Page 1


Cpublished

Holland.

hij

the


i ff C O P Y

R I G H T


^he ^Milestone I


ication Because he has the respect and admiration of the student body, by reason of his austerity combined with his urbanity; we, the Junior Class of 1929

1

do sincerely dedicate this Fifteenth Milestone

i.

<L iL

PROFESSOR P A U L E . H I N K A M P

V


Gforeword

D

U R I N G the past year many

ships

have

appeared on the horizon of H O P E . T O many of us they h a v e b r o u g h t s o r r o w , to others joy, and some of them have borne away those whom we loved; yet we all have been watching and waiting for these ships to come in, and in so doing, we have created the events that make up the Milestone of 1929.


O^ontents DEDICATION SCENIC SECTION ADMINISTRATION STUDENTRY FEATURES RELIGION ART SOCIETIES ATHLETICS HUMOR ADVERTISEMENTS


i


I


i e i

mae


MGMXXX

M

AGIC. L L I T E R S these! There is something in Old Roman Numerals which casts a spell about one.

Ihey speak of a world that has long been with the eternities, never more to be known among human kind; and yet they speak of a world whose only proper name is Grandeur,—"The Grandeur That Was Rome." And both the Antiquity and the Greatness enthrall. Magic Letters they are, also, which measure time in its flight. Nothing else seems so fit for the Baptism of the Years. Once to every year this magic symbolism is given, never the same, and henceforth down the long trail from " I n the Beginning" to "World Without E n d " each year marches with its lettered symbol on its scutcheon.— the horizons of the future beckon. Never before has M G M X X X greeted Hope: in this Milestone M G M X X X

stands at Salute.

Never again

will M C M X X X sound the bugle call; with the "Einis" of this Milestone M G M X X X bows to Taps. ^ et between ths Salutation and the Valedictory fancy drives with freest rein, friendships meet in gayest pleasantry. faith writes large on prophet scroll. Good Reader, be you gentle or churl, pray laugh at our fancies or scorn if you please; drop curtsies f o r friendship or frown if you must; speak leal f o r our faith or doubt if you w i l l , — w e d i p y o u o u r c o l o r s , the ORANGE a n d BLUE of

MGMXXX


EDWARD D . D I M N E N T , A . M . , L i t t . D . . L . H . D . , L L . P R E S I D E N T OF H O P E COLLEGE


o

1

JOHN

B.

NYKERK, A.B.,

Dean English

A.M.,

9

Litt.D.

of Men

and Public

Speaking

THOMAS E. WELMERS, A . B . . A . M . , B.I).

Greek

Language

and

Literature

Registrar

EKBERT W I N T E R , A . B . , A . M .

Education

PAUL E. HINKAMP, A.B.. A . M . ,

Philosophy

WILLARD RODINSON, A . B . ,

German

A.M.,

and French

MARTHA J. GIBSON, A . B . ,

A.M.

English

LAURA

A.

BOYD, A . B . ,

A.M.

German

ALBERT H . TIMMER, A . B .

Latin

Page Eighteen

Ph.D.

B.D.

X

9


BKUCE M .

RAYMOND, A.B..

A.M.

History

METTA J. R o s s , A . B .

History

ADELAIDE

DYKHUIZEN, A . B .

English Preparatory

and History Department

J. HARVEY KLEINHEKSEL. A . B . .

Chemistry

A.M.,

Ph.D.

and Biology

GARRETT VANDER BORCH, A . B .

Mathematics

and Physics

Preparatory

HARRY J.

Department

HAGER, A . B . . A . M . . T H . B . .

College Biblical

IN W I N

B.D.

Pastor Literature

J. LUBBERS, A . B . .

A.M.

English Coach

JOHN

Coach

of Debate

L. SCHOUTEN

of Athletics

I'age Ninetee n


mmm

T H E

M I L E

8

T

O

N

i

E

9

GERRIT V A N ZYL, A . B . , M . S . , P h . D .

Chemistry

CLARENCE KI.EIS, A . B .

Physics

ALBERT E.

LAMPEN, A . B . .

A.M.

Mathematics

MRS. W .

H . DUREEE, A . B . , A . M .

Dean of Women French and Dramatics

r » "vf . . ' M Graduate of School of Music, U. of N. Instructor of Violin Director of Orchestra

MRS. GRACE D . F E N T O N

Voice Culture and Singing Director of Glee Clubs

MARTHA BARKEMA, A . B .

and Voice Culture

OSCAR C . CKESS

Piano and Harmony i,- -

Page

Twenty

. 11

MONTY EMMONS

French

,

a.

9


T H E

L

E

8

T

O

N

t

I

9

The Board of Trustees of Hope College GENERAL SYNOD

MEMBERS

Rev. E. W. T h o m p s o n . D. D Mr. Herman Liesveld Hon. G. J. D i e k e m a . LL. D Mr. C. M. M c L e a n Rev. D. A. Poling. D. D., LL. D Mr. P. J. Kriekaard. M. D Rev. J. A. Dykstra, D. D

New York City Grand Rapids Holland '""Holland l\ew York City Grand Rapids Grand Rapids C L A S S I S OF C A S C A D E S

Rev. G. de Motts

Lynden,

Washington

CLASSIS OF C H I C A G O

• Rev. M. E. Broekstra Rev. F. J. Zandstra

• CLASSIS

Blue

Chicago, Island,

III. III.

OF D A K O T A

Rev. B. Van Heuvelen Mr. C. De H o o g h

Huron, Monroe,

S. D. S. D.

CLASSIS OF E A S T S I O U X

Kev. J. A. Vis Rev.F. M a n s e n

Sheldon, Iowa Oarnge City, Iowa C L A S S I S OF G E R M A N I A

Rev. Wrn. R. Everts Rev. A. L i n n e m a n

Davis, Scotland,

S. D. S. D.

CLASSIS CF GRAND RAPIDS

Kev. N. Boer Rev. C. H. Spaan

Grand Grand C L A S S I S OF

Rapids Rapids

HOLLAND

Rev. Wm. Pyle Mr. W y n a n d Wichers, A. M

Holland Holland C L A S S I S OF K A L A M A Z O O

Rev. A. Klerk Mr. S. W y k k e l

Kalamazoo Kalamazoo C L A S S I S OF ILLINOIS

Mr. George D a l e n b e r g Prof. J a m e s Sterenberg, P h . D

Chicago, Galesburg,

III. III.

C L A S S I S OF M U S K E G O N

Rev. H e n r y S c h i p p e r Hon. C. A. Broek

Grand Haven Muskegon C L A S S I S OF

PELLA

Rev. B. M uld er Rev. George H a n k a m p

fV//^ i o w a Pella, Iowa C L A S S I S OF

PLEASANT

PRAIRIE

Rev. W. T. J a n s s e n Prof. H. E. S c h o o n

German

Kings, Valley.

III. Hi

C L A S S I S OF W E S T S I O U X

Rev. J. De J o n g h

,—Rock

Rapids,

Iowa

Mr. N. Balkema

Sioux

Center,

Iowa

Sheboygan,

Wis.

C L A S S I S OF W I S C O N S I N

Rev. C. Kuyper

Cedar

Grove,

Wis.

Rev. H. Maassen

OFFICERS OF T H E C O U N C I L

PresidentVice-President

Rev. G. De Jonge. 1). D. Mr. C. M. M c L e a n

Secretary Treasurer

Hon. G. J. D i e k e m a . LL. D. Mr. C. J. Dregman

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

Mr. Edward D. D i m n e n t . Chairman Rev. G. De J o n g e , D. D. Secretary Mr. C. M. M c L e a n

Hon. G. J. D i e k e m a . LL. D. Rev. N . Boer INVESTMENT COMMITTEE

Mr. Edward D. Dimnent

Hon. G. J. D i e k e m a . LL. D. Mr. C. M. M c L e a n


SluMiInj


E . Tysse, K. H y i n k , C. R o z e m a , A. Cook, J. Y o n k e r H. Smith, D. Beeuwkes, R. Mooi, C. P a l m e r

THE

STUDENT

COUNCIL

The Student Council is the one organization on the Campus representative of the whole student body. Its duties extend to all matters concerning the studentry of the College. It solves problems and carries out duties as the occasion arises. The Council is composed of nine m e m b e r s : the president of the Senioi Class, who automatically becomes president of the Council, and two representatives f r o m each class, elected at the beginning of each school year. The Council functions as an organized representative group, whose duty is to promote all student activities. The annual Tug of War, Freshmen Rules and theii observance. Cap Night Celebration, the Honor Code, and the Point System are some of the events and problems in charge of the Student Council. 1 he Oratorical and Debating activities are also financed through the Council. OFFICERS President

CHARLES

Vice-PresklentV.VJ-.-Vâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;

ROEEMA

KENNETH

Secretary

JANET

HYINK YONKER

H a r r y

Treasurer

S m 1 t h

REPRESENTATIVES Senior Class Junior Class Sophomore

Class

F r e s h m e n Class

Page

Twenty-four

EVA

TYSSE, KENNETH HYINK

JANET CYNTHIA

YONKER, ALVIN COOK

PALMER.

HARRY

SMITH

ADELIA BEEUWKES, ROY MOOI


srnturc


T H E

M I L E S T O N E

CHARLES

THE

•*

•*

-V

^

1 9

KOZEMA

SENIOR

CLASS

"Now as grave and reverend Seniors Smile ive o er the verdant past." Rather a sad one—but a real smile. The sadness lies in the thought of leaving friends and surroundings grown more dear than we could have imagined. There is regret, too, for the chances thrown away and ihe time lost during those flying verdant years. 1 he smile is for \ictories well earned and for defeats well lost. A smile not quite as confident as one of four years ago, but just as significant of happy ideals and probably a bit sweeter and a little more serene. Just another Senior Class leaving just another College, with just another sad farewell and just some other reminiscences? No, not just another College—but Hope College—and all having caught at least a part of the famed ''Hope Spirit." And it is not what we have done here so much as what we shall take away that will count in the world. OFFICERS President.

CHARLES

ROZEMA

EVERETT

BEKKEN

Vice-President Secretary 1 reasurers

Student Council

Page

Twenty-six

ALICE IDA

TOWNSEND,

FRANK

LAMMERS BROKAW

EVA TYSSE, K E N N E T H H Y I N K

X

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NELLIS TANIS, Z e e l a n d , M i c h i g a n Some love too little, some too long. H i s t o r y Course. F r a t e r n a l ; V i c e - P r e s i d e n t ' 2 9 ; A"' ^ 9 : 1 1 0 1 1 5 6 M a n a g e r '29; Mi l e st o ne , 4,, • . s o c ' a t e Business M a n a g e r '28 ; P y r a m u s and T h i s b e ' 2 8 ; H . K . K . OTTO N . YNTEMA, H o l l a n d . M i c h i g a n / shall have less to say, but I shall be gone. H i s t o r y Course. F r a t e r n a l ; P r e s i d e n t '29 • Mile5 ] 0 5 - V S t a i ! , ' 2 8 ; M e n ' s G l e e C l u l ' Manager '29; H . K . K . ; A l t e r n a t e R e g e n t s S c h o l a r s h i p '29.

ADIUAN KUYPER, C e d a r Grove, W i s c o n s i n At eventide, to play and love and rest. Because / know for me my work is best. Science Course. CosmoiJolitan ; C h e m i s t r y C l u b ; r r c - m c c h c C l u b ; P r e s i d e n t '29; Science C l u b ; O r c h e s t r a ; P r e s i d e n t '29; Glee C l u b ; H . K . K . DORA VIVA MCCOVVAN, P e o p l e s , K e n t u c k y Yours are the mildest manners, and yours gentlest heart. H i s t o r y Course. S o r o s i s ; V i c e - P r e s i d e n t S.G.A.

the

LEON A . BOSCH, H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n The windy

satisfaction

of the tongue.

H i s t o r y Course. F r a t e r n a l ; V i c e - P r e s i d e n t '28, 2 9 ; H o u s e C o m m i t t e e T r e a s u r e r '29; A n c h o r S t a f f ' Sport E d i t o r ' 2 8 ; M i l e st o n e Staff, S p o r t •T- ,, „r A t h l e t i c Association Board '28 '29C ii - \ r ? s t e r ' 2 8 ; R e s e r v e B a s k e t b a l l '27; Basketball M a n a g e r ' 2 9 ; Senior Class P l a y '29P y r a m u s and T h i s b e " C l u b ; H . K . K . CLARENCE DIEPHOUSE, M u s k e g o n , M i c h i g a n He was humble, but he had reason to be proud. H i s t o r y Course. E m e r s o n i a n ; P r e s i d e n t '29 • Basketball V a r s i t y '25, '26, '27, '28; M a n a g e r F o o t b j ; " M a n a g e r '28; A t h l e t i c Board '27, /?i 'u J , C l u l i , ; H . K . K . ; P r e s i d e n t '29; Ulfilas C l u b ; J u l i u s C a e s a r ; Van Vleck H o u s e Committee. RUTH KENNELL, P a s s a i c , N e w J e r s e y H i s t o r y Course. D e l p h i ; Vice-President '28; Class S e c r e t a r y '28; A r t E d i t o r , Milestone '28; A n c h o r R e p o r t e r '27; S e c r e t a r y - T r e a s u r e r Orc h e s t r a 2 9 ; D r a m a Class P l a y ' 2 8 ; A s s o c i a t e .Lditor F r o s h A n c h o r ; H e a d R e p o r t e r , Soph A n c h o r '26; D i r e c t o r in P a g e a n t s '26, '28; Senior P l a y C o m m i t t e e ' 2 9 ; S.G.A. JACK FELON, H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n Bid me discourse and I will thine ear enchant. Science Course. C o s m o p o l i t a n ; P r e s i d e n t ' 2 9 ; L y c e u m Course M a n a g e r '28-'29 ; Science C l u b ; P r e - m e d i c C l u b ; Gospel T e a m ; O r c h e s t r a '26 2 7 ; P a g e a n t ' 2 6 ; A t h l e t i c Board '28; M i l e st o n e A u x i l i a r y Staff ' 2 8 ; A f f i r m a t i v e D e b a t i n g T e a m ' 2 9 ; A. A. Raven C o n t e s t in O r a t o r y , 1st ' 2 7 ; M O . L . C o n t e s t , 2nd ' 2 8 ; P h i K a p p a ' D e l t a ; Senior Class Play ; H . K . K .

Page

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X

LAWRENCE EDWARD VREDEVOOGD,

Grandville, Michigan "When there are men like this, it is the daivn, Not the dusk of the gods." Classical Course. Cosmopolitan ; P r e s i d e n t ' 2 9 ; Michigan T r u s t C o m p a n y Scholarship '25; Deb a t i n g T e a m '28, ' 2 9 ; Coach H o p e H i g h School D e b a t e '29; Ci K a p p a D e l t a ; Senior Class P l a y ; i i . Y . C . Club.

GEORGE RUSSCHER, H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n He will come back and storm the Western Gate. H i s t o r y Course. D i c k e n s i a n ; S e c r e t a r y '28; Ulfilas C l u b ; H . K . K .

LORAINE HENRIETTA RAAK, H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n She studied Latin like a violin. L a t i n Course. S i b y l l i n e ; S . G . A . ; Senior Class Play.

NORRIS VAN DUREN, H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n / came from an acorn, but will be an Oak. M a t h e m a t i c s Course. A n c h o r Staff '27; Milestone Staff ' 2 8 ; Business M a n a g e r ; Dickensian.

C. VAN TAMELIN, Z e e l a n d , M i c h i g a n The mildest

manner

with

the bravest

mind.

MARVIN J. FOLKERT, H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n Mans best possession L a t i n Course.

is a sympathetic

wife.

LAVERNE VANDER HILL, H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n The calm of self reliance. H i s t o r y Course. C o s m o p o l i t a n ; Y . M . C . A . Cabinet ' 2 8 ; Gospel T e a m '29; Basketball Reserves '25, V a r s i t y Basketball '27, '28, ' 2 9 ; M a n a g e r '28; Captain '29; V a r s i t y Baseball '26, '27, '28, ' 2 9 ; M a n a g e r ' 2 8 ; Athletic Board '28; M o n o gram Club; H.K.K.

EVA TYSSE, H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n A sweet girl graduate, lean as a fawn. Science Course. S o r o s i s ; President, S p r i n g T e r m '29; Y . W . C . A . Cabinet '29; Editor-in-chief, the A n c h o r '28; Editor, Coed A n c h o r '28; Student V o l u n t e e r s ; Vice-President ' 2 9 ; Milestone Staff '28; S t u d e n t Council '29; H a r m o n y Glee Club '25, '26; S.G.A.

Page

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BERNARD DI: PHEE. H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n He lusts for freedom. Science Course. F r a t e r n a l ; P r e s i d e n t ' 2 8 ; Class P r e s i d e n t '26; Basketball '26-'29 ; Basketball Reserves ' 2 6 ; Baseball '26; D r a m a Class P l a y ' 2 9 ; H.K.K.

BEATRICE VANDER KAMP. H o s p e r s , I o w a Like a flower sweet and shy. M o d e r n L a n g u a g e English Course. Dorian; H o u s e C o m m i t t e e '28; Senior Class S e c r e t a r y ; S.G.A.

IDA TOWNSEND, Berlin, N e w J e r s e y She seemed like a little chip. Just broken away from the sun itself. H i s t o r y Course. Sorosis P r e s i d e n t '28; S . G . A . ; A . D . D . P r e s i d e n t '29; Milestone Staff '28A n c h o r Staff '29; A t h l e t i c B o a r d Control '29.

DEAN MARTIN, H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n It takes a long time to forget an iron man. H i s t o r y Course. K n i c k e r b o c k e r ; P r e s i d e n t '29; 1 .M.C.A. C a b i n e t ; T r e a s u r e r ' 2 8 ; P r e s i d e n t '29Basketball '25, '26, '27, '28, ' 2 9 ; C a p t a i n ' 2 8 ; F o o t b a l l 27, ' 2 8 ; S t u d e n t C o u n c i l ; T r e a s u r e r 2 7 ; Class P r e s i d e n t ' 2 6 ; M o n o g r a m C l u b ; l i . \ . C . C l u b ; Gospel T e a m '27-'29; H . K . K .

ALVIN VANDERBUSH, B a l d w i n , W i s c o n s i n Forever wilt thou love, and she be fair. H i s t o r y Course. C o s m o p o l i t a n ; V a r s i t y F o o t b a l l *26, '27, '28; Reserve Basketball '26, ' 2 7 ; V a r s i t y Basketball '28, ' 2 9 ; V a r s i t y T r a c k '28; H . K . K . ; V i c e - P r e s i d e n t ; B.Y.C. Club ; Athletic Board '28.

GRACE KOEPPE, C e d a r G r o v e . W i s c o n s i n And a lass at the turn looks after her lad with a dawn on her brotv. H i s t o r y Course. Delphi ; P r e s i d e n t '29; A t h l e t i c B o a r d ' 2 9 ; Class T r e a s u r e r '27 ; A . D . D . ; S . G . A . ; President.

DOROTHY BLEKKINK, S h e b o y g a n F a l l s . W i s . / dole on his very absence. H i s t o r y Course. A l e t h e a ; P r e s i d e n t ' 2 8 ; Gospel T e a m '29; S . G . A . ; S e c r e t a r y - T r e a s u r e r .

ALFRED BENTALL, G r a n d K a p i d s , M i c h i g a n A Corinthian, a lad of mettle, a good boy. Classical Course. C o s m o p o l i t a n ; V i c e - P r e s i d e n t , W i n t e r t e r m '28; V . M . C . A . ; Cabinet ' 2 9 ; H o m e V o l u n t e e r s ; V i c e - P r e s i d e n t ' 2 8 ; D r a m a Class Play ' 2 9 ; Senior Play C o m m i t t e e ; Senior Play, P r o d u c t i o n M a n a g e r ; B.V.C. C l u b ; H . K . K . ; H o u s e C o m m i t t e e , Van Vleck H a l l ; Gospel T e a m '28, '29.

Pagir Twtnty-nine


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WALTER DK VELDER, B o y d e n , I o w a Behind the night things are right—I

there is plenty know it.

of light

and

Classical Course. E m e r s o n i a n ; P r e s i d e n t '28; \ . M . C . A . Cabinet '28, '29; Vice-President '29; Class Vice-President '27; Football '28; Basket ball '27, '28, '29; T r a c k '27, '28, 'S9; Captain '29; M a n a g e r '28; A t h l e t i c A s s o c i a t i o n ; " H " C l u b ; T I . K . K . ; Raven C o n t e s t '28; B.V.C. Club. HERMAN F. LAUC, C o o p e r s v i l l e , M i c h i g a n He was sleepy, yet he could not sleep. H i s t o r y Course. E m e r s o n i a n ; " H " C l u b ; T r a c k '27, '28, '29; Athletic B o a r d ; Circulation Manager A n c h o r '28; Milestone S t a f f ; D r a m a Class P l a y ' 2 8 ; Band '26, '27, '28, '29; President '28, 2 9 ; O r c h e s t r a '28, ' 2 9 ; A d v e r t i s i n g M a n a g e r Senior Class P l a y ; " P y r a m u s and T h i s b e " Club • B.V.C. C l u b ; H . K . K .

HERMAN PAUL HARMS, A r c h e r . I o w a /T histle and she'll come to you. Science Course. E m e r s o n i a n ; V i c e - P r e s i d e n t , W i n t e r T e r m '29; Basketball '25, '26; P r e - m e d i c C l u b ; Band '25, '26, '27; H . K K

ESTHER BRINK, H o l l a n d . M i c h i g a n Daylight and lantern light ivere one to her. Modern Language-English Course. Dorian; V i c e - P r e s i d e n t '28; P r e s i d e n t ' 2 9 ; Senior Class P l a y ; S.G.A.

JOHAN MULDER, H o l l a n d . M i c h i g a n My heart is true as steel. Classical Course. K n i c k e r b o c k e r ; Vice-President '29; H o m e V o l u n t e e r s '28, ' 2 9 ; P r e s i d e n t '29T r a c k '28, '29; M a n a g e r ' 2 9 ; A t h l e t i c Board ' 2 9 ! Van \ leek H o u s e C o m m i t t e e ' 2 9 ; Business Staff Senior Class P l a y ; H . K . K .

ANDREW VINSTRA, L a f a y e t t e . I n d i a n a W hat U you

bet he never

calls

again?

ADA BOONE, H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n Thoughts are mightier than the strength of hand. M odern Language-English Course. Dorian; S.G.A

WILLIAM

FREDERICK

BESVVICK. P a s s a i c ,

N.

J.

The very pink of courtesy. Course. Science Knickerbocker; President, W i n t e r T e r m '29; Vice-President, S p r i n g T e r m 29; Pre-Medic Club; H.K.K.

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RAYMOND E. VAN RAALTE, H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n Men of jew words are the best men. Science Course. B a s k e t b a l l '25, ' 2 6 : T r a c k '21 • r o o t b a l l '27, '28.

EVERETT BEKKE.X, H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n He tvas a gentleman from sole to crown. Clean favored and imperially slim. H i s l o r j - Course. C o s m o p o l i t a n ; V i c e - P r e s i d e n t 28; Baseball '26, '27, '28, '29; Basketball Reserves 26; Captain ' 2 7 ; Basketball '28; Class Basketball 2 9 ; D r a m a Class Plav ' 2 8 ; Senior Class P l a y ; S t u d e n t Council '28; Class ViceP r e s i d e n t 29; .Monogram C l u b ; 1I.K.K. • Pvram u s and T h i s b e '29.

HARRY J. CLARK, H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n There's gold in them thar hills. Classical Course. V. M. C. A. Cabinet ' 2 7 ; Dickensian ; S t u d e n t V o l u n t e e r s ; I I . K . K .

HAZEL NEERKEN, H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n y ou have deserved high commendation. M o d e r n L a u g u a g e - E n g l i s h Course. S. Salutatorian.

G. A. ;

JOHN TYSSE, S o u t h H o l l a n d , I l l i n o i s Dumped

down

in paradise,

nobody

is happy.

Course

' E m e r s o n i a n ; V i c e - P r e s i d e n t '28( Ihlas C l u b ; V i c e - P r e s i d e n t ' 2 8 ; H o m e Volmit e e i s ; Gospel 1 earn '28, ' 2 9 ; H o u s e C o m m i t t e e , Van Vleck H a l l ; P r e s i d e n t ' 2 9 ; I I . K . K . ; D r a m a Class P l a y ; M a n a g e r '29.

FLOYD I. KLEINJAN, V o l g a , S o u t h D a k o t a Those that secuted.

have

visions

among

them

are

per-

H i s t o r y Course. D i c k e n s i a n ; H o m e V o l u n t e e r s 27; S t u d e n t V o l u n t e e r s ; P r e s i d e n t '29; f l l i l a s C l u b ; Gospel T e a m 27, '28, '29- V M C A Cabinet '28; T r a c k '26, ' 2 7 ; Baseball '28, '29 •' College A l l - S t a r s ' 2 9 ; I I . K . K

HARRIET BOONE, H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n She couldu Modern S.G.A.

t kep away from doing something. Language-English Course. Dorian;

HAROLD KRAAI, O r a n g e City. I o w a Undimmed by human tears. M a t h e m a t i c s Course. D i c k e n s i a n ; Ulfilas • J u l i u s Caesar '28; H . K . K .

Pagt

Thirty-one

X


WALTER J. B. HYINK, H o s p e r s , I o w a A man bent toward economy. Science Course. F r a t e r n a l ; H . K . K . ; P r e - m e d i c C l u b ; Vice-President ' 2 9 ; " H " C l u b ; Baseball '27, '28, H o p e "All S t a r s " ; Basketball T e a m ; Band '27, '28, ' 2 9 ; D r a m a Class Play, Business M a n a g e r ' 2 9 ; Class Basketball '25-'29.

EVELYN MARIE WAGEISAAR, C o n s t a n t i n e , M i c h . Strength uses props to escape from props. Modern Language-English Course. Dorian; Y. W . C. A. Cabinet '28; Secretary ' 2 9 ; Gospel T e a m '28, '29; S. G. A.

GERTRUDE BOS, H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n Merit wins the soul. Calvin College '26, '27 ; M o d e r n L a n g u a g e E n g lish C o u r s e ; S. G. A.

CLARENCE KLAASEN, H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n Discretion of speech is more than eloquence. Mathematics Course. Emersonian; Reserve Basketball T e a m '25, '26; Class Basketball T e a m ' 2 8 ; T e n n i s T e a m '28; H . K. K.

JOHN L. KLAY, O r a n g e City, I o w a / am slow of study. H i s t o r y Course. E m e r s o n i a n ; H . K . K . ; Football '25, '26, '27, '28; M a n a g e r '27; Co-Captain '28; Basketball Reserves '25, '26; Varsity '26, '27, '28, ' 2 9 ; T r a c k V a r s i t y '28; Baseball Varsity '28.

IN A DECR ACKER, M a r i o n , N e w Y o r k Gentle of speech, beneficent in mind. Classical Course, D o r i a n ; Y. W . C. A . ; Cabinet '28, ' 2 9 ; Gospel T e a m '28; D r a m a Class P l a y ; S. G. A.

