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T h e Junior Class of H o p e College preset} ts

The Milestone of 1945 Alan Staver

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Editor

Elsie Parsons

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Associate Editor

Wilbur Brandli

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Business Manager


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Dedication "Professor, Registrar, and Patriarch," Observes the flippant freshman who, In Thomas Welmers' awesome dignity, Drops the conceit of fame already won. The wily sophomore complains, "No Use. To take the course required, I must agree" Experienced Juniors catch his larger mind, "True Calvinist, judicious, wise and kind." But worthy Seniors reverently acclaim "Our 'Thossy,' friend to me and to mankind." In love this book we dedicate to him Who never stooped; he made us climb to win. . . . in this l i g h t e r vein has t h e p o e t c a p t u r e d t h e richness of a p e r s o n a l i t y t h a t has been d e d i c a t e d to G o d . J u s t as a w h e e l has a center a n d m a n y r a d i a t i n g spokes, so, too, this personality h a s a C e n t e r a n d m a n y radii t h r o u g h w h i c h t h a t C e n t e r ' s f o r c e is expressed. O f these lines, w e choose t h e t h r e e t h r o u g h w h i c h we, as s t u d e n t s , h a v e f e l t his C h r i s t i a n s t r e n g t h ; . . . T O A P R O F E S S O R w h o has t a u g h t us not only t h e finer p o i n t s of G r e e k , but also h o w to integrate all o u r l e a r n i n g in l i fe by g i v i n g to it a p u r p o s e — t h e service of G o d ; . . . T O A F R I E N D w h o has never f a i l e d us w h e n w e w e r e beset w i t h difficulty; w h o , h a v i n g s h o w n us w h a t w e are, has instilled us w i t h a desire to o v e r c o m e ourselves a n d w h o has l a u g h e d w i t h us as w i l l i n g l y as h e has w o r k e d a n d t h o u g h t w i t h u s ; . . . T O A M A N w h o h a s n o t " h i d his l i g h t , " but w h o has as fearlessly a d h e r e d to his p r i n c i p l e s in his daily l i f e as h e has t a u g h t t h e m in the classroom a n d as h e has p r e a c h e d t h e m f r o m t h e p u l p i t ; . . . t h e r e f o r e , w e h u m b l y dedicate this " T h e M e a n i n g of H o p e "

T O T H E R E V E R E N D T H O M A S E. W E L M E R S


WE PRESENT THE STORY OF THE SPIRIT OF HOPE IN THREE PARTS . . .

Because we believe that the traditions of a college dedicated to Christian service have been a savoring salt in the lives of our student body, we feel that ive will be better equipped to fulfill our parts in a world constantly striving for Brotherhood and Peace. Therefore, ive of the Milestone staff have selected this year to present as the theme of our yearbook THE MEANING OF HOPE COLLEGE . . as it roots itself in the past, as it permeates the present campus life, and as it strengthens her sons and daughters to take their places in the world of tomorrow.

PAST Traditions College PRESENT

7 9 11 35

Classes

36

Activities

51

Athletics

85

FUTURE

91

Hope College

94

Hope Graduates

95


EJJSC Oh Towers cleaving the sunset sky, Extolling God on high, Renewing a pledge of ages past, That Hope would never die. From sweat of blood and dust thou came. To oppose a world of wrong, Though man's life he short, indeed. Its progress you carry along. Through the ages the echoes ring, Of glory, honor, and fame. Of ivork and siveat and prayers and tears. That have glorified thy name. The Milestones of the years slip by, Youth carries on as before. Bringing into the present, The traditions founded of yore.


THE ROSE W I N D O W

SYMBOL OF HOPE

Hopeites of the Past, privileged to share in the building of our beautiful Chapel, remain at Hope in the beauty and significance of the Rose Window, their gift. This Rose Window is set in solid stone and arranged in concentric circles around the seal of Hope College. After an alternating pattern of the seals of great universities and symbols of the arts, we read, in detailed and accurate design, the story of the world from Creation to the Christ Child. Students of the future, like those of today, will pause here in growing appreciation of the Meaning of Hope.


Dr. A. C. Van Raalte, Founder

H o p e Prep School Class

D r . Phelps, First College President

l o p p (Enllrp nf fpsttrgpar iCfniia nf tlir Uraltb nf its Srabilinna to tin- ffiifp nf ijnpp in 1345 . . . . H o p e College is of noble descent. W h a t we now know as H o p e College and the H o p e tradition has evolved throughout more than eighty years in a manner filled with drama and challenge. W e pride ourselves in a glorious tradition that we believe unique. T h e founding fathers in the early days, men of struggles, hardships, and disappointments, challenge us to bold e n d e a v o r — o u r builders, administrators, and teachers through the years, men and women of sterling character, intellectual gifts, and spiritual devotion, encourage us to steadfast persistence—our great body of alumni everywhere. Christians and useful citizens, bid us be like them. Truly the Present inspirits the Past! Familiar to every Hopeite are Dr. Van Raalte's prophetic words, "This is my Anchor of H o p e . " So visioned our founding fathers!

T h e Greased Pole

Establishing an academy here on Dr. Van Raalte's five acres in 1848 was indeed a bold endeavor. But these men were devoted to an ideal of Christian education, and they labored bravely with faith and prayer. W h a t disappointments they had to grapple with and what obstacles they had to overcome we may never know, but with what success they met we have ample evidence, for we know that the visions and labors of these men who "lived in faith and wrought in h o p e " realized completion as H o p e College was founded, named, and incorporated at the graduation of the class of 1866. It remained, however, for our administrators, builders, and teachers throughout many years to make of our college what she is today. Devoted men have guided her rapid, steady growth to an assertion of maturity. As

T h e Pull T h r o u g h Black River, 1916

H o p e ' s Baseball T e a m


Glory Day, 1918

.

.

.

a i t &

i m h B

Senior Breakfast, 1918

P r n m i a ?

outstanding personalities came to the faculty and increasingly higher scholastic standards to the curriculum, H o p e College found new recognition and friendship. Physical growth was gradual and slow until the turn of the century brought a building era that gave us Graves Library, Van Raalte Hall, Voorhees Hall, and C a r n e g i e G y m n a s i u m . More recently has come our beautiful Memorial Chapel for which Dr. Dimnent in his presidency was so largely responsible, and our modern, well-equipped Science Building, the pride of D r . W y n a n d W i c h e r s , Hope's seventh president. Coupled with the high ambition and enterprise of these men has been the daily purpose, mutual interest and fellowship peculiarly our own here at Hope. Courageous, able leaders, visioned, ambitious builders, and noble, consecrated teachers are

Sweater Girls of 1920

10

n f

i > u r r p a B

i n

i F u l u r r

our heritage and a large part of Hope's tradition. Most significant of all tributes that may be paid to H o p e comes from the lives of H o p e men and women all over the world. This tradition of graduates instilled with a desire to serve their fellowmen has been chief among the aims of the institution from the beginning. Learned, envisioned men and women with determination to serve God, country, and H o p e in whatever field of life they choose — are her foremost contribution and her great glory! W e may speak of these as dark days, but in the light and challenge of the Past, we do not fear dark days. T h e Past bestows upon the Present the faith that dares to hope — — for a better world, — for an even greater Hope.

Girls Glee Club


ua


Foreword

It is a great pleasure to introduce to you another annual Milestone.

I am deeply gratejul to the entire staff for pro-

ducing so fine a book under the trying

circumstances

produced by shortages of materials and labor. It is another evidence of the loyalty and spirit of Hope College students who are known to do the best ivhen the going is hardest. Civilian enrollments have improved this year and will continue to do so. Next year, tue are confident that all vacancies in the faculty will be filed and that there will be additions for new courses to be offered. I shall not have the pleasure of working with you in the next school year but I shall not lose my interest in Hope College nor my affection for the faculty and student body. Whenever we shall have opportunity to peruse the pages of the 1943 Milestone, I know that fond memories will come to the fore. Very sincerely yours. W Y N A N D WICHERS

President

12


Administration

Our President t. -. •

II y Jk i f

•At*' '4 r •

DR. W Y N A N D WICHERS It is with distinct, h e a r t f e l t regret that w e see Doctor W i c h e r s take his leave. T o say merely that w e will miss this great h u m a n i t a r i a n is an understatement, f o r he is the e m b o d i m e n t of all that is truly H o p e : in his appreciation of the intrinsic worth of individual personality, in his honest interpretation of the value of life, and in the kindly patience w i t h which h e guides his college. H e is k n o w n as a devoted civic leader, a sympathetic f r i e n d to youth and a reverent teacher. W e are convinced that we are better persons f o r h a v i n g been in his company and h a v i n g felt his quiet strength and understanding in our lives. W e are p r o u d to k n o w this man w h o m others likewise acknowledge to be great. Doctors W i c h e r s received his A.B. f r o m Hope, his A . M . f r o m the University of Michigan and honorary degrees of LL.D. f r o m H o p e , L . H . D . f r o m Central and Litt.D. f r o m Rutgers. Doctor W i c h e r s has been part of our campus life, one of us in obliging service and amiable good will, yet c o m m a n d i n g respect by virtue of his wisdom, his tolerance and his very bearing. H o p e sustains a great loss at his g o i n g but his influence on the campus will continue to be felt. O u r h u m b l e thanks and G o d ' s richest blessing g o with him to his field of greater service!


supported by THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES

T h i r d Row. Rev. H . T e n Cliy, Mr. J. N . Dykema, Rev. E. Huibregtse, Mr. J. Ver Meulen, M r W m . Timmers, D r . P. J. Kriekard, M r . M. H . Chapman, M r . Henry W i n t e r . Second Row: Rev. J. W e l w o o d , Mr. T . Hager, Mr. R. Verseput, Rev. J. D . Dykstra, Rev. A. D e Young, D r . W . Wichers, Rev. J. Stegeman, Rev. D . Kolenbrander, Rev. T . Luidens. First Row: Mr. W . Swart, Rev, A. Cook, Rev. O. Snuttjer, Rev. B. K r u i t h o f , Rev. J. A. Dykstra, Mrs. J. Beardslee, Rev. L. Brunsting, Rev. H . Brower, Mr. P. H . Friesema, Mr. M. Den Herder.

Popular student opinion generally makes a college s Board of Trustees a f o r m i d a b l e body of wealthy old men, whose money supports the college, w h o meet in dangerous sessions of j u d g m e n t u p o n us, and finally sign our diplomas. But w h e n H o p e dormites entertained our own Board at lunch one noon last spring, w e were in f o r a pleasant surprise. They appeared neither old nor tremendously wealthy. In fact, they weren't even all m e n — two were w o m e n . They ate heartily, were jovial, and acted as if they might have started first grade with our Dads. Many are ministers or elders representing the classes of the R e f o r m e d Church, but the n u m b e r also includes an attorney, a printer, and many business and professional men. Most of t h e m are Michiganders, but many travel long distances to meet with our administration to hear reports and offer suggestions as to the best possible policy and means of maintaining the best possible college here on our sixteen acres. Contrary to student opinion, they don't foot all the bills or pry into the private lives of the matriculants. T h e y ' r e all Christian people, w h o believe in young people and the values of Christian Education. W e d o n ' t want to shatter all your old dreams, but, they d o n ' t even sign diplomas any more. Only the signature of their able president, D r . John A. Dykstra, of G r a n d Rapids, appears on a H o p e G r a d ' s sheepskin.


and aided by

H i s Secretary

D e a n of W o m e n

MISS M I L D R E D S C H U P P E R T Friendly, efficient, well liked secretary to the President is one of the first persons to welcome new students to college life. " M i l l y , " as she is familiarly called, goes beyond the call of her official position to be h e l p f u l , maintaining a f r i e n d l y interest in H o p e ' s servicemen by her "letter a day" policy. Milly shares her musical ability, as organist, with T h i r d R e f o r m e d Church, of which she is an active member. Ever a valuable source of information a n d advice, Milly is a f r i e n d well worth having.

D e a n of M e n

MISS E L I Z A B E T H E I G H T Y , D e a n of W o m e n T h e care of dormitory girls d u r i n g peace time is responsibility e n o u g h f o r any dean, without the addition of war-time troubles. In spite of the h u b b u b of girls exclaiming, "Miss Lichty, my m a n is here! May I have late p e r m i s s i o n ? " or "May I take a week off?", our dean has maintained a steadfast patience and a keen sense of h u m o r . Continually teased, the petite mademoiselle is a d m i r e d f o r being such a "good sport." Ever poised and efficient. Miss Lichty takes an active part in college parties, and has as much f u n as any student. T h u s the versatile nature of our dean has won the respect and f r i e n d s h i p of H o p e coeds. P R O F . M I L T O N L. H I N G A , D e a n of M e n Hopeites k n o w f r o m past experience that " w h e n in need Professor Milton L. Hinga, newly-appointed dean of men, is a f r i e n d i n d e e d . " H i s patience and understanding have been proved d u r i n g his training of the men in basketball and f o o t b a l l ; and h e is also noted f o r his "advice to t h e love-lorn." It is characteristic of " C o a c h " that he takes time on Sunday to teach a Sunday School Class. M a n y Hopeites attend regularly, and have been inspired by his interpretations of Christian ideals. H i s clever wit and casual h u m o r find their way in to the lesson, keeping each m e m b e r attentive; and all w h o attend find spiritual strength f o r the week ahead.

Registrar

P R O F . T H O M A S E. W E L M E R S , Registrar As vigorous in his other responsibilities as h e is in his tutorial capacity. Professor T h o m a s W e l m e r s efficiently fulfills his position as registrar. F r o m the beginning to the end of a school year his controlling h a n d is felt by everyone in academic affairs. H e ushers in new students, establishes them in their courses and obtains data f o r his files, persisting f o r m o n t h s if necessary; and he ushers out the g r a d u a t i n g class, h a v i n g unscrambled the senior's credits b e f o r e h a n d in order that no one's record will be f o u n d w a n t i n g . Professor W e l m e r s , e q u i p p e d with such varied capabilities, tirelessly carries on his never-ending tasks as instructor and registrar.

Personnel Director

P R O F . A L B E R T T I M M E R , Personnel Director Even though his official duties consume most of his time, Professor Albert T i m m e r still finds time to pursue his hobby, g o l f , t h e n a m e of which is practically synonymous with T i m m e r . D u r i n g this war period, Mr. T i m m e r has taken over scores of duties as the personnel director, r a n g i n g f r o m directing counselling to supervising the correspondence with prospective students and other interested persons. His practical suggestions and kindly encouragement give students an impetus to continue w o r k i n g toward their ultimate goals. In this new capacity, M r . T i m m e r ' s infectious good will and his ability to put students at ease take away the odiousness of h a n d i n g out grades and academic advice.

15


MEMORIAL CHAPEL


The Departments of BIBLE, RELIGIOUS EDUCATION, PHILOSOPHY

Lester J. Kuyper

George M e n n e n g a

A.B., B . D . , T h . M , , T h . D . , D . D .

Paul H i n k a m p

A.B., T h . M . , A . M . , P h . D . , D . D .

A.B., A.M., B.D.

W a l t e r Van Saun A.B.,

A.M.,

B.D.,

Ph.D.

D R . LESTER K U Y P E R D r . K u y p e r has returned to his alma mater in the role of professor. A typical son of Iowa w h o can't seem to get f a r m i n g out of his blood, D r . K u y p e r succeeds in g r o w i n g prize-winning victor B I B L E y g a r d e n s . H i s classes are m a d e interesting by his original translation of the H e b r e w , his non-technical explanations and his ability to make Bible characters live. H o p e College certainly owes h i m a debt of g r a t i t u d e f o r filling temporarily one of Rev. Bast's accustomed places. DR. G E O R G E M E N N E N G A Seemingly somewhat u n a p p r o a c h a b l e but in reality just r e s e r v e d is this year's stand-in for Reverend Bast — D r . G e o r g e M e n n e n g a , borrowed f r o m the Seminary faculty. His reserve, however B I B L E ' 's obscured by the thin m a n t l e of scrupulous satire. H i s choice analogies of h u m a n experience, and subtle comments in passing expose Biblical characters and incidents as s o m e t h i n g g e n u i n e and basic. In addition to being a p r o f e s s o r , D r . M e n n e n g a is the author of the outlines used in both F r e s h m a n and Ju n i o r Bible. REV. P A U L H I N K A M P Rev. Paul H i n k a m p has always shown versatility, f o r at one time he served both as college pastor and instructor in psychology. O f t e n his subjects by their very nature would become too "cut dr y " w e r L e l1 n o t f o r t h e " i n k a ^ P w i t . a n d h o m 7 experience which serve so well as illustrative material. W h e n Prof Bast l e f t the college, Rev. H i n k a m p was d r a f t e d to fill one of the vacancies, that of advisor to the Y . M . C . A . H i s ability to analyze clearly has helped his hearers to a new appreciation of the c o m m o n place — witness his talks concerning the symbolism of the chapel windows.

R E L I G I O U S

E D U C A T I O N

and

DR. W A L T E R V A N S A U N N o t h i n g daunted by his change of classrooms f r o m the Chapel, where h e h a d been many years, to Van Raalte, D r . W a l t e r V a n Saun with his usual zeal and earnestness undertook another year of teaching Philosophy and Religion. Liberally a d d i n g h u m a n interest, he leads the p h i l o s o p h y s uc en,:s P H I L O S O P H Y ' ' t h r o u g h the courses offered and the senior students t h r o u g h a course. Philosophy of the Christian Religion. W h e t h e r taking a required or selected course, every one leaves his classes with a greater respect for D r . V a n Saun, especially for his sense of h u m o r which is even m o r e keen if a joke is on himself. "It's like this . . ."

a whale of a b o o k ! "

17


GRAVES HALL


DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS DR. E D W A R D D. D I M N E N T O n e of t h e m o s t d i s t i n g u i s h e d intellects H o p e C o l l e g e h a s ever claimed is D o c t o r E d w a r d D . D i m n e n t , o n e - t i m e p r e s i d e n t of H o p e , w h o has attained t h e s u m m i t of l e a r n i n g i n m a n y f i e l d s . As the H o n o r a b l e G e r r i t J. D i e k e m a c o m m e n t e d , " D o c t o r D i m n e n t k n o w s m o r e a b o u t m o r e t h i n g s t h a n any o n e m a n I k n o w . " F o r over half a century this rem a r k a b l e m a n has g i v e n f r o m the richness of his g r e a t m i n d to his l ife w o r k — H o p e College. D o c t o r D i m n e n t ' s t r a n s l a t i o n of T h e Book of J o b a n d his m a g n i f i c e n t S e v e n t y - F i f t h A n n i v e r s a r y P a g e a n t , T h e P i l g r i m , are a m o n g the masterpieces of his literary c o n t r i b u t i o n s .

Edward D . D i m n e n t A.B., A . M . , L . H . D . . Lift. O . L.L.B., L . L . D .

In his p u r s u i t of e n l i g h t e n m e n t , D o c t o r D i m n e n t has achieved t h e r a r e ability to t u r n incisive wit i n t o refined jesting. F r o m his lips p u n s b e c o m e c u l t u r e d c o m m e n t s a n d comm o n " s l a n g u a g e " p u t s o n t h e robe of classicism. Beloved by countless H o p e i t e s , is this s i n g u l a r m a s t e r of business a n d education, p h i l o s o p h y a n d literature, l a n g u a g e a n d science. All h i g h tributes of affection a n d respect w e p r e s e n t to E d w a r d D i m n e n t , a pillar of H o p e .

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

Primary

Secondary

Caroline H a w e s B.S., A . M .

Miss H a w e s , o n e of our b u s i e s t f a c u l t y m e m b e r s , really does "double duty." H e r day is largely filled w i t h h e r d u t i e s as Supervisor of Elementary E d u c a t i o n in t h e H o l l a n d P u b l i c Schools. At H o p e , she teaches j u n i o r a n d senior courses in elementary school t e a c h i n g a n d supervises practice t e a c h i n g in t h e early g r a d e s . H e r classes are " a l i v e " with p e r s o n a l experience and f i r s t - h a n d k n o w l e d g e of " e l e m e n tary p e o p l e . " Miss H a w e s ' g e n u i n e interest and f r i e n d l y efficiency are an inspiration a n d an e x a m p l e to t h e girls with w h o m s h e w o r k s . As s o m e o n e r e c e n t l y said, " Y o u d o n ' t m i n d w o r k i n g f o r Miss H a w e s b e c a u s e s h e is such a g o o d w o r k e r herself."

Garrit V a n d e r Borgh A.B., A . M .

T h e h e a d of the education d e p a r t m e n t — Professor Garrett Vand e r b o r g h , in a d d i t i o n to t e a c h i n g courses in e d u c a t i o n a n d psychology has t h e responsibility of m o l d i n g f u t u r e p e d a g o g u e s a n d also t h e duty of a d v i s i n g T h e A n c h o r . N o t only d o his s t u d e n t s ever m a r v e l at his t r e m e n d o u s vocabulary b u t also they are f o r c e d to be " o n their t o e s " in t h e face of his o w n amazing m e m o r y for f a c t s a n d d a t a . Prof. Vanderborgh refreshes his class p e r i o d s w i t h his casual, yet p o i n t e d drolleries. H i s geniality a n d sincerity find their way into all his relat i o n s h i p s w i t h his stud e n t s to create an atm o s p h e r e of m u t u a l g o o d will a n d u n d e r 5 standing.

19


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DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH PROF. CLARENCE DE G R A A F Professor D e G r a a f , soon " D o c t o r " D e G r a a f , creates a propitious impression at the first meeting, f o r he is a sincere, s t r a i g h t f o r w a r d , attractive person. His sagacious m i n d assembles facts into reasonable, organized f o r m f o r student e n l i g h t e n m e n t . M r . D e G r a a f is, above all else, a g e n u i n e person â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a warm, unders t a n d i n g h u m a n b e i n g w h o perceives acutely the needs of youth f o r s o m e t h i n g basic and lasting; and the witness of his personal religion is a continual source of strength. A precise a n d exacting worker, a practical business man, and a wise and judicious arbiter is Professor Clarence D e G r a a f , head of the D e p a r t m e n t of English.

Clarence D e Graaf A.B.,

A.M.

Metta J. Ross A.B.,

A.M.

M I S S M E T T A J. R O S S In any g r o u p . Miss M e t t a Ross is a welcome m e m b e r with her t h o u g h t - p r o v o k i n g questions and her skillful participation in conversation. As one of the professors in English, she stimulates a h u n g e r f o r great literature, not only because of her own great love f o r literature, but also because she has an uncanny knack of looking t h r o u g h the superficial and extracting the author's thoughts and implied meanings. H e r clear, analytical m i n d challenges her students to see these f o r themselves. W i t h like definiteness. Miss Ross fulfills the role of counsellor â&#x20AC;&#x201D; her g e n u i n e interest, h e r willingness to share her experiences, her impartial j u d g m e n t s and sincere advice m a k e her f r i e n d s h i p truly desirable.

Hr

PROF. E D W A R D WOLTERS Quietly a n d patiently, Professor E d w a r d W o l t e r s strives to instil correct usage of English into t h e t h o u g h t and speech of college students. G r a n t e d a leave of absence because of illness, he, nevertheless, returned f o r second semester to assist with one H e s h m e n English class. L e a d i n g an unostentatious life. Professor W o l t e r s lives his ideals daily and remains a constant, loyal person u p o n w h o m students may d e p e n d .

