123 board of foreign missions rca 1955

Page 1

O n e Hi undred and Urtenty-Ohird BEAttDs?c^HlVEs

— Annual Report 1955

Board of Foreign Missions of the Reformed Church in America

REFORMED CHU RCH HEADQUARTERS, 156 FIFTH AVE., N E W YOR K


B O A R D O F F O R E I G N MISSIONS M E M B E R S OF THE B O A R D

1953

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56

Rev. Harry L. Brower, 44— 10th Street, S.E., Sioux Center, Iowa Mrs. Stanley J. Brown, Elm Grove, Wisconsin Rev. John E. Buteyn, 417 Alexander Street, Rochester 7, N. Y. Rev. Bernard Brunsting, 9052 East 165th Street, Bellflower, California Rev. Theodore J. Jansma, 841 Burton Street, S.W., Grand Rapids, Michigan Rev. Harold Leestma, 1967 Jefferson, S.W., Grand Rapids 7, Michigan Mr. Norman MacLeod, 20166 Beach Road, Detroit 19, Michigan Rev. LeRoy Nattress, Northwestern College, Orange City, Iowa Mr. Howard B. Nichols, 33 Elm Place, Hastings-on-Hudson, New York Mrs. Emmett L. Paige, 309 Kenwood Avenue, Delmar, New York Mr. Maurice A. Te Paske, Sioux Center, Iowa Mrs. M. Tjoelker, Route No. 1, Everson, Washington Mrs. Philip T. Wagner, 514 Wyndham Road, Teaneck, New Jersey Mrs. De Witt Wells, Box 286, 7 Orchard Street, Hurley, N. Y.

1954

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57

Rev. Daniel Y. Brink, 220 Ballston Avenue, Scotia 2, N. Y. Mrs. Raymond Fairchild, R. D. 3, Gordon Road, Schenectady, N. Y. Mrs. Wilhelm K. Haysom, 41-42 Elbertson Street, Elmhurst 73, N. Y. Rev. Warren J. Henseler, 67 West Main Street, Freehold, N. J. Rev. Orville J. Hine, 22 Maple Avenue, Warwick, N. Y. Rev. Richard P. Mallery, 82-50 Kew Gardens Rd., Kew Gardens 15, N. Y. Mrs. Calvin C. Meury, 7601 Palisade Avenue, North Bergen, N. J. Mrs. George C. Muyskens, 109 East Morris Street, Morrison, Illinois Rev. Chester A. Postma, 302 Bly Street, Waupun, Wisconsin Rev. Frank Snuttjer, Little Rock, Iowa Mrs. Edward H. Tanis, 209 Central Avenue, Zeeland, Michigan Dr. R. R. Van Heukelom, 25 East 12th Street, Holland, Michigan Dr. Harold E. Yeldman, 2447 Oakwood, N.E., Grand Rapids, Michigan Mr. Samuel H. Woolley, c/o Bank of New York, 48 Wall Street, New York 15, N. Y.

(Continued on inside back cover)


I

7955

The Board of Foreign Missions Respectfully presents to the General Synod of the Reformed Church in America Its One Hundred and Twenty-Third Annual Report, The Ninety-Eighth of its Separate and Independent Action and the Ninth of the Reorganized Board, Continuing the Former W o m a n ’s Board of Foreign Missions



‘Dedication

n h e B o a r d of Foreign Missions dedicates this report to o n e of its outstanding leaders, Dr. L u m a n J. Shafer. In 1912 Dr. Shafer b e g a n his association with the B o a r d of Foreign Missions a n d since then in J a p a n or the U n i te d States h e has b e e n using his G o d given gifts for the w o r k of his church, especially in its outreach overseas. In J un e 1 9 5 5 Dr. Shafer will retire f r o m his active service with the Board. His c hu rchmanship, his creative genius a n d his devotion a n d loyalty to his L o r d h a v e b e e n a b e a c o n not only to the B o a r d of Foreign Missions, but to the entire church. T h e B o a r d m e m b e r s , his associates in the office a n d the entire g r o u p of missionaries are grateful for his leadership a n d w i s h bot h Dr. a n d Mrs. Shafer G o d ’s richest blessings.


‘Forertori V*/ he Board of Foreign Missions presents herewith its one hundred and twenty-third annual report to the General Synod of the Reformed Church in America. As this report is studied it is hoped that the work of the churches in each country will be visualized. The leadership of the Christians of various races has developed so that in many places the missionary serves in an evangelistic capacity, free from administrative responsibilities. W e recognize and give thanks for the great influence that our missionaries have in this development and we salute the churches that are coming to maturity during these revolu­ tionary days. The purpose of our work overseas will continue to be the theme of General Synod of 1955 — “Thine is the Glory.” It is with gratitude to the church for its continued support and with the purpose of carrying the responsibility set before us in a revolutionary world that we give thanks and go forward in our important and exacting task. H. G. B ovenxebk B. M. L uben

E dwina Paige R uth R a nsom L. J. Shafer


Sayyid Ismail al Azhari, a Muslim, and the first Sudanese Prime Minister of ^^

x ~"y

the country.

h e M u s l i m world is combining in an explosive mixture the power of an awakened nationalism and the drive of a powerful mis­ sionary religion. It is not an easy combination to beat.” Such isthe arresting comment on an historic meeting in August of 1954 in Mecca, the most sacred city of the Muslim world. This was the meeting of the Premier of Egypt, the Prime Minister of Pakistan, and the King of Arabia. These three leaders of Muslim countries decided to launch a missionary cru­ sade to save Africa from the perils of Christianity and communism. Islam openly declared itself on the march in the South Sudan. Whether this decision will be implemented in any large way remains to be seen, but it is an immediate reminder of the missionary purpose that lies at the heart of Islam, and is an alert for all those who yearn to see the Sudan won for Christ. At the same time the struggle for the political control of the Sudan continues. Since 1899, the Sudan has been a condominium administered by Great Britain and Egypt. In early 1953 a pact was signed giving immediate self-government to the Sudan. By early 1956 the Sudanese are to choose between complete independence or having some politi­ cal link with Egypt. Though the situation has been kept under control during the past year, the tensions within the country have been great. Since Egypt’s predominatingly agricultural economy is almost totally dependant on the Nile which runs for hundreds of miles through the Sudan before reaching Egypt, this northern neighbor naturally desires some voice in the government of the new nation. Both the political and other changes in the Sudan are of such a nature as to leave the Sudanese bewildered and breathless. They share in the surprise that came to the previous British authorities who dis-


covered that tomorrow was here while they still thought it was the day before yesterday. There remains some nervousness on the part of South­ erners, but in view of the history of the land this is not strange. It is related that when the first Muslim Minister of Education toured the pagan Sudan a Southerner said to him: “Your grandfather made a slave of m y grandfather; how do I know that you will not do the same to me as soon as you get the chance?” The Northerner replied: “Things are different today; there is an alert public opinion and there is the United Nations — even if we wanted to enslave you we could not go very far.” In the course of the past two or three years the American Mission in the South Sudan has shared in the apprehension of what would happen when British rule ended and the Muslim northern Sudanese became pre­ dominant in influence. While changes go on apace, the missionaries have had restored a large degree of confidence in the future. Considerable adaptation to the new order must yet be made, but the worst fears have not been realized. The new District Commissioners who have replaced the British officials, for instance, are well trained Muslims from the North who are friendly to the Mission and have the welfare of the people of the South Sudan at heart. They have kept order among the tribes with firm discipline and are filling their places with commendable administrative knowhow. It is interesting to note, too, that in the new Parliament in Khartoum are many southern Sudanese representatives, of w h o m twenty in the House of Representatives and twelve in the Senate are Christians. This means that over one fifth of the members of the Parliament are Christians. In view of these many changes in the Sudan, the Mission continues to reassess its work. One of its chief concerns is that of the communica­ tion of the gospel. Language remains one of the baffling problems. Arabic, having replaced English as the official language, is now taught in all the schools as a subject of study. As opportunity allows, members of the Mission receive a year of Arabic study in Khartoum. Some feel that much more emphasis should be placed upon Arabic: “The Christian church here must take the initiative in using Arabic. If Arabic comes to the South slowly, it will come as the language of Islam; if we take the initiative we can baptize that language into Christ. A vigorous Arabic­ speaking church within the Islamic world . . . could have great influence on Islam as a whole.” At the same time, the tribal languages will undoubtedly be in use for decades to come among the tribespeople; therefore it is important that they have the Bible and Christian literature in their own languages. Both the African leaders and the Mission have gained a sharper realiza­ tion of the need for acceleration in the translation of the Bible in all the tongues of the Nilotics, and for the production of more Christian literature. The visit of Dr. Eugene Nida, of the American Bible Society, has been of inestimable value not only in making the Mission more


