outgrowth of the former Latin Club, made its appearance on our campus. It invites all students to spend one evening a month in the fascinating study of ancient culture and history. Since its organization in 1950, the Business-Econ C l u b has been active in acquainting interested students with current problems of business management and in giving them a comprehensive picture of trends in the national economy.

Front Row: Dot Preston, Keith Van Koevering, T e d Anderson, Rog Toonder, A1 Grube, John Klaasen, Hetty Vos. Second Row: Rick Gould, Pete Hoek, Bob Johnson, Bob VanderLugt, Bill Comstock, Cal Losee, Dr. Yntema. Third Row: Duane Hop, Don Knoll, J a n Wagner, Chuck Thomae, Paul Duey, Dave Kuyers, Paul Van Koevering.

BusinessEcon Club

83


Front Row; R u t h VandenBerg, J a n Tuttle, Diane Johnson, J a n e MacEachron, Deanna Deas, Yoshie Ogawa, Alyce Weener, Sharon Hackman, Mary Kay Diephuis, Mary Hunter. Second Row: Elaine Halbersma, Joan Fendt, Marlene Hartgerink, R u t h Wright, Helen Van Dyke, Darlene Elzinga, Lynn Van't Hof, Anna Geitner, Ethelanne Peelen, Sally Smith. T h i r d Row: J a n Blunt, Sue Klyn, Hope Brahs, Carol De Vries, Phyllis Sienstra, Mary Lou Van Es, Aileen McGoldrick, Patty Knoll, Sue Monte, Sheryl Yntema, Elena Bylsma, Em Curlee. Fourth Row: Carol Houghtaling, Fran Kramer, Barb vanPutten, Lois Bos, Kay Rynbrandt, Lois Hoeksema, Adele Dingee, J a n Peck, Harriet Van Heest, R u t h Bruins, Mary VanderHoven, Phyllis Brink. Fifth Row: Erma Van Dyke, Fran Roundhouse, Marge DeWitt, Del Farnsworth, J o h n Plasman, Steve Van Grouw, Harold Knoll, Nella Swart, Virginia VanderBorgh, Jocelyn Fryling.

F. T.A.

T h e F u t u r e Teachers of America C l u b acquaints the student with various aspects of the teaching profession on both the elementary and secondary levels. T h r o u g h its monthly meetings, membership in NEA and MEA, the club develops an insight into the duties and the characteristic problems of the teacher. Seated: R u t h Bruins, Kay Rynbrand. First Row: Mary Ann Vollink, Carolyn De Young, Jo Barton, Marlene Hartgerink, Donna Paris, Carol Matheis, Nella Swart. Second Row: Fran Kramer, Lois Hoeksema, Kay Peelen, Mary Hunter, Mary Kay Diephuis, Deanna Deas.

A.D.D.

T h e girls seen at basketball and football games wearing blue cardigans and selling popcorn and candy are members of a service organization called the Athletic Debt Diggers. T h e proceeds from these activities are channeled in two directions, one half going to the athletic department, and the other being allocated for a gift to the school.


T h e members of the board o( the Women's Athletic Association under the supervision of Miss Mary Bried are the girls who supervise all women's intramural sports activities. Members of this organization participate in a variety of sports among themselves and with other schools having similar organizations.

p

W.A.A. First Row: J a n Evert, Joy Philip, Winona Keirer, Shirley Meiste. Second Row; Sandy Dressel Joyce Leighley, Barb vanPutten, Betty Burnett, Mary Kay Diephuis. Third Row; Fran Roundhouse, Jane MacEachron, Donna Hardenberg, Erma Van Dyke, Marge De Witt Pat Bont Fran Kramer, J a n Blunt, Alice Warren, Harriet Van Heest.

TI77' 1/1/ 'f *^

A

T I

All w o m e n o n c a m p u s a r e m e m b e r s of t h e W o m e n ' s Act i v i t i e s L e a g u e , w h i c h is g o v e r n e d by a b o a r d c o n s i s t i n g of r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s f r o m classes, s o r o r i t i e s a n d o t h e r w o m e n ' s o r gw a n i z a t i o n s . Besides n u m e—r-o— u s l e c t u r e sw,| W . A . L s o ris *—J. • s ^pon i Ahjvr M aa yv D Oav. M a y , tt hh ee aa nn nn uu aa ll r~!hricfmac C h r i s t m a s ti-jrr\7 p a r t y . Prtnm, Penny Carnival, and a p r o g r a m in t h e fall of t h e y e a r t o i n t r o d u c e t h e f r e s h m e n w o m e n to the c a m p u s .

First Row; Jini VanderBorgh, Mary Alice Ferguson, Carol T e n Haken, Ethelanne Peelen, Anna Geitner, Shirley Meiste, Joyce Van Doorn. Second Row; Nena Mih, Rosemarie Kish, Mary Ann Lammers, Carol Nieuwsma, Elena Bylsma, Lois Bos, Ethel Swets, Sandy Dressel, Suzie Graves.


LR.C T h e year 1956-1957 marks one of the most profuse and rewarding years in the eleven-year history of the IRC. Being host to two major conferences â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the annual meeting of the M I C H I G A N C O U N C I L for U N E S C O and the M I D W E S T R E G I O N A L I R C C O N F E R E N C E â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and the dynamic leadership of the club's advisor, Dr. Paul Fried, are some of the visible reasons for the success of this year's program. T h e Hungarian Revolution provided an opportunity for the I R C to bridge the gap between the purely academic and the pressing realities of living in a nucleardominated world. An IRC-sparked drive enabled five Hungarian students to come to Hope. T h e I R C strives to maintain its all-college appeal, so that as many students as possible will be stimulated intelligently and prayerfully to seek answers to the complex problems of this interdependent world.

Playing host to the regional conference afforded many opportunities to all students.

Front Row: Dr. Fried, Don Scott, Don Van Lare, Gene T e Hennepe, Harold Knoll, Dave Dethmers. Second Row; Helen Wade, Betty Fell, Patti Knoll, Hetty Vos, Lois Hoeksema, Judy Mulder, Mary Ann Klaaren, Lois Thorns, Artel Newhouse, Nancy White, Reiko Kim, J a n e MacEachron. Third Row: Dave Cassie, Larry Siedentop, Walter Francke, Dave De Ruiter, Chuck Leramen, J o h n Hood, Don Lindskoog, John Van Dam, Dave Van Eenenaam, T o m Lewis.


A banquet early in the second semester was indicative of the projects to be accomplished during the remainder of the year.

Bringing Hungarian students to Hope's campus was one of the most notable accomplishments.

In a very short time these new students adopted Hope College and they too were a part of an American college.

87


Front Row: Jean Kromann, Lois Grilles, Mary Ann Cumerford, Dr. Rider, Nancy Boyd, Miss Holleman, Zoe Gideon. Second Row: Betty Rothwell, Judy Tysse, Miriam Klaaren, Marcia Welch, Jane MacEachron, Jane Gouwens, Sandy Dressel, Terry Zylrnan, Diane Sluyter, Bob Ritseraa. Third Row: Cal Langejans, Howard Harrington, Len Rowell, Cheryl Normington, Gordon Hoeksema, Chuck Lindahl, Harold Ritsema, Wayne Dixon, Bill Meengs, Keith Brower, Ev Nienhouse.

Often composed of Symphonette members, there are several instrumental ensembles which play for their own enjoyment and the listening pleasure of others.

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Symphonette T h e Hope College Symphonette is made up of twentyseven musicians selected from the regular sixty piece college symphony orchestra. Since its establishment by Dr. Morette Rider in 1954 the Symphonette has played more than seventy concerts in thirteen states and Canada, including two television appearances, and has been given wide recognition by newspapers and professional music journals. Mr. Anthony Kooiker, a member of the College's music faculty, is the featured soloist with the group.


Front Row: Chuck Lindahl, Gordon Hoeksema, Dr. Rider, Jane Tomlinson, Jill Mac Neil. Second Row; Jack Overzet, Barb Emmick, Diane Sluyter, Dale Heeres, Cal Langejans, Harold Ritsema, Terry Zylman, Gary Looman, Nick VanderBorgh, Marshall Elzinga, Third Row; Bill Meengs, Bruce Mathews, Evert Fikse, Bob Huffine, Myron Kaufman, Howard Harrington. Back; Marge Wood, Wayne Dixon, Jack Ver Hulst.

Orchestra

Band

Front Row; Jean Kromann, Lois Griffes, Judy Tysse, Dr. Rider, Miriam Klaaren, Zoe Gideon. Second Row; Mary Ann Cumerford, Betty Rothwell, Marcia Welch, Donna Hoogerhyde, Bill Roy, J a n Tillman, Lillian Bruins, Jane MacEachron, Betty Oosterhof, J a n e Gouwens, Diane Sluyter, Marge Wood. Third Row; Nancy Boyd, Dale Heeres, Barb Emmick, Gordon Hoeksema, Chuck Lindahl, Sandy Dressel, Terry Zylman, Harold Ritsema, Wayne Dixon. Fourth Row: Bill Meengs, Keith Brower, Bruce Mathews, George Worden, Cheryl Normington, Nancy Demarest, Gary Looman, Marshall Elzinga, Howard Harrington. Standing; Jack Ver Hulst, Cal Langejans.


Front Row: D. Hesselink, A. Cramer, J. Blunt, M. Van Es, M. Ferguson, A. Van Lente, M. Van Koevering, S. Graves, E. Lower C Rylance E VandeZande, J. Van Peursem, H. Wade, A, Bloodgood. Second Row: E. Dykhuizen, A. De Free, E. Peelen, M. Hartgerink F Roundhouse' B Wolfe, C. Beuker, M. Kortenhoven, J. Fryling, L. Van't Hof, J. Owen, E. Hollander, R. Wright, S. Braaksma, J. VanderBorgh M T e n Haken Third Row: E. Van Dyke, C. Nieuwsma, P. Hesselink, N. VanderWerf, S. Yin, G. Bryson, N. Petty, B. Huffine, B. Ortquist G Peelen G Worden C. Vandenberg, A. Martin, J. Klaasen, 0 . Luth. Fourth Row: G. TeHennepe, A. Fassler, J. Kleinheksel, B. Van Wart, 1. Krauss, W. lohnson' R. VanderKolk, B. Vander Yacht, S. Harrington, D. Franken, B. Broakstra, B. Bast, H, Brown, D, Cassie.

Dr. Robert Cavanaugh, director.

Chapel Choir Mm

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90

Hope College places its major emphasis upon a sound religious program. T h e Chapel Choir serves as an instrument which spreads the message of God thru song. Music creates a worshipful atmosphere. T h e Chapel Choir, as its name implies, plays an important part in the Chapel service which begins each school day. Every morning the Choir is present to sing an opening sentence and a response to the prayer. T h e Hope College Chapel Choir, touring since 1953, has established an enviable reputation throughout the nation in a few short years. T h e tour is the highlight of the year for the Choir, and as the organization travels it introduces Hope as a Christian College. T h e Choir has made two full-length sacred concert recordings with R. C. A. T h e most recent of these was finished last year.


Women's Choir Men's Choir

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At the Piano: M. Van Doornik. Standing: Mr. Rietberg. Front Row: I Van Dvke

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Vander Hart

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Roger Rietberg, director.

Chancel Choir T h e Chancel Choir, under the capable direction of Mr. Roger Rietberg, provides an opportunity for all interested students to sing with a musical organization. T h e r e are rehearsals I uesdays and 1 hursdays fourth hour in the basement of the chapel. In addition to singing several weeks in chapel during t h c y e a r , the Chancel choir takes part in the Homecoming and Christmas Vespers, sings in various nearby churches, and joins with the Chapel Choir to present Handel's "Messiah."

92


Front Row: Anita Van Lente, Dorothy Hcsselink, Ann Bloodgood, Jean Kromann, Ethelanne Peelen, Carol Matheis, Lois Hoeksema, Norma Damstra, Sue Underwood. Back Row; Nate Vander Werf, Larry Siedentop, John De Vries, Dave Van Eenenaam, Bob Winter, Gord Hondorp, Neil Petty.

Who's Who

T h e 1956-57 edition of "Who's W h o Among Students in American Colleges and Universities" will include the biographies of 15 outstanding senior students. Campus nominating committees make their choice on the basis of the student's scholarship, leadership and cooperation in academic and extracurricular activities, general citizenship and service to the college, and his promise of f u t u r e usefulness to society.

Seated: Zoe Gideon. Left to Right: Peter V. De Moya, Mr. De Witt, Aileen McGoldrick, Mike Brummel, Del Farnsworth, Marlin VanderWilt.

N.CP. N a t i o n a l C o l l e g i a t e Players, or Pi Epsilon Delta, is a national honorary dramatics fraternity. Membership qualifications are governed by a national board which uses as its criteria for membership both scholarship achievement in the field of drama and participation in actual theatrical production on campus.


Palette and Masque T h e year 1956-57 was an experiment for Palette and Mosque. Beginning with an old fashioned "Meller-dramer" in November, Because Their Hearts Were Pure or The Secret of The Mine by Corey which included a bold step in set construction, the organization continued its operations by presenting Shakespeare's Macbeth. This reader's theatre production made use of a stylized stage setting and intriguing lighting effects. T h e major spring production, Wilder's Our Town, was presented as theatre in the round in the Music Building auditorium. T h e year's activities were concluded as Palette and Masque produced three one-act plays directed by the T h e a t r e Production class, and the National Collegiate Players conducted their first annual interpretive reading program.

Mr. D e W i t t "blocks" a scene in an early rehearsal of "Our Town", a modern play by T h o r n t o n Wilder.

My strength is as the strength of ten, because ray heart is pure," asserts the noble hero in the old-time "mellerdrama".

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Shakespeare comes to Hope's campus as P. & M. performs the great tragedy, Macbeth, in a Reader's Theater Production.


T h e smell of grease paint fills the air as Greta Weeks makes up Lynda Dekker before a performance of "Because T h e i r Hearts Were Pure".

F R O N T ROW: Carol T e n Haken, Janice Blunt, Carol Houghtaling, Aileen McGoldrick, Zoe Gideon, Jane Gouwens, Carol Rylance, Joan Roos. SECOND ROW; Anthony Roller, Robert Van Wart, Jocelyn Fryling, Una H u n t , Greta Weeks, Anna Geitner, J o Ann Barton, Joe Woods, Mr. D. DeWitt. T H I R D ROW; A1 Roller, Robert Vander Arde, Adelbert Farnsworth, Stan Harring ton, M i k e B r u m m e l , Marlin Vander Wilt, Robert Marshall, Ron Stepanek, Peter DeMoya.

95


Front Row: Isla Van Eenenaam, Artel Newhouse, Reiko Kim, Carol Luth, Matie Fischer. Second Row (Members of Pi Kappa Delta, honorary debate fraternity) T o m Lubbers, Bob Winter, Jane MacEachron, John Van Dam, Dave Dethmers, Bob Williams. Third Row: Dr. Schrier, Young Kang, Herman Maertens, George Worden, Jan Leestma, Gene Klaaren, Martin Riekse, Ken Brink, John Meengs, Mr. Reid.

Debate 1956-1957 was a time of discussion on the topic of foreign aid. Hope's debaters joined the discussion with the proposition: " T h a t the U. S. should discontinue direct economic aid to foreign countries". Hope's students argued the pro and con of the matter with teams from Albion, Central Michigan, Calvin, Wayne, Michigan State, and Ohio State. In the spring of the year, two British debaters furnished a special challenge to the team. At the end of the year, the problem had not been solved, but the field of international politics certainly had become more meaningful.

96

Bob Winter and Guy Vanderjagt meet their visiting British opponents, Meirion Lloyd Davis and Gareth Morison Kilby Morgan, before a debate on international problems.


Left to Right: Sharon Crosswell, Sewell Hayes, Dr. Talbert, Dave Cassie, Jane Gouwens, Jim Clark, Diane Johnson

David Cassie, Editor

Opus Opus, Hope's literary annual, is now in its fourth year of publication. As before. Opus is primarily intended to provide a medium of expression for Hope students who have something to say in the fields of essay, fiction, poetry, or art. T h i s year for the first time Opus also included sections of original musical composition and photography. In order to present this wider range of creative efforts, new printing techniques were used and a larger magazine was published. Confident that there is much latent literary and artistic ability on campus which lacks only encouragement and the opportunity to manifest itself, the editors of Opus aimed this year more than ever, at providing both the encouragement and the opportunity.


Jini Vander Borgh and Dave Spaan Second Semester Editor and Assistant Editor

Anchor

Throughout the year, the A N C H O R , u n d e r editors Robert W i n t e r and Virginia Vanderborgh, attempted to fulfill what the staff considered to be the tripartite objective of college journalism: information for students and faculty, stimulation of thought, and mediation of divergent viewpoints. 1 o the first end, the year saw expanded news coverage and a more diversified paper. By means of editorials on varied subjects, an attempt was made to awaken interest in significant events and situations, and in opening the Anchor's columns to the opinions of those who disagreed, it is hoped that the paper has attained the interested impartiality without which no newspaper can long survive.

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Bob Winter First Semester Editor

Reporting Staff Front Row: Artel Newhouse, Gordon Kissack, John Fragole, Sally De Wolf. Back Row: Bob Van Wart, Jan Wessels, Jan Blunt, Bert Swanson.


Fred Brown Managing Editor

Fred Birdsall Business Manager

Art Martin Circulation Manager

J a n Peck, Makeup Editor, Bill Means and Mary Ann Vollink, Rewrite Editors, and Sally Schneider, Copy Editor.

Joyce Leighley and Henry Doele Society Editors

Dr. Fried, Advisor; Jane Gouwens, News Editor; Lynn Van' Feature Editor.


Milestone T h e 1957 Milestone is a sincere attempt to provide a living picture of a year at Hope, a Christian liberal arts college. T h e staff believes that an education at Hope fosters the development of the mature Christian through intellectual and social activities. It is hoped that through its pictorial &nd literary coverage of the many aspects of life at Hope, the book presents a clear insight into the u n i q u e character of the college.

Jim Evenhuis, Editor

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Mr. Henry ten Hoor and Lynn Van't Hof Advisor and Activities Editor

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Mick Faber and Dick Gantos Advertising Editors


Bob Vander Lugt Sports Editor

Sally Schneider Literary Editor

Fran Roundhouse and Ray De Does Faculty Editors

J a n Blunt and Rog Garvelink Organizations Editors

Vic Ambellas Photographer

Henry Doele Business Manager

Jane MacEachron Class Editor

Stan Harrington and Mary Kay Dieph Art Editors


Student Council T h e Student Council is an organization of prime concern to every Hope College student. Theoretically, each student on our campus has a representative on the council to whom problems may be presented for solution. Twenty-four student members and three faculty advisors constitute the council, whose main responsibilities are jurisdiction over all extra-curricular activities of the student body and liaison between the student body and the faculty and administration of Hope College.

Dave Van Eenenaam, President

From Row: Jan Van Peursem, Bob Lesniak, Carol Matheis, Dave Van Eenenaam, Lynn Van't Hof, Jane MacEachron. Second Row: Carol Hondorp, Jan Mackay, Carol Nieuwsma, Carol T e n Haken, Helen Van Dyke, Judy Mulder, Diane Sluyter, Aileen McGoldrick. Third Row: Rog Garvelink, John TenPas, Dick Brockmeyer, Art Olson, Dick Brown, Chuck Hesselink, Bert Swanson, Jim Evenhuis.


Thirsty students pause for a moment of refreshment at the All-College Formal, sponsored by the Student Council. Aftergame parties and the Christmas banquet are other features of the C o u n c i l ' s social program.

By means of an enthusiastic pep rally in the gym, the Student Council provides an opportunity for students to express their exuberance in celebrating the team's championship by a day off from school.

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Campaign managers acquaint themselves with the regulations which govern the activities of a busy election week. Early in the spring the Student Council officers and the class presidents are elected.

103


Women's House Board

Front Row: Nancy White, Artel Newhouse, Dorothy Hesselink, R u t h Laning. Second Row: Lynn Van't Hof, Miss Reeverts, R u t h Bruins, Mary Lou Van Es, Mary Kay Diephuis. T h i r d Row: Sue Kirkwood, Joan Schroeder, Lois Thorns, Diane Sluyter, Carol T e n Haken, Jocelyn Fryling, Mary Hoffmeyer, Carol Nieuwsma.

T h e House Board of Kollen Hall is the judicial and governing body of the new men's Dormitory. T h e House Board acts as a medium between the administration and the occupants of the Dormitory alone with the Councellors.

Women's house board is composed of the presidents of each residence hall, representatives from each House Council, the student counselors, and Dean Reeverts. T h e board meets twice monthly to insure uniformity in dormitory government and to sponsor various dorm activities.

Front Row: Austin Aardema, Jim De Witt, Mr. Jekel, Dick Brown. Walchenbach.

Men's House Board

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Second Row: Dick Bennett, Dick Kelly, Jack


PanHellenic Board

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Left to Right; Anita Van Lente, Miss E. Reeverts, Paula Brouwer, Ann Bloodgood, Ethel Van Lare Ethel Peelen, Carol Luth, Jocelyn Fryling, Marge T e n Haken, Anne De Free, Doris Stickle, Hope Brahs.

T h e body which governs sorority life on Hope's campus is T h e Pan-Hellenic Board. T h i s board is composed of three members from each regular sorority, along with two representatives from the A.S.A. and Dean Reeverts. T h e board regulates sorority pledging rules and activities, and discusses problems common to the societies.