EVANGELINE M . GROOTERS, N o r t h p o r t , M i c h i g a n

Honest labor ivears a lovely face. L a t i n Course. D o r i a n ; P r e s i d e n t '28; D r a m a Class P l a y '29; S. G. A . ; Gospel T e a m '29.

HERMAN KNOL, Cicero, I l l i n o i s Alert in the presence of opportunity and openeared to the call of conscience. Classical Course. D i c k e n s i a n ; P r e s i d e n t '28; H o m e V o l u n t e e r s ; Ulfilas C l u b ; J u l i u s C a e s a r ; Class B a s k e t b a l l ; Gospel T e a m .

Page

Thirty-two


RUTH VANDER LINDEN, C o o p e r s v i l l e , M i c h i g a n Marriage is a desperate thing. Modern LanguaRe-Enplish Course. Delphi; V i c e - P r e s i d e n t ' 2 8 ; Y. W . C. A. Cabinet ' 2 8 ; Gospel T e a m ' 2 7 ; S. G. A. • Senior Class P l a y .

•s*

r-

DICK MOUW, H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n

M/'M

A boy's will is the wind's will. Science Course. Dickensian ; Science Club, Milestone S t a f f ; H . K. K. ; Calvin College '26, '27.

BERNARD VAN OSS, H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n Let the world slide. Science Course.

JOSEPHINE A . LIPPENCA, Z e e l a n d , M i c h i g a n She travels the fastest who travels alone. English-Modern L a n g u a g e Course. Dorian; S e c r e t a r y ' 2 9 ; Gospel T e a m '28, '29; S. G. A.

I iiitf HL

MARRIET DK GROOT, W a u p u n . W i s c o n s i n Gentle in manner, firm in reality. R i p o n College. H i s t o r y Course. S i b y l l i n e ; President 29; D r a m a Class P l a y ' 2 8 ; S e n i o r Class P l a y ' 2 9 ; S. G. A.

EDWARD L. SWARTOUT, A l b a n y , N e w Y o r k Holidays come and you're sick; When you get well, there is school. Classical Course. A d d i s o n ; P r e s i d e n t ' 2 9 ; H o m e V o l u n t e e r s ; P r e s i d e n t '28; T r a c k T e a m '27, '28 '29; Class Basketball ' 2 9 ; D r a m a Class Play 29; Gospel T e a m ; H . K. K.

|

GEORGE DE ROOS, S p r i n g F i e l d , S o u t h D a k o t a There is a touch dictionaries.

oj

two

hands

that

jails

all

Classical Course. D i c k e n s i a n ; P r e s i d e n t ' 2 9 ; Julius Caesar; Uufilas Club; Monogram Club; Track T e a m '27, ' 2 8 ; H . K. K.

f

j Js

ELIDA DEN HERDER, S i o u x C e n t e r , I o w a i

Give us a song" the soldiers cried. M o d e r n L a n g u a g e - E n g l i s h Course. D r a m a Class Play ' 2 8 ; S w e a t e r Club '25, '26; H a r m o n y Glee Club '26; O r c h e s t r a ; A. D. D . ; S. G. A.

Page

Thirty-three


PETER SCHOLTEN, H a w a r d e n , I o w a It's women that seduces all mankind. Science Course. C o s m o p o l i t a n ; M e n ' s Glee Club '26, '27, '28, '29; M e n ' s Gospel T e a m '26, '27, '28, *29; H. K. K . ; Class Basketball '26, 2 7 ; Stage M a n a g e r , D r a m a Class P l a y '29.

LESTER VANDE POEL, H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n It was right that he should have his fling. M a t h e m a t i c s Course. E m e r s o n i a n ; H . K K â&#x20AC;˘ Reserve Basketball '27; Class Basketball T e a m '26, '28, '29; T e n n i s T e a m '28.

ALICE LAMMERS, S i o u x Center. I o w a She spoke; though others heard. She kept her gaze still fixed, as on some problem in the sky. H i s t o r y Course. D o r i a n ; Vice-President ' 2 8 ; P r e s i d e n t '29; A. D. D . ; V. \V. C. A. Cabinet '28; H o u s e C o m m i t t e e '29; H a r m o n y Glee C l u b ; S. G. A . ; Gospel T e a m '29; A t h l e t i c Board '29. RAYMOND DE YOUNG, K a l a m a z o o , M i c h i g a n He loved, but the story we cannot unfold. H i s t o r y Course. K n i c k e r b o c k e r ; President ' 2 8 ; Class P r e s i d e n t '27; Football '26, '27, '28; Captain '28; Basketball '28, '29; T r a c k '27, '28, '29; Captain, 28; Athletic B o a r d ; P r e s i d e n t ' 2 8 ; " H " C l u b ; Milestone S t a f f : Y. M. C. A. Cabi n e t ; Gospel T e a m ; Senior Class P l a y ; B. V. C Club.

FRANK BROKAW, O w a s c o , N e w York The loving are the daring. H i s t o r y Course. K n i c k e r b o c k e r ; V i c e - P r e s i d e n t , Fall T e r m , '29; H o u s e P r e s i d e n t , K. H. N. ; T r e a s u r e r , Senior C l a s s ; H . K. K.

DOROTHY STROOP, H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n Whose body lodged a mighty mind. L a t i n Course. S. G. A . ; Valedictorian.

WILLIAM HUGHES, P a s s a i c , N e w J e r s e y Oh, I have sailed the seven seas. Science Course. K n i c k e r b o c k e r ; Milestone Staff '25, '26, '27; A n c h o r Staff '27, '28; Band '26, '27 ; H o u s e Committee, V a n Vleck, '27; PrcMedic C l u b ; Science C l u b ; H. K. K.

HARM TIMMER, S t e e n , M i n n e s o t a A decent

baldness

ever meets

with

friends.


LAVERNE R .

SANDY,

Central Park. Holland. Michigan Honor lies in honest toil. Classical Course. D i c k e n s i a n ; H . K. K.

ELEANOR VERWEY, N e w York, N e w Y o r k Silence that spoke and eloquence of eyes. M a t h e m a t i c s Course. Dorian; Vice-President ' 2 9 ; M i l e s t o n e Staff '28; A n c h o r Staff '28, '29; Senior Class P l a y ; H o u s e C o m m i t t e e , V o o r h e e s H a l l '28, ' 2 9 ; S. G. A.

EVELYN WELMERS, Grand R a p i d s , M i c h i g a n What an imposter H i s t o r y Course. c h o r Staff '28.

Genius is. S i b y l l i n e ; Y . W . C. A . ; An-

JACOB C. GULICK, N e w b u r g h , N e w Y o r k They have rights who dare maintain them. H i s t o r y Course. A d d i s o n ; V i c e - P r e s i d e n t ' 2 9 ; II. K. K.

KENNETH HYINK, C e d a r Grove, W i s c o n s i n But I have promises to keep. And miles to go before I sleep. H i s t o r y Course. C o s m o p o l i t a n ; P r e s i d e n t '29; Editor-in-chief Mi l e st o n e ' 2 8 ; D e b a t i n g '27, ' 2 8 ; M a n a g e r of O r a t o r y ' 2 9 ; Pi K a p p a D e l t a ; Student Council '29; Class O r a t o r ; Class B a s k e t b a l l ; H . K. K.

MARY A . WALDRON, Y o n k e r s , N e w Y o r k There are get aivay.

those

who

talk

of going,

but

never

Modern Language-English Course. Sorosis; \ ice-President '27; P r e s i d e n t ' 2 9 ; H o u s e Comm i t t e e ' 2 5 ; S. G. A.

MARGARET W. OTTE, East N o r t l i f i e l d , M a s s . Her circle of friends will ever grow. For she's the kind of a girl it's well to know. H i s t o r y Course. D e l p h i : P r e s i d e n t '28; S t u d e n t V o l u n t e e r ; Glee Club '28, ' 2 9 ; Gospel T e a m ;

CLARENCE BREMEU. H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n A man can do what man has done. S c i e n c e - M a t h e m a t i c s Course. T r a c k '27; Chemistry '27, 28,'29; S e c r e t a r y zci; H . K. K.

Pagt

Thirty-five


1

9

X

CHARLES EDWARD ROZEMA, F r e m o n t . M i c h i g a n Here is a man to hold against the world, A man to match the mountains and the sea. Science Course. E m e r s o n i a n ; Class T r e a s u r e r '28; Senior Class P r e s i d e n t ; S t u d e n t Council P r e s i d e n t ; Athletic Board of c o n t r o l ; E m e r sonian Vice-President '28; C h e m i s t r y C l u b ; T r a c k T e a m '28, ' 2 9 ; H. K. K.

MARTHA VAN BUREN, M i l l e n v i l l e . N e w Y o r k Young in limbs; In judgment, old. H i s t o r y Course. Athletic Board '27; D r a m a Class Play '28; Milestone '28; Y. W . C. A. Cabinet '28; A. D. D . ; S. G. A . ; D e l p h i ; ViceP r e s i d e n t '29; H o u s e - P r e s i d e n t '29.

KATHRYN ANNE SCHAAFSMA, H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n Sweet mercy is nobility's true badge. English M odern L a n g u a g e Course. Vice-President '29; S. G. A.

Sibylline;

STANLEY KLEINHEKSEL, H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n He can dream and not make dreams his master. H o p e C h e m i s t r y Club '27, '28; President '29.

JOE DE VRIES, S h e l d o n . I o w a He tried each study and proved a shark. Mathematics Course. Emersonian; Science C l u b ; P r e s i d e n t '29; H . K. K. ; Band '26, '27

SARAH KLOOSTER, A t w o o d , M i c h i g a n The beauty of her quiet life. If as like a rose in blooming. H i s t o r y Course. D e l p h i ; P r e s i d e n t '29, W i n t e r T e r m ; Y. W . C. A. Cabinet '28; President ' 2 9 ; Gospel T e a m '27, 28, ' 2 9 ; S. G. A.

JULE ALBERTA OSSEWARDE, Z e e l a n d , M i c h i g a n April's the time to woo! H i s t o r y Course. Sibylline; President ' 2 9 ; S. G. A . ; A. U, D . ; M. S. C. '28.

ROY BREMER, H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n Constancy to purpose. Science-Mathematics '26, '27, '28. '29.

Page

Thirty-six

Course.

Chemistry

Club

9


M

|

O

N

E

GERRIT REZELMAN, H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n hor soon or late,

love

is his own avenger.

r L ' r t ' " - , Course. Dickensian ; H o m e V o l u n t e e r s : Ulhlas C l u b ; J u l i u s C a e s a r ; H . K. K.

LEON DE PREE, Z e e l a n d , M i c h i g a n Make

me immortal

in mortality.

Science Course. Science C l u b ; ' 2 9 ; H . K. K . ; B. V. C.

Vice-President

MARJORIE DU MEZ, H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n Soft is the music that would charm forever. M o d e r n L a n g u a g e Course. S i b y l l i n e ; P r e s i d e n t 29; S t u d e n t Council '28; S e c r e t a r y ; V. W . C. A. Cabinet '28; Milestone Associate E d i t o r 2 8 ; O r c h e s t r a ' 2 8 ; S. G. A.

EVA VAN SCHAACK, C o x s a c k i e , N e w York A progeny of learning. Science Course. D o r i a n ; S. G. A.

EDITH MCGILVRA, S i o u x C e n t e r , I o w a And they will pass, these people that I know. And understand a little, and love much. Y W . C. A. Cabinet '28; V i c e - P r e s i d e n t '29; A l e t h e a ; V i c e - P r e s i d e n t '27; P r e s i d e n t '29 T r u m p e t Q u a r t e t t e '28, ' 2 9 ; S. G. A. Vice-Presid e n t ; Gospel T e a m '28, 29; Senior Class P l a y .

"*

â&#x20AC;˘<*

**

**

H El H

H

P

P*

HENRY P . WACKERBARTH, J e r s e y City, N . J. He's on his way. H i s t o r y - C l a s s i c a l Course. E m e r s o n i a n ; Vicep r e s i d e n t '29; A t h l e t i c Association T r e a s u r e r ' 2 9 ; H o m e V o l u n t e e r s ; V i c e - P r e s i d e n t '28; D r a m a Class P l a y Business M a n a g e r ' 2 8 ; Pageant of '28, A s s i s t a n t Business M a n a g e r ; H . K. K. ; B. V. C. C l u b ; S t a g e M a n a g e r Senior Class P l a y .

(y

Thirty-seven


SENIOR

GIRLS'

ASSOCIATION

\ ery n e a i l \ foui years have elapsed since we first made our appearance on the campus, as Freshman in September of 1925. They have been filled to overflowing; with activities of all kinds: good. bad. and indifferent, we suppose. Of course we are sorry for the times when we have failed to do our best, and for the opportunities of which we have not made the most, but we love rather to think of the good and fine things we can carry with us, in memory, during the years to come. Not least among these memories will be the hours spent together in our S. G. A. meetings. These monthly gatherings have meant a great deal to all of us. Girls who were merely classmates before are now called friends, friends in whom we have a special interest. \ ^ e want to know what the years will bring for each and every one ol us and are making plans whereby we, the girls of the Class of '29, will always remain the true friends we are today. That is why we are thankful f o r Hope College and the Senior Girls Association. OFFICERS

President Vice-Presidents Secretary-T reasurer.

Page

Thirty-eight

GRACE KOEPPE BEATRICE V A N D E R K A M P ,

EDITH

DOROTHY

MCGILVRA BLEKKINK


HOPE

KURFEW

KLUB

In accordance with established tradition, the Senior men organized themselves in the past fall as the Hope K u r f e w K l u b or the H.K.K. as it is called. The purpose of (he organization as followed out by this year's H.K.K. is twofold â&#x20AC;&#x201D; firstly, to promote and maintain a feeling of fellowship and friendliness between the Senior men, and secondly, to instill in the minds of the lower classmen, particularly the Freshmen, a respect for the dignity of Seniors and for the traditions of the school. We feel that we have been singularly successful in promoting these aims. Ibis year's body, departing f r o m the age-worn tradition of derbies and canes, provided themselves with campus coats made up in the College colors. This f e a t u r e has served to distinguish the Senior men f r o m the other male students on the campus. 1 he H.K.K. has fostered several social gatherings during the year and has proven itself a live-wire organization in every respect. OFFICERS President Vice-President

CLARENCE DIEPIIOUSE A L V I N V A M I E R BI SH

Page

Thirty-nine


mmm T

H

K4

1

i.

o

THE

t>

CHAPEL

â&#x20AC;˘

TOWER

Before I knew your calm majestic strength, Before you held me high up in your arms, I was a stranger to your sovereign grace; I only knew the shadow of your charms. But looking f r o m your turret's highest ledge My heart became the bee upon a flower; The honey that 1 held was just to know That 1 was standing in a music bower. The wind became a thousand silver notes, My heart became a pulsing set of chimes; And where none but the wind has ever played I caught a melody of songs and rimes. P. A. E., '30.

Pagt

Forty

9


juniors


â&#x20AC;˘

9

CARL V A N L E N T E

JUNIOR

CLASS

The Class of 1930 came back last fall fewer in number, but as f a i t h f u l to their motto, Co-operation and Progress, as ever. This year its members have been leaders in all the activities on the campus, and have proved themselves worthy of Hope. Only one year of active life on the campus remains, a year during which we try to produce as many results as possible. On the work of our past college depends the success of the next year, so '"live your best and act your best and your best today; for today is the sure preparation for tomorrow and all the tomorrows that follow."

OFFICERS President Vice-President Treasurers Secretary Council

Pags

Forty-two

CAUL

VAN

ROXIE

LENTE

HALDANE

BERNARD ARENDSHORST, LOIS D E W O L F SUZANNE SCHOEP

Representatives

JANET YONKER.

ALVIN COOK

shall days think other

X

9


T

H

E

I L E

S T

O N

E

M Y R A R O S E T E N GATE, H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n

Let some later [over's brow W rinkle at the thought of this one now."

CARL F. VAN LENTE, H o l l a n d . M i c h i g a n

"Now the mountain Behold my Juniors

top is won. in the sun."

EARL MOSIER, F e n n v i l l e . M i c h i g a n

"Glass walls do not a prison make For fish who find a bowl a lake."

GRACE W . DUHRKOPH, H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n

When I was young, my hopes ran high-My hopes did run, and so could I."

VERNA A L M E D A BROWER. H o l l a n d . M i c h i g a n

"Hour by hour goes slowly past; The stars, like bads, fade at last."

M ILLARD DE JOJNGE, Z e e l a n d , M i c h i g a n

"Tame your wild and wayward To my love-sick measure."

air

HENRY WOLTHORN, Grand Rapids. M i c h i g a n "A man to whom a million women cling; A man who's not afraid of anything."

RUTH KOSTER, W i l l i a m s o n . N e w Y o r k

"Always getting ready, some place to go. This may be false, but I know it's so."

ROXY HALDANE, P o r t l a n d , M a i n e

"They say a rolling stone's a loss: And yet I see no use in moss."

MARVIN KUIZENCA, H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n

"The leopard cannot change his spots. In short, they're his for-get-nots."

Pagt

Forty-three


T H E

M I L E S T O N

^

^

-»•

-v

^

I

9

PAUL NETTINGA, FFolland, M i c h i g a n

"I seldom mean a single thing I say, or (as the phrase goes) sing."

JULIA VAN DAM, Hudsonville. M i c h i g a n "Her lot approaches human life; Her days are full of fear and strife."

RUTH DAANE, Grand Rapids, M i c h i g a n "Since our own delights must end. Introduce me to your friend."

RUSSEL SMITH. H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n

"/ understand that women are As fickle as a gift cigar."

HAROLD DYKHUIZEN,

Holland, Michigan

"With rue my heart is laden. For many a lass I had."

DORIS BROWER, H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n

"Love,

after all, is but a delusion."

DOROTHY VANDER SCHEL, H o l l a n d ,

Michigan

"All that glitters will for gold Glitter more a thousand-fold."

BURNS KOEKOEK, W a u p u n , W i s c o n s i n

' Always unto others do What they'd like to do to you."

HAROLD JAPPINCA, H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n

"Some day perhaps you'll fall. You'll have reason then to bawl."

MARION KATTE, Z e e l a n d , M i c h i g a n

"With an innocent But plenty spice,

Page Forty-jour

savor. for flavor."

2.

9


T H E

M I L E

S T O M

E

l

9

JOAN VANDER WERF, H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n

"Lady, to whose feet I'd bring The world, ij I could win it."

ARTHUR V A N ARENDONK, W a l l k i l l , N e w Y o r k

"Are you sure of anything For a single minute?"

HENRY STEFFENS, H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n

"/ dreamed I stood in the forest, And heard the singing birds."

SUZANNE SCHOEP, Platte. South Dakota "As sweet as thine were their voices. And as mellow-like their words."

MILDRED DE FREE, Z e e l a n d , M i c h i g a n

"I do not question woman's place: She's entered in the human race."

EDWIN D E JONCH, H o l l a n d . M i c h i g a n

"No matter what the morrow brings. Inventors are inventing things."

LEONARD HOCENBOOM, C l y m e r , N e w

York

"Me, alas, you have forsaken; Now you love another lad."

ALICE BRUNSON, H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n

"And I see I teas mistaken, Thinking that I would be sad."

MYRTLE TEN HAVE, Z e e l a n d , M i c h i g a n

"There may be some, whose ways are meek. If 'ho dream submission to a sheik."

ARTHUR OUDEMOOL. H o l l a n d . M i c h i g a n

"Who'd like to waste their love and care And sweetness on a desert heir?"

Pagf

Forty-five

1


M I L E

S T

O M

X

WARREN DE FREE, l l o l l a n d . M i c h i g a n

"A man who'd rather work than eat. And doesn't have to cook his meat."

JANET YONKER. H o l l a n d . M i c h i g a n

"Fe wish our minds would let us take You as you are for your own sake."

ANN HEYBOER, Hudsonville, M i c h i g a n "If Fate despise her own elect. What on earth do you expect?"

WILBUR VANDER SCHAAF, O r a n g e C i t y , I o w a

"And so it goes, from dawn to dusk; There's never corn ; there's only husk."

RICHARD ELZINGA, C h i c a g o , I l l i n o i s

"There is nothing so kingly as kindness. And nothing so royal as truth."

HELEN MARIE BROEK,

Holland.

Michigan

"Psycho-analyzed, you stand And meditate your little hand."

MYRTLE KLOOSTER, H o l l a n d . M i c h i g a n

"If you love me, as I love you, We'll both be friendly and untrue."

PHILLIP ENGEL, G h e n t , N e w Y o r k

"It's no use â&#x20AC;&#x201D; so great the curse is, 1 ou go from bad to worse, then verses."

STANLEY J . VERHEY, H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n

"The lips that are so eager. The lips that would deny."

ARTHUR MICHMEHHUIZEN, H o l l a n d . M i c h i g a n

"/ like Holland best for this: Because they put it where it is."

Paz: forty-six

9


E

GENE\A

\ AM)EN

8

BRINK, H o l l a n d ,

9 Michigan

Twinkle, twinkle, Utile star. But stay, my darling, where you are."

BERNARD ARENDSHORST, H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n

"Into my life if you should fall, I'd never see you shine at all."

MARVIN B. MEENGS, H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n

"Maiden Maiden

with the cheeks of cherry, with the eyes of blue."

GEORGIAN\A FREDRICKS, M u s k e g o n ,

"Much Much

I thought / thought

Michigan

you loved me very. that I loved you."

L o i s E. DE WOLFE. Rochester, N e w York "For all de wolfs in sheep's attire, A hundred thousand sheep aspire."

HERMAN KRUIZENCA, Spring Lake, M i c h i g a n "Blonde or Titian or brunette. Some of them will get you yet."

RAYMOND STEKETEE, H o l l a n d . M i c h i g a n

"And, having swerved, no might or main Can ever put him straight again."

A N N A M A \ ENGELSMAN, R a n d o l p h , W i s c o n s i n

"And in that dark and fatal hour. My brave arithmetic went sour."

WILHELMINA WALVOORD, H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n

"If winter come to winter. If hen shall men hope for spring?"

DONALD MACCLAIN

WADE,

N e w Brunswick, N e w Jersey "I 'nless he willed, he would not. Though all the world should urge."

Pags Forty-sevtn


JOHN BRINK. H a m i l t o n , M i c h .

"Soldiers have to fight and swear To win the stripes they proudly wear."

MILDRED J. VERHACE, Z e e l a n d . M i c h i g a n

"And yet 1 should be quite cast down To see the country come to town."

HILDA AIKEN, A l e x a n d r i a B a y , N e w Y o r k

"Do you in your triumph, think We'll stay forever on the blink?"

MARVIN SHOEMAKER, H o l l a n d . M i c h i g a n

"Now alas, it is too late To buy Manhattan real estate."

SIDNEY HEERSMA. O a k L a w n , I l l i n o i s

"Amid such swell variety. Can I, discontented be?"

BERTHA OLCERS, H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n

"From coast to coast the railroads roam. Yet every inch of rail strays home."

RUTH VAN ALSBURC, H o l l a n d . M i c h i g a n

"W ait a year or two, and see What a different girl you'll be."

LAMBERT OLGERS, H o l l a n d . M i c h i g a n

"Too much philosopher to wake For catnip, siren, milk or steak."

GARRETT NONHOF, Prairie View. Kansas "He who spent every sorrow. Is far too proud to come and borrow."

RUTH HIEFTJE, Z e e l a n d . M i c h i g a n

*7 like to think 1 think And so I think should

Page Forty-eight

I do, you."


JULIA MAY VAN OSS, Holland, M i c h i g a n "I could not love thee, dear, so much, Were I not born to be in Dutch."

HENRY BAST, F e n n v i l l e , M i c h i g a n

"The very horses seem to talk About me, as before they walk."

CLARENCE SCHIPPER, Z e e l a n d . M i c h i g a n

"You should try and get some sleep. For men must work or women weep."

GERTRUDE BENES, T h a y e r . I n d i a n a

"A girl that wakes a fellow up. Should have been a buttercup."

PHYLLIS D E JONCE, H o s p e r s I o w a

"I'm sorry that I ever said against you."

one unkind

word

STANLEY VAN LARE, W a l c o t t . N e w Y o r k

"And when my time is come to die, There will not be a grave to buy."

ALVIN JAMES COOK, H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n

"With your share of trouble spent. You should flower in content."

GLADYS HUIZINCA, H o l l a n d . M i c h i g a n

"If we told you what to do Then Ziegfeld would come to glorify

you."

GERTRUDE LEUSSENKAMP, Grand Rapids, Mich. "You are simple as a daisy. You are blushful as a rose."

MARTIN SCHOLTEN, H o l l a n d . M i c h i g a n

"Of course, you say, a lot I care. My heart is weak. I won't be there."

••••

Pagf

Forty-nine


1

9

MABEL ESSENBURG, H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n

"So feed your lover pansy buds, When you are short of bread."

NICHOLAS L A N M N C , Z e e l a n d , M i c h i g a n

''I'd fire a bullet at the sky. Trample the music down and die."

JOHIN BERGHORST, West Olive, M i c h i g a n "He deems the treasured pearl a fault. And takes his world with ample salt."

BERNADINE SIEBERS, Grand Rapids, M i c h i g a n "The head that wears a crown Inclined to some anxiety."

may be

EVELYN STEKETEE, H o l l a n d . M i c h i g a n

' Some may prefer to sit and shirk. But I must do, my own, art work."

HENDRIK NOBEL, H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a

"You'll not die of mortal ache: They'll hang you by mistake."

WARREN KREUNEN, O n n , W i s c o n s i n

' Oh, go and say that women are As changeful as a bootleg bar."

ANNE RUTH

DP

IOUNG. C h i c a g o , Illinois

'7 want to take a ship and go Abroad, but where I do not know."

HARRIET MAE BARON, H o l l a n d . M i c h i g a n

"The lady of my heart is one Who has no peer beneath the sun."

HARVEY WOLTMAN, H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n

"For sheer urbanity, I deem A man deserving of the cream."

Page

Fifty

X

9


H

C

I I-

E

S

T

O

M

£

-v

—•

1 9

JACOB TICELAAR, J a m e s t o w n , M i c h i g a n

"There's nothing sweeter than a bride, I j you're not standing by her side."

H O W A R D SCHOLTEIM,

Holland,

Michigan

"Stir not till / have my say. The girl you love will run away."

DONALD AMOS

HICKS, A l t o o n a ,

Pennsylvania

"I burned my candle at both ends. And now have neither joes nor friends."

•3*

jfe

HARRIET SCHURMAN, H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n

"Every time you love again. Former lovers failed in vain."

WILLIAM JANSEN, Z e e l a n d , M i c h i g a n

"Tomorrow comes, tomorrow goes; The thorn intrudes upon the rose."

r REINA DE JONCE, M u s k e g o n , M i c h i g a n

"With gentle yet prevailing force. Intent upon her destined course."