Edward A.B.,

Wolters A.M.

REV. B A S T I A N K R U I T H O F Reverend Bastian K r u i t h o f , Pastor of First R e f o r m e d Church, has become a f a m i l i a r and welcome figure on H o p e ' s campus. Students enrolled in his literature courses appreciate his s t r a i g h t f o r w a r d interpretation of the classics and come away richer f o r his searching criticism. Reverend K r u i t h o f ' s spirit of good will and f e l l o w s h i p have won the admiration of the students and t h e respect of the community. MISS R E T T A PAS Miss Retta Pas, whose interested teaching men t h r o u g h the highways and byways of H o p e ' s most recently acquired professor. Preparatory School and claims H o p e as her

m e t h o d s and perseverance g u i d e freshEnglish g r a m m a r and composition, is Miss Pas was g r a d u a t e d f r o m H o p e alma mater.

Bastian A.B.,

Kruithof A.M.

Retta Pas A.B.,

A.M.

21


DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY DR. W Y N A N D W I C H E R S It has been the good f o r t u n e of the student body this year to k n o w D r . W i c h e r s in the lecture room as well as in his administrative capacity. It was as professor of history that Dr. W i c h e r s first came to our campus, although his duties as president have kept him f r o m teaching d u r i n g recent years. T h e f r e s h m a n courses in " T h e M a k i n g of the W e s t e r n M i n d " have afforded an excellent opportunity f o r new students to become acquainted with their president. T h i s n e w course, p r e p a r e d especially by D r . Wichers, provides a broad cultural background f o r underclassmen early in their college experience. W h e n Doctor Raymond left. D r . W i c h e r s assumed direction of the D e p a r t m e n t as well as the teaching of the "Political G r o w t h of E n g l a n d . " D r . W i c h e r s ' scholarly presentation of history a n d his disciplined t h i n k i n g have been a challenge to all his students a n d we count it a privilege to have been in his classes.

DR. B R U C E R A Y M O N D Doctor Raymond, o n e of t h e most congenial faculty m e m b e r s a n d f o r m e r l y the head of the history department, is n o w serving as a director of veteran rehabilitation in M i c h i g a n . W e on the campus miss h a v i n g Doctor R a y m o n d enliven class periods and f r e e hours with his "tall tales" a n d vast repertoire of anecdotes and true experiences. His history lectures were always colorful and illustrative in addition to b e i n g really informative. Doctor Raymond's interest in y o u n g people m a n i f e s t e d itself not only in his sponsorship of the college g r o u p of H o p e Church, but also in the o u t s t a n d i n g way in which he h a n d l e d the Army A.S.T.P. boys last year.

P R O F . M I L T O N L. H I N G A In war time everything seems to be rationed, but P r o f . M i l t o n L. H i n g a has proved that his talents are unlimited. N o t only is he able to teach students world events, but his courses are a u g m e n t e d by the " H i n g a Philosophy of L i f e " and interesting events in the H i n g a H o u s e h o l d . M r . H i n g a has t a u g h t us that ancient history is a living and timely subject and that E u r o p e a n history is an i m p o r t a n t part of our own lives. "If you never remember another t h i n g , " you are sure to recall that Disraeli's favorite flower is the primrose, and that Metternich escaped f r o m V i e n n a in a laundry cart. Professor H i n g a ' s keen sense of h u m o r and jolly m a n n e r induce many students to linger a f t e r class to listen to his latest experiences. H i s talents are immeasurable and his f r i e n d s h i p k n o w s no bounds.

MISS M E T T A R O S S W i t h equal thoroughness and enthusiasm. Miss Metta Ross teaches history as well as English. H e r sympathy a n d u n d e r s t a n d i n g of p e o p l e and their relations psychologically and socially as well as politically and economically enable her to stimulate appreciation for history in students w h o otherwise become lost in the dryness of facts. H e r interests outside of the classroom are many and varied, r a n g i n g f r o m a w i d e correspondence to an enthusiastic interest in current h a p p e n i n g s . Quietly and efficiently she also counsels Pallette and M a s q u e and W o m e n ' s Athletic Association.

m telling you

Creating H i s t o r y !

never forget it!'


VOORHEES DORMITORY


DEPARTMENT OF ART MRS. LOUISE K R U M For t h e past three years prospective teachers have f o u n d themselves u n d e r t h e capable tutelage of quiet, pleasant Mrs. Louise K r u m f r o m H o l l a n d H i g h School, w h o is g i f t e d in p e r s u a d i n g s t r u g g l i n g w o u l d - b e teachers that art can be learned even t h o u g h there is n o latent ability present to indicate artistic prowess. Assisting Mrs. K r u m this year has been Miss H e n r i e t t a Althuis, w h o ably carries on the w o r k of emp h a s i z i n g the d e v e l o p m e n t of greater artistic appreciation a m o n g children. H e r art courses f o r elementary teachers prove a b o o n in p r o v i d i n g material experience with art work in all grades.

DEPARTMENT OF HOME ECONOMICS MISS L A V I N A C A P P O N It is natural f o r college girls to wish to become f a m i l i a r with h o m e economics. T o satisfy this desire, neat and capable Miss Lavina C a p p o n , teacher and dietitian at H o l l a n d J u n i o r H i g h School, has become a m e m b e r of our faculty. Miss C a p p o n is k n o w n f o r all her g o o d o l d - f a s h i o n e d " dishes, yet she is aware of the m o d e r n advancements in t h e art of f o o d p r e p a r a t i o n and p l a n n i n g balanced diets. A n evidence of this proficiency is her well m a n a g e d cafeteria at the junior h i g h . H e r college students f o u n d Miss C a p p o n ' s classes e n l i g h t e n i n g and instructive both in actual practice and lectures.

DEPARTMENT OF LIBRARY SCIENCE MISS M A R G A R E T GIBBS A familiar figure in Graves Library is Miss M a r g a r e t Gibbs, w h o in coordination with her well trained assistants, keeps t h e affairs of the library r u n i n g smoothly. Patience and u n d e r s t a n d i n g are t w o essential qualities of a college librarian a n d Miss G i b b s seems to have an a b u n d a n c e of each. She deals firmly and directly w i t h student problems, such as queries about t h e location of material on ant eaters, Ptolemy's geocentric theory of t h e universe, or t h e w h e r e a b o u t s of last W e d n e s d a y ' s sports page. As librarian and general a d m i n i s t r a t o r . Miss G i b b s aids students w h o come to her for reference a n d i n f o r m a tion and carefully selects t h e books to be purchased f o r the library. All in all, her g e n e r o u s h e l p f u l n e s s and u n c o m m o n k n o w l e d g e of library science have m a d e her indispensible to t h e college.

/

Louise K r u m

Levina C a p p o n B.S.

Margaret Gibbs A.B.,

B.S.

i

'Straight lines, please "

"Salad or S o u p ? "

"Term Paper?"

25


/

I Laura Boyd A.B., A . M .

Elizabeth

Lichty

A.B., A.M., P h . D .

V Mrs. Peter Prins A.B.,

A.M.

DEPARTMENT OF LANGUAGES Dr. ELIZABETH L I C H T Y " T o u r n e z a' la page dix sept et — — " and the French class officially convenes. A typical lesson m i g h t include a conjugation of an irregular verb, a c a ter F R E N C H ^ P f r o r n Rousseau's " E m i l e , " or a dramatization in French conversation. D r . Elizabeth Lichty's lively nearly French mannerisms and her u n i q u e descriptions of her trip to France are matters of g e n u i n e interest to her stud e n t s ; and her class lectures are indicative of a t h o r o u g h , keenly intelligent m i n d . Thomas A.B.,

E. W e l m e r s A.M.,

Albert Timmer

B.D.

A.B.,

A.M.

MISS L A U R A B O Y D G E R M A N U n d e r s t a n d i n g and willing. Miss Laura Boyd is a sympathetic counsellor as well as an effective capable teacher of G e r m a n g r a m m a r and literature. H e courses are enlivened by her selective wit and her efficiency is felt in many parts of the campus life, f o r it is t h r o u g h her u n t i r i n g and ingenious efforts that the yearly social calendar continues to f u n c t i o n smoothly. MRS. P E T E R P R I N S S P A N I S H W h e r e v e r a good time is enjoyed, there you will find vivacious, sparkling Mrs. Peter Prins, her typical warm Latin personality investing in the gaity of t h e occasion. U n d e r her interested direction a Spanish Sing has been organized this year to fulfill t h e student d e m a n d ; taking the place of a language club in that d e p a r t m e n t . Mrs. Prins holds f o r t h w i t h equal zeal and animation on Spanish and French. PROFESSOR ALBERT T I M M E R L A T I N " A m o , amas, amat T h i s is the usual extent of a college student's recollection of that dead and ancient language — Latin. H o w e v e r , happily, we at H o p e boast of many students w h o have acquired an interest which spurs them on to search f o r the b e a u t i f u l diction of Virgil, and the literary g e m s of Livy and Horace. T h i s interest can be attributed to t h e teaching of our own Professor Albert T i m m e r . PROFESSOR T H O M A S W E L M E R S G R E E K V i g o r o u s and explosive, Thossy, as he is familiarly called, has a rigid standard f o r life as well as certain tenacious ideas concerning education that are conductive to thinking. H i s decisive and vehement m e t h o d of teaching Greek and Latin is a u g m e n t e d by his keen sense of h u m o r . His traditional hospitality is displayed admirably at T h a n k s g i v i n g w h e n h e is host to his Greek and Latin students. Cheese Cake?'

Must be a French novel!

D i e Lehrerin!


i

vk. Mrs. W . Curtis Snow

Reba Burrows

A.B,

A.B.,

B.Mus.,

rfrs

r

Mrs. Harold Karsten

Mus.M.

MRS. W . C U R T I S S N O W Friendly and u n d e r s t a n d i n g , M r s . Curtis W . Snow, directs the varied activities of the music department. M a k i n g a h o m e f o r her family, w o r k i n g in t h e community and in her church are only a f e w duties that c o m m a n d her attention. Yet, with all this, she skillfully and encouragingly gives a f u l l day's schedule of piano a n d organ lessons and enthusiastically leads the C h a p e l Choir and Girls' G l e e Club. All w h o k n o w M r s . Snow find her a d e l i g h t f u l c o m p a n i o n ; a capable teacher and director. MISS R E B A B U R R O W S Vitality and cheerfulness p r e d o m i n a t e in the personality of Miss Reba Burrows, associate professor of music. In addition to teaching and advising Alcor, she directed the choir of First R e f o r m e d Church. Miss Burrows had the ability to u n d e r s t a n d the student's viewpoints; t h e r e f o r e she consciously a t t e m p t e d to m a k e her classes u s e f u l and appealing. MRS. H A R O L D K A R S T E N

Stanley Baughman

T h e cultural and musical inclinations of many students have been encouraged by various courses offered at H o p e . T h e music d e p a r t m e n t is f o r t u n a t e in h a v i n g the musical talent of Mrs. H a r o l d Karsten at its disposal. Capable, efficient and friendly, Mrs. Karsten is admired by her students of piano, on the campus and in H o l l a n d . MR. S T A N L E Y B A U G H M A N Friendly a n d cheerful, M r . Stanley B a u g h m a n , voice teacher, takes a personal interest in his students. H a v i n g a fine voice h i m s e l f , he finds little difficulty in h e l p i n g others improve their singing. Living in G r a n d Rapids, he is the organist and choir director of the W e s t m i n s t e r Presbyterian Church of that city.

B.S.,

A.M.

n ^

f-

MR. P A L M E R Q U A C K E N B U S H A new m e m b e r of H o p e ' s faculty, M r . Palmer Quackenbush, is the head of the music department of G r a n d H a v e n H i g h School as well as the director of the W e s t Shore Symphony Orchestra. A n accomplished violinist, as well as an excellent director, M r . Quackenbush gives lessons to violin and viola students. A l t h o u g h new at H o p e , the patience and skill of M r . Q u a c k e n b u s h have w o n the admiration of his students. LIEUT. R O B E R T W . C A V A N A U G H

Palmer Quackenbush

A l t h o u g h on active duty with the U n i t e d States Navy, Lieutenant Robert W . Ca v a n a u g h retains a special place in the affections of all "Hopeites." N o n e can f o r g e t his heartfelt direction of T h e Messiah or his droll pleasantries d u r i n g chapel choir rehearsals. "Music is our Passion!

Robert Cavanaugh, U S.N.R A.B.. B . M u s . , M u s . M .


CARNEGIE GYMNASIUM •

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W i l l i a m Schrier A.B.,

A.M.

John Hains A.B.,

B.D.

DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH PROF. W I L L I A M S C H R I E R Are you one of t h e students whose knees quake every time public speaking is m e n t i o n e d ? T o counteract this "audience fright, H o p e College offers a varied speech p r o g r a m supervised by the extraordinary Professor Schrier. Because of the requirement that all f r e s h m e n take speech, a new f o u n d poise is developed a m o n g first year students, which is so valuable at that time in college. In t h e advanced speech and debate courses, the attention given to rhetoric, audience contact, posture and any speech i m p e d i m e n t s and the s h a r p analysis of logic in individual speeches have p r o d u c e d an excellent record for Hope in forensics. This year f o u n d

Professor Schrier at the University of

M i c h i g a n w h e r e he is w o r k i n g on the thesis f o r his doctorate. D u r i n g his absence we have had the pleasure of studying speech with the R E V E R E N D B A S T I A N K R U I T H O E and M R . J O H N H A I N S . T h e latter has m a d e an excellent coach f o r t h e debate squad, f o r his youth and enthusiasm are an inspiration to the team. Reverend K r u i t h o f substituted in the speech and English d e p a r t m e n t s d u r i n g both semesters; in the first semester, he presented a course in oral interpretation which improves the r e a d i n g ability and adds m e a n i n g to the texts of ministers a n d teachers. In the second semester, he offered an excellent study of M i l t o n , which became an inspiration f o r all students. Reverend K r u i t h o f injected an excellent philosophy of life which Christians m i g h t well follow.

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION MR. J O H N S C H O U T E N

John Schouten

S i n g l e h a n d e d , J o h n H . L. Schouten ( " J a c k " to y o u ) manages t h e affairs f o r both girls' and boys' physical education classes a n d organized sports, initiating this year a class in physical education m e t h o d s f o r prospective " g y m " teachers. Jack merits well the f o n d n e s s students have f o r him for he is a w a r m , sincere, h u m a n personality whose single standards of expectation and j u d g m e n t and u n c o m m o n faith in people unconsciously h e l p to mold y o u t h f u l characters. It w o u l d be h a r d to find a better e x a m p l e of one w h o commonly lives the g o l d e n rule than this loved, staunch supporter of youth's causes — Jack Schouten.

DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY

7 — 16 — 57 — H i p !

n

>

P R O F . E. P A U L M c L E A N

Paul McLean A.B., A . M .

Professor McLean occupies an especially w a r m spot in the hearts of d o r m girls f o r as a result of his judicious f o o d p l a n n i n g and purchasing, nutritious, t e m p t i n g meals are served. H i s unalloyed genuineness and e n g a g i n g smile, his refined levity, and his buoyant o p t i m i s m have set " M a c " apart and certainly w e r e the causes of the unmatched popularity of his classes. Fortunately, MRS. M A Y O H A D D E N , SR., supervisor of the Bureau of Social Aid f o r O t t a w a County, was able to take over f o r Prof. McLean d u r i n g his leave of absence. Her intense interest in p e o p l e and descriptions of typical "cases" m a d e her course in case problems alive and practical.

Mrs. Mayo Hadden, Sr. O t t a w a Supervisor of T h e Bureau of Social Aid


*

v

]. Harvey Kleinheksel A.B.,

M.S.,

Ph.D.

Gerrit Van Zyl A.B., M.S.,

Ph.D.

Albert Lampen A.B., A . M .

DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE DR. T E U N I S VERGEER Lone biology enthusiast is individualistic, Doctor Vergeer, the p h i l o s o p h e r - f r i e n d of so many students. H e possesses that natural love f o r youth and respect f o r personality which make f o r unusual u n d e r s t a n d i n g and sympathetic appreciation s,:uc en,: B I O L O G Y ' problems. Countless numbers of us w h o have spent inspiring " z o o " classes or have enjoyed t h e long, hot embryology labs of summer school will long remember the excellent example set f o r us by this scientist. D R . J. H A R V E Y K L E I N H E K S E L D r . Kleinheksel, c o m m a n d s respect as a chemist, inspires zeal as a professor and generates w a r m t h and confidence as a f r i e n d . T h o u g h reserved in m a n n e r Teunis Vergeer C H E M I S T R Y Clarence Kleis and f o r m a l in teaching methods, D r . A.B., M . S . , P h . D . A.B., A . M . Kleinheksel reveals, at strategic intervals, a suppressed but refined and ingenious sense of h u m o r which lightens the b u r d e n of many an oral quiz or abstruse class lecture. DR. G E R R I T V A N Z Y L A m i a b l e and pleasant, with a keen wit any Irishman would envy, is Doctor Gerrit V a n Zyl, head of the chemistry d e p a r t m e n t and t h e most elusive " p r o f " in the science building. " D o c , " as he is k n o w n affectionately to all chem majors, t h o u g h moderate of stature, is mighty in great-minded inspiration. N o one C H E M I S T R Y w h o has ever come u n d e r t h e influence of this quiet, kindly man can soon forget his subtle classroom h u m o r or the f r i e n d l y bits of encouragement given in difficult m o m e n t s of " l a b . " PROFESSOR ALBERT L A M P E N D e e p in the realms of trigonometry, analytics, and calculus dwells Professor Albert Lampen. T h e r e ' s no time for a cat-nap in his classes; it takes both eyes, both ears, an alert m i n d , and plenty of luck to follow h i m t h r o u g h M A T H F i U A T i r * ; ^ â&#x20AC;˘ n t r ' c a , : e maneuvers of x, y, and z. Occasionally he finds it permissable to " g o off on a t a n g e n t " with a bit of religious philosophy, or to tell his students about the achievements of Pythagoras or N e w t o n or Archimedes, w h o was a "very brainy f e l l o w . " For friendliness, interest, intelligence, and unlimited patience. Professor Lampen can't be t o p p e d . PROFESSOR CLARENCE KLEIS T h e vast a m o u n t of k n o w l e d g e Professor Clarence Kleis possesses both amazes and f r i g h t e n s his students. However his classes in physics and astronomy are interesting as well as informative. M r . Kleis requires a high P H Y S I C S ^eSree excellence in the work of his students, and in face of his kindly and mild satire n o shirker can remain in his classes very long. W e prove absolutely and positively everything!


PRESENT The autumn leaves whisper together, The train whistles long and low, "All aboard" — laughing and shouting • Back to college they go. Back to the busy campus With its laughter and its noise, The cheers and jokes and singing Of carefree girls and boys. They undertake the problems Of math and chemistry, They study German, Greek and French, And the trends of history. Day-in, day-out their eager feet Rush back and forth to class, Fall — winter — spring, How quickly the time does pass. Skating in the winter, Young loves' enchanted looks, The Four-mile in the springtime — Tempt them from their books. Chapel in the morning, Vesper bells at five, Y on Tuesday evenings Keeps their faith alive. Work and play mixed together. And love and sorrow and tears, Each student helping the other, To overcome his fears.


SesuMA. Sec'y-Treas., Elaine Scholten Vice-Pres., Helen W i l h e l m President, Sarah Jack

MARY

ELIZABETH

ALDRICH,

HOLLAND,

MICHIGAN

L a t i n , E n g l i s h ; Sorosis 1, 2, 3, 4, P r e s i d e n t 4 ; S t u d e n t C o u n c i l 3, 4. V i c e - P r e s i d e n t 4 ; Y . W . C . A . 1, 2, 3, 4, C a b i n e t 2 ; M i l e s t o n e 3 ; W . A . L . 3, 4, P r e s i d e n t 4 ; W h o ' s W h o 4 ; Pi K a p p a D e l t a 3, 4, P r e s i d e n t 4 ; Alcor 4 ; French Majors' Club 3 : English M a j o r s ' Club 4 ; Musical Arts Club 2 ; Palette and M a s q u e 1; Pan Hellenic Board 4 : Voorhees H o u s e B o a r d 2 ; N y k e r k C u p C o n t e s t 2, C h a i r m a n ; C h a p e l C h o i r 1, 2, 3, 4 ; G l e e C l u b 1, 2, 3, 4 ; I n t e r s o r o r i t y Baseball 2 ; G i r l s ' V o l l e y b a l l 1 ; P u l l - T e a m A i d e I ; Senior H o n o r R o l l 4 ; C a m p u s Q u e e n 4 ; D e b a t e I , 2, 3, M a n a g e r 3-

J A N E T M A Y B O G A R T , SEA C L I F F , L O N G ISLAND, N . Y . Business A d m i n i s t r a t i o n ; Sorosis 1, 2, 3, 4, V i c e - P r e s i d e n t , P r e s i d e n t 4 ; Y . W . C . A . 1, 2, 3, 4 ; W . A . L . 3 ; F r e n c h M a j o r s C l u b 2, 3, 4, ViceP r e s i d e n t 4 ; Paiette a n d M a s q u e 3, P r e s i d e n t 3 ; Pan H e l l e n i c B o a r d 4 ; V o o r h e e s H o u s e B o a r d 1 ; May D a y Play 1 ; H o m e c o m i n g Play 2 ; C h a p e l C h o i r 3, 4 ; I n t e r s o r o r i t y Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4 ; I n t e r s o r o r i t y B o w l i n g 1 ; P u l l - T e a m A i d e 1 ; Q u e e n ' s C o u r t 4 ; Class Secretary-Treasurer 2 ; All C o l l e g e M i x e r 3, P r o g r a m C h a i r m a n 3. THOMAS DAVID

B O S L O O P E R , G R A N D RAPIDS, M I C H I G A N

G r e e k ; C a l v i n C o l l e g e 1, 2, 3MYRON

H . B R O W E R , GENEVA, IOWA

E n g l i s h ; C e n t r a l U n i v e r s i t y of I o w a 1, 2, 3. R O S A N N A A T K I N S , N E W PALTZ, N E W YORK F r e n c h ; Sorosis 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4 ; Y . W . C . A . 1, 2 ; A n c h o r 1, 2 ; M i l e s t o n e 3 ; W . A . L . 3, 4 ; A l c o r 4 ; F r e n c h M a j o r s ' C l u b 1, 2, 3, 4, T r e a s u r e r 3, P r e s i d e n t 4 ; P a l e t t e a n d M a s q u e 3 ; C o m m o n ' s C o u n c i l 3 ; N y k e r k C u p C o n t e s t 2. 4, S o p h o m o r e Adviser 4 ; May D a y 3, 4, M a y D a y C h a i r m a n 4 ; C h a p e l C h o i r 1, 2, 3, 4 ; G l e e C l u b 3. 4 ; B a n d 1 ; I n t e r s o r o r i t y Baseball 2, 3, 4 ; I n t e r s o r o r i t y B o w l i n g 2 ; G i r l s ' B a s k e t b a l l 1, 2, 3, 4 ; G i r l s ' V o l l e y b a l l 1, 2 ; T e n n i s T e a m 3 : Senior H o n o r R o l l .