Composed of two representatives from each fraternity with Dean Hinga serving as advisor, the Inter-Fraternity Council functions in a capacity similar to that of the Pan-Hellenic Board. All problems which are related to fraternity affairs are discussed and acted upon by the board. T w o joint meetings a year are held by the boards at which time matters pertaining to both fraternities and sororities are discussed.

Left to Right: J o h n Needham, Bob Bast, Jack Walchenbach, Karl Hoellrich, Bill Means, Larry Lup, Peter Bylenga, Phil T o p p e n , Dave Kuyers, Norman Boeve.

Inter fraternity Council

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SOCIETIES T h e a i m o f t r u l y l i b e r a l e d u c a t i o n is t o d e v e l o p the w h o l e individual.

This implies

social, as well as spiritual, intellectual, a n d physical g r o w t h .

The social life of the Hope

student is greatly enriched by his m e m b e r ship a n d participation in the activities of his fraternity or sorority.


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Front Row; J. Tysse, M. Adams, C. Nelson, M. Klaaren, C. Rylance, P. Brouwer, J. Brookstra, B. Martin, E. Wagner, P. Lovins, V. Akker M. Giemsoe, E. Clelland. Second Row: J. Vander Kolk, G. VerMeulcn, J. Toppen, S. Braaksma, C. Creager, C. Hull, E. Hollander, G. Weeks' N. De Young A Tell, A. Litts, G. Aardema. T h i r d Row: L. Nelson, S. DeWitte, J. De Noble, M. Van Koevering, G. Burggraaff, D lurries S Scffert, H. Wissink, S. Decker, S. Doyle, J. Bechtel, A. Vandenberg, J. Olson, B. Rothwell, C. Ingles, L. Dekker, M. Vander Hart. Fourth Row! v i' M n!!"13"' 4 â&#x20AC;&#x17E; 7, e.' - LaGrande, B. Monroe, C. Ham, D, Sluyter, E. Dykhuizen, P. Welch, L. Lammers, M. Hendrickson, Cameron, Laning, Sikkenga, M. wood, J. 1 illman, M. Boughton, B. Fell, M. Baldwin, M. Shalekamp, J. Stavenger, M. Gotte, N. Long, B. Sanko, E. Swets, ] ' Philip, J. Van Dyke.

ASA. A n e w a n d s p i r i t e d g r o u p of girls i n c o r p o r a t e ann u a l l y i n t o A l p h a Sigma A l p h a , t h e f r e s h m a n girls' sorority.

T h i s y e a r was a n a c t i v e o n e f o r t h e 115 girls

of A . S . A .

Soon after an initial get-acquainted meeting,

t h e f r o s h social s e a s o n w a s i n a u g u r a t e d w i t h a d a t e - n i g h t h a y r i d e . " A q u a t i c s in A b s t r a c t " p r o v i d e d a t h e m e f o r the winter formal.

A u n i q u e " T e a h o u s e of t h e M a r c h

C h i c k " was A . S . A . ' s w i n n i n g b o o t h a t t h e P e n n y C a r n i val. C l i m a x i n g a y e a r to b e r e m e m b e r e d was a " D i x i e Daze" informal.

108


At their Penny Carnival booth, "Teahouse of the March Chick", an A.S.A. member confers a prize on a lucky winner.

Elaine descends the stairs to her date, anticipating her first sorority formal.

Activities A.S.A. girls are entertained at a joint meeting with the Dorians, one of a series of introductions to the campus sororities.

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Front Row; L. Tahkopfer, H. Horton, L. Bruins, D. Deas, R. Bruins, D. Hardenberg, D. Johnson, S. Graves, B. Van Voorst. Second Row: M. De Young, M. T e n Haken, J. Wessels, H. Hungerink, L. Van't Hof, E, Peelen, J. Van Duinen, J. Evert, L. Buys. Third Row: C. Hondorp, R. Voss, J. Groenewold, W. Keizer, E. Arendsen, J. Korver, P. Sienstra, J. Leighley, A. Warren, C. De Vette. Fourth Row: M. Van Es, R. Boniel, C. Beuker, L. Bos, M. Kortenhoven, J. Peck, D. Elzinga, R. Vanden Berg, M. Vander Hoven, B. van Putten. Fifth Row: W. De Vey, N. Huizenga, E. Van Dyke, D. Paris, M. Hageman, V. Vanderborgh, J. Gouwens, J. Fryling, C. Scholten, B. J. Burnett.

Delphi Initiating Delphi activities this year was a lively house party held early in the fall on Lake Macatawa. Homecoming day in October say Delphi capture first place with their float. "Electro-positive Proof." At the Alumni Luncheon held the same week-end, the twenty-six new pledges were introduced to the Alumni. Echo Valley was the scene of the winter informal, "Festival in Frost." An afternoon of tobogganing and skating was followed by dinner and dancing in Kalamazoo. Later in February the traditional Spring Fashion Show was presented for the A.S.A. Society. In addition to the latest in fashions, the show featured bathing suits of the early 1900's. Under the direction of Carol Beuker, Delphi was awarded second place in the All-College Sing with "Surrey with the Fringe on T o p " . As the year drew to a close, Delphi enjoyed a successful spring formal and a farewell house party.

110


In a musical interlude, the Delphi song stylists charm their audience with "Christopher Robin is Saying his Prayers."

Here comes the bride, as R u t h Bruins models a perennial fashion, the bridal gown, to awed A. S. A. girls at the traditional Delphi Style Show.

In contrast to the enjoyable, relaxed atmosphere in front, behind the scenes there is feverish activity as the girls hurry to get ready for their entrances.

Spring is early this year, judging by the lovely spring and summer fashions shown by Alicc and the other Delphis.


Front Row: R. Kim, A. Newhouse, P. Parker, R. Volkenborn, C. Paton, C. Meyers, C. Cook, D. Hesselink, V. Tellman. Second Row: C. Cloetingh, B. Wolfe, J. Abma, D. Stickle, J. Barton, M. Vollink, C. Matheis, H. Taylor, U. H u n t . Third Row: N. Demarest, M. Campbell, A. McGoyrick, Z. Gideon, L. Van Leeuwen, D. Schmidt, P. Boelhouwer, J. Van Peursem, C. Gaskin, J. Blunt. Fourth Row: S. Hackman, S. De Wolf, S. Yntema, M. Fischer, M. DeKock, J. Fendt, C. Normington, J. Giljam, N. Mih, L. Pschigoda. Fifth Row: L. Thoms, J. Van Lierop, P. Knoll, N. White, C. DeVries, H. Brahs, R. Kish, A. Bloodgood, E. VandeZande, A. Van Lente.

Dorian Wearers of the Dorian D have moved through several mutations this year. Both impish slave pledges and their cruel masters were transformed into angelic queens for the fall formal entitled "A little bit of heaven." Paper, paint, a new floor and ceiling gave the sorority room an early American air. Before the holidays the girls became "Santa Claus" for a mother and her two children. T h e minstrel show, square dance, informal. Wonderland, and especially the Sing winner, " T h u m b e l i n a " , left Dorians at the end of a satisfying year more than "nine feet tall."

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After a treasure h u n t around town, Dorians and their dates return to the gym for square dancing and pizza. Appetites sharpen as the hungry group waits to be served.

A couple of hours of square dancing can make food the most keenly anticipated item on the program.

Finally! Food! But â&#x20AC;&#x201D; after repeated helpings of hot pizza, most energetic activity comes to a standstill for the rest of the evening.

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Front Row; B. Wenzel, T . De Vries, M. De Witt, J. Haken, A. Weener, Y Ogawa, E. Lower, E. Smith. Second Row: D. Maines, C. Luth, M. Ferguson, R. Wright, A. Geitner, J. Mulder, D. Brandt, M. Roelofs, C. Vander Meer. T h i r d Row: C. Zhe, C. Houghtaling, M. Welch, J. Westrate, J. Koeman, H. Van Heest, M. Luidens, S. Klyn, A. Morris, L. Puehl. Fourth Row: R. Wendt, S. Underwood, C. McCahan, F. Kramer, S. Monte, J. Short, V. Westra, E. Bosley, M. Hunter. Fifth Row: J. Barber, B. Mericle, S. Smith, P. Bont, T . VanZoeren, E. Southland, C. T e n Haken, C. Michaelis, A. Dingee, D. Preston.

Sibylline T h e fun of the fall house party at which the sophomore pledges were selected soon turned to work as the Sibs slaved on their Homecoming Hoat carrying out the theme of " F u t u r e Fantasies". T h e pledges were formally and informally initiated with the traditional Sib hike and breakfast. In February the Sibs held their gala winter formal, a cool "Marshmallow World" at the Spring Lake Country Club. Immediately following the formal, plans were made for the joint A.S.A.-Sib. meeting which featured the theme "My Fair Lady". T h e Sibs, appearing in navy shirts and white baby-doll blouses on March 15, sang " T h r e e Little Maids" in the All-College Sing. T h e spring informal in May was followed by the concluding event of the year, the spring house party, as which nine Senior Sibs said, "Farewell".

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Dorothy reads the traditional serious paper during the literary portion of the meeting.

a period of sociability before a typical sorority meeting.

Lit. Meeting T h e program is climaxed with the usual hilarity as antic Sibs present a humor program. ^ ,,

115


Front Row; M. K. Diephuis, J. Tuttle, H. Wade, J. Smith, S. Schaafsma, M. Hansen, J. Bremer. Second Row: P. Kole, S Meiste M Exo il Klomparens, J. Rypma, M. Oosting, M. Vugteveen, J. Klaasen, M. Oonk. Third Row: J. MacEachron, M. Vande Poel, S. Dressel, K Peelen ' M Hoffmeyer, J. Mackay, J. Peelen, I. Van Eenenaam, H. Vos. Fourth Row: J. Miller, B. Bootsman, P. Brink, K. Rynbrand H Van Dyke B Variden Brink, M. Wildschut, A. Proos, L. Hoeksema. Fifth Row: J. Knapp, J. Van Doom, A. De Pree, M. Hartgerink, E. Zylstra, B Vander Taet J. Maclntyre, E. Bylsma, S. Schneider. J 8 >

Sorosis For fifty-one years the gold and white crescent banner of Sigma Sigma, the oldest of the sororities, has guided her members to a fuller appreciation of life at Hope. T h i s year, after the informal and formal initiation of pledges, the busy weeks preceding the Homecoming season were filled with work on the parade float and the Alumni luncheon. In February, after Sorosites and their escorts decided to "Paint the T o w n P i n k " at their winter formal, the traditional spaghetti dinner honoring the seniors was held. With the advent of Spring, Sigma sisters found many activities demanding their attention. Joint , meetings with the Fraternal Society, A.S.A., and Sorosis A l u m n i were held. Climaxing the year came an informal in May and a rollicking spring houseparty.

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Pledging

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Active Sorosites rate prospective pledges, consulting the "Milestone" for identification.

Kay Peelen, Sorosis president, solemnly initiates Jane Klaasen into sorority membership.

A new pledge joyfully displays to other pledges her invitation to become a member of Sorosis.


Front Row: J. Su. N. Vander Werf, L. South, B. Cameron, R. Den Uyl, D. Sasaki, B. Hoffman, D. Keffy. Second Row: H. Brown, H. Gazan, J. Van Dyke, D. Adelberg, J. Walchenback, R, Verduin, D. Knapp, J., Wassink, J. Hough, J. Heflriegel, J. Kleinheksel. Third Row: M. Elzinga, E. De Young, L. Schut, R. Garveiink, D. De Ridder, D. Wyma, C. Bredeweg, R. Zimmerman, E. Vander Kooy, J. Griep, C. Vanden Berg, P. Koets, H. Widmer, W. Karachi, L. Roweli, Fourth Row: J. Meengs, P. Cupery P. Kragt, B. Vanden Aarde, R. Schut, A. Hielkema, B. Andre, E. Tenhor, D. Brockmeier, U. Hoffs, J. DeWitt, B. Kalee, J. Leestma, J. Kotun. Fifth Row: B. Matthews, D. Moore W. Westenbroek, J. Plasman, P. Hook, M. Van Doornik, B. Bast, P. Van Wyk, B. Peterson, G. Hondorp, R. T e Hennepe, R. Cots, B. Ortquist, R. Leonard.

Arcadian

' miiiilhlniUl

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A decade of activity brought forth a highly successful tenth anniversary celebration at the Homecoming festivities this year. Scores of Arcadian Alumni joined with the active membership to commemorate this milestone in the life of Chi Phi Sigma. W i t h the addition of several new men the fraternity of brotherhood enjoyed a successful year. Serenades and open houses surrounded the memorable winter formal, " T h e Inaugural Ball". T h e Arcadians enjoyed participating in many activities of Hope College and the community of Holland, m d again held their traditional " H e l p Week" project. T h e spring informal party was held at Spring Lake in May and upheld the Arcadian tradition of a joyous and "special" occasion for all. T h e fraternity of the blue and white closed the year with a stag party and once again bound themselves in the true spirit of brotherhood, benefiting the men, the campus, and the community.


House Life

/ In spite of the pressure of other more important duties, some part of an Arkie's evening is usually spent in a form of relaxation known as cards.

Paul and Bob devote what may thought to be an insufficient amount of time to the main business of the college student, the pursuit of higher learning.

T h e charms of Rog's music attracts a group of Arkies for a relaxing session of song before "sacking in".

119


Front Row: R. Gould, J. Woods, B. Van Wart, G. Brouwer, B. Bremer, J. Stringer, D. Camp, B. Huftine, H. Van't Hot. Second Row: W. Kane, J. Heins, G. Williams, j . Hood, J. Klaasen, J. Hendrickson, B. Zomer, R. Borr, R. Einaar, P. Duey. Third Row: N. Petty, T . Bechtel, W. Plaggemars, j. Evers, B. Meengs, R. Beckering, K. Brink, G. Wheable, R. Teck, P. Damstra, J. Wagner, B. Noorlag, P. Northuis, B. Thomson. Fourth Row: P. Hoek, T . Hays, P. Elzinga, G. Worden, T . DuMez, L. Arends, D. Franken, B. Murphy, S. Bosker, J. Bolthouse, T . Polhemus, D. Wiersma, H. Van Essen, D. Lautenbach, P. T o p p e n . Fifth Row: E. Bredeweg, A. Aardema, J. Ver Beek, G. T e r Haar, D. Piersma, J. T e n Pas, D. Kuyers, P. Wiegerink, D. Schoon, N. VanderBorgh, M. Riekse, R. Korteling, D. De Jongh, F. Brown, D. Komejan.

Cosmopolitan Phi Kappa Alpha was founded in the year 1890, and is the second oldest fraternity on Hope's campus. Its colors are green and white, and its symbols are the knight and the globe, which signify the fraternity's ideals of friendship, truth, and progress. T h e year 1956-1957 has been a successful one for Cosmopolitan. Besides winning trophies in the float and house decorations competition during Homecoming, the Cosmos, directed by Neil Petty, won the All-College Sing. Cosmopolitan is also among the leaders in interfraternity sports. As part of the International Relations Club project to raise funds to bring Hungarian students to Hope College, the Cosmopolitans sold coffee in Grand Rapids and Holland, and in doing so made a contribution of over five hundred dollars.

120


Neil Petty conducts the Cosmo serenaders as unprepared Voorhees girls look, on wistfully.

Marilyn and Carol receive the traditional musical good wishes and roses from the fraternity.

Cosmopolitan men deliver their musical message.


Front Row; C. Elzinga, C Emmons, H. Ver Beek, R. Lokhorst, G. Bryson, D. Jansen, J. Needham, D. Lee. Second Row; P Bostrom R Yonkers B, Ritsema, J. Van Iwaarden, A. Grube, H. Ritsema, J. Hamelink, G. Looman. T h i r d Row: D. Kots, M. Decker B Gooper G Kissack W Nykamp, B Bratton, D. Stadt, R. Roelofs, S. Wilson, G. Bennink, S. Hazelton. Fourth Row; R. Stockhoff, P. Nykamp, G. Bolt D Voskuil K Kurtz, S. Shoemaker, K. Woltman F. Burne, R. Bulthuis, D. Werkman, D. Portinga. Fifth Row; J. Fragale, D. Heeres D Lenters G Poit N. Boeve, J. Zwyghuizen, L. Tinholt, J. Drost, V. Essenberg, J. Soeter, D. Thompson, G. Hesselink. . â&#x20AC;˘ .

Emersonian Men of Emersonian started the year by pledging a well-organized and rousing group of rushees who proved their worthiness not only by planning a fun-filled joint Dorian-Emmie meeting, but also numerous other activities. Homecoming provided f u n for most of the members caught in the whirl of house decorations and float projects â&#x20AC;&#x201D; though the highlight of Phi T a u Nu activities was the winter formal "Carousel" in Grand Rapids' Pantlind Hotel. Not long after giving Voorhees hall a television set, sing practice and the Sing were upon us. T h e spirit of "let's mingle" prevailed at the stag spaghetti supper in March where the members showed off the completely redecorated game room to their guests, alumni, professors and advisor, Mr. DeVette. Also doing much to stimulate frat brotherhood were occasional songfests, the Penny Carnival, and May Day. After a fine spring informal in May, the returning members bade a fond farewell to 17 seniors who were graduating from the ranks of Emersonian.

122


Formal

Sideline shenanigans occur between dances at the Emer sonian formal at the Pantlind Hotel.

Emmies and their dates dance to the music oÂŁ Lew Allen's band.

After a delicious dinner, chaperones busy themselves with the construction of a 'cat s cradle


A ^ MMHi

â&#x20AC;˘ Âť.tai. j'^/wj^jrssjrj.

fcsaa-

J. Van Dam, E. Nienhouse, G. Boeve, G. Van Dongen, J. Baker, C. Menning, T. Dochertv E T a l l m a r

K Faher

Fifth R ^ w n

i&

v tt' u r

Fraternal The Fraternal Society was brought to Hope by its first president, Dr. Philip Phelps, in 1854 from Union College making it the oldest fraternity on Hope's Campus. I his fall saw the Praters rush prospective members and plan vigorously for Homecoming. Shangri-La" was the title of the annual winter formal held in the Grand Ballroom of the Pantlind Hotel. Late winter saw Praters and Alumni participate in the annual Washington Day Stag. With Spring came the Prater Prolics, the Informal Party, and last but not least the annual Swan Song where last tributes were paid to the graduating Seniors. T h e Praternal Society this year was grieved by the loss of one of their members, Thomas James Zwemer, who died March 11, 1957. T o m was a friend and beloved brother of all those who knew him.

124

t-'


Frolics Projects

I m m e d i a t e l y f o l l o w i n g s p r i n g v a c a t i o n t h e F r a t e r h o u s e r e s o u n d s w i t h activity of all sorts as t h e f r a t e r n i t y p r e p a r e s to p r e s e n t its gala " F r a t e r Frolics."

B e f o r e each p e r f o r m a n c e t h e b a s e m e n t of t h e Lit. C l u b p r o v i d e s a scene of c o n f u s i o n as actors scurry to be m a d e u p b e f o r e t h e i n e v i t a b l e c u r t a i n call.

O n stage t h e F r a t e r C h o r u s m a k e s itself a n e n j o y a b l e p a r t of t h e p r o g r a m p a c k e d w i t h l a u g h s a n d e n t e r t a i n m e n t for all.


Front Row; M Kaufman, C. Lindahl, J. Myers, D. Rikkers, B. Williams, G. Mazzei, B. Lesniak, P. Durkee, D. Bennett. Second Row: P. Fell, M. Brummel, C. Lemmen B Holt, E. Westerbeke, J. Kaat, D. Siedentop, L. McPherson, J. Ronda, B. Tulenko. T h i r d Row: B. Crawford, T. Pangburn D Morgan R. Sikkema, J. Kranendonk. K. Brown, G. Bylsma, K. Hoellrich, G. Hook, L. Siedentop, T . Cook, B. Marshall. Fourth Row: K. Bowler, M. Gideon, J. Kamp, D. Cooper, P. Wehnau, B. Brumels, J, Kinkema, A. Kober, K. Emerson, B. McNeal, D. Clark B Trimmer G B'tner. Fifth Row: A Ko ler, D. Brown, C. Skinner, W. Dixon, D. Kinkema, M. Loomans, S. Dorn, D. White, B. Means, JT. Martin, B. Kisken, J. VerHey, J. LaFleur, B. VanderLugt.

Knickerbocker CP O 0

Knickerbocker Write-up I h e a i m of K a p p a E t a N u , as a f r a t e r n i t y , is n o t p a r t i c u l a r l y a b s t r u s e . It p u r p o s e s t o s e r v e t h e H o p e C o l l e g e m a l e as a n i n d i v i d u a l . It realizes k e e n l y t h a t it h a s n o e x i s t e n c e a p a r t f r o m s u c h i n d i v i d u a l s , a n d it d o e s n o t look u p o n this as a w e a k n e s s to b e c o r r e c t e d . H e n c e " t h e K n i c k e r b o c k e r s " j u s t i f y t h e i r c o l l e c t i v e exi s t e n c e o n t h e g r o u n d s of service, n o t m a s t e r y . T h e y h a v e n o t f o u n d t h a t this h i n d e r s t h e h a v i n g of a r o u s i n g g o o d time . . .

126


Service

Knickerbocker is known as the "service fraternity". One of their service projects was the conduction of a paper drive, proceeds going toward the Tadayon Memorial.