1

9


THE

PIECE

OF

STRING

He spoke, with dancing eyes, Recalling many college pranks and then â&#x20AC;&#x201D; "It is these many years Since I have seen the dear old campus grounds. But near the walk a tree Grows that has changed as much as these two hand That pressed its tiny roots. "You, with a piece of string, Can measure off the maple's greatest girth And send it back to me." Finding the tree I clipped the length of string; And as I licked the seal I wondered what was being locked within â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Surely more than a piece of string! P . A. E., '30


L o u i s SCHUDDER

EDWIN TELLMAN

S O P H O M O R E CLASS 1 lie Class of 3] has finished its second year of College life. A glorious year of pep. enthusiasm and excitement, it has been, our first chance to do our bit for Hope on our own initiative. It has not been a year of great achievements, but rather, we hope, one of great beginnings. We have finisl^d one-half of our college life, the half where we stand back and enjoy the achievements of our upper classmen. The other half lies before us, the half of our leadership anil our accomplishments. Next year we shall be upper classmen. It is our desire that as such we may be respected and admired. May we be true leaders in all that Hope stands for. May the (.lass of >1 be the greatest class to leave this College, not only greatest in numbers, but greatest in our contributions to Hope. In the last year we have gained in self reliance and in the knowledge of the use of intellectual tools. We have advanced in seriousness and sincerity. We have resolved to make each year steps in advance for ourselves and for Hope. "Let us then be up and doing With a heart for any f a t e ; Still achieving, still pursuing. Learn to labor and to wait." OFFICERS

First Semester

S e c o n d Semester

L o u i s SCUDUER

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

HDW'N

Vice Presidenl

JOKN

IELLMAN MULDER

Secretary

1 ILLIE M A S S E L I N K CORNELIUS V A N

Treasurer

LEUWEN

Student

Page Fifty-four

President

Council

EDWIN TELLMAN RAYMOND

MCGILVRA

ESTHER

MULDER

LUCILLE WALVOORD WILLARD WICKERS

CYNTHIA

PALMER, HARRY SMITH


f l LEENHOUTS

M.BOTER

BOSHKA

M.RDTTSCHAFER H.VER STRWE

6.FELL

C.PALMER

A . BUTH

C.KOOPMAN

G.HANSON

A.BRUNSON

E..GEE.RLtNGS

N.BURGGR^ff

R.BOLHUIS

C.liEENGS

J OE. HAAN

L.VANOER \NERF

H VAN EENENAAM

> * .1

D.DEGOED

H.BOONE

J.SPYKER

R.EVENHUIS

E.HEFFROM

S.RENSINK

B.KIEINESTAKER

R.BAILARD

W.W1CHERS

O D E BENDER

E GUNOLAH

MANOERSON

A VAN HARN

H.HOFFMAN

M KINKEMA

T.ZAND5TRA

J.HONDEUNK

A.ALDAY

f t WEST VEER

R.HOODEMA

LDECOOK

O.EHLE

J.BOUMA

TMASSEL1NK

I'nge- Fijty-fiv


C NtTTINGA

APEELtN

E.POPPINK

J ROOtNBERC

E.RUAARSDAM

E.OINGS

H.KLMSEN

R.GLERUM

J.JUIST

O.JOHNSON

BVERntER

J.KAPER

k J.EISKAMP

H PAALMftN

L.SCUOOER

p r F. DUNKIRK

M COSTING

R.EVERHART

•^9

¥ D. ZANDSTRA C.VAN LEUWEN

A KOEMAN

P.ARENDSEN

WKUIPER

E.SMIES

T.KNAPP

H.PHILLIPS

B.SCHOUTEN

S.YNTEMA

t . MULDER

G.HUENtCK

M.KLOOSTERMAN

C.SMITH

I. PRINCE

J.MULDER

PrtSi- Filly-six

MJCHUPPERT

E.TELLMAN

G.KORVER

D.VANDE BUNTE

M LORDAHL

E.VANOEM BELT

R.MC 61LVRA

L.NYKAMP


T H E

M I L E S T O N E

E.DEGRAAr

L WAIVOORO

A.ANTAR

-*

~

1 9

M.SLUYTER

H.SMITH

D H ^ N

A DYKHUIZEN

RIVtRHWKT

P.BROUWER

A.RICHARDSON

A.POPMA

S. FOX

R.NOORTHOEK

M.OtKUIPER

W.SH1TH

E.ALBERS

B.SMITH

C.BECKER

H.JANSSEN

C.MOREHOUSE

Page Fifty-seven

3 L 9


T

H

E

E

8

T

O

N

E

v

-*â&#x20AC;˘

MUNIFICENCE

A starling picks the dried grapes f r o m the vine That clings around my icy window f r a m e ; He has put aside that form of shrinking fear That a hunter's gun instills in all wild game. But I cannot move to mar his noisy feast, Though well aware that early buds will bring The bandit to some f a r m e r ' s thrifty trees As if he were the taster for a king.

P. A. E., '30

1

9

X

9


ROBERT NOTIER

ROGER V O S K U I L

FRESHMEN

CLASS

"Aw do it right this time — when I turn the crank you push that d o f u n n y on the wheel up, step on the third whatchit on the floorboard, and p u m p the •— oh you know, the jigger on the dash — it's easy." Perhaps these instructions would have nothing to do with College life in the form presented, but such seemed the orders to the Freshman class. When they got started, however, all became plain and thus their journey began. A f t e r a few stops f o r class parties and the usual get-togethers, they resumed their first year tour. Few bumps were hit but one mud hole stopped their course for a few days. This did not dampen their hopes very much as they "came b a c k " during basketball season. Their athletes are good and they hope to see some of them on the varsity team next year. Some of the members became interested in the Glee Clubs, more of them joined various societies, others became members of the Y. M. and Y. W. During this trip they were a loyal group, staying together and ever ready to do their best. Now that the first tour of the Class of '32 is almost over and they can translate the above orders as "Aw do it right now — when I turn the crank, push the spark on the steering wheel up, step on the starter on the floorboard, and pull the choke which is on the dash — it's easy," they are ready to return to start on their Sophomore trip. OFFICERS

First Semester ROBERT HAROLD

S e c o n d Semester

NOTIEK

President

HOOVER

VERA V A N

Vice-President

DUREN

MARY HARPER IVAN J O H N S O N

VOSKUIL

WALVOORD

Secretary

EDITH DRESCHER

Treasurer

DOROTHY LARSON WILLIAM

Student Council

Page Sixty

ROGER CARL

ADELIA BEEUWKES, ROY M O O I

AUSTIN


T H E

M I L E S T O N E

IN

-

1

9

MEMORIAM

ARTHUR SCHERMERHORN

"Death

came upon him like an untimely

frost"

Page Sixty-one

X

9


R.HOSPERS

W.AUSTIN

H. STROVEN

L.ELLER8R0EK

E.HINKAMP

J.HARMS

N. DERKS

R.KLAASEN

M.KOSEGARDEN

O, DRESSEL

E.TEN BRINK

R.AIKEN

R. NICHOLS

M.DE KLEINE

S.My-l:'

G.DOGGER

H.OALMAN

L.OtPREE

H.FRIESEMA

K . TOON IAN

M.HARPER

LViATHAM

N.VAN LOO

J.DLVRIES

H. DICK

m W.MEENGS

H. BARRE

H.HOFFMAN

d.MEENGS

J,STRIKER

E. ZONNtBELT

I.JOHNSON

M GROOTERS

W.KOBES

J.REYNOLDS

R.MOOI

R,JOHNSON

BMOLLEMA

6 . MACLEOD

J.NIENHU1S

N.CUPERY

I.5ABO

R.FOX


R

N01"1^

L.MAR5IUE

HVAW UHDEGENP

R.KLM^SEN

C.MEYER

M.VMILOON

C.VAN DOfintLEH fl VANDERBERC L DAMSTRA

L.SCHUILING

D.REARDON

E. POTTS

KLERK

t.ARENDSHORST T.BEAVER

G.RUPD

C.WALVOORD

E.WINTER

R.M*RCOTTE

M TASE

H.HOOVER

^ G A H AG AN T.VAN HWTSMA R.VANDYKE

E.ORE.SCHER C.VANDERNAAID A.BEtUKES

A. BOSSENBROEK

M.RUDD

T.SCHA^P

W. HA6ER

E.CUNN16AN

R.SCHAAP

M.KLEIS

A STEKETEE

A.NIENHUIS

K . SKILLERN

i

H.SCHAOE

V.BLAIR

R.VOSKUIL

dM

G.ROTTSCHAfER

r

A.BUS

Sixty-lhrt


T H E

M I L E S T O N

RONDEL

t

ON

NIGHT

The ancient a r m s of creeping night Have long drawn men f r o m daily care. Have brushed aside the sparking light That lamps the day with light to spare. More deft than downy birds alight — Exact beyond a word's grave care —• The ancient arms of creeping night Have long drawn men f r o m daily care. The lips of dusk breathe out a prayer. Near soft enough to touch the sight, That steals upon the evening air And feeds the spirit's appetite. The ancient arms of creeping night Have long drawn men f r o m daily care. P. A. E.. '30

/>ng^ Sixty-four


HOPE

COLLEGE

HIGH

SCHOOL

With the beginnig of the new school year, the College High School officially took its place among the schools of the state, no longer just a p r e p a r a t o r y school, but also a training school for the students of the college. Also, to make it possible for more students to avail themselves of this splendid opportunity for obtaining a secondary education, it was decided to abolish tuition fees. The effect of this was as expected and there has been a marked increase in the number of students, which in turn has tended to strengthen the school in every way. What are some of the advantages of attending the College High School? First of all. there is a well trained faculty of teachers, each of them specialists in his own teaching subjects and at the same time imbued with a desire to see every student derive the maximum benefit f r o m his school work. There is also a strong religious atmosphere present. Every day is begun with devotional exercises, attendance at which is compulsory of all students; Bible study is required of all students; and all classroom work is directed toward equipping the student not only mentally but also morally and spiritually. In addition to these advantages there are those that come f r o m the contacts the students have among themselves. Both the boys and the girls have their literary societies. There are also the Y. M. and the Y . W. C. A's. Furthermore, there is the work in the gymnasium, which is eagerly participated in by all the students. So we come to the end of another year and it is a pleasure to review its happenings. Many new friendships have been formed, many valuable lessons have been learned, many rich experiences have been lived through. Our only regret is that the year has been so short.

Page Sixty-six


DEANE KNOLL — H o l l a n d , Michigan. Exceeding

wise, fair spoken

and persuading."

Senior Class President "29." Minerva President "28"-"29." Vice-President, "28." Y. W. C. A. Cabinet "28."

JOY M. HUNGERINK—Zeeland, Michigan. "fie who studies nature's laws hrom certain truth his maxims

draws."

BERNARD A. ECKWIELEN — H o l l a n d , Michigan. He was wont to speak

plain

and to the purpose,"

M e l i p h o n e President "28" and "29." Vice-President "28."

CATHERINE NETTINGA — Hull. Iowa. "Music exalts each joy, alloys Y. W. C. A. Cabinet "27."

each grief."

ALBEKTA L. ROWLS—Holland, Michigan. "To jriend

a friend,

how kind

to all."

Minerva Vice-President "28"-"29."

MILTON B. VANDEN BERG — H o l l a n d , Michigan. ' He who thinks

for himself

is a free man."

ESTHER C. MULDER — Holland. Michigan. "We

attract

hearts

by the qualities

we display."

Pagt Sixty-seven


X

E. Mulder, D. Xnoll, A. Rowls, F. A m a n AI. S a r g a n t , L. A m a n , J. B r u i s c h a t , K. Benedict A. E s s e n b e r g , M. Boeve

MINERVA The Minerva Society lias again come to the close of another year, during which her banner of Loyalty and Truth were lifted high. Loyalty and Truth have been the ideals of Minerva ever since its was organized in 1896. The Minerva Society is the oldest society on Hope's Campus. The enrollment of Minerva is only eleven, but the high ideals and noble aspirations of those before us have not existed in vain. The spirit of Minerva is so planted in the hearts of the Minerva Sisters thai they are ever ready to pledge: "Minerva, to thee we will ever be true. Our love and allegiance we bring, We will ever be true to thy noble ideals, While thy praises exalting sing." OFFICERS

First S e m e s t e r DEANE

KNOLL

ALBERTA ROWLES

Second Semester President Vice-President

ESTHER MULDER

Secretary

MARION

Treasurer

Page Sixty-eight

SARCEANT

ALBERTA

ROWLES

ESTHER MULDER ADA

ESSENBURG

DEANE

KNOLL

9


H . Schneider, B. E i k w e e l e n , H . Kuizenga J. H u n g e r i n k , M. V a n d e n Certr, S. IlungeriiikK. S t e p h a n , H . Nienhuis, R. De W i t t

MELIPHONE Throughout seventy-two years Meliphone has stood the test of time. Since Hope College was established, the High School has undergone several changes, and yet the society flourishes. It continues to develop literary talent, refinement and culture; to create fellowship and offer wholesome recreation. Another year has been added to the illustrious existence of Meliphone Society d u i i n g which it has lived up to all it has ever stood for. Almost every new student has joined us in helping to make the year the success that it has been, and with us they sing: "We always cheer whene'er we hear That name known f a r and wide. The name alone of Meliphone With us will e'er abide." OFFICERS

Fall T e r m President

Winter Term

Spring Term

BERNARII E C K W I E L E N _ _ BERNARD E C K W I E L E N _ _ M .

Vice-Presidenlâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;WILLARD Secretary

HENRY

Treasurer

JOHN

VANDEN

KUIZENCA ECKWIELEN

BERCHERBERT SCHNIEDER HENRY MILTON

Ki-IZENCA VANDEN

N. J.

VANDEN

BERG

WHELAN ECKWIELEN

B E n c . ' l . KUIZENCA

Page Sixty-nin


S t a n d i n g â&#x20AC;&#x201D; D . K n o l l , K . Benedict S e a t e d â&#x20AC;&#x201D; H . K u i z e n g a , T. E i k w e e l e n , L. V r e d e v o g d

HOPE H I G H SCHOOL DEBATING This was the first year in which the College High School had membership in the Michigan Debating League. Hence, debating was a new venture for them for the team had to be chosen from students who had never debated before. This fact, notwithstanding, the High School can point to a successful record of two victories and two defeats. All the debates were against teams with much experience in debating and in every contest the College High School made a creditable showing. The proposition for debate was, ''Resolved: that a Federal Subsidy for the Development of an American Merchant Marine would be a wise National Policy." The first two debates, on the affirmative side of the question were lost to the (rabies High School and Coopersville High School. The two negative debates with Comstock High School and Lake Odessa High School were won. 1 he personnel of the College High School team were: Deane Knoll. John Eckwielen and Henry Kuizenga. with Kathryn Benedict as alternate. The debating team was ably coached by Mr. Lawrence E. Vredevoogd of the Senior Class of Hope College.

Page Seventy


PILL


Page Seventy-four


Pagt Seventy-five


Page Seventy-six


Page Seventy-seven


orvn

Pagt

Seventy-right


Pag< Stvtnty-nint


SHIPS OF YESTERDAY We know some ships, to ply their trade, Must nose around the plumb lines of the deep While others feel the touch of clouds And are familiar with the storm clouds keep. In spite of all these myriad ships That a modern wand has brought before our gaze We are not loath to read the lore, But seek to breathe the spirit of Viking Days. We cannot see the Grecian Galley Sailing along the coast with airy grace Nor can we see a Viking ship Manned by the sturdy of the Norseman race. Nor Richard's fleet decked for crusade With banners ol the Lion proudly borne And waving high above the band Whose zeal could most eclipse a golden morn. Our ears are not allowed to hear 1 he flap or Norman sail or dip of oar â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Rich music to the ears of men Whose wild, adventurous hearts loved to explore. But drinking in the vivid tales. We catch the splendor of the briny spray. And fairly feel those rocking waves That tossed the daring ships of yesterday. P. A. E.. '30

Pagr Eighty


IWipn


1 c

M l t E S T O N

E

Y. M . C. A. I he is the only organization on the campus to the membership of which every Hope man is heartily welcome. The reason is not hard to find: this welcome is universal because the appeal of its purpose is universal. That purpose is to help every man on the campus to that fullest realization of himself which is the result of a living fellowship with Jesus Christ. In order to more efficiently carry out this purpose, the " Y " organization is built around a cabinet of twelve members, four elected and the remainder appointed, which constitutes the administrative body of the group. The cabinet meets every week to take up whatever problems arise in connection with the work and to seek guidance from Him whose we are and whom we serve. The heart of the \ . M. C. A. is in the weekly meetings, lasting only an hour, at seven o'clock on Tuesday evenings. These meetings are of a distinctly religious nature, but they are not concerned with vague speculations about abstruse theological questions. Rather they seek through frank discussion and open-minded thought to settle the practical problems of college life. The " Y " is wholeheartedly in sympathy with Christ's injunction, "Freely ye have received; freely give. To that end " Y " men and girls carry on Sunday School work in outlying communities about Holland. Gospel Team work is open to anyone who feels that he has homething "too good to keep ' and seeks opportunity to pass his experience on to others. In conjunction with the Y. W., the Y. M. endeavors to help the new student during his first few critical days of College Life. An Information Desk during Registration Week and a Freshman "Get-Acquainted P a r t y " at the Lake were part of last Fall's program. The same idea is carried out by holdin";, some time durin^ the year, the annual Prayer Week. Its purpose is to confront every Hopeite with the challenge of a Christian Life. It is the sincere wish of the Cabinet that everyone who reads these words may. by the memories and associations which center around " Y , " be moved to face again the old, old question; "What then shall I do with Jesus who is called C h r i s t ? " The stand of the "Y is too well known to require elaboration: "Jesus Christ is King of of this Campus. Will you submit to H i m ? "

Page Eighty-two


YMCA

M. M e e n g s , D. M a r t i n , W . D e Velder, L. H o g e n b o o m B. A r e n d s h o r t , A . Bentall, L. V a n d e r Hill, R. D e Y o u n g H . K r u i z e n g a , R. Steketee, R. M c G i l v e r a

Y.

M.

C. A .

CABINET

President Vice-President

Secretary

DEAN WALTER

LEN

DE

MARTIN VELDER

HOOCEINROOM

Treasurer

MARVIN MEENGS

Missions

ALFRED BENTALL

Social Membership Publicity

RAYMOND

MCGILVRA

HERMAN

KRUIZENGA

RAYMOND

DE

YOUNG

Personal Work

LAVERNE VANDER HILL

Sunday School

BERNARD ARENDSHORST

Gospel Teams

RAYMOND STEKETTEE

Pag(

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Y . W . C. A . "Y"' has sometimes been called the "Church on the Campus." Because it recognizes the glorious privilege of the "more abundant life" which can be had through fellowship with Christ, it strives to assist the girl in her religious life, and to train for Christian leadership. Every Tuesday evening an hour is set aside for meetings of a distinctly worshipful nature where problems of vital importance are discussed in a friendly wav as an aid in Christian living. The joy of giving is experienced through the sending of Christmas boxes and 'lie raising of f u n d s f o r maintaining Hope Hostel in India. Chris'ts command to "Go Ye is answered by consecrated girls who are sent to neighboring towns as "Girls Gospel Teams,' to assist in spreading the message of Salvation. Prayer Week this year was under the able leadership of Dr. John Vander Meulen, and was felt to be unusually successful. Several declared for the first time their love for Christ, while many others reconsecrated their lives to His service. ^ believes in the social side of life. The Freshmen girls are made welcome by Big Sisters. Beach parties, basketball, and a Japanese tea have helped to promote friendships and give pleasure. Next year the girls will have the inspiration of a new room in Hope's Memorial Chapel, which will be furnished largely through gifts from alumni friends. As the Church cannot exist without the Christian College, so our College cannot exist without the "Church on the Campus."

Page Eighty-four

3 L 9


YWCA

R. V a n d e r L i n d e n , E. McGilvera, S. K l o c s t e r , Ar. V a n B u r e n , I. D e c r a c k c r E. Steketee, M. W ' a s e n a a r , E. Tysse, H. Siebers A. B r u n s o n , M. L o r d a h l , D. Knoll, E. D i n g s

Y.

W.

C. A .

CABINET

President

S A R A H KLOOSTER

Vice-President

EDITH

Secretary

M

MCGILVRA WAGENAAR

A R 1 E

freasurer

DECRACKER

Committee Chairmen Publicity Music Prayer M e e t i n g Missions Employment Social Service Social Gospel Team Preparatory Representative

EVELYN

STEKETEE

BERNADINE ALICE

SIEBERS BRUNSON

EVA RUTH

VANDER

MARION MARTHA

TYSSE LINDEN

LORDAHL

VAN EDITH

DEANE

BUREN DINGS K^.OLL

/'asi- hishly-fi.'


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M. P e n n i n g s , F. K l e i n j a h n , M. Otte, H . Clark E . Tysse, I . D e c r a c k e r , B. Siebers, B. Mollema, G. Benes

THE STUDENT VOLUNTEER BAND The Student Volunteer group which meets on Hope's Campus once a week is a small but nevertheless active body. Its main purpose is to keep alive that inspirational fire of service in the heart of each individual member. Every student belonging to this group has as his or her purpose â&#x20AC;&#x201D; "God willfi'g â&#x20AC;&#x201D; t o serve Christ in a foreign land just as soon as adequate preparation has been made in this country. The cry today is quality of preparation as well as quantity. The weekly meetings vary in nature, if there is a missionary home on furlough. he or she is asked to tell us of the work abroad, of the needs of that particular country as well as the opportunities for giving one's all to Christ. At various intervals during the year two or three volunteers go out to the churches to tell the young people of the church what the organization is all about. Hope College has sent out many students once members of this group who have represented the College courageously. They have spread abroad among the people ol other nations the knowledge of Hope s leader. Christ. This is a challenge to each student on the Campus. OFFICERS President

Vice-President Secretary-Treasurer

Page Eighty-six

FLOYD

KLEINJAHN

EVA TYSSE BERNADINE

SIEBEKS

9


H . W a c k e r b a r t h , N. B u r g r a p f , E. De Graff, H . Ver S t r a a t A. Bentall, J . Mulder, H . Scholten, G. R e z e l m a n W . A u s t i n , C. S c h i p p e r , E . S w a r t o u t , H . J a n s e n

H O M E VOLUNTEERS Theodore Roosevelt once made a statement to the effect that even though a man can t very often make opportunities for himself, he can so prepare himself so as to he able to take advantage of opportunities when they do come. And in order to prepare ourselves for the opportunities which will come to us in our chosen work of the Gospel Ministry, we meet for an hour every Friday evening to discuss ways and means of better fitting ourselves for that great work. Discussion of the problems we shall have to face also makes up part of our program and in order to teach umore about these problems, ministers of wide experience have come to speak to us. These talks have always been of an educational and inspirational nature. In the Christian life we feel that the saying, "impression demands expression," holds true. We have received the impress of Christ on our lives and through our expression of our love and devotion for Him at our weekly meetings He has become more of a reality in our lives. OFFICERS

Hrst Semester EDWARD

SWAKTHOUT

HOWARD SCHOLTEN MARTIN

KLOOSTERMAN

Second Semester President

JOHAN

Vice-President

LAMBERT

OLCERS

HARRY VER

STRATE

Secretary

MULDER

Page Eighty-seven


D. B l e k k i n k , J . L i p p i n g a , S. K l o o s t e r , M . O t t e , L, D e W o l f e A. K o e m a n , E. D i n g s , B. S i e b e r s , J . V a n O s s , A, B r u n s o n , E. G r o o t e r s , A. L a m m e r s J . H o n d e l i n k , J r . S c h u p p e r t , E . M c G i l v e r a , M. L o r d a h l , j\(. W a g e n a a r , G. l l u i z e n g a

W O M E N ' S GOSPEL TEAM The Y. W. C. A. Gospel Team members earnestly strive to become better friends, not only of God. which is their constant aim. but of themselves, their comrades and their outside acquaintances. The aim of this group is to spread the joy of religion and to extend the gospel of Christ in every way possible, whenever and wherever opportunity offers. It is the desire of this group to mingle and make personal contacts with girls of surrounding High Schools or other groups of young people, that the standards of an ideal Christian Life may be made higher. Visits have been made to Hamilton, Zeeland. Overisel, Forest Grove, Saranac and Muskegon Heights, the teams having charge of the various young people : s organization meetings and the church services. The future months of the college year offer many more opportunities f o r service, and the girls are keenly interested in complying with these requests. The young women on the various teams find true joy and happiness in serving Christ by using their God-given talents to "count for Jesus." There is a real challenge to endeavor to grow physically, mentally, morally, and spiritually, constantly pressing on toward a full and richer life.

Page Eighty-eight


R. M c G i l v e r a , H . K r u i z e n g a , L . V a n d e r Hill D . M a r t i n , M. M e e n g s , A . K u y p e r , F . K l e i n j a h n H . J a n s e n , R. S t e k e t e e , P . S c h o l t e n , A . B e n t a l l , B. A r e n s h o r s t

MEN'S GOSPEL T E A M Another successful year of Gospel Team work has passed. Teams of men have gone out f r o m Hope to the many outlying communities to share with others the blessings which they feel have come into their lives. The aim of the year's work has been primarily to show to the young people that there is very much in Christianity f o r young people. And while trying to make this fact known to other young folks, we of the Gospel Teams have found f o r ourselves even richer blessings for ourselves. Gospel Teams were sent during this year to the Sixth Reformed Church of Holland, to Middleville, to Caledonia, to Hamilton, to Fennville, to Saranac, to Byron Center, to Grand Haven, to Overiesel, to Forest Grove, and to Vriesland. To some of these places, two or more teams have been sent on different dates.

Page Eighty-nine


M I L E

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W I N T E R ROSE* Blooming among the stern and leafless trees, A rose looked down upon a bed of snow And showed a healthy crimson cheek As if to mock the tender things that freeze. The winter wind tried hard to rend the stalk; But with a firm, immovable, resolve She stood most elegant and unconcerned â&#x20AC;&#x201D; A bit of summer near an icy walk! P. A. E. '30 (''Suggested by a rose blooming in Centennial Park, winter of 1928-29.)

9

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M. Tase, H . Aiken, >[. De P r e e , M. O t t e , S. Schoep, H . P a a l m a n R. D a a n e , R. Bolhuis, W . W a l v o o r d , M. Beach, AI. Ten Cate, H . Van E e n a a m G. R u d d , I. Klerk, A. H e y b o e r , G. H u i z e n g a , E. Albers, G. D u r k o p h

THE GIRLS' GLEE CLUB The Hope College Girls' Glee Club has by its splendid work of the past attained a high reputation for itself on the campus and in its home state as well as in the eastern and western states, having won first place in the state contest three times. This year s group, although but five of its members are old members, has done fine work in retaining the club's reputation. This year the girls appeared frequently in Holland, gave several successful concerts in nearby towns, and made an extended concert tour through Illinois and Wisconsin. The girls and their director have received high praise for remarkably artistic performances. OFFICERS Director Accompanists

MRS. FENTON GRACE D U H R K O P F .

MILDRED

DE

President

GLADYS

HUIZINCA

Vice-President

MYRA

TEN

Treasurer

HAZEL

Secretary

SUZANNE

Page Ninety-two

FREE GATE

PAALMAN SCHOEP

3L

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W . K u y p e r , A. K u y p e r , C. V a n L e e u w e n , P. N e t t i n g a , A. O u d e m o o l , W . De J o n g e R. S m i t h , H. J a n s e n , S c h a d e , E. P o t t s , W . J a n s e n , P. Scholten, W. A u s t i n H . F r i e s e m a , L. V a n d e r W e r f , A. Steketee, S. De P r e e , G. Fell, B. Ver Meer

MEN'S GLEE CLUB Under Mrs. Fenton's able direction the Men's Glee Club has passed through a very successful year. The Club has already made several public appearances and its success in its tour of Indiana, Illinois, and Iowa is practically assured. Extensive plans are being made that will cover a two weeks trip of these three states. It is the ambition of the Club to carry off the State title this year. Director

MRS. W . H. FENTON

Accompanist

RAYMOND

OTTO

YNTEMA

Manager

SMITH

NICHOLAS L A N M N G

President.