language conscious, but in giving technical advice. It is now clear, for example, that while the tribal languages were previously considered comparatively simple, they are complicated and among the most difficult in the world. More missionaries are now giving primary attention to language, and this year language clinics are planned in every station by the language experts to help the members of the Mission gain a greater facility in the use of the tribal tongues. A proposed visit of the Laubaich literacy team for several weeks in the spring of 1955 was post­ poned until the orthography of these languages was improved. It is hoped that Dr. Nida and the Laubach team may both be in the Sudan next year. The South Sudan Christian Council in a recent meeting, bearing in mind the vital need of more translation work in all areas of the Sudan, urged the member Missions to consider the setting aside of additional workers to engage solely in this important work. The same Council urges that where the N e w Testament is as yet uncom­ pleted in the vernacular languages, the completion of this translation should be given high priority and regarded as a primary obligation and duty of the missions to the Sudanese Church. The Council is also plan­ ning simple commentaries, particularly of the Four Gospels, to aid the devotional life of the African Christians. In the production of Christian literature, the Spearhead Press in Malakal is assuming key importance. Physical facilities are being im­ proved, and a Christian magazine called The Torch is now being printed for the whole Sudan. To eliminate the long delay in proof­ reading of the translations in Anuak being done by Mr. Hoekstra, an IB M electric typewriter is being sent out capable of cutting aluminum stencils for the Spearhead Press, thus insuring accurate work and early production in a country where transportation is difficult and time con­ suming. It should also be recorded that the first Murle hymnal has been produced. This is a small initial volume, but it speaks well of the begin­ nings that are being made in this new work among the last tribe. The problem in the Sudan is not only one of communication, but of raising African leaders to communicate the gospel to their own people. Full agreeement has been reached with the Diocese of the Sudan for the joint training of pastors and evangelists in the Bishop Gwynne College, a Divinity school in Mundri to the south. The principal of the college is a member of the Church Missionary Society; the dean is the Reverend William Anderson, a member of the American Mission. Five qualified Nilotics from the mission area are now in residence at Mundri preparing themselves for Christian service. The required additional buildings are in process of construction. While men are being trained here, others who have been given informal training by the mis­ sionaries are active in proclaiming the gospel among the villages in the mission area. One of the most encouraging features of the work is that these are being supported by the small Christian congregations. The


sense of stewardship and evangelism is constantly cultivated in all the congregations. In line with the renewed emphasis upon national African leadership, the first Christian conference in the area of the Mission was held immediately following the annual mission meeting in Akobo in February. Some fifty African representatives attended this meeting for inspiration and the discussion of problems. As the new church is emerging in the South Sudan, study is being given to the organization of this church. All are agreed that this must be an indigenous church, self-governing and self-supporting, and that it must take into consideration not only historic ecclesiastical organiza足 tion, but also forms of tribal government. In view of the strong desire for a united church, it is felt that consideration should be given both Presbyterian and Episcopal patterns and the possible affinity which either may bear to the tribal pattern of organization. While the political future relation between Egypt and the Sudan remains uncertain, the Christian Church has surmounted this national boundary by the presence of an Egyptian minister and his wife working as full members of the Mission. The Reverend and Mrs. Swailem Sidhom were sent as missionaries by the Evangelical Church in Egypt and have been members of the Mission for over a year. It is also significant that the Coptic Church of Egypt is showing interest in doing missionary work in the South Sudan. It should be remembered that most of the members of the Evangelical Church in Egypt have come over from the Coptic Church. This has produced tension with this ancient Chris足 tian Church, but it has also stimulated the Copts to thinking of thenown place in the life of Egypt, both in relation to Islam and to the Evangelical Church. Also, in face of the new missionary interest shown by Islam, there has been an awakening in the Coptic Church and a realization that it must begin a missionary work in cooperation with other Christians. One indication of this new awakening is the sending to this country for the Evanston Conference of three Coptic monks. This is the first time that representatives of this Church have set foot on western soil. One of them, the Reverend Mr. Makary el Souriany, has been studying this year at the Princeton Theological Seminary. Mr. Makary is an active leader in the Sunday school movement which enrolls several hundred thousand in the Coptic Church. Recognizing the unity of Christian work in the Near East, our Board has shared in the expenses involved in the year of study for Mr. Makery. The great problem of transportation in the South Sudan was made more difficult in past months when both planes of the Missionary Avia足 tion Fellowship were destroyed by a freak wind storm in Malakal. Just two days previous to this tragedy, one of the planes had made a mercy flight, bringing a doctor to Akobo where one of our missionaries


was critically ill. Through a loan on the part of one of the missions in the Sudan, another plane has been secured and is in operation. It is hoped that the second plane may soon be replaced. The United Presby­ terians made a grant of $5,000, and our Board was able to supply $1,500 toward the purchase of a Cessna 180. The Reverend T. Donald Black, new General Secretary of the United Presbyterian Board, visited the South Sudan and was present at the annual meeting in February. It should also be recorded that Dr. and Mrs. Taeke Bosch, parents of Mrs. C. Lee Crandall, arrived on their visit to the Sudan in time for the annual meeting. In view of the many changes and uncertainties of the past year, we record our gratitude to God for all His mercies and overruling provi­ dence. He has led the Mission in the making of important decisions as the new day is faced. It is interesting to record that of the forty-nine career missionaries in the Mission, only two were appointed before 1940. From 1940 to 1949, twenty-seven members joined the Mission, and since then twenty more were added. With the five short termers, making a total of fifty-four, this is a Mission not only young in years but youthful in spirit. A deep spiritual note is characteristic of its whole life. The revival movement in East Africa has been a source of great blessing to many members of the Mission who have taken their out-of-country leave in the revival area. The Mission meeting in February again revealed the spirit of unity, courage and anticipation that marks this pioneer band among the hundreds of thousands of Nilotics in the Upper Nile Province where pagans, Muslims, and Christians meet.

•as


An

evangelist in Kirkuk of the United Mission in Iraq.

Mr.

Forced Thoma (left) chairman of the Basrah Con­ ference, in discussion with Iskof Garabet, pastor of the Basrah Church. |

‘A rabia An active Christian convert in Amarah. !

“O

.

_ NE °f the chief purposes of missionary work is the draw­ ing together and integration of Christians into a local fellowship which becomes a functioning, worshiping part of the Church Universal.” With this declaration one of the missionaries begins his annual report, and then follows it with the remark that the most hopeful and joyful feature of the years work in his station has been the apparent development of a certain amount of cohesiveness and mutual concern among the church members. This emphasis on the strengthening of the church and the development of national leadership is characteristic of the life of all the stations in both the Arabian Mission and the United Mission in Iraq. The impact of the historic Basrah Conference and of the youth conferences has been felt in all of Iraq and the Persian Gulf. The impetus of these conferences toward unity and mission has stimulated the members of the ancient evangelical churches, the converts from Islam, and the members of the two missions. This growing sense of togetherness has led to a greater loyalty to the church and a stronger spirit of evangelism in the life and thinking of all the believers. In expectation of the organization and the growth of the coming Church, a sense of urgency has developed in the training and use of national leadership. The appropriation for theological training in the United Mission has been doubled. In all of Iraq and the Persian Gulf there is only one ordained minister in the Evangelical Church. One young man has gone from Bahrain to the Lebanon Bible Institute; one or two have also gone from Iraq. While serious attention is being given to the recruiting and training of leaders in such institutions, the several congregations are developing local leadership. With the growing consciousness of the significance of