\

T h e Knicks regularly, as a fraternity project, donate blood to the local Red Cross Blood Bank.

Renovating and redecorating the library basement was the Knicks' service to the campus.


SENIORS The senior student is the final product of the liberal education.

W i t h the k n o w l e d g e a n d

understanding which he has acquired a n d d e v e l o p e d during his college days, he must stand r e a d y to world.

meet the challenge of

his

O n l y time will tell if his p r e p a r a t i o n

has been a d e q u a t e .


ALLEN

H . AARBSMA

Holland, Michigan

A.B.

Psychology

T H E O D O R E D . ANDERSON

A.B.

Brooklyn, New York Business Administration

RANDALL J . BAAR

Zeeland, Michigan Fraternal JAMES A.

A.B. Biology

A.B.

BAKER

Montclair, New Jersey Fraternal

Physics

w .

ROBERT A.

BARR

Port Washington, Wisconsin OWEN

THEODORE BECHTEL

Indianapolis, Indiana Cosmopolitan

FREDRIC

R.

BIRDSALL

Afton, New York Emersonian ANN

E . BLOODGOOD

Brooklyn, New York Dorian; Alcor; Who's Who

DONALD J.

BOERMAN

Zeeland, Michigan â&#x20AC;˘*a. '

A.B.

Chemistry

NORMAN

G.

BOEVE

A.B.

History

A.B.

Sociology

A.B.

Music

A.B. Economics A.B.

Holland, Michigan Mathematics Emersonian; Delta Phi Alpha

130


PATRICIA L . B O N T

A.B.

Grand Rapids, Michigan Sibylline

Sociology

Lois J E A N B O S Grand Rapids, Michigan Delphi

RUTH M.

A.B.

English-French

BRUINS

A.B.

Douglaston, New York Delphi

Psychology

MYRON L. BRUMMEL

A.B.

Grand Rapids, Michigan Knickerbocker; Pi Epsilon Delta

RONALD

H.

BULTHUIS

Holland, Michigan Emersonian

Biology

A.B.

Mathematics

ELIZABETH J . BURNETT

A.B.

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Delphi; Alcor; Beta Beta Beta

PETER D . BYLENGA

Grand Rapids, Michigan Fraternal DONALD E.

BYRO

Muskegon, Michigan Fraternal

WILLIAM M . CAMERON, JR.

Cleveland, Ohio Arcadian WILLIAM J . COMSTOCK, I I I

Glenmont, New York

Biology

A.B.

Economics

A.B. Mathematics

A.B. Sociology

A.B.

Economics

131


NORMA L. DAMSTRA

A.B.

Dayton, Ohio Delphi; Alcor; Beta Beta Beta; Delta Phi Alpha; Who's Who

Biology

PETER V . DE MOYA

A.B.

North Swanzey, New Hampshire Pi Epsilon Delta

RONALD J. DEN UYL

A.B.

Holland, Michigan Arcadian

Mathematics

CARL L. D E VREE

A.B,

Hudsonville, Michigan Fraternal; Phi Alpha Theta

CAROL V.

Speech

History

A.B. English-German

D E VRIES

Blue Island, Illinois Dorian J O H N C . D E VRIES

A.B.

Katpadi, South India Chemistry Cosmopolitan; Blue Key; Delta Phi Alpha; Beta Beta Beta; Who's Who

EARL

M.

DE WITT

Grand Rapids, Michigan Fraternal MARJORIE A. D E W I T T

Sturgis, Michigan Sibylline

ADELE DINGEE

Somerville, New Jersey Sibylline PAUL E. DUEY

Holland, Mich. Cosmopolitan

A.B. Physics

A.B. Engl ish-Spanish

A.B. English

A.B. Business Administration


ROBERT PETER DURKEE

Staten Island, New York Knickerbocker K A R L L . ESSENBURG

Holland, Michigan Emersonian

JANICE K . EVERT

Grand Rapids, Michigan Delphi JOAN E . F E N D T

West Olive, Michigan Dorian

M A R Y ALICE FERGUSON

Benton Harbor, Michigan Sibylline MARTIN

K.

GIDEON, JR.

Paterson, New Jersey Knickerbocker

GERALD A. GIEBINK

W a u p u n , Wisconsin RICHARD H .

GOULD

Wantagh, New York Cosmopolitan

JON D.

HAMELINK

Holland, Michigan Emersonian HOWARD W .

HARRINGTON

Holland, Michigan Fraternal; Blue Key

A.B. English

A.B, Chemistry

A.B. History

A.B. English-Spanish

A.B. English

A.B. History

^jjgsr

A.B. Chemistry A.B. Economics

A.B. Chemistry A.B. Chemistry

133


THOMAS J.

HARRIS, JR.

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Fraternal S E W E L L S. HAYES

Melrose, Massachusetts

SHERWOOD L .

GEORGE L. HERLEIN

Muskegon Heights, Mich.

Muskegon, Michigan Dorian; Who's Who PHILIP H .

A.B. Mathematics

A.B. English-Spanish

HESSELINK

Lynden, Washington Phi Alpha Theta

ARTHUR G .

A.B. Philosophy

A.B. Music

HAZELTON

Coemans, New York Emersonian

DOROTHY J . HESSELINK

A.B. History

HIELKEMA

Orange City, Iowa

A.B. English

A.B. History

A.B. Business Administration Grand Rapids, Michigan Cosmopolitan PETER G . HOEK

Lois A. H O E K S E M A East Williamson, New York Sorosis; Alcor; Phi Alpha Theta; Who's Who JOHN E.

HOLMLUND

Brooklyn, New York Fraternal

A.B. History

A.B. History


GORDON R . HONUORI-

^

Detroit, Michigan Chemistry Arcadian; Blue Key; Beta Beta Beta; Delta Phi Alpha; Who's Who GERRIT HOOK

South Holland, Illinois Knickerbocker

A.B. English

f DUANE L.

HOP

Zeeland, Mich. KEITH

F.

A.B. Business Administration

HOSKINS

Schenectady, New York Knickerbocker

RONALD D.

HUGHES

Grand Rapids, Michigan Knickerbocker DIANE

L . JOHNSON

Berwyn, Illinois Delphi

ROBERT S. JOHNSON

A.B.

English-French

A.B. History

A.B. English-French

A.B.

Business Administration Rochester, New York Fraternal WARREN W .

KANE

Stuarts Draft, Virginia Cosmopolitan

DAVID R . K I N K E M A

Hagaman, New York Knickerbocker JAMES H .

KINKEMA

Hagaman, New York Knickerbocker

A.B.

History

A.B. Sociology

A.B. History

135


A. JOHN KLAASEN, JR.

Holland, Mich. Cosmopolitan BARBARA G .

A.B.

Business Administration

KLOMPARENS

Holland. Michigan Sorosis

A.B.

English-Spanish

MARGARET J A N E KNAI>P

A.B.

North Bergen, New Jersey Sorosis

Biology

DONALD K. KNOLL

A.B.

Business Administration Grand Rapids, Michigan

HAROLD KNOLL, JR.

Holland, Mich. Knickerbocker

A.B.

Elementary Education

DELWYN D. KOMEJAN

Zeeland, Michigan Cosmopolitan

A.B.

Political Science

JOHN J. KOTUN

A.B.

South Bound Brook, New Jersey Arcadian FRANCES A N N K R A M E R

Kalamazoo, Michigan Sibylline

History

A.B.

English-German

iM

JEAN K. KROMANN

A.B.

Holland, Michigan Music Sorosis; Delta Phi Alpha; Who's Who DAVID A . KUYERS

A.B.

Zeeland, Mich. Business Administration Cosmopolitan; Who's Who

136


ROGER

M.

A.B. English

LEONARD

Old T a p p a n , New Jersey Arcadian

A.B. M usic

CHARLES E. LINDAHL

Chicago, Illinois Knickerbocker

A.B.

MAURICE E. LOOMANS

Chemistry

Arpin, Wisconsin Knickerbocker

A.B,

ELSIE L . L O W E R

Fruitport, Michigan Sibylline

LAWRENCE N .

LUP

Milford, Michigan Fraternal; Blue Key KENNETH

P,

M A C DONALD,

Holland, Michigan

EDWARD E . MARKS

English-French

A.B. Chemistry

JR-

A.B. English

A.B.

Physics-Mathematics Schenectady, New York ARTHUR W .

MARTIN

Syracuse, New York Emersonian

H . JOSEPH MARTIN

Herkimer, New York Knickerbocker CAROL ANN

MATHEIS

A.B. English

A.B.

English

A.B.

Elementary Education Long Island City, New York Dorian; Who's Who

137


I VICTOR DALE

A.B. Psychology

MAXAM

Kalamazoo, Michigan Fraternal JOANNA M .

M C INTYRE

Hastings-on-Hudson, New York Sorosis

WILLIAM

A.

A.B. Philosophy

MEANS

Bronx, New York Knickerbocker GORDON A.

A.B. Music

MEEUSEN

Holland, Michigan Fraternal

DANIEL P.

MEEUWSEN

Grand Rapids, Michigan Fraternal HARRY P.

MENCARELLI

Grand Rapids, Michigan

RUTH

M.

MOORE

DAVID A . PAYNE

Grand Rapids, Michigan

ETHEL ANN

PEELEN

KAY

D. PEELEN

Kalamazoo, Michigan Sorosis

138

A.B. Mathematics

A.B. English

A.B. Music

Hawthorne, New Jersey Sorosis

Kalamazoo, Michigan Delphi; Who's Who

A.B. Psychology

A.B. Psychology

A.B. English-German

A.B. History


GEORGE A. PELGRIM, JR.

Holland, Michigan Fraternal MURIEL J.

PETERS

Sheboygan Falls, Wisconsin

NEIL E.

PETTY

Marion, New York Cosmopolitan; Who's Who JOHN

R . PLASMAN

Manchester, Massachusetts Arcadian

ROBERT R . QUISENBERRY

Hamilton, Ohio Emersonian

A.B. History

A.B. Psychology

A.B. Music

A.B. History

A.B. History

A.B. Biology

T H E O D O R E J . REDDING

Newaygo, Michigan Emersonian; Blue Key

RICHARD A. R H E M

Kalamazoo, Michigan MARY R .

RHOADES

Holland, Michigan

HAROLD J. RITSEMA

Momence, Illinois Emersonian; Blue Key ROBERT A.

A.B. Philosophy A.B. Psychology

A.B. Music

RITSEMA

Momence, Illinois Emersonian; Bine Key; Who's Who

A.B. Music

139


ROGER G . ROELOFS

A.B.

Business Administration Grand Rapids, Michigan Emersonian ELLSWORTH A,

A.B. Physics

ROLFS

Holland, Michigan Emersonian

A.B. English

LEONARD G . R O W E L L

Holland, Michigan Arcadian

A.B. History

KAY G . RYNBRAND

Kalamazoo, Michigan Sorosis

A.B. English

JUDITH A . R Y P M A

Holland, Michigan Sorosis REDA RYNBRANDT SANTINGA

Ann Arbor, Michigan Delphi

PAUL K . SCHIERINCA

Holland, Mich. Knickerbocker

A.B.

Business Administration

MELVIN L. SHY

Grand Rapids, Michigan

LARRY A . SIEDENTOP

Downers Grove, Illinois Knickerbocker; Blue Key; Phi Alpha Theta; Who's Who Louis G. S M I T H Chicago, Illinois

140

A.B. English

A.B. Biology

A.B. History

A.B. Religion and Bible


JOHN R . SOETER

A.B.

New Brunswick, New Jersey Emersonian

Biology

EVON J . SOUTHLAND

A.B.

Muskegon, Michigan Sibylline; Alcor; Beta Beta Beta

A.B. Chemistry

PHILII' W . STAAL

Zeeland, Michigan DONALD E.

A.B. Economics

STOLTZ

Holland, Michigan

LUCRETIA T A H K O F P E R

Lawton, Okla. Delphi CHARLES W .

Biology

A.B.

Elementary Education

THOMAE

A.B.

Business Administration Bergenfield, New Jersey

MARILYN

LUIDENS T I M M E R

A.B.

Selkirk, New York Sibylline

History

PAUL R. TROOST

Byron Center, Michigan

A.B.

Political Science

?

JANET TUTTLE

A.B.

Hawthorne, New Jersey History-Sociology Sorosis SUZANNE UNDERWOOD

C r a n d Rapids, Michigan Sibylline; Alcor; Who's Who

m

• :

'

• >

&

A.B.

English

141


ROBERT E. VAN

ARK

A.B.

Holland, Michigan Knickerl>ocker DOUGLAS W .

Political Science

VANDER

A.B. English

HEY

Kalamazoo, Michigan Arcadian

MARY C . VANDER HOVEN

A.B.

German

Paterson, New Jersey Delphi; Delta Phi Alpha NATHAN •

H.

VANDER W E R F

A.B.

Muskegon, Michigan Arcadian; Blue Key; Who's Who

MARLIN

A.

VANDER W I L T

English

A.B.

Orange City, Iowa Biology Emersonian; Blue Key; Beta Beta Beta; Pi Epsilon Delta W I L B U T C . VANDER YACHT

Holland, Michigan Emersonian; Blue Key

ELSIE D .

VANDE ZANDE

W a u p u n , Wisconsin Dorian

A.B.

Chemistry

A.B. English-Spanish

JOYCE A. VAN DOORN

Coopersville, Michigan Sorosis

MERWIN D . VAN DOORNIK

Holland, Michigan Arcadian JOYCE M . VAN DUINEN

Grand Rapids, Michigan Delphi

A.B.

History

A.B. English

A.B. History


3QSBB|H9HHHH

A.B.

ERMA J. VAN DYKE

Zeeland, Michigan Delphi; Delta Phi Alpha DAVID O . VAN

EENENAAM

English

A.B.

Muskegon, Michigan Chemistry-Biology Fraternal; Blue Key; Beta Beta Beta; Delta Phi Alpha; Who's Who

GEORGE H .

VAN

EMBURG

Ocean Grove, New Jersey

A.B. English

ES

A.B.

Sonoma, California Delphi; Alcor

English

MARY LOU VAN

Tfrn-t-i

HENDRIK VAN

A.B.

ESSEN

Hall, Gelderland, Netherlands HARVEY W . VAN FAROWE

Zeeland, Michigan

JOHN

L. VAN

IWAARDEN

Holland, Michigan Emersonian

A.B.

A.B.

Business Administration

PAUL E, VAN KOEVERING

Zeeland, Mich. Knickerbocker

A.B. English

Physics-Mathematics

KEITH C . VAN KOEVERING

Zeeland, Mich.

History

A.B.

Business Administration

DONALD H . VAN LARE

Holland, Michigan

A.B.

History

143


ETHEL SMITH VAN

A.B.

LARE

English

Schenectady, New York Sibylline LARRY D . VAN

A.B.

LARE

English

Holland, Michigan

ANITA J. VAN

A.B.

LENTE

English

Holland, Michigan Dorian; Alcor BARBARA V A N P U T T E N

Holland, Michigan Delphi; Phi Alpha Theta

RICHARD W .

A.B. Chemistry

VAUGHAN

Hawthorne, New York ROBERT

A.B. English

B. VELTMAN

Holland, Michigan

A.B. Biology

ROBERT V . VERDUIN

Detroit, Michigan Arcadian MARY ANN

VOLLINK

Grand Rapids, Michigan Dorian

R. Voss Muskegon, Michigan Fraternal HARRY

H O W A R D G . VOSS

Holland, Michigan

A.B.

History

A.B. Psychology

A.B.

History

A.B.

Physics-Mathematics


WAGNER

A.B.

Chicago, Illinois Cosmopolitan

Economics

N.

JAN

JOHN

R.

WALCHENBACH

Hawthorne, New Jersey Arcadian; Delta Phi Alpha

BRUCE A. W A R D

A.B. Chemistry

A.B.

Rochester, New York

Psychology

ALYCE A. WEENER

A.B.

Kalamazoo, Michigan Sibylline

HERBERT T .

English-German

A.B.

WIDMER

Edgewater, New Jersey Arcadian; Delta Phi Alpha

Mathematics

A.B.

ROBERT L. WILLIAMS

Political Science

Chicago, Illinois Knickerbocker

â&#x20AC;˘

i

A.B. Biology

DOROTHY J. WINSTROM

Zeeland, Michigan Sorosis JOHN E. WINTER

Allegan, Mich. Fraternal

A.B.

Business Administration

ROBERT A. WINTER

A.B.

Grand Rapids, Michigan Chemistry Fraternal; Pi Kappa Delta; Blue Key; Who's Who STANLEY Y E - K U N G YIN

Singapore, Malaya Arcadian

A.B.

Chemistry

145


UNDERCLASSMEN V a r i e t y a n d growth, the driving forces of the

liberal tradition, are e p i t o m i z e d by the Hope

underclassman.

Each step up the ladder of

years reveals to him b r o a d e r horizons as he

continues to g r o w in w i s d o m a n d stature.

i


Class of I960

if

J i m Evers, P r e s i d e n t C h i c a g o , 111.

MARCIA BALDWIN Muskegon, Mich.

BARBARA BOOTSMAN Chicago, HI.

JUDY BECHTEL Indianapolis, Ind,

STANLEY BOSKER Kalamazoo, Mich,

148

R u d o l f Einaar, Vice-Pres. G r e a t N e c k , N . Y.

A u d r e y Veld, Secretary S. H o l l a n d , 111.

R o w l a n d V a n Es, T r e a s u r e r Sonoma, Calif.

GERTRUDE AARDEMA Central Lake, Mich.

MARY JANE ADAMS Poughkeepsie, N, Y.

VIRGINIA AKKER Morrison, El.

ROBERT BERENS Zeeland, Mich.

JIM BEUKEMA Grand Haven, Mich,

RONALD BJORKLUND Peekskill, N,Y,

IRIS BOGART N, Wilbraham, Mass.

MARCIA BOUWS Holland, Mich.

NANCY BOYD Boonton, N.J,

MARYLIN BOUGHTON Teaneck, N.J.

BARBARA BOUMAN Holland, Mich.

JANE ANKER S, Holland, 111,

JIM BOLTHOUSE Muskegon, Mich.

SHELBY BRA A KS MA Cambria, Wis.

HARVEY BRANDT Holland, Mich,


FRESHMEN kiK

[ , v i

ROBERT BRATTON West Seneca, N.Y.

BRUCE BRINK Hamilton, Mich.

KENNETH BRINK Holland, Mich.

RON BRONSON Holland, Mich.

JOHN G. BRYSON Paterson, N.J.

GERTRUDE BURGGRAAFF Staten Island, N.Y.

FRED BURNE Schenectady, N.Y.

GARY BYLSMA Grand Rapids, Mich.

-s*-

•/ ELIZABETH TED CLELLAND COOK New York, N.Y. Grosse Point Farms, Mich.

DONALD COOPER Chicago, ILL.

KENNETH BROWN Herkimer, N.Y.

ARDITH BROWER Holland, Mich.

JUDY BROOKSTRA Wheaton, HI.

PAULA BROUWER Cleveland, Ohio

WINIFRED CAMERON Cleveland, Ohio

EVELYN CARTER Woodboume, N.Y.

RON CHANDLER Holland, Mich.

DAVID CLEASON Palmyra, N.Y.

CHARLOTTE CREAGER Conklin, Mich.

MARY ANN CUMERFORD Holland, Mich.

KAREN DAMSON Holland, Mich.

I\ CHUCK COULSON Jersey City, NJ.

BRUCE CRAWFORD Herkimer, N.Y.

LYNDA DECKER Pompton Lakes, NJ.

SONDRA DECKER YONKERS, N.Y.

oI,

l k l , i PHILIP DAMSTRA Holland, Mich.

GORDON DANIELS Vicksburg, Mich.

HARRIET DAVENPORT Riverdale, N.J.

MARVIN DEKKER Chicago Heights, 111.

JACK DE LONG Holland, Mich.

ROBERT DEN BOER Saranac, Mich.

V

I

fW JANET DE NOBLE Paterson, NJ.

JACK DE POND Bellevue, Mich.

ROGER DE VRIES Zealand, Mich.

SHERYL DE WITTE Fremont, Mich.

DAN DE YOUNG New York, N.Y.

NANCY DE YOUNG Kalamazoo, Mich.

FRED DIEKMAN Union City, N.J.

•:.v\

RONALD DISBROW Holland, Mich.

149


FRESHMEN . . . .

ELAINE DYKHUIZEN Scotia, N.Y.

STUART DORN Castleton, N.Y.

SUE EDWARDS Herkimer, N.Y.

CHARLOTTE EKEMA Kalamazoo, Mich

- 1 4 Taylor Cottage

BARBARA EMMICK Holland, Mich,

MARSHALL ELZINGA Hudsonville, Mich,

CRAIG EMMONS Holland, Mich,

FRIEDA ENDERT Stoney Creek, Ontario

O it GARY ENGEL Flushing, N,Y,

JANET GILJAM Sodus, N.Y.

VERN ESSENBERG Ellsworth, Mich,

MILDRED GLOSS Mt. Prospect, 111,

ANDRE FELIX Grand Rapids, Mich.

LINDA GORDON Holland, Mich.

BETTY FELL Warrenton, Va,

MARCO GOTTE Rego Park, N.Y.

PAUL FELL Warrenton, Va.

EVERT FIKSE London, Ontario

ARTHUR FISHER Delton, Mich.

LOIS GRIFFES Muskegon Heights, Mich.

ROBERT GROEN Holland, Mich.