I'a-Ar Wntty-tlxne


HOPE COLLEGE ORCHESTRA The College Orchestra experienced some difficulty in getting under way last Fall since Mr. Ritter, under whom such a fine orchestra was built up last year had left town. It is a mark of the strong interest existing in music on Hope's campus that the members of the orchestra labored indefatigably to keep the organization together and secure another director. Mr. Emmons is now acting in that capacity and the promises for a good year's work in orchestra look bright indeed. New music of a fitting type has been secured and rehearsals are enjoyed, the members profiting by the experience gained and in their ability to afford entertainment f o r college activities, for to be able to please with music is truly a gift that the world appreciates.

OFFICERS Director

MR.

MONTE

EMMANS

President

ADRIAN

KUYPER

Secretary

RUTH

KENNEL

Page Ninety-four


H O P E COLLEGE B A N D Shortly after school convened in the Fall, ths band was gotten together and an organization was undertaken. With the advent of the new officers, a very vigorous program was begun. Regul ar practices were instituted, and a leader was secured. The Seminary responded, providing this leader, and several lacking instruments as well. On the eve of Home Coming Day, November 9, the Band first appeared in its new sweaters. 1 he f u n d s for the purchase of these sweaters were raised by general contribution of students and faculty, and throught the sale of tags throughout the city of Holland. The students and townspeople responded in a very generous manner, so that sufficient money was raised to buy the sweaters and further, to start paying their leader. In view of the services rendered the school, the Student Council voted a grant of money to f u r t h e r assist in the payment of the leader. The progress of the institution as a whole has been remarkable. Last year it was a feeble, but growing group, while at the present time it is healthy and thriving. No small part of this is due to the activity of the leader, Nick Gosling, and to the intensive work of the president, Herman F. Laug. Director. Fresidenl Manager.

NICK

GOSLING

HERMAN HOWARD

B.

LAUG

SCHOLTEN


J . H o n d e l i n k , B. S i e b e r s , M . K i n k e m a , F . ATcGilvera

H O P E COLLEGE TRUMPETERS With the graduation last June of Miss Margaret Hondelink, the Hope Trumpeters ost their first leader. She had trained three girls who were the original members of I ie quaitette, and three others to take tneir places upon their graduation in 1927 and 192t). I his year the quartette is composed of four entirely different girls, two new ones and two who played last year. The quartette was an innovation in Western Michigan, and was warmly received. Because there are so few trumpet quartettes, there is very little music suitable for them, and Miss Hondelink wrote or adapted all the music used by the Hope Trumpeters in f o r m e r years. L nder her direction they worked for three years, playing in Holland and towns and cities in this vicinity, and gave a recital in Winants Chapel last May. This year the Hope Trumpeters have practised almost every day and have made several appearances. The Fourth 1 rumpeter will be graduated in June, but another girl will take her place, and the Hope Trumpeters will continue to "toot for Hope."


Drama


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SMILIN' T H R O U G H On the three evenings of April 17. 18, 19. Carnegie Hall resounded with applause as the Class of 1929 presented its play, SMILIN' THROUGH, by Allan Langdon Martin. The cast, coached by Miss Gladys Presley of Grand Haven, showed the result of weeks of intensive training. A new feature in Senior plays was presented by this year's class by placing the matter of scenery and lighting effects, which helped greatly to make the play a success, into the hands of the Century Art Scenic Studios of Grand Rapids, Michigan. SMILIN' T H R O U G H was decided upon as the class play after many hours of deliberation and much investigation by a committee headed by Miss Martha Van Buren. Much credit must be given to them for their effort. CAST PROLOGUE Sarah

Wayne

ELEANOR L . VERVVAY

Mary Clare

EDITH MCGILVRA

THE PLAY John

Carteret

Dr. O w e n

LEON A .

Harding

Ellen

Willie

SEENA

Ainley

Kathleen

BOSCH

JACOB PELON C.

WELLING

EVERETT

Dungannon

BEKKEN

ESTHER A .

BRINK

Kenneth Wayne

LAWRENCE E . VREDEVOOCD

Jeremiah Wayne

LAWRENCE E . VREDEVOOCD

M o o n y e e n Clare Wedding

Guests

MARIETT DE GROOT RUTH

VANDER LINDEN, LORAINE R A A K RAYMOND DE YOUNG, JOHAN

MULDER,

HERMAN

KNOL

PRODUCTION STAFF Production

Manager

Circulation

Manager

ALFRED

Publicity Manager Stage

Managers

BENTALL

ALICE LAMMERS HERMAN LAUG GEORGE D E

ROOS,

Scenery and Lighting

HENRY

WACKERRARTH

CENTURY ART STUDIOS

Property Manager

JOHAN MULDER

M i s t r e s s of R o b e s

EVANGELINE GROOTERS

Music

COLONIAL

Head

Usher

•• -

Page Ninety-eight

ORCHESTRA

DICK

MOUW

X


T H E AMATEUR DETECTIVE Miss Constance Darcy, "The Amateur Detective, sets out in pursuit of a man who has stolen a bag containing valuable securities f r o m the office of her father, a wealthy mine owner. She loses all trace of the thief near Tuxedobrook. Here, however, she finds her mother s f o r m e r school chum, Mrs. Delevan, in reduced circumstances. Constance assumes the disguise of an Irish waitress in Mrs. Delevan's Club House, and. as Nora 0 Brien, makes the tea room very popular, especially to Cruger Blainwood who becomes a frequent visitor. Through her aid also. Mr. Delevan realizes his dream of perfecting "Ozonia and renders himself famous. Meanwhile, the villain, Ralph Hastings, who was engaged to Fay Blainwood, makes love to pretty Mildred Delevan and plans to elope with her, but decides at the last moment that he prefers Nora. She, however, having discovered that the bag carried by Hastings is the one that had been stolen from her father, throws off her disguise and has Hastings arrested. The play ends with the announcement of " N o r a ' s " engagement to Cruger. The difficult title role was admirably sustained by Myra Ten Cate, ably supported by a cast of twenty members of the Drama Class. Much humor was provided throughout the play by the lugubrious sentiments of Susan, played by Anne Heyboer. the gay vivacity of Celeste, a French maid, played by Wilhelmina Walvoord. and the keen Irish witticisms of " N o r a . " Among the male characters, Bernard De Free proved himself to be a delightful lover, and Maurice Marcus shone as an ideal villain.

I'ag? Ninety-nine


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D R . J . B . NYKERK

ORATORY Under Dr. J. B. Nykerk's supervision and most efficient coaching oratory has maintained itself as a most prominent activity at Hope. Hope's record in this very distinctive art is an enviable one. Our orators have three times achieved national honors as well as numerous district and state victories. At the last Michigan Oratorical League contest held at Alma College, Miss Alice Brunson presented her oration, "The Poet's Share," and Arthur Michmerhuizen spoke on "Ministering America." For the first time in several years, though our orators did honor to themselves and the school, old dame fortune saw fit to exclude Hope's representatives from the winning list. The college orators for both the men's and women's speakers are chosen each year at local contests, will have been selected f o r next year by the time this book is published. The women's contest for this year was scheduled for the sixth of May and the men s for the seventeenth of May. The winners of these respective contests will represent Hope at the next M.O.L. meet to be held at Calvin College.

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A L I C E BRUNSON

T H E POET'S SHARE The world was new. The gods has issued an edict proclaiming the division of the earth among men. In response, first came the agriculturists who claimed the fertile lands Then came the merchants who desired the roads and seas; next the monks who chose the slopes suitable for vines. The noblemen came desiring woods and forests for game; and the kings, claiming bridges and defiles to expedite the collection of taxes. Last of all came the poet, but there was no land left; and the gods, in mercy, gave him instead the power to bring at will heaven down to earth. What a glorious gift this, the poet's share! What marvelous ability, the power to experience here and now the inward happiness, contentment and bliss assigned to heaven! And yet do we not all have the power the old legend allotted to the poet? Do not all of us possess the power to be completely and serenely happy, and to make others so? The poet breathes the same air we do, sees the same things, encounters the same everyday occurences and hardships, experiences the same emotions. True, his imagination, vivid and alert, and ever prompted by devotion to the beautiful and ideal, sublimes every common thing into the region of the aesthetic, and so creates a heaven on earth at will. But is imagination limited to poets alone? True, the poet has the gift of expressing the joy and inspiration he feels in beautiful, well-penned verses. But need we write poetry in order to inspire and help our fellowmen? Emerson said. "All men are poets at heart." Yes, we say, imagination has done as much to make the scientist, the inventor, the ruler, as it has the poet. Vision is the foundation on which has been built every great success; the basis of the simple contenlment or jubilant joy of the lowliest peasant or slave. There are few who have not the poet's g i f t ; few who may not learn to see things, not only as they are, but with

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that spark of imagination that enables one to see the beautiful even in the ugly, the funny in the tragic, worth in the seemingly useless, the uncommon in the common. And if our lives are to be sources of joy to ourselves and inspirations to others, such vision must be cultivated. Napoleon said. "Imagination rules the world." Truly it does, and has from the beginning of time. When based on faith in the ideal, the good, and beautiful, and backed by energy and will-power, the power of imagination has lifted men from huts to mansions, from cabins to the White House, from despair and hopelessness to joy and victory. When fancy is prompted by discouragement, fear, discontent, jealousy, evil desires, or sinful thoughts, it ever has debased and held men to the ground. The power and influence of imagination is amazing. There is no person in the world whom it fails to affect. If there is one who bemoans his lack of imagination, and pictures himself hopelessly incapable of humor, foresight, and vision, he proves its very existence and strength in his life by the vividness and power of the wretched picture of himself which his self-depreciation and discouragement paint. Yes. imagination does rule the world. Its strength is definite and undeniable. But unless we make it our servant, we shall become its slave. There is a tendency for all to live passively — to take things as they come, and let them strike us as the moment's mood may dictate. Only seldom do we really exercise our powers of thought and judgment and our common sense. And, as a result, the truth of things is hidden in a maze of feelings, petty worries, and hastily made conclusions. How many days we spoil by brooding over and magnifying some trifling blunder on which we have placed undue importance! How many times we have fretted and wasted precious time and strength on problems that might with propriety be settled by the "tossing of a coin"! How often, wearied by the work and worries of our everyday life, have we not felt that only we are tired and troubled, that fate has thrust upon our weary backs the brunt and burden of the world's most crushing woes! How many now are dwarfing all their chances to rise and grow, by harboring and nursing in their souls an overwhelmingly vivid picture of themselves, as less original, less capable, less talented and personally pleasing than their associates! How many others, though they may not realize it. are ruining all their chances f o r happiness because they feel themselves too clever, too superior, too dignified to mingle with and glory in their fellows! Imagination! Oh how much pain and unhappiness we allow it to create! Imagination forgetting truth, hiding truth, ignoring truth — this it is which makes us wretched slaves, and makes our lives mere cruel existences. But there is another type of imagination, which, based on knowledge and honest consideration of truth and fact, is one of life s greatest gifts and greatest helps to joyf u l . enthusiastic living. It is the type that led Abraham Lincoln, filled with strength of purpose, to the presidency and gave him. when a nation s crushing and heart-rending burdens weighed him down, his wellknown. saving sense of humor. It is the type that drew Columbus across forbidding seas to an unknown world. Imagination founded on a proper sense of proportion — founded on the power to recognize at once a thing's importance — brings about a sense of humor, yes, the ability to see the sunny side of things. Imagination backed by thorough knowledge of

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a situation, and impelled by a desire to better or to make use of that situation, is the substance of discovery and invention. Imagination based on the love of beauty capacitates a person f o r the fullest joys received f r o m deep appreciation of nature and the arts, and enables one to see the beauty in the plain and the otherwise uncomely. Imagination based on Christ's principle of love for all mankind creates in us the power of perfect understanding of associates, and intelligent sympathy and helpfulness and kindness toward all. Imagination based on self-knowledge and an honest appreciation of one's talents and capabilities, makes possible a vision of the place and means that they may be best employed. Imagination based on energy, ambition, and selfconfidence sees victory and success through failure and defeat; founded on faith in the power of good, sees hope beyond the blackest hour. Such imagination is of the type that may create for us a heaven on earth. If imagination is to make our lives a joy and inspiration, it must be founded on knowledge of the truth, on faith in all that is beautiful, ideal, and good, and above all, in devotion to the God who gave us all good things â&#x20AC;&#x201D; who sacrificed His son that we might see in Him exemplified the life of perfect peace, and joy, and beauty. Friends, such imagination may be cultivated. Our individual modes of thinking or imagining are merely matters of habit. And will-power and determination can change any habit. Why is it not just as easy to imagine ourselves capable, fortunate, h a p p y , and successful, as to picture ourselves hopelessly inferior, unfortunate, and u n h a p p y f a i l u r e s ? Why can we not just as easily imagine our future supreme, as to foresee it merely as mediocre? Our present outlook will determine to a large extent what that future will be. T h e value of constructive imagination is inconceivable. Throughout the ages it has written history, built and rebuilt empires, conquered thrones, made kings and leaders, prophets, bards, inventors: raised men from the crudest primitive life to the wonders and complexities of modern civilization. Before the laying of a single stone, the architect sees and plans his structure. Before the masterpiece is scarce begun, the artist sees a vision f a r more lovely. Before the writing of a single melody, there was a song of matchless beauty singing in the author's soul. Without active, constructive imagination, life becomes a drudgery, or at most, a mere existence; work becomes a bore and a g r i n d ; contact with our fellows becomes a necessary but wearing strain upon our patience. Happiness is an inward thing. If we are unhappy, it is because we have a vivid mental picture of ourself, unfortunate and wretched. If we are every moment glad to be alive, it is because we see ourselves happy and blessed. If we are successful, it is because we have ever seen success through seeming failures and defeat. If we are unsuccessful and have lost all hope to rise, it is likely because we have seen in these same difficulties unsurmountable barriers, and have allowed to grow within us an overwhelming sense of hopeless failure, self-deficiency, and inability. In a weird and tragic story by Calderon, the hero is constantly thwarted by a mysterious figure in a mask. At last when the mask is surprise, his own features are revealed. How often do we merely exist! do we really live! How often the fault lies in ourselves alone â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the holding us back!

haunted and lifted, to his How seldom masked man

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Let us not stand in our own way. Let us not be slaves to a ruler that grinds us to the ground, but triumphant masters of a gloriously helpful and creative servant. Let us not allow our imaginations to tarnish truth, but brighten it. Let us see things as they really are, and then look beyond reality to something that is far superior. Imagination does and will rule. It can crush us to the earth, or make every day of our lives a glorious, enthralling opportunity and adventure. Which shall it be? The poet's share is ours, if we but realize it.

M. O. L. RESULTS OF W O M E N ' S C O N T E S T First Place — Margaret Sleigh. Albion. Second Place — Ann Sess Dunning. Kalamazoo College. Third Place — Barbara Wilson. Olivet.

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A R T H U R MICHMERSHUIZEN

M I N I S T E R I N G AMERICA A nation of bootleggers, gunmen, female vampires and dissolute clergymen â&#x20AC;&#x201D; such is the growing impression overseas of what is typical of the people of the United States! Motion picture producers, novelists, and playwrights have concentrated their energies for the past several years toward convincing the world outside of our borders that criminality and every manner of venality and viciousness are overwhelmingly dominant throughout our social structure. Our better side, in the meantime, is caricatured and burlesqued. To foreigners our nation is seemingly a humorless, colorless edition of Eighteenth Century England, bent on enriching itself at the expense of personal honor and honesty. To complicate matters there are also Americans, so called, who are slandering our country abroad. By spreading this damaging propaganda, they are. therefore, making it extremely hard tor us to keep on amicable terms with our neighboring countries. Many of the books and plays by writers of this sort are hailed by the mentors of criticism in our great cities as works of supreme excellence. Once they are boosted sufficiently at home, they find their way abroad, where they are welcomed by an undiscriminating multitude, eagerly willing to accept the characterizations at their face value as achievements of art and truth by gifted American literati. Is it any wonder that the typical foreigners of the quiet better sort, who rarely travel f a r from home, commonly remark, '"If Americans are pretty generally of this stamp, they ought to be wiped off the face of the earth!"' There are modern writers who seem to take great delight in slandering our govern-

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ment. Next they love best to discuss cynically the baseness of American business and the American business man. But the most despicable writer of all is he who directs his satire at the American home and the American family as an institution. The damage done by these writers is not great here where we know the facts, but their works are read throughout Europe, where they give a mistaken impression of us and of our social customs. These writers have partially succeeded in developing a superlative degree of proficiency in their attack on whatever might bear the label of Americanism. It seems that great numbers of so-called culture clubs and literary societies throughout the United States have been readily bamboozled into following this phase of thinking, that as a nation we are realistically unique. So we see that, after all, we are partially to blame for this black eye that we are getting. To capitalize on this fad has been supremely profitable for the novelists and playwrights. The strife among them has been to set the pace in exaggerating or burlesqing whatever is foul or vile in our human nature and presenting this as typically American. We are promised, through this process of "cleansing satire," a dazzling place in the limelight. If you take a very light view of the situation, it is easy to say, "With our income of ninety billion dollars a year and our magnificent standard of living, why should we w o r r y ? ' Of course, the rest of the world is jealous of us; why then care that they think all our clergymen are Elmer Gantrys, that all our capitalists are well-dressed thugs, that prohibition has brought only debauchery to our homes! There is nothing easier than being egotistical about such things and coddling our self-conceit, but there is very little pride or manhood in such an attitude. Even the least intelligent and those more indifferent toward us know that we have a better side. The question is, then: Have we enough sense of patriotism left in us to demand that our slanderers and detractors be compelled to tell at least a part of the truth ? In Europe's own interest it is time that this erroneous impression be countered by a succession of plays dealing with something more closely approximating the real life of our misunderstood country. This is happening at the present time, for many of our famous dramatists are producing plays that are masterpieces and worthy to be read and acted the world over. Eurther, American movies are in great demand by movie fans in Europe, and we have a wonderful opportunity to present to them American principles and ideals and to foster a cordial good-will between nations. America is awake to the fact that she holds a position of supreme influence, and that she can make the world worse or better just as she wills. America is on the right road because she believes in the idea that brought the Quakers from England and the Hugenots f r o m France. It is one of the most powerful ideas in the world, hidden within the very warp and woof of American life, keeping the American spirit alive. We believe in the God of the Pioneer Pilgrims. Our missionaries are working diligently to spread Christianity throughout the land. Our engineers are spending their lives in foreign countries, laboring to install modern and sanitary living conditions. It seems, however, that we are not welcomed by other countries. They seem to think that we are rich and avaricious. Lindbergh, however, showed them that there are Americans who refuse wealth. What about the Panama Canal, which we built at a great expense and now operate at mere cost? What did the United States ^et f r o m the Spanish-American war and the World W a r ? Were we bent on material gain?

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It is not pleasant to be misunderstood, and if the United States is to blame for this misunderstanding, should she not do her best to straighten out the matter? There is only one thing that can check this outpouring of slander to the f o u r corners of the e a r t h : an honest and u n a f r a i d protest at home, that will nullify all the derogatory statements of our calumniators. It is the duty of every one of us to raise this protest. We Americans have many problems to solve, many evils to fight, and many deeds to do if we have the wisdom, the strength, the courage, and the virtue to do them. Our nation is that one among the nations of the earth which holds in its hands the fate of the coming years. We enjoy exceptional advantages and are menaced with exceptional dangers, and we shall triumph as a nation if we seriously investigate evil and attack it with unyielding resolution. But there remains to us a great duty of defense and preservation, and there is open to us a noble pursuit to which the spirit of the times strongly invites us. In a day of peace let us advance the acts of peace. Let us develop the resources of our land, build up its institutions, promote all of its great interests, and see whether we also in our time may not perform something worthy to be remembered. Let us cultivate a spirit of union and harmony, and rear f o r our country a vast and splendid monument of peace and liberty, upon which the world may look with admiration. We know that we are not perfect. There are many things we must change, and to effect this change we must bring to the solution of every problem this spirit: an intense and fervid Americanism. A large percentage of our crime, statistics show, is perpetrated by the foreign element in our large cities. This f o r c e f u l l y brings to us the necessity of more severe immigration laws as well as a substantial reduction of the number admitted to our crowded shores. Uncle Sam has proved himself a very decent and honorable member of international society. By receiving with open arms all the races of the world, he has welded a diversified family into an orderly nation of over one hundred million people. We must Americanize those already here, in speech, in political ideas and principles, and in their way of looking at the relations between church and State. We shall never do away with crime unless all of the foreigners in America become Americans in heart and soul, in spirit and purpose, keenly alive to the responsibility implied in the very title of American, and proud beyond measure of the glorious privilege of bearing this exalted name. We Americans must set a good example f o r these future citizens. We must learn to discriminate between propaganda and literature worth reading. Already our schools and colleges are fast doing away with illiteracy and are creating a demand for the best literature. Foreign students attending these institutions know that the propaganda spread in Europe slandering the people of the United States is absolutely false. Our copyright union is becoming more stringet in the censorship of plays and books, thus preventing playwrights and authors from falsely defaming our country. Nothing definite will be accomplished, however, until we get a keener sense of loyalty towards our own country. To apologize f o r being American is too common among us. The word " p a t r i o t i s m " seems to have become obsolete in our vocabularies. But when we once again thrill to the strains of our national anthems, and doff our hats to the colors,

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then, and not until then, will all those who slander us creep into the shadows and disappear. We have nothing to be ashamed of. We are rich, but we have toiled and labored in our own country for our wealth. We have grown rich because we had the brains to invent. We have done one remarkable thing by lifting the education of the entire nation to a point never reached by any other nation. We have had more f u l l stomachs; we have spread luxuries among the people more widely even than have some of the countries which are our most severe critics. Against foreign criticism and malicious propaganda what have we to offer? Well, nothing but real equality of opportunity. Nothing but the fact that every office boy carries in his pocket the key to the president's office. Nothing but the knowledge that intelligence and industry can get you anywhere you may want to go. Nothing, in short, but those very things which any and every nation of Europe would give its heart and soul to possess in just half the degree that is ours: national honesty of purpose, national good sportsmanship, national integrity — qualities which every other nation recognizes as essential and depends upon every day of its life. Triumphant in this, may we never forget that the great need of America today is a "full-statured Christ." "America, America, Torchbearer of the free. Upon thine ample shield I read Law, Order. Liberty. All races here in friendship meet And here united plan On justice and good will to build The Commonwealth of Man."

M. O. L. RESULTS O F MEN'S C O N T E S T First Place — Homer Barlow. Alma. Second Place — Harold Spiegel. Albion. Third PI ace — David Cannon. Hillsdale.

Vage One Hundred

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S. Ver Hey, Prof. Richards, L. Hogenboom, Prof. Hooker W . Kuyper, J. Pelon, N. Burgraff, D. Martin

AFFIRMATIVE Hope Affirmative

Kalamazoo Negative

J. PELON

C . WALLENDORF

L . HOGENBOOM

R . GIBSON

S. VERHEY

E. LAUTH

E x p e r t J u d g e : PROFESSOR JOHN MUYSKENS of t h e U . of M .

The Hope Affirmative team won a decisive victory over tlie Kalamazoo College debaters on the evening of February 8. At no time during the debate was the case of Hope debaters seriously broken down. The debate was held at Winants Chapel and was well attended. Professor Paul H i n k a m p acted as chairman. Hope Affirmative

Calvin Negative

J . PEI.ON

J. DOLFIN

L . HOGENBOOM

V . ROEI.OF

S. VERHEY

W . ERANKEMA

Judges: PROF. H. W. BLAKE, Michigan State College PROF. A. H. NELSON. Michigan State College PROF. A. C. MENCOFFER, Michigan State College Tlie Hope Affirmative team traveled to Grand Rapids and met defeat at the hands of a capable Calvin team. The closeness of the debate is evidenced by the fact that the judges themselves disagreed, rendering a two to one decision.

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C. Rylersdam, L. Vredevogd, H. Bast, 11. Nobel

NEGATIVE Hope Negative

Ypsilanti Affirmative

H . BAST

ELMEN WINKELMAN

J . RYLARSDAM

JAMES L A T T U R E

L . VREDEVOOGD

HENRY RICE

J u d g e s : PROF. LOUIS EICH, U n i v e r s i t y of M i c h i g a n PROF. LYMAN JUDSON, U n i v e r s i t y of M i c h i g a n PROF. HENRY MOSER, U n i v e r s i t y of M i c h i g a n

On the evening of February 8, the Hope Negative team traveled to Ypsilanti to engage in debate Ypsilanti's experienced team. After a spirited contest the judges rendered their decision which was unanimously for Hope. Mr. Gorden Giddings acted as chairman. Hope Negative

Calvin Affirmative

H . BAST

P. DEVRIES

J . RYLARSDAM

J . WESTRA

L . VREDEVOOGD

C. VAN W E I S U P

Expert J u d g e : PKOF. A. J. WEISS. Albion College The Hope Negative squad met the Calvin Affirmative squad on February 25. in Winant's Chapel. The debate was very close and heated as both teams showed themselves to be intimately acquainted with the subject. The expert judge, however, gave his decision in favor of the visitin"; team.

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A . B r u n s o n , S. V e r H e y , R. S t e k e t e e , A. M i c h m e r s h u i z e n L. l l o g e n b o o m , K. H y i n k , J. Pelon, L. Vredevogd H . B a s t , C. R y l e r s d a m

PI KAPPA DELTA The local chapter of the national fraternity of Pi K a p p a Delta, although small, has won for itself considerable honor during the past year. The membership this year was very small due to the losses sustained through graduation of last year's class. Membership cannot be filled out by appointment as the fraternity is purely an honorary one; students who have taken part in collegiate debate or who have represented their college in an oratorical contest are alone eligible. Opportunity f o r participation in such activity is furnished through Hope's membership in the Michigan Debating and Oratorical Leagues. Further opportunities for meriting membership in this organization are made possible through intersectional and national conventions of the Pi Kappa Delta. During the last few years it has been customary to hold a spring banquet. This furnishes an opportunity f o r the active and alumni members to reacquaint themselves with the ideals and efforts of the Fraternity and adds zest to the year's activities.

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THE ANCHOR The 1928 Anchor witnessed many changes, so that by the time the end of the year rolled around, the staff has been quite revised. The first editor. Harms Bloemers, who started the work with such promise and who put out many issues of the best Anchor we had seen f o r a long time, was forced to leave school on account of ill-health, and his rather heavy cloak fell on the shoulders of a coed. However, this uncertain year saw the "Coed Edition" an innovation in honor of Leap Year and the Sophomore and Freshman Anchors were of the best. The 1928 Anchor saw the College through a difficult crisis of indifference and dissatisfaction, and on the road to better feeling. The paper was enlarged and improved. Our policy has been: Hope for Hope-ites and Hope-ites for the world. We recognize in Hope College a spirit that cannot be copied by larger or smaller schools and which is not improved by copying other schools, and we have sought to keep alive this individuality in the news of the school and in recording the doings of Hope's alumni and friends.