the Church, lay folk are responding in a most encouraging manner. They are offering suggestions and initiating movements whereby they shall be more responsible as members of a witnessing Christian fellowship. At the same time, increased use is being made of Christians from other areas. In Kuwait, for instance, where there has been a phenomenal influx of workmen, including Christians of various persuasions, mostly of the ancient churches, earnest lay Christians from Jordan, Lebanon, Syria and Palestine, as well as from Iran and Iraq, are doing what they can to assist the padre of the station. Also, in Bahrain, two young men are acting as full time colporteurs, the salary of one being paid by the local congregation. Perhaps the most significant development along this line is the keen interest being shown in the possibility of having a fraternal worker from another area of the Near East being sent to Kuwait to work with the missionary padre in the marvelous opportunities for service in this fabu­ lous place. Many visitors to Kuwait have been impressed by the unusual situation developing there, and among them has been Dr. R. Park Johnson, Presbyterian field representative in the Near East. Writes Dr. Johnson: “A certain amount of discussion is going on, as yet quite informally, about the possibility of the churches of the Near East under the auspices of the Near East Christian Council expressing their unity and mission by organizing an ecumenical mission venture by sending an Arabic­ speaking, trained Christian leader as a missionary or fraternal worker to Kuwait.” This proposal is in the early discussion stage, but deep interest is being expressed in various circles in some such venture. Such an ecumenical venture should prove to be a great blessing to the churches in the Near East,” as well as an added resource of great value in the work of Kuwait. High tribute should be paid to those devoted national Christian colleagues of the missionaries who year after year, often greatly under­ paid, carry their full share of responsibility in the evangelization of Iraq and the Persian Gulf. One thinks of the colporteurs, the teachers in the schools, the workers in the hospitals, those who are devoted helpers in both menial tasks and professional positions — without them it would be impossible to witness to the tens of thousands who annually hear the gospel in our institutions and in the non-institutional work. A deep sense of gratitude is also owed those friends of the Mission who assist in so many ways. Just as an example, we think of the gift of a car for the padre in Bahrain by the Protestant Fellowship among the oil camps on the mainland, and of the hard surfacing of the play­ ground of the Basrah boys’ school by the Port of Basrah. These friends of the Mission are a source of constant encouragement and inspiration.


In enumerating the difficulties facing the Arabian Mission, Dr. Johnson summarizes by saying: “The Arabian Mission in these days isfacing its share of the general and specific problems which beset almost every branch of the Christian mission enterprise in these days. In the small sheikdoms of the Arabian coast, as well as in the larger Arab nations, communism exerts an influence which cannot be ignored. Nationalism, often with politics and religion intermingled, tends to be suspicious or hostile to any kind of foreign enterprise. Secularism and materialism are major factors as these regions become more and more affected by west­ ern influences and the products of modern scientific advances.” The influence of communism has been especially felt in southern Iraq. Here it has produced a spirit of restlessness and irresponsibility in the youth of the land. It is increasingly realized that the Christian Church must respond more adequately in the way of social action to meet this restlessness. As this is being written, the Sultan’s soldiers in Muscat have stood at the door of the church each Sunday morning for several weeks to check on those who gather for worship. Restrictions have been placed on the activities of the Christian congregation, bringing back memories of the difficulties encountered a few years ago. This testing has revealed the timidity of some of the believers, but has also displayed the courage and constancy of others. Strangely enough, in a land known for its great heat and sand storms, one of the difficulties of the past year has been the floods, par­ ticularly in Iraq and Kuwait. Transportation and work were made diffi­ cult all the way from Baghdad to Kuwait. Considerable damage was done to property entailing extensive repairs. Perhaps the greatest difficulty facing the two missions is the lack of resources for developing opportunities. In no station is there sufficient personnel to enter the opening doors for evangelism. Annually the mis­ sions remind the Boards of their personnel needs and seek greater re­ inforcements for our commitments in Iraq and the Persian Gulf. This is true of the United Mission in Iraq, a small mission of fourteen members responsible for all of central and northern Iraq, as well as for the Arabian Mission, carrying responsibility for southern Iraq and all the Persian Gulf. The enforced reduction of the work budget for 1955 has further added to a certain sense of frustration. The difficulties facing the Arabian Mission are many, but there is no sense of dismay or discouragement. The annual meeting in Muscat was characterized by a fine sense of Christian fellowship and of high morale, with a deep manifest application to a united task. The minutes of this annual meeting reveal prayerful thought and planning, and the Board has commended the Mission for the wise and progressive attitude


revealed in the spirit and actions of the Muscat gathering. The spirit of alertness to the new opportunities is evident from the careful prepara­ tion being made for the full annual meeting to be held in Kuwait this coming October with emphasis on long range policy. The possibilities of radio evangelism are recognized by the Mission. A radio evangelism committee has been formed with power to make arrangements with the radio committee of the Near East Christian Council and other interested Christian groups in the Near East for the production of radio programs. The United Mission in Iraq is cooperating in this venture. A studio for processing programs in preparation for broadcasting is already in operation in Beirut, and there is hope of an outlet through Radio Ceylon, which is heard easily over all the eastern Arab world. Through this proposed radio program great numbers of people, never reached through personal contact, would hear the gospel. The Mission is marked by a vigorous effort at the mastery of the Arabic by the younger missionaries. After visiting the various stations and being present at the Muscat meeting, Dr. Johnson wrote that he “was impressed by the missionaries themselves, by their proficiency in the use of the Arabic language and their persistence in perfecting their difficult but all-important means of communicating the witness of Christ.” In both missions language committees carefully supervise the language studies of the younger missionaries, and careful report is made to the missions and to the boards. The building program has been going on apace during the past year. In Baghdad the girls’school is under construction in a new location and will be ready for occupancy in September. The Mylrea Memorial Hospital will be dedicated and opened in October. Also in the fall the new missionary residence will be completed in Basrah. Both this house and the one in Kuwait, under construction, were made necessary by town planning developments. Other long delayed building projects await Eendracht funds. The Mission has been encouraged by the visits of many friends and relatives within the past eighteen months. Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Van Keuren and the Rev. and Mrs. Orville Hine, on their return from the India Centenary, visited the various stations of the Mission. The Rev. and Mrs. Anthony Luidens, parents of the Rev. Edwin Luidens, with Miss Joy Luidens, and Dr. and Mrs. Bosch, parents of Dr. Donald T. Bosch, have recently been in the Gulf. The Rev. Richard P. Mallery, a member of the Board, also visited Basrah and Kuwait. The Mission has lost through “second retirement” Dr. and Mrs. Paul W. Harrison; after thirty-nine years of service Miss Charlotte Kellien; through marriage Miss Marianne Walvoord and through ill health Miss Ruth Young. The Mission rejoices in the recovery of Mrs. Wells Thoms,


after her critical illness. Babies were b o m in the homes of the Deklcers, Hollers and Kapengas. After language study in Cairo, the Rev. and Mrs. James Dunham have joined the mission force, as has Miss Lavina Hoogeveen, sailing as a new recruit. After their long illness, Dr. and Mrs. Gerald Nykerk have returned to the field. Miss Eunice Post was married to Mr. D. M. Begg who has become mission and Bahrain station accountant. Miss Madeline Holmes, a short termer, has been given career appointment, while Miss Arlene Schmalzriedt has been given similar appointment and will be sailing in the fall. Miss Marilyn Tanis has been named a short term missionary nurse and upon sailing this fall will be stationed in Bahrain. In listing the assets and liabilities of the Mission, one can do no better than give the encouraging report of one experienced observer: “It was profoundly encouraging to find in each station a group of faithful Christians, a genuine Church of Christ in Arabia, and especially to see the devoted enthusiasm of these Christians, coming in family groups to church services, prayer meetings, and gatherings of fellowship. A dis­ tinctive feature of the life of some of the churches is the practice of stewardship by the members — there are many tithers and these embry­ onic churches are starting with a real sense of benevolent opportunity and missionary obligation. These churches can teach an important lesson to other young churches that have fallen into a mood and habit of dependence. May they continue, as they grow, to preserve and develop this strong sense of independent Christian stewardship!”