CAROL HAM Claverack, N,Y,

MYRA GIEMSOE Des Plaines, 111.

LINDA HA MEL INK Holland, Mich.

y: JEANETTE HANSEN Sh^boygaa, Wis.

THORVAL HANSEN Grand Rapids, Mich.

DALE HEERES Muskegon, Mich.

LORRAINE HELLENGA Three Oaks, Mich.

JOHN HELLRIEGEL Buffalo, N.Y.

MARILYN HENDRICKS ON Grand Rapids, Mich.

MARJORIE HIGGINS Montague, Mich,

GORDON HOEKSEMA Holland, Mich,


FRESHMEN

I i k k i . TERRY HOFMEYER Holland, Mich.

BOB HUFFINE Sayville, N.Y.

DAVID KENNEDY Muskegon, Mich.

JANICE KYLE Fremont, Mich.

CARL H<XKEBOER Holland, Mich.

PAUL HU1ZENGA Grandvillc, Mich.

SUSAN KIRKWOOD Metuchen, N.J.

VERNA LA GRANDE N. Muskegon, Mich.

CHUCK LEMMEN Holland, Mich.

EDNA HOLLANDER Kalamazoo, Mich,

ROBERT HOLT HoUand, Mich.

CLARICE HULL Brandon, Wis.

WALTER JOHNSON Grand Rapids, Mich

MARY ANN KLAAREN Sioux Center, la.

DONNA LAMMERS Hingham, Wis.

MIRIAM KLAAREN Englewood, Col.

PHILIP HOOK Morrison, Ql.

JAMES HOUGH Bergenfield, NJ.

HARLAN HOUSENGA Fulton, HI.

DONNA JURRIES Hamilton, Mich.

JIM KAAT Zeeland, Mich.

MARVIN KALUF De Motte, lnd.

JIM KAMP Grandville, Mich.

JOHN KLEINHEKSEL Holland, Mich.

ROGER KLEINHEKSEL HoUand, Mich,

JACK HOOCENDOORN Kalamazoo, Mich.

^ o^ ANTHONY KOLLER Flushing, N. Y.

JACK KRAAI Chicago, 111,

MARY LAMMERS Jamestown, Mich.

NANCY LONG New Kingston, N.Y,

Voorhees Annex

151


FRESHMEN

Zeeland, Mich.

PHYLLIS LOVINS Grandville, Mich,

DELWYN MACHIELE Zeeland, Mich.

HERMAN MAERTENS Brooklyn, N.Y.

BARBARA MARTIN Highland Park, N.J.

JUDY MARTIN Midland Park, N.J.

THOMAS MC CARTHY Holland, Mich.

JILL MC NEIL Clifton, N.J.

I \\A JAMES MENZER Sheboygan, Wis

NELDA MILLER

Clifton, N.J.

ARTHUR MILES Holland, Mich.

KAREN MITCHELL Morrison, 111.

BARBARA MONROE Pittsford, Mich.

BOB MURPHY Holland, Mich«

CAROL NELSON Rochester, N.Y.

i CAROL NIEUWSMA Holland, Mich

KAREN NYHUIS Waupun, Wis

JOHN NYKAMP Holland, Mich

WADE NYKAMP Holland, Mich.

JUDY OLSON Gary, Ind.

ELIZABETH OOSTERHOF Holland, Mich.

NORMA PECK Grand Rapids, Mich.

GEORGE PEELEN Kalamazoo, Mich.

LYNALICE NELSON Muskegon, Mich.

mm®

CARROLL NIENHUIS Holland, Mich

PAULA NYKAMP Zeeland, Mich.

Voorhees Hall

PETE OSTERBAAN Ellsworth, Mich.

152

DAVE OUSTERLING Waupun, Wis.

JACK OVERZET Dorr, Mich.

JANET OWEN Kalamazoo, Mich.

JOHN PARKES Chicago, 111.


FRESHMEN

JOY PHILIP Wyandotte, Mich,

BARBARA PHILLIPPSEN Rochester, N.Y,

DONALD PIERSMA Chicago, HI.

PAUL PINTER Budapest, Hungary

LORETTA PLASSCHE E. Williamson, N.Y.

ROGER POTTER Holland, Mich.

Durfee Hall

DAVE RIKKERS West Unity, Ohio

WAYNE PLATZER Castleton-onHudson, N.Y.

CARL POIT Poughkeepsie, N.Y.

SANDRA POSTEMA New Era, Mich.

CAL PRINCE Holland, Mich,

RAY RITSEMA Momence, 111.

JOAN ROOS Holland, Mich.

STUART POST Holland, Mich.

PHYLLIS RIEKSE Grand Rapids, Mich.

JIM ROSCZYK Fennville, Mich.

-"zm*

7

HAZEL ROSENDAHL Three Rivers, Mich.

CYNTHIA SCARLETT Lansing, Mich,

BETTY ROTH WELL Flushing, N.Y.

MYRNA SCHALEKAMP Orange City, la

i

DYKE ROTTSCHAFER Alma, Mich,

KAREN SCHIEFELBEIN Grand Haven, Mich.

TY RUPP Wauseon, Ohio

SHERYL SCHLAFER Leaf River, 111

DONNA RUSSCHER Muskegon, Mich.

JOAN SCHROEDER Calgary, Alberta

CAROL RYLANCE Kingston, N.Y.

SCHUT

Hudsonville, Mich.

BARBARA SANKO Kenmore, N.Y.

ALYN RYNBRANDT Jamestown, Mich.

MARILYN

ROLL AND SCHUT

Hudsonville, Mich.

Kuwait, Persian Gulf

153


FRESHMEN

SUZANNE RALPH SEIFFERT SEYMER New Brunswick, N.J. Grand Rapids, Mich

S IE BEL ING Kohler, Wis

DARYL SIEDENTOP Downers Grove, Dl.

RON SIKKEMA Morrison, 111.

CAROL SIKKENGA Spring Lake, Mich.

DIANE SLUYTER Herkimer, N.Y.

/

ROBERT SPRAGUE Detroit, Mich.

JUDY STAVENGER Cicero, 111.

RON STOCKHOFF Westbury, N.Y.

JI ANN TELL Rochester, N.Y.

ED TENHOR Paterson, N.J.

DICK THOMPSON Des Plaines, 111.

JIM STRINGER Lansing, Mich.

ยง

JOHN STRYKER Holland, Mich.

K

TOM THOMPSON Levittown, Pa.

BILL SWARTS Detroit, Mich.

m

ETHEL ANN SWETS Staten Island, N.Y.

CHUCK SMITS Zeeland, Mich.

/

EL WOOD TAUMAN Momence, Dl.

-

'A.

JANET TILLMAN St. Joseph, Mich.

LLOYD T1NHOLT HoUand, Mich.

JANE TOMLINSON Churchville, Pa.

VIRGINIA TOP Hamilton, Mich.

I'll JANICE TOPPEN Muskegon, Mich.

Van Vleck Hall

JUDY

TYSSE

Lyndhurst, Ohio

154

DORENE TORNGA Grand Rapids, Mich.

JIM VANDE POEL Holland, Mich.

ROBERT TRIMMER Schenectady, N.Y.

ANITA VANDEN BERG Grand Haven, Mich.

JOHN TYSSE Coxsackie, N.Y.

NICK VANDERBORGH Sayville, N.Y,


. . . , FRESHMEN

MARNA VANDER HART Ithaca, Mich.

IVAN VANDER KOLK Grandville, Mich.

JOYCE VANDER KOLK New Brunswick, N.J.

ALAN VANDER MEER Chicago, HI.

BRUCE VANDER MEL Delmar, N.Y.

RUTH VAN DER MEULEN Zeeland, Mich.

CYNTHIA VANDERMYDE S. Holland, ILL.

ELAINE VANDER WERE Holland, Mich.

MARSHA VERKAIK Yucaipa, Calif.

GRETCHEN VER MEULEN Racine, Wis.

JANET WALRAD Herkimer, N.Y.

^ 9 7

PAUL VAN WYK Grand Rapids, Mich,

F. ALLAN VCXSL Kearny, NJ,

KARL VON INS Holland, Mich,

1DUANE VOSKUIL Hammond, Wis,

EDNA WAGNER Waldwick, NJ.

NORMA WALLACE New York, N.Y.

PHYLLIS WELCH Holland, Mich.

EARL WELLING Holland, Mich.

LEE WENKE Kalamazoo, Mich,

DUANE WERKMAN Chicago, 111.

VERNON WESTENBROEK Holland, Mich,

MARC LA WIERSMA Zeeland, Mich.

CARL WISSINK Zeeland, Mich.

WAYNE VAN SWOL S. Holland, 111

WAYNE VISSERS Allendale, Mich.

GRETA WEEKS Grand Rapids, Mich,

FETE WEHNAU Rensselaer, N.Y.

DAVID WHITE Amsterdam, N.Y.

FORREST WHITE Paradise, Kansas

BRUCE V1SSER Grand Rapids, Mich.

RUTH VELD MAN Grand Rapids, Mich,

VAN'T HOF Grand Rapids, Mich,

MARY VAN KOEVERING Zeeland, Mich,

JUDY VAN DYKE Zeeland, Mich.

fl DARRYL WIERSMA Zeeland, Mich.

HARRIET WISSINK Milwaukee, Wis.

MARJORIE WOOD Ridgefield, NJ.

GEORGE : WHEABLE Oakland, Calif,

HARRY WRISTERS New Orleans, La,

155


Class of 1959

J o h n T e n Pas, P r e s i d e n t A l t o n , N . V.

AUSTIN AARDEMA Muskegon, Mich.

J o h n Meyer, Vice-President A l t a m o n t , N . Y.

Marge T e n H a k e n , Secretary Milwaukee, Wis.

Sandy Dressel, T r e a s u r e r Holland, Mich.

JEANETTE ABMA Ringle, Wis

JOHN ANGUS Holland, Mich.

LARRY A RENDS Lansing, 111.

ELLYN ARENDSEN Grand Rapids, Mich.

WARDA BARKJHO Syria, Tell Tammar

PR ISC ILL A BOELHOUWER Three Bridges, N.J.

EUGENE BOELTE Oostburg, Wis.

GERALD BOEVE Holland, Mich.

ROBERTA BONIEL New York, N.Y.

EDNA BOSLEY Long Island City, N.Y

CAROL BEUKER Marshall, Mich.

GEORGE BITNER Sturgis, Mich.

' t .

CAROL BLOCK Jenison, Mich.

156

PAUL BOSTROM Chicago, 111

KEN BOWLER Fonda, N.Y,


SOPHOMORES

CARCa. BRANDT Grand Rapids, Mich.

CORWIN BREDEWEG Dorr, Mich.

EDWIN BREDEWEG Holland, Mich.

BILL BREMER Holland, Mich.

JO BETH BREMER Birmingham, Mich.

DICK BROCKMEIER Grand Rapids, Mich.

LILLIAN BRUINS Douglaston, N.Y.

BRUCE BRUMELS Chippewa Lake, Mich.

BILL BROOKSTRA Davenport, la.

GERALD BROUWER Holland, Mich.

, ^ 5 ^

HARLEY BROWER Holland, Mich.

FRED BROWN Mohawk, N.Y.

MARILYN CAMPBELL Grand Rapids, Mich.

CAROL CLOETINGH Muskegon, Mich.

LESLIE DE VRIES Holland, Mich.

THERESA DE VRIES W, Lafayette, Ind.

HARLEY BROWN Danforth, El.

CAROL COOK Holland, Mich.

DICK BROWN Herkimer, N.Y.

DON DE JONGH Burmps, Mich.

HENRY DE WITTE Indianapolis, Ind.

BOB DE FOREST Duanesburg, N.Y.

SALLY DE WOLF Kalamazoo, Mich.

NANCY DEMAREST Tenafly, N.J.

MARLENE DE YOUNG Friesland, Wis.

-

DENNIS LINDA CAMP BUYS W. Savyille, N.Y. Grand Rapids, Mich.

WILMA DE VEY Palmyra, N.Y.

DAVE DE RUITER Los Angeles, Calif.

WAYNE DDCON Muskegon, Mich.

TED DU MEZ Holland, Mich.

C-.

k \ i E IS SEN Fulton, Ql.

PAUL ELZINGA Holland, Mich

KEITH EMERSON Sturgis, Mich

MARL IN EN SING Dorr, Mich,

MAR-LES Traverse City, Mich.

JACK FABER Zeeland, Mich.

New Brunswick, N.J.

Holland, Mich.

157


^ O^

SOPHOMORES r/

%

k

!>*

& MATE FISCHER Muskegon, Mich.

JACK GROENEVELD Grandville, Mich.

JOHN FRACALE Lodl, N J .

WALTER FRANC KE Zeeland, Mich.

DAVE FRANKEN Winnipeg, Canada

CAROL GASKIN Harvey, 111.

ALLEN GRUffi De Motte, Ind.

JOYCE HA KEN Muskegon, Mich

JOHN HAMERSMA Holland, Mich,

Cicero, HI,

HAROLD GAZAN Grand Rapids, Mich.

MARILYN HANSEN Sheboygan, Wis

CARL GIANT Grand Haven, Mich.

SUSAN GRAVES Grand Rapids, Mich.

VICTOR

JOAN HE NE VELD Holland, Mich.

Dorr, Mich.

r CHUCK HESSELINK Waupun, Wis,

Hope Memorial

158

Chapel

BOB HOFFMAN N, Bergen, N.J,

MARY HOFFMYER Grand Rapids, Mich

Sheldon la

CAROL HONDORP Detroit, Mich

JOHN HOOD Indianapolis, Ind

DONNA HOOGERHYDE Holland, Mich.

HELEN HORTON Indianapolis, Ind

BELL HUIBREGTSE Sheboygan, Wis

NANCY HUIZENGA Grand Rapids, Mich

HELEN HUNGERINK Zeeland, Mich,

HUNT New York, N.Y,

LARRY IZENBART Grand Rapids, Mich,

VERN HOFFS

DON JANSEN

Holland, Mich.

JACK JOHNSTON Van Buren, Ark,


SOPHOMORES & -

JERRY JULIEN Oak Lawrn, HI.

MYRON KAUFMAN Herkimer, N.Y

WINONA KEIZER Lansing, Mich.

REIKO KIM San Francisco, Calif.

W, GARDNER KISSACK Chicago Heights, HI.

JANE KLAASEN Holland, Mich

DON KNAPP Midland Park, NJ.

RON KNOPER Zeeland, Mich

raGGY KOLE Zeeland, Mich.

AL KOLLER Flushing, N.Y.

MARILYN KORTENHOVEN S. Holland, ni.

ROBERT KISKEN Tarrytown, N.Y

7 r Jf- rrjr rr

in

$ KATHRYN KURTH Wyandotte, Mich.

NICK LANNING Grand Rapids, Mich.

JANET MACKAY St, Joseph, Mich.

GEORGE MAGEE Clawson, Mich.

JOY KORVER Grand Junction, Col.

DON TOM LAUTENBACH LEWIS Chicago, 111. Muskegon Heights, Mich.

BILL MC NEAL Schenectady, N.Y.

SHIRLEY MEISTE Holland, Mich.

JANICE KOEMAN Holland, Mich

Science Building

JOHN KRAUSS Midland, Mich.

k.i DON LINDSKOOG Chicago, 111.

BEVERLY MERICLE Duanesburg, N.Y.

DON LOHMAN Hamilton, Mich.

CECELIA MICHAEL IS Long Island City, N.Y,

RONALD LOKHORST Baldwin, Wis.

CAROL LUTH Holland, Mich.

JANICE MILLER St. Joseph, Mich.

DICK MORGAN Herkimer, N, Y.

159


SOPHOMORES

/

•'©fe.

i

~"S/*

T i

j|

|

ANNE MORRIS New York, N.Y.

DAVE MUILENBURG San Mateo, Calif.

JUDY MULDER Grand Rapids, Mich.

o

CAROL MYERS Holland, Mich.

o

J Graves Library

JOHN NEEDHAM Oak Tree, N.).

ARTEL NEWHOUSE Grand Rapids, Mich.

BILL NOORLAG Chicago, 111.

ART OLSON Grand Rapids, Mich.

:N2Pt

(

MARY JO OONK Holland, Mich.

MARY COSTING Dayton, Ohio

JIM REMMELTS Grand Rapids, Mich.

MARILYN ROELOFS Grand Rapids, Mich.

DON PAARLBERG S, Holland, HI.

CAROL PA TON Lincoln Park, Mich.

JOAN PEELEN Kalamazoo, Mich.

JAMES RONDA Oak Park, 111.

WILLIAM ROY Malvern, Pa.

DANIEL SASAKI Hokkaido, Japan

ALYCE PROOS Grand Rapids, Mich.

LORAINE PSCH1GODA St. Joseph, Mich.

LOIS PUEHL Grand Rapids, Mich.

\\ SHIRLEY SCHAAFSMA Grand Rapids, Mich.

DORIS SCHMIDT Ridge wood, N.J.

CAROLYN SCHOLTEN Steen, Minn.

^ on -•/

KAY SCHRECKENGUST Fennville, Mich.

160

DON SCOTT Millbum, N.J.

JUNE SHORT Auburn, N.Y.

CHUCK SKINNER Whitestone, N.Y.

EDWARD SLACK Grandville, Mich.

Muskegon, Mich.

DICK STADT Grand Rapids, Mich.

V

MARY STAM De Motte, Ind.


SOPHOMORES .

r

t DORIS STICKLE Somerville, N.J.

BERT SWANSON Three Oaks, Mich.

HELEN TAYLOR McRain, Mich,

.

i ROGER TECK Baldwin, N.Y.

VIRGINIA TELL MAN Holland, Mich,

CAROL TEN HA KEN Hingham, Wis.

ROGER TE HENNEPE Baldwin, Wis,

—»•

W LARRY TER MOLEN Grand Rapids, Mich.

l Il k LOIS THOMS Kuwait, Persian Gulf

CAROL VANDER MEER Battle Creek, Mich,

CARL VER EEEK Holland, Mich,

HELEN WADE Holland, Mich,

JOHN VAN DAM Holland, Mich,

MARY VANDE POEL Holland, Mich,

JOHN VANDEN BOS Holland, Mich.

BEA VANDEN BRINK Holland, Mich.

CLARENCE VANDERBORGH W. Sayville, N.Y,

BETTY VANDER JAGT Conklin, Mich,

LOIS VANDERLAAN Muskegon, Mich,

ISLA VAN EENENAAM Muskegon, Mich,

MEL VAN HATTEM Grand Rapids, Mich,

LESLIE VAN LEEUSWEN Bellflower, Calif,

JAN VAN PEURSEM Zeeland, Mich,

HAROLD VAN'T HOP Grand Rapids, Mich,

BEVERLY VAN VOORST Greenville, Mich,

THELMA VAN ZOEREN Zeeland, Mich,

Saugerties, N,Y,

RUTH VOSS Bahrain, Persian Gulf

PETE WATT St, Joseph, Mich,

SPENCER WEERSING Lake City, Mich,

HARLEY VER BEEK Hamilton. Mich,

JEROME WASSINK Hamilton, Mich,

O " \ iL s Schoulen-Carnegie

Gyrnruisuirn

161


SOPHOMORES r

i

- t "

MARCIA WELCH Holland, Mich,

RUTH WENDT Holland, Mich.

WENZEL Holland, Mich.

NANCY WHITE Roxbury, N.Y.

MARIANNE WBLDSCHUT Holland, Mich.

MARVIN WOOD Zealand, Mich.

BARBARA

JANET WESSELS Grand Rapids, Mich,

JOE WOODS Dumont, N J .

JOHN ZWYGHUIZEN Zeeland, Mich,

1,1

i

162

WAYNE WESTENBROEK Holland, Mich,

ED WESTERBEKE W, Sayville, N.Y,

GEORGE WORDEN Cadillac, Mich.

RUSSELL YONKERS Muskegon, Mich,

TERRY ZYLMAN Holland, Mich,

VIRGINIA WESTRA Grand Rapids, Mich,

JANICE WESTRA TE Hart, Mich.

CAROLYN TED ZHE ZICKEFOOSE Schenectady, N.Y.Charleston, W, Va,


Class of 1938

Virginia Vanderborgh, Vice-President S a y v i l l e , N . Y.

Bob Vander Lugt, President Holland, Mich.

CHARLES ADAN E. Creenbush, N.Y.

Joyce Leighley, Secretary Syosset, N . Y .

Roger Garvelink, Treasurer Holland, Mich.

BOB ANDREE Grand Rapids, Mich.

/f*i -

-

?

'

p

\ li

JOYCE BARBER Delanson, N.Y.

DICK BENNETT Albany, N.Y.

JOANN BARTON Otsego, Mich.

h* *,. } . '

tli -

KEITH BROWER Holland, Mich.

*

EDWARD BUYS Chandler, Minn.

>

ROBERT BOEHM Buffalo Center, la.

Cs ^

# ;

DAVID CASSIE BtooHyn, N.Y.

JAMES CLARK Holland, Mich.

JAMES COOK Holland, Mich.

PHYLLIS BRINK Hamilton, Mich.

HOPE BRAHS Butier, NJ.

BEVERLY BOOTSMAN Chicago, m .

-'

^

ELENA BYLSMA Grand Rapldt, Mich.

^I r? o JANICE BLUNT Dunellen, N J .

/

STANLEY COOK Teaneck, N.J.

DAVID COSTER E. Pine Lake, NJ.