E.TY5SE

JM L.mLETT

R.SMITH

Wijrf, A R.MCGILVRA

m

E LANGELAND

D.WADE

C. PALMER

ITOWNSEND

E.STEKETEE

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THE MILESTONE Each year the Milestone staff vies with the staffs which have gone before, in trying to create a finer annual. Each class before us has succeeded in its purpose. We hope and believe that our purpose too, has been gained; and yet we also extend to the next staff our wish that they may produce a book even finer than ours. The staff has spent long, wakeful hours that all this might some dav be recalled to your memory. All those dear class-mates and teachers, those happy hours when all the world seemed right, those sad hours when the silver lining refused to peep through the dark cloud, if some day in the struggle for success, a look at this Milestone brings back with a warm glow tender memories of our Alma Mater, the staff which presents to you this fifteenth annual will feel amply repaid.

RAYMOND

HERMAN

STEKETEE

KRUIZENGA

BERNADINE MARVIN GERBIT

Editor-in-Chief

Assistant Editor

SIEBEBS

Assistant

Business Manager

MEENCS. VANDEN

Editor

Art Editor

BOS

EVELYN

STEKETEE

Assistant Art Editor

PHILLIP

ENCEL

Assistant Art Editor

MARVIN

KUIZENGA

Circulation Manager

ANN

DE

YOUNG.

BERNARD ARENDSHORST WLLHELMINA

WALVOOBU

SUZANNE

SCHOEP

DONALD

WADE

JOAN VANDER W E B F SIDNEY

HEERSMA__,

HENDRICK WILLARD

NOBEL. DE

JONCE

PHILLIP

ENCEL

ABTHUB

VAN

Page One Hundred

Eighteen

ARENDONK

Assistant

Circulation Manager Photo Editor Snap Shot Editor

Assistant Snap Shot Editor Literary Editor Assistant Literary Editor Athletic Editor Assistant Business Manager â&#x20AC;&#x201D; A s s i s t a n t Business Manager Class Poet Humor Editor


R,STEKETEE

G .VANDEN BOS

mm-J H. KRUIZENGA

B.SIEBERS

B.ARENOSHORST

A .VAN ARENDOHK

M .VANOEN BERG

E. STEKETEE

A OE YOUNG

W. WALVOORO

S.HEERSMA

W DE JONGE

S. SCHOEP

P.ENGEL

H.NOBEL

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IF â&#x20AC;&#x201D; If in the years to come you chance to find This book among a heap of themes and things And as you turn the page, the years behind Come flying up as if on fairy wings, And all the brightest hours you spent at Hope Come tripping down the pages' yellow lane To give delight to memory's charming scope, Why then, this book shall not have been in vain! P. A. E. '30.

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FRATERNAL The year 1929 marks the passing of another milestone in the histroy of "Old Fraternal. Since 1834 hundreds of men have graduated from its halls with its timehonored traditions, and delightful memories, giving their lives to the cultivation of Friendship, to the love of Law, and the consecration of Truth. Its men have gone out to all parts of the world and have given their best that the world might better understand and appreciate the golden motto of '"Friendship. Love and Truth. To make this the Golden Rule of society, to live up to the highest ideals of "Old Fraternal, that is the aim of F. S.—that is the fundamental basis of its existence and to that alone can we attribute its success. May the glories of the past challenge us to even greater accomplishments in the future. OFFICERS

Fall Term President

Winter Term

BERNARD D E FREE

Vice-President

_LEON BOSCH

NELLIS

Secretary

WALTER HYINK

Treasurer

ARTHUR VAN

Page One Hundred

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OTTO

YNTEMA TANIS

BERNARD ARENDSHORST

ARENDONK.,HENRY

STEFFINS

Spring Term NELLIS TANIS BERNARD D E PREE WARREN D E PREE HENRY STEFFINS

9


K W.HYINK

B.DtPREC

N.TANIS

vi r 0 .YNTtMA

L.BOSCH

P. NETTINGA

W.DEPRtE

B.AREND5H0RS7

E.DEJONGE

R.STEKETEE

N,LANNING

H. JAPIN6A

A.VAN ARENDONK

S

H.STE.FFENS

Jam A.COOK

C.BECKER

ild C.MEENGS

H.BOONE

R NOTIER

T.BEAVER

H.SCHADE

R.NICHOLS

G.VAN ARK

E.POPPINK

B.VERNEER

C.VANDER NAAID G.R0TT5CHAFERC.VAN D0M/1ELEN

T.VAN HAITSMA

J.MEENGS

R FOX

W.WICHERS

H. DALMAN

C WALVOORD

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SOROSIS

Hail to Sorosis, Queen of girlish lives, Glad hearts thy praises sing; Thee we pledge to love and honor, As we now thy tributes bring. May thy ranks grow ever stronger. Hope and courage never f a i l ; To uphold the gold-white banner. As upon life's sea we sail.

Oh, Sorosis, thou art dear to us. And the fondest friends must p a r t ; Be to us an ever shining emblem Of the love that fills our hearts.

Oh, Sigma. Signia's light shall ever shine To guide us on our way, E'er to bring us youth's fond memories Of those hours so bright and gay.

In the light of Truth and Knowledge, And Friendship we shall strive, To live lives of grateful service, And in every virtue thrive. For the glory of Sorosis, And the honor of "Old Hope," Do thou lead us on and ever onward. Crescent banner, star of Hope.

OFFICERS

Fall Term Presiden*

IDA T O W N S E N D

Vice-President

SENA WELLING

DORA M C C O W A N

MILDRED D E FREE

GEORGIANNA FREDRICKS

JEANETTE YONKERS

Treasurer

SENA WELLING

Lois

GENEVA VANDEN BRINK

Twenty-four

HALDANE

Spring Term EVA TYSSE

Secretary

Vage One Hundred

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;ROXIE

Winter Term MARY WALDRON

DE WOLFE

i


SWELLING

M.WALDRON

r

M.TtN CATE

E.TYSSE

G. VANOEM BRINK

R.KOSTER

R. DA AWE

E ALBER5

L.WALVOORO

B.SCHOUTEN

I M E.GAHAGAM

G.HUIZENGA

L.DEWOLF

I. TOWN SEND

D.HC COWAN

M .DEPREE

R, HAL DANE

M.KATTE

G.FREDERICKS WWALVOORD-

J.YONKER

B.SMITH

R, BOLHUIS

li.ANDERSON A.BEEUWKES

E.WINTER

M.VAN LEUWEN

LAREMDSH9RST

li ^ R HOSPER3

R VAN DYKE

M KLEIS

E-DRESCHER

M.GROOTERS

L DEPREE

m

V.VAMOUREN

KLERK

Page One Hundred

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COSMOPOLITAN Four years at College constitute a miniature working model of Life. Here, though we live under more or less artificial conditions, nevertheless we liveâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Life. The embryo citizen of the world is subjected to influences similar to those which he will encounter in later days. Its whole purpose is to enable him to get his bearings, to decide which of these influences shall be the predominant factor in his subsequent contacts with the world. Cosmos believes that Society Life has an important part to play in this process of orientation. Here a man can learn the reactions of his fellows to his ways of thought and action, and can shape himself accordingly. He learns the essentiality of a sane, charitable, optimistic "slant"" on men and things. Best of all he learns the heartening thrill of real sympathetic understanding that flows through a man-to-man hand-shake, with all it implies of lasting friendship and brotherhood. Cosmos recognizes no conflict between societies and the school as a whole. Diversification is not disunion. The ideals of Hope are the ideals of Cosmos. As a unit we are pledged to entwine with the Orange and Blue the Green and White of "Old Cosmos" and enshrine with the Royalty and Loyalty of our beloved Alma Mater, the trilateral standard of Cosmosâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Friendship. Truth, and Progress. "No ocean can this band dissever. No age destroy that sacred tie; Though we travel far away. Though our hair be turning gray. We will give her our love till we die!""

OFFICERS Fall Term President Vice-President

KENNETH

HYINK

.EVERETT B E K K E N

Winter Term

LAWRENCE VREDEVOOGD

ALEREU

LAVERNE VANDER HILL

BENTALL

Secretary

HOWARD SCHOLTEN

LEN

Treasurer

MARVIN KUIZENGA

RAYMOND MCGILVRA

Page One Hnndred-Ttaenty-six

Spring Term

JACK P E L O N HOCENBOOM

HERMAN

KRUIZENGA

N I C H O L A S BURGGRAAFF


c J:

i L.VANDER HILL

A.KUIPER

M.KUIZENGA

K.HYINK

L.VRE6EV0060

P.SCHOLTEN

WOtJONet

H.SCHOLTEN

H.KRUIZENGA

J.PELON

A.BENTML

A.VAN0ERBU5H

S.VERHEY

E.BEKKEN

L HOGENBOOM

C.VAN LENTE

L.VANDER V^ERF

G HUENICK

^ <(• M LEENHOUTS

ADYKHUIZEN

W.KUIPER

R.MCGILVRA

A.ANTAR

N BUR6GR^^F^

M.OOSTING

%m m

A SCHERMERHORN

11

LDAMSTRA

t.WELMERS

R VOSKUIL

H. FRIES EM A

K.TOONIAN

R.JOHNSON

C.MEYER

W AUSTIN

D.REARDON

L.WATHAN

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DELPHI "Delphi, dear old Delphi. For thee our happy hearts heat high. Our songs we raise in joyous praise. And fling thy banner to the sky." Delphi furnished her members an inspiration to live the four-square life which is a mental, spiritual, social and physical growth. As in days of yore the Greeks gathered at the Delphi Oracle in search for Wisdom, so do we today. With Knowledge, Truth, Loyalty, Service and Love as the watchwords. Delphi has inculcated in her members both past and present a bigger and nobler standard of living. Contacts with others are richer for having learned the lesson of honor, courtesy and fair play in Delphi. OFFICERS

Fall Term President Vice-President Secretary Treasurer

Winter Term

MARGARET OTTE .â&#x20AC;&#x201D;RUTH

KENNEL

RUTH

VANDER

GRACE KOEPPE

Page One Huvdred Twenty-eight

RUTH LINDEN

Spring Term

GRACE KOEPPE VANDER

SARAH KLOOSTER LINDEN

MARTHA VAN BUREN V E R N A BROWER

MARTHA V A N BUREN - M A R G A R E T BOTER MYRTLE KLOOSTER


R VANOER LINDEN

P.OEJONGE

R. KENNELL

G.KOEPPE

J.VANDER WERF

S.KLOOSTER

I B Mk . fl VAN BUREN

M.OTTE

A • HYBOER

J, VAN DAM

1

J S. 5CH0EP

M.KLOOSTER

M.BOTER

M ESSENBURG

E. MULDER

M.SLUYTER

G.RUOO

V BROWER

D. GROWER

H. PAALMAH

M. DE KUIPER

M RUDD

E WESTRATE

A.0UTH

E.GEERLINGS

W.HAGER

Pagt

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KNICKERBOCKER "We do not know beneath what sky Nor on what seas shall be our fate; We only know it shall be high. We only know it shall be great."

OFFICERS

Fall Term President

RAYMOND

Vice-President

—-FUANK

Winter Term

DE

BHOKAW

Secrelary

DONALD M .

Treasurer

I o n AN M U L D E R

Page One Hundred

thirty

YOUNC---

WADE

WILLIAM

BESWICK

JOHAN MULDER !

Spring Term DEAN MARTIN - . W I L L I A M BESWICK

HAROLD DYKHUIZEN

JOHN WINTER

MARVIN MEENCS

EARL MOSER


FBROKAW

W.BESWICK

D .MARTIN

W.HUGHES

R.DE YOUNG

R.SMITH

C.KRUENEN

J.MULDER

E.MOSIER

D.WADE

H.DYKHUtZEN

M.MEENG5

L.SCHUDDER

E.TELLMM<

A.BRUNSON

G.FELL

E.GUNO^W

H HOOVER

A STEKETEE

f

I.JOHNSON

R.MARCOTTE

P.BROWER

V lii t J.5TREKER

W.MEENGS

R.MOOI

A.NIENHUIS

1m J.HARMS

Pagf One Hundred

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31

SIBYLLINE "Before the cave of Cumae Rolled the deep blue sea, Crested with silvery ripples, Sun-dappled, moon-frosted."

1 hese colors, the royal blue and chaste silver have inspired the Sibyls with worthy ideals of the life abundant, the enrichment of the mind and the santification of the spirit. (»uided by the spirit of Sibylline, each member has been led to greater achievements in college activities, greater service for Sibylline and her Alma Mater. We have enjoyed the companionships of those united by common interests and aspirations and by the search f o r knowledge, for appreciation of the beauty in the world and for the development of complete and well-rounded lives. "Friendship, Love and Fellowship, kind and true," represent many of the friendships we have formed, and the good times we have had together.

OFFICERS First Semester MARJORIE EVELYN LORAINE JULE

DU

MEZ.

STEKETEE_ RAAK

OSSEWAARDE.

Second Semester --President Vice-President —Secretary Treasurer

JULE

OSSEWAARDE

KATHRYN SCHAAFSMA -_RUTH

V A N ALSBURG

-MARGARET WESTVEER

9


E. WELNERS

L.RAAK

D.ZANDSTRA

R. VAN ALSBERG

M.DE GROOT

M, DUMEZ

K.SCHAAFSMA

E.STEKETEE

A.DE YOUNG

h.VERHAGE

AW

C, PALMER

C.SMITH

A.RICHARDSON

E.GLERUM

D.EHLE

CHANSON

M. WEST VEER

J.SPYKER

T.MASSELINK

D.HAAN

L 5CHUILING

H.VAN EENENAAM

J.OEHAAN

R GLERUM

H.VAN LAMDEGEN5 V. BLAIR

M.HARPER

N, VAN LOO

N.DERK5

L.NYKAMP

Page One Hundred

Thirty-three


EMERSONIAN The year 1929 marks the close of the tenth year that the Emersonian Society has been upon Hope's campus as an actively organized group. This period has been marked with steady progress, at times slow, but always forward. The second article of the Constitution states that: "The purpose of this Society shall be the development of its members from a moral, social, intellectual, and literary standpoint." This thought is kept constantly in mind in all the activities of the Society, and with the passage of the years of his college life every member realizes to a fuller extent the great part his Society has taken in putting him in the position in which he finds himself, morally, socially, and intellectually. Letters from alumni members indicate that more and more as life goes on, do they realize the breadth and value of the training they received in their four years as Emersonians. The patron "saint'" of the Society is Ralph Waldro Emerson, the greatest of American philosophers. No thing f u r t h e r would have to be said of our activities, other than that we are attempting to truly follow the precept of this m a n ; a man who had the genius to write, "The power of a man increases steadily by continuance in one direction.

He becomes acquainted with the resistances

and with his own tools; increases his skill and strength and learns the favorable moments and favorable accidents. H e is his own apprentice, and more time gives a great addition of power, just as a falling body acquires momentum with every foot of the fall."

OFFICERS

Fall Term President Vice-President Secretary Treasurer

Pngr Our Hundred

.

Spring Term

Winter Term

--CLARENCE DIEPHOUSE

CLARENCE DIEPHOUSE.

JOHN

--WALTER DE VELDER--.

HERMAN

HENRY WACKERBARTH

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;HARRY

EARLE E . LANCELAND .

WlLBl'R VANDERSCHAAF

EDWIN

HARRY VER STRATE

K.

--HERMAN

Thirty-jour

SMITH

F. LAUC

P.

HARMS--.

VANDEN

BELT.

TYSSE


J.OEVRIES

W.OEVELOER

C ROZEMA

J.TYSSE

LVANDERPOEL

k\

J.KUY

H.SMITH

L.OLGERS

C.OIEPHOUSE

C.KLAASEM

W.VANDERSCHAAF S.VAN LARE

H.LAUG

H.VERSTRATE

C . V A N LEEUWEM

H.KLAASEN

HWACKERBARTK

rn v

J. JUIST

H,HARMS

R EVENHUIS

3SM

'r

R.HOODEMA

J . MULDER

L.DECOOK

v E.VANOEN BELT

R KLAASEN

H.HOFFMAN

J.DEVRIES

H JANSSEW

S.ELLERBRMK

H,HOFFMAN

W.SMITH

A BOSSENBROEK

N.CUPERY

Pagt On? Hundred

Thirty-jive


T H E

M l t E S T O t s I

E

1 9

DORIAN Dorian, like the old Greek tribe from which our name is derived, stands for what is highest, finest, simplest, and best in Life. Thus, it is ever our purpose to reach, individually, and collectively, upward and onward toward our life's goal. We are working together for the highest good which college and its social contacts can give. We are striving for honor, in the personal sense of the word. We are striving for understanding in our relations to the world. We are striving for unselfishness in our attitude toward all. We are striving for true culture, refinement and poise. And ultimately, as a result, we are striving for that true happiness which makes life really worth while. Believing that frienship is one of the most precious gifts of Life, we meet together each week to develop this gift, and other gifts which can be secured only in the company of one's fellow beings. Here, under the lavender and gold of the Dorian standard, surmounted by the orange and blue of our Alma Mater, our hearts will ever be true to these two groups which do mean and will mean so much in our lives. "We love the Strength for which it stands: Simplicity and Truth. Love, Loyalty, and Friendships fair. And the colors of Old Hope. But we love the lavender and gold. S h i n i n g down through ages o l d ; And we'll acclaim this dear old name. T h e name of Dorian."

OFFICERS Second Semester

First Semester ALICE LAMMERS ELEANOR VERWEY

President Vice-President.

BEATRICE V A N D E R K A M P

Secretary

AHA BOONE

Treasurer

Pagi' One Hnrtdrrd

Thirtx-six

ESTHER

BRINK

EDITH

DINGS

-JOSEPHINE

LIPPENGA

HARRIET

BOONE

1

9


EVERWEY

B.VANOERKAMP

H.BARON

a, lammers

e.grooters

A BRUNSOM

A.ENGLESMfvN

H.BOONE

J.LIPPENGA

j.ossewaarde

B S1EBERS

E.BRINK

A.BOONE

t>{ i

m. l o r d a h l

d.oegoed

e.dings

C. KORVE.R

j.rodenberg

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a.peelen

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Page- One Hundred

Thirty-seven


T H E

M I L E S T O N E

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ADDISON In the remotest periods of time man knew the uplifting influence of fellowship as an enrichment of Life. Humanity and social instincts were infants together. Improvements in the conditions of civilization means improved social relationships, greater fidelity, and increased brotherhood among men, and cultural advancement. Addison as a social group spreads her a r m s to the light, welcomes truth, encourages c u l t u r e — s t a n d s for an abundant life. f h r o u g h social contact and group responsibility, leadership emerges as a knight filled with wonder and joy at new-found powers. To have these aims continually before him is an invaluable aid to the student of Life. "Leadership our truest motto, Culture in the purest light, With fidelity our standard. Hail the Purple and the White."

OFFICERS

Fall Term President Vice-President

PHILLIP ENCEL —HARVEY

WOLTMAN

Secretary

EDWARD SW:ARTHOUT

Treasurer

JACOB GULICK

Winter Term DEAN

HICKS

HENRY

BAST

SIDNEY

HEERSMA

Spring Term EDWARD SWARTHOUT JACOR G U L I C K FRANKLIN RYMBRANDT MARTIN KI.OOSTERMAN

2 . 9


HWALTHORNE

tM

D HICKS

E.SWARTOUT

M. SHOEMAKER

P.ENGEL

J.GUUCK

fk> m *-• J

KC H.BAST

S.HEERSMA

H KLOOSTERMAN

J.T1GELA^R

A.OUDEMOOL

f R Y M BRANDT

H.mTMAN

P AREHOSEN

E.DE GRAAF

C.NtTTINGA

Pag? One Hundred

Thirty-nin


T H E

K 1

I

L

E

S

T

O

N

E

•«'

V

F

^

1

9

X

ALETHEAN

Alethea's blue and rose are the symbols of truth and love — truth for its own sake and love for the sake of others. Throughout life's journey we need the encouragement and strength from association with others who have a similar philosophy of life and are striving for the same high goal. Alethea has supplied that need and in the cultivation of friendship and helpfulness in the smaller group we are learning the art of friendship and helpfulness in the larger group. Alethea does not tend to limit our circle of friendships but to expand it and to cause the range of our vision to take in all humanity in its pledge of service. Alethea has been an inspiration to each of us and has helped to create a spirit of true loyalty combined with a sincere love f o r our Alma Mater and each other. Because we have put our best into our educational and social pleasures we have been able to achieve a greater literary ability. "Then sing to the rose and blue, For its service and friendship true; For upheld by thy light we will walk in the right With a torch for a beacon and signal. For thee we'll live and work, N o duties ever shirk. For thee with our heart. W e will all do our part, For thee, oh Alethea."

OFFICERS S e c o n d Semester

First Semester HILDA

AIKEN

EVELYN

HEFFRON

EVANGELINE HORNING. RUTH

BAILARD

President Vice-President Secretary Treasurer

EDITH MCGILVRA ANN

KOEMAN

GERTRUDE B E N E S MARTHA

VANDERBERG

9


i' D.BLEKKINK

B.0LGER5

E. MC G1LVR^

A. KOEMAN

R.BAILARD

E, HEFFRON

H.AIKEN

J. HONDELINK

tM J. KAPER

S . FOX

M.K1NKEMA

R. EVERHART

E.SMIES

L.MARSILJE

G.BENES

M.SCHUPPERT

B MOLLEMA

R.AIKEN

H BARRE

C.MOREHOUSE

M.VANOENBERG

Pags One' Hundred

Forty


DICKENSIAN "Trust no Future, howe'er pleasant! Let the dead Past bury its dead! Act — act in the living Present! Heart within, and God o'erhead!" With that spirit Dickensians are ardently extending a hand of friendship to all who desire it. and valiantly they carry the banner of loyalty to themselves, their fellow members, their fellow students, the faculty of the College, the traditions of Hope, and to God. The Dickensian aim is to place first things first at all times. OFFICERS

Pagr

Spring Term

Fall Term

Winter Term

HERMAN K N O L L .GEORGE D E R o o s

GEORGE D E R o o s HAROLD K R A A I —

GERRIT REZELMAN

Secretary

MARION ALDAY

ANDREW VINSTRA.

HENRY HAKKEN

Treasurer

ANDREW VINSTRA

GERRIT

R A L P H BEILEMA

President Vice-President

One Hundred

Forty-two

REZELMAN

ANDREW VINSTRA


H.KRAA1

G .DE RODS

F.KLEIN JAN

H.TinnER

f

H.CLARK

D MOUW

G.RU5SCHER

N VANDOREN

G REZELMAM

A.V1NSTRA

4

T.KNAPP

A.VAN HARN

I H.KNOLL

A.ALDMf

A.POPMA

C.SCHIPPER

J.RYLAM&OAM

Pagt

Ontr Hundred

Forty-three


^ D W I R R


T H E

M I L E S T O N E

~

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2 - 9

A. Van A r e n d o n k , C. Rozema, A. K u y p e r , W . W i c h e r s , S. Kleinheksel E. Langlancl, J. T i g e l a a r , P r o f . Kleinheksel, H . W o l t h o r n , J. Mulder E. P o p p i n k , Prof V a n Z u y l , C. Bremer, R. B r e m e r

CHEMISTRY CLUB No man with his eye upon the trend of human development can deny that at the present time more than at any other period in its history the world lives, moves, and has its being in the test tube. The whole fabric of modern existence is woven so closely with that of the science of Chemistry that to separate them would result in a throwback in progress of many centuries. And age in which a substance hundreds of times sweeter than sugar, colors more brilliant than indigo, flavors better than the fruits themselves, perfumes sweeter than the rose, and disinfectants safer than carbolic acid, may all be manufactured from the same black pitch â&#x20AC;&#x201D; coal tar. An age in which the clothes we wear and the food we eat may both be prepared from sawdust. An age in which we get a motor fuel from corn husks, and the buttons on our coat from milk. That truly is an age of Chemistry. Then, too, no one will deny that in any field of endeavor whatsoever, the highest possible development can come only as a result of the closest cooperation of the workers in that field, and the intensive and extensive correlation of material such cooperation affords. To the fact that these two situations do exist, the Hope College Chemistry Club owes its existence and development. The members have pledged themselves to the work of the retort and balance; and have bonded themselves together for the purpose of greater development, and freer expression. OFFICERS President Vice-President

STANLEY

KLEINHEKSEL

MARVIN

KUIZENGA

Secretary

KARLE E .

LANGELAND

Treasurer

HENRY

WOLTHORN

Page One Hundred

Forty-six


M. Costing-, M. S c h o e m a k e r , W . H y i n k , P. A r e n d s e n M. Aleengs, A. K u y p e r , W . V a n d e r S c h a a f , S. H e e r s m a

PREMEDIC CLUB Among those students on Hope's campus who have dedicated themselves to the service of mankind, the Pre-medics hold no menial place. These students are brought together because of their common aim and because their conception of the f u t u r e makes them aware of certain common needs. A stepping stone to success in their chosen profession is offered in the form of the Pre-medic Club. The society feels that there is afforded to its members a feeling of unity that will endure. It presents a true outlook on subsequent study and the professional career, and at the same time invaluable instruction is given, and discussion carried on witii a different aspect than that of the classroom. Lectures are given by prominent men. The students read papers on subjects of interest and instruction, and a discussion is carried on about them at the bi-monthly meetings. Especially through our college course we hold our ideals before us, pressing toward this goal, that we may offer to our race the best that is in us, and that our descendants may profit by our attainments, for our aim is to leave to them a blessed heritage f o r which we now hear a crying need. OFFICERS President Vice-President Secretary

. ADRIAN .

KUYPFR

WALTER SIDNEY

I'agt

HYINK

HEERSMA

One Hundred

Forty-seven


^

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S. H e e r s m a , M. K u i z e n g a , E. L a n g l a n d , J. Pelon L . De P r e e , D. M o u w , J. D e Vries, M. Vancler Schaaf, J. T i g e l a a r

T H E SCIENCE CLUB Ours is a scientific age. Modern civilization has developed f r o m wild savagery only through the progress of science. By it we are enabled to build our homes, to have automobiles, to cure our sick, and to converse with one another through thousands of miles of space. The American scientist has been in a large measure responsible for the position of respect and influence which America holds among the nations of the world. It is only through the continued progress of science that we can hope to see the future race more efficient and stronger than the present. Science is destined to fill a greater and greater part in the development of the future generation. The Science Club of Hope College aims to develop the natural scientific interests of its members into more active, dynamic interests, and to show the individual the important place that science holds in everyday modern life. The programs, which are not restricted to any particular field, afford each member a broad conception of the relation of his individual field to the general. As members of the science club it is our task to fit ourselves for service to humanity, by mastery of some particular field of science. As those great men who have gone before, looked into the future, and committeed themselves to the task of making this the best of all ages to live in, so are we committing ourselves to the task of making the future an ever more and more glorious future to live in. OFFICERS

President Vice-President Secretary

JOE D E VRIES .LEON ADRIAN

DE

PREE

KUYPER

X

9


fltl

l i f t ICS


COACH

JOHN

SCHODTEN

A W O R D FROM T H E C O A C H Athletics play a definite part in the work of an educational institution. It is the classroom and the gymnasium cooperating that will accomplish the most for the individual student. Athletics accomplish two m a j o r things: they develop a man physically and they assist in the formation of character. Hard training makes for strong welldeveloped bodies and a powerful physique. The work is a builder of character, making the athlete every inch a man. Participation in sports develops individual initiative, perseverance, and a determination to overcome all obstacles. As a member of a team the athlete must learn the necessity of cooperation and self-sacrifice. Proper team play and team spirit inculcate into the individual habits which will be of value to him in later life. Good sportsmanship and a desire for fair play are qualities which an athlete must possess. Diligent training and practice, throwing yourself into the game f o r all you are worth, playing to win, yet not fearing to lose, and always playing like a true sportsman,â&#x20AC;&#x201D;these are the things which build character. Hope College has always maintained a high standard of sportsmanship. It is traditional and has helped to mold the character of the institution. To win games at any costâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;never! Hope stands for something nobler; she aims at something higher than a victory unfairly won. Teams must fight, but they must fight fairly. Hope is a member of the M. I. A. A. and meets the competition of rival colleges in the sports of football, basketball, baseball, and track. Teams are turned out for each one of these sports. Also, gym classes are conducted for the benefit of the studentry. These various duties require long hours of service, but the work is interesting and the satisfaction worth while.