Dr. Julius Savarirayan is superintendent of the Scudder Memorial Hos­ pital in Ranipet.

Mrs. Sanjeevi Savarirayan and baby represent a well-known Christian family. in which there are many leaders.

3. India -tL proper appreciation of the place and progress of the Christian mission in India during the past year may be gained only by having a perspective of the national scene. The significance of the Church’s efforts is more apparent if seen in the light of the drama of present day India. India is the world’s second largest nation and its biggest democracy. This federal republic, with one sixth of the human race crowded into less than half the size of the United States, is courageously facing its many problems, the gravest being the feeding of her people. Her effort to raise the living standards of 360 million people, while safeguarding individual freedom, has been called “the most enormous experiment in democracy the world has ever seen.” To develop her resources, Nehru says, “this generation of Indians is sentenced to hard labor.” The world’s largest nation is China, with the Soviet Union India’s near neighbor. The eyes of Asia are on India, comparing her develop­ ment by democratic methods with Chinese progress under communism. In this historic setting it is not strange that George V. Allen, former ambassador to India, should solemnly declare that “In India, democracy faces its most important trial. Unless it succeeds there we cannot expect democracy to command the respect of other Asian people.” The free world is encouraged when another former ambassador, Chester Bowles, upon revisiting India opines that “no country on earth in a similar stage of development can ever touch India’s record of the last few years.” Within a period of less than five years the production of food grains has increased 20% and for the first time in a generation the country has become self-sufficient in food. During the same period


the world’s largest free election was held when over 100 million Indians voted. The leader in India is Jawaharlal Nehru, Gandhi’s political heir and the Prime Minister. Born in India and educated in England’s best schools, he cast his lot with India’s masses and spent years in jail to win their freedom. Adamant in his stand against communism, he success­ fully thwarted the concerted efforts of the Communists to win control over the new state of Andhra where they were most numerous, a political victory vitally important to that part of the Arcot Mission area lying in Andhra. In foreign relations, dreading imperialism and war, he follows a policy of non-involvement in the ideological struggle of the opposing forces led by the United States and Russia. Under this leadership, the nation has developed a new sense of hope, assurance, and dignity. It is but natural that there should be tensions created and sometimes strong expressions of nationalism. But the salient fact all must recognize is that there is a new India in the world today, a fact important not only to statesmen, but to churchmen as well. With this kind of a political background the report on India is here presented. Popular opinion notwithstanding, it is possible for missionaries to go to India and carry on the work to which they are assigned by the church, whether it be educational, medical, evangelistic, or any other phase of missionary activity. It is true that some visas have not been granted, but a survey of twenty boards reveals that during the two-year period 1953-1955 about 90% of the applications for visas were granted, some of the 10% are still pending, and many refusals had no political significance but reflected some local situation. It is quite possible that there will be increased pressme from government for Indianization of staffs, and for fewer missionaries with certain restrictions imposed, but it is not anticipated, unless the situation changes quite radically, that missionary work will become impossible. The opportunities for service in India today are practically unlimited. At the same time the normal process of transferring responsibility to nationals has seen distinctive gains in the past year. Since the organi­ zation of the Church of South India in 1947, A. Michael Hollis has been the able and genial Bishop of the Diocese of Madras, one of the largest of the dioceses and the one in which most of the Arcot Mission area is located. He has also been the presiding bishop of the whole church. Last year- an Indian bishop was made presiding bishop and Bishop Hollis resigned as Bishop of Madras to become Professor of Church History in the United Theological College at Bangalore in hopes an Indian would succeed him. Early this year the Reverend David Chellapa, for many years principal of the St. Paul’s High School in Madras and editor of the South India Churchman, was installed as Bishop of Madras. Bishop Sumitra of the Rayalaseema Diocese, the other diocese in which


the Arcot Mission area is found, is the presiding bishop. The Reformed Church now sends missionaries and money to India to be placed at the disposal of a church where the majority of the bishops are Indian. Thus one of the chief goals of missionary effort in South India, the establish­ ment of a responsible national church depending on Indian leadership, has been reached in visible and dramatic form in our area. This is also true in large measure of the institutions in the Arcot Mission area. In the course of the year Dr. C. R. Wierenga, principal for nearly a quarter of a century of the Arcot Theological Seminary in Vellore, resigned in favor of the Reverend E. Tychicus, one of the gifted Indian professors of this institution that has over 1500 graduates. Though not qualified for ordination they serve as teacher-cathechists and do the work of evangelists and pastors in many parts of India. This is the institution transferred last year from General Synod to the Madras Diocese of the Church of South India. Likewise the Scudder Memorial Hospital at Ranipet now has an Indian medical superintendent. Dr. Galen F. Scudder has headed this institution since he took it over from his father; upon the return to this country for retirement of Dr. and Mrs. Scudder, the ‘last of the Scudders” in the active service of the Board in India, he has been succeeded by his long time friend and colleague, Dr. Julius Savarirayan. The Agricultural Institute at Katpadi has had as its director since its founding Mr. J. J. DeValois. During his furlough periods one of the members of the Mission has been responsible. This year, however, while Mr. DeValois is on furlough, Mr. M. J. John has been named acting director. Mr. John has had considerable experience at the Institute and last year studied at Ames, Iowa. Steps have also been taken to transfer responsibilities from the Arcot Continuation Committee to the Diocesan Committees. The Arcot Con­ tinuation Committee, with two thirds of its members and all officers Indian, has been responsible for the institutional work and for coordinat­ ing the total program of the area. In general it has been the liaison between the Board and the Church of South India. The work is becom­ ing increasingly integrated into diocesan administration, thus giving Indian churchmen ever greater responsibility. It is anticipated that before long the assignment of members of the Arcot Mission will be by the diocese in quite the same manner as Indian pastors are now posted to their places. Another important move has been the development of plans for greater self-support. It is recognized that the conversion of India by the traditional missionary methods, whereby parishes are indefinitely subsidized by foreign funds, is financially impossible. It is also true that the spiritual health of the Church and her evangelistic power urge a greater sense of stewardship. In one area grants to established pastorates are being reduced one-third for three years, the funds thus released


being applied to the winning of new villages who similarly are aided for three years only. This xrew plan is being bolstered by a program of stewardship training. Increased self-support is now possible with the end of the famine and the gradual rehabilitation of the economic life of the community, though the chronic poverty of the area and of the depressed classes which form the bulk of the membership of the church must be recognized. In further recognition of the place of the church in the new India the Board has informed the Church of South India of the willingness of the Board and the Mission to have all ecclesiastical properties held by the Mission transferred to the church at such time as the church may deem wise and when it can be accomplished without too great a finan­ cial outlay. The chief obstacle to such a step is the exhorbitant transfer tax required in India. It is hoped that it will soon become possible to have this transfer made at minimum cost. The Board has been making a study of all institutions for which it has some responsibility abroad, at the same time encouraging a self­ study and evaluation by the institutions themselves. It was felt that the changing situation in India called for a study group coming in from the outside to undertake a careful review of educational institutions above the village level historically related to the Arcot Mission and now in process of being integrated into the life and direction of the Church of South India. Through the efforts of Bishop Hollis a Neutral Commis­ sion composed of three Indian and one non-Indian Christian educators did a study survey and laid its findings and recommendations before the proper diocesan committee. It was then sent to the Board which made response to the various recommendations. The Board has confi­ dence that through this survey the Church will be better served through her Christian schools. The Board took this occasion to reaffirm its historic position of con­ fidence in a program which includes Christian educational institutions of high quality in both scholastic standards and Christian witness. At the same time the traditional emphasis on the evangelistic outreach of the Church through non-institutional forms and the strengthening of believers was reiterated. The Board urged that such measures be under­ taken as will allow for a greater proportion of funds, made available from abroad to the Church of South India in the Arcot area, to be in­ vested less in institutional forms and more in the non-institutional efforts of the Church. One immediate and noteworthy result of the study of the Neutral Commission was the decision to upgrade Voorhees College. For over half a century this institution in Vellore, long under missionary principals but now for many years headed by Indian Christian educators, has served the church and community well. It is now in process of becoming a degree institution and thus becoming a stronger arm of the church.