163


JUNIORS - 5 ^

11

^ 3

7

ri

J EMELYN CURLEE Dearborn! Mich.

ADELE ' CRAKCR Muskegon, Mich.

DEANNA DEAS Staten Island, N.Y.

MILFORD St. Johnsville, N.Y.

RAY DE DOES Kalamazoo, Mich.

JOHN ED DE FOUW DE JONG Grand Rapids, Mich. Kuwait, Persian Gulf

DAVE DETHMERS E. Lansing, Mich.

tk CHARLENE DE VETTE Muskegon, Mich.

MELVIN DE WEERD Hudsonville, Mich.

CAROLYN DE YOUNG Chicago, ILL.

JUDD DE YOUNG Glenwood, la.

MARY DIEPHU1S South Haven, Mich.

JACK DOCHERTY Somerville, N J .

HENRY DOELE Grand Rapids, Mich.

DARLENE ELZINGA Chicago, 111.

•CP

i

kl

JIM EVENHU1S Grand Rapids, Mich.

.'k DEL FARNSWORTH Wayland, Mich,

'

JOCELYN FRYLING Newark, N.Y.

ED FUDER Holland, Mich.

ANNA GEITNER Little Falls, N J .

DELWYN GRISSEN Holland, Mich.

ZOE GIDEON Kalamazoo, Mich.

JOHN GROOTERS Grand Rapids, Mich,

JANE GOUWENS S. Holland, m .

SHARON HACKMAN White Pigeon, Mich.

i JOHN GRIEP Grand Rapids, Mich.

MARIANNE HAGEMAN Millstone, N J .

II It Health Clinic

164

ELAINE HALBERSMA Edgerton, Minn,

STAN HARRINGTON Holland, Mich.

MARLENE HARTGERINK Zealand, Mich.

T ALMADGE HAYS Gray Hawk, Ky,


JUNIORS

JOHN HE INS Bombay, India

JOHN JELTES Grand Rapids, Mich*

KARL HOELLRICH Herkiiiier, N.Y.

BOB KALEE Grand Rapids, Mich.

CAROL HOUGHTALING HurleyviUe, N.Y,

MARY HUNTER Jersey City, NJ.

ELMER KANENGETER Little Rock, la.

YOUNG CHAE KANG Pusan, Korea

I

President's Home

^

A V c

DICK KELLY Schenectady, N.Y.

O

HENRIETTA KET Lafayette, Ind.

ROSEMARE KISH Wyandotte, Mich.

MAREYN KLYN Grand Rapids, Mich.

PAUL KOETS Grand Rapids, Mich.

KENNETH KOLE Hudsonville, Mich.

ALICE KOOYERS Holland, Mich.

PAUL KRAGT Grand Rapids, Mid

£"!)

f ^

/Jl RONALD KUIPER Holland, Mich.

CAROL MCCAHAN Red Hook, N.Y,

DONALD LEE Taipei, Formosa

DICK MCCL1NTOCK Webster Groves, Mo,

.51 \i

DICK LENTERS Holland, Mich.

BOB LESNIAK Herkimer, N.Y.

CALVIN LOSEE Holland, Mich.

JANE MAC EACHRON Grandville, Mich.

AEEEN MCGOLDRICK Fennville, Mich,

LLOYD MCPHERSON Traverse City, Mich.

BEL MEENGS Holland, Mich,

NENA MIH Taipei, Taiwan

BRUCE MATTHEWS Muskegon, Micl

DOROTHY MAINES Kingston, N.Y,

SUE MONTE Pittsfield, Mass.

CHERYL NORMINGTON Bangor, Mich.

165


PAUL NYKAMP Holland, Mich.

DONNA PARIS Livonia, Mich.

Van Raalte Hall

BOB , PETERSON }rand Rapids, Mich.

JASON SHOEMAKER : Zeeland, Mich.

DOROTHY PRESTON Kankakee, 111.

DOROTHY SHY Waterloo, Ind.

TRUMAN RAAK Maurice, la.

PHYLLIS SIENSTRA Grand Rapids, Mich.

YOSHIE OGAWA Fujisawa-Shi, Japan

HARRISON OVEROCKER Schenectady, N,Y.

PATRICIA PARKER Wyandotte, Mich.

BRUCE PEARSON Castleton, N.Y.

JOHN PADGETT Holland, Mich.

JANICE PECK Grand Rapids, Mich.

o o,

LAKRY SCHUT Maple Lake, Minn.

CARL REISIG Niagara Falls, N.Y.

MARTIN RIEKSE Grand Rapids, Mich,

FRANCES ROUNDHOUSE Kalamazoo, Mich.

DOROTHY SKINNER South Haven, Miclu

S ALL IE SMITH Grand Rapids, Mich.

DAVID SPAAN Grand Rapids, Mich.

KENNETH SC UDDER W. Coxsackie, N.Y.

RONALD STEPANEK Holland, Mich.

Q '

3 -

D WAYNE TEUSINK Holland, Mich,

EUGENE TE HENNEPE Baldwin, Wis.

166

PHILLIP TOPPEN Chicago, HI,

CHUCK VANDEN BERG Muskegon, Mich.

RUTH VANDEN BERG Grand Rapids, Mich.

BOB VANDER AARDE Orange City, la.

KEN VANDER BROEK Grand Rapids, Mich.

ROGER VANDER KOLK Grandville, Mich.


. . . . JUNIORS

ED VANDER KOOY Lansing, 111.

MERT VANDER LIND Grand Rapids, Mich.

i f^. BILL VAN OOSTERHOUT Holland, Mich.

LYNN VAN'T HOF Detroit, Mich.

JOHN VAN DYKE Holland, Mich.

HELEN VAN DYKE Hudsonville, Mich,

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JOE VASEY St. Petersburg, Fla.

ROBERT VAN WART Thornwood, N.Y.

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ERWIN VOOGD Buffalo Center. la.

ALICE WARREN Muskegon, Mich.

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Ol JAY VELDMAN Coopersville, Mich.

HARRIET VAN HEEST W. Coxsackie, N.Y.

JOANNE VAN LIEROP Holland, Mich.

JACOB VAN OORT Sheldon, la.

JOHN VER BEEK Holland, Mich.

JACK VER HULST Holland, Mich.

ERIKA VOLKENBORN Irvington, N.J.

Qs

^ PAUL WIEGERINK Grand Rapids, Mich.

RON WETHERBEE Zeeland, Mich.

GLENN WILLIAMS HoUand, Mich.

ROGER WINKELS Zeeland, Mich.

BARBARA WOLFE Miami, Fla

MAURICE WIT TE VEEN Holland, Mich.

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KENNETH WOLTMAN Oak Park, Ell,

STEVE VAN GROUW Redlands, Calif.

DAVE WOODCOCK Saginaw, Mich.

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DICK WYMA Grand Haven, Mich.

RUTH WRIGHT Berne, N.Y,

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m SHERYL YNTEMA Quinton, NJ.

LOUISE ZHVERBERC Holland, Mich.

VERNON ZUVERINK Holland, Mich.

EVELYN ZYLSTRA De Motte, Ind.

Gilmore Cottage

167


SPORTS A well-conditioned b o d y is an i m p o r t a n t characteristic of the liberally educated person. By sponsoring a diversified a t h l e t i c

program,

based upon friendly competition â&#x20AC;&#x201D; individually,

intramurally,

and

intercollegiately â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

Hope College helps the student to d e v e l o p into a sound, healthy, well balanced individual.


Football

From the first of September when the squad assembles for two weeks of basic practice before the opening of the new school year, until the middle of November when the managers collect the pads for the last time, football reigns as the feature attraction every weekend. Halftime: A moment of relaxation for the players; a moment of keen analysis for the coaches.

"The Cripples", four Dutch gridders, become spectators after sustaining injuries.

170

T h e Dutch split an eight-game schedule evenly. Reviewing their record, we can be both pleased with the accomplishment of well-earned victories, yet must feel a tinge of disappointment and talk in terms of "if only...". Losing two early-season encounters to outstate, nonconference foes, Hope received a rash .of injuries which plagued them through much of the season. Playing in Kalamazoo the next Saturday, it was just a case of "ifs" as the Dutch dropped a 20-18 thriller, falling just short of the winning T D at the final gun. W h e n captain Dave Kuyers returned to anchor the backfield in our Homecoming clash with Adrian, the string of three defeats was decisively broken. T h e combination of Mr. Outside, Mert Vander Lind, and Mr. Inside, Dave Kuyers, plus Hope's first semblance of stubborn, determined defensive play combined to give a second beginning to the season. Momentarily stopped by a Hillsdale squad which just had too much depth, the gridders went on to close out the season for the second straight year with three convincing victories over Albion, Olivet and Alma. Perhaps the injury which hurt the most was that sustained early in the season by stellar quarterback, Harry Voss. T h e r e a f t e r the Dutch had no outstanding passer, but were fortunate in having a n u m b e r of fine r u n n i n g backs. At season's end, Kuyers and VanderLind ranked n u m b e r one and two respectively in MIAA rushing totals.


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Front Row: E, DeWitt, H. Voss, Coach Vanderbush, U. Kuyers, Coach DeVette, T . Harris, 1). Cantos. Second Row: P. Watt, D. Grissen, J. Menzer, M. VanderLind, T . Zwemer, ). Faber, R, Wetherbee, T . Rupp, J. DcFouw. Third Row; Manager H. Doele, L. TerMolen, J. DeWitt, ). Hendrickson, C. Menning, G. Peelen, R. Siebling, Manager B. Hoffman, Manager C. Ver Beek. Fourth Row; R. Bronson, C. Smits, V. Essenoerg, D. Paarlberg, K. Faber, C. Van Uongcn, B. Waggoner, E. Welling, D. DeYoung, J. DuPond. Fifth Row; Coach Brewer, D. Lautenback, M. Peelen, C. Coulson, J. Hilmert, P. Wiegerink, R. Beuker, D. Rottschafer, B. Brookstra, Trainer Creen.

1956 Captain Dave Kuyers and Head Coach Russ DeVette.

Final statistics for all games show that Kuyers led the team in rushing with 605 yards, having been stopped for a loss only once in 91 carries. J u n i o r quarterback Del Grissen led the passers, completing 25 passes for 330 yards and 4 T D ' s . Jerry Hendrickson was the top receiver with 6 for 147 yards. Pete Watt topped all scorers with 48 points on 7 T D ' s and 6 P A T s. Only four seniors leave the squad this year, so next fall Coach DeVette will greet a very large contingent of letter-winners. Meeting two new opponents, the Hope gridders should be capable of turning in a season s record that will please even the most ardent Dutch partisans.

V


Halfback VanderLind drives for the clincher as the Dutch crush visiting Adrian in the Homecoming tilt.

1937 Captain

Captain-elect Mert VanderLind

172

All-MIAA

Guard Dick Gantos


Center

Earl

Guard T o m Harris

DcWitt

Quarterback Harry Voss

Seniors T h e end of the line for Jerry Hendrickson, as Hillsdale was able to cop victory number 22 at the expense of the Dutch.

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173


F u l l b a c k Dave Kuyers shows why h e t o p p e d all M I A A r u s h e r s by d r a g g i n g his tacklers for those e x t r a yards.

Season's Scores HOPE 6. . . .Heidelberg 7. . . .Wabash 18. . . . Kalamazoo 25. . . .Adrian

OPPONENTS 40 41 20 6

HOPE 14. . . .Hillsdale 59. . . .Olivet 18. .. .Albion 25. .. .Alma

OPPONENTS 34 6 13 20


Ml A A Standings Hillsdale

6-0

Kalamazoo

5-1

Hope

4-2

Albion

3-3

Adrian Alma

2-4 1-5

Olivet

0-6

Alert downfield blocking permits a Dutch back to spring loose for a long gain.

Hope's forward wall swarms in to stop Olivet for a loss.


Saturday's Game 176


Practice T h e entire scope of football is not seen in the glory of Saturday afternoon. Each week the team spends many long, trying hours preparing for the weekend's game. For every h o u r of actual game time the team spends anywhere from fifteen to twenty hours in rugged practice sessions. In these sessions the foundation must be laid for a successful season. Opponents' r u n n i n g plays are carefully scrutinized and simulated in d u m m y scrimmage. T h e defense is then erected in a manner to best stop them. Offensively the practice session consists predominantly in polishing and perfecting plays that have been time tested against opponents in the past. T o supplement this, grinding hours are spent in the never completely learned fundamentals of football. Work on the sled and tackling dummies continues throughout the entire season. Each week Coach De Vette takes time out to show movies of the last game which vividly point out mistakes and show areas of needed improvement. Everyone works hard in practice. T h e results of this work are clearly evident in the precision of Saturday's game.

Line coach Gord Brewer sharpens the blocking with dummy practice.

Daily calisthenics sessions are essential to keep the team in top physical condition.

"How about some clean socks?", is a question often asked of manager Hank Doele.

Perfect play timing calls for long hours of running through plays ky the backfield.

177


Front Row: Harry Wristers, Jack Hoogendorn, Carroll Bennink, H e r b Widmer, Second Row: Coach Green, Ron Den Uyl, John Needham, Manager Dan Meeuwsen.

Captain H e r b Widmer

Cross Country W i t h only a handful of r e t u r n i n g lettermen. Coach Green was hoping for a n u m b e r of new men to help r o u n d out a potent squad. Very few freshmen responded and the harriers were forced to go through the season without necessary depth. T h e Dutch were victorious in six of nine meets, mainly on the strength of fine running from a few key men who consistently finished near the winning times. T h e outstanding individual r u n n e r was senior H e r b W i d m e r who won first in every Hope victory. He set a new course record at Calvin and lowered both the Hope school record and the home course record on four different occasions. His top performance came in the season final when he ran the four mile course in 20:57. Seniors Ron Den Uyl, previous holder of both school and course records, and Jack Walchenbach also turned in fine performances and will be sorely missed when the Dutch runners begin the "loneliest sport of all" again next fall.


T h e start of the gruelling four mile run.

John Needham

Carroll Bennink


Varsity Basketball â&#x20AC;&#x201D; MlAA Co-Champs Beginning the season optimistically but with a young squad that had a n u m b e r of unknowns, Coach Russ DeVette and all Dutch partisans were well pleased by the season's results. Freshmen Warren Vander Hill and Ray Ritsema came through with outstanding performances, as did MVP Paul Benes, J u n Buursma and Dwayne Teusink. A very strong bench led by captain Bob Ritsema was also a tremendous factor in the fine showing of the Dutch cagers. After splitting two non-conference games, Hope found tough going in the MIAA, losing two of their first three games by a single point. After tucking away the championship in the Holiday T o u r n a m e n t which they hosted, the Dutchmen began playing top-notch basketball and romped through the remaining 14 games with 12 victories, copping the MIAA co-championship with Albion.

180

Hitting a season high of 100 points against Ferris, they frequently scored in the 90's. In league action, the cagers scored at an 81-point average and literally ran over most opponents. T h e defensive work was equally outstanding, with the opposition held to a 68-point average in MIAA play. Hope was ranked as the top college team in Michigan and many post-season honors came to the team and its coach. Vander Hill and Benes were selected by league coaches on the All-MIAA first team and they repeated on the A l l - M i c h i g a n NAIA team along with Ray Ritsema. Coach DeVette was honored as NAIA coach of the year in Michigan. W i t h the loss of only Bob Ritsema through graduation, the Dutch are likely to remain a dominant basketball power for several years, upholding a long tradition of fine basketball at Hope College.


Captain Bob Ritsema

"Tall Paul" Benes shows why he is an awesome opponent as he towers over the action with Earlham.

Captain-elect Dwayne Teusink

Front Row: Jack Kempker, J u n Buursma, Dwayne Teusink, Bob Ritsema, Warren Vander Hill, Dave Woodcock, Mert VanderLind, Second Row: Coach De Vette, Roland Schut, J o h n Hood, Paul Benes, Ray Ritsema, Daryl Siedentop, Manager Chuck Pettingill.


Hope's smallest starter. Tiger Teusink, goes high after a rebound as the Dutch crush arch-rival Calvin.

" J u m p Ball", as Capt. Bob Ritsema is swarmed over by his opponents in an MIAA encounter.

HOPE 81 54 75 74 76 94 66 84 69 61 78 83 99 100 92 92 89 69 71 92 78

SEASON S SCORES OPPONENTS Earlham 91 Eastern Michigan 32 Olivet 60 Albion 75 Alma 77 Holiday T o u r n a m e n t Earlham 85 Central State 61 Hillsdale Manchester Calvin Ferris Kalamazoo Adrian Ferris Albion Alma Calvin Kalamazoo Adrian Hillsdale . .Olivet

77 54 64 56 73 73 64 63 75 62 57 80 63 56


Ray and Bob crowd for rebound positions as Warren arches one of his outcourt shots.

Just eluding his defenders, Mert VanderLind shows top form in getting off a jump shot.

Calvin's John Vandenberg tries desperately to get the ball away as Ray Ritsema closes in.


JV Basketball U n d e r Coach Gord Brewer, the freshmen squad compiled a satisfactory 6-5 record this year. Playing predominantly local independent teams, the frosh found that top conditioning enabled them to outlast their opponents. T h e season's peak came in the second Calvin game when the JV's rang up 62 points in the first half and went on to cop an 85-78 victory. T h e squad featured balanced scoring, and team effort was responsible for their successful season. A n u m b e r of boys displayed good potential and may well move to the varsity next year.

J i m Kaat tries to get the tip in action with Borr's Bootery.

Front Row: Dave White, John Tysse, A1 Kober, Roland Van Es, Lloyd Tinholt, Dave Clark, Vern Essenberg, Second Row: Coach Brewer, Roger T e Heneppe, Ron Bronson, Jon Robbert, John Kleinheksel, Don Piersma, Manager Cal Prince. Missing: Jim Kaat, Forest White.

1

184


Left to right: Joy Philip, Wilma De Vey, Betty Burnett, Pris Boelhouwer, Sue Bratt, Linda Decker.

Go, Dutchmen, Go

New cheers are worked out in practice sessions.

T h e cheerleaders spark the efforts of the fans to express their support for the Dutchmen at all home football and basketball games. W h e n a touchdown seems imminent or when the whole basketball team hits a hot streak to pull into the lead, the cheerleaders find their task simplified. But when things are not going so well they are noticed. An apathetic crowd can do little to help a team's effort, and when the cheerleaders can keep the fans pulling for the team throughout the game? they do their job superbly. Willing hours of practice in writing cheers and coordinating their motions, a willingness to brave cold November weather clad simply in their orange and blue sweaters, a willingness to sit on the floor when the auditorium is packed to capacity â&#x20AC;&#x201D; these are the reasons we tip our hats in appreciation to our cheerleaders.

185


Baseball Russ DeVette returned to the baseball coaching duties in the spring of 1955. Graduation had thinned the ranks of the lettermen and only seven remained. T h u s most positions were keenly contested and a n u m b e r of new men saw action. T h e pitching staff lacked depth, and since the MIAA plays only double-headers, DeVette had to call on the same hurlers continually. Jack Kempker and Wayne Westenbroek turned in commendable performances, as did Dave Woodcock behind the plate. T h e team posted a winning record, ending with a 7-6 won-lost record. W i t h several fine pitching prospects among the new men and the return of most of the lettermen from 1955, the baseball squad should be able to improve its league standing this spring, possibly dethroning defending champion. Alma.

Captain Dave Woodcock

Jack Kempker

186

M e n VanderLind

Gerry Boeve


Front R o w R Welherbee G Boeve, D. Woodcock, A. Olson, M. VanderLind, D. Morgan. Second Row: Coach DeVette, J^ Faber, V. Essenberg, T Va^ermel,' A Kober Manager R. Lokjorst. Manager G. Wheable. Third Row: R. Bulthuis, J. Tysse, B. Verduin, G. Blysma. D. S.edentop, D. Cooper.

A m Boeve

Ron Wetherbee

Carl DeVree

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187


Lejt to Right'.

Bob Burwitz, Bob Holt, Roy DcDoes, Joe Martin,

Golf W i t h three experienced lettennen returning, the prospects for the 1955 season were bright. Ray DeDoes, Bill Holt and Bill Kramer were all fine golfers and the problem facing coach T i m m e r was to find two other men of equal skill. He was not entirely successful, but Bob Burwitz and Joe Martin played well after winning places on the squad. T h e Dutch were somewhat erratic, first losing three straight and then winning the next trio of matches. Ray DeDoes was usually medalist, but Holt and Kramer also shot in the 70's and low 80's throughout the season. DeDoes, Burwitz and Martin return this spring and along with Bill Holt's brother Bob, an equally fine golfer, should provide the Dutch linksmen with the likelihood of an improvement on the '55 record.

188

The number one player for the third year is Ray DeDoes.


Joe Martin carefully lines up his putt.

Veteran Bob Burwitz practices his chipping.

Blasting out of a trap, Bob Holt makes it look easy.


Phil Boersma, repeating this season as the second singles player.

John Jeltes, Hope's, number one singles player for the third straight year.

Front Row: Ron Hughes, Jim Engbers, Roland Van Es, Second Row: John Jeltes, Dwayne Teusink, Phil Boersma.

190


Tennis Tiger Teusink, a two year veteran now playing n u m b e r three singles.