MILDRED

BURGHARDT,

BROOKLYN, N E W

YORK

C h e m i s t r y ; T h e s a u r i a n 1, 2, 3, 4 ; S t u d e n t C o u n c i l 4 ; Y . W . C . A . I , 2, 3 4 - A n c h o r 3 ; M i l e s t o n e 3 ; G e r m a n M a j o r s ' C l u b 1, 2 3, 4 t r e a s urer 2. P r e s i d e n t 3 ; Scalpel C l u b 1. 2, 3, 4, P r e s i d e n t 4 ; C h e m i s t r y C l u b 4 ; P a l e t t e and M a s q u e 3 ; I n t e r s o r o r i t y Baseball 1, 2 3, 4. C a p t a i n 3 ; G i r l s ' B a s k e t b a l l I , 2. 3 ; G i r l s ' V o l l e y b a l l 1. 2 3 ; PullT e a m A i d e 2 ; D i r e c t o r of F r o s h - S o p h I n f o r m a l G a m e s 4 ; A l l - C o l l e g e M i x e r 3 ; M a y D a y 2.

M . E. Aldrich, R. Atkins, J. M . Bogart, T . D . Boslooper, M . H . Brower, M . L. Burghardt,


First Row: R. E. Commeret, C. M . C r a w f o r d , D . M . Cross, M . Curtis, J. S. D e W i t t , H . D u M o n t . Second Row: E. J. Everse, V. M . Glewen, F. G. Grote, B. M . H i b m a , R. Hine, M . J. Hubers.

R A Y M O N D E. C O M M E R E T , BROOKLYN, N E W YORK P h i l o s o p h y ; G o r d o n C o l l e g e 1, 2 ; Y . M . C . A . 3, 4 ; M i l e s t o n e 3 ; A l p h a Chi 3, 4 ; P h i l o s o p h y C l u b 3, 4 . CONSTANCE M. C R A W F O R D ,

SCHENECTADY, N E W Y O R K

E n g l i s h ; D e l t a P h i 1, 2, 3, 4, T r e a s u r e r 3, V i c e - P r e s i d e n t 4 ; Y . W . C . A . 1, 2 ; A n c h o r 1, 2, 3, F e a t u r e E d i t o r 2, A s s o c i a t e E d i t p r 3 ; M i l e s t o n e 3, Associate E d i t o r ; A l c o r 4, V i c e - P r e s i d e n t ; F r e n c h M a j o r s ' C l u b 1, 2, 3, T r e a s u r e r 3 ; E n g l i s h M a j o r s ' C l u b 4 ; M u s i c a l A r t s C l u b 1, 2 ; P a n H e l l e n i c B o a r d 3, 4 ; May D a y 3, P r o g r a m C h a i r m a n ; C h a p e l C h o i r 2, 3 ; G l e e C l u b 2, 3, 4 ; I n t e r s o r o r i t y B o w l i n g 2, C a p t a i n ; Senior H o n o r R o l l ; E x t e m p o r e C o n t e s t 1.

ELEANOR

J.

EVERSE,

GRANDVILLE, MICHIGAN

E c o n o m i c s , E n g l i s h ; D e l p h i 1, 2, 3, P r e s i d e n t 3 ; S t u d e n t C o u n c i l 3, Y . W . C . A . 3 ; A n c h o r 1 ; W . A . L . 2 ; W h o ' s W h o 3 ; Pi K a p p a D e l t a 2, 3, D e b a t e M a n a g e r 3 ; A l c o r 3 ; E n g l i s h M a j o r s ' C l u b 2, 3, SecretaryT r e a s u r e r 3 ; V o o r h e e s H o u s e B o a r d 1, 3, Social C h a i r m a n 3 ; N y k e r k C u p C o n t e s t 1 ; S e n i o r H o n o r R o l l 3 ; D e b a t e 1, 2. V E L M A G L E W E N , W A U P U N , WISCONSIN E n g l i s h ; S u m m e r S c h o o l , U n i v e r s i t y of W i s c o n s i n , 1943-44 ; D e l t a Phi 1, 2, 3, V i c e - P r e s i d e n t 3, Secretary 3 ; Y . W . C . A . 2, 3 ; M i l e s t o n e 2 ; V o o r h e e s H o u s e B o a r d 3 ; C o m m o n ' s C o u n c i l 2 ; I n t e r s o r o r i t y Baseball 2 ; Intersorority Bowling 1 ; Girls' Volleyball 1 ; English M a j o r s ' C l u b 2, 3.

D O R O T H Y M . C R O S S , N I A G A R A FALLS, N E W Y O R K

FRIEDA

B i o l o g v ; D e l p h i 1, 2, 3, 4 ; S t u d e n t C o u n c i l 3, S e c r e t a r y ; A n c h o r 1, 2, 3. 4, Assistant Business M a n a g e r 3, Business M a n a g e r 4 ; M i l e s t o n e 3 ; W . A . L . 1, 2 ; W h o ' s W h o 4 ; A l c o r 4 ; F r e n c h C l u b 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Scalpel C l u b 2, 3, 4 ; M u s i c a l A r t s 1, 2, 3 ; H o u s e B o a r d , P r e s i d e n t of V a n Vleck 3, T r e a s u r e r 3 ; C h a p e l C h o i r 1, 2 ; G l e e C l u b 2, 3, 4 ; O r c h e s t r a 4 ; I n t e r s o r o r i t y Baseball 1, 2, 3 ; I n t e r s o r o r i t y B o w l i n g 1, 2, 3 ; T e n n i s 1 ; P u l l - T e a m A i d e 1 ; S e n i o r H o n o r R o l l ; A s s i s t a n t s n i p in P h y s i o l o g y t o the U n i v e r s i t y of I l l i n o i s ; D e b a t e 1, 2 ; B i o l o g y Prize 4 .

M u s i c ; D o r i a n 1, 2, 3, 4, T r e a s u r e r 2, Secretary 3 ; Y . W . C . A . 1, 2, 3, 4, C a b i n e t 3 ; A n c h o r 3 ; M i l e s t o n e 3 ; W . A . L . 3, 4, Secretary 4 ; W h o ' s W h o 4 ; G e r m a n M a j o r s ' C l u b 2, 3 ; M u s i c a l Arts C l u b 1, 2, 3, 4, P r e s i d e n t 4 ; H o m e c o m i n g 4, M u s i c C h a i r m a n 4 ; C h a p e l C h o i r 1, 2, 3, 4, P r e s i d e n t 3, 4 ; G l e e C l u b 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Sextet 3 ; I n t e r s o r o r i t y Baseball 2, 3 ; I n t e r s o r o r i t y B o w l i n g 3, T e a m C a p t a i n ; Q u e e n ' s C o u r t 4 ; S c h o l a r s h i p to U n i v e r s i t y of M i c h i g a n S c h o o l of M u s i c ; F r e s h m a n P i a n o S c h o l a r s h i p ; M i x e d Q u a r t e t 4 ; J o i n t V o i c e Recital 4 ; J u n i o r a n d Senior P i a n o Recitals.

M A R J O R Y C U R T I S , HUDSONVILLE, MICHIGAN M a t h e m a t i c s ; T h e s a u r i a n 4 ; S e n i o r H o n o r R o l l ; Class V a l e d i c t o r i a n ; S o p h o m o r e Bible P r i z e ; J u n i o r Bible P r i z e .

B E R N I C E H I B M A , HOLLAND, MICHIGAN E l e m e n t a r y E d u c a t i o n ; T h e s a u r i a n 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Y . W . C . A . 4 ; M u s i c a l A r t s C l u b I , 2, 3, 4 ; I n t e r s o r o r i t y Baseball 2, 3 ; G i r l s ' B a s k e t b a l l 2 ; Girls' Volleyball 2 ; Elementary Club 4.

JANE SMIES DE

R I C H A R D H I N E , C H I C A G O , ILLINOIS P h i l o s o p h y ; C o s m o p o l i t a n 2 ; T r i A l p h a 3, 4, Secretary 3, P r e s i d e n t 4 ; Y . M . C . A . 1, 2, 3, 4, P r e s i d e n t 4 ; M i l e s t o n e 3 ; A l p h a Chi 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3. P r e s i d e n t 4 ; P h i l o s o p h y C l u b 2, 3 ; I n t e r f r a t e r n i t y Basketb a l l 1, 2 ; I n t e r f r a t e r n i t y B o w l i n g 2 ; I n t e r f r a t e r n i t y S o f t Ball 1, 2 ; P u l l T e a m 1 ; D e b a t e 4.

WITT,

SHEBOYGAN, WISCONSIN

E l e m e n t a r y E d u c a t i o n ; D e l p h i 1, 2, 3, 4, P r e s i d e n t 4 ; Y . W . C . A . 1, 2, 3, 4, C a b i n e t 3 ; M u s i c a l A r t s C l u b 1, 2, 3, 4 ; P a n H e l l e n i c B o a r d 4 ; V o o r h e e s H o u s e B o a r d 2, 4, P r e s i d e n t 4 ; N y k e r k C u p C o n t e s t 1, 2 ; May D a y 2 ; H o m e c o m i n g 4 ; C h a p e l C h o i r 1, 2, 3, 4 ; G l e e C l u b 3, 4 ; I n t e r s o r o r i t y B o w l i n g 2, 3 ; G i r l s ' B a s k e t b a l l 1, 2 ; E l e m e n t a r y T e a c h e r s ' C l u b 4. H E R B E R T D U M O N T , SCHENECTADY, N E W Y O R K G r e e k ; A l p h a C h i 1, 2, 3, V i c e - P r e s i d e n t 3 ; P h i l o s o p h y C l u b 2, 3 ; C h a p e l C h o i r 1, 2, 3, 4 .

GRACE

GROTE,

MARCIA HUBERS, Social S t u d i e s , E n g l i s h ; Treasurer 4 ; Y . W . C . A . 4 ; Girls' Basketball 4 ;

HOLLAND, MICHIGAN

BOYDEN, IOWA N o r t h w e s t e r n J u n i o r C o l l e g e 1, 2 ; S i b y l l i n e 4, 4 ; English M a j o r s ' C l u b 4 ; P a l e t t e a n d M a s q u e Anchor 4.

• 57


SARAH Relieious Council President

J A C K , FAIRMONT, W E S T VIRGINIA E d u c a t i o n ; T e n n e n t C o l l e g e I , 2 ; T h e s a u r i a n 3, 4 ; S t u d e n t 3 ; Y . W . C . A . 3, 4 ; P a n H e l l e n i c B o a r d 4 ; S e n i o r Class 4.

M A R I E J E N K I N S , N E W PALTZ, N E W YORK E n g l i s h ; D o r i a n 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2 V i c e - P r e s i d e n t 3 ; Y . W . C . A . 1, 2, 3, 4, C a b i n e t 3 ; A n c h o r 1, 2, 3, 4, Society E d i t o r 3, 4 ; M i l e s t o n e 3 - A D D 2 3 4, V i c e - P r e s i d e n t 4 ; E n g l i s h M a j o r s C l u b 3, 4, ViceP r e s i d e n t 3 ; G e r m a n M a j o r s ' C l u b 2 ; P a l e t t e a n d M a s q u e I, 3 ; P a n H e l l e n i c B o a r d 4, Secretary 4 ; V o o r h e e s H o u s e B o a r d 2 ; May D a y 3 ; P u l l - T e a m A i d e 2 ; J u n i o r E n g l i s h Prize 3. M Y R A K L E I S , HOLLAND, MICHIGAN M a t h e m a t i c s ; S i b y l l i n e I , 2, J , 4, P r e s i d e n t 4 ; Y . W . C . A . 1, 2, 3, 4 ; M i l e s t o n e 3 ; W . A . L . 3. 4, V i c e - P r e s i d e n t 4 ; W h o s W h o 4 ; A l c o r 4 ; G e r m a n M a j o r s ' C l u b 4 ; M u s i c a l A r t s 3, 4 ; P a n H e l l e n i c B o a r d 4 ; N y k e r k C u p C o n t e s t 3 ; C h a p e l C h o i r 2, 3 ; G l e e C l u b 2. 3, 4 Presid e n t 4, A c c o m p a n i s t 3 : P u l l - T e a m A i d e 1 ; S e n i o r H o n o r Roll 4 ; Q u e e n ' s C o u r t 4 ; J u n i o r Class P r e s i d e n t . S H I R L E Y L E M M E N , HOLLAND, MICHIGAN E l e m e n t a r y E d u c a t i o n ; Sibylline I , 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2, V i c e - P r e s i d e n t 4 : Y . W . C . A . I , 3, 4 ; G e r m a n M a j o r s ' C l u b 3 ; M u s i c a l A r t s C l u b 4 ; Palette and Masque 4 ; Intersorority Baseball 3 ; Girls' Basketball 4 ; Girls' Volleyball 4 ; Elementary Club 4. I R E N E A. L U N D I E , HOLLAND, MICHIGAN H i s t o r y , E n g l i s h ; D e l p h i 1, 2, 3, 4, P r e s i d e n t 4 ; Y . W . C . A . I , 2, 3, 4, C a b i n e t 4 ; M i l e s t o n e 3 ; W . A . L . 3 ; A . D . D . 2 3. 4 P r e s i d e n t 4 ; A l c o r , S e c r e t a r y - T r e a s u r e r 4 ; E n g l i s h M a j o r s ' C l u b 3, 4. V i c e - P r e s i d e n t 4 ; Palette and Masque 3 ; Pan Hellenic Board4 4 ; H o m e c o m i n g 4 ; Q u e e n ' s C o u r t 4 ; S e c r e t a r y - T r e a s u r e r J u n i o r Class. H A R R I E T M A A T M A N , KALAMAZOO, MICHIGAN E n g l i s h ; Sibylline 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3, P r e s i d e n t 4 ; M i l e s t o n e 3 ; W A L 3 ' A . D . D . 2, 3, 4 ; W h o ' s W h o 4 ; E n g l i s h M a j o r s C l u b 4 ; Scalpel C l u b 4 ; P a n H e l l e n i c B o a r d 4. P r e s i d e n t 4 ; H o u s e B o a r d , V o o r h e e s H a l l 2 ; I n t e r s o r o r i t y Baseball I , 2, 3 ; Q u e e n ' s C o u r t 4 ; Y . W . C . A . 1, 2, 3, 4, T r e a s u r e r 3, P r e s i d e n t 4 .

M . P A U L I N E N A A S , ROCHESTER, N E W YORK P r e - M e d i c a l ; D o r i a n I , 2, 3, 4, V i c e - P r e s i d e n t 4 ; Y . W . C . A . I , 2, 3, 4 ; A n c h o r 4, C a m p to C a m p u s E d i t o r 4 ; M i l e s t o n e 3, 4 ; W h o ' s W h o 4 ; G e r m a n M a j o r s C l u b 2, 3, 4 ; Scalpel C l u b 1, 2, 3, 4, T r e a s u r e r 3 ; M u s i c a l A r t s C l u b 4 ; O r c h e s t r a 4 ; I n t e r s o r o r i t y Baseball 2, 3 ; I n t e r sorority Bowling 2 ; Girls' Basketball 2 ; Girls' Volleyball 2 ; Pull-Team A i d e 2.

V E R A J . P E N N I N G S , ORANGE CITY, IOWA Elementary Education; Northwestern Junior College, I o w a ; Sibylline 3, 4, Secretary 4 ; Y . W . C . A . 1, 2, 3, 4, W . A . A . 2 ; Pan H e l l e n i c B o a r d 4 ; C h a p e l C h o i r 1, 2, I 2 4 ; I n t e r s o r o r i t y Baseball 3 ; G i r l s ' B a s k e t b a l l 1, 2 ; ball 1, 2.

O r a n g e City, C a b i n e t 2, 4 ; 3 ; Glee Club Girls' Volley-

G E O R G E C A L V I N P O P P E N , BELMOND, IOWA H i s t o r y ; C e n t r a l C o l l e g e 1, 2, 3 ; T r i A l p h a 4 ; Y . M . C . A . 4, C a b i n e t 4 : A l p h a Chi 4 .

R U T H A N N P O P P E N , HOLLAND, MICHIGAN E l e m e n t a r y E d u c a t i o n ; T h e s a u r i a n 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3, P r e s i d e n t 4 ; W h o ' s W h o 4 ; M u s i c a l Arts I , 2, 3, 4, S e c r e t a r y - T r e a s u r e r 4 ; P a n H e l l e n i c B o a r d 4 ; C h a p e l C h o i r 1, 2, 3, 4 ; G l e e C l u b I , 2, 3, 4, T r e a s u r e r 4 ; Mixed Q u a r t e t 4 ; E l e m e n t a r y C l u b 4.

M A R G E R Y P R I N C E , HOLLAND, MICHIGAN E n g l i s h ; D o r i a n I , 2, 3. 4, Secretary 2, P r e s i d e n t 4 ; S t u d e n t C o u n c i l 3, Social C h a i r m a n 3 ; Y . W . C . A . I , 2, 3, 4, Mission C h a i r m a n 4 ; W . A . L 4 ; W . A . A . 3, 4, T r e a s u r e r 4 ; F r e n c h M a j o r s ' C l u b 2 ; English M a j o r s ' C l u b 3, 4 ; G e r m a n M a j o r s ' C l u b I ; I n t e r s o r o r i t y Baseball 1, 2, 3 ; G i r l s ' V o l l e y b a l l 1, 2 ; S e n i o r H o n o r R o l l .

E V E L Y N R E U S , G R A N D RAPIDS, M I C H I G A N S c i e n c e ; Sibylline 1, 2, 3. 4, V i c e - P r e s i d e n t 4, T r e a s u r e r 3 ; Scalpel C l u b 2, 3, 4 ; May D a y , Daisy C h a i n ; B a n d 1 ; I n t e r s o r o r i t y Baseball 1.

First R o w : S. H . Jack, M . Jenkins, M . J. Kleis, S. A. Lemmen, I. Lundie, H . A. M a a t m a n . Second Row: M . P. Naas, V. J. Pennings, G. Poppen, R. A. P o p p e n , M. N . Prince, E. M . Reus.

38


EDNA

MAY

RICHARDS,

FLUSHING, N E W

YORK

SCHOOLCRAFT, MICHIGAN

E l e m e n t a r y E d u c a t i o n ; W e s t e r n M i c h i g a n C o l l e g e 1, 2 ; T h e s a u r i a n 3, 4, P r e s i d e n t 4 ; Y . W . C . A . 3, 4 ; A n c h o r 3, 4, C i r c u l a t i o n M a n a g e r 4 ; Pan H e l l e n i c B o a r d 4 ; I n t e r s o r o r i t y B a s e b a l l 3, 4 ; E l e m e n t a r y Club 4. CONSTANCE

SCHOLTEN,

POUGHKEEP:IE. N E W

SCHOLTEN,

NESHANIC, N E W

JERSEY

E n g l i s h ; D o r i a n , Secretary 3, P r e s i d e n t 4 ; Y . W . C . A . 1, 2, 4, ViceP r e s i d e n t 3 ; A n c h o r 1, 2, C i r c u l a t i o n M a n a g e r 3, A s s i s t a n t B u s i n e s s M a n a g e r 4, B u s i n e s s M a n a g e r 4 ; M i l e s t o n e , B u s i n e s s M a n a g e r 3 ; W h o ' s W h o 4 ; Alcor 4 ; French M a j o r s ' C l u b 2 ; English M a j o r s ' C l u b 3, 4 ; M u s i c a l A r t s 2, 3, 4, S e c r e t a r y - T r e a s u r e r 3, V i c e - P r e s i d e n t 4 ; Palette a n d M a s q u e 3, 4 ; P a n H e l l e n i c B o a r d 4 ; H o u s e B o a r d , V o o r h e e s H a l l 2 ; C o m m o n ' s C o u n c i l 1 ; N y k e r k C u p C o n t e s t 1, 2 ; May D a y , C o - C h a i r m a n B a n q u e t 4 ; C h a p e l C h o i r 1, 2, 3, 4 ; G l e e C l u b 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4 ; Sextet 3 ; I n t e r s o r o r i t y B a s e b a l l 2 ; S a l u t a t o r i a n 4 ; S e n i o r Class S e c r e t a r y - T r e a s u r e r 4 . MILDRED

SCHOLTEN,

HOLLAND,

SCHUTMAAT,

HOLLAND, MICHIGAN

E l e m e n t a r y E d u c a t i o n ; S i b y l l i n e 2, 3, 4, S e c r e t a r y 3, V i c e - P r e s i d e n t 4 ; Y . W . C . A . 1, 2, 3 ; M u s i c a l A r t s C l u b 1, 2, 4 ; O r c h e s t r a 4, Secretary 4 ; Elementary Teachers' Club 4.

M a t h e m a t i c s ; W o o d r o w W i l s o n J u n i o r C o l l e g e 1, 2 ; U n i v e r s i t y of C h i c a g o 3 ; C h a p e l C h o i r 4 ; T r i A l p h a 4 ; A l p h a C h i 4, T r e a s u r e r 4 ; Philosophy C l u b 4 ; Y . M . C . A . 4 ; Milestone 4.

ROSE

SEITH,

YONKERS, N E W

YORK

E n g l i s h ; S i b y l l i n e 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3 ; Y . W . C . A . 1 ; A n c h o r 1, 2, 3, 4, F e a t u r e E d i t o r 3, 4 ; W . A . L . 1 ; M i l e s t o n e 3 ; F r e n c h M a j o r s ' C l u b 1, 2 ; M a y D a y 1 ; B a n d 1, 2, D r u m M a j o r e t t e 1, 2 ; I n t e r s o r o r i t y B a s e b a l l 1, 2 ; I n t e r s o r o r i t y B o w l i n g 1 ; S e n t i n e l R e p o r t e r 4 .

YORK

E n g l i s h ; T h e s a u r i a n 1, 2, 3, 4, S e c r e t a r y 4 ; Y . W . C . A . 1, 2, 3, 4 ; A n c h o r 1, 2, 3, 4 ; F r e n c h M a j o r s ' C l u b 1, 2 ; E n g l i s h M a j o r s ' C l u b 3, 4 ; P a l e t t e a n d M a s q u e 1 ; I n t e r s o r o r i t y B a s e b a l l 3. ELAINE

S Y L V I O S C O R Z A , ROSEMEAD, CALIFORNIA

A L F R E D R Y P S T R A . G R A N D RAPIDS, M I C H I G A N Social S c i e n c e ; W e s t e r n M i c h i g a n 3 ; F r a t e r n a l 1, 2, 3, 4, H o u s e M a n a g e r 2 ; T r i A l p h a 4 ; Y . M . C . A . 1, 2, 4 ; A n c h o r 1, 2 ; P a l e t t e a n d Masque 1 ; May Day 2 ; H o m e c o m i n g 2 ; Chapel Choir 1 ; Glee Club 1 ; Interfraternity Baseball 2 ; Interfraternity Basketball 2 ; Cheerleader 1 , 2 ; P u l l - T e a m Boys 1 ; D e b a t e 1 ; S p a n i s h C l u b 4 ; U . S . N a v a l R e s e r v e . SAUNDERS,

HARLENE

E n g l i s h ; T h e s a u r i a n 1, 2, 3, 4, V i c e - P r e s i d e n t 4 ; Y . W . C . A . 1, 2, 3, 4, CaBinet 4 ; A n c h o r 3, 4 ; M i l e s t o n e , L i t e r a r y Staff 3 ; A . D . D . 2, 3, 4, S e c r e t a r y - T r e a s u r e r 4 ; W h o ' s W h o 4 ; A l c o r 4, P r e s i d e n t 4 ; E n g l i s h M a j o r s ' C l u b 4 ; G e r m a n M a j o r s ' C l u b 2, 3, V i c e - P r e s i d e n t 3 ; P a l e t t e and M a s q u e 3, S e c r e t a r y - T r e a s u r e r 3 ; I n t e r s o r o r i t y B a s e b a l l 1, 2, 3, 4 ; G i r l s ' V o l l e y b a l l 1 ; S e n i o r H o n o r R o l l ; B i b l e Prize 1.