Three members of the Mission are returning this year, having reached the age of retirement. Miss Wilhelmina Noordyk has been a missionary nurse for thuty-eight years. Dr. and Mrs. Bernard Rottschaefer have served for over forty-five years. Including these, within ten years the Arcot Mission will have twenty-six members who will be of retirement age, accounting for just one half the pending retirements in this period for all fields. While matters of high policy have had a prominent place in the program of the past year, the regular work has been carried on with dedication and vigor. The sick have been healed, the poor have been helped and the hungry fed, the young have been taught and the gospel has been preached to all. In a period of transition and testing, the blessing of the Lord has been evident. Whole villages have come into the church. The representatives of the Reformed Church have been sustained in trying times, learning that in the new India, in the words of an Indian Christian educator, Dr. David Moses, that what the new missionary policy calls for is “a man or woman who withdraws without separating; who leads without occupying the first place; who gives with­ out making the receiver feel he is receiving; who continuously slaves but without ever getting tired; who is busy in the King’s business but with unhurried pace and instant majesty of God Himself; who has de­ nominational relation but ecumenical loyalty.”


^ / h e World Council of Churches meeting in Evanston, Illinois, during the summer of 1954 dramatized as no other single event in that year the world-wide sweep of the Christian Church. Representatives of the churches in Asia, Africa, and other areas where Christianity is a minority demonstrated in the discussions at Evanston that they were the peers in every category with the representatives of the more established areas of Christendom. “The Holy Spirit is living and working within men. The stead­ fastness of Christian men and women in their daily work and their courage in times of Roubles are tokens of our hope in Christ. The fruits of the gospel when it is proclaimed in the world, the winning of the hearts and lives of men by Christ are tokens of hope. A society which seeks to recognize human dignity, where there is an attempt to distribute justly the burden and benefit of labor, where there is effort to banish hunger, war and despair, is a token of hope.â€? These words from Evanston describe the work of the Holy Spirit among all men unto the ends of the world and until the end of time that men may have hope and that God may have the glory. Another significant barometer of the progress being made by the Christian Church through the foreign mission movement is the fact that the organizational meeting of the World Council of Churches was held in Amsterdam, Netherlands, the second meeting in Evanston, Illinois, and the Council has the invitation from the Japanese churches to hold the third general meeting in their country. The World Council of Churches is following the pattern already established by the Interna-

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tional Missionary Council which has held some of its most momentous convocations in the Orient. The message of Evanston was transmitted by both the Christian and secular press in Japan. In that country where such significance is placed on the intellectual defensibility of the Christian message and where the citizens know as no other nation does the horrors of atomic destruction, both Christian and non-Christian gave heed to Christ— the Hope of the World. The delegates returning from Evanston, including the Rev. John C. de Maagd* who was one of the few missionaries selected by the Japanese to be part of their representation, were invited to speak and lead discussions in every area of the country. As a culmination of more than a decade of preparation the Church of Christ in Japan adopted at its bi-annual assembly both a creed and a covenant. When the Church of Christ was founded in 1941 they made the Apostles’ Creed the foundation of their faith. The Church has now adopted an important preface to the Apostles’ Creed in which they de­ fine the Scriptures, the nature and function of the triune God, the saving grace of Christ, the Church, the sacraments and the coming again of the ■Cord. The covenant of the Church of Christ, to which all members must give assent, makes five commitments in Christian living and witnessing, ihe preface of this Covenant reads as follows: “By the grace of God, having been baptized in the name of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit, and admitted into the Church, which is the Body of the Lord, we put aside all iniquities and supersti­ tions, maintain with one another the close fellowship of brothers and sisters in the Lord, pray always for the manifestation of the glory of God, and strive to do the following things”: (Then follow the five commitments) The “praying always for the manifestation of the glory of God” is a remarkable parallel to the 1955 motto of General Synod of the Re­ formed Church— “To Him Be the Glory.” In its last annual report the Church of Christ in Japan indicated that 83% of its total budget of 276 million Yen ($761,000) has been raised at home and only 17% of its budget came from the mission organizations abroad. Ihere have been definite accomplishments in evangelism among the blind, the rural folk, on the college campuses and among the labor­ ing segments of society. The churches in Japan have again begun their foreign missions program which was disrupted by the war and the de­ feat; they have sent representatives abroad who have visited sister churches in the Orient on missions of reconciliation; the Church of Christ has sent two of their missionaries to assist a sister communion in Okinawa. This last year has witnessed a distinct advance in the radio broad* The Rev. John D. Muyskens was also selected by the Church in South Tndia to be a member of its delegation.


casting efforts and the audio-visual programs of the churches. The indi­ genous churches concentrating their efforts through the Audio-Visual and Radio Department of the National Christian Council feature regular programs on private and government networks, most of them on free time. These programs present classical Christian music, hymns, biogra­ phical episodes of outstanding Christians, portrayals of events in the life of Christ, sermons, and messages from Christians visiting Japan from abroad. The magnificent choruses of Christian high schools and colleges are an important resource in Christian broadcasts. The completion of the combined audio-visual and recording studio costing $80,000 early in 1955 places in the hands of the churches an invaluable asset. Our Board of Foreign Missions shared with other boards in assisting the churches in Japan in the financing of this studio. Ferris Junior College in Yokohama has begun its efforts to raise funds for a classroom building. Meiji Gakuin University in Tokyo is more advanced in its fund-raising efforts and has actually launched the erection of a library building as the first unit of a program which shall greatly enlarge the campus facilities. The school has launched a drive to raise 99 million yen ($272,222) from indigenous sources. Both insti­ tutions are watching with anxious interest the response of the Reformed Church members to the Eendracht Appeal for the response to this ap­ peal will determine whether there will be some assistance from the mother church which originally founded these institutions. The facilities of the Albertus Pieters Evangelistic Center in Fukuoka and our missionaries in Kyushu are being mobilized in an island-wide evangelistic program conducted by the church. In this program the mis­ sionaries are working side-by-side with the ministers and laymen in teams in a systematic effort to preach the gospel. This program will in­ crease in acceleration until 1959 which is the centenary year of Protes­ tantism in Japan. Letters from across the Pacific give evidence that the younger mis­ sionaries are completing their period of language study and are expe­ riencing the joys of serving the Lord in then- adopted language. Miss Marcella M. Poppen and William H. Estell, Jr., and Miss Carol Van Zoeren are returning to the homeland after completing their three-year terms of service (Miss Poppen has served four years). Miss C. Janet Oltman leaves Japan as an honorably retired missionary. As a fitting recognition for her career service the Japanese government presented her with an official decoration.


Rev. Wesley Shao and family influence a whole community in M i n d a n a o , Philippine Islands.

W o r k With Overseas Chinese J, f o n e were to study the annual reports of the Board of Foreign Missions to General Synod over the past ten years, he might become confused because of the various names given to the work with the Chinese people. For over one hundred years the A M O Y MISSION grew in South China and although there were wars and many difficulties because of these wars, the A M O Y MISSION continued the great work that helped in the establishment and development of the Church of Christ in South Fukien. W e give thanks to God for the firm foundations that were laid during those years when Christian men and women were trained for leadership in churches, hospitals and schools. And then came the time when the missionaries found it wise to leave China because they were an embarrassment to the Chinese Christians who were having to deal with the Communists. To the people w h o m the missionaries for the American churches had trained and influenced, fell the grave respon足 sibility for the churches in South China. When the history of the Church behind the Bamboo Curtain is written, we will hear of those strong national leaders who witnessed for Christ under fire and held the Christians together. These people should be remembered daily in our prayers. It was late in 1951 that the last missionaries of our Church said farewell to China. Some of those missionaries, after a necessary rest and re-habilitation, went to other areas for specific tasks that they could fill because of their special skills and experience. Those areas welcomed