O p e n i n g the 1955 season, coach J o h n Van Ingen faced a task of completely rebuilding the net team, with only the n u m b e r one singles man, J o h n Jeltes, back from the previous spring. Sophomore T i g e r T e u s i n k and freshmen Phil Boersma and J i m Remmelts stepped right into singles spots behind Jeltes, and surprised the conference with their fine play. Losing only to Kalamazoo in dual matches, the Dutch copped second place in M I A A tournament play. W i t h Athletic Director A1 Vanderbush taking over the coaching duties this spring, the outlook is again dependent u p o n how well the new men can fill the open positions. If they succeed, the netters will certainly win their share of matches and rank high in MIAA standings again in 1956.

1

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\ Jim Kamp returns a volley with his doubles partner Ron Hughes playing net.

191


Track

y.

T h e record of the 1955 track squad was neither surprising nor disappointing. Coach Green realized that there was little depth, but he was blessed with a handf u l of outstanding performers. T h e y ran their hearts out and were able to pull into second place in the final M I A A standings. Leading the way were Paul Wiegerink and J i m Hilmert who broke MIAA records of 19 years standing in the 220 low and 120 high hurdles respectively. Dave Spaan starred in the 440 yard dash, setting a new school record and winning the conference meet. Shot putter Larry T e r Molen and miler H e r b W i d m e r also won several firsts in dual meets and were big assets to the team. But overall strength was weak, and although all but W i d m e r return this spring, new strength will have to be found in the distances and the jumps. T h e r e t u r n to 1954 form of MIAA record holder J o h n DeVries may be a good start for the thinclads in climbing the final step into first place this spring under the new coach, Gord Brewer.

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MIAA record holder J o h n DeVries is counted on for consistent firsts in both the broad j u m p and pole vault.

Front Row: Coach Brewer, J. Hilmert, P. Wiegerink, J. DeVries T . Mohr, C. Bennink. Second Row; H. Wristers, C. Smits, B. Huibregtse, J. Menzer, J. Needham, Manager J. Van Dam. T h i r d Row: R. Bronson, D. White, H. Gagan, J. Hood, J. Robbert, R. Schut, H. Van Farowe.

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Paul Wiegerink flashes the form that enabled him to set Hope and M1AA records in the low hurdles last spring.

Running in a midwestern regional trackmeet, Jim Hilmert finds competition in the high hurdles is keen.

Winner of the 440 yard dash in last year's MIAA Field Day, Dave Spaan concentrates on a fast start.

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Larry TerMolen gives everything he has in throwing the 16 pound shot.

193


Intramurals A diversified program of intramural athletics gives opportunity to all Hope's men to participate in a sport. T h e five fraternities, the independents and the Seminary all have opportunity to enter teams in a series of eight different sports ranging from major ones as football, basketball and softball to minor sports as handball, golf or ping-pong. T h e y range widely, allowing everyone to find something he enjoys to play. Points are awarded for each sport, with the highest yearly total winning the coveted All-sports trophy. T h e Cosmos are defending champions, but each of the other fraternities are eyeing the trophy enviously. T h e program this year is under the student direction of J i m Cooper, with Dr. Green serving as faculty advisor.

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Front Row: J. Bolthouse, J. DeVries, B. Thomson, J. Evers. Second Row: J. Hendrickson, D, Schoon, R. Borr, J. Klaasen. Volleyball â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Cosmos

Coif â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Knicks

194

Medilist C. Bitner

Handball â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Praters

D. Cantos, M. Peelen


P. Toppen, E. Bredeweg, J. Evers, J. Wagner. Bowling — Cosmos

Tennis — Emmies Front Row: R. Bulthuis, L. Stegink. Second Row: R. Kuiper, J. Hamlink.

Front Row: E. Bredeweg, R. Gould, T. Bechtel, P. Northuis. Second Row: D. Schoon, R. Borr, J. Wagner, J. DeVries, J. Klaasen, P. Duey. Football — Cosmos

Football — Fraters Front Row: J. Jeltes, J. Remmelts, D. Teusink. Second Row: D. Woodcock, G. Boeve, F. Leaske,

Basketball — Fraters Front Row: J. Remmelts, J. Jeltes. Second Row: D. Gantos, M. Peelen, G. Boeve.


Women's Athletics Under the watchful eye of Miss Bried, Hope's co-eds participate in a wide variety of both intramural and inter-collegiate athletics. Be it square dancing, volleyball or track, the girls are able to chose the intramural activity they enjoy most. On an inter-collegiate basis, tennis is the dominating sport, as the MIAA has active competition. Archery and basketball are also inter-collegiate sports for the Dutch maids, and golf seems likely to be added in the near future.

If good form gives accurate drives, she should have few lost ballsl

These feminine archers get set to split the bulls-eye.

T h e air is filled with birds as the girls begin badminton competition.


h h h

"Swing your partner, then promenade" are familiar words to these square dance enthusiasts.

Alice and Donna team u p in a doubles match.

Freshmen girls practice shooting lay-ups.

197


ADVERTISING Practical experience is an essential ingredient of the liberal education. Much experience of this type is g a i n e d through contact with the businessmen a n d industrialists of the Holland area. The f o l l o w i n g advertisements are indications of their interest in us. It is h o p e d that increased p a t r o n a g e will serve as a material expression of our sincere appreciation.


BUILT BY

ELZINGA & VOIKERS INC.


WADE DRUG CO. 166 W«st 13th St.

Phone EX 2 - 9 5 6 4

J. KLASSEN PRINTING COMPANY 136 East 8 t h St.

Phone EX 2 - 2 9 3 3

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Phone EX 6 - 6 5 2

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Catalogs Forms Stationary Weddings

u H t h o u t !

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TILE CO.

380 Central Street

Phone EX 6-8033

FIRST NATIONAL BANK Holland's National Bank with the Local Outlook

FIRST NATION

CONVENIENCE FRIENDLINESS PROMPTNESS M e m b e r s F.D.I.C. — Deposits Insured up to $ 1 0 , 0 0 0 . 0 0 each

Convenience Friendliness Promptness

202


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TIMELESS FROM

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TREASURE OF

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203


TAYLOR'S CLOTHING

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HEKMAN RUSK CO.


GO THAT

R-O-U-T-E AT THE

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VOGUE FEATURES Holland's Number One H a m b u r g e r Treat

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207


JEANES SHOP

HOLLAND T H E A T R E

Congratulations to the 1 9 5 7 Graduates of Hope College

DEPREE CHEMICAL COMPANY 130 Central Ave.

STEKETEE-VANHUIS 208

Phone EX 2 - 3 1 4 5


ZEELAND LOCKERS

VAUPELLS MEN'S SHOP

Compliments of

H E RF *

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SUPPLY

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Factories and General Offices Holland, Michigan

Cabinet Makers and Upholsterers For those Who Appreciate

the Best

HERFST STUDIO 209


WESTRATE'S LADIES and INFANTS WEAR ;t 8th St.

Phone EX 2 - 2 9 6 6

A. J. COOK LUMBER COMPANY Phone EX 6 - 4 6 2 1

4 3 6 Lincoln A v e . Manufacturers Insul-Sfud

of

Homes

HOLLAND SHEET METAL CO Phone EX 2 - 3 3 9 4

210


V. L. Boersma, M.D.

C. S. Cook, M.D. S. S. Tiesenga, D.D.S.

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XV

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GET VISITORS CARDS HERE


SLIGH-LOWRY FURNITURE CO. We are proud

to have

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of Kollen

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Phone EX 6-4618

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AMERICAN LEGION COUNTRY CLUB CLUB R O O M 212

PRO SHOP


PEOPLES STATE BANK 3 6 East 8th Street - Phone EX 2 - 3 1 5 4

FRIS OFFICE SUPPLIES

H O W A R D M I L L E R CLOCK CO 213


Holland New Car Dealers Association VenHuizen Auto Co. Robert DeNooyer, Inc. Haan Motor Sales, inc. Henry TerHaar Motor Sales

m U.S. 311

Paul's Pharmacy '

Bunte's PharmÂŤ Hansen's Drug Store


Maycroft and Ma^Eachron Motor Sales R. E. Barber, Inc. Vandenberg Buick Inc. Michmerhuizen Pontiac Holland Motor Sales, Inc.

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A Friendly Welcome Awaits

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— Compliments

DEFOUW ELECTRIC CO. LIGHT FOR BETTER LIVING"

HOLLAND MOTOR EXPRESS, INC. 216


BRINK'S BOOK STORE

— Compliments

DEVRIES & DORNBOS FURN

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WESTERN MACHINE TOOL WORKS — MACHINE TOOLS — "Reliable

— Since 1895"

SCOTT-LUGERS LUMBER CO. 217


u

DAIRY MAID MILK DEPOT 101 Howard Street

RUSS' S A N D W I C H SHOP 218

Phone EX 2-3227

BLUE KEY BOOKSTORE


HOTEL WARM FRIEND TAVERN 5 East 8th Street

DONNELLY-KELLY GLASS CO

Phone EX 2-3131

IDEAL DRY CLEANERS 219


The Plumbing Contractors of Kollen Dormitory

HOLLAND PLUMBING and

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HEATING COMPANY 691 M i c h i g a n Ave.

Ph. EX 2 - 2 0 0 2

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HOLLAND 430 West 18th St.

220

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Seniors Not Pictured RONALD H . ALBRECHT

A.B.

JOHN P . DROST

A.B.

Berwyn, Illinois

History

Hall, Gelderland, Netherlands

English

HENRY J. ALKEMA

A.B. History

J O H N H. H E L M U S Holland, Michigan

A.B. English

RICHARD I. JOHNSON

A.B. History

Muskegon, Michigan

CONSTANTINE VICTOR AMBELLAS

Holland, Michigan

A.B.

Biology

BERGEON

A.B.

Charlevoix, Michigan

Biology

MICHAEL T .

WARREN R . BUITENDORP

A.B.

History-Political Science N o r t h T a r r y t o w n , New York Knickerbocker DWIGHT V . COOPER

Spring Lake, Michigan

DONALD L . D E VRIES

Zeeland, Michigan Delta Phi Alpha

J O H N RICHARD D E W I T T

Chicago, Illinois Arcadian; Delta Phi Alpha

A.B.

English

A.B.

Chemistry

A.B.

English

LEONA A . WILTERDINK

Holland, Michigan

Holland, Michigan

ALTON D . KOOYERS

Holland, Michigan Emersonian

JAMES M . KRANENDONK

A.B. Mathematics

A.B.

Business Administration Oostburg, Wisconsin Knickerbocker

EARL R . NIEBOER

A.B.

Allegan, Michigan

English

EDWIN J . SPYKE

A.B. Biology

Muskegon, Michigan

FREDERICK A . STAP

Grand Rapids, Michigan

A.B. English

A.B.


Student-Faculty Index A Aardema, Austin Albert, 104,120,156 Aardema, Gertrude Kathryn, 108,148 Aardsma, Allen Harry, 130 Abma, Jeanette Winifred, 82,112,156 Adams, Mary Jane, 92,108,148 Adan, Charles William, 163 Adelberg, Donald Bruce, 118 Akker, Virginia L., 108,148 Albers, Jeanette, not pictured Albrecht, Ronald Harry, not pictured Alkema, Henry James, not pictured Altena, Dale Herman, not pictured Arabellas, Constantine Victor, 101 Anderson, Edward David, not pictured Anderson, Theodore Donald, 83,130 Andree, Robert Glen, 118,163 Angus, Arthur Lloyd, not pictured Angus, John Galen, 156 Anker, Jane Alice, 108,148 Arends, Larry John, 120,156 Arendsen, Ellyn Jean, 110,156 B Baar, Randal Jay, 124,130 Bailey, Janet Helen, not pictured Bailey, Lois M., 32 Baker, James Allen, 124,130 Bakker, Carl Erwin, not pictured Baldwin, Marcia Ann, 92,108,148 Barber, Joyce Marilyn, 114,163 Barket, John Lloyd, not pictured Barkho, Warda, 156 Barr, Robert Arnold, 130 Barton, Jo Ann, 84,95,112,163 Bast, Robert Lee, 90,105,118 Baughman, Norma, 15 Bechtel, Helen Judith, 108,148 Bechtel, Owen Theodore, 120,130,194 Beckering, Raymond Eugene, 120 Bekius, Ronald Benny, not pictured Benes, Paul Allen, 181 Bennett, Richard Harry, 104,126,163 Bennink, Carroll Benton, 122,178,192 Berens, Robert D., 148 Bergeon, Michael Taylor, not pictured Bergeon, Ramona Te Grotenhuis, not pictured Bergman, Benjamin Meindert, not pictured Beukema, Jim, 148 Beuker, Carol Margaret, 90,110,156 Beuker, Ronald John, 124 Biery, David Michael, not pictured Birdsall, Fredric Raymon, 99,130 Bitner, George Phillip, 126,156,195 Bjorklund, Ronald Edward, 148

Block, Carol, 156 Bloodgood, Ann Elizabeth, 62,74,77, 78,90,93,105,112,130 Blunt, Janice Eleanor, 84,85,90,95, 98,101,112,163 Boehm, Robert Bernard, 163 Boelhouwer, Priscilla Ann, 112,156, 185 Boelte, Eugene J., 156 Boerman, Donald, 130 Boersma, Phillip, 124,190 Boeve, Arnold J., not pictured Boeve, Gerald Lee, 124,156,186,194, 195 Boeve, Norman Gene, 105,122,130 Bogart, Iris Frances, 148 Bogart, William Frank, not pictured Bolhuis, Jack K., not pictured Bolt, Gordon Alan, 122,148 Bolthouse, James J., 120,148,186,194 Boniel, Robert, 110,156 Bont, Patricia Lorraine, 85,114,131 Bootsman, Barbara Jane, 108,148 Bootsman, Beverly J., 83,116,163 Borr, Roger Hale, 120,194 Bos, Lois Jean, 33,84,85,110,131 Bosch, David Cherest, 80 Bosch, Donald Jay, not pictured Bosker, Stanley Gene, 120,148 Bosley, Edna A., 114,156 Bosman, Calvin L., not pictured Bostrom, Paul John, 122,156 Boughton, Marilyn Frances, 49,108, 148 Bouman, Barbara Jean, 108,148 Bouman, Paul Alan, not pictured Bouws, Marcia Elaine, 148 Bowler, Kenneth Tunis, 126,156 Boyd, Nancy Anne, 88,89,108,148 Braaksma, Shelby M., 90,108,148 Brahs, Hope B., 84,105,112,163 Brand, Edward E., 18 Brandt, Carol Ann, 114,157 Brandt, Harvey Nelson, 148 Brat, Paul Jay, not pictured Bratt, Sue Karen, 185 Bratton, Robert William, 122,149 Braunohler, Ingrid H,, not pictured Brideweg, Corwin Jay, 81,118,157 Brideweg, Edwin Russell, 120,157,194 Breid, Mary Louise, 21 Bremer, William Paul, 120,157 Bremer, Joan Elizabeth, 116,157 Brewer, Gordon, 21,92,171,177,184 Brink, Bruce Edward, 124,149 Brink, Kenneth Wayne, 96,149 Brink, Phyllis Joan, 23,84,116,163 Brockmeier, Richard Taber, 102,118, 157

Bronson, Ronald Jay, 149,171,184,192 Brookstra, Judy A., 108,149 Brookstra, William Robert, 90,124, 157,171 Brouwer, Gerald Allen, 120,157 Brouwer, Paula Jean, 105,108,149 Brower, Ardith Jeanne, 92,108,149 Brower, Harley, 157 Brower, Keith La Mar, 88,89,163 Brown, Donald F., 17,82 Brown, Frederick Martin, 99,120,157 Brown, Harley Dean, 90,118,157 Brown, Kenneth Henry, 126,149 Brown, Richard Eugene, 102,104,126, 157 Bruins, Lillian Carol, 89,110,157 Bruins, Ruth Mary, 69,84,104,110,131 Brumels, Bruce Clayton, 126,157 Brummel, Myron Lee, 93,95,126,131 Bryson, John Gregory, 90,122,149 Buitendorp, Warren Roger, not pictured Bulthuis, Ronald Herbert, 122,131 Burggraaff, Gertrude, 108,149 Burne, Frederic A., 122,149 Burnett, Betty Jane, 78,85,110,131, 185 Burwitz, Robert Harmon, not pictured Buursma, Albert, J r . , 181 Buys, Edward, 163 Buys, Linda Jane, 110,157 Bylenga, Peter Donald, 105,124,131 Bylsma, Elena Grace, 84,85,116,163 Bylsma, Gary Barton, 126,149,186 Byron, Donald Ervin, 124,131 C Cameron, William Mcintosh, J r . , 118, 131 Cameron, Winifred Carol, 108,149 Camp, Dennis David, 81,120,157 Campbell, Marilyn Suzanne, 112,157 Carter, Evalyn Hughes, 82,92,108,149 Cassie, David Glenn, 86,90,97,163 Cavanaugh, Robert William, 15 Chandler, Ronald Lee, 149 Clark, David Lee, 126,184 Clark, James Adams, 97,163 Cleason, David G., 149 Clelland, Elizabeths., 108,149 Cloetingh, Carol May, 112,157 Comstock, William James HI, 83,131 Cook, Carol Ann, 92,112,157 Cook, Charles A., not pictured Cook, Edgar Ted, 126,149 Cook, James Dale, 81,124,163 Cook, James Michael, not pictured Cook, Mary Catharine, not pictured 229


Cook, Phillip E., not pictured Cook, Stanley Rheaume, 163 Cooper, Burton Frederick, 122 Cooper, Donald W., 126,149,186 Cooper, Dwight Vernon, not pictured Cooper, J a m e s Harold, not pictured Corteling, Ralph, 120 Coster, David Lynn, 163 Cots, R., 118 Coulson, C h a r l e s Myron, 149,171 C r a m e r , Adele, 90,164 Crawford, Bruce Roger, 126,149 Crawford, D a r r e l l Lee, not pictured C r e a g e r , Charlotte Rose, 108,149 Crook, Philip G., 28 Croswell, Sharon R., 97 Cumerford, Mary Ann, 88,89,108,149 Cupery, P., 118 Curlee, Emelyn, 84,164 D Dahlke, F r a n c i s Gene, not pictured Dalman, Gary Wayne, not pictured Damson, Karen M., 108,149 Damstra, Norma Lou, 69,78,81,93, 132 D a m s t r a , Philip Lew, 120,149 Daniels, Gordon C., 149 Davenport, H a r r i e t Elizabeth, 149 Deas, Deanna Ogle, 82,84,110,164 De Braal, Alan Ray, not pictured Decker, Milford Alton, 76,122,164 Decker, Sondra, 108,149 De Does, Raymond Allen, 101,164 d e F o r e s t , Robert Rohrer, 92,157 De Fouw, John, J r . , 38,124,164,171 De Graaf, Clarence, 18 De Haan, Robert, 22 De Jong, G a r r e t t E., 118,164 De Jonge, John W., 157 De Jongh, Donald C., 81,120 Dekker, Lynda Ann, 108,149,185 Dekker, Marvin John, 149 Delong, Jack, 149 D e m a r e s t , Nancy Ruth, 89,112,157 deMoya, P e t e r Villar, 74,93,95,132 Den Boer, Robert Martin, 149 De Noble, Janet R., 108,149 Den Uyl, Ronald Jay, 118 De Pond, Jack G., 149 De P r e e , Anne Mills, 90,105,116 De P r e e , Eleanor M., 14 Dering, Joan, 108 De Ruiter, David John, 76,86,118,157 Dethmers, David Conrad, 86,96,164 De Vette, Charlene Mae, 110,164 De Vette, Russell, 21,171,181,186 De Vey, Wilma Frances, 110,157,185 De Vree, C a r l Lee, 80,132,194 De Vries, Carol Verna, 76,84,92,112, 132 De Vries, Donald Laverne, 81

230

De Vries, John Cornelius, 74,77,79, 80,93,132,192 De V r i e s , Leslie Dale, 157 De Vries, Roger Lee, 149 De Vries, T h e r e s a Elizabeth, 82,92, 114,157 De Weerd, Melvin Dean, 164 De Witt, Dale, 19,93,95 De Witt, Earl Martin, 124,132,171, 173 De Witt, Howard Eugene, not pictured De Witt, J a m e s Garth, 104,118,157, 171 De Witt, John Richard, not pictured De Witt, M a r j o r i e Ann, 84,85,114,132 De Witte, Henry John, 157 De Witte, Sheryl R'Dean, 108,149 De Wolf, Sally June, 98,112,157 De Wolfe, Ruth, 18 De Young, Carolyn Ann, 76,84,164 De Young, Daniel J., 149,171 De Young, Marlene J e s s i e , 110,157 De Young, Nancy Ann, 108,149 De Young, Ward Judd, 124,164 Diekman, Fred William, 149 Diephuis, Mary Kay, 82,84,85,101, 104,116,164 Dingee, Adele, 84,92,114,132 Disbrow, Ronald Keith, not pictured Disselkoen, Orville F., not pictured Dixon, Wayne Edward, 88,89,126,157 Docherty, John W., 124,164 Doedens, Robert John, not pictured Doele, Henry J . , 99,101,124,164,171, 177 Dorn, Stuart R., 126,150 Doyle, Shirley Ann, 108 D r e s s e l , Sandra Kay, 85,89,116,156 Drost, John Pelgrim, 122 Duey, Paul Ellsworth, 83,120,132,194 Du Mez, Theodore Andrew, 120,157 Du Pond, Jack, 171 Durkee, P e t e r Robert, 126,133 Dykhuizen, C. Elaine, 90,108,150 Dykstra, D. Ivan, 13 E Edwards, Suzanne Lee, 92,108,150 Einaar, Rudolf Martin, 120,148 Eissen, Alvin J,, 157 Ekema, Charlotte Anne, 150 Ellert, Ernest E., 16,31,80 Elzinga, C., 122 Elzinga, Darlene Ruth, 84,110,164 Elzinga, Marshall Gene, 89,118,150 Elzinga, Paul, 120,157 Elzinga, William Edward, not pictured Emerson, Emmons Keith, 126,157 Emmick, B a r b a r a Ann, 89,150 Emmons, Craig George, 122,150 Endert, Frieda M., 108,150 Engbers, J a m e s Arend, 124,190