VERLADYNE

MICHIGAN

E n g l i s h , H i s t o r y ; Sorosis i , 2, 3, 4, K e e p e r of A r c h i v e s 2, 3, 4, T r e a s u r e r 3, P r e s i d e n t 4, S e c r e t a r y 4 ; Y . W . C . A . 1, 2, 3, 4 ; A n c h o r 1, 2, 3, 4, G i r l s ' S p o r t s E d i t o r 3, 4 ; M i l e s t o n e 3 ; W . A . A . 2, 3, 4, Secretary 3, P r e s i d e n t 4 ; A . D . D . 4 ; A l c o r 4 ; F r e n c h M a j o r s ' C l u b 2 ; English M a j o r s ' C l u b 3, 4, P r e s i d e n t 4 ; P a n H e l l e n i c B o a r d 4 ; M a y Day 3. S p o r t s - A s s i s t a n t t o C h a i r m a n ; H o m e c o m i n g 4, C h a i r m a n of Girls' F o o t b a l l G a m e ; I n t e r s o r o r i t y B a s e b a l l 1, 2, 3, 4 ; I n t e r s o r o r i t y B o w l i n g 1, 2, 3, 4 ; G i r l s ' B a s k e t b a l l 3, 4, C a p t a i n 4 ; G i r l s ' V o l l e y b a l l 4 ; Senior H o n o r R o l l .

E V E L Y N M A R I E S H I F F N E R , N E W BRUNSWICK, N . J . E n g l i s h ; D o r i a n 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 2, V i c e - P r e s i d e n t 3, P r e s i d e n t 4 ; Y . W . C . A . 1, 2, 3 ; A n c h o r 2, 3, " C a m p to C a m p u s " E d i t o r ; M i l e s t o n e 3 ; E n g l i s h M a j o r s ' C l u b 3, 4 ; P a l e t t e a n d M a s q u e 3, 4, V i c e - P r e s i d e n t 3, P r e s i d e n t 4 ; P a n H e l l e n i c B o a r d 4 ; C o m m o n ' s C o u n c i l 1 ; May D a y 3, C h a p e l C h o i r 3 ; G l e e C l u b 3, 4 ; I n t e r s o r o r i t y B a s e b a l l 1, 2, 3, 4 ; S e n i o r H o n o r R o l l ; D e b a t e 3.

JEAN

SHIFFNER, NEW

B R U N S W I C K , N E W JERSEY

B u s i n e s s O r g a n i z a t i o n ; Sorosis 1, 2, 4, V i c e - P r e s i d e n t 4 ; N e w Jersey C o l l e g e of W o m e n 3 ; Y . W . C . A . 1, 2 ; A n c h o r 4 ; F r e n c h M a j o r s ' C l u b 1, 2 ; P a l e t t e a n d M a s q u e 4 ; N y k e r k C u p C o n t e s t 2 ; May D a y 1 ; H o m e c o m i n g 4 ; I n t e r s o r o r i t y Baseball 1, 2 ; I n t e r s o r o r i t y B o w l i n g 1, 2 ; G i r l s ' B a s k e t b a l l 1, 2 ; G i r l s ' V o l l e y b a l l 1, 2, 4 ; P u l l - T e a m A i d e 2.

M A R I A N S M A L L E G A N , HUDSONVILLE, MICHIGAN C h e m i s t r y ; D o r i a n 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4 ; A n c h o r 4 ; G e r m a n M a j o r s ' C l u b 2, 3, 4 ; M u s i c a l A r t s 2 ; C h e m i s t r y C l u b 2, 3, 4, S e c r e t a r y - T r e a s urer 3, P r e s i d e n t 4 ; I n t e r s o r o r i t y B a s e b a l l 3 ; A s s i s t a n t s h i p in C h e m i s t r y at U n i v e r s i t y of I l l i n o i s .

First Row: E. M . Richards, A. Rypstra, V. Saunders, C. Scholten, E. S. Scholten, M . Scholten. Second Row: H . W . Schutmaat, S. Scorza, R. M . Seith, E. M . Shiffner, J. A. Shiffner, M . J. Smallegan.

39


First R o w : E. V. Steele, C. Stryker, B. M . Tazelaar, E. Van Leeuwen, C. M . VanLente, L. G. Vet Meulen. Second R o w : A. Voorhorst, L. W e z e m a n , H . W i l h e l m .

VERNON

LLOYD

B O E R S M A , U . S . N . R . , HOLLAND, MICH.

E V E L Y N V E R M U L M S T E E L E , R . N . , CONRAD, M O N T A N A B i o l o g y ; Y . W . C . A . 2, 3, 4 ; Sibylline 2, 3, 4, T r e a s u r e r 3 ; Scalpel C l u b 3 , ' 4 ; D o r m i t o r y N u r s e 2, 3, 4 .

Pre-medical; Fraternal.

CLARENCE

Pre-medical; Cosmopolitan.

S T R Y K E R , G R A N D RAPIDS, M I C H I G A N

Science, P r e - d e n t a l ; C o s m o p o l i t a n Chapel Choir 4.

1, 2, J a n i t o r

I;

Tri Alpha

3, 4 ;

N O R M A N R A L P H D A V I S , U . S . N . R . , FREWSBURG, N . Y .

R O B E R T G E O R G E H E N E V E L D , U.S.N.R., WYCKOFF, N . J. Pre-medical ; Emersonian.

B A R B A R A T A Z E L A A R , KALAMAZOO, MICHIGAN E d u c a t i o n ; W e s t e r n M i c h i g a n C o l l e g e of E d u c a t i o n 3 ; Sorosis 1, 2, 4, V i c e - P r e s i d e n t 4, Secretary 4 ; Y . W . C . A . I , 2 4 ; A n c h o r 1, 2 ; Pi K a p p a D e l t a 2, 4 ; E n g l i s h M a j o r s C l u b 4 , M u s i c a l A r t s C l u b 2, 4 ; P a l e t t e a n d M a s q u e I, 2, 4, T r e a s u r e r 2 ; N y k e r k C u p C o n t e s t Play 1 ; C h a p e l C h o i r I , 2, 4 ; G l e e C l u b 2 ; I n t e r s o r o r i t y B o w l i n g 2 ; G i r l s B a s k e t b a l l 1, 2 ; G i r l s ' V o l l e y b a l l I , 2 ; P u l l - T e a m A i d e , G i r l s I ; Senior H o n o r R o l l ; Debate 2 ; C o m m u n i t y Chest Speaker 2 ; Co-chairm a n C a m p u s W a r Activities 2. E T H E L Y N V A N L E E U W E N , HOLLAND, MICHIGAN E l e m e n t a r y E d u c a t i o n ; T h e s a u r i a n ; Y . W . C . A . 1, 2, 3, 4 , P a l e t t e a n d M a s q u e 4 ; I n t e r s o r o r i t y Baseball 2 ; S p a n i s h C l u b 4 .

HARVEY

THOMAS

SEMINARY, M A P L E

HOEKSTRA,

WESTERN

THEOLOGICAL

LAKE, MINNESOTA

Philosophy. M A U R I C E C H A R L E S L A U G , U . S . N . R . , COOPERSVILLE, M I C H . Biology; Emersonian. LLOYD

LEMMEN,

U.S.N.R.,

HOLLAND, MICHIGAN

Pre-medical; Cosmopolitan. L E S T E R I R V I N N E I N H U I S , U . S . N . R . , HOLLAND, MICHIGAN Pre-medical; Fraternal.

C A R O L J E A N M E P P E L I N K V A N L E N T E , HOLLAND, MICH. B u s i n e s s A d m i n i s t r a t i o n ; D e l p h i 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4 ; C h a p e l C h o i r 2 ; G l e e C l u b 2 ; I n t e r s o r o r i t y Baseball 2. L O R R A I N E V E R M E U L E N , HOLLAND, MICHIGAN B i o l o g y ; D o r i a n ; Y . W . C . A . 2, 3 ; G e r m a n M a j o r s ' C l u b 2 ; Scalpel C l u b 1, 2, 3, 4 . A R L Y N E V O O R H O R S T , HOLLAND, MICHIGAN E n g l i s h ; D e l t a P h i 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary 4, V i c e - P r e s i d e n t 4 ; Y . W C . A . 1, 2 ; E n g l i s h M a j o r s ' C l u b 3, 4 ; N y k e r k C u p C o n t e s t I ; C h a p e l C h o i r l l 2, 3 ; S e n i o r H o n o r R o l l . LEONARD

WEZEMAN,

OAK

CORNELIUS WESLEY PETTINGA, BYRON CENTER, MICHIGAN

U.S.N.R.,

Chemistry; Cosmopolitan. C H A R L E S R I D E N O U R , U . S. A R M Y M E D I C A L C O R P S , HOLLAND, MICHIGAN Dentistry ; Fraternal. GEORGE

SLAGER,

U.S.N.R.,

DECATUR, MICHIGAN

Mathematics ; Cosmopolitan.

PARK, ILLINOIS CURTIS

C h e m i s t r y ; I l l i n o i s I n s t i t u t e of T e c h n o l o g y 1, 2, 3.

MURRAY

SNOW,

HOLLAND, MICHIGAN

Chemistry; Fraternal. H E L E N W I L H E L M , CANANDAIGUA, N E W Y O R K Early Elerrf-ntary E d u c a t i o n ; G e n e s e e State T e a c h e r s C o l l e g e 1 ; S i g m a Iota Beta 2, 3, 4, P r e s i d e n t 4 ; S t u d e n t C o u n c i l 3, Inter-class C h a i r m a n ; Y . W . C . A . 2, 3, 4 ; A n c h o r 2, 3, 4, Associate E d i t o r 3, E d i t o r 4 ; W . A . L . 3, M o n e y M a k i n g P r o j e c t ; M i l e s t o n e 3 ; W h o ' s W h o 4 ; M u s i c a l Arts C l u b 2 ; H o u s e B o a r d , V o o r h e e s H a l l 4, V i c e - P r e s i d e n t 4 ; N y k e r k C u p C o n t e s t 2, 3, Inter-class C h a i r m a n 3 ; C h a p e l C h o i r 2, 3 ; G l e e C l u b I 2, 3, 4 ; I n t e r f r a t e r n i t y C o u n c i l 1, Sorority A l t e r n a t e ; I n t e r s o r o r i t y B o w l i n g I , 2, 3 ; G i r l s ' V o l l e y b a l l 3 ; Q u e e n ' s C o u r t 4 ; W . A . L . 3.

• 40

DONALD HOLLAND,

EDWARD MICHIGAN

VAN

FAROWE,

U.S.N.R.,

Mathematics ; Knickerbocker. ARNOLD VAN LUMMEL, SEMINARY, PATERSON, N E W

, W E S T E R N THEOLOGICAL JERSEY

Philosophy; Emersonian.


pSixuuAe JleaxieAAAif tadau

lab tamowuHu! HONOR STUDENTS

Third Row; Rosanna Atkins, Barbara Tazelaar, C. Murray Snow, Myra Kleis.

Second Row: Margery Prins, Evelyn Everse, Mary Elizabeth Aldrich, M i l d r e d S c h o l t e n , Elaine Scholten.

First Row: Evelyn Shiffner, Arlyne Voorhorst, Margery Curtis, Edna Mae Richards.

Missing from the picture: Dorothy Cross.

WHO'S W H O

Third Row: Frieda Grote, C. Murray Snow, Ruth Ann Poppen.

Second Row: Elaine Scholten, Pauline Naas, Harriet Maatman, Myra Kleis.

First Row: Helen W i l h e l m , Evelyn Everse, Mary Elizabeth Aldrich, Edna Mae Richards.

Missing from the picture: Dorothy Cross.

/\ I

vrnJii

At a special m e e t i n g last f a l l t h e S e n i o r Class m e t to bestow u p o n

Sarah Jack, H e l e n W i l h e l m , a n d E l a i n e

in his d e t e r m i n a t i o n to carry on his e d u c a t i o n a l pursuits, a n d h a s b e c o m e f o r us a living, p o i g n a n t e x a m p l e of

Scholten t h e c h a r g e s of P r e s i d e n t , V i c e - P r e s i d e n t , a n d

Christian

Secretary-Treasurer respectively. Each Senior class h a s its

w e r e elected to W h o ' s W h o a n d thirty-five p e r cent of

distinctive

marks

of

merit

but

this

year's g r o u p

of

the

hope.

seniors

Sixteen m e m b e r s of

attained

honor

averages.

t h e senior class We

pause

to

B e i n g g r a d u a t e d this

a c k n o w l e d g e t h e a c h i e v e m e n t s of t h e class of 1945, w e

J u n e " i n a b s e n t i a " f r o m H o p e C o l l e g e is Sylvio Scorza

cherish t h e i r f r i e n d s h i p , a n d w e w i s h t h e m t h e best of

w h o h a s o v e r c o m e t h e p r o h i b i t i n g effects of i n v a l i d i s m

a c c o m m o d a t i o n s on t h e i r j o u r n e y t h r o u g h life.

g r a d u a t e s h a s m o r e t h a n usual.

41


unixMi. Fall Semester Treasurer Edith Wolbrink Vice-President Harriet Stegeman President Alan Staver Secretary Elaine Bielefeld Spring Semester Treasurer..Marion Mastenbrook

{

Third Row: D. Atkins, M. Bakelaar, E. Bielefeld, E. M. Boersma, N . Bosman, W . Brandli, J. Darress. Second Row: B. D e Vries, D . Dixon, L. Edwards, R. Ellison, C. Erickson, V. Einlaw, H . Goff. First Row: M. Gysbers, P. Haskin, M. L. Hemmes, L. Hibma, J, Huizenga, R. Joldersma, C. Kile.


First Row: R. Kip, D . Klokkert, F. Koeman, A. Laughlin, S. Leestma, G. Levy, C. Malefyt. Second Row: M. Mastenbrook, J. Muddle, E. Mulder, E. Parsons, R. Patterson, C. Peterson, E. Prins. Third Row: R. Probst, A. Rezelman, L. Romaine, H . Sawitzky, A. Staver, H . Stegeman, K, Stickney. Fourth Row: A. Sybesma, L. Teninga, A. Tuurling, J. Van Oss, B. Van Tatenhove, M. Van Vranken, L. Voss. Fifth Row: D. Weyenberg, N, Wezeman, E. W o l b r i n k ,

. astd. 43


O-'JCLt'IO'WIOSI&'A' First Row: A, Anderson, P. Barense, R. Bartholomew, B. Bilkert, V. Bilkert, I. Boer, C. Boerman. Second Row: E, Bogart, E. Bosland, M. Brouwer, B. Dalcher, M. Dame, R. Danhof, J. Decker.

{

First Row: M. L. D e Fouw, J. D e Ruiter, A. Douma, V. Dykema, V. M . Efird, M . Felton, A. Fikse. Second Row: D. Frederick, G. Gore, W . Groenewoud, W . Haak, H. Hains, P. Haskin, W . Hietbrink. Third Row: L. Hospers, D. Ingham, B. Kingsfield, M. Korteling, W . Krings, A. Lundberg, G. Maasen.


First Row: E. Meeusen, D . Menchhofer, J, Meulendyke, L. Meulendyke. Second Row: D. Mills, E. Miskotten, J. Mooi, T . Oonk.

President Treasurer Secretary' Vice-President

W i l l i a m Haak Richard Vriesman Louise Ter Beek Marion Korteling

First Row: L. Pyle, M. Reus, N . M . Ritsema, R. Scholten, R. Schuller, L. Ter Beek, B. R. Timmer. Second Row: J. T i m m e r m a n , A. Vander Jagt, A. Van Derveer, F. Van Leeuwen, H . Van Dyke, B. Van Lente, M. R. Van Saun. Third Row: E. Van Tamelen, E. M. Van Tatenhove, G. Vredeveld, R. Vriesman, M. W h i t e , M. Young, P. Voss.

43


First Row:

N . Albers, P. Andre, L. Austin.

Second Row: R. Bennet, J. A. Biddle, R. Boeikins, E. Boerman, T . Boeve, L. Bonzelaar, D . Boot.

i

Third Row: M. Boyink, M. Brewer, B. Brinkman, L. Brooks, M. E. Brower, G. Bruins, L. Bult. Fourth Row: D . Bulthuis, R. Cloetingh, R. Dalenberg, R. Dalman, M. D e Bey, I. D e Graff, I. Demian. Fifth Row: H . Des Autels, F. D e Wilde, J. De W o l f , M. D e Young, M. D e Young, G. Diehl, P. Dietrich.

Treasurer Vice-President Secretary President

Ted Boeve Ruth Hoffman Virginia Hemmes Timothy Harrison


awot First Row: R. Dykstra, A. Eilander, R. Fairchild, R. Finlaw, R, Fuller, W . Gee, J. G r u n d m a n . Second Row: R. Harmeling, T . Harrison, V. Hemmes, C. J. Hermance, J. H o f f m a n , R, H o f f m a n , I. Holt. Third Row: D. Huizenga, R. Jensen, R. Jipping, L. Johnson, L. Jonkman, M. Karsies, A. Kloosterman. Fourth Row: E. Kragt, G. Lemmen, M. Lucking, P. Macomber, M. Maurer, M. McLean, M. Mellema. Fifth Row: D. Miles, J. Mustee, C. Nyland, K. Olsen, J. Parsons, J. Pontier, R, Quant.

47


First Row: R. Raak, A. Reagen, W . Reed, L. Rove, N . J. Roy, E. Rubingh, R. Ruys. Second Row: J. Rynbrandt, J. Rypstra, F. Schaard, G. Scherens, G. Schipper, J. Sibley, L. Sikkema, Third Row: R. Simpson, W . Sivyer, M. Slinn, J. Smallegan, P. Stegenga, K. Steketee, H, Stelwagen. Fourth Row: J. Streur, E. Szporka, M. Ter Borg, E. Ter Haar, N . Vader, F. Van Bergen, I. Vander Heuvel. Fifth Row: A. Vander Hill, C. Vander Molen, N . Vander Wiere, A. Vander Wilke, D. Vander W o u d e , M. A. Van Dyke, M. Van Eck.

48


lea^in ta Sesiv

First Row: M. Van H a a f t e n , W . Van H o r n . M . Van Kleef, T. Van Leeuwen, J. Van Lopik, M. Van Oss, L. Van W y k Second Row: M . Vermaire, B. Visscher, S. Visser, G. Wagemaker, H. W a g n e r , W . W a l k e r , J. W a t s o n . Third Row: M. Westerman, D . W i e g h m i n k , M . W i e r s m a , M. L. Williams, J. W o l f , A. M. Wyngarden, J. Yuk. Fourth Row: B. Zandbergen, J. Zondag.


ACTIVITIES ALL-COLLEGE CLUBS ORGANIZATIONS PUBLICATIONS SOCIETIES


All-College Events CONVOCATION As is the custom at H o p e College we again assembled on the 20th of September in the Chapel for the beginning of another school year. Held during the mid-morning when the sun shines directly through the beautiful glass windows depicting Biblical scenes the new and old student is once again impressed with an invigorating spirit of reverence. T h e Rev. Paul Tanis spoke to us this year reminding us once again of the great heritage that belongs to the Christian college and the untold privilege we have as students of such an institution.

RECEPTION D u r i n g the evening of September 27, the faculty was introduced to the new student body, which in turn made the acquaintance of the professors. A record number, over 200 students, was in attendance. Dr. Wichers spoke a few words of "witty Wicherian welcome" intimating that he was happy to see us once more. Mrs. Snow sat at the keyboard as we renewed our unity in a period of g r o u p singing. Prof. Hinga, as Master of Ceremonies, introduced T h o m a s Boslooper and Frieda Grote who entertained with several duets. Miss Boyd, with the help of the faculty women, served refreshments during the social period.

DORM LIFE A familiar step is heard in the living room; the mailman is here â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and more quickly than any fire drill, H o p e co-eds come bounding down the stairs to look for "that certain letter." D o r m life is a gay life. Girls darting into their rooms at the call, "janitor"; water fights; cocky frosh who won't go to bed; spreads and gab fests cause activity f r o m morn 'til night. Since there are no "little angels" among dormites, a house board enforced rules and campuses for those who make themselves too much at home. Evenings in the dorm range from the lively formal parties with the faculty to the quiet, informal gatherings around the glowing fireplace; interrupted occasionally by male voices serenading from the court. However, amid the excitement of dorm existence, many girls find proper time for evening devotions. T h u s between the drudgery of unpacking in the fall and packing again in the spring â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a suitcase full of memories is stored away for future reminiscing. Good, even with rationing'

They rule the d o r m s !


of the Social Whirl GUEST SPEAKERS W h a t better way to start a new day than for students and faculty to unite in the fellowship of worship? For the H o p e College student these chapel services have been enriched by our faculty and guest speakers who spurred our efforts, widened our fields of interest and deepened our faith. Last semester Davis Edwards from the University of Chicago speech department stirred us with his dramatic monologues, a m o n g which were Daniel and W a s h e d in the Blood.'' N o r m a n Vincent Peale suggested the ameliorative quality of religion in effecting world cures. In February, our foremost speaker, Alexander Loudon, N e t h e r l a n d s Ambassador, stressed that eternal vigilance is the price of liberty. Mr. Edward Simms, director of the Brough Community Association, addressed the student body and gave his analysis of the racial problem. Dr. Luman Shafer from T h e Committee for A Just and D u r a b l e Peace; Irwin Lubbers, president of Central College; W i l l i a m H u n t s m a n , missionary f r o m Kentucky; and Sinclair T h o m p s o n , representing T h e Student Volunteer Movement — each in turn enhanced our chapel programs. O u r own former college pastor — Rev. Henry Bast — an ever welcome source of spiritual strength, returned to the p l a t f o r m in celebration of the Day of Prayer for Crops.