Page One Hundred

Fifty-one


E

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O M

E

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S. H e e r s m a , H . W a c k e r b a r t h , R. De Y o u n g , L. Bosch A. L a m m e r s , H . K r u i z e n g a , C. Diephouse, G. Koeppe J. Mulder, H . L a u g , W . De Free, J. M u l d e r

ATHLETIC BOARD ATHLETIC BOARD President

RAYMOND DE

Treasurer

HENRY

Secretary

YOUNG

WACKERBARTH

HERMAN

KRUIZENGA

Assistant Treasurer

WARREN DE FREE

Publicity Managers

AREND FREYLING, SIDNEY HEERSMA, HERMAN LAUG

Coed

Representatives

GRACE KOEPPE, ALICE LAMMERS

Football Manager

CLARENCE DIEPHOUSE

Basketball Manager

LEON BOSCH

Baseball Manager

JOHN MULDER

Track Manager

JOHAN MULDER

\> Page One Hundred

Fifty-two

X

9


Dr. Van Kersen, Prof. Winter, Prof. H i n k a m p C. R o z e m a , J . S c h o u t e n , R. D e Y o u n g

ATHLETIC BOARD O F C O N T R O L Hope's athletics are directed by the Athletic Board of Control, a joint student, faculty, and alumni organization and the Athletic Board, a student organization. The Board of Control passes upon the eligibility of the members of the athletic teams. I he Athletic Board, the student organization, experienced the re-assumption many of its duties this year. The coach was relieved of much of the work which right should have been taken care of by the students. The students are now aware the responsibilities which are theirs, and the coach has more time f o r the execution his office of Athletic Director.

of by of of

The Athletic Board presented a number of " F u n Nites" which proved entertaining for the audience and profitable f o r the Board. This year has seen a great step taken toward the removal of debt in the athletic department.

Page One Hundred

Fifty-three


â&#x20AC;˘*

I

9

G. Cook, C. V a n L e n t e , H . S l u y t e r , S. De W e e r d , K. B e k k e n , J . K l a y H . J a p p i n g a , J . N a u t a , W . H y i n k , L . V a n d e r Hill, J . S c h o u t e n

BASEBALL Hope's baseball veterans and aspirants assembled early in the spring f o r practice. The outlook appeared bright with the return of many veterans, the team lacking only two infielders and two outfielders of being a veteran squad. The team, captained by Oppie De Groot at short stop, showed very good baseball at times, but lacked the steadiness and polish of a sure winner. Hope's first game was played at Riverview park against the strong Western State Teacher's college. Many errors led to an 8-1 victory for Western. This game, however, ironed out many of the rough spots in the Hope team. On April 21, Albion swamped Hope again as the results of errors 7-1. Cole pitched a good game for Hope but his team mates could glean but one run during the entire match. On April 25 Hope engaged Kazoo College on its campus diamond and was swamped by a 10-1 score. Cole had much difficulty with the Kazoo batters, while Watson of Kazoo held the Hope men to four hits. The Orange and Blue found its baseball form against Hillsdale in a double header on their diamond. The first game Hope took by a 5-3 score. The second game was taken by Hope 12-0. Cole pitched through the first game, and with good support, held the Hillsdale nine to three runs. Van Lente pitched a shutout game in the second of the double-header. On May 5, Kazoo took the breaks in a close game and won 2-1. Hope made five hits to Kazoo s four but could not turn their's into the necessary runs. The next week

Page One Hundred

Fifty-six


C. Van L e n t e

J. Nauta

N. Hyink

H. Jappinga

J . Klay

Hope successfully took the measure of Olivet at Riverview park by the score of 7-5. \ an Lente and R. J a p p i n g f o r m e d the battery for Hope and though touched frequently timely hitting kept the home nine in the lead. On the 17th, the Albion baseball team did not entertain their visitors well and swamped the Hope team with an orgy of base hits and runs. They won 7-1. On the 19th, Olivet suffered at the hands of Cole and his team mates and they bowed before the 81- onslaught of Hope. Though the day was poor for baseball Hope easily held Olivet to one run and socked the Olivet moundsman for eight runs and several basehits. Cole yielded but five hits to the Olivet batters. At this point Hope stood in third place in the M.I.A.A. run. having f o u r wins and three losses. Good fortune did not smile on the Hope nine, for after twelve long innings of desperate fighting, the Hope squad cracked, and Albion, the association leaders, took a 10-5 win. Hope missed chances of bringing in the much-needed runs by poor batting, but the experienced Albion crew came through with five runs on hits and errors in the third extra inning of the match. This was the last regular season game, but at the Albion field day on June 1 and 2. Hope again played Albion and this time was defeated 17-6. Van Lente and Cole were hit often and hard. M.S.C. then showed their superiority by giving Hope an 11-0 defeat. The Staters had everything their way during the game, but Hope showed up well considering the competition. The team ended the season in fourth place in the M.I.A.A. race and conducted themselves well during the whole season. Coach Schouten is to be commended on the baseball team and the work he has done with them. Of this team, three men graduate, leaving a veteran squad with which to start next year.

Page One IIundred

Fifty-seven


H . Sluyter

G. De Cook

S. D e W e e r d

L. Vander Kill

E . Bekker

REV IEW Hope

Opponents

April 17

1

Kazoo Normal — there

8

April 25

1

k a z o o College — here

10

April 28

12

Hillsdale — there

0

April 28

5

Hillsdale — there

3

May

5

1

Kazoo — there

2

May

12

7

Olivet -— here

5

May

17

1

Albion -— there

7

May

19

8

Olivet — there

1

May

23

5

Albion — here (12 Innings)

10

June

1

6

Albion •— there

17

June

6

6

M.S.C. — there

11

Oiic Hundred

Fijty-i'ight


T H E

M I L E S T O N E

â&#x20AC;˘Âť

-v

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R. E v e n h u i s , A . B r u n s o n , F . W y n g a r d e n , F. P o p p i n k , J . M u l d e r , W . K u y p e r H . V e r S t r a a t , M. I . e e n h o u t s

FRESHMAN BASEBALL The Freshman baseball team was organized mainly for the purpose of finding material which could be used in the varsity in the years to come. The frosh played a number of teams of the community and of the neighboring vicinity. The team was also used several times against the varsity for practice. Although the frosh season was rather short, it served to point out the possibilities of several players. Coach Schouten believes that several of the boys can be made into real players. Perhays in a year or two, this g r o u p will be the varsity!

Page One Hundrtd

fifty-nine-

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J . S c h o u t e n , M. O o o s t i n g , C. V a n L e n t e , D . M a r t i n , A . Cook, J . W i n t e r , H . Steffens, C. D i e p h o u s e . J . J a p p i n g a , W . De V e l d e r , A . B r u n s o n , A . V a n d e n B u s c h , C. B e k k e r , R. D e Y o u n g

FOOTBALL, 1928

Hope entered the football season with a nucleus of seven veterans and at the first call. Coach Jack Schouten began to whip his team into shape. To all appearances h=; had a veteran line, bul an inexperienced backfield with which to battle the strong M.I. A. A. teams. The offensive of this team was to be developed before any success of the team could be assured. Several weeks of training had developed the team to a good physical condition but (he problem of filling in a good backfield was not so easily solved. The best solution seemed to be in Cook as fullback. De Young and De Velder as halves, and Jappinga as quarter. Captain Vanden Bush led the strong line with experienced players at all the line positions.

Page One Hundred

Sixty-two


R . D e Young

A. Cook

A. V a n d e n B u s h

H . StefFens

J. Klay

The first game was played at Riverview park September 28 against Olivet. The weakness of the team then became apparent. Though neither team scored, both teams fought hard. Hope seemed weak in blocking an aerial attack and in co-operation between backfield and line, while Olivet could do nothing against the Hope line. Steffens and Martin broke through in fine form, but the lines' efforts could not offset the scoreless tie. 1 he next Saturday Hope journeyed to Hillsdale where they earned the name of Scoreless Wonders. As at Olivet the teams lacked the offensive power but the defense seemed to be proportionately strong. In this game the teams were evenly matched. Coach Schouten extended his efforts to put his team in shape for the hard approaching games of the schedule. The third game of the season presented the greatest difficulties the team had yet met. Alma, '26 and '27 champions, was anxious to make a record of three successive championships. Their superior teamwork, weight, and cleverness overcame the fighting Hopites and won out 12-0.

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T H E

M I L E S T O N E

J. Winter

C. Van L e n t e

^

D.Martin

^

C. Bekker

^

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Z

W . De Velder

The experience and clever lactics of the Alma crew was lacking in Hope's machine, but Alma had great difficulty in scoring her twelve points. Successive line smashes both times placed the ball near the Hope goal line where the strong hope line failed to hold back Alma s heavy artillery. Hope celebrated her homecoming day in a record game with the Kazoo College eleven. The return of Alumni brought a record crowd to see Kazoo defeat Hope 7-0. To all appearances Hope should at least have equaled the lone touchdown of the Celery Pickers. A pretty run, a penalty, two line bucks, gave Kazoo the ball on Hope's one-yard line where ihey could not be stopped. The team fought desperately to even the score but the whistle ended the bitter struggle. De Young and Cook played very well in the backfield and the whole line was to be commended on their fight and ability. The greatest football the 1928 team played was in the game at Albion in which the fighting Dutchmen took the short end of a 7-0 score. Albion got a flying start, scoring in the first two minutes of play, but thereafter they had all they could do to keep their record as an undefeated team. After the first few minutes, though the game was played in a steady rain, the Albion team was forced to use all its strength in holding Hope. Winter punted well. Becker, Klay, Brunson. De Young and Cook all shared in smashing the clever plays of the M.I.A.A. champions.

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Hope put a flying finish on the 1928 season by breaking into the scoring column and defeating General Motors Tech 12-7. Vanden Bush. Klay. De Young, and Martin made their last appearance on a Hope Grid team and played a good game as their last for Hope. Early in the game, a Flint man ran thirty-five yards f o r a touchdown after which he kicked the extra point. They never again made a first down, while Hope successfully traversed the field for two touchdowns. The slippery condition of the ball prevented successful try f o r extra point. The line was able to open up holes for the ball toters better than ever before and, also, the Flint team was unable to break through on Hope's plays. Hope's hard tackling was also a feature of the game. Although not an M.I.A.A. game, it clearly showed the capabilities of the Hope squad. Although the season did not productwins, yet it showed clearly the scrappiness of the Hope squad.

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TT. H o f f m a n , W . S p o e l s t r a , J . B o u m a , A . B o s s e n b r o e k , N . C u p e r y S. W a b e k e , H . D a l m a n , E . S t e g g e r d a , T . B e a v e r , T . V a n H u i t s m a , R. F o x

FRESHMAN FOOTBALL Hope's Freshman team of ihis year provided ample material on which to build a team next year as well as carrying out a successful campaign against other freshman teams. Paul Nettinga assisted Coach Schouten in making a team that offered plenty of opposition to the varsity and to the other freshman teams that were played. In the first game. Hillsdale yearlings were overcome by the Hope team. Alma and kazoo College defeated the Frosh but this was due largely to lack of experience in the young Hopites. Dalman and Beaver showed varsity possibilities in the General Motors games and the team as a whole is to be commended for sportsmanship and ability.

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J . S c h o u t e n , W . D e V e l d e r , A . Cook, 1). M a r t i n , C. V a n L e n t e , R. D e Y o u n g C. B e k k e r , B. D e P r e e , L . V a n d e r Hill, C. D i e p h o u s e , A . V a n d e n B u s c h

BASKETBALL, 1928-1929

Hope's basketball team entered the season with four veterans and plenty of reserve material to form a real team. Vander Hill was unable to play because of illness but the return of Cook to the game was an important addition to Coach Schouten's quintet. As usual, interest was manifest in the game early in the season and the earlypractice games resulted in the Hope team whipping their early rivals. After a few practice games Manager De Velder arranged a trip through Michigan, Illinois, and Iowa. These games were contested with indifferent success. Hope was successful in two of the seven games played against real competition. On January 1 Hope struck a stone wall in the Boter's of Grand Rapids. lost its second game to Kazoo Normal and again was defeated by the surpising dale team by the close score of 29-26. Hope's veterans did not begin to find selves till too late in the game and only came within three points of tying the

Pagi' One Hundred

Sixty-eight

Hope Hillsthemscore.


L . V a n d e r Hill

B. De Pree

D. Martin

W . D e Velder

It was a different team that played at Alma and gave the Alma quintet far more than they expected. Hope held the hall during most of this game and piled a lead that they kept through the game. The final score was 30-25. This was Hope's first M.I.A.A. win. The Orange and Blue again suffered a relapse before the Hillsdale basketeers. Martin and Cook played all the basketball f o r Hope but they could not offset some clever passwork by the Hillsdale quintet. In a stirring contest the St. M a r y ' s College team pulled ahead of the Orange and Blue to win 28-26. Clever basketball had the slight edge on Hope's defense but it was anyone's game till the Catholics scored the two free throws.

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T H E

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C. Van L e n t e

A. Cook

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J , Schouten

Hope left M.I.A.A. competition to administer a defeat to General Motors Tech at Flint by a 35-31 score. Reserves played most of this game and provided plenty of competition for the Flint aggregation. On February 6 the varsity journeyed to the Celery City and earned a victory over the Hornets which placed us in the first division in the M.I.A.A. race. Hope crept past the Olivet team to win from them 32-25. Though behind at the half, in the final scoring for points. Hope's superiority came 10 light and another obstacle was swept aside in the M.I.A.A. race. Alma was entertained at Carnegie Gymnasium on March 6 and a rejuvenated team with great difficulty took the measure of the Hopites. This game offered the best brand of basketball ever seen on Hope's floor in recent years. The whistle ended the game with the score 29-25 in favor of Alma.

P a g s One Hundred

Seventy

9


R. De Young

A. V a n d e n B u s h

J. Klay

C. Diephouse

At the Burton Heights gym Calvin defeated Hope f o r the second time by a score of 25-20. For three quarters Hope's courtsters stayed even with the Calvinites but the fourth quarter offered Calvin several chances to score which they were not too slow to take and thereby maintain a comfortable lead. Some poor shooting was evidenced by both sides, but there was no lack of fight on either side. Men receiving their letter in basketball were: Martin, Vander Hill, De Free, De Velder, Vanden Bush, Becker, Klay, Cook. Van Lente, De Young and Diephouse. The team ended in a tie for third place in the M.FA.A. race, scoring 190 points against 177 of their opponents.

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Seventy-one


J . S c h o u t e n , J . B o u m a , W . S p o e l s t r a , E . S t e g g e r d a , T . Beaver, R. F o x N. C u p e r y , T . V a n H u i t s m a , H . D a l m a n , H . H o f f m a n , A . B o s s e n b r o e k

FRESHMAN BASKETBALL

Hope's Freshman basketball team this year was apparently to be of the highest caliber when at the first call some of the best material f r o m high school squads made its appearance. The duty of Coach Schouten appeared to be to weld together a team from this assorted material that could work together. This freshman team made an enviable record for itself, winning all its games on the home floor and losing but two away. The yearlings defeated all the class t e a m s the College All Stars twice, the Olivet Frosh, and twice the Calvin Reserves. Kazoo's freshmen barely won a victory over the frosh, while Albion's team had a real tussel overcoming the Hope youngsters. The large floor at Albion did much to bring defeat to the Hope yearlings. Since no Freshman team can play more than six games in M.I.A.A. circles, the Frosh had little chance for real competition or experience. However, most of the material will prove valuable as varsity material within the next two years.

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E . S w a r t h o u t , H . L a u p , C. R o z e m a , M. M e e n g s , J . ^Eulder F . D u n n e w o l d , F . M o s e r , R. D e Y o u n g , A . V a n d e n B u s c h , W . D e V e l d e r

TRACK Interest was again strong in track in the spring of the 1928 term and though few came out for early practice, much good track material was unearthed. On April 28 the Hope fleetfoot squad matched paces with the experienced Kalamazoo College team, but the Hornets took too many firsts, and the final event saw them 15 points ahead of the Hope men. Hope showed up well in the pole-vault, two-mile, and the hurdles. On Field Day, May 12, Hope easily defeated the Olivet track team 104-17. Hope took first in most every event and had a large enough squad to count in the second and third places. The team which went to Albion took fourth place in the M.l.A.A. meet with 16 points. Hard training and student support would give Hope's tracksters even better standing as the next season comes around. Hope's Freshman material is of the highest grade and since they won all their meets, the outlook for the coming year is very bright.

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H . B o v e n k e r k , L . V a n d e r Poel, O . M a d d a u s , C. K l a s s e n , N . M c C a r r o I l W. Heydorn

TENNIS Although the long promised tennis courts had not yet arrived. Hope sent out a tennis team to various colleges and showed some real class, considering her handicaps. Considerable interest was shown among students and there was no lack of material f o r the Orange and Blue team. E. Damstra, C. Klaassen. L. Vander Poel, 0 . Maddaus, N. McCarroIl. and L. Bovenkerk represented Hope in intercollegiate meets. Two games were lost to Kazoo in the season and one contest was taken f r o m Olivet. Kazoo won the first contest 4-'5 when only Damstra, Vander Poel, and Klassen could win their singles matches, while Bovenkerk, Maddaus, and the two double teams lost their matches. In the other engagements all the men took part in taking honors for Hope, but Kazoo again came out on the large end of the score, in the second match Olivet was again easily defeated 5-2. Enthusiasm f o r tennis is greatly on the increase at Hope.

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R. D e Young - , A . Cook, W . D e V e l d e r , A . B r u n s o n T. W i n t e r , H . Laugr, M . M e e n g s , C. B e k k e r , H . S t e f f e n s L . V a n d e r Hill, J . N a u t a , C. V a n L e n t e , B. D e P r e e , D. M a r t i n , H . J a p p i n g a

" H " CLUB

The " H " CIuIj is an organization having as its one requisite for membership the possession of a Hope letter earned in one of the sports in which the college engages. This requires participation in the majority of intercollegiate contests in any certain sport. Thus, in this organization all of the athletes of the school are handed together for the promotion of the entire movement. To be an athlete of Hope indicates several qualities in the character of a man. A strong and healthy physique, well-developed and trained, and an alert and active mindâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;^ these are the prime essentials. Natural ability as an athlete, perfected by hours of practice and a strict adherence to training, is always found in the man who has distinguished himself on the athletic field. Hope men have always stood for these things, and they feel that it is worth while to be the possessor of an " H . "

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E . A l b e r s , A . D e Y o u n g , E . D e n H e r d e r , M. A n d e r s o n G. F r e d e r i c k s , J . O s s e w a r d e , E . S t e k e t e e , A. L a m m e r s , G. H u i z e n g a , G. K o e p p e M. V a n B u r e n , D . H a a n , I . T o w n s e n d , A . B u t h

A T H L E T I C DEBT DIGGERS The letters A.D.D. have a double meaning to all members of the Athletic Debt Diggers. To them the letters also spell a word which they use as their motto. Throughout the school year they have tried to do their bit to add to the assets o: the athletic f u n d and to add to the pep and the school spirit of the student body. Besides selling hot-dogs at the football games and frost-bites at the basketball games, they also have been in the bleachers rooting f o r the team. All money that they have made has been turned into the athletic f u n d to buy sweaters and equipment for the various teams.

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There is a mistake in one of the ads

F1KD ITand a free Milestone will be yours if you are the first . . . .

DEDICATION To those who walk with the Spirit of J a n u a r y on their faces, the Spirit of May in their blood, the Spirit of June in their desires, and the Spirit of April First in their hearts, is this section of the Milestone respectfully dedicated. FOREWORD Lest we forget, recall to mind that humor was handed down to us f r o m the beginning of time. Therefore, if the antiquity of some of this h u m o r does not appeal to you. recall that there are styles in h u m o r as well as in custom and dress. Therefore, bear in mind that interspersed with some of ultra modern style of humor, is some of the midVic'.orian humor. Recall that Grandaiother got a kick out of it. so

(Salendar Sept. 17. An occasional student is to be seeti wandering about the streets and looking rather forlorn and lonesome. This behavior can be explained by the fact of Hope's not having yet started. As soon as classes start and lessons are assigned, ixone will be the forsaken look, and in its place will be one of rush and worry. Sept. 18. Registrar's room not crowded. Far f r o m it, in fact. Sept. 19. Opening address given by the Rev. C. Muste. A few remarks were also made by Dr. Dimnent. Several new faculty members also put in an appearance. Sept. 20. Classes supposedly started and a few lessons were assigned. Students go lo Brinks with the hope that the books haven't showed up. The Freshmen disco er how dumb they are bv the intelligence ( ? ) tests.

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Eighty-one


Sept. 21. Societies meet. Sept. 24. Not much excitement. classes in one hour. Sept. 27. Y. M.-Y. W. Mixer.

Some student# discover that they have three

Sept. 2 / . First mass meeting. Freshmen rules read, and Frosh warned to observe them. A half-hearted free-for-all transpired between the Frosh and Sophs after the meeting. The goldfish pond was visited by a few Frosh. Sept. 28. Frosh-Soph pull, and how! The Freshies test the temperature of Black River. Much rejoicing at the Soph party at night. The spirit was so contagious that the three other classes "broke loose" and blew a party. Sept. 29. First football game played against Olivet. Oct. 13. No game today. Oct. 15. Frosh take a day off and travel to Albion to play. The Frosh lost. 25-0. Oct. 16. The Army Band plays in the gym. Those with the girls and the cash listen to it on the inside, while the remaining few sit on the steps. Oct. 17. Rainy night. Tough on those with dates, and no cars. Oct. 19. After chapel, the merits of an honor code were discussed and a vote taken, by which each, every, and all codes were abolished. Frosh play at Alma and lose 12-0. Mass meeting at night for the coming game. Good crowd, good program, lots of pep. Oct. 20. Hope plays Albion here. Good game but we lose, 12-0. Oct. 21. Rainy Sunday. Oct. 2.5. First number of the Lecture Course of which we have been hearing all year, came off tonight. Banty praises two jazz numbers. Is the world coming to an end? Oct. 24. Six weeks exams start off with a bang. During exam time, half of the students wonder why they came here, and the other half wish they hadn't come. Oct. 26. Frosh play Olivet. We win, 6-0. First game won by Hope this year. Frosh come to chapel without their pots or ties, and scrap ensues. Soph girls paint a few necks and so forth at the game. First scrap ever seen in public in which girls participate. Faculty (Mrs. Durfee) up in arms. Oct. 27. Pheasant season now open. Sleep and books put aside. Oct. 28. Another rainy Sundayâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;also some snow. Oct. 30. Seniors appear with smoking jackets. What will Nykerk say? Fraters have their initiation in their new home. Oct. 31. H a l l o w e e n once more. Noise and deviltry around town. Fraters have second night of initiation. Nov. 1. Cosmos have their initiation. Nov. 2. Cosmos stag. Nov. 5. Freshmen trials and how! Guilty Frosh sentenced to extreme punishment for misconduct. Nov. 6. Emersonians and Knicks have initiation. Nov. 8. Mona Ungersma gives vocal program. Nov. 9. Emersonians and Knicks have stags. Nov. 10. Home coming day. Hope loses to Kazoo, 7-0. Fraters have house warming in their new home. Hundreds of townsfolk and those connected with the school pay the Fraters a visit. Nov. 12. The Student's Guides come out, after a long waiting. Dorian girls entertain 1* rosh girls. 1 raters have their Armistice party at the Country Club. Nov. 14. Green-tinted Anchor comes out. Much writing, no news.

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FIRST STATE B A N K G . j . D I E K E M A , PRESIDHNT

W Y N A N D

W I C H E R S , CASHIER

Resources over $4,000,000

Trust is almost the highest thing in life. It is the essence of civilization. Trust is the very foundation of banking. T h e idea that hundreds of people trust some banker with their surplus funds, and he puts those funds at the service of the community as a whole through loaning them to persons who redeposit them, to be reloaned and redeposited again, so that the bank, a bundle of individual trusts of rich and poor, becomes one of the fulcrums upon which civilization turns."

We want every student to use the facilities of this Bank, which is the largest and strongest in Ottawa County.

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Pictorial ^Portraits of Distinction by

^Photography J O N E ' S

S T U D I O

361 Central Avenue HOLLAND,

P H O N E

2 5 5 0

MICHIGAN

^ H O M O G I Y V P H S

Qytn/e Forever

FOR A P P O I N T M E N T S

F. B O O N S T R A MERCANTILE CO. Home of

Hart Schaffner & Marx

EVERYTHING

IN

MEN'S

AND

BOYS' C L O T H I N G

ZEELAND, MICHIGAN

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GREEN Holland's

MILL Distinctive

Eating

CAFE Vlace

Excellent meals and just the place to go after an evening's entertainment CHRIS KOROSE, Proprietor

Nov. 16. Second Lyceum course number. Edna Means, a reader, entertains. Sorosis entertain Frosh girls. Dickensians have a stag. Nov. 23. First real snow of the year. Nov. 24. Hope plays General Motors Tech at Flint and wins, 12-7. Nov. 26. Groups of would-be astronomers light off the sand man, and see the eclipse of the moon at four o'clock A. M. Nov. 27. Little or next to nothing doing. Nov. 28. After two weeks of uncertainty, Dimmie announces to the students that classes cease at noon. Nov. 29. A day of much gourmandizing, and little or no activity. Nov. 30. Hope plays basketball against the Seventh Reformed Church of Grand Rapids and wins by a score of 28-14. Team shows much promise. Dec. 1. Christmas is coming. Dec. 3. Back to the daily grind. Dec. 4. Hope confers an L.L.D. degree on Dr. Jan Herman Van Roijen, ambassador of Holland. Dec. 6. H a r r y F a r b m a n gives a violin concert in Carnegie Hall, as a part of the Lyceum course. Dec. 7. Societies meet on Friday for a change. Dec. 10. Hope plays some team f r o m Grand Rapids and trims them. 42-18. Frosh beat Seniors, 29-25. Six Delphi initiates sang ( ? ) during the half. Dec. 11. Girls' societies have their initiations this week. Dec. 12. Everybody's getting twelve weeks exams and the flu. Can you think up a worse combination? Dec. 14. Societies meet again. Dec. 16. Another Sunday. Dec. 17. Dec. 18. The still raging Dimmie speaks of Anticipatory cases of the flu. Dec. 20. One more day to go. Knicks have housewarming for lady " f r i e n d s . " Dec. 21. School closes at noon f o r the rest of the year. Sounds big but means little. Dec. 24. Christmas eve, if you don't know it. Dec. 25. Fraters have Christmas party at their home. Dec. 30. Another year about to be ruled off the calendar. J a n . 1. New Year's day. Many woke up with a headache, and a " W h e r e was I last n i g h t ? " Only one more week of blessed vacation left. Jan. 7. Several students attempt to get in chapel at 8:10 A. M., having misunderstood Dimmie's announcement that school was to open on the seventh.