these missionaries and at present they are serving happily and effectively in their new fields of service. By 1950 there were twenty-two of the A M O Y MISSION who had not taken up some work either in the homeland or in other areas of the world. Requests came often for these missionaries to go to various parts of Southeast Asia to assist the Amoy-speaking Chinese as they en­ deavored to establish themselves in new localities. After a survey of the various opportunities made by Miss Holkeboer, it was decided that the greatest need for these remaining missionaries was in the Philippine Islands. Rev. and Mrs. Joseph R. Esther were the first to answer this call. Others followed and the Board began to think of the CHINAPHILIPPINE work. It is the purpose of the missionaries who speak the Amoy language to integrate the Chinese churches with the Church of Christ in the Philippines. They have found varying stages in coopera­ tion. In some cities the Filipino Christians welcome their Chinese brothers; in other areas, because of the misunderstandings caused by economic and social maladjustments, barriers have grown up that are difficult to overcome. Among these Chinese whose background lay in the area in China where our missionaries had worked, the few mission­ aries who could go to the Philippines seemed to be so small that to any but Christian people the task would have seemed hopeless. Some of the missionaries traveled from place to place where small or large groups of Chinese were living. Others worked with Chinese ministers to develop a stable Chinese Christian church; others taught in schools where their influence in developing Christian leaders will be felt for years to come. By 1954 there were sixteen missionaries of the former A M O Y MISSION working in the Philippine Islands. But the call for work in other areas where the Amoy-speaking Chinese had made their homes continued to come. Hong Kong, Malaya and Formosa called for assistance. The minimum program in the Philip­ pines had been superseded by a vision for efforts to bring the Amoy­ speaking Chinese in Southeast Asia to Christ. Plans were sent to the Board and after many suggestions and policies were discussed through correspondence and a conference was held with the secretary for the field, a plan for the next five years evolved. This plan envisions a pro­ gram in which the missionaries will associate themselves with the organized church in each area to strengthen the existing organized church and share with the Christian Chinese leaders in a definite pro­ gram of evangelism. No buildings will be erected; no institutions will be organized; no work separate from the program of the indigenous churches will be developed. Mobility similar to the missionary movement during the first century is a part of this five year plan.


So the name of this work was changed again. N o w it is W O R K W I T H O V E R S E A S CHINESE. In July 1954 Miss Jeane Walvoord and Miss Ruth Broekema went to South Taiwan (Formosa) to work with their former neighbor in Amoy, the English Presbyterian Church. There are at least eight million Amoy-speaking people in Formosa for the Formosan language is the Amoy language. Miss Walvoord is in a hos足 pital giving leadership because of her training and experience in China. Miss Broekema is filling a great need as she works with the Formosan women in the City of Tainan and in nearby areas. Not long after these missionaries were transferred from the Philippines, Dr. and Mrs. Richard Hofstra arrived in North Taiwan to work with the Hospital Board of the Church of Christ in Formosa. Dr. Hofstra will assist in the Mackay Hospital which is under the supervision of the Canadian Presbyterian Church, but his chief assignment is to work with the Christian forces that are concerned about the increase in leprosy on the island. With his experience and knowledge of the Chinese as well as his training in public health, Dr. Hofstra has already taken a place of leadership with his new associates. An official request from the Formosan Church has come for another doctor to relieve Dr. Hofstra so that he may give full time to his leprosy work. There are two well organized Amoy-speaking churches in Hong Kong under the leadership of two ministers who came from the Church of Christ in South Fukien. These churches have expressed the desire to have missionaries come to assist them in their church work in this new homeland. Refugees and displaced persons, who can go no further from the mainland because of political barriers that have been erected, are in need of counsel, advice and encouragement as they adjust them足 selves to new conditions away from loved ones. Miss Elizabeth Bruce stopped in the Philippines en route to Hong Kong where she has been assigned for permanent work. She visited in small towns and in Chinese sections of larger cities meeting many friends w h o m she had known in Amoy. The friendly visit, showing these lonely people that they were not forgotten by the Christian friends, did much to encourage these people without permanent homes. In early April Miss Bruce and Rev. and Mrs. Walter de Velder and family sailed for Hong Kong where they will continue to carry on their work with these people who are dis足 placed and lonely. They will work with the two Amoy-speaking churches in close cooperation with the Chinese Christian leaders. The work among the Chinese in the Philippines continues. The nine missionaries who are there (with two at home on furlough) go beyond their regular assignments to do special evangelistic work. At least four of the men have made several extended trips to contact Chinese groups, some giving out Christian literature in the Chinese shops, others preach-


ing in the Chinese Chamber of Commerce quarters in the towns visited and others taking an active part in mobile evangelism. More interest is being shown this past year in radio evangelism. This is becoming a fine medium of broadening opportunities for reaching those who speak Amoy throughout the islands. Rev. and Mrs. H. M. Veenschoten have a weekly program broadcast from Manila and Rev. and Mrs. John Muilenburg have taken the responsibility for a program from Dumaguete station three times a week. Mrs. Esther took part in a series on Christian Family Problems broadcast from Manila. Dr. and Mrs. Jack Hill continue their medical-evangelistic work in Cebu, witnessing both in the church and hospital to the Chinese and Filipinos alike. The work with youth and women is especially encouraging. There are unlimited opportunities for work with students. Every missionary is aware of this and uses each opportunity to have Bible classes, worship services and fellowship groups to guide these future leaders of their own people. One missionary writes: “Chinese women are full of zeal and earnestness for church work while generally among the men zeal and time are claimed largely for business.” Training church leaders has been and is the most important prob­ lem and concern since our work in the Philippines started. The Chinese churches cannot draw on the fine theological schools established in Taiwan and Hong Kong since Chinese immigration into the Philippines has virtually ceased. Some readiness has been in evidence to engage in seminary training, but always independent of the existing church institutions. Plans have been devised for cooperative work but they have not been feasible and were rejected for various reasons of language differences or clash of doctrinal behefs. The Rev. Wesley K. Shao in Davao City and Rev. Peter Hsieh who is in Malaya, were trained in Western Theological Seminary in Holland, Michigan. At present Mr. Paul Shih and Mr. David Yap are studying in the States, the former at Western Seminary and the latter at the Westminster Choir School in Princeton. The Chinese in the Philippines are apt to think of their young sons in business. The example of these men will do much to enhance the position of Chinese pastors in the church and community. Yes, the Work with Overseas Chinese continues. The geographical location of the Chinese may change, but the interest of the Reformed Church and its representatives will continue wherever there are Chinese people needing the gospel. Strong pleas come for new missionaries. For the first time since 1947 has it been possible to appoint new people to this troubled area. Rev. and Mrs. Earl Kragt will go to Manila in Sep­ tember to begin their language study for work in the Philippines. Ministers are needed. Educators are needed. What is the Church at home doing to fill these needs?


David Yap, a Chinese student, tells an American audience what Christ means to him.

6. H o m e tBase rr V ^ A ie

m e m b e r s of the Board of Foreign Missions have con足 tinued to study their responsibility in discovering and carrying out major policies made necessary by the changing world situation. To discharge the duty assigned to the Board of Foreign Missions for work with churches and individuals overseas, time has been spent during the past year in serious considerations of ways that the Chinch at home and the Church overseas may meet the various opportunities to witness for Jesus Christ. Three full Board meetings have been held, the one in February be足 ing held a day longer than usual in order to consider policies and plans for the future. The financial report for 1954 gave cause for rejoicing because it showed a wholesome increase in giving by the churches. H o w 足 ever, when the requests from the fields were studied all were conscious of the needs for even more sacrificial giving because of the increase in opportunities for evangelism and the decrease in the value of the dollar to care for these needs. In order to follow the suggestion of General Synod, Lambrides and Lambrides, the auditors used by other boards at headquarters, have been employed and a new system of accounting inaugmated. A careful study of legacies and investments has been made. The chapter on finances recorded in another part of this report gives the facts of the financial situation of the Board. For the purpose of learning of the work on the fields and also to discuss questions of finance and accounting, the treas足 urer will visit Africa, Arabia and India during the coming fall and early winter. Besides carrying their regular responsibilities the secretaries have spent considerable time speaking for Eendracht. Beheving that this is