Engel, Gary J . , 150 Ensing, Marlin A., 157 Essenburg, Karl Lee, 133 Essenburg, Vern J a m e s , 122,150, 171,184,186 Evenhuis, J a m e s Richard, 74,83,100, 102,124,164 Evers, J a m e s Lowell, 120,148,194 Evert, Janice Kay, 85,110,133 Exo, M a r - L e s Ann, 92,116,157 F Faber, Jack Edwin, 124,157,171,186 Faber, Kenneth Marcus, 102,124,171 Farnsworth, Adelbert Cleon, 84,92, 93,95 F a s s l e r , Albert William, J r . , 90,157 Feenstra, Gus, 157 Felix, Andre B., 150 Fell, Elizabeth Ann, 86,108,150 Fell, Paul E r r e n , 126,150 Fendt, Joan Evelyn, 84,112,133 Ferguson, Mary Alice, 74,77,85,90, 114,133 Fikse, Evert H., 89,92,150 Fischer, Matie Eileen, 96,112,158 Fisher, Arthur Jay, 150 Folkert, Jay E r n e s t , 26 Fragale, John, 98,122,158 Francke, Walter Karl, 80,82,86,158 Franken, David, 90,120,158 Franzon, Axel Ingvar, not pictured Fried, Paul, 24,80,86,99 F r i s s e l , H a r r y , 27 Fryling, Jocelyn, 48,82,84,90,95,104, 105,110,164 Fudor, Edwin, 124,164 G Gagan, H., 192 Gantos, Richard, 102,124,171,172,195 Garvelink, Roger, 82,101,102,118,119, 163 Gaskin, Carol Joyce, 112,158 Gay, William, not pictured Gazan, Harold Sidney, 118,158 Geerlings, Clyde, 34 Geitner, Anna W., 81,95,114,164 Giant, Carl Edward, 158 Gideon, Martin Kort, J r . , 126,133 Gideon, Zoe A., 88,89,93,95,112,164 Giebink, Gerald Allen, 133 Giemsoe, Myra F., 108,150 Giljam, Janet Ruth, 92,112,150 Gloss, Mildred Ann, 108,150 Gordon, Linda Megan, 108,150 Gorz, Richard Allen, not pictured Gotte, Margo Ruth, 108,150 Gould, Richard H a r r i s , 83,120,133, 194


Gouwens, Jane Anne, 74,88,89,95,97, 99,110,164 Graves, Susan F r e e m a n , 49,85,90, 110,158 Green, Lawrence J . , 21,171,178 Griep, John A r t h u r , 118,164 Griffes, Lois E., 88,89,108,150 Grissen, Delwin, 164,171 Groen, Robert Jay, 150 Groeneveld, Jack Richard, 158 Groenewold, Janet Jean, 110,158 Grooters, John Henry, 164 Grube, Allen Ward, 122,158 Gunneman, Roger Wayne, not pictured H Hackman, Sharon Mae, 84,112,164 Hageman, Marianne, 110,164 Haken, A. Joyce, 114,158 Halbersma, Elaine M a r g a r e t , 76,84, 164 Ham, Carol Anne, 108,150 Hamelink, Jon D., 122,133,195 Hamelink, Linda Lou, 150 H a m e r s m a , John Albert, 158 Hansen, Jeanette E., 108,150 Hansen, Marilyn M a r g a r e t , 92,116, 158 Hansen, Thorval A., 150 Hardenberg, Donna Mae, 85,110 H a r m s , Herman Paul, not pictured Harrington, Howard, 77,79,81,88,89, 124,133 Harrington, Stanley J . , 90,95,101,124, 164 H a r r i s , Thomas J a m e s , J r . , 134,171, 173 Hartgerink, Marlene J., 84,90,116, 164 Hayes, Sewell Staples, 97,134 Hays, Calvin, not pictured Hays, Talmadge Vee, 120,164 Hazelton, Sherwood Lee, 62,122,134 Heasley, Victor Lee, 81,158 Heeres, Dale W., 89,122,150 Heins, John E., 82,120,165 Hellenga, L o r r a i n e Kay, 83,108,150 Hellriegel, John Curtis, 118,150 Helmus, John Jacob, not pictured Hendrickson, J e r r y Arthur, 120,171, 194 Hendrickson, Marilyn Joy, 108,120, 150 Henebeld, Joan, 158 Herlein, George Leonard, 134 Hesselink, Charles Bernard, 74,76, 102,122,158 Hesselink, Dorothy Jean, 80,90,93, 104,112,134 Hesselink, Philip Harold, 90,134 Hielkema, Arthur Gerald, 118,134 Higgins, M a r j o r i e Rae, 150

Hilmert, J a m e s Edwin, 112,124,171 Hilmert, William J., 12 Hinga, Milton Lage, 10,23 Hinkamp, Paul, 11 Hoek, P e t e r Gordon, 120,134 Hoeksema, Gordon J a m e s , 88,89,150 Hoeksema, Lois Aurine, 76,77,78,80, 82,84,86,93,116,134 Hoellrich, Karl G., 105,126,165 Hoffman, Robert Jay, 158,171 Hoffman, William H., 116 Hoffmyer, Mary Jean, 104,116,158 Hofmeyer, T e r r y Lee, 157 Hoffs, Vernon Lowell, 77,118,158 Holkeboer, C a r l , 151 Hollander, Edna C l a r i e , 90,108,151 Holleman, Jantina Wilhelmina, 15,88 Holmlund, John Edward, 134 Holt, Mary Doris, not pictured Holt, Robert Lyle, 126,151 Hondorp, Carol Ann, 102,110,121,158 Hondorp, Gordon Ray, 74,77,79,80,81, 93,118,135 Hood, John Dave, 86,92,120,158,181, 192 Hoogendoorn, Jack Lee, 124,151 Hoogerhyde, Donna J., 89,158,178 Hook, G e r r i t , 83,92,126,135 Hook, Philip John, 118,151 Hop, Duane Lee, 83,135 Hop, Lyle Wayne, not pictured Horton, Helen Joy, 110,158 Hoskins, Keith F r e d e r i c k , 135 Hough, J a m e s Easton, 118,151 Houghtaling, Carol Eleanor, 92,98, 114,165 Houghsenga, Harlan Gregg, 151 Huffine, Robert Paige, 89,90,120,151 Hughes, Ronald D., 135,190 Huibregtse, William Henry, 124,158, 192 Huizenga, Nancy Kay, 110 Huizenga, Paul Arden, 151,158 Hull, C l a r i c e Marie, 108,151 Hungerink, Helen M., 110,158 Hunt, Una Irene, 92,95,112,158 Hunter, Mary Boyd, 84,114,165 I Ingles, Courtney, 108 Izenbart, L a r r y Alan, 158 J Jacobs, Jackie Ann, 108 Jansen, Donald Jay, 122,158 Jekel, Eugene C,, 29,81,104 Jekel, David Richard, not pictured Jeltes, John Simon, 124,165,190,194, 195 Johnson, Diane Louise, 84,92,97,110, 135

Johnson, Richard Immanuel, not pictured Johnson, Richard Wayne, not pictured Johnson, Robert Stevens, 83,135 Johnson, Walter Lyle, 151 Johnson, William Dwayne, 90 Johnston, Jack Leon, 158 Johnston, William H., not pictured Julien, J e r o m e Marshall, 159 J u r r i e s , Donna Mae, 76,108,151 K Kaat, J a m e s Lee, 126,151 Kalee, Robert J., 118,165 Kaluf, Marvin D., 151 Kamp, J a m e s P e t e r , 126,151 Kane, Warren William, 120,135 Kanengieter, E l m e r H., 165 Kang, Young Chae, 96,165 Karachi, W., 118 Karsten, Helene P r i s m a n , 15 Kaufman, Myron Jacobs, 89,126,159 Keith, Sara, 18 Keizer, Winona Jean, 85,110,159 Kelly, Richard John, 104,118,165 Kemme, C a r l Dwain, not pictured Kempker, Jack J., 181 Kennedy, David L,, 151 Ket, Henrietta Evelyn, 38,76,165 Kim, Reiko, 86,96,112,159 Kinkema, David R., 92,126,135 Kinkema, J a m e s H., 126, 135 Kirkwood, Susan Randplph, 104,108, 151 Kish, R o s e m a r i e , 74,85,112,165 Kisken, Bob, 126,159 Kissack, Wayne Gardner, 98,122,159 Klaaren, Eugene Marion, 96 Klaaren, Mary Ann, 76,86,108,151 Klaaren, Miriam E., 88,89,108,151 Klaasen, Adrian John, J r . , 120,136 Klaasen, Jane Ann, 49,74,90,116,117, 179 Kleinheksel, J . Harvey, 29,81 Kleinheksel, John Robert, 90,118,151, 184,194 Kleinheksel, Roger Edwin, 151 Kleis, Clarence, 27 Klomparens, B a r b a r a Grace, 69,116, 136 Klomparens, Tom, 124 Klyn, Marilyn R., 83,84,114,165 Knapp, Donald E., 118,159 Knapp, M a r g a r e t Jane, 22,38,116,136 Knoll, Donald K., 83,136 Knoll, Harold, J r . , 82,84,86,136 Knoll, P a t r i c i a Poling, 82,84,86,112 Knoper, Ronald Dale, 159 Kober, Albert Richard, 126,184,186 Koeman, Janice Arlene, 114,159 Koets, Paul D., 118,165 Kok, Gerald W., not pictured 231


Kole, Kenneth W., 165 Kole, Peggy Anne, 116,159 Koller, Alfred F r a n c i s , 95,126,159 Koller, Anthony Stephen, 95,151 Komejan, Delwyn D., 120,136 Kooiker, Anthony, 15 Kooyers, Alice M., 165 Kooyers, Alton Dale, not pictured Korteling, Ralph G., not pictured Kortenhoven, Marilyn Jane, 90,110, 159 Kortering, Vernon Dale, not pictured Korver, Phyllis Joy, 110,159 Kots, David Erwin, 122 Kotun, John Joseph, 118,136 Kraai, Franklin Delano, not pictured Kraai, Jack Allen, 151 Kragt, Paul Bertrand, 118,165 K r a m e r , F r a n c e s Ann, 84,85,114,136, Kranendonk, J a m e s Mark, 62,126 Krauss, John C., 90,124,159 K r e m e r , Norman, not pictured Kromann, Jean Karen, 62,77,88,89, 93,136 Kuiper, Ronald Eugene, 165 Kurth, Kathryn Emily, 92,159 Kurtz, Leonard Roy, 122 Kuyers, David Allen, 83,105,120,136, 171 Kyle, Janice, 108,151 L La Fleur, J., 126 La Grande, Verna Lee, 76,108,151 L a m m e r s , Donna Mae, 108,151 L a m m e r s , Mary Ann, 85,108,151 Lampen, Albert Eugene, 26 Langejans, Calvin Paul, 88,89 Laning, Ruth Joan, 92,104,108,151 Lanning, Nicholas E., 124,159 L a n s e r , Marvin G., not pictured Lautenbach, Donald Wayne, 120,159, 171 Leaske, F r e d e r i c k Grant, 124,165,194 Lee, Donald C. T., 122,165 Leestma, Jan E., 96,118 Leighley, Joyce C., 33,85,99,110,163 Lemmen, Arie William, not pictured Lemmen, Charles J e r o m e , 86,92,126, 151 Lenters, Richard, 122,165 Leonard, Roger Moore, 118,137 Lesniak, Robert John, 74,102,124 Lewis, Thomas Richard, 86,124,159 Lin, Stanley, 92 Lindahl, Charles Edgar, 63,88,89, 126,137 Lindskoog, Donald Philip, 76,159 Litts, Alberta J e s s i e , 108,151 Loew, Clyde Warren, not pictured Lohman, Donald P., 122,159

232

Lokhorst, Ronald Dale, 76,122,159, 186 Long, Nancy, 92,108,151 Looman, Gary J . , 89,152 Loomans, Maurice Edward, 29,81, 126,137 Losee, Calvin Y., 83,165 Louch, C h a r l e s D., 28 Lovins, Phyllis Jean, 108,152 Lower, Elsie Lou, 90,114,137 Lubbers, Irwin J., 6, 8 Lubbers, T h o m a s John, 96 Lup, Lawrence Nicholas, 79,105,137 Luth, Carol Jane, 82,90,96,105,114,159 M MacDonald, Kenneth P a r s o n s , J r . , 137 MacEachron, Jane Helene, 84,85,86, 88,89,96,101,102,116,165 Machiele, Delwyn Earl, 152 Machiele, Calvin Paul, not pictured Mackay, Janet Ann, 102,116,159 Maertens, Herman H., 96,152 Magee, George, 92,159 Maines, Dorothy Louise, 114,165 Marks, Edward E., J r . , 137 Marshall, R o b e r t s . , 95,126 Martin, Arthur Watson, 35,90,99,137 Martin, B a r b a r a Ruth, 108,152 Martin, Henning Joseph, 126,137 Martin, Judith H., 152 Matheis, Carol Ann, 69,84,93,102, 112,137 Matthews, Bruce Edwin, 89,92,118,165 Maxam, Victor Dale, 124,138 Mazzei, George William, 126 McCahan, Carol M., 82,92,114,165 McCarthy, Franklin Leroy, not pictured McCarthy, Thomas Leslie, 152 McClintock, Richard N., 165 McGoldrick, Aileen Irma, 82,84,93, 95,102,112,165 Mclntyre, Joanna Marston, 116,138 McNeal, William David, 126,159 McNeil, Jill B., 89,92,108,152 McPherson, Lloyd George, 126,165 Means, William Aaron, 92,99,105, 138,165 Meengs, John R., 96,118 Meengs, William John, 88,89,120,126 Meeusen, Gordon Alvin, 63,124,138 Meeuwsen, Daniel P e t e r , 138,178 Meiste, Shirley Anne, 85,116,159 Mencarelli, H a r r y Phillip, 138 Menning, Curtis Boyd, 124,171 Menzer, J a m e s Tyrone, 124,152,171, 192 Mericle, Beverly Edna, 114,159 Meyer, John Hollebrands, 74,83,156 Meyer, Kenneth Ray, not pictured

Meyer, Nella, 17 Meyer, Thelma, 38 Meyers, Carol, 112 Michaelis, Cecelia Mattie, 114,159 Mih, Nena Lila, 85,112,165 Millard, Wayne Arthur, not pictured Miller, Janice Adeline, 116,159 Miller, Nelda Leona, 152 Miles, Arthur, 152 Mitchell, Karen Eleanor, 92,108,152 Mohr, J a m e s N., not pictured Monroe, B a r b a r a E., 92,108,152 Monte, Susan Jane, 84,114,165 Moore, Richard Wesley, 118 Moore, Ruth Marie, 138 Morgan, Richard Thomas, 126,159, 186 M o r r i s , Anne, 114, 160 Muilenburg, David Cornelius, 124, 160 Mulder, Janet, 34,160 Mulder, John A., not pictured Mulder, Judith Lynne, 76,86,102,114 Murphy, Robert J., 120,152 Muyskens, Donald Lee, not pictured Myers, Carol Elaine, 160 Myers, Huston Kimmel, 126 N Needham, John Addison, 105,122, 160,178,192 Nelson, Carol Marie, 92,108,152 Nelson, Lynalice, 92,108,152 Newhouse, Artel Jane, 86,92,96,98, 104,112,160 Nieboer, Earl Raymond, not pictured Nienhouse, Everett J a m e s , 81,88,124 Nienhuis, C a r r o l l W., 152 Nieuwsma, Carol Joanne, 85,90,102, 104,108,152 Noorlag, William, 120,160 Normington, Cheryl Joann, 88,89,112, 165 Northuis, Paul Edwin, 120,194 Nyboer, Wayne, not pictured Nyhuis, Karen Marie, 108,152 Nykamp, John Marvin, 152 Nykamp, Paul Wayne, 122,166 Nykamp, Paula C., 108,152 Nykamp, Wade Lewis, 122,152 O

Ogawa, Yoshie, 76,84,92,114,166 Olson, Arthur Laurence, 102,124, 160,186

Olson, Judith Alice, 76,92,108,152 Oonk, Mary Joan, 116,160 Oosterhof, Elizabeth Joan, 89,152 Oosting, Mary Jane, 82,116,160 Ortquist, Milton Russell, 90,118 Osterbaan, P e t e r Donald, 152


Ousterling, David Lynn, 152 Overocker, H a r r i s o n , 166 Overton, A r t h u r Wayne, 152 Overzet, J a c k Roger, 89,152 Owen, J a n e t L., 76,90,108,152 P P a a r l b e r g , Donald, 124, 160,171 Padgett, John F r e d e r i c k , 166 Pangburn, J a m e s , 126 P a r i s , Donna Mae, 84,110,166 P a r k e r , P a t r i c i a Irene, 112,166 P a r k e s , John Edward, 152 Paton, C a r o l Lynn, 82,92,112,160 P a t t e r s o n , Judith A., 108 Payne, David Allen, 138 P e a r s o n , Bruce Elliott, 166 Peck, Janice Elaine, 82,99,110,166 Peck, N o r m a Lynne, 49,108,152 Peelen, Ethel Ann, 23,49,68,84,85,90, 93,105,110,138 Peelen, George W., 90,124,152,171 Peelen, Joan Wilsa, 116,160 Peelen, Kay Diana, 33,116,117,138 Peelen, Matthew Herman, 124,171 P e l g r i m , George Arthur J r . , 139 P e t e r s , Muriel Joyce, 139 P e t e r s o n , Robert Neil, 118,166 P e t r o e l j e , Marvin, J r . , not pictured Pettengill, C h a r l e s V., 181 Petty, Neil Edwards, 62,90,93,120, 121,139 Philip, Joy Laverne, 85,92,108,153, 185 Phillippsen, B a r b a r a Jane, 108,153 P i e r s m a , Donald Duane, 120,153,184 P i e r s o n , Mary Lou, not pictured Pinter, Paul, 153 P l a g g e m a r s , Warren K., 120 Plasman, John Russell, 84,118,139 P l a s s c h e , Loretta Mae, 108,153 P l a t z e r , Wayne D., 153 Poit, C a r l Hogan, 122,153 Polhemus, Theodore, 120 Ponstein, L a m b e r t J., 12 Portinga, David Eugene, 122 Post, Stuart H., 124,153 Postema, Sandra Lee, 108,153 Potter, Roger Allen, 153 Preston, Dorothy Arlene, 76,83,114, 115,166 P r i n c e , Calvin Wilbur, 153 P r i n c e , Lyle Vernon, 184 P r i n s , Albert J a m e s , 17,18 P r i n s , M a r g u e r i t e Meyer, not pictured P r o o s , Alyce, 116,160 Pschigoda, Loraine Mae, 81,112,160 Puehl, Lois Jean, 114,160

Q

Quisenberry, Robert Roger, 139 R Raak, Truman, 166 Redding, Theodore J o r j , 139 R e e v e r t s , E m m a M a r i e , 10,18,104, 105 Reid, Paul E,, 19 Reimink, Floyd, not pictured Reisig, C a r l E r n e s t , 166 R e m m e l t s , J a y m e s Edward, 124,160, 194,195 Rhem, Richard Allen, 76,77,139 Rhoades, Rosella Mary, 139 Rider, Monette L., 15,88,89 Riekse, Martin J a m e s , 74,76,96,120, 166 Riekse, Phyllis, 152 Rietberg, Roger J . , 15,92 Rikkers, David O., 126,153 Ritsema, Harold John, 63,79,88,89,92, 122,139 Ritsema, Ray Lee, 124,153,181 Ritsema, Robert Allen, 63,79,88,122, 139,181 Robbert, Jan Louis, 184,192 Roberts, Kenneth G., not pictured Roelofs, Marilyn Kay, 114,160 Roelofs, Roger Gordon, 122,140 Rolfs, Ellsworth August, 140 Ronda, J a m e s Alvin, 126,160 Rookus, Joyce A., not pictured Roos, Joan C., 108,153 Rosczyh, J a m e s Russell, 153 Rosendahl, Hazel Jean, 153 Ross, Metta J . , 24,80 Rothwell, Betty Ann, 88,89,108,153 Rottschafer, Leon Dyke, 124,153,171 Roundhouse, F r a n c e s Meyer, 84,85, 90,101,166 Rowell, Leonard George, 76,88,118, 140 Roy, William Arnott, J r . , 89,160 Rupp, Tyrone Daniel, 124,153,171 R u s s c h e r , Donna Rae, 153 Rylance, Carol Ann, 76,90,95,108, 153 Rynbrand, Kay Glenna, 84,116,140 Rynbrandt, Alyn J r . , 153 Rypma, Judith Ann, 69,116,140 S Sanko, B a r b a r a A., 108,153 Santinga, Reda Rynbrandt, 140 Sasaki, Daniel Nozomu, 118,160 Saunders, Robert William, 124 Scarlett, Cynthia Ann, 153 Schaafsma, Shirley Ann, 116,160 Schalekamp, Myrna Ruth, 108,153