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Nies Hardware Co. Van Putten Grocery

H

J O H N OLERT, Prop.

Phone 5827

O L L A N D OUR APPY OME

202 River Ave.

Largest Hard ware Store in Holland 43-45 E A S T E I G H T H ST.

Phone

5032

Established

1867

T. Keppel's Sons Fuel and Mason's

Supplies

63 East Eighth Street

OLDSMOBILE "The

Fine Car oj Low Price' CAMBELL SALES A N D SERVICE 174 Central Avenue Phone

Compliments

2065

Dykstra's Funeral

oj

Home

the

Federal Manufacturing Company

AMBULANCE SERVICE Phone 5267

Kobinson

29 E. 9th St.

Dr. A. Leenhouts EYE, EAR, N O S E A N D

THROAT

Parsons 9 : 3 0 to 1 1 : 3 0 A . M . — 2 : 0 0 to 5:00 P.M. ATTORNEYS AT LAW

Holland

Page One Hundred

Michigan

Eighty-six

N o Office Hours W e d n e s d a y Afternoons

Holland, Mich.

20 W . 8th St.


PHONE

5001

SCOTT-LUGERS LUMBER CO. Dealers in ALL K I N D S O F B U I L D I N G M A T E R I A L

Quality at

Reasonable

Prices

Office; Corner 6th St. and River Ave. HOLLAND, MICHIGAN

Jan. 8. Doors open again to those wishing to attain an education. J a n . 9. Nothing much. Jan. 10. Anchor elections held. " S o n n y " Langeland chosen new Editor. Jan. 15. Hope team loses to Hillsdale, 27-25. J a n . 20. P r a y e r week begins with a Vesper Service in Chapel. Reverend Hager lakes charge. Jan. 21. Prayer week with Dr. Vandermuelen. Jan. 24. Revival meeting held in the gym. Jan. 25. Albion team kept away by ice and snow. Jan. 31. Hope loses to St. Mary's, 28-26. Feb. 4. Athletic association gives " F u n Nite." Lots of fun and funniness. Feb. 7. Hope runs over General Motors Tech by score of 35-31. Feb. 8. Hope wins over Kazoo Hornets, 24-22. Both the affirmative and negative debating teams win, over Kazoo here, and Michigan State Normal there. Feb. 12. First night of the Drama Class Play, "The Amateur Detective." Marcus kisses three other fellows' girls and gets away with it. Feb. 15. Van Vleck initiates its new inmates. Feb. 19. Hope loses to Albion, 35-26. Feb. 21. Freyling forsakes books and finds relief in wedding bells. Men's Societies hold their Smoker stags. Feb. 22. Hope plays Calvin at the Armory before the largest crowd of the season. Hope loses, 30-31 score.

Pagir One Hundred

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DOESBURG Druggist

3 2 EAST E I G H T H S T R E E T

HOLLAND MICHIGAN

W H I T E BROS. ELECTRIC CO.

Gebben & Vanden Berg Dependable

Dependable Electric

Fuel

Service Phone 4651

178 River A v e n u e

275 East Eighth Street

HOLLAND, MICHIGAN

Prompt Service

Compliments

Quality W o r k

Holland Dry Cleaners

BEN H. LIEVENSE

O U R D E L I V E R Y CAR

BOWLING

is at Your Service 9 East Eighth St.

CAR

KRAKER

All Plumbing FIXTURES IN THE

PHONE 5 7 2 0

Page One Hundred

Eighty-eight

N E W

ALLEYS

STORAGE

BATTERY

Phone 5 5 2 8

H E N R Y

of

STATION

C O M P A N Y

and Heating

CHAPEL WERE

INSTALLED

BY US

2 1 3 RIVER A V E .

X

9


FOURTH REFORMED CHURCH C O R N E R FIRST AVE. A N D F I F T E E N T H ST. HENRY

VAN

DYKE,

Minister

2 4 0 W . Fifteenth St.

SUNDAY

SERVICES

Morning Service Afternoon Service

9:3a 2:30

Evening Service

7:30

Sunday School H o u r

11:00

Senior C. E

6:30

Junior C. I:.

4:00

Y o u n g People's Class for D o c trinal Instruction, M o n d a y at 7 : 3 0 P.M.

Everybody W e l c o m e Students Cordially Invited

Feb. 25. Both H o p e debating teams lose to Calvin teams. Feb. 27. H o p e wins over Olivet, 32-25. Feb. 29. Mass meeting in gym to await results of M. 0 . L. No Glory day M o n d a y but we realize that we should get o u r education. March 6. H o p e p l a y s Alma and loses a hard fought scrap in the last minute. March 12. H o p e plays Calvin at Grand Rapids. Calvin cops the game, 25-20. H o p e band gains great a p p l a u s e . M a r c h 15. Dr. Samuel Zwemer addresses chapel, giving a tribute to Rev. Bilkerk. M a r c h 22. No basketball game. Rain instead. â&#x20AC;˘<>i

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

nip..

C l e r k : Are you an o r p h a n ? Lucile W a l v o o r d (Chicago-ite) : I don t know, I haven't seen the m o r n i n g p a p e r yel. Ethelyn K o e p p e : Captain, would you please h e l p me find my s t a t e r o o m ? C a p t a i n : Have you forgotten what n u m b e r it is, m i s s ? E. K.; Yes, but I'll know it if I see it again, because there was a lighthouse just outside the window. M. Leenhouts: Late dates always get me in trouble. L. V a n d e r W e r f : Yea, I flunked that history quizz too. The f o o t b a l l g u a r d was smoking an unusual and u n t i m e l y cigarette. 11 began to grow perceptibly shorter. It decreased and decreased in size. F i n a l l y he inhaled deeply and with a slight movement the cigarette split u p the middle. It was the last drawthat broke the Camel's back.

Vase

One

Hundred

Etghty

nine


Best Ice Cream Parlor

Fancy Candy in Bulk

in Holland

and Boxes

A .

P A T S Y

F A B I A N

O P H O N E 5575

26 W E S T E I G H T H ST.

Imported and Domestic Woolens

Compliments

of

DR. W . M . TAPPEN NICK DYKEMA

Tailor

PHYSICIAN

19 W . 8th St., over J. J. Rutgers Co.

Phone

5105

MCBRIDE

BLOCK

G. Cook Company

Thomas H. Marsilje

for EIRE INSURANCE

L A W N GRASS, G A R D E N SEEDS and

Phone 5212

First State Bank Bldg,

H O L L A N D ,

M I C H I G A N

FERTILIZERS OF Q U A L I T Y Phone 5236

109 River Ave.

WICHERS LUMBER COMPANY ZEELAND, M I C H I G A N

Everything

in Lumber

See us if you are planning

Page Onr Hundred

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to build


Trinity Reformed Church C E N T R A L A V E N U E AND T W E N T I E T H STREET HOLLAND,

MICHIGAN

Minister R n v . C. P. DAME, 4 9 5 C e n t r a l A v e . , P h o n e 2 1 5 3 MISSIONARIES MISS MARY E, GEEGH. Palmaner Chitoor District, South India Miss ESTHER DE WEERD. Kodainahal, Arcot Mission, South India

Sjinday Services Divine W o r s h i p at 10:00 A . M . and 7:30 P.M. Sunday School at 11:40; Student's Class, Prof. J. R. Mulder, teacher. Christian Endeavor Meeting at 6 : 3 0 P.M. MAKE TRINITY CHURCH YOUR CHURCH HOME

Pags One 11 undred

\intty-on*


Real Estate Bought, Sold and Exchanged LAKE M I C H I G A N W A T E R - F R O N T LOTS A N D LARGE TRACTS A SPECIALTY

Farms, Resort and City Property

ISAAC KOUW 36 West Eighth Street

Phone 5166

Holland, Michigan

Guide: This is a mummy over 3000 years old. M. W a l d r o n : M y ! Weren't women brown and homely in those days? C. Becker: What would I have to give you for one little kiss? Betty Smith: Chloroform. P. Nettinga: Why didn't you take a taxi on your date? S. De P r e e : My woman doesn't look well in yellow. She: Every time 1 come to Minnesota. I have to change to my heavy undies. You know I'm f r o m Georgia. He: I'm from Missouri. She: S i r ! ! ! ! ! When her father snaps on the parlor light, and there she is in some ridiculous position on your lap. be nonchalant â&#x20AC;&#x201D; light out. T. Van Haitsma: You are the light of my life. Ethyl: Ah yes, and if you would forsake me, I would go out â&#x20AC;&#x201D; with other men. Wife: Tomorrow is the tenth anniversary of our wedding. Shall I kill the turkey? Husband: Why, what did he have to do with it? About the only thing that can make a freshman think fast on his feet is a cafeteria. Burglar (in a monument store) Say, is dis a practical joke, or did Jake give me de wrong address?

Buss Machine Works HOLLAND, MICHIGAN

Woodtvorking T H E

B U S S

I S

A

R E A L

Machinery P

L

A

N

E

R


An old man in the house is a good sign â&#x20AC;&#x201D; B E N J A M I N FRANKLIN

It is a sign that part of the earnings of productive youth have been thriftily laid by. The best method of saving for old age, and the surest protection for the family in the meantime, is the legal reserve life insurance policy. It costs you nothing to find out all about it.

W . J. O L I V E , Representative

THE FRANKLIN LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY in HOLLAND,

MICHIGAN

over a quarter of a century

/'<7;V

One- 11 undrtd \ i


Holland's Food

— Patronize

Up-to-Date

Shop

THE EAST E N D DRUG STORE

KUITE'S E C O N O M Y GROCERY AND MARKET

Where

12 West Eighth Street

A Smile

Service, Always

Quality Greet

and You

H O L L A N D CITY STATE B A N K HOLLAND, M I C H I G A N W. H. BEACH, President A. H. LANDWEHR, Vice-President O T T O P. KRAMER, Cashier HENRY A. GEERDS, Asst. Cashier Capital

-

-

-

-

-

-

$

-

100,000 205,000

Surplus and U n d i v i d e d Profits

3,800,000

Resources

MEMBER OF FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM Friendly,

Compliments

Helpful

of

H O L L A N D MEMORIAL PARK ASSOCIATION 29 E. 8th St.

Phone 2024

HOLLAND, MICHIGAN

Page One Hundred

Ninety-jour

Service

Always

Herman N . Dosker and Company Home State Bank BIdg. INSURANCE Grand Rapids, Michigan


S M A R T NEGLIGEES LINGERIE

F R O C K S

$15.00

COSTUME JEWELRY HOSIERY

Exclusively

Phone 2170

208 College Avenue

First Egus: How did you like that m e a l ? Second Ditto: Oats all right. Where do you want to go, b a b y ? I want to go buy-buy. College is just like a washing machine: you get out of it just what you put into it. but you'd never recognize it. Gypsy: Stude: Gypsy: Stude:

I tella your fortune, mister. How much? Twenty-five cents. Correct. How did ya guess it?

Messenger: Are you the mate? Irish Cook: No, Oi'm the guy that cooks the mate. Stenographer: How do you spell " s e n s e " ? E m p l o y e r : Dollars and cents, or horse sense? Stenographer: Well, in like "I ain't seen him sence." H u s b a n d : I say, if the worst comes to worst, I suppose we can live with your parents. W i f e : Not a chance. They're already living with their parents. A Junction City young woman who acquired a haircloth chair as an antique the other day, says that now sbe knows why her grandmother wore six petticoats.

YOUTH SETS THE PACE Youth sets the styles — it has always done so. The young man knows his wants, and we make it our business to anticipate them. Here are style-treats galore for the student trade, because this is a young man's store. C L O T H I N G — SHOES — G E N T ' S F U R N I S H I N G S

The

Lokker-R u t gers

Company

Page One Hundred

Ninety-five


Complements

Reefer's LUNCH

ROOM

of

T h e DePree Company

29 West Eighth Street

HOLLAND

MICHIGAN

for Ladies and Gentlemen REMEDIES TOILET ARTICLES

Bolhuis Lbr. & Mfg. Co.

NURSE

BRAND

PURE DRUGS

Dealers in

SUNDRIES

LUMBER FORMALDEHYDE

AND

FUMIGATORS

B U I L D I N G MATERIALS

VERMI-TOX

Also manufacturers

of

HIGHEST QUALITY

DEPREE

INSECTICIDE

PHARMACEUTICALS

WILHELMINA

CANDIES

MILL W O R K AND

KITCHEN FURNITURE

Page One Hundred

Ninety-six

Look for the sign of the Nurse


D A M S T R A

BROS.

Plumbing and Heating Contractors 2 0 6 COLLEGE A V E N U E HOLLAND

MICHIGAN

A pedestrian is a college boy's father. Customer in drug store: Gimmie a chocolate egg malted milk, whipped cream and two scoops of ice cream, one chocolate and one vanilla. Beat up the f o r m e r and let the other float. Clerk: Yes, sir. Can you come in for trial sip next Wednesday?

BOARD OF PUBLICATION, R. C. A. Headquarters for Religious Books REFORMED C H U R C H HOUSE, H O L L A N D , M I C H I G A N

How does a man find time to keep a silver cigarette case loaded? It's such f u n , this job hunting. You know, being a college man, I never wear a hat. Yesterday I was standing in a book shop waiting to be hired, when a lady came in, picked up a book and handed me two dollars. Today I'm going to loiter in the piano store.

fr

Srt3/ It With Flowers" Graduation Day Crowns June's calendar of many events. Naturally flowers add so much to the Congratulations. And how they will be remembered along with your wishes in recollection of the day!

EBELINK'S FLOWER SHOP

2JS

^

â&#x201E;˘ n1 if

Page Oiir' Hundred

Ninrty-sfvcn


W A R M FRIEND TAVERN HOLLAND, MICHIGAN

Only All Fireproof Hotel on U.S.-31 in Michigan F i n a n c e d — B u i l t — F u r n i s h e d by H o l l a n d C i t i z e n s ONE

HUNDRED

AND

Home for Commercial

SEVENTY

ROOMS

Man and Tourist

The " W a r m Friend Tavern" with its Beautiful Lobby, Private Dining Rooms and W a r m Friend Hall is the Social Center for Holland

Great care given Banquets, WE

Conventions,

SOLICIT Y O U R VALUED P A T R O N A G E E. L. L ELAND, Manager

B u i l t / Like d y ^ w P i d n o

Product 0 f

The Bush 6? Lane Piano Co. HOLLAND, MICHIGAN

/'rtgr Our Hundred

Parties

Ninety-eight


Third Reformed Church CORNER T W E L F T H A N D PINE REV. JAMES M . MARTIN,

Pastor

SERVICES Morning Worship 10:00 A.M. Bible School 11:30 A.M.

Evening Service 7:30 P.M. Christian Endeavor 6:30 P.M.

HOPE STUDENTS CORDIALLY WELCOMED AT ALL THE CHURCH SERVICES

I'age One Hundred Ninety-nine


T H E

K i l L E S T O M

E

^

v

Phone 5133

1 9

X

9

"We do your work to please you"

D R . U . F . DEVRIES

COLLEGE BARBER SHOP (FORMERLY

DENTIST

26 E. 8th St.

FORTHEY'S)

10 W . 8th St.

HOLLAND, MICH.

Spring

Rear of Ollies

(^Air

The Mattress That's Easy to Handle and It's Supreme In Comfort *

C H A R L E S

*

K A R R

C O M P A N Y

HOLLAND, MICHIGAN

"You

Can't Buy Bed-Comjort

Compliments

oj

Thompson Manufacturing Co. Manufacturers

oj

by the Found"

Diekema, Kollen & Ten Cate ATTORNEYS AT LAW

TABLES A N D CABINETS Holland

Michigan

HOLLAND

MICHIGAN

u Pags

Two

Hundred


t

Compliments

9

X

of

FRIS BOOK STORE Headquarters Students'

for

Supplies

30 W E S T EIGHTH STREET

PHONE 5 7 4 9

P r o f . Hager (giving his customary Bible n o t e s ) ; The next point to take down, class, is the attempted Hellenization of the Jews by coercion. Marve Meengs: By w h o m ? She: Did I ever show you the place where I hurt my h i p ? He: NnnnNo. She: All right, we'll drive right over there. P h o t o g r a p h e r (taking a picture of Father and his collegiate son) : P e r h a p s it should be more natural, my boy, if you were to stand with your hand upon your father's shoulder. F a t h e r : The picture would be more natural if he stood with his hand in my pocket. Sandy bought two tickets for a raffle and won a $1500 car. His friends rushed over to his house to congratulate him, but found him looking as miserable as he could be. Why, mon, what's the matter wi ye? It's the second ticket. Why I bought it. I can not imagine. Wife (looking at husband's noticeable beard I : Why didn't vou shave? H e : 1 did. She: When? H e : Just after you said you were nearly ready. Cashier (buying a f u r coat) : Can I wear this f u r coat in the rain without hurting it? S a l e s m a n : Madam, have you ever seen a squirrel carrying an u m b r e l l a ?

Paqr

T:co riundri-J

Ciic


Hope College HOLLAND, MICHIGAN

63

years Purposeful

1866-1929

Christian

Education

The Product of Seventy Years Consistent Growth "PIONEER SCHOOL" 1851 " H O L L A N D ACADEMY" 1857 " H O P E COLLEGE" 1866 " H O P E H I G H SCHOOL" 1928 Write for Details — THE PRESIDENT

Page Two Hundred

Ttvo


STUDY LAMPS

EDISON M A Z D A L A M P S

Everything

Electrical

DE F O U W S ELECTRIC SHOP 2 6 E, 8 T H S T .

HOME FURNACES Manufactured,

Installed and Guaranteed by the

H O M E F U R N A C E CO.

Compliments

BAY VIEW F U R N I T U R E COMPANY Makers

of Good Furniture

DESKS A N D

for Modern

TABLES FOR T H E

Homes

LIVING ROOMS

HOLLAND, MICHIGAN

Page

Two Hundred

Thre-


T H E

M

I

L

E

S

T

O

M

E

•"

•*

-v

^

1 9

2*

9

WASHINGTON WROTE THIS — "Economy makes happy homes and sound nations. Instill it deep." The passing years have only proved the truth of his words. It is as essential to save in 1929 as it was in 1776. Also it is easier, for now every facility is offered persons desiring to save. The people of this community will find every convenience and absolute safety at this bank. OK5

P E O P L E S

STATE

BANK

HOLLAND, MICHIGAN Manager: Do you drink? Applicant: I'll have a small one, thank you. Sweet: Jack says he can read you like a book. Thing: Yes, and darn him. he wants to use the Braille system. He: I sent my girl some mistletoe the other day, and last night when 1 went over, she had it hanging up. I asked her if she'd kiss me under the mistletoe. H i m : What did she say? He: No, she wouldn't even kiss me under an anaesthetic. This is so sudden, said the recently married husband, as he accepted another product of his wife's baking. Father: Are you sure you can give my daughter the luxuries to which she is accustomed? Suitor: I ought to. I'm the one who accustomed her to 'em. Dietitian; Yes, a few lettuce leaves without oil, and a glass of orange juice. There, that completes your daily diet. Any College Girl: Thank you so much. Doctor, but do I take this before or after meals? G. Van Ark (lighting a match) : Anybody want to light a cigarette? W. Hyink: Just a minute; I'll run up stairs and get one. She: You don't know what love is. He: Sure I do. It's the tenth word in a telegram.

J


<

1046 FLYING 0 0 0

d t

CLUBS^ 0 0 0

COLLEGES - H I G H SCHOOLS UNIVERSITIES in 1928

5 MEN WITH $400.00 MAKE 1 CLUB WITH

THIS

SHIP

^jefeelp Aircraft ani) Cngine Co.

Pagt

Two IIundri

J Fiv


9

GEO. H. HUIZENGA & CO. Jewelers Always Large Selection of the latest in Diamonds, Watches and Gift Articles Holland's

Leading Jewelry and Gift Store

Colonial

CEMETERY MEMORIALS

Manufacturing Co.

A G U A R A N T E E of quality and workmanship is given on all orders. Whether it be for a

Manujacturers

large monument or a simple

0

1

marker.

Hal! Clocks

Holland Monument Works

ZEELAND,

18 W . 7th St.

MICH.

Holland, Mich.

Buy Direct and Save 3 0% or More at the O T T A W A F A C T O R Y STORE

OTTAWA FURNITURE CO. HOLLAND, MICHIGAN

Tivo Hundred

Six

X

9


College Siveet Shop

W H I T E CROSS Barber Shop

TRY

OUR

DI;LICIOUS MALTED MILKS SUNDAES AND CANDIES

Let Us Serve You

Corner College Ave. and 14th St. HOLLAND

L. F. BLAIR, Proprietor

MICHIGAN

H e : Have you ever loved b e f o r e ? She: No, J o h n ; I have often admired men for their strength, courage, good looks, or intelligence, but you. it's all love, nothing else. You'll have to take less strenuous exercises, and get more sleep," said the doctor to the dejected man before him. " T h a t ' s my idea exactly," said the other. " W o u l d you mind coming up to the house and telling that to the baby?"' Really, my dear, you should wait more than three months a f t e r your husband's death before getting married again. You forget that he was paralyzed f o r eight months, Reverend.

G O O D

C O U R T E S Y

WILL

ARCTIC ICE CREAM Serve It and You Please All

PHONE

S E R V I C E

5470

S A N I T A T I O N

P. gs Two Hundred-Sevcn


-

I

T

H E young men and women do grace the Society banquet table of course, but there is something

lacking if the program and place card is not the very best. W e are famous in Michigan for the very best in this line.

HOLLAND PRINTING COMPANY Fine Printers HOLLAND, MICHIGAN

2 1 0 COLLEGE A V E N U E

CLOTHING FURNISHINGS FOOTWEAR

P. S. BOTER & CO.

T W O L E A D I N G STORES C L O T H I N G — 1 6 W . 8 T H ST. S H O E S — 1 4 W . 8 T H ST.

Twenty-Two

I'nge

Two Hundrt'd

Eight

Years of Successful Service in Holland

9


H

E

M

I L

S

T

o

M

Insurance at Cost TT'S a matter of price, but an insurance policy once bought must bear the burden as to the contingency insured against. It can not be worn for a time, thrown away like a shoe and the incident closed. Your policy may expire like an old horse and then be replaced but in most cases the new policy can not be sent back to pick up the load left by the other. Either insurance is good or it isn't. If you can't depend upon it the price you paid for it is of little consequence. The cheapest may prove the most expensive. Vjsscher-Brooks offer all forms of insurance. N o matter what kind of insurance you need, this agency assures you that it will use only the best companies obtainable anywhere. You will always enjoy having a policy written while you were in college.

VISSCHER-BROOKS

Pags Two Hundrt'd Nine


COLLEGIATE JEWELRY CLASS and SOCIETY PINS BANQUET FAVORS HERALDRY We believe in cooperation — In e x c h a n g e f o r y o u r p a t r o n a g e w e g i v e ; C O U R T E O U S SERVICE REASONABLE TERMS UNEQUALED VALUES GUARANTEED WORKMANSHIP

Your satisfaction is our best advertisement SEE

LEN HOGENBOOM Our College

HARDIE

Representative

JEWELRY

COMPANY

HOLLAND, MICHIGAN

A traveling man who had been obliged three times to take an upper berth in the sleeping car "Aloha," has requested the Pullman Company to name the next one "Anuppah." Not a day passes, but my wife shows her incompatibility. Ain't it a crime the way these women dress nowadays? One day Jones called up a friend and said: "I understand that Brown was at your house last night, and was not in A-l condition?" "You are right," admitted the friend. "He was here and very much intoxicated." "Terrible, terrible!" ejaculated Jones. "By the way, was I there t o o ? " The Smith Brothers are swearing vengeance on Old Golds.

"Say it with Flowers"

SHADY LAWN FLORISTS J O H N B . V A N D E R P L O E G , ' 2 2 , Mgr.

Retail S t o r e C o r n e r C o l l e g e a n d 8th S t . — G r e e n h o u s e s 281 E. I 6 r h St. "Our

Page Two Hundred

Ten

Business

is Growing"


ri

L

E

8

T

O

N

a

£

FIRST REFORMED CHURCH COR. EAST N I N T H ST. AND CENTRAL AVE.

MRS. D . DYKSTRA,

Missionary

REV. JAMES W A Y E R ,

Pastor

SERVICES Morning W o r s h i p 9:30 A.M. Bible School 11:05 A.M.

Evening W o r s h i p 7:30 P.M. Christian Endeavor 6:30 P.M.

A Cordial Welcome

to All

Page

Two Hundred

Eleven


E

I t

E

S

T

O

N

El

**

v

—•

-v

J. C. P E N N Y 6 4 - 6 6 EAST EIGHTH STREET

•-»"

I 9

CO.

HOLLAND, MICHIGAN

Lincoln Once Said-. "Teach economy. That is one of the first and highest virtues. It begins with saving money." T h e J. C. P e n n y Co. h a s b u i l t u p a l a r g e b u s i n e s s by s a v i n g m o n e y f o r its c u s t o m e r s . W e b u y in c a r l o a d l o t s — by t h e t h o u s a n d d o z e n — a n d t h e s e e c o n o m i e s a r e t h e secret of o u r L o w Prices.

SAVE!

SAVE!

SAVE!

It Is the Watchword of Our Business

Keep Up with the Times Read The Grand Rapids Press daily and keep yourself informed. Every issue brings, in addition n all the news of the day, many special features — including fiction, comics, education, entertainment, etc. Any one feature is worth more than the price of a year's subscription.

T H E G R A N D RAPIDS PRESS

DE VRIES - D O R N B O S The Home of Furniture 4 0 - 4 4 E. 8th St., Holland, Michigan

3 L 9


A. STEKETEE & SONS 20-22 East Eighth Street HOLLAND, MICH.

60 East 8th St.

HOLLAND

DRY GOODS COATS A N D DRESSES INFANTS' WEAR Always a Good Line of the Season's Dress Goods

HIGHEST IN QUALITY, LOWEST IN PRICE

She s the original magazine girl â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Everybody's. Motor C o p : So you saw the accident, s i r ? What was the n u m b e r of the car that knocked this man d o w n ? Prof L a m p e n : I m a f r a i d I ve forgotten it, but I remember noticing that if it were multiplied by fifty, the cube root of the product would be equal to the sum of the digits reversed. Forty per cent of the women in this country are working women. T h e other sixty per cent are working men. Widow (writing a testimonial f o r a life insurance c o m p a n y ) : On August 9th. my husband took out a policy. In less than a month he was drowned. I consider insurance a good investment. Hotel Clerk: You have registered as Mr. and Mrs. Smith. Where is Mrs. S m i t h ? Mr. Smith ( p l u m b e r ) : By golly, I forgot to bring her. What is your brother in college? A half back. I mean in studies? Oh. he" s away back. I have just learned of an editor who started poor, twenty-five years a^o, and retired with a c o m f o r t a b l e fortune of fifty thousand dollars. This was acquired through industry, economy, conscientious effort, indomitable perseverence and the death of an uncle who left him $19,990.