very important to the Church as a whole as well as to the much needed building program in lands where the missionaries are at work, every effort was made to cooperate in this plan of General Synod. This past year we have been very fortunate to have leaders from churches in other lands as our scholarship guests. Rev. Henry .Lazarus of the Church of South India and Rev. Mitsuho Yoshida of the Church of Christ in Japan, were two of these guests who have endeared them­ selves to then hearers as they have told of work in their homelands. Miss Padma Satya, also of the Church of South India, has been a guest of the students of Hope College. Her ability to tell American youth of the youth of South India has not only made her a welcome guest but has done much to help in creating a better understanding of opportunities and problems of South India. The Board has gone on record that in future budgets, funds be made available “for increased numbers of scholarships for overseas Christian students and potential leaders, for study both in the homeland and abroad.” To this end plans are being made for other Christian leaders to study on scholarship aid from the Board during the coming year. Rev. John Sathyanathan of the Church of South India and Mr. Michihiro Miyazaki of Japan, have already been accepted. Three official visitors from lands where missionaries of the Board are at work have strengthened the bonds of understanding and coopera­ tion. Rev. H. T. Hwang, President of the Theological Seminary of Tainan of South Formosa; Bishop Lesslie J. Newbigin of the Church of South India and Rev. R. Fenn, Secretary of the English Presbyterian Board of Foreign Missions of London, gave the secretaries of the Board thoughtful reports of their work and made suggestions of ways in which evangelistic work can be furthered in their particular areas. Steps have been taken during the year to develop new methods of education and promotion as well as to strengthen some of the procedures that have proved successful in the past. Forty-two of the forty-seven Classical Agents for Foreign Missions were responsible for showing the film, The Village of the Poor, in their classes. The presentation of the work by audio-visual means was of great inspiration to many classes. W e plan to present another film, In the Face of Jeopardy, in much the same manner during this-next year. Two meetings were held with Clas­ sical Agents for Foreign Missions. Not only were the problems that the Board faced explained to these leaders, but the Board learned from these representatives many ways to improve work among the churches. The Board of Foreign Missions is exceedingly grateful for the constant cooperation and interest evidenced by a great number of Classical Agents. W e have worked with the Boards of Education and Domestic Mis­ sions in the Children’s Department and the Youth Department endeav­ oring to present a unified approach to the future leaders of the Church.


The Board of Education will give the official report of these depart­ ments, but the Board of Foreign Missions loyally endorses through its cooperation for support, the excellent work of Miss Felon, Miss Van Horne and Mr. Teusink. A short report of the Department of W o m e n ’s Work is included in this chapter. Organizational steps have been decided upon and now the Department is ready to do more along educational lines in present­ ing the total missionary program of the two mission boards to the women of the church. In 1953 the women gave toward the budget $108,993.64 and in 1954, $114,577.99, a gain of $5,584.35. This does not include gifts for Sewing Guild projects. For many years the Sewing Guild has been a project outside the regular budget of the Board. Be­ ginning in 1956 all Service Projects (this includes the former Sewing Guild and Magazines for Missionaries) will be included in the budget of the Board, thus again putting into practice the policy made to en­ deavor whenever possible to include all gifts in the ongoing program of the areas where we are working. The passing of time makes it necessary for two retirements to take place in June, 1955. Dr. Luman J. Shafer, missionary statesman and leader, to w h o m this report is dedicated, will retire from active work but we know that his interests in the work of the Board will continue wherever he may be. Dr. Edwin W. Koeppe, missionary to China and acting field secretary for the past three years, has been closely connected with the Board of Foreign Missions since 1919. The Board members as well as the whole church express their loving appreciation to these two friends as they leave their active work but keep their keen interest in the work to which they gave their lives. As plans were made for these retirements new plans were devel­ oped to make the work more effective. It has been voted to have two field secretaries, one to be responsible for promotional work in Albany, N e w York and N e w Jersey Synods and the other for Chicago and Iowa Synods, but with the understanding that they shall have mutual respon­ sibility in all areas of the church. Rev. Leonard A. Sibley, Sr., has been engaged as one of these secretaries with special responsibility for the three eastern synods. Synod will need to confirm his appointment at this session. It is hoped that the name of the other field secretary can be announced soon. During the year Dr. H. V. E. Stegeman was called home. He with Mrs. Stegeman went out as a missionary to Japan in 1917. He served there until the end of World War II, returning to this country in the Fall of 1941. Latterly he has served as registrar and teacher in North­ western College, Orange City, where he was working when he died on August 14, 1954. The members of the Board have been grateful for their opportu­ nities for sharing in this part of the work of the Church. Without the


prayerful, intelligent understanding of the needs of the world by the whole church, this report would not have been possible. W e pray God’s blessing on all His work. R E P O R T O F T H E D E P A R T M E N T O F W O M E N ’S W O R K The primary function of the Department of W o m e n ’s Work is to spread the gospel at home and abroad through domestic and overseas missions. This is done through the women in more than 1200 societies in our churches. As we look back on another year of witnessing for Christ we feel we have “lengthened our cords and strengthened our stakes.” The increase in the number of leadership training workshops held in the spring by the women’s Classical Unions is most gratifying. At the fall conferences teams of speakers carry the Good News and take inspiration and information to the women of the church. Through thenpledges for missionary support, conference offerings, Baby Roll enroll­ ments and special appeals their contributions increased by $25,000 in 1954. The Department serves the women through nine standing commit­ tees. The Stewardship and Spiritual Life Committee has concerned itself with extending the work to our Canadian sisters in Christ. Worship and stewardship materials translated into the Dutch language will be made available to newly organized women’s societies in Canada. The Christian Citizenship Committee keeps our women alert to local, national and international legislation which affects our mission work. The Education and Promotion Committee plans programs covering a wide range of topics and written by specialists in their fields. The mission topics follow the interdenominational study themes each year. The Committee on Organization completed a handbook covering all phases of women’s work. A survey of women’s societies is proving most helpful. The Field Committee acts as liaison between the missions and the Department. In cooperation with the Missionary Hospitality Committee, itkeeps the Department informed of mission news and the “comings and goings” of the missionary personnel. • All that we have done has been richly blessed by our Heavenly Father without whose help we would not have achieved these goals. May he continue to bless our efforts and guide us in the paths He would have us walk.


J . Missionary ^Personnel M issionaries of the Board are listed below to give accurate information to General Synod. O n May 1, 1955 there are 161 missionaries in active service. Thirty-six men are ordained; 23 are unordained (10 of these are doctors); 60 are married women (4 of them are doctors and 6 are nurses) and 42 are unmarried women. Of the unmarried women 2 are doctors; 16 are nurses and 24 are teachers and specialists in Christian Education. There are 8 short term missionaries in Japan and Arabia. There are 37 emeritus missionaries on the roll of the Board. There are also 8 under appointment and 2 under re-appointment who are still in the United States. It is expected that those under appoint­ ment will sail in 1955 or early 1956.

R E T U R N E D T O T H E FIELD: To Work with Overseas Chinese — Dr. and Mrs. Richard Hofstra (Taiwan); Miss Elizabeth Bruce (Hong Kong). To India — Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin De Vries. To Japan — Miss F. Belle Bogard; Rev. and Mrs. John C. de Maagd. To Arabia — Rev. and Mrs. George Gosselink; Dr. and Mrs. Gerald Nykerk. To Africa — Miss Lillian Huisken. AT H O M E O N FURLOUGH: From China — Rev. and Mrs. Joseph R. Esther; Rev. and Mrs. Edwin W. Koeppe; Dr. and Mrs. Henry A. Poppen. From India — Miss Harriet Brumler; Miss Maiy Geegh; Dr. Mar­ garet Gibbons; Rev. and Mrs. John Muyskens; Dr. and Mrs. Galen Scudder; Miss Charlotte C. Wyckoff; Miss Lois Rozendaal.