W a s h e d in the Blood of the L a m b "

N e t h e r l a n d s Ambassador

HOMECOMING H o m e c o m i n g was once again on H o p e ' s calendar of events and became one of the highlights of the year. Determined to continue all campus activities, W . A . L . arranged a celebration which included all previously known H o m e c o m i n g features with just one variation — there was a strictly "ladies only" football game. Co-eds filled all positions as managers, referee, linesmen, cheerleaders, water "boys" and doctors in the touch ( ? ) football g a m e played in the afternoon on the athletic field. Many of Hope's servicemen were much in evidence, especially Johnny Kleis who appeared agonized at the sight of feminine football but w h o did his best to sneak a little advice to his favorite team; and Buter and Van Lente w h o edged in to coach the announcer. In the evening a buffet supper was served in the gym. This was complemented by programs given by a quartet — Dick Vriesman, Calvin Malefyt, Frieda G r o t e and Ruth Ann Poppen, representing Musical Arts Club; and a play given by Pallette and Masque featuring that "memorable scene" between Rosemary Finlaw and Adrian Bos. Climaxing Homecoming events were the annual " O p e n H o u s e " celebrations at the three girls' dormitories. T h e newest of these. T h e Emersonian, was under particularly careful scrutiny by the men of H o p e w h o "once upon a peaceful time" occupied these same quarters. Mess! ?

Home Ground

Let's have m o r e of t h i s !

It really h a p p e n e d

H o p e ' s Navy

/

7< •

.

i

5

r


ROLLER SKATING "Quality, not quantity" partially

describes the year's skating parties, which took place at Virginia Park. They were few in number — three, to be exact — sponsored by the " Y " and the Freshmen and Sophomore classes. Added attractions, such as beginners, grabbing passing skaters, thin air, and almost anything for support, were hilarious and plentiful. Thirsty skaters could refresh themselves at any time with cold drinks. O n e or two long benches were utilized to take a short, much needed, breathing spell at various points throughout the evening.

FROSH FROLICS Green "honors" were presented at the all-college mixer and once again the humble frosh were obliged to assume their naturally submissive roles. T o make their appointment official, the usual fee was collected — an added impression of their lowly state. W a r n i n g s were issued to likely offenders, most of whom eventually offended and harvested their rewards. But — here comes the saving note. T r u e to typical freshman vivacity and "eager-beaver" complex, the Frosh carried away the final victory in the FroshSoph games(?)• T h e inserted punctuation indicates the dubious attitude of one slightly battered frosh following the contests. W i t h a final score of 155 to 105 to buoy them up, the frosh gave a yell for the defeated Sophs and retired wearily, content that they need not suffer the further indignity of "potting" to fellow underclassmen. Concluding the f r e s h m a n f r o l i c s c a m e that anxiously awaited evening of the Nykerk Cup Contest, when this friendly rivalry was settled advantageously for the wearers of the green. It is evident by their enthusiastic participation in all the activities of their first college year that the Freshmen have captured the spirit of H o p e College.

THANKSGIVING Thanksgiving this year felt the effects of the war when "Thossy's traditional dinner for his Greek and Latin students was held in conjunction with the dormitory dinner. This arrangement pleased everyone; especially since it gave Mrs. Welmers the opportunity to be served instead of serving. After the more than bountiful feast had vanished, Mr. and Mrs. Welmers opened their home with magnanimous hospitality. T h e afternoon swiftly passed as fun predominated, and another perfect Thanksgiving, with "Thossy" as host, concluded with a general song fest!


CHRISTMAS PARTY A dorm girl knows Christmas vacation is almost here when time comes for the Faculty Christmas Party. Co-eds hurry to press their gowns, the Christmas tree wears its festive lights, and W e d n e s day evening dinner is especially good. At eight o'clock the professors begin to arrive, and soon games are in progress. T h e program is entertaining — as only Voorhees talent can make it — some serious, some funny, with the help of our guests. Eventually Santa Claus arrives with gifts, which later bring cheer to little children of the city. T h e Freshman quickly disappear — and then, as quickly, reappear — with food! W h e n the last " M e r r y Christmas" is said, we discover that w e know our professors better — and their wives, too.

CONCERTS A valuable opportunity for the enjoyment of good music is provided by the concerts given each year. T h e 1944-45 season opened with the dedication concert of the Steinway piano by John Lloyd Kollen of Holland. T h e Community Concert Series began with an inspiring program by the renowned Coloratura Soprano, Josephine Tuminia. This concert was followed by the famous Gen. Platoff D o n Cossack Chorus which gave a superb performance of Russian songs and dances. T h e varied program for this year came to a close with a brilliant piano concert by the Viennese prodigy, H i l d e Somer.

PRAYER

WEEK

H o p e students were deeply impressed by the series i n s p i r a t i o n a l m e s s a g e s delivered by D r . Frederick Olert of Detroit, guest speaker for our Prayer W e e k . T h e theme for the week was "Christ for the Crisis" and dealt with the responsibilities of college youth in a world at war, and the effectiveness of Christ's principles for living in such a world. W e also received a rich spiritual experience from the daily eventide prayer services in the chapel as our hearts were bound more closely together in Christian fellowship.

of

DUTCH TREAT WEEK W h e n a feminine voice is overheard asking falteringly, " W o u l d you like to go bowling with me on Monday a f t e r n o o n ? " then it's Dutch T r e a t W e e k on Hope's campus. This year, in February, Hope's men enjoyed cokes, bowling, dinners, movies and walks with Hope's version of Sadie Hawkins. T h e Koffie Kletz became the Dutch-treaters retreat as each hour saw the same girl drinking another cup of coffee with a different man. T h e W . A . L . sponsored "Coketail" party and Student Council's gay "Jamboree" were highlights during the week. 55


MAY

DAY

Helen Myra Kleis Harriet Maatman

Queen Mary Elizabeth Wilhelm Irene Lundie Janet Bogart Frieda Grote

May D a y â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 1944. T h e assemblage had gathered to pay homage to beauty and intellect. First Alcor tapped its new members. Then from among our studentry six fair maidens were escorted to the throne by the retiring court to await the crowning of the new queen, Mary Elizabeth Aldrich. T h e audience was silent as she approached the retiring queen, Rose

Winstrom.

T h e crown was placed upon her head

and the sceptre given as evidence of a new reign. Her entourage quietly surrounded her as the pine grove darkened with the approach of evening. After the ceremony the queen and her retinue led her subjects to the banquet in the gymnasium.


o\A' ;

S\ 5.

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0

• H

* PICNICS T h e weather turned a trifle chilly for our final jamboree at Tunnel Park, but it would have taken more than that to call off the faculty men vs. H o p e co-ed softball game. Even with "Prexy" as umpire the g a m e had to be chalked up a draw. Prof. Kleis seemed right at home as "chief cook and . . and we must admit he fed us well. From that day on all-college picnics were voted traditional affairs.

BACCALAUREATE W e Seniors assembled for our last Sunday service in H o p e chapel on June 3. It was one of those balmy June evenings that puts spring in your step and exuberance in your heart. W a y down deep there were a few regrets — we hated to leave this, our h o m e for four years — but our responsibility as tomorrow's citizens was brought to our attention by Dr. F. M. Potter from the Reformed Church Board of Missions — instilling us, for our last time at Hope, with a faith as firm as our A N C H O R .

PtofcssV Vl0eS

COMMENCEMENT It would be inappropriate to be graduated f r o m any other place on the campus than the chapel, for here we have strengthened our spiritual relationships and learned the requisites of Christian character. And so here we gathered for the last time on June 7 as the rays of the setting sun gave added glory to the beauty of the stained glass windows. W e were led into the campus sanctuary by Valedictorian Margery Curtis and Salutatorian Elaine Scholten, to be addressed by Dr. N o r m a n Vincent Peale. As w e m a d e our last exit as students, our hearts were not heavy, but rather — eager — as we looked f o r w a r d with Christian H o p e to our tasks in the world.


Clubs Foster Pursuit Fourth Row: N . Bosman, M. Bakelaar, C. Crawford, V. Glewen, H. Maatman, E. Scholten, Third Row: M . L. A l d r i c h , M . Prince, D. Weyenberg, B. Tazelaar, M . Hubers, P. Haskin, J. Van Oss. Second Row: N . Wezeman, E. Bielefeld, E. M. Richards, M. Jenkins, A. Voorhorst, E. Shiffner. First Row: Prof. DeGraaf, Adviser; I. Lundie, Vice-Pres.; M. Scholten, Pres.; E. Everse, Sec.-Treas.; Miss Ross, Adviser.

Third Row: F. Koeman, L. Hospers, E . M e e u s e n , B, Kingsfield, D . Atkins. Second Row: B, Van Lente, J. Timmerman, B. D e V r i e s , M. Van Saun, P. Voss, G. Gore. First Row: E. Prins, Sec.; R. Atkins, Pres.; Miss Lichty, A d v i s e r ; J. Bogart, Vice-Pres.; M. Van Vranken, Treas.

L

7 Standing, left to right: A. Rezelman, M. Kleis, H. Hains, J. Decker, G. Levey. Seated, left to right: M. Burghardt, R. Kip, N . M. Ritsema, C. Kile, Vice President; Miss Boyd, Advisor; H. Sawitzky, President; E, M u l d e r , Secretary-Treasurer; P. Naas, M. Gysbers, M. Smallegan.

\

58


of Special Interest Composed of juniors and seniors, English Majors Club meets one evening each month for discussion. T h i s year the club forged ahead toward new goals under the leadership of Millie Scholten, w h o was assisted by Irene Lundie, vicepresident, and Eleanore Everse, secretary- treasjr <• t urer. In addition to the intll iCuyUfiXJ crease in their general and and specific literary knowledge, the members were drawn together in a closer relationship because of their common interest. T w o innovations this year were a magazine club and a book club. English M a j o r s w h o joined the magazine club subscribed to The Atlantic Monthly, while each of those w h o became members of the book club purchased modern novels as

well as classics, which were later exchanged at the meetings. At the end of the school year, an entire meeting was devoted to the discussion of these novels — their relative literary value and the reasons for their individual popularity. W i t h such subjects as " M a r k T w a i n , " the Literary Value of the Radio," " N a t u r a l i s m in the M o d e r n N o v e l , " "A Comparison of Stephen Vincent Benet and Carl Sandburg," " W o r k s and Significance of O ' H e n r y , " and " T h e Place and Influence of the N e g r o in American Literature," English majors improved their knowledge of literature and deepened their appreciation of it. T h e meetings engendered the members with a desire to study literature with greater awareness of its intrinsic worth and more interest in its authors.

In spite of "la g u e r r e " Le Circle Francais held its monthly "reunions" with Rosanna Atkins in the president's chair, Janet Bogart acting as vice president, Elaine Prins writing up the minutes and M a r g e V a n Vranken taking care of accounts. T h e purpose of T h e French Club has been conceded to be to memorize a great deal of French for such . « * occasions as will be appropriate, and to try valiantly to become as fluent as the faculty advisors Mile. Lichty and Mme. Prins. Meetings this year included discussions of great French literature, art, music, politics and representatives of each group. Games were played in French and a delightful Christmas party was held at Mrs. Prins'

home, with French the official language. T h e class in French conversation presented a play "L 'Anglais Tel Qu'en Le Parle" which likewise was given in the mother tongue — unfortunately there were lapses of memory; but then have you ever tried to play bridge in French — especially when you partner trumps your ace? T o increase their vocabulary and stimulate their aptness in the language, the same class instituted a French table for two weeks in the dormitory dining room — aided and abetted by Mile. Lichty whose keen ear was ever t u r n e d t o c a t c h the slightest off note of inflection or a grievous blunder in grammar. A slight fine was levied for every back sliding into English.

This year D e r Deutsche Verein m a d e a series of lecture tours, as it were, into G e r m a n y — T h e Beautiful Travel Country. Miss Boyd, with the precision and f r i e n d l i n e s s of a well informed guide, helped to keep u p progress and enriched —» our routine trips with side comin O e r m a n ments and ancedotes. O u r brief background study covered geographical G e r m a n y and historical data revealing social customs, economic barriers and cultural outgrowths. O u r study of literature was limited to some of the lesser known works of distinguished G e r m a n authors and appreciation was sought for their shorter prose and poetical works. At the Christmas season we delved into traditions, customs.

folk songs, games, and lore dealing with die Weihnachszeit. In keeping with the lighter side of life in any country, a portion of our time was reserved for a sketch of the h u m o r of the people, unearthing at the same time many types, characters, and dispositions. In making the rounds of the f a m o u s cathedrals we were introduced to t h e fields of art and architecture, and gained something of their religious significance. Succeeding tours acquainted us with the more famous scientists, politicians, and statesmen and the chief contributions of each. O u rfinalfling, apropriately enough, was in tune with the melodies of Germany's W a l t z King — Johann Strauss.

* rencn

59


in Musical

Rapids for O . W . I .

GIRLS' GLEE CLUB T h e Girls' Glee Club is one of the most active organizations on H o p e ' s campus. Composed of thirty-eight voices under the direction of Mrs. W . Curtis Snow, the Glee Club has performed for many church services, and for several cultural and social gatherings. In the fall the Glee Club learned the Dutch National Anthem and a Netherlands folk song and recorded these in Grand Rapids for the Office of W a r Information, complemented by movies of the Glee Club in authentic Dutch costumes. These Dutch songs were welcomed again by a Dutch refugee and the N e t h e r l a n d s Ambassador. February 10 the Glee Club sang for a Sunday church service in Grand Rapids. Afterward Holland High School and several churches of Holland also requested musical programs. T h e annual Glee Club concert this year was a part of commencement week program, given the evening following Baccalaureate. It was not all work and no play for there were many delightful informal suppers at Mrs. Snow's home and a formal dinner party was planned in the spring with former members of the Glee Club present.

Third Row: V. Pennings, M . L. D e F o u w , F. G r o t e , R . F i n l a w , B. Visscher, E. Meeusen, E. Scholten, R. Ellison, R. A. Poppen, H. Sawitzky, S. Leestma, M . Dame, D . Weyenberg, Second Row: M . E. Brower, A. Sybesma, H. Hains, B. Brinkman, B. DeVries, M. Korteiing, E. Mulder, M. Kleis, P. Haskin, L. Romaine, B. Van Lente, R. Probst. First Row: H. W i l h e l m , M. Brouwer, P. Haskin, M. L. Aldrich, R. Atkins, J. Smies, M r s . S n o w , Director; M. Ter Borg, E . B i e l e f e l d , M. L. Hemmes, D. Dixon, E. Shiffner.


Appreciation

Above: "Blue D a n u b e " or "Tales f r o m Vienna W o o d s " ? Below: A truly gracious artist!

MUSICAL ARTS CLUB Twice each month members of the Musical Arts meet in the music room of the chapel where members display their interest and talents in music. T h e programs are varied with instrumental and vocal solos, papers about great composers, discussion and enjoyment of classical and semi-classical records. This year Frieda Grote capably served as President with Elaine Scholten as Vice-President, and Ruth Ann Poppen as Secretary-Treasurer. T h e organization planned three impressive Vesper services this year; the first, a program in conjunction with the " Y " organizations on the first Sunday of the school year; the second, a Christmas Vesper; and the third, a vesper service on Palm Sunday which featured the initial appearance of the newly re-organized college orchestra. T h e free-will offerings from these services were given to the Red Cross. Following the brilliant concert of Miss Hilde Somer, Musical Arts gave a formal reception for her in the chapel basement. T h r o u g h o u t its existence, this organization has become of increasing importance in heightening the cultural life on the campus.

Frieda and T o m " sang in Chapel Fourth Row: E. Boerman, H . W a g n e r , J. Huizenga, N. M. Ritsema, D. Vriesman, T . Harrison, P. Naas, M. L. D e F o u w , H. Sawitzky. Third Row: M . M a s t e n b r o o k , D . Weyenberg, H. Hains, A. Sybesma, B. Hibma, L. Hospers, D. Haskin, J. Rynbrandt, N. Albers, B. Tazelaar, R. Bartholomew. Second Row: L. Hibma, E. Prins, B. Brinkman, M. Korteling, G. Gore, M. Brouwer, R. Probst, L. Van W y k , P. Haskin, R. Scholten. First Row: S. Lemmen, H. Schutmaat, R. A. Poppen, Treas.; Mrs. Snow, Adviser; F. Grote, Pres.; E. S c h o l t e n , Sec.; M . Kleis.

61


in Christian Service, Chemistry, Medicine ALPHA CHI In this chaotic world in which even the future appears dark, the need for the Gospel of Christ has become even greater. And those w h o are making preparations here at H o p e to enter the ministry have found practical help in their organization, Alpha Chi, the messengers of Christ, which provides them with new experiences as well as enlightenment. D u e to uncontrollable conditions, namely, war, the number of pre-seminary students has diminished, but Alpha Chi has still offered much to strengthen the faith and to enlarge the views of its members. T h e meetings offer opportunities to hear various speakers of repute on the various phases of the ministerial work. This year began very

appropriately with a meeting of prayer and devotion conducted by the members of Alpha Chi. In December, Mr. Thompson led the annual informal discussion meeting in which personal opinions a n d e x p e r i e n c e s are exchanged. In conjunction with Western Seminary, they heard a lecture in January by Dr. N o r m a n Vincent Peale from the Marble C o l l e g i a t e Church in N e w York City. Other meetings were as successful with such speakers as Dr. Kuyper from Western Seminary. Alpha Chi had a profitable year in spite of the war under the able leadership of Richard Hine as President, W i l b u r Brandli as VicePresident, a n d W i l l i a m H a a k , SecretaryTreasurer.

CHEMISTRY CLUB Limited activities of the Chemistry Club have not in any way affected its high standards in this, the twenty-second year of its formal existence. T h e members of Chem. Club preparing for graduate work in Chemistry still carry on with as many stimulating meetings, research papers and lectures as possible. Members who have been chosen on the basis of high scholarship, have been placed in positions of great importance and prominence in industry; and have received honors, scholarships and assistantships in the leading universities and graduate schools of the country. Dr. Van Zyl keeps in touch with his " W h o ' s W h o from H o p e in Chemistry" at regular intervals upon receipt of information concerning his proteges; a very use-

ful and satisfying hobby, we might add. This group of pre-professional chemists, with the assistance of Doctors Van Zyl and Kleinheksel, attempts to supplement classroom activities with informal discussions and provides opportunity for individuals to investigate scientific subjects of contemporary interest and to experiment with problems unearthed. Several of Hope's s e r v i c e m e n alumni returned this year to give the Chem. Club members interesting facts from their own recent experiences and furnished encouragement and impetus to enable the members to see through to their goals of scientific advancement and human enlightenment.

SCALPEL CLUB Scalpel Club is graduating! In the fourth year of its history, this reconverted Biology Club reached its peak, thus far, with a highly sucessful year and superseded the Chemistry Club as the foremost pre-professional organization. N o t only did it fulfill its purposes of giving the pre-med students and biology majors a broader concept of their work and an insight into advances in biology, medicine, and related fields, but the club added its own particular spark of life to campus activities with lectures open to the student body. These stimulating lecture meetings helped to integrate the interest of individual members and supplemented class study with additional useful, and often unusual. 62

information to the pre-professionals. T h e lecturers of the year featured Mr. Bulthuis, roentgenologist at Holland City Hospital,, who discussed the typing of blood; Dr. Tempas, a H o p e alumnus, speaking on the physiology of burns, the production and use of blood plasma in treatment; Dr. Vander Velde who presented some of the pros and cons of socialized medicine; and Mr. John Groop of the Michigan Red Cross whose talk covered some of the aspects of rehabilitation and vocational education. O t h e r meetings presented discussions of x-ray technique and its utilization, advances in physiotherapy and the final meeting climaxed the year with a panel discussion by the members.


Fourth Row: J. Parsons, J. Mustee, C. Malefyt, G . Poppen. Third Row: M. Brouwer, W . Gee, H. Des Autels, W . Krings, A. Staver. Second Row: {I. Commeret, W . Hietbrink, J. M u d d e l . First Row: W . Brandli, Rev. Hinkamp. Adviser; R. Hine, Pres.; W m . Haak.

G. Van Tamelen, M. Snow, Prof. Van Zyl, Adviser; M . Smailegan, Pres.; M. Burghardt, Prof. Kleinheksel, Adviser; G. Levey, J. Mooi.

Third Row: M. Reus, P. Barense, D . Klokkert, A. Lundberg. Second Row: L. Meulendyke, A. Van Derveer, J. Darress, R. Scholten, C. Kile. First Row: P. Naas, M. Burghardt, Pres.; Prof. Vergeer, Adviser; F. Koeman, V i c e - P r e s . ; M. Van Vranken, Sec.-Treas.

63


in Drama Fourth Row: C. Peterson, R. Jipping, P. Barense, E. Bogart, S. Leestma, L. Hospers, L. Pyle, E. Scholten, R. Ellison, A. Laughlin, R Finlaw, Third Row: L. Hibma, A. Tuurling, M. Reus, D . Frederick, J. Decker, H. Hains, I. DeGraff, E. Rubingh, J. Shiffner, B. Tazeiaar, R. Scholten, G. Bruins. Second Row: V. Hemmes, L. Van W y k , A. Van Derveer, G. Vredeveld, G. Gore, H . Goff, E. Bielefeld, R. Hoffman, C. J. Hermance, J. Sibley, E. Van Leeuwen. First Row: W . G r o e n e w o u d , C. Vander Molen, E. Parsons, VicePres,; E. S h i f f n e r , Pres.; M. Korteling, Sec.-Treas.; M. Hubers, T. Harrison.

PALETTE

AND

MASQUE

T h e lights were dimmed and the curtain went up on the production of "Memoirs of P. & M . " T h e Commons room was the setting for the first scene. T h e call to order was given by the president and the play began. A discussion ensued as the g r o u p decided which play to produce for Homecoming. There was much laughter over the plot of "Live Alone and Like It," and everyone was enthusiastic about producing it. Even the prospective audience hoped that it would be chosen. T h e first scene faded away, and the curtains re-opened to the actual production of ""Live Alone and Like it." Its great success induced members of P. & M. to plan immediately for future productions. Some of the resulting scenes were: Phyllis Barense "Getting Pinned" by T i m Harrison, Barbara Tazeiaar in the missionary play, " T w o Masters," Rosemary Finlaw and Bunny Goff showing how rebellious "two Little Rebels" can be, Angelia Tuurling as "Lady Rose," and of a play "Right About Face," in which women dominated the family life. Between acts, some members of Palette and Masque staged a typical club program given after a P. and M. business meeting. A serious paper was read on production techniques, and then several pantomimes were given. Action again took place in the Commons room, but this time it was the new president who called the meeting to order. Officers had just been elected to take the place of Evelyn Shiffner, President, Elsie Parsons, Vice-President and Marion Korteling, Secretary-Treasurer. Much action took place in this scene, for P. & M. was planning another production entitled ""Future Memoirs of P.& M . " Included in these memoirs would be scenes of artists painting canvas and making back drops, and actors participating in good three-act plays. Thus just as the biographical sketches of P. &: M. were unfolded, the dramatic club o f - H o p e College will again unfold its plans before a greater audience and will advance to new heights in the coming school year.