Page

Two Hundrtd

Thirteen


-

Page Two Hundred

Fourteen

-v

^

Âť

9

X

9


Headquarters for Fine Catalogues

D

O you realize that Zeeland has a print shop capable of, and actually doing, a class of

high grade printing that is fully equal in every respect to the best equipped printing plants of the larger cities? Such is the case as is again evidenced by this year's publication of the ""MILESTONE." Above all, remember that there is a very material saving in placing your printing needs with us. "Country prices" for high class quality.

ABE, T H E P R I N T E R ZEELAND

PRINT

SHOP

/'ass

Two Hundrcd

Fiftc-i u


Compliments

of

STATE COMMERCIAL & SAVINGS BANK ZEELAND, M I C H I G A N Commercial

— Savings

— Baud

— Safety

Deposit

Box

Departments

WE IN

SPECIALIZE H I G H

GRADE

TAILORED-TO-MEASURE C L O T H E S

J. N. TROMPEN FOUR

STORES

CO.

FOUR

STORES

548-550 Eastern Ave. 405-411 Grandville Ave.

804-806 W . Leonard St. 823-825 Division Ave.

THE

COVER

jor this annual was created by

The DAVID J. MOLLOY CO. 2857 N. Western Avenue

Page Two Hundred

Sixteen

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS


THE STUDENT'S STORE •4

Young Men's Clothing furnishings •4

J. J. R U T G E R S CO. 19 W . EIGHTH STREET

The House of New Ideas Where Collegians Are Outfitted

A blotter is a thing you spend your time looking f o r while the ink is drying. Congratulate me, Edna. Oh, Ethel, has Tom p r o p o s e d ? No. but we're engaged. The infant prodigy wasn't prodigying so well I don't believe that baby will ever learn to walk, sighed the young father. He's wise, remarked the pedestrian friend who had been grazed by three trucks and five taxies that day. P r o f . Kleinhexel: Can you tell me the name of any animal peculiar to A u s t r a l i a ? P. Nettinga: The rhinoceros. P r o f . W r o n g ; That's not f o u n d in Australia. P a u l : Well, sir, that's exactly why it would be peculiar. A gentleman, to create a good impression at a college commencement, undeservedly wore the hooded gown of higher degree. The following conversation between two spectators occurred: That man is wearing a lie upon his back. Oh. I wouldn't call it that. Let us rather say it is a falsehood. Scottish National A n t h e m : T h e Best Things in Life are Free. A flapper tripped up to the counter where a clerk was assorting music, and in her sweetest tones asked, '"Have you 'Kissed Me By the M o o n l i g h t ? ' " It must have been the clerk at the other counter. I've been here only a week.

Page Two Hundred

Seventeen


Quality

a n d Speed

We Have

Both

Jlollanb Citp :d

'4

Jtetos PRINTERY

ESTABLISHED

THE TOAST SUPREME

1872

'The Printers who know how"

T H E DUTCH TEA RUSK CO. Holland, Mich.

The H O P E CHEST of everlasting usefulness to anyone — a growing account at this bank!

Your Future By Storing Up Savings

Brighten

ZEELAND STATE BANK SERVICE, SAFETY AND 4 %

JOHN

JOSEPH BORGMAN

DYKEMA

PHONE 5 4 4 2

MODEL LAUNDRY rr

The Soft Water Laundry"

W E T WASH, R O U G H DRY, FINISHED W O R K H O L L A N D

Page Two Hundred

Eighteen

M I C H I G A N


HA AN

BROS.

HOLLANDS LEADING DRUGGIST

for Years Corner of Rivet and Eighth

B. & M. SHOE STORE This year marks another "Milestone" in the history of our business. W e attribute our prosperity to the liberal patronage of Hope students.

C O L U M B I A

B. & M. Shoe Store BEST IN T H E STATE

13 W E S T EIGHTH STREET

Hats reblocked Suits cleaned and pressed Suits pressed ivhile you wait

HENRY MA ATM A N FRED V A N LENTE

S H O E S H I N E PARLOR SERVICE

Prep. 1912

Hope 1922

HOLLAND

Next to Strand

Q U A L I T Y is always the first consideration H E R E regardless of the

ECONOMY

W h e n in need of Q U A L I T Y SHOE R E P A I R I N G call on "Dick, the shoe doctor"

ELECTRIC SHOE HOSPITAL W/e call for and deliver Phone 5328 13 E. 8th St.

in our PRICES

V A N D E N BERG BROS. and

Visser & Bareman CLOTHIERS, HATTERS, FURNISHERS 50 East Eighth Street

TER BEEK BROS. Quality Furniture at Lower Prices 2 3 - 2 5 W . E I G H T H ST.

I'age

Phone 5504

Two Hundred

Nineteei.


H

M I C E

O

n4

^

|

The Lacey Studio REMEMBER

W e make pictures all sizes and kinds in or out of the studio.

OLD PICTURES COPIED A N D ENLARGED

As usual most of the pictures in the

MILESTONF.

were made at our studio.

The Lacey Studio 19 E. 8rh Street (upstairs)

Pdg-^ Two Hundred

Twenty

H O L L A N D , MICH.


Compliments

of

HOLLAND THEATRICAL CORPORATION C O L O N I A L — H O L L A N D — STRAND

She: What kind of cigarettes do you smoke? Movie S t a r : I'll tell you later. I'm holding out f o r more money. Every time I'm late my English Prof, gets historical. You mean hysterical. „ No, I don't. I mean historical. He begins to dig up the past. It takes 1.500 nuts to hold an automobile together, but it takes only one to spread it all over the landscape. Just between you and me and the lamp post, what do you see in that g i r l ? Not a thing. But with the girl between me and the lamp post—well that's a different story.

Co-ed Dresses Y O U T H

L O O K

COATS

A N D

SUITS

Here are exquisite Frocks, Smart Coats, Suits for street and afternoon parties, too. Each shows a charming aptitude for its particular occasion, and the pricings are varied enough to meet every plan of expenditure.

ROSE CLOAK STORE The Shop of Exclusive

Service

HOLLAND, MICH.

Pagt T'.vo Hundred

Twenty-one


N E W Y O R K LIFE I N S U R E N C E C O M P A N Y

Your Business Appreciated A L B E R T E . L A M P E N , Agent

EVERY YEAR A BETTER YEAR IN H O L L A N D Holland is justly proud of the fine New College Building which holds a distinctive place on the skyline of our Progressive City. The Memorial Chapel with its beautiful auditorium and its finely appointed rooms will render an infinite service to our community. An equally valuable service you will find near Hope's New Memorial C h a p e l in the adequately equipped printing plant of SteketeeVan Huis Printing House, and the valuable counsel of the three men who have made printing their life's work and study. Call for this service on your next printing require ment.

1

Steketee-Van Huis Printing House

Inc. Holland's

9 East Tenth St.

GEO.

Leading

Printers

Phone 5908

MOOI

Over Twenty-five

H O L L A N D , MICH.

ROOFING

CO.

Years Experience

Keeping Holland Dry Home: 346 Pine Ave. Phone 4485

Page Two Ihindrcd

Ttoenty-tivo

Office & Warehouse: 29 E. Sixth St. P h o n e 5684


^Y\ /1 â&#x20AC;˘"

0 / - >

/ ^

/

- X

V..\

J

s

A College Man's Shoe is the Popular Scotch Grain Oxford. The best shoe for wear. T H E

BEST

FOR

T H E

V A L U E M O N E Y

v "S

Unexcelled

MANUFACTURED ONLY

for Durability

BY

H O L L A N D SHOE COMPANY and sold in Holland by

B & M SHOE STORE

PHONE 5787

WEST 16TH STREET

H O L L A N D LUMBER & SUPPLY CO. Everything

to Build Anything

Let us serve you

H O L L A N D

M I C H I G A N

Page Tzvo Hundred Ttoenty-thri-e


o

A Tjreasured 'Photograph Its Value

Multiplied

Many

Times

of Each Passing A

BEAUTIFUL

by the Memories

Year

P H O T O G R A P H

becomes a truly priceless possession

Telephone

107 for Appointment

MACDERMAND. Operator

13he ZEELAND A R T STUDIO A Skilled Artist in Each Department D E VRIES

DAI.MAN

KARSTEN

She: We've been married six months, darling, and not once have you told me which one of my dishes you like best. He: Canned salmon, honey. Do you ever try to tell people by the clothes they wear? Sometimes. For instance, if I see a man dressed in a blue suit with shiny buttons, with a helmet on his head and a club in his hand, Fm willing to bet a dollar he's a policeman. Candid letter acknowledging a present. Dear Aunt Harriet: Thank you for your gift. I have always wanted a pin cushion but not very much. You have two alternatives. Your professor is either easy or hard. If he is easy, you have nothing to worry about. If he is hard, you have two alternatives; either you study hard or you bluff. If you study hard, you don't have to worry. If you bluff, you have two alternatives. Either your bluff works or it doesn't. If it works, you have nothing to worry about. If it doesn't you have two alternatives; you are conditioned, or you flunk. If you are conditioned, you don't need to worry. If you flunk, you won't have to worry any longer. Therefore, why worry? Babe, the circus elephant, had just killed her keeper and was the center of the day's news, so the photographer of the Tabloid Daily Scream was sent to get a picture of the mammoth murderess. When he arrived, he must have been a trifle absent minded, because as he focussed his camera at the elephant he said, "Come on, Rabe. smile and cross your legs.

Page Two Hundred

Twenty-four


In Books and Stationery we aim to supply our Customers with Honest Merchandise at Right Prices.

Something N

E

W

under the S U N

.

The NEW R

e

m

i

n

g

t

o

n

P o r t a b l e

We have it on display It's a m o d e r n miracle of mechanism — the lightest, most compact typewriter with standard keyboard—and the efficiency o f the standard office machine, though it weighs o n l y onefourth as much. It has eight new features—some of which you can't find o n even big machines . . . and y e t . . . n o increase in price. Come in and try it today!

W e invite you to bring all your Typewriter troubles to us for adjustment. We equip your Office completely in Safes, Files and up-to-date Bookkeeping Systems.

HENRY R. BRINK 4 8 EAST EIGHTH STREET

HOLLAND, MICHIGAN

I'ti:-- 7.70 Hundrsd

Trrfnty-fiv/'


T H E

I L E S T O M

Make

Your

Horn2

E

-

Happy

With

^

^

I

9

Ho77ie Furnishings

FROM

T h e Old Reliable F u r n i t u r e Store

JAMES

A.

BROUWER

212-214-216 RIVER AVENUE

fRlPPLES CURED

HOLLAND, M I C H I G A N

Laughlin's R e s t a u r a n t "We We We We But

Expert

Repairing

G O O D Y E A R

TIRES

Holland Vulcanizing Company

CO.

may live w i t h o u t poetry, music and art; may live w i t h o u t conscience and live w i t h o u t heart; may live w i t h o u t f r i e n d s ; may live w i t h o u t books; civilized man cannot live w i t h o u t cooks.

H e may live w i t h o u t books — w h a t is k n o w l e d g e but grieving? H e may live w i t h o u t hope — w h a t is hope but deceiving? H e may live w i t h o u t love —• w h a t is love but p i n i n g ? But w h e r e is the man that can live without dining? —-Lord Lytton W E HAVE THE BEST OF FOOD, THE BEST OF COOKS, AND THE BEST OF SERVICE!

Laughlin's R e s t a u r a n t

1 8 0 RIVER A V E .

WOLVERINE GARAGE DULYEA & VANDER BIE

Dnrant

Motor Cars

M a n y m o d e l s to c h o o s e f r o m

One Satisfied Customer today brings us two tomorrow

Page Two Hundred

Twenty-six

Citizens Phone 5656 Cor. River and 9th, Holland, Mich.

3L


COTA'S

D R U G

S T O R E

5 4 EAST E I G H T H ST,

Z A N A D U

PHONE

A N D

G A R D E N

PENSLAR G U N T H E R

A N D

C O U R T

5295

TOILETRIES

REMEDIES

W H I T M A N

C A N D I E S

Game w a r d e n : Hey. young fellow, what's the idea of hunting with a last year's hunting license? Boo Cook: Oh, I'm only shooting at the rabbits I missed last year. Did you ever hear about the Scotch athlete who hated to loosen up his muscles? " I beg pardon madam,'" said a patron of the movies who leaned over and touched the lady in front of him. "but would you mind reading the sub-titles in a louder lone? The organ sometimes prevents me f r o m hearing y o u ? " Sunday School Teacher: And why did Noah take two of each kind of animal into the a r k ? Bright Little L a d : Because he didn't believe the story about the stork. Chicago's Alma M a t e r : "That Old Gang of Mine." She: Say Larry, I think a wheel is coming off. H e : 0 . K. with me Grayce, I'm kinda tired of that out-of-gas gag myself. It takes a Scotchman to turn a corner on two wheels. (Another one) Did you hear about the Scotchman who died and left a million dollars to the mother of the Unknown Soldier. L a d y : Is that a b l o o d h o u n d ? Dog Salesman: Yes madam. Oscar, bleed for the lady.

Meyer

Mrs. Gage THE STYLE SHOPPE

Music House

DRESSES, C O A T S , "FOR THINGS MUSICAL"

MILLINERY,

LINGERIE. HOSIERY, COSTUME J E W E L R Y , PURSES, SCARFS We

17 W .

8 t h St.

HOLLAND, MICH.

solicit

patronage

and

our best to please

your

you.

28 W .

will

do

8TH STREET

Page Two Hundred

Twenty-sev


T H E

I L E

8 T

O N

X

E

FOOT-WEAR Interesting New Patterns All the Time Exclusively for the Whole Family HOLLAND

BOOT

232 RIVER AVENUE

SHOP Across from Post Office

She: Don't tell me that! I can see deception written all over your face. H e : Don't talk, little one; I can see it painted all over yours. "My Rose," he whispered tenderly as he pressed her velvet cheek to his. "My Cactus," she said, as she touched his face.

C I T Y S I G N CO. T E L L T H E W O R L D WITH SIGN

1 8 2 RIVER A V E N U E

C O L O N I A L

SWEET

SHOP

Candies, Fancy Sundaej, Hot Fudge Sundaes, Hot Chocolate, Toasted Sandu'khes, Gilbert's Chocolates OPPOSITE TAVERN

How does Rose like your new mustache? Darn it, I forgot to show it to her. She (dreamily) : When did you first know you loved me? H e : When I first hegan to get sensitive when people said you were brainless and homely.

KLOMPARENS COAL IS

Good Coal 129 E. 8th St.

rage Two Hundred

Twenty-eight

Phone 5247

Compliments the

of

DONNELLY KELLY GLASS CO. DUFFY

W&

MFG.

m

ai -

CO

9


T H E

M I L E S T O N E

D R . G . W . V A N VERST

"

1 9

K & B H A T SHOP MILLINERY

DENTIST

Gossard Corsets—Bt'ldntg TELEPHONE

Hose

5265

Holland City State Bank Bi/ildhig

19 E. 8th St.

Holland, Mich.

Beggar: \^ill you give me a dime for a sandwich? Scotchman: Let's see the sandwich. Doc. Van Zyl: What is a reducing agent? W. De Free: I wish I knew, I've tried everything.

T A Y L O R ' S

L U N C H

Treat You Right. Both Day and Night, And Give No Cause For Sorrow. So Eat Your Fill and Pay Your Bill And Come Again Tomorrotv.

Lakeside I n n — Jenison P a r k R o a d How does your tonsilitis feel? Oh, sorta down in the mouth. When you have just impressed the girl friend as to what an experienced traveler you are, and how seaworthy, and your chum makes a crack about how many times you were sick on your boat trip across Lake Michigan — be nonchalant, light into him.

Compliments

oj

Nibbelink and Notier FUNERAL DIRECTORS

CALL

5030

Classified A d v . D e p t . You are sure to get results THE HOLLAND EVENING

Phone 5013-Fl

18 W . 9th St.

SENTINEL


FRANK DYKE & CO. Qeneral Contractors H O L L A N D ,

M I C H I G A N

Builders

THE

The Milestone Staff state that The Dyke donated the cut of Chapel found in the tion of the book.

Page Two Hundred

Thirty

NEW

wishes to Company the New front sec-

of

CHAPEL

SKILL INTEGRITY RESPONSIBILITY


Compliments

DU

ME Z

of

Model D r u g Store

BROS.

33-35 W . 8th St.

HOLLAND, MICH.

Dry Goods, Cloaks, Millinery "Serve-Self" Grocery 31-33 E. 8th St.

The Largest Drug Store in Western

HOLLAND

Michigan

We appreciate Students'

patronage

The b o a r d i n g house mistress glanced g r i m l y down the table as she announced, " W e have rabbit pie f o r d i n n e r . " The b o a r d e r s nodded resignedly â&#x20AC;&#x201D; that is, all but one. Bud Vredevoogd. He glanced nervously d o w n w a r d , s h i f t i n g his feet. One foot struck something soft, something that said. " M e o w . " U p came his head. A relieved smile crossed his f e a t u r e s as he gasped. " T h a n k goodness." T r o j a n ; Come Horatius, sit in on our g a m e of poker. H o r a t i u s : Nay, but I II challenge all comers at Bridge. J. S t r i k e r : Dear, I love you terribly. M a r i o n A n d e r s o n : I'll say you do. B a r b e r : Is there any p a r t i c u l a r way you want your hair c u t ? L. W i l l e t s : Yeah, off. R. M a r c o t t e : \ ou are the most b e a u t i f u l girl I've ever seen! I long to hold you in my arms, to caress you. to kiss your eyes, your hair, your lips â&#x20AC;&#x201D; to whisper in your ear, " I love y o u . " Ruth Van D y k e : Well, I guess it can be a r r a n g e d . J u d g e : Were you alone when you were r o b b e d ? t.. V a n d e r N a l d ( f r o m C i c e r o ) : No, sir, there was a policeman being r o b b e d at the same time.

G R E E T I N G S from

VENHUIZEN

AUTO

COMPANY

Distributors STUDEBAKER

Established

1911

AND

DODGE

BROS.

CARS

18 EAST 7TH ST

Page Two Hundred

Thirty-one


T H E

M L T E

S T O N

E

1

ENLARGING

COPYING

Kodak Finishing as yon like it

D.

J. D U

SAAR

HOLLAND PHOTO SHOP 10 EAST EIGHTH STREET

Kodaks and Eastman Supplies

FRAMING

Pagr Two Hundred-Thirty-two

P H O T O SUPPLIES

9

X

9


Holland Furnaces Make Warm Friends Our Product

The Holland Warm-Air System will keep ALL of your home filled with clean, circulating, moist, warm-air, and do it silently. You wouldn't drink water from a stagnant pool; then why risk your health and your family's by breathing stagnant air? It is the business of the Holland Furnace Company to do one thing, do ALL of that thing, and do it well. Over 300,000 users of the Holland recommend it for your home. The Holland Guarantee makes the World's Largest Installers of Furnaces directly responsible to you for your entire Heating System â&#x20AC;&#x201D; completely installed. Your Home deserves one.

HOLLAND FURNACE COMPANY General Offices - Holland,

Michigan

Page Two Hundred

Thirty-three


X

Compliments

Paris D r y C l e a n e r s

of

East Sixth Street

S m i t h ' s D r u g Store

C L E A N I N G - PRESSING REPAIRING

You Know Where

C. COR.

16TH

ST.

&

C E N T R A L

AVE.

Phone 2054

H,

FLICKINGER

HOLLAND,

MICH.

HOPE REFORMED CHURCH W E S T E L E V E N T H STREET, H O L L A N D , M I C H I G A N O r g a n i z e d in 1861 R E V . T . W . D A V I D S O N , D . D . , Minister

S U N D A Y SERVICES Morning Worship

10:30 A.M.

Evening Worship

7:30 P.M.

Sunday School at

....12:00 Noon

Young Peoples' Forum

6:30 P.M.

Midweek Prayer Service Thursday at

7:30 P.M.

T h e consistory of t h e C h u r c h e x t e n d s a most cordial i n v i t a t i o n to everyone, and especially to t h e S t u d e n t s of H o p e C o l l e g e and P r e p a r a t o r y D e p a r t m e n t .

COME A N D M A K E T H I S YOUR C H U R C H H O M E

Cotnpliments WEST

of the

D R . M . J. C O O K

Dentist

MICHIGAN

FURNITURE

CO.

Over 26 W . 8th St. O p p . V a n D e n Berg Bros. F u r n . Store

HOLLAND

MICHIGAN

P H O N E 5151

HOLLAND, MICH.

9


T H E

M I L E S T O N E

"

Phone 2465

^

The

^

Holland

T h e Ideal D r y Cleaners "The

House

I

9

Sandwich

Shop

of Service"

Cleaning & Steam Pressing A u t o Service Call

^

Greatest Variety of TOASTED AND PLAIN

Delivery

College Ave. & 6th St.

SANDWICHES

HOLLAND

" C o u l d you give a poor fellow a b i t e ? " asked a dust-stained t r a m p . " I don't bite m y s e l f , " answered the lady of the house, '"but I'll call the dog." W h a t kind of a girl is M a r y ? Well, she thinks that slips are made exclusively f o r pillows. (At a m a s q u e r a t e ) Who are y o u ? I'm Fatima. Good, I ' m a cigarette h o l d e r . Bill Beswick: Let's go down to the cemetery. P h y l l i s : Gracious no, I'd die first. P r o f . L u b b e r s : Do you know a n y t h i n g about Vina D e l m a r ' s " B a d G i r l " ? F. W i n e g a r d e n : No, but f r o m the way everybody talks, she must be a holy terror. P r o f e s s o r ; I'll not c o n t i n u e my lecture till the r o o m settles down. Voice f r o m the r e a r : Better go home a n d sleep it off, old m a n . S o p h : H e a r about the f e l l o w who invented a device f o r looking t h r o u g h a brick wall ? F r o s h : No, what's h e call i t ? S o p h : A window, sap. W. K u i p e r : How do you get local color in y o u r t h e m e s ? H. F r i e s e m a : Oh. I use a d o u b l e color ribbon on my typewriter.

W e can supply you with your fresh Roasted Peanuts for Picnics and Parties

S t e k e t e e T i r e Shop LEONARD STEKETEE, FIRESTONE

Prop.

TIRES

ALEMIT1NG

A R N O L D ' S

SHELL

GAS

A N D

OILS

V U L C A N I Z I N G 250

RIVER

AVE.

H O L L A N D

77

EAST

EIGHTH

Pas?

STREET

Two

Hundred

Thirty-five

i

9


T H E

M I L E S T O N E

~

V

^Autographs

-

â&#x20AC;˘

^

'

^

1

9

X

9


T H E

M I L E S T O M E

-

v

^

^

I

9

^Autographs

Page Two Hundred

Thirty-seven

i


T H E

M I L E S T O N

t

^Autographt

1

9

X

9


T H E

M I L E 8 T O N

E

k.

.fgr

9

X

Index c7d() ^Advertisers Arctic Ice Cream.. Arnold Bay View Co Bolhuis Lumber Co.. Boonstra Co Boter, P. S B & M Shoe StDre Brink, H. R Brouwer. J a s Bush & Lane Piano Co Buss Machine Works City Sign Co. Colonial Mfg. Co Colonial Sweet Shop College Barber Shop College Sweet Shop Columbia Dry Cleaners Cook, G Cook, M. J Cota's Drug Store Damstra Bros. De Fouw Co De Pree Co De Vries, U. F De Vries & Dornbos Diekema, Kollen & Ten Cate Doesburg, H. R Donnelly, Ke'ly & Duffy Co Dosker, H. N Du Mez Bros Du Saar, D. J Dyke, F r a n k Dykema, Nick Dykstra, Funeral Home East End Drug Store Ebelink, Electric Shoe Hospital Fabiano, A. P Federal Mfg. Co. First Ref. Church F i r s t State Bank Fourth Ref. Church Fris Book Store Gebben & Vanden Berg Cd Grand Rapids Press Green Mill Cafe H a a n ' s Drug Store Hardie Co Holland Boot Shop Holland City News Holland City State Bank Holland Dry Cleaners Holland Furnace Co Holland Lumber & Supply Co. Holland Memorial P a r k Association Holland Monument Wks Holland P r i n t i n g Co Holland Sandwich Shop Holland Sentinel Holland Shoe Co Holland Theatrical Co Holland Vulcanizing Co Home Furnace Co Hope College Hope Ref. Church Huizenga, Geo. H Ideal Dry Cleaners

207 ..235 ..203 .196 184 208 219 225 226 198 192 228 203 228 200 207 219 190 234 227 197 203 196 200 2i2 200 188 228 194 231 232 230 190 186 191 197 219 190 186 211 .183 189 201 188 212 185 219 210 228 218 194 188 233 223 194 206 208 ^35 229 223 221 '^26 203 200 234 206 235

Jeane's Shoppe Jerrold Co Jones' Studio K a r r , Charles Co Reefer's R e s t a u r a n t Keppel, T K & B Hat Shop Klomparens Coal Co Kouw, 1 Kraker, Henry Co Kuite, Jacob Lacey's Studio Lampen, A. E Laughlin's R e s t a u r a n t Leenhouts, A Lievence, Ben H Lokker Rutgers Co Marsilje, T Meyer's Music House Michigan Tea Rusk Model Drug Store Model Laundry Molloy, David Mooi, Geo Nibbelink-Notier Nies H a r d w a r e Oldsmobile Sales & Service Olive, W. J Ottawa F u r n i t u r e Co P a r i s Dry Cleaners Penney, J . C People's State Bank Reformed Church House Robinson & Parsons Rose Cloak Store Rutger's Clothing Store Scott-Lugers Co Service E n g r a v i n g Co. Shady L a w n Florists Smith's Drug Store Steketee, A Steketee Tire Shop Steketee-Van Huis Co Style Shoppe Szekely Co Tappen, W Taylor's Lunch Third Ref. Church Thompson Mfg. Co Trinity Ref. Church Trompen, J . N Vanden Berg Bros. & Ter Beek Bros Van P u t t e n Grocery Van Verst, G. W Venhuizen Auto Co Visscher Brooks Co Visser-Bareman Co Warm Friend Tavern West Michigan F u r n i t u r e Co White Bros. Electric Co White Cross Barber Shop Wicher's Lumber Co. Wolverine Garage Zeeland Art Studio Zeeland Commercial Bank Zeeland P r i n t i n g Co Zeeland State Bank

Page- Tzvo IIundrtd

195 213 184 200 196 186 229 228 192 188 194 2'10 222 226 186 188 195 190 227 218 231 218 216 222 229 186 186 193 206 234 212 204 197 186 221 217 187 214 210 234 213 235 222 217 205 190 229 199 200 191 216 219 186 229 231 209 119 198 234 188 207 190 226 224 116 215 218

Thirty-mn:


j

i


Milestone 1929  

Hope College yearbook

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