Schiefelbein, Karen E., 108,153 Schieringa, Paul K., 140 Schlafer, Sheryl J a m e s , 76,153 Schmidt, D o r i s Hildegard, 92,112, 160 Schneider, Sara Lou, 81,99,101,116 Scholten, Carolyn Marie, 110,160 Scholten, Donald Paul, not pictured Schoon, Dale Richard, 120,194 Schoon, Helen Haberland, 20 Schreckengust, Kay Elizabeth, 160 Schreur, Donald Wayne, not pictured Schreur, Ivan J a m e s , not pictured Schrier, Dr. William, 19,96 Schroeder, Joan Arlene, 104,108,153 Schut, Lawrence J a m e s , 80,118,166 Schut, Roger Lee, 153 Schut, Holland J . , 118,153,181,192 Schuurman, Edwin J a m e s , not pictured Scott, Donald Whuard, 82,86,92,160 Scudder, Kenneth Earl, 82,166 Scudder, Marilyn Jean, 76,92,108, 153 Seiffert, Suzanne Ruth, 108,154 Seymer, Ralph H., J r . , 154 Shoemaker, Jason Ray, 122,166 Short, June Elizabeth, 114,160 Shy, Dorothy Hauser, 166 Shy, Melvin Louis, 140 Siebeling, Ronald Jon, 154,171 Siedentop, Daryl Lee, 126,154,181, 186 Siedentop, L a r r y Alan, 77,79,80,86, 93,126,140 Sienstra, Phyllis Ann, 84,110,166 Sikkema, Ronald Lee, 126,154 Sikkenga, Carol Ann, 92,108,154 Singleton, Mildred E., 32 Skinner, C h a r l e s E., 126,160 Skinner, Dorothy Marie, 92,166 Slack, Edward George, 160 Sluyter, Diane, 88,89,102,104,108, 154 Smits, Charlie, 192 Smith, Julie M., 116 Smith, Kara Hardy, not pictured Smith, Louis George, 140 Smith, Sallie Jo, 84,114,166 Smiths, Charles Allen, 154,171 Snow, Esther MacFarlane, 16 Soeter, John Randolph, 122,141 South, Lawrence E., 118,160 Southland, Evon Janice, 78,81,92, 114,141 Spaan, David Bruce, 98,124,166 Sprague, Robert, 154 Spyke, Edwin J e r r y , not pictured Staal, Philip Ward, 81,141 Stadt, Richard Allen, 92,122,160 Stam, Kenneth Duayne, not pictured Stam, Mary, 112,160 Stap, F r e d e r i c k Allen, not pictured 233


Stavenger, Judy Ann, 108,154 Steffens, Henry, 8,11 Stegink, Lewis Dale, 81,195 Steketee, C h a r l e s Andrew, 26,29 Stepanek, Ronald Lee, 95,166 Stickle, Doris Louise, 105,112,161 Stirnweis, B a r b a r a Jean, not pictured Stockhoff, Ronald Conrad, 76,122,154 Stoltz, Donald E., 141 Stout, J a m e s Robert, not pictured Streur, Eileen Marie, not pictured Stringer, Christopher J a m e s , J r . , 120,154 Stryker, John Alvin, 154 Stryker, Marian A., 34,74 Su, Aaron Chung Liong, not pictured Su, Joseph C. W., 118, Su, Lawrence C. L., not pictured Swanson, Bertil Wilhelm, 98,102,161 Swart, Floyd P r a s o d , not pictured Swart, Nella Jean, 83,84,166 Swarts, William L., 154 Swets, Ethel Ann, 85,92,108,154

Tinholt, Lloyd Allan, 122,154,184 Tomlinson, Jane, 89,108,154 Toonder, Roger Allan, 83 Top, Virginia Joyce, 92,108,154 Toppen, Janice Ruth, 154,166 Toppen, Phillip Roy, 105,108,120,194 Tornga, Dorene Ruth, 154 T r i m m e r , Robert W., 126,154 Trimpe, Dwayne, not pictured Troost, Paxil Rowland, 141 Tulenko, Robert Andrew, not pictured Tullar, Benjamin Franklin, J r . , 126 Tuttle, Huber Alvah, not pictured Turtle, Janet, 84,116,141 T y s s e , John Paul, 124,154,184,186 T y s s e , Judity Wynne, 88,89,92,108, 154 U Underwood, Suzanne, 74,77,78,93,114, 141 V

T Tahkofpher, Lucretia, 110,141 Talbert, Joy K., 18,74,97 Tallman, Elwood Henry, 124,154 T a l s m a , Mearl, not pictured Taylor, Helen Carol, 112,161 Teck, Roger Maxim, 120,161 Te Hennepe, Eugene Kenneth, 13,74, 86,90,166 T e Hennepe, Roger, 118,161,184 Tell, Ann Marie, 108,154 Tellman, Virginia, 112 Ten Broehe, Melvin Jay, not pictured Ten Haken, Carol Jean, 82,85,95,102, 104,112,161 Ten Haken, M a r g a r e t Mary, 90,105, 110,156 T e r Haar, Gary Lee, 81,120 Tenhor, Adrian George, 118,154 Ten Hoor, Henry, 18,100 Ten P a s , John Herman, 102,120,15( T e r Molen, L a r r y Richard, 124,161, 171 Teusink, .Dwayne Dale, 124,166,181, 190,194 Thomae, Charles William, 83,141 Thompson, O s c a r Edward, 28 Thompson, Richard Edward, 122, 154,194 Thompson, Thomas Walter, 92,122, 154 Thoms, Lois Ethel, 74,82,86,92,104, 112,161

Thomson, Robert J a m e s , 120 Tillman, Janet Louise, 89,108,154 T i m m e r , Albert, 11 T i m m e r , Albert II, not pictured T i m m e r , Marilyn Luidens, 114,141

234

Van Ark, Robert Eugene, 142 Van Dam, John Howard, 86,96,124, 161,192 Vanden Berg, Anita Louise, 108,154 Vanden Berg, Charles M., 118,166 Vanden Berg, Ruth Elaine, 84,110, 166 Vanden Bos, John William, 161 Vanden Brink, B e a t r i c e Jean, 116,161 Vanden Brink, Ronald Dale, not pictured Vande Poel, J a m e s Russell, 154 Vande Poel, Mary Lou, 92,116,161 Vander Aarde, Robert L., 76,95,118, 166 Vander Borgh, G a r r e t , 20 Vanderborgh, Nicholas E., 89,120, 154,161 Vanderborgh, Virginia V., 49,74,84, 85,90,98,110,163 Vander Broek, Kenneth, 166,171 Vanderbush, Alvin Wallace, 24 Vanderham, Robert Clair, 23 Vander Hart, Marna Lois, 92,108, 155 Vander Hart, William Eugene, not pictured Vander Hey, Douglas Wayne, 142 Vander Hill, Charles Warren, 181 Van Der Hoven, Mary Catherine, 80, 84,110,142 Vander Jagt, Elizabeth M a r j o r i e , 76, 116,161

Vander Kolk, Ivan Wayne, 155 Vander Kolk, Joyce, 108,155 Vander Kolk, Roger Dale, 90,166 Vander Kooy, Edward J., 118,167 Vanderlaan, Lois Ann, 92,161

Vander Lind, J a m e s R., 124 Vander Lind, Merwyn, 124,167,171, 172,181,186 Vander Lugt, Robert William, 10,13, 83,101,126,163 Vander Lugt, William, not pictured Vander Maat, Paul, not pictured Vander Meer, Alan Wilson, 114,155, 161 Vander Meer, Carol Ann, 82 Vander Mel, Bruce Paul, 124,155,186 Van Der Meulen, Ruth, 155 Vander Molen, Evert, not pictured Vandermyde, Cynthia Fae, 76,92,108, 155 Vander Ploeg, Marvin, not pictured Vander Ven, John Edward, not pictured Vande Vusse, Kenneth, not pictured Vander Werf, Elaine Rae, 108,155 Vander Werf, Nathan Hilbert, 74,77, 79,90,93,118,142 Vander Wilt, Marlin Anthon, 79,93, 95,142 Vander Yacht, Wilbut C., 90,142 Vande Zande, Elsie Delaine, 90,112, 142 Van Dahm, Thomas E., 25 Van Dongen, Gene W., 124,171 Van Doorn, Joyce Aleen, 85,116,142 Van Doornik, Merwin Don, 92,118,142 Van Duinen, Joyce Marie, 110,142 Van Dyke, E r m a Jean, 84,85,90,110, 143 Van Dyke, Helen Jean, 102,116,167 Van Dyke, John William, J r . , 118,167 Van Dyke, Judith Ann, 92,108,155 Van Eenenaam, David Owen, 77,80, 81,86,93,102,124,143 Van Eenenaam, Isla, 74,96,116,161 Van Emburg, George Holden, 92,143 Van Es, Mary Lou, 20,69,74,78,84, 90,104,110,143 Van Es, Rowland Dean, 124,148,184, 190 Van Essen, Hendrik, 120,143 Van Farowe, Harvey Ward, 143 Van Grouw, Steven, 82,84,167 Van Hattem, Melchoir Henry, 161 Van Heest, H a r r i e t Eileen, 84,85 114,167 Van Ingen, Jean, 32 Van Ingen, John, 25 Van Iwaarden, John Lloyd, 122,143 Van Koevering, Keith Conrad, 83,143 Van Koevering, Paul Edward, 83,143 Van Koevering, Mary Beth, 90,108, 155 Van Lare, Donald Hugh, 86,143 Van L a r e , Ethel Smith, 105,114,144 Van L a r e , L a r r y Dale, 144 Van Leeuwen, Leslie Joan, 112,161


Van Lente, Anita Jean, 63,74,78,90, 93,105,112,144 Van Lierop, Joanne C., 112,167 Van Oort, Jacob Winfield, 167 Van Oosterhout, William Paul, 167 Van P e u r s e m , Jan, 90,102,112,161 van Putten, B a r b a r a , 80,84,85,110, 144 van Putten, J a m e s Dyke, 24 Van Schaah, Eva B,, 28 Van Swol, Wayne Ronald, 155 V a n ' t H o f , Donald Gene, 155 V a n ' t H o f , Harold Richard, 120,161 Van't Hof, Lynn Carol, 84,90,99,100, 102,104,110,167 Van V e r s t , George Orthel, 124 Van Voorst, Beverly Ann, 110,161 Van Wart, Robert R., 90,95,120,167 Van Wyk, Paul H e r b e r t , 118,155 Van Zoeren, Thelma Eileen, 114,161 Van Zyl, G e r r i t , 29,30 Vasey, Joseph Norman, 167 Vaughan, Richard Willis, 144 Veld, Audrey Elaine, 108,148 Veldman, Jay Edwin, 167 Veldman, Ruth Joanne, 108,155 Veltman, Robert Bruce, 144 Ver Beek, C a r l Edward, 74,124,161 Ver Beek, Harley Dale, 122,161 Ver Beek, Irene, 33 Ver Beek, John Gilbert, 120,167 Ver Beek, John J., 20 Verduin, Robert V i s s c h e r , 118,144, 186 Ver Hey, Jay Stanley, 126 Ver Hulst, Jack, 89,167 Verkaik, M a r s h a Mae, 155 Ver Meulen, Gretchen, 108,155 V i s s c h e r , Rein, 11 V i s s e r , Bruce G e r r i t t , 155 V i s s e r , John E., not pictured V i s s e r s , Wayne Allen, 76,155 Vogel, Franklyn Allan, 155 Volkenborn, Erika M a r g a r e t , 112,167 Vollink, Mary Ann, 84,99,112,144 Voogd, Erwin Ray, 167 Voogd, Henry, 12 Von Ins, Karl A., 155 Vos, Hetty Molenaar, 82,83,86,116, 161

Voskuil, Duane, 122,155 Voss, Faye Ruth, 110,161

Voss, H a r r y Russell, 124,144,171,173 Voss, Howard Glenn, 144 Vugteveen, Mary Ellen, 116 W Wade, Helen Louise, 86,90,116,161 Wager, David Earl, not pictured Waggoner, William C h a r l e s , 145,171 Wagner, Edna Mae, 108,155 Wagner, Nellis Jan, 83,120,194 Walchenbach, John Robert, 80,104, 105,118,145 Wallace, Norma McDonald, 108,155 Walrad, Janet Donlon, 92,108,155 Ward, B r u c e Arthur, 145 Warren, Alice Marie, 85,110,167 Wassink, J e r o m e Hugh, 118,161 Watt, P e t e r Duane, 161,171 Weber, Eugene Edward, not pictured Weeks, Greta P e a r l , 95,108,155 Weener, Alyce Arlene, 84,114,145 Weersing, Spencer, 124,161 Wehnau, P e t e r Lawrence, 126,155 Welch, M a r c i a A., 88,89,114,162 Welch, Phyllis Ann, 108,155 Welling, E a r l J . , 155,171 Wendt, Ruth Sharon, 92,114,162 Wenke, Lee Henry, 155 Wennersten, George Thomas, not pictured Wenzel, B a r b a r a Jane, 114,162 Werkman, Duane T., 122,155 Wessels, Janet Carol, 98,110,162 Westernbroek, Vernon Jay, 155 Westenbroek, Wayne, 118,162 Westerbeke, Edward Jan, 126,162 Westra, Virginia Jean, 92,114,162 Westrate, Jack I., not pictured Westrate, Janice Rae, 92,114,162 Wetherbee, Ronald Willis, 167,171, 186 Wheable, George Edward, 120,155, 186

White, David E., 126,155,162,184,192 White, F o r r e s t Eugene, 155 White, Nancy Cyphers, 86,104,112 Wiegerink, Paul Howard, 120,167,171, 192 Wiers, C h a r l e s J a m e s , not pictured Wiersma, D a r r y l J . , 120,155 Wiersma, Marcia Lou, 155

Widmer, H e r b e r t Theodore, 118,145, 178 Wildschut, Marianne Janet, 116,162 Williams, Glen B., 120,167 Williams, Robert Lee, 96,126,145 Wilson, B a r b a r a Cline, 22,31 Wilson, Stuart M., 76,122 Wingard, John Richard, not pictured Winkels, Roger John, 167 Winstrom, Dorothy Jean, 145 Winter, John Egbert, 124,145 Winter, Robert Allan, 79,93,96,98, 124,145 Wissink, C a r l Dale, 155 Wissink, H a r r i e t , 108,155 Witteveen, Maurice E., 167 Wolbert, John A., not pictured Wolfe, B a r b a r a Mae, 90,112,167 Wolters, Edward John, 2, 3,16 Woltman, Kenneth George, 122,167 Wood, M a r j o r i e Eleanor, 89,108,155 Wood, Marvin Elton, 162 Woodcock, Daniel Lee, 124,167,181, 186,194 Woods, Joseph Windsor, 83,95,120, 162 Worden, George A., 89,90,96,120,162 Wright, Ruth Elaine, 84,90,114,167 W r i s t e r s , H a r r y Jan, 155,178 Wyma, Richard John, 81,118,167 Y Yin, Stanley Ye-Kung, 90,145 Yntema, Dwight B,, 25 Yntema, Sheryl, 82,112,167 Yonkers, Russell, 122,162 Z Zanbergen, Howard, 33 Zhe, Carolyn, 114,162 Zickefoose, Theodore, 162 Zilverberg, Louise, 92,167 Zimmerman, Raymond, 118 Zomer, William, 120 Zuverink, Vernon, 167 Zwemer, Thomas, 171 Zwyghuizen, John, 122,162 Zylman, T e r r a n c e , 88,89,162 Zylstra, Evelyn, 38,81,116,167

235


Organizations' Index Alcor, 78 Alphachi, 76 Anchor, 98,99 Arcadian F r a t e r n i t y , 118,119 A.S.A. Sorority, 108,109 Athletic Debt Diggers, 84 Band, 89 Beta Beta Beta, 81 Blue Key, 79 Business Economics Club, 83 Chancel Choir, 92 Chapel Choir, 90 Chemistry Club, 81 C l a s s i c s Club, 83 Cosmopolitan Fraternity, 120,121 Debate, 96

Delphi Sorority, 110,111 Delta Phi Alpha, 80 Dorian Sorority, 112,113 Emersonian F r a t e r n i t y , 122,123 Faculty Honors, 77 F r a t e r n a l Society, 124,125 French Club, 82 Future T e a c h e r s of America, 84 I n t e r - F r a t e r n i t y Council, 105 International Relations Club, 86,87 Kappa Delta, 76 Knickerbocker Fraternity, 126,127 Men's Choir, 91 Men's House Board, 104 Milestone, 100,101 National Collegiate P l a y e r s , 93

Opus, 97 O r c h e s t r a , 89 Palette and Masque, 94,95 Pan Hellenic, 105 Phi Alpha Theta, 80 Pi Kappa Delta, 96 Sibylline Sorority, 114,115 Sorosis Sorority, 116,117 Spanish Club, 82 Student Council, 102,103 Symphonette, 88 Women's Activities League, 85 Women's Athletic Association, 85 Women's Choir, 91 Y.M.C.A., 74,75 Y.W.C.A., 74,75

Advertisers' Index American Legion Country Club, 212 Arendshorst, Wm, M.D., 211 A and W Root B e e r Drive-in, 216 Baker Furniture, 209 B a r b e r , R, E., Inc., 214,215 Blue Key Book Store, 218 Boersma, V. L., M.D., 211 Brooks 7-Up Bottling Company, 198 Brinks Book Store, 217 Bulford Studio, 216 Bunte's P h a r m a c y , 214,215 C h a r l i e ' s Fine Foods, 206 Colonial Mfg. Co., 203 Cook, A. J. Lumber Co., 210 Cook, C. S., M.D., 211 Dairy Maid Milk Depot, 218 DeFouw E l e c t r i c Co., 216 DeNouyer, R., Inc., 214,215 D e P r e e Chemical Co., 208 DeVries and Dornbos Furn., 217 Doesburg Drug Store, 214,215 Donnelly-Kelly Glass Co., 219 DuMez B r o s . DepLStore, 220 Dutch Boy Baking Co., 222 Eerdmans, W. B. Pub. Co., 225 Edwards Brothers, Inc., 224 Elzinga and Volkers, Inc., 200 F i r s t National Bank, 202 F r i s Office Supplies, 213 Haan Moter Sales, Inc., 214,215 Hansen's Drug Store, 214,215 Hekman Rusk Co., 204 H e r f s t Studio, 209 236

Holland Bowling Lanes, 223 Holland Furnace Co., 222 Holland Hitch Co., 220 Holland Motor E x p r e s s , Inc., 216 Holland Motor Sales,Inc., 214,215 Holland Plumbing and Heating Co, 220 Holland Sheet Metal Co., 210 Holland Theatre, 208 Howard Johnson's Restaurant, 224 Ideal Dry Cleaners, 219 J e a n e s Shop, 208 Kearney, J . B., M.D., 211 K e p p e r s , T . Sons, 204 Klaasen, R. A. Ins. and Realty, 221 Klassen, J . Printing Co., 201 Koop Insurance Agency, 221 Lievense Agency, 221 M a r s i l j e Agency, Inc., 221 Maycroft and MacEachron Motor Sales, 214,215 Michigan Tile Co., 202 Michmerhuizn Pontiac, 214,215 Miller, Howard Clock Co., 213 Miller, Herman Furniture Co., 207 Model D r u g s t o r e , 214,215 Mooi Roofing, 204 Padnos, Louis, Iron and Metal Co., 201 P a u l ' s Pharmacy, 214,215 Peoples State Bank, 213 P r i n c e Studio, 207 P r i n s Texaco Service. 204 Post Jewelry, 204

Reformed Bible Institute, 225 Ridenour, C.B., D.D.S., 211 Rooks T r a n s f e r Lines, Inc., 223 R u s s ' Sandwich Shop, 218 Scott-Lugers Lumber Co., 217 Self Help Mutual Life Assurance Society, 223 Shady Lawn F l o r i s t s , 216 Skip's P h a r m a c y , 214,215 Sligh-Lowry Furniture Co., 212 Smith, Ray Oil Co., 217 Steketee-Van Huis, 208 T a y l o r ' s Clothing, 204 T e r Haar, Henry, Motor Sales, 214, 215 Tiesenga, S. S., D.D.S., 211 Vanderderg Buick Inc., 214,215 Van Lente, B. H., Insurance, 221 Van Raalte's Restaurant, 208 Vaupells Men's Shop, 209 Ven Huizen Auto Co., 214,215 V i s s c h e r - B r o o k s Ins. Agency, 221 Vouge Restaurant, 205 Wade Drug Co., 201 Warm Friend Tavern, 219 Western Machine Tool Works, 217 Western Theological Seminary, 226, 227 W e s t r a t e ' s Ladies and Infants Wear, 210 Wolbrink Insurance Agency, 221 Zeeland Lockers, 209 Zeeland State Bank, 206


Acknowledgements The 1957 Milestone owes a great debt of appreciation to the many who have worked with determination, patience, and vision to make our book an actuality. We would especially extend a s i n c e r e thank you to those outside of the official staff who have worked and sacrificed above and beyond the call of duty. Roger P r i n c e Dick Gantos Dave Spaan Mert Vander Lind Curt Menning Elena Aylsma Donna P a r i s R o s e m a r i e Kish Ekdal Buys, J r . David Cassie


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Milestone 1957  

Hope College yearbook.