Campus Activities are promoted by THE STUDENT COUNCIL T h e first duty Student Council assumed in September was Freshman Initiation. T h e Frosh Mixer saw T i m Harrison, Frosh president, and Milly Vermaire, Student Council representative, first to receive their green from Student Council Prexy, Eleanor Everse, and W A L head, Mary Liz Aldrich. H a v i n g donned their traditional green, the class of '48 faithfully ( ? ) held to their colors until the " B u r n i n g " which took place immediately following the Nykerk Cup Contest. It turned out to be "hats off" to the lively class w h e n they walked off with this honor cup. This promising class also took honors in the Council-sponsored athletic contests. Prexy Eleanor Everse kept them in line, however, and very efficiently checked u p on lawbreaking. Student Council cooperated with W A L in presenting a modified version of Homecoming. A f t e r Christmas it was a week of fun with Dutch Treating. Activities were planned throughout the week climaxed with a "Coketail" Party Friday afternoon, and a College Jamboree Saturday night. T h e Jamboree was really an innovation in H o p e College history, and with " B u n n y " Goff and H a r o l d des Autel's brother as callers. T h o s e attending really had a grand time with folk games and squares. T h e Council once more affiliated itself with the National Student Federation which allowed for greater acquaintance of the work of other college student councils, and a broader view of student government. Mr. H i n g a acted as adviser during the second semester and worked with the student g r o u p in plans for further student government and services during the next school year. Other officers under President Ev Everse were Vice-President Mary Liz Aldrich, Secretary Joyce V a n Oss, and Treasurer W a r r e n Hietbrink. T h e other M e n ' s Union representative was Eugene V a n T a m e l e n ; Milly Vermaire and Marvin D e Y o u n g defended their class. R u t h Ellison, Dorothy Atkins, Pat Haskins, and Millie Burghardt represented their respective sororities. Soon after May Day, elections were held for new officers. M. Vermaire, P. Haskin, G . Van Tamelen, M. E. Aldrich, Vice-Pres.; E. Everse, Pres.; J, Van Oss, Sec.; W , Hietbrink, Treas.; M . D e Y o u n g , D. Atkins, M . B u r g h a r d t .


ALCOR

Second Row: M. Kleis, M. Scholten, E. Everse, M. E. Aldrich, R. Atkins, M. Jenkins. First Row: M i s s B o y d , Adisor; C. C r a w f o r d , Vice-Pres.; Miss Lichty, Adviser; E. M. Richards, Pres.; M i s s B u r r o w s , Advisor; I. Lundi, Sec.Treas.

1944, May Day, greatest honors were given to campus women who had fulfilled the standards of Alcor. Edna May Richards, Marie Jenkins, Elaine Scholten, Irene Lundie, Rosanna Atkins, Myra Kleis, Mary Liz Aldrich, Millie Scholten, Peggy Cross, Connie Crawford, Eleanor Everse were tapped members of Alcor — Hope's honor society for women. Alcor is the society toward whose membership all girls strive. Such membership goes only to those outstanding Junior girls who have consistently excelled in scholarship and activity participation. T h e Alcor girls, with Miss Laura Boyd and Miss Reba Burrows as patronesses and Dean E. E. Lichty as faculty adviser, evolved the idea of a

union room where late risers could secure breakfast and those hungry could do the same. Thus the Koffee Kletz was born; its growth has been rapid and successful with a large daily patronage by students, faculty and seminary men. A blue and yellow motif has brightened the room in Van Raalte — all decorations effected by the members themselves. Monthly meetings were held with a social period following. T h e members went to an opera at Grand Rapids, were entertained by Miss Lichty, and had a generally good time all year. Alcor is proud of the standards it has set up. She has few members but her influence is great because many of her members are campus leaders. W e hail them and accept the challenge with which they present us — to become, as Alcor members have, a finer type of college students.

W h a t ' s cookin', Mike.-'

John Kollen dedicated the Steinway.

Pot-Luck Supper.


W. A. L.

Third Row: E. Parsons, M . Dame, E . B o g a r t , N . Bosman, H . Sawitzky. Second Row: E. Bielefeld, H, Goff, H. Stegeman, B. D e Vries, E. Prins, E. Mulder. First Row: L . R o m a i n e , Treas.; M. Kleis, ViceP r e s . ; M. E. Aldrich, Pres.; Miss Lichty, Adviser; R. Atkins, May Day Chairman.

T h e great man shortage on H o p e ' s campus caused W o m e n ' s Activities League to become more active than ever this year. O n e of its great responsibilities was to keep all college girls active and socially entertained so that Saturday night would not become " t h e loneliest night in the week." Therefore, when Freshmen arrived last fall, the W.A.L. board was here to greet them, and in welcome, gave her a booklet containing prevue of coming events which would keep her busy until Uncle Sam released her " G . I . " A m o n g these events were: the Orientation Tea at which frosh were greeted by all former H o p e coeds, a Homecoming banquet with an all-girl's football game, coketail parties at which bridge, ping-pong and pinochle were the prominent games, and a "P.J." party at the dorm for town girls. T o prove that

girls can also have fun without a man in sight, an all-girls party was one of W . A . L . ' s main features. Freshmen and Sophomores dated faculty and upper classmen. Everyone came in costume, ranging from the Queen of Sheba to Satan himself. On the intellectual side, W . A . L . sponsored Mr. Edward Simms, w h o spoke on racial prejudices, and was a source of real interest to all. T o be patriotic, W . A . L . held stamp and bond sales, the results of which purchased a jeep; and sponsored a carnival in support of the Red Cross drive. T h e crowning of the May Queen was the final event in the W . A . L . calendar and as the girls recalled the former parties, they realized how quickly the year had passed and how well the W o m e n ' s Activity League had fulfilled its responsibilities. Twice a week

Social W o r k e r

They're real!


Third Row: R. J o l d e r s m a , R. Ellison, L. Romaine, M. Bakelaar, L. Tenninga. Second Row. J. Bogart, V. Saunders, I, Lundie, M. E. Aldrich, E. Scholten. First Row: Miss Boyd, Adviser; S. Jack, M. Jenkins, H. Maatman, Pres.; Miss Lichty, Adviser; C. Crawford, V. Pennings.

PAN-HELLENIC BOARD T h e Pan-Hellenic Board, composed of representatives from the junior and senior classes of each

decision of the majority of girls abandoned the rushing of freshmen. These freshmen will, there-

sorority, and the s o r o r i t y p r e s i d e n t s , is one

fore, become members of a sorority in their second

example of the cooperative and democratic spirit among H o p e students. T o this group are brought

year when they are better able to choose the group in which they will be the happiest. A decision was

all sorority problems, and by this group are made

reached whereby a junior with inactive status is

the rules governing certain phases of society life,

represented in the group. Also this year each girl

especially rushing.

was given a creed stating the ideals of the H o p e

Alphabetically, according to society, Pan Hel

co-ed.

elects a president for the year. Harriet Maatman,

T h e responsibilities of the Pan-Hellenic Board

the Sibylline representative demonstrated her exec-

have been especially heavy this year, with the

utive ability as president for this year.

largest number of girls ever to be on Hope's campus. But the board has shown that it has been

Jenkins,

Dorian

senior

representative,

Marie capably

filled the office of secretary-treasurer. This year the Pan-Hellenic Board, executing the

worthy of the trust that the sororities have placed in it.

WOMEN'S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION W o m e n ' s Athletic A s s o c i a t i o n , with Millie Scholten as president, began a very successful year with a Saturday morning breakfast hike. It was early, but hikers were amply rewarded during the last stretch of the "four-mile" when delicious rolls and bottles of cool chocolate milk were served. Ruthmary "Cookie" Cook arranged and organized the volley-ball games to be played every night after " Y " for a two-month period. W h e n "Cookie" left for nurse's training at the end of the first semester, Glenna Gore, a sophomore, was elected Strike, Pinks?

68

to fill the vacancy.


P. Haskin, E. Mulder, Sec.; E, Bogart, Mr. Schouten, Adviser; M. Scholten, Pres.; Miss Lichty, Adviser; L. Romaine, V. Dykema, M. Prince, Treas.

^ ii

Friday afternoons meant " b o w l i n g " at Liev-

Tennis

had

a good

season, with

Old-Man

ense's for the ambitious H o p e Keglers. Pat Haskin

W e a t h e r providing plenty of sunshine and an

and Viv Dykema collected score sheets and, inci-

early start. T h e r e were both intra-school tourna-

dentally, many a laugh, as they saw the facial

ments and matches with W e s t e r n College and

expressions that invariably accompany gutter balls.

others.

Es Bogart, in charge of basketball, organized the

W . A. A. climaxed the g r a n d and glorious year

girls into teams. Four teams were arranged and

with a " H i t

played every Tuesday night following the end of

W . A. L. Carnival; applause goes to Prexy Millie

the volley-ball

and the advisers, Lichty, Schouten, and Ross for

season.

Ginny

Hemmes'

team

the N i g g e r

Baby" booth at the

such able direction and supervision.

proved to be "all-star."

ATHLETIC DEBT DIGGERS "Substitution: A . D . D . reporting, Blue Key out!" Yes, in the vernacular of the basketball

keeping accounts, and Mr. Lampen, the adviser.

floor,

was always available and willing to help untangle

that's the story. T h e Athletic Debt Diggers were called upon to take over the book store for the tem-

the figures. For the present, the intellectual influence is appreciated but A . D . D . will gladly

porarily disbanded Blue Key.

resign its "duration role" when the time comes, in

President " I k e "

Lundie did a masterful job of ordering books and

Third Row: H . M a a t m a n , R. Ellison, H. Sawitzky, L. Teninga, E. Mulder. Second Row: M. Korteling, B. D c Vries, M. Reus, D. Frederick, B. Timmer. First Row: M. Jenkins, I, Lundie, E. M. Richards, M . Scholten.

favor of selling candy.


Third Row: E. Parsons, Big Sister; H. Sawitzky, P u b l i c i t y ; M. Young, Finance. Second Row: M . Prince, Mission; I . L u n d i e , Membership; H . Goff, Deputation; V. Pennings, Music; E. M. Richards, Personal Service. Third Row: E. Mulder, Social; H . Maatman, Pres.; Miss Gibbs, Adviser; M. L. Hemmes, VicePres.; E. Romaine, Sec. Missing from picture: B. Fuller, Treas.

Y. W. C. A.

Pres. Harriet Maatman

V, >

70

'

.

T h e Y. W . C. A. is the religious organization on Hope's campus which has become a vital part of the student's curriculum. Tuesday night is " Y night" on the campus and interesting meetings are planned in the form of talks by ministers, professors, seminary students; panel discussions on timely religious subjects; consecration meetings; and regular joint meetings with the Y. M. C. A. " Y " was introduced to the new Hopeites almost as soon as they had arrived upon the campus by the annual Beach Party at Lake Michigan. It was an afternoon and evening packed with laugh-provoking games; delicious, drift-wood roasted hotdogs and a lusty song service that bespoke complete enjoyment by all. An impressive Recognition Service welcomed the new students into the ranks of the " Y " Triangle which glorifies the Mind, Body, and Spirit. T h e annual Campus W e e k of Prayer was held in February led by Dr. Frederick Olert, Pastor of the First Presbyterian Church of Detroit, Michigan. Dr. Olert delivered inspirational and challenging messages to the H o p e students on the theme "Christ for the Crisis" in which he outlined the Christian life for youth in a world on fire with hate and sin. Y. W . C. A. also collected clothing for missions and sponsored a book drive for Prisoners of W a r . W i t h the cooperation of the churches in Holland, over four hundred books of those collected were cleaned and sent to the prison camps to cure the "barbed-wire disease" of the incarcerated service men. It bears repeating that " Y " is one of the organizations — no — not organization, but one of the experiences of college life that seems to wedge its way into an individual's life and to bring home in a new and fresh manner the Gospel of Jesus .Christ. This year certainly was no exception — " Y " served its purpose not only because of an enthusiastic cabinet headed by Harriet Maatman and advised by Miss Margaret Gibbs, but because every member took upon herself the responsibility of the success of the meetings.


T. Harrison, Social; G. Levey, Membership; R. Vriesman, Music; H . Des Autels, Treas.; R. Hine, Pres.; Rev. Hinkamp, Adviser; W . Brandli, V i c e - P r e s . ; P. Tanis, Publicity; W . Haak, Deputation; A. Staver, Mission; missing from picture: R. Schuller, Sec.

Y. M. C. A T h e limited number of men enrolled at H o p e this year in no way discouraged the Y. M. C. A.; rather we became more determined than ever to m a k e "Christ K i n g of the Campus." Aided by Rev. Paul H i n k a m p , our advisor, Wesley Dykstra and his cabinet members m a d e plans for the college year at the joint " Y " retreat last May. However W e s found himself in seminary before September and so Dick H i n e was elected to the presidency.

Pres. Richard Hine

A variety of programs were given each Tuesday night in which faculty as well as students participated. Outside speakers consisted not only of local ministers and seminary professors, but also of such men as C a p t . H o w a r d Scholten, an army chaplain w h o was in H o l l a n d a few days before going overseas; and Dr. Albertus Pieters â&#x20AC;&#x201D; professor emeritus from both H o p e and W e s t e r n Seminary and a former missionary to Japan. H o p e students have such a high regard for Rev. Henry Bast, former professor of Bible and ' Y " advisor, that they persuaded him to return in the spring to speak at a joint " Y " meeting. His message on "Stand U p and Be Counted," was not only a stirring challenge to all who heard him, but the inspiration they received was passed on to others. T h e virulence of " Y " evidenced itself most graphically this year. In spite of the fact that the enrollment was cut in half, the " Y " M i s s i o n D r i v e m a d e a new record â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the contributions totaled $1027.50. This year's Mission Project was a telephone system for the Mission Hospital at Velour, India. T h e success of the drive was due largely to the cooperation of Dr. Eva MacGilvay and Rev. Korteling, missionaries to India, and to the w o n d e r f u l spirit in which the student body responded. As we look back over this year of " Y " , we find that a closer fellowship and unity has developed in spite of small numbers and that this fellowship was accomplished not only by working together but also by laughing together, and praying together.

11


Fijth

Row: R. Vriesman, T. Boeve, J. Smallegan, L. Van Horn, W . Brandli, R. Fairchild, H . Des Autels, T. Harrison, R. Fuller, C. Malefyt, W . Hietbrink, G. Levey, P. Tanis. Fourth Row: R. Ellison, H . Van Dyk, C. Vander Molen, E. Meeusen, V. Dykema, A. Fikse, E. Scholten, P. Haskin, G. Maasen, R. A. Poppen, M. Slinn, H. Wagner, H. Sawitzky, N . Bosman, N . M, Ritsema. Third Row: M. Lucking, A. Vander Hill, R. Finlaw, F. Grote, R. Atkins, A. Wyngarden, E. Prins, B. Van Lente, C. Kile, J. Bogart, M . Dame, H. GofF, J. Rynbrandt, L. Ter Beek, L. Pyle. Second Row: R. Scholten, R. Quant, J. Sibley, M. A. Van Dyke, M. Van Saun, M. E. Brower, M . Ter Borg, E. Bielefeld, L. Van Wyk, R. Probst, D. Atkins, V. Hemmes, M. Mastenbrook, D. Weyenberg. First Row: C. J. Hermahce, A. Sybesma, R. Bartholomew, B. Brinkman, P, Haskin, Mrs. Snow, Director; L. Meulendyke, J. Meulendyke, M. Felton, G. Wagemaker, D. Dixon, L. Romaine.

CHAPEL CHOIR T h e morning Chapel services have always been a source of inspiration for each day; and this year, with the innovation of a processional hymn by the Chapel Choir, there has been a marked change in the worshipful attitude. This has been appreciated by many for the short period that it gives for reverent meditation, and also for setting the atmosphere each day. T h e choir also adds to the service by leading in the singing and giving a choral response after the prayer. This year the choir has taken an active part in special Chapel programs and Vespers. This occasional use of a formal service with a long processional and special music has added variety and has met with the approval of the student body as a whole. In case you had not noticed, there were no feminine tenors this year; but through their own efforts, the male section has been built up so that the choir has been able to use mixed chorus anthems; and although few in number, the needed

72

and appreciated tenor and bass sections have made their voices heard. W i t h this pleasant sight before her, a mixed choir of eighty voices, Mrs. Snow, the capable and energetic director of the Chapel Choir, enthusiastically conducted the choir through a prosperous year. Twice they had the honor to represent H o p e College o u t s i d e of H o l l a n d . On November 27, with the aid of the factulty-provided transportation and local train, the choir embarked for Grand Rapids to join in presentnig a festival of sacred music with the combined choirs of the Reformed churches of Grand Rapids. Second semester came with no prospect of another such appearance, but again the choir was asked to join in a combined choir in Grand Rapids. T h e united chorus performed in the Civic Auditorium and provided the music for the program which sponsored Dr. N o r m a n Vincent Peale. Thus the Chapel Choir has played an effective part in the life of H o p e College this y e a r â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 1944-45.


ORCHESTRA For years H o p e College h a d an orchestra when the enrollment was no more than it is now. W e , as a college, have always had an enviable reputation for musical prominence and have embellished such achievements with orchestral presentations. It is therefore gratifying that at last the orchestra has been reorganized and can again take its place with the musical organizations of H o p e College. Since there are always many students on the campus w h o play musical instruments, it was hoped for some time that an instrumental g r o u p

Palmer Quackenbush, Director

might be formed. T h a n k s to the organizing ability of W i l b u r Brandli and the assistance of Mr. Kleis, interested students organized with Patricia Haskin as president.

Mr.

Palmer

Quackenbush,

well

known in musical circles in western Michigan, was secured as director and W e d n e s d a y evening rehearsals began. Mr. Quackenbush was also on the campus W e d n e s d a y mental instructions.

afternoons to give instru-

appearance at the Palm Sunday vesper service caused much favorable comment, and w e are all looking forward to hearing them more often next fall. They played "Sanctuary of the H e a r t , " by Kettelby and a modern suite for string ensemble. T h e organization and formation of a g r o u p of this kind present many difficulties, but the progress has been very promising.

Several outside musicians

T h e intention at first was to have a "little sym-

helped out this year, but in the next few years,

phony," but lack of complete brass and woodwind

with increasing enrollment, H o p e College will have a good-sized orchestra. W e might say of our orchestra, "It's small but up and coming."

sections caused them to limit themselves to a string orchestra.

Standing:

The o r c h e s t r a ' s

first

public

R. Cloetingh, A. Douma, P. Naas, M . Slinn, N . M . Ritsema.

Seated: C. J. Hermance, Mrs. French, M . French, R. Patterson, A. Rynbrandt, P. Tanis, H. Schutmaat, P. Haskin, B, Van Lente, M. E. Brower, M . Felton, P. Haskin.

73


Third Row: R. E l l i s o n , R. Hine, L. Pyle. Second Row: Laughlin.

J. H a ins, A.

First Row: G . B r u i n s , E. Bielefeld, J. Decker. Missing from Watson.

picture:

J.

DEBATE

Debating this year was somewhat curtailed

Alice Laughlin and Dick Hine, affirmative;

because of the absence of Professor W m . Schrier

Gretchen Bruins and Jean Watson, affirmative;

but this loss was lessened by the substitution of

and Luella Pyle and Joanne Decker, negative. Because these debates were for practice only

Mr. John Hains. Debate records were excellent and the college is sure that when Mr. Schrier returns he will be well

satisfied with

the

progress of his proteges. T h e teams this year were composed of Luella Pyle and Joanne Decker; Elaine Bielefeld, Alice Laughlin, and Dick Hine; Jean W a t s o n and Gretchen Bruins. Although small, the squad did a commendable piece of work to make us proud of it.

On

Tuesday afternoon, February 6, three teams went to Grand Rapids Calvin College to debate on the subject, "Resolved, that the federal government should enact legislation requiring the settlement of all labor disputes by compulsory arbitration when voluntary means of settlement have failed, constitutionally conceded." T h e three teams that participated were composed of

74

there were no judges and consequently no decision was handed down. T h e next appearance was February 17 at the state tournament in Lansing where the team won five out of nine decisions. T h e colleges represented were Michigan State, Western State, Albion, Alma, Calvin, and H o p e and each of the schools brought its own judges. T h e regular speech was limited to ten minutes with a period of five minutes for rebuttal. Another showing at Kalamazoo on the 23rd of January upheld Hope's consistently fine record in intercollegiate debate. In all these events, the efforts of Mr. Hains were well rewarded and the whole college is grateful to him for his interested and generous coaching.


ORATORY H o p e has long been proud of an outstanding record in Oratory. This year, since there was no Raven Contest for men, all eyes were focused upon the Adelaide Contest for women. T h e contest occured in February, and judged Miss Luella Pyle, H o l l a n d sophomore, H o p e ' s orator for 1945. Her oration, " O u r Color-Bound Americans," dealt with our responsibilities in creating a new America â&#x20AC;&#x201D; free from race prejudice â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the America to which our fighting men expect to return. Luella represented us at Ypsilanti on March 9 in the annual contest of the Michigan Intercollegiate Speech League. Oratory this year was coached by Mr. John Hains, in the absence of Professor Schrier.

Luella Pyle

PI KAPPA DELTA H o p e has always had an enviable record of forensic accomplishments, and upperclass members of our forensic teams are eligible for membership in the Michigan G a m m a Chapter of the national honorary fraternity. Pi K a p p a Delta. Members this year were W i l b u r Brandli, Alan Staver, Elaine Bielefeld, Barbara Tazelaar, Eleanor Everse, Mary Elizabeth Aldrich, Edith W o l b r i n k , Harriet Stegeman, and Ruth Ellison. Since Professor Schrier was at the University of Michigan w o r k i n g on his doctorate, Mr. John H a i n s served as advisor for "Pi K a p . " In April, Dick Hine, Alice Laughlin, Joanne Decker and Luella Pyle were initiated into the order. At a breakfast in May, plans for next year were discussed. Mary Elizabeth Aldrich has served as president this year, assisted by W i l b u r Brandli as vicepresident, and Elaine Bielefeld as secretary-treasurer.

Third Row. Staver,

B. T a z e l a a r ,

A.

Second Row: E. Bielefeld, Sec.Treas.; E. Everse, H . Stegman. First Row: J. Hains, Adviser; M. L. Aldrich, Pres.; W , Brandli, Vice-Pres.

I

7.5


College Life THE ANCHOR T h e exigencies of war naturally incur more than the usual amount of difficulties — especially in the publishing game. T h e Anchor staff with Helen W i l h e l m , editor-in-chief and Associate Editors Ruth Joldersma and Joyce Van Oss were determined that the Anchor tradition would be maintained in spite of the emergency. T h e r e was determination about one thing — the paper's primary task was to bring to the boys overseas some of the flavor of H o p e and make them feel a bit of nostalgia for their alma mater. Special emphasis was placed on " C a m p to Campus" written by Polly Naas. Verladyne Saunders and her crew laboriously addressed some 300 copies every week to the men in the service of their country. Feature editor, Rose Seith, ordered a greater output of special interest articles for the fellows overseas. Marie Jenkins ably edited news concerning the sororities and the Men's Union. Peggy Cross managed the business staff during the first semester and after her graduation Elaine Scholten assumed the task of procuring ads to keep the Anchor financially on top. Many campus problems were discussed pro and con on the editorial page, in accordance with an attempt to gain more voluntary contributions from the readers, both on and off the campus. It was a potent factor in the revision of various campus organizations. \

W e are looking forward to the day when we can once again report H o p e M.I.A.A. champ, or holder of the latest track records in T h e Kibitzer but 'til then — we shall devote our efforts to maintaining the H o p e spirit, and advertising war bond sales and Red Cross drives. Fourth Row: D. Weyenberg, L. Pyle, C. Vander Molen, H. Wagner, P. Barense, L. Hospers, E. Meeusen, P. Naas, N . Bosnian, M . Gysbers, R. Ellison, H. Hains, V. Dykema, M . Young, A. Fikse. Third Row: G. Bruins, G. Schippers, M. Ter Borg, M. Reus, D. Frederick, M. Hubers, J. Shiffner, B. Bilkert, B. Kingsfield, M, Scholten, G. Gore, C. S c h o l t e n , M. Dame, N . M. Ritsema. Second Row: M . Mastenbrook, V. H e m m e s , L. Van Wyk, I. Vander Heuvel, J. Decker, A. Van Derveer, L. Meulendyke, J. Meulendyke, E, M. Richards, E. Bielefeld, G. Vredeveld, C. Kile, E. Prins. First Row: R. Joldersma, Assoc. Ed.; J. Van Oss, Assoc. Ed.; M. J e n k i n s , H, W i l h e l m , Editor; V. Saunders, R. Seith,


exposed by

. .

.

THE MILESTONE It has again been the privilege of the Junior class to record through our yearbook, the Milestone, the experiences of another significant year of H o p e . T h e quality of the finished product is due largely to the ability and strength expended by the editor, Alan Staver, in coordinating the efforts of all the staffs. T h e literary work, with its divergent tasks, was discharged by Elsie Parsons, the associate editor, and her staff; Dorothea Dixon, Helen Goff, Mary Lou Hemmes, R u t h Joldersma, Carol Kile, Eleanor Mulder, Roger Patterson, Harriet Stegeman and Dorothy Weyenberg. T h e necessary finances were procured by W i l b u r Brandli, business manager, and his assistants: Elaine Bielefeld, Natalie Bosnian, Betty DeVries, R u t h Ellison, Agnes Einlaw, Patricia Haskin, Marcia Hubers, Gerrit Levey, Marian Mastenbrook, Clarice Peterson, Alvin Rezelman, H e l g a Sawitzky, Joyce V a n Oss, Marjorie V a n Vranken, and Nellie M a e W e z e m a n .

Alan Staver, Editor and Photographer

4~

^J'

| J

Jtxixt t o

!S ./O X 4

Alan Staver handled the photography section with Elaine Mensinger Boersma attending to the " G o l d Star" servicemen pictures and Libby Romaine fulfilling the endless tasks connected with the student photographs. T h e art work was skillfully accomplished by Elaine Prins and Carole Erickson. W i t h gratitude, w e acknowledge the assistance of those not of our class w h o helped to m a k e our book a success — Polly Naas, a Senior; G e n e V a n Tamelen, a Sophomore; Sylvio Scorza, a former H o p e i t e confined to his home as the result of a severe automobile accident; and Mr. D e G r a a f , our faculty advisor. W e also wish to express our sincere appreciation for the cooperative support and generous assistance of Mr. Neal Steketee, our printer.

Associate Editor Parsons and Literary Staff

This year, 1944-45, has not been a banner year in which to produce a yearbook, because in each succeeding war year, materials — flashbulbs, film,, and paper — the manpower of the printers and engravers, and w o r k m a n s h i p have been drastically affected. However, having overcome these obstacles to the best of our ability, it is with pride that we, the staff, present the

1945 Milestone. Fourth Row: N . Bosman, M . Van Vranken, G. Levy, H. Sawitzky, R. Finlaw. Third Row: H . S t e g e m a n , P . Haskin, M. Hubers, E. Mulder, E. Wolbrink, D. Weyenberg, R. Ellison. Second Row: R, Patterson, C. Kile, E . B i e l e f e l d , M . L. Hemmes, D . Dixon, C. Peters o n , M . M a s t e n b r o o k , R. Rezelman. First Row: Prof. D e G r a a f , Adviser; L. Romaine, E. Parsons, A. Staver, Editor; W . Brandli, E. Prins, G. Van Tamelen.

" H o w much this time, Bill?"

I


Fellowship

DELTA PHI

Third Row: J. Rynbrandt, B. Van Lente, J. Van Oss, R. Jensen, L. Pyle, E. Meeusen, M. L. De Fouw, M . Bakelaar, S. Visser. Second Row: M . Westerman, G. Vredeveld, M . Brower, J. Verberg, J. H o f f m a n , J. Rypstra, N . M. Wezeman, L. Voss, N . Albers. First Row: A . Vander Hill, E. Mulder, E. Prins, I. Lundie, J. S. D e W i t t , E. Everse, V. Glewen.

"At the portals of the sunrise, ' N e a t h the gold and blue . . Like the faint golden glow of sunrise against a soft blue dawning, Delta Phi enters the heart of each of her sisters. " D e l p h i sisters proudly gather, Strong, united, true . . As she treads along the path through the years of Delta Phi, each Delphian is inspired by the steady warmth of friendship radiating from the golden orb which binds the sisterhood of Delphi. "Radiant as the heaven above us W i t h the smile of dawn . . T h e awakening of sincere friendships first bursts upon her as does a glorious sunrise in early morn. ""As upon the breeze of morning Floats our gladsome song . . W i t h every year the sun looms higher in the true blue sky of Delta Phi, burning with a zestful glow â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the steady light of ties which naught can sever. Till at last, through the journey of college T h e Andrew Sisters?

78

years, each Delphian, after sharing in spreads of laughter and sessions serious, finds herself walking down the road toward commencement and into the sunset of her college years and Delta Phi.

W h a t t a line!"

"Delta Phi! Delta Phi! Faithful friends and true. Memory turns while life shall last, Delta Phi â&#x20AC;&#x201D; to you." OFFICERS FALL T E R M President, Jayne Smies D e W i t t Vice-President, Velma Glewen Secretary, Carol Meppelink W I N T E R TERM President, Irene Lundie Vice-President. Connie Crawford Secretary, Arlene Voorhorst SPRING TERM President, Eleanor Everse Vice-President, Arlene Voorhorst Secretary, Velma Glewen Treasurer, Elaine Prins Formal Pledge


Found in

DORIAN

r

%

h: _

#

Fourth Row: D . Weyenberg, M. D e Bey, I. H o l t , J. Van Lopik, M. Van Oss, H. Van Dyke, R. Ellison, ' 1| A Laughlin, J. D e W o l f . Third Row: M. Korteling, G. Maasen, T . Oonk, J. Biddle, P. Macomber, L. Ter Beek, R. Quant, R. Finlaw, J. Scherens, J. Zondag, B. Van Tatenhove. Second Row: P. Voss, M. A. Van Dyke, J. Decker, R. Probst, L. Bult, J. W a t s o n , R. Dalhenberg, B. Brinkman, C. Erickson, P. Andre, B. Kingsfield, B. Goff. First Row: L. Ver Meulen, M . Prince, M. Jenkins, M . Smallegan, E. Scholten, P . Naas, F. Koeman, V. Finlaw, E. Shiffner.

N o w that the curtain is about to fall on the memorable performance of " K a p p a Beta Phi, "45," let's review the acts and scenes for content of the play. T h e director for Act I, Scene I, was Evelyn Shiffner, assisted by R u t h Ellison. Helen Goff handled the minutes and Ronnie Finlaw became business manager for the entire production. Among the many clever programs, never-to-beforgotten, was the "Music Box" which entertained the Freshmen at the R o u n d Robin Tea. In the following scene, twenty-two girls were pledged into Dorian. Act II, Scene I, opened with Elaine Scholten as director; she was assisted by Helen Goff, while Edith W o l b r i n k kept the books in order. T h e climax of the play took place on February nine Chivalry?

when the Dorian girls and their escorts listened to "Music of the N i g h t " at their winter formal party. T h e pledges of 48 accepted the Dorian ideals as their own in Scene II. W i t h the coming of spring and Act III came many more programs, including class-meetings and joint-meetings with other sororities. Margery Prince was in charge of the production; Polly N a a s was her assistant, and Marian Smallegan kept the records. W i t h a last curtain call let's bid farewell to each member of the cast, and especially to the eight stars w h o will no longer appear in this role: Frieda Grote, Marie Jenkins, Polly Naas, Margery Prince, Elaine Scholten, Evelyn Shiffner, Marian Smallegan, and Lorraine Ver Meulen.

Tired, Frosh?

Last pledging f o r the Seniors

v-r

| l 79


Fourth Row: V. Dykema, H. Hains, G. Bruins, T. Van Leeuwen, L. Rove, M . Reus, A. Eilander. Third Row: H . Sawitzky, R. Bartholomew, E. M. Van Tatenhove, L. Romaine, M. D e Young, P. Haskin, C. Vander Molen, R. Dykstra, I. Vander Heuvel, G. Schipper, P. Dietrich. Second Row: G. Diehl, L. Van W y k , A, Van Derveer, M. Ter Borg, R. Ruys, L. Johnson, I. Demian, P. Haskin, R. Hoffman, V. M. Efird. First Row: H. Wilhelm, S. Lemmen, H. Schutmaat, H . Maatman, M. Hubers, V. Pennings, R. Seith, M. Kleis.

SIBYLLINE

" W y n k u m , Blynkum, and N o d ! "

Pasty Face!

Sibs celebrated the return to school with "talk" and fun at Mike Kleis'. Reminiscing was in order, and plans for a great year began to take shape for the girls w h o love the Silver and Blue. T h e busy whirl of rushing parties, teas, and hikes, was soon over and fifteen girls were pledged to the ideals and friendship of Sibylline. Prexy Myra Kleis was aided by Evelyn Reus, Vera Pennings, and Harriet Stegeman. Back from Christmas vacation into preparations for " T h e Starlit H o u r " ! On February 10, twinkling silver stars looked down on happy Sibs and their dates in the T u l i p Room. But pledges' starry-eyed happiness is shortlived, for dustmops and window cleaner took over as slaves labored for their masters one long, weary 80

"Repeat after me

week. Even these gave place to limburger cheese, oysters, and flour and water paste when pledges "took it" at Informal. Formal Initiation found Sibyls rededicating themselves as pledges repeated the vows to "take their honors to be earned by deeds." Mid-term president Harriet Maatman presided at the Initiation with Shirley Lemmen, Phyllis Haskin, and Helga Sawitzky. Then Helen Wilhelm, H a r l e n e S c h u t m a a t , Vivian Dykema, and Marcia Hubers took over. Soon it was Spring and we had to say good-bye to our senior sisters who carry our friendship and ideals with them wherever they go. And so it was good-bye to Happy, Penny, Willie, Marcia, Mike, Harlene, Shirl, O'Day, and our two Evelyns.


Fourth Row: B. Visscher, D . Boot, M . Lucking, N . Vander W i e r e , E. Bogart, B, Bilkert, V. Bilkert, L. Hospers, R. Harmeling, N . Vader, R. Joldersma. Third Row: A. Wyngarden, J. Sibley, C. Lemmen, L. J o n k m a n , E. Parsons, P. Barense, D . Frederick, D. Atkins, A. Vander Jagt, M. Wiersema. Second Row: C. J. Hermance, V. Hemmes, M. McLean, G. G o r e , M. L. Williams, E. Bielefeld, B. D e Vries, M . L. Hemmes, K. Steketee. First Roiv: J. Bogart, R. Atkins, M. Scholten, M. L. Aldrich, B. Tazelaar, J. Shiffner, N . Bosman.

SOROSIS

m â&#x20AC;˘,

W a t c h that boy!"

"Thoid Degree"

Sorosites started off another banner year with fun and excitement at the slumberless slumber party at Kooiker's Macatawa cottage where new plans were formulated for the year. Rushing party arrangements were ingeniously devised in true Sorosis style and fifteen neophytes emerged as pledges to the gold and white. W h o can forget the gay "Carramba Club" down Mexico W a y ; the "Gaslight Fantasy" formal party in January; or the very impressive formal initiation when Mrs. Pelgrim, as a big sister, tendered to us words of wisdom. Mildred Scholten wielded the gavel during the first term with Jan Bogart assuming duties as VicePrexy, and Rosanna Atkins jotting down the minutes. N a t Bosman was elected to watch over

Prexy Bogart pledges Frosh

the money bags for the year. After Christmas Mary Elizabeth Aldrich took over command as second term prexy with Barbara Tazelaar assisting and Mildred Scholten as secretary. At a very lovely spring tea Jan Bogart was unanimously elected to serve as third term president, Jean Shiffner as vice-president, and Barbara Tazelaar as secretary. Sorosis is proud to claim Mary Liz as Campus Queen with Jan on her court; Mary Liz, Rosanna and Millie as members of Alcor; Mary Liz prexy of W . A . L . ; and Millie as president of W . A . A . and English Majors. T a k i n g leave of our senior sisters we carry on the "greater light of Sorosis" which they have kept shining so brightly this year. 81


Fourth Row: M. Slinn, J. Huizenga, N . M. Ritsema, M. Van Haaften, M. Young, M. Dame, A. Lundberg, M. Van Vranken, B. Timmer. Third Row: A. Sybesma, A, Tuurling, A. Fikse, M. Mastenbrook, L. Hospers, M. Van Kleef, D. Vander W o u d e , C. Peterson, M. Maurer, A. Kloosterman. Second Row: M. Burghardt, E. Bosland, R. Kip, M. Felton, J. Meulendyke, L. Meulendyke, L. Edwards, L. Sikkema, M. Van Saun, L. Teninga, R. A. Poppen. First Row: E. Van Leeuwen, S. Jack, E. M. Richards, V. Saunders, C. Scholten, B. Hibma, M. Curtis.

THESAURIAN

Dig it, gal!"

Satan, Mrs. Satan, Medusa and Co.

"And so I pledge . . ."

In the bright autumn days, the Thetas again found themselves at college ready to begin the year with house parties at Lake Michigan, spreads, the annual Round Robin Tea, and formal gatherings. In the early fall, quaint figures in dresses of far-distant lands added atmosphere to the "Allied Tea, where Ruth Ann Poppen presided and was assisted by Edna Mae Richards as vice-president; Bernice Hibma as secretary; and Marian Mastenbrook as treasurer. T h e weather turned colder and the Thetas met with Tri Alpha in a joint meeting to share "Thanksgiving Leftovers." Before one could say "Santa Claus," the evergreens and holly decked the sorority room and Santa tumbled down the chimney with gifts for all. After a refreshing vacation the Thetas returned to start the new year with clever and original meetings. W i n t e r found Verladyne Saunders taking over as president; Lucille Tenninga, v i c e - p r e s i d e n t ; Constance Scholten, secretary; and Marjorie Van Vranken, treasurer. Informally the sorority journeyed to Grand Rapids to hear the Westminster Choir. Traveling south again soft music filled the air as "Plantation Portraits," the formal party, came into view. T h e upperclassmen settled back for a night of fun while the "Pledges' Comedy" was enacted at informal initiation. But it was with dignity and beauty that the pledges were formally welcomed into full membership of Theta G a m m a Pi. There are buds on the trees; the air is fresh and warm! T h e Thetas were playing baseball and bicycling to the lake. All too soon the college year drew to a close and commencement came. W i t h it, a loving farewell to our loyal Seniors: Ruth Ann, Verladyne, Edna Mae, Bernice, Connie, Jackie, Millie, Ethelyn, and Marjorie. After a pleasant summer of work and play, Thesaurian will be back again in the fall to hold high her banner of friendship, service, and devotion.


TRI ALPHA A combination of the four former fraternities was organized last year into a M e n ' s Union. T h e results of the merger were uncertain at the time of inception but after two years on this campus Tri-Alpha has been accepted as a g r o u p indicative of brotherhood and fellowship. All the men on the campus are automatically eligible for membership; this year there were returned veterans a m o n g them. Last year was spent mainly in organization — this year the fellows have been actively developing a few traditions to h a n d down to posterity. W a l t e r Krings composed the Tri-Alpha song. Tri-Alpha pins were designed by David Menchofer and made available to all members — a black triangle outlined in gold with a gold cross set in a black background. A formal party was given in February — " F o r g e t - M e - N o t s " was the theme; mighty sentimental were the boys! Gene Van Tamelen and H a r o l d Des Autels edited T h e Student G u i d e and Men's Union furnished it gratis to the student body. It contained as usual the college and home addresses of all Hopeites plus phone numbers and a directory of W e s t e r n Theological Seminary and a complete list and schedule of campus organizations. Dick H i n e held the prexy reins the first semester, directing especially the initiation and slave week. ( A n d how the frosh slaved!) Meetings were held on Friday featuring the regular serious and h u m o r papers, a prayer and song service and the master critic report. Alan Staver managed affairs for the fellows during the second semester and m a d e plans for an even better g r o u p next year. T h e men are looking forward to a greater influx of veterans; perhaps some of our former H o p e men will be among them. It is the desire of the Men's Union that H o p e men through this organization will become imbued with new and greater zeal for brotherhood.

Heave that rock, frosh!

Congratulations, W a r r e n ! "

Mustee's Roller Skating T r o u p e

Fijth Row: W . Sivyer, G. Poppen, R. Vriesman, J. Parsons, W , Groenewoud, R. Cloetingh. Fourth Row: R. Fairchild, J. Mustee, P. Tanis, R. Schuller, J . Smallegan, E. Van Tamlen. Third Row: W . Haak, L. Van H o r n , D. Miles, W . Gee, M . D e Young, G. Streuer, W . Hietbrink. Second Row: J. Mooi, E. Kragt, T. Harrison, W . W a l k e r , A. Rezelman, T. Boeve. First Row: H. Des Autels, G. Levey, R. Hine, A. Staver, W . Brandli, R. D a n h o f .


1

.

:

IN

—i


ATHLETICS


Girls (jo All-Out . . . EVEN FOOTBALL So there's nothing new under the sun? But since when have female Hopeites taken to football? This year a Homecoming game just couldn't be o m i t t e d — w a r o r n o w a r ! So promptly at 3:30 the "Blues" and the "Oranges" trotted out on the field amid cheers a-plenty. Both teams battled valiantly and when the final whistle blew, the "Oranges" were pronounced victorious. T o climax the day — a buffet supper at Carnegie Gym for hungry spectators. . . . GYM Poor Frosh! Groans of " O h my aching back!", " T h a t blister!" and " W h e r e do we limp from here?" invariably accompany the new co-eds out of the gym. Previous visions of college life hadn't exactly included trunk-forward-bends, deep knee bends, hip rolls and push ups. Veterans of two or three of "Jack's" gym classes know now that "it can be done!" All the Missouri-ites have long since taken back their, "Ya gotta show me!" This year's rigorous schedule allowed three hours a week for frosh and two hours a week for sophs, and neither class found time enough for anything extra. Fall gym classes were spent in the open air — hiking in the country and taking the four-mile through the woods to find "Jack" waiting at the other end of the " T r a i l " with chocolate milk and apples. There were a few brief sessions of soft ball in prevue of the coming Spring. Those horribly difficult exercises became gradually easier, and by the

end of October the "younguns" traded resolute acceptance for their former " W h e r e do we limp from here."

. . . V O L L E Y BALL Cries of "Help it over!" and " T w o hands for beginners" sounded through the gym on those snappy fall nights at eight sharp when volley ball enthusiasts took over. Ruthmary "Cookie" Cook, the W.A.A. member in charge, organized and arranged the teams. A fair over-all picture can't be drawn without again including "Jack," our favorite whistle blower, laughing himself to tears on the side line, as the more eager participants fell all over each other and themselves. But Softball, hiking and volley ball were minor matters in comparison to the way football swept the campus; for every hour of every afternoon for three weeks found H o p e women engaged in the roughest, toughest exhibitions of touch football. Although snow and ice soon turned us to the milder sports, it was fun while it lasted!

86


for Athletics

.

f r o m "strugglers" to "experts," and all the skaters, experienced or otherwise, students as well as a few brave chaperones agreed that it was a lot of fun, and conceded that practice really does make perfect. . . . PING PONG Foremost among the ping-pong champs were such notables as "Es" Bogart, " V i v " Dykema and Margaret W h i t e . T h e tables were set up on the stage of Carnegie Gym. T h e tournaments were organized by W . A . A . , in charge of Libby Romaine and was closely attended. T h e games usually were hard fought, closely contested affairs. . . . SWIMMING

. . . BOWLING Campus keglers, beginners and otherwise, used Lievense's alleys to good advantage on Friday afternoons f r o m 1 to 5. An activity card and fifteen cents were the only requirements for ten frames of spares, strikes and gutter balls. Scores ranged from very, very low to 173 and up.

. . . SKATING Many were the letters written home with rush orders for skates as the thermometer slid down to zero. T h e 19th street rink was taken over by the college gym classes in the afternoon for a few hours of cool but perilous fun. Almost as popular as the ice itself was the shack adjoining, for inside was a real, honest-to-goodness stove surrounded by benches, offering a moment's rest between attempts at figure eights and ice waltzing. A f t e r a few more turns around the pond it was home again via the grocery store and doughnuts and apples for extra healthy appetites.

Swimming met its inevitable war time enemy — transportation — with a smile and at least one victory in March. Those last gallons were squeezed out of " A " coupons by "Jack" and " P a t . " T w o carloads m a d e only a dent in the number who wanted to swim. T h e lucky ones were the W . A . A . board members and the Phys. Ed. class. T h e " Y " in G r a n d Rapids played host to the eager swimmers for a solid hour of f u n in the pool. Many times the watchful eye of a life guard winced as a co-ed bravely tried a new but unsuccessful dive f r o m the board. They all learned a new chain dive and another better known as " V a n Dyke Special." Highlight of the evening was a g a m e of " f o l l o w the leader" in imitation of Billy Rose and his aquacade; however, a bit more practice is needed before the contracts can be drawn up, so the talent scouts informed us. N e x t year, or maybe the next — whenever Hitler and Tojo adopt the policy of cooperation and the word — transportation — is included freely in our sports vocabulary, the popular vote calls for more and merrier "Splash Parties."

Similar thrills and spills and just as much f u n was roller skating. Virginia Park was the scene of such gala events sponsored by the " Y , " the Freshman and Sopohomare classes. Degrees of proficiency varied 87


batting technique, pitching, and what to do in the event that one should actually end up hanging on to one of those mean, twisting grounders or a high fly; which information Jack only too willingly "gave out with." Thursday nights i m m e d i a t e l y following dinner were set aside for the inter-sorority games. Competition was keen, encouraged by enthusiastic Softball fans who scattered about the slope overlooking the field. T h e home runs totaled few and far between but the laughs were many in contrast.

. . . BASKETBALL

"Jump ball," "foul," and the shrill whistle ot the referee echoed through the gym doubly often this year as if to make up for last year's loss of time when Carnegie was converted into a mess hall for the A.S.T.P. T h e girls had been moved to the "2 x 4," better known as Lincoln School Gymnasium — a lovely place but somewhat cramped and not especially suited to basketball. This year the favorite in gym classes was basketball and all phases of the game were practiced. Dribbling contests were not at all uncommon and each girl had her fling at foul shots. Under "Es" Bogart's supervision, basketball, her W . A . A . project, became a favorite after " Y " time consumer. Five teams were organized and from out the mixture of held balls, steps, fouls and free shots arose Virginia Hemmes' team to carry away the honors. . . . SOFTBALL About the end of March in stepped Spring, bringing her warmer weather, robins galore, daffy-dills and the stentorian call — " B a t t e r U p ! " Each sorority asked for the lowdown from Jack on rules,

. . . TENNIS Right after lab or choirpractice, during gym class or at six in the morning —whenever there were a few odd moments to work in a quick set of tennis— then it was that the server could be heard to exclaim

"love - five." In gym classes the training was thorough to say the least. Girls learned how to stroke the ball, serve and all the other tricks of the trade. Supplementing the instruction, M r . W i l l i a m s , t h e t e n n i s p r o , dropped in now and then to give a few needed pointers and a real work out. It didn't take long to find out that the mastery of correct balance and footwork is more than an overnight task. As always W . A . A . lined up the matches with other schools. Western is still the favorite rival even though Hope is outclassed. One redeeming feature of a defeat at Western's hands is the follow up in the gym of cokes and sandwiches — a very agreeable conclusion to any match. . . . TRACK '"No, thank you" to luscious chocolate cake with chocolate frosting? T h a t is news! But in the light of a coming May Day and its strenuous track events, it is q u i t e understandable. T h e odd moments, especially for the Freshman, were filled with high jumping practice, and taking a quick dash around the track— just to warm up! •««—•»—-

. " ••• • TV

•*.7:

I

rm

So ends another year of sports activities and gala occasions but don't forget to work on that backhand this Summer — and we'll see you next Fall.


As the Men Battle On

" J u m p Ball!"

" T a k e it in, D i c k ! "

O w i n g to the limited number of men students on

three grames with opposition f r o m outside. T h e first

the campus, H o p e has not been able to maintain an

g a m e played was with a g r o u p of alumni, many of

adequate men's sports program, and so the men's

them former H o p e stars, w h o were h o m e on leave

sports activity has been confined chiefly to the Fresh-

during the Christmas season.

man boys' gym class, about twenty-five strong.

should be obvious to all, an accurate score was not

For reasons which

kept of the game, but it was plain to all the on. . .

FOOTBALL

At the beginning of the year the class could regularly be found playing touch football twice a week on Tuesday and Thursday afternoons. T h e climax of the lengthy football season was a g a m e between the Frosh boys and the upperclassmen, w h o found it necessary to augment their diminishing ranks with

lookers that the former H o p e boys could still give a good account of themselves when called upon. After Christmas vacation plans were m a d e for the formation of a basketball league of four teams. T h r e e of these teams were from the college and the fourth would have been a team from the Seminary. Unfortunately too many difficulties were encountered in

some servicemen on leave. After the dust had cleared away the imaginary scoreboard read â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Upperclassmen 12, Frosh 6. All considered, it was a good game, and it is u n f o r t u n a t e that more could not have been made of it, because although the number of participants was low, the interest was high. . . . IN BASKETBALL A N D B O W L I N G As soon as the cold weather drove them indoors the favorite and only organized sport was basketball. Bowling occupied second place, but no official bowling teams were organized. At the beginning of the season high hopes were held for having a few games arranged with local industries' teams, but this later proved impossible and the men were able to play only

Southpaw Ingham!

89


arranging a suitable time and the plan had to be dropped. However, a few boys found Monday night to be a convenient time to play in addition to the regular gym class, and for two months in the winter old Carnegie Gym creaked as a dozen or more men ran up and down its tired old floor. T h e second game played was with the Seminary. In the first part of the game an accurate score was kept, but in the second half, for reasons which should again be obvious, no further score was kept. However, as long as the so-called first string was in the game, it was played evenly and well. T h e last 100 yds. are the hardest!

T h e last game of our three-game season was rather novel and unique and something that only the war could have brought about. In this game the boys played the girls, and all who witnessed the glorious spectacle will not forget it for some time to

in progress and with the aid of their Seminary friends, several good games were played. An immediate success was a softball game between the fellows and girls of Hope. From all reports it turned out to be

come. W h e n the battle had subsided and peace once again reigned, the score stood more or less decidedly in favor of the boys,- but all who took part and those who watched were willing to concede them a hard-

quite an affair, but the mortality rate among sore arms and stiff backs was unusually high that afternoon.

won victory. This game, then, rang down the curtain on the basketball at H o p e for this year. T h e games,

. . .

though not large in number, served as a satisfactory substitute for the ordinary peace-time schedule. . . .

IN

SOFTBALL

In the spring the fancies of the young men of Hope, besides turning to the usual things, turned also to baseball, tennis, track and related subjects. Practically every afternoon a softball game could be found

"Strike!"

90

IN TRACK

T h e tennis courts were being frequented more every day and it was not surprising that some men developed a high degree of skill. There were still quite a few addicts of the way of the cinder path left at H o p e and occasionally we saw the men running a mile or more just to keep themselves in condition.

. . . D U R I N G T H E W A R YEARS This then, is a year of boys' sports at war-conscious Hope. It is indeed a far cry from the well organized and smoothly running athletic program of past years; but it has served the purpose it set out to accomplish. It has provided the few men on the campus with a program of sports that has maintained their interest and has given them something to look forward to when the other men are again able to resume their places in Hope's campus activities. T h e men who were at H o p e this year were just a little disappointed, of course, that it was impossible to maintain a full sports program, but they all appreciate the fact that in the present situation a sports program has been established that is the best the athletic department could possibly offer.


Courage is strong in young hearts, And \aith and vision grow, As they pass through these halls of learning And then go jorth to show â&#x20AC;&#x201D; North, South, East and West, Wherever there is strife â&#x20AC;&#x201D; HOPE and Youth go hand in hand. To shoulder the problems of Life. The road will be steep and rocky, Their pace may be labored and slow, But armed with Truth and Knowledge, They will conquer as they go.


We Pause to Honor the Hope

Weep not for us, though your heart he heavy, Weep not for us, nor let your days be sad; We've given our lives, our love, our youth, We have given all, and we are glad. We turned not from the dangers. Though they were all around; We fought for a purpose â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a charge â&#x20AC;&#x201D; We never yielded ground. We upheld our childhood teachings. Our faith was ever strong. Our fight was noble and true and just. For our foe was in the wrong. Although the days may be dreary, And memories bring no release. There is nothing to fear! Our God is near, With Him will you find our Peace.


Who Have Given the "Last Full Measure of Devotion"

First Row: John Ayers, '45; Eugene Baker, '44; E. Raymond Boot, '38; Edward D e Free, '42; John P. Eisenberger, '42; Leroy W . Elderbrook, 41. Second Row: Lewis J. Geerlings, '28; Lester Lampen, '43; J o h n Palmer, '42; Leonard Pape, '45; Clark Poling, '33; Ralph Wallace, 42. Third

Row: Willis Smallegan, '43; G. Steinenger, '16; Edwin Tellman, '31; Louis Van Dyke, '44; W . Van Faasen, 45; Roger Van Oss, '38.

Fourth

Row:

Milton J. Verburg, '44; Benjamin VerMeer, '31; Leonard Vos, '46; Wallace Riemersma, '43; J. W h i t w o r t h , '44.

93


Hope College Looks Forward FOR THE COLLEGE T h e year is 1955 — this is your first visit to your beloved Alma Mater since that day in June when you left so reluctantly with your diploma in one hand and your Milestone in the other. It is good to be back — one glimpse of the stately, beautiful chapel and oceans of nostalgic recollection flood your memory. But time and change go on together in even stride; lusty masculine voices now boom out from Voorhees' familiar halls while fair coeds seek out their new abode within shouting distance of the other. Certain delightful aromas attract your interest as you pass Van Raalte and cause you to inquire if the Koffee Kletz still operates; however you discover that they are from the home economics division housed in Van Raalte, where once chemistry students held sway with less delightful odors. Looking around on your way to the gym, your eye lights upon the wonder of wonders — Van Vleck hall still

standing! About the campus the landscaping has been carried out methodically and attractively even to the addition of a garden, new tennis courts occupy a prominent place, and the gym now functions as a recreation center since the completion of a new gym and athletic field off the campus. Just for old times' sake you take a run around the track but it doesn't seem that it was this far around when you were in college; well, you're right, because the track was lengthened to a quarter-mile stretch after the sand hill had been removed. T h e familiar, old campus seems even more pleasing after ten years of additions and substractions. It is extremely gratifying to you who attended H o p e during the war years that it has grown beyond all temporary scars of difficult days into an e v e r - e x p a n d i n g institution dedicated as always to Christian education.

ilpilMiPE

Proposed Girls' Dormitory

94


to a Bright Future FOR ITS ( " W i l l the youth never learn that the f u t u r e is not bright and shiny, but that it is hard and relentless? Is this w h a t you asked yourself as you read the headlines on this page? It has long been said of college students, particularly those of a liberal arts college, that they are silly-headed, unpractical and theoretical; and that they know n o t h i n g of life. T o d a y education seeks to make a person better fitted to take his place in the world. This purpose has been achieved by constant applications of the theoretical to the actual; by the close scrutiny of life's trends and problems; by harmonizing our learning with practice in every-day living. H a v i n g been m a d e acquainted with history, we too saw the sights that m a d e our elders declare that the f u t u r e is not bright, but that it, like fate, is relentless. W e saw that man's greed constantly thwarts his attempts toward right living; we saw that wars, depressions and booms occur in rhythmic cycles. W e saw man's attempt to call a halt to this mad rotation—his attempts through science and research in every field—even to the searching of his own m i n d — a n d we saw all of them fail. W e , dejected, f o u g h t against the darkness of cynicism and pessimism and in spite of our wills, the f u t u r e seemed almost black. Our youthful vigor thwarted, our young strength ineffectual — we h u n g our heads and turned away but as we did, words, old, yet ever new, sounded with promise in our ears: "Come unto me . . . I am the W a y , the T r u t h and the Light." ( O h , yes, we too had heard them before when we were younger, but they meant nothing to us then, for we knew not the world. As we here learned to know the world through our studies, as well as our experiences, we studied also the A u t h o r of these words. Full realization of their meaning came only when we first realized our own weakness — with this as a foil the words stood out in all their brilliance.) W e turned and as w e turned the darkness lifted much as night lifts when the flushed brilliance of a dawning sun falls upon a darkling world. This flood of light came from the Past and lighted clearly our way into the Future. T h e future no longer appeared dark and relentless but now

the glory of promise and possibility shown distinctly upon that horizon — yes, the f u t u r e again appeared bright. W h a t our stumbling words are trying to convey is that in a new and w o n d e r f u l sense the f u t u r e is bright. W e , the youth of today, are not unpractical or misled — we know where we are to go and we k n o w how we are to get there. W e realize that this will be most difficult and that in all probability some of us will fail. T h a t some succeed now and that more succeed in generations to come, makes worthwhile our own failures. Shake your head not when we tell you that the directions for living are laid down clearly in G o d ' s W o r d . These directions have never failed — how could they? — they have never been given a fair trial. W e are convinced that History will place the D u m b a r t o n Oaks and the San Francisco Conferences in the same category as Versailles unless their principles are congruent with these Directions for Living — unless they are built on solid rock. This, our fathers, will be of your doing. If you succeed in this much, the burden for the peace will then fall on us. W h a t shall we do? Again w e look to the Directions for Living and here learn that it is our duty as individuals to live sinlessly before God and \or our fellow man; it will be our duty as Christian citizens to live not selfishly unto our own nation, but unto the whole world. T o the ever-present skeptic we answer that we realize that this means sacrifice — not for others alone — but for ourselves as well; that it means that we must select men of God w h o love T r u t h and hate greed to plan and to rule; that we must learn ever more than we are able to know now — exploring every realm of k n o w l e d g e to its fullest extent; integrating constantly in order to succeed more fully in our job of living. Every other way having been tried and found grievously wanting, the Light of the W o r l d is the Brilliance of the Future. T h e r e f o r e we ask that you doubt not, but that you have faith in God and place your confidence in us. For if we fail, and if we are wrong, then your sons and d a u g h t e r s — our friends, brothers and sisters — have died in vain. 95


Sunbeams penetrating vivid panes Create elusive, shadoivy designs — Now less, now more intense — Which, disunited, play on chapel floor. Rebounding from its glossy face They coalesce, to form before the eyes Visionary patterns, images and scenes. Look on our earnest fathers, who From stress and conflict came — and here Endured harsh cold and stagnant heat. In utmost sacrifice — their eyes on God — They wrought the anchor of our Hope. See now bewildered youth ivho seek With curious, hungry minds to know Whereof to hope, wherefore to strive Amid this dread disordered time which Overpowers calm, coherent acts of will. Behold their comrades — uncertain too In war's swift cruelty and hate; Battling against confusion armed, not man; Loathe to drain love's gift of faithful life In fullest measure for destruction's cause. The future gleams — Almighty God, restored in man. Creating balanced, ordered lives, Where misapplied self-will makes room For spacious, intertwining unity Through faith such as our fathers knew.

Hope's Eternal Light

97


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INDUSTRIES C o m p l i m e n t s of

C R A M P T O N M A N U F A C T U R I N G CO. C o m p l i m e n t s of

D O N N E L L Y - K E L L E Y GLASS C O M P A N Y - •

DISTRIBUTORS OF OIL PRODUCTS C o m p l i m e n t s of

VANDENBERG OIL C O M P A N Y

CHURCHES HOPE CHURCH Rev. M a r i o n de Velder Compliments

THIRD REFORMED CHURCH WESTERN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY G r a d u a t e d 2 8 3 m e n in t h e last t w e n t y y e a r s . E q u i p p e d its m e n f o r p r o m i n e n t p u l p i t s . Is a c c r e d i t e d by t h e A . A . T . S.


CLOTHING AND SHOES

MAR-DO MILLINERY 13 W e s t 8 t h St.

M O D E R N I H A T SHOP

SUCCESS

SPAULDING'S BROWN-BUILT SHOE STORE

Give s o m e t h i n g better t h a n the average a n d you m a k e a bid for trade p r e f e r e n c e — t h a t is the a n s w e r to o u r success.

VAUPELL'S MEN'S SHOP •

DAIRIES MAPLE GROVE DAIRY ENJOY MODERN DAIRY MILK

FOR O V E R 30 YEARS

G O O D SERVICE

W e s t e r n M i c h i g a n ' s Largest Sellers of M e n a n d Boys' C l o t h i n g

M A R T I N STORES

AND

QUALITY — Phone 3053

C o m p l i m e n t s of

ROMEYN ED, DAIRY

8 W e s t 8th Street

DISTRIBUTORS OF OIL PRODUCTS

" M o s t For Your M o n e y "

RYPMA'S SHELL SERVICE STAMM'S SUPER SERVICE

BORR'S BOOTERY — FINER SHOES

DRY CLEANERS

p. s. BOTERT & CO. "TRY

BOTER'S

CARLETON CLEANERS

FIRST"

BOVEN DRY GOODS

MODEL LAUNDRY, Inc.

BUDGET DRESS SHOP

SUPREME DRY CLEANERS

DICK THE SHOE DOCTOR DU MEZ BROTHERS "WHAT

W E SAY W E D O , W E D O

DO"

FAASEN'S "RED LINE" SHOE REPAIR FRENCH CLOAK STORE "Where

Y o u Always

Find

Something

JEANE'S SHOP "LADIES'

READY

TO

WEAR"

LITTLE MISS SHOP LOKKER-RUTGERS CO.

New"

DRLTQ STORES DE LOOF'S D R U G STORE Washington

Square

Phone

2908

DOESBURG~DRUG STORE H A N S E N ' S D R U G STORE PRESCRIPTIONS—SICK ROOM SUPPLIES

MODEL D R U G STORE M E E T YOUR

FRIENDS

AT

THE

MODEL

SMITH'S D R U G STORE W A D E BROTHERS D R U G STORE " W e ' v e got it, we'll

get it or it isn't made."


FLORISTS

SEARS O R D E R S E R V I C E

EBELINK FLOWER SHOP

C o u r t e s y of

TEMPLE FURNITURE COMPANY

FUNERAL HOMES

F. W . W O O L W O R T H C O M P A N Y

NIBBELINK-NOTIER FUNERAL HOME

GROCERS J. & H . D E J O N G H Grocers — 2 1 East 1 0 t h St.

Dykstra Funeral H o m e

C o m p l i m e n t s of

D O W N T O W N I. G. A . E C O N O M Y I. G. A . C o l u m b i a A v e . at 15 th St. GROCERIES AND MEATS

FUNERAL DIRECTORS

EL'S F O O D M A R K E T Gilbert V a n D e W a t e r , M g r .

THE HOME MARKET

Julius Kleinheksel

KUITE'S MARKET MEATS — FISH — P O U L T R Y C o m p l i m e n t s of

A M B U L A N C E SERVICE

NABER'S MARKET OLERT'S GROCERY STORE

Call 2 3 4 8 2 9 East 9 t h St.

PEOPLE'S M A R K E T

Holland

MEATS AND GROCERIES C o m p l i m e n t s of

STEFFENS BROTHERS

FURNITURE AND DEPARTMENT STORES

WARNER'S GROCERY

BAKER'S USED F U R N I T U R E

HATCHERIES

J A M E S A. B R O U W E R & C O .

BRUMMER & FREDERICKSON

"THE

RELIABLE

FURNITURE

STORE"

DE VRIES-DORNBOS C O M P A N Y S. S. K R E S G E C O M P A N Y C o m p l i m e n t s of

'The

POULTRY FARM AND HATCHERY chicks yoti want are the chicks we've got." C o m p l i m e n t s of

LEMMEN LEGHORN FARM

MASS F U R N I T U R E C O M P A N Y McLELLAN'S STORE & C O M P A N Y

ICE CREAM

J. C . P E N N E Y C O M P A N Y

MILLS ICE C R E A M C O M P A N Y


INDUSTRIES

W E ARE P R O U D T O H A V E H O P E COLLEGE AS O U R N E I G H B O R S

Baker Furniture Inc. Compliments of Makers of

H. J. HEINZ CO.

Connoisseur Furniture

BUSS M A C H I N E W O R K S "THE

BUSS

IS A R E A L PLANER"

T H E DE PREE C O M P A N Y Manufacturers

of " W h e a t a m i n V i t a m i n P r o d u c t s "

VISIT D U T C H NOVELTY SHOPS DISPLAY R O O M "HOLLAND'S

WOODEN

SHOE

FACTORY"

H A R T & COOLEY M A N U F A C T U R I N G CO.

H O L L A N D CELERY P L A N T E R C O .

H O L L A N D CITY BOTTLING W O R K S Drink

" S q u i r t " — Largest selling in the world

grapefruit

drink

BAKER BEVERAGE C O M P A N Y HOLLAND PRECISION PARTS

HOLLAND FURNACE COMPANY 'World's

Largest "Warm

Installers Friends

of Home Heating of Hope College"

Holland, Mich.

Systems"

LOUIS PADNOS IRON & METAL CO. MILL

AND

FOUNDRY

SUPPLIES

C o m p l i m e n t s of

HOLLAND HITCH COMPANY "NO

Holland, Mich. HITCH IN OUR BUSINESS"

SEVEN-UP BOTTLING CO. OF WESTERN MICH. "FRESHEN

UP

WITH

7-UP"


C o m p l i m e n t s of C o m p l i m e n t s of

SLIGH-LOWRY FURNITURE CO.

VISSCHER-BROOKS INSURANCE AGENCY FIRE, A U T O M O B I L E , ACCIDENT

Holland, Mich.

AND LIFE I N S U R A N C E

IXL M A C H I N E SHOP

JEWELRY AND GIFTS

T H E WESTERN F O U N D R Y CO.

D U SAAR P H O T O A N D GIFT S H O P KODAKS

INSURANCE AND REAL ESTATE Compliments — A. W . Hertel

ARENDSHORST INSURANCE AGENCY

FRAMING

GIFTS

HEERSPINK'S JEWELRY & GIFT SHOP KNOLL'S GIFT SHOP POST JEWELRY A N D GIFT SHOP B. H . W I L L I A M S — J E W E L R Y

O. A. W O L B R I N K & SON, I N S U R A N C E ISAAC K O U W REALTOR

MISCELLANEOUS

MARSILJE INSURANCE AGENCY

NELSON B O S M A N — R A D I O SERVICE

C o m p l i m e n t s of

CARLEY A M U S E M E N T C O M P A N Y

HENRY COSTING REALTOR

CASTLE PARK Castle P a r k , Mich.

W I L L I A M J. O L I V E A G E N C Y K e n D e P r e e — E. A . S t e g i n k — B e n j a m i n L e m m e n

DE F O U W S ELECTRIC S H O P


NICK DYKEMA — TAILOR

C. L. L O E W , D.D.S.

ESSEN B U R G E L E C T R I C C O M P A N Y FABIANO'S HOLLANDERT HOTEL

C o m p l i m e n t s of

MAIHOFER, MOORE, DE LONG, AND KRAGT

Mr. and Mrs. Burrows, Proprietors

K . C. M Y E R S , D.S.C.

MEYER'S MUSIC H O U S E

R. H . N I C H O L S , M . D .

C o m p l i m e n t s of

W A R M FRIEND TAVERN

J O H N PIEPER

RELIABLE BICYCLE S H O P

J O H N S T E R E N B E R G , D.D.S.

YOUNG AMUSEMENT COMPANY " W H E R E YOU

KIDS

SPEND

YOUR

S. S. T I E S E N G A , D.D.S.

NICKLES"

C. V A N A P P L E D O R N , M . D .

PHOTOGRAPHERS

O. V A N DER VELDE, M.D.

BEERNINK STUDIO "NEXT TO THE CENTER THEATER"

PORTRAITS BY"UNDERHILL O F F I C I A L MILESTONE

PHOTOGRAPHERS

WINSLOW STUDIO

T I T U S V A N H A I T S M A , D.D.S. M . J. V A N K O L K E N , C H I R O P R A C T O R C. V A N D E R M E U L E N — Attorney-at-Law 190 River A v e n u e

PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPHY

RESTAURANTS

PRINTERS

BOONE'S CITY KITCHEN

HOLLAND PRINTING COMPANY

D U T C H MILL RESTAURANT T H E J. K L A A S E N P R I N T I N G C O .

C o m p l i m e n t s of

THE HITCHING POST

PROFESSIONAL E. J. B A C H E L L E R D . C . P . H . C . P A L M E R GRADUATE

Holland, Mich.

HOFFMAN'S RESTAURANT "You'll

like our food

— o u r service — o u r price"

MARY JANE RESTAURANT J. J. B R O W E R , D.D.S.

STAR S A N D W I C H S H O P

H . G. D E V R I E S , M . D .

Hours:

F. E. D E W E E S E , D.D.S.

TRANSPORTATION

A. L E E N H O U T S , M.D.

ALVAN MOTOR FREIGHT

D a i l y 9 - 1 1 ; 2 - 5 ; n o n e W e d . ; Sat. Eve. o n l y

MESSRS. L O K K E R A N D D E N H E R D E R

CITIZENS TRANSFER & STORAGE CO. V Y N C O M P A N Y , Inc.


CENTRAL ENGRAVING COMPANY "Official

Milesto7ie

Engravers"

W E S T E R N MICHIGAN'S LEADING PHOTO-ENGRAVERS 15-19 Lyon Street, N. E. G R A N D RAPIDS, MICHIGAN

STEKETEE-VAN HUIS PRINTING HOUSE, INC. "Official

Milestone

Printers"

CREATIVE P R I N T I N G SERVICE 9 East 10th Street HOLLAND, MICHIGAN


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Milestone 1945  

Hope College yearbook.