From Arabia — Rev. and Mrs. Garrett E. De Jong; Miss Ruth Jackson; Miss Charlotte B. Kellien; Miss Christine A. Voss; Rev. and Mrs. Harvey Staal. From Africa — Mr. and Mrs. Paul E. Arnold. N E W MISSIONARIES: In Arabia — Mr. Douglas M. Begg; Miss Lavina C. Hoogeveen. In Africa — Rev. and Mrs. Paul E. Hostetter; Miss Arlene Schuiteman. APPOINTEES T O SAIL W I T H I N T H E YEAR: To Work with Overseas Chinese — Rev. and Mrs. Earl Kragt (Philip­ pines). To Arabia — Miss Allene C. Schmalzriedt; Miss Marilyn J. Tanis. To Japan— Miss Fenita Harmelink (Short term) APPOINTEES ACCEPTED: To Arabia — Mr. and Mrs. Bernard L. Draper. To be Assigned — Miss E. Roxanna Sarr, R.N. At the February meeting the Board adopted the policy of putting a certain amount of money in the budget each year to send out 8 or 10 missionaries for the next 10 years. Most of these will be replacements, but the Personnel Committee and the Finance Committee will confer from time to time making the final decision for the needs for each year. Among the greatest needs in the next years are missionaries for evangelistic work with training in the fields of the ministry and educa­ tion (men and women). W o m e n doctors are needed. Several men are tentatively accepted for medical service upon the completion of their medical training.


8

. "Finances

a V./ h e increase in giving during the past year has been un足 precedented and was the occasion for a spontaneous session of thanks足 giving during the first Board meeting in 1955 when the financial facts became known. T H E Y E A R 1954 W A S M A R K E D BYs I. A substantial increase in budget income

1954 From Living Donors ______ $827,420.07 From Non-living Sources ___ 47,961.19 Total_________________ $875,381.26 Amount of Increase_______$100,055.98 Percentage of Increase____ 13%

1953 $735,089.81 40,235.47 $775,325.28

II. A Decrease in per capita Givingfrom Living Donors 1941-------- $1.75 per member 1951 ------- 4.78 per member 1952 ------- 4.82 per member 1953 ------- 4.86 per member 1954 _________ 4.72 per member This slight decrease is due to the fact that while the church is show足 ing a steady growth in membership, the giving to missions abroad has not kept pace with this increase in membership. III. The Income for Objects Outside the Budget has Decreased

1954

1953

From Living Donors_______ $113,156.56 $117,880.25 From Non-living Sources___ 51,521.19 52,961.76 Total_________________ $164,677.75 $170,842.01 While there was during 1954 a 13% increase in giving to the bud足 get, there was a decrease of 3/2% in giving to objects outside the budget. The Board recognizes with gratitude this response of the church to the emphasis made on budget-giving. IV. Comparison of the 1953 and 1954 Gross Income from

the Particular Synods

1954

Particular Synod of Albany--- $ 55,971.74 Particular Synod of Chicago__ 399,216.12 Particular Synod of Iowa____ 231,961.73 Particular Synod of N e w Jersey 114,927.56 94,704.33 Particular Synod of N e w York..

Total______

$896,781.48

1953

Increase

$ 52,635.65 367,610.91 193,557.15 100,008.12 80,717.19

6.3% 8.5% 19.8% 14.9% 17.3%

$794,529.02

13%


F U R T H E R I N F O R M A T I O N O N FINANCES The budget expenditures sent overseas in 1954 exceed the 1953 payments by $70,492.69. H o w the 1954 Income of the Board was Spent:

INDIA

ARABIA

OVERSEAS CHINESE JAPAN

ADMINISTRATION AND SERVICES TO MISSIONARIES

AFRICA

PENSIONS AND SOCIAL SECURITY PAYMENTS —^COOPERATION WITHIN DENOMINATION 'MISSIONARY EDUCATION AND PROMOTION P E R C E N T A G E O F I N C O M E DISTRIBUTION Work in Africa___________ _________________ _ 6.2% Work in Arabia_________ _____________________21.3% Work in India________________ _______________23 % Work in Iraq__________________________________1.2% Work in Japan______________ 17.5% Work among Overseas Chinese__________________ 9.7% Pensions and Social Security_____________________ 7 % Administration and Services to Missionaries__________ 9.8% Missionary Education and Promotion_____________ 1.5% Cooperation Within Denomination_________________ 2.8% Total_______________________________ 100 %


I. F o r

the

R egular W

ork of the

Board:

A. Offerings from Living Sources: Churches, S.S., & Y.P.S. $698,139.54 Women’s Societies __ 114,577.99 Individuals________ 14,702.54 827,420.07 B. In c o m e f r o m N o n -Living So u r c e s : Interest on Funds available for general work of the Board___ Accumulated Income from General Purpose Legacy _____________ Miscellaneous Income__________

43,300.51 3,926.20 734.48 $ 875,381.26

II. F o r Sp e c ia l O bjects O utside B u d g e t : A. Income from Living Donors: Churches, S.S. & Y.P.S. $47,339.38 W o m e n ’s Societies 36,738.57 Individuals __ ____ 16,003.19 R.C.A. World Service 13,075.42 $113,156.56 B. Income from Non-Living Sources: Legacies------------------- $ 30,521.19 Interest on Funds Not Available to General Work of the Board . 21,000.00 $ 164,677.75 Total Receipts------------- --------------$1,040,059.01 1954 Total Income from Living Sources: For the Regular Work of the Board______$ 827,420.07 For Special Objects Outside the Budget 113,156.56 1953 Total Income from Living Sources_________ Gain in Contributions from Living Sources______ Gain in Total Receipts from all Sources_________

$ 940,576.63 $ 852,970.06 $ 87,606.57 $ 93,891.72


Auditor's Statement March 29, 1955 The Board of Foreign Missions of the Reformed Church in America 156 Fifth Avenue N e w York 10, N. Y. Dear Sirs: W e have made an examination of the books and accounting records of T H E B O A R D O F F O R E I G N MISSIONS of the R E F O R M E D C H U R C H IN A M E R I C A for the year ended December 31, 1954 and have prepared there­ from the following statements: Exhibit “A ” Exhibit “B ” Schedule Schedule Schedule Schedule Schedule Schedule Schedule

— Balance Sheet — Statement of Income, Expenditures and Appropriations “A-l” — Schedule of Unexpended Appropriations “A-2” — Schedule of Designated Funds “A-3” — Statement of Changes in General Fund Equity “A-4” — Schedule of Investments “A-5” — General Endowment Fund Balances “A-6” — Specific Endowment Fund Balances “B-l” — Statement of Expenditures and Appropriations for Administration, Education and Promotion and Cooperation within the Denomination

While our examination was made in accordance with generally accepted auditing procedures and included certain test checks of accounting records, we did not attempt to determine that all items of charges and credits had been posted in all cases into the appropriate accounts, or that there had been a com­ pliance with all conditions and restrictions under which funds were received. During the year under review, certain changes were effected in your account classifications, as well as in your accounting methods and procedures. Such changes affected neither your operating results nor your financial position, but merely the form of presentation of your financial statements. In our opinion, subject to the foregoing qualifications, the accompanying statements present fairly the financial position of The Board of Foreign Mis­ sions of the Reformed Church in America as at December 31, 1954 and the results of its operations for the year then ended. They were prepared in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles applied on a basis consistent with that of the preceding year. Very truly yours, LAMBRIDES & LAMBRIDES Certified Public Accountants


REFORMED CHURCH IN AMERICA Balance Sheet December 31, 1954

ASSETS General Fund: Cash ....... ............ ......... $ 370,475.53 Savings Accounts ................... 24,407.84 Loans and Advances Receivable ............... 9,737.41 5,273.48 Receivable from Missionaries ................. Deferred Charges— Remittances Applicable to 1955 .. 36,443.42 15,750.00 Real Estate Used for Missionary Residences ....... $ 462,087.68

Total General Fund Assets Endowment and Reserve Funds: Cash ............... ......... ..... $ 28,020.17 Investments:— per Schedule “A-4” Bonds (Market Value $642,623) ... $632,698.56 Stocks (Market Value $791,038) ... 518,653.73 Mortgages .......... 79,496.61 35,000.00 Federal Savings and Loan Shares ... Total Investments ................

1,265,848.90

Total Endowment and Reserve Fund Assets ........

1,293,869.07

TOTAL ASSETS ....... ... ....... .... ..... ......

$1,755,956.75


General Fund: $ 3,627.78 Accounts and Taxes Payable .......... 506.76 Unremitted Accommodations .......... 206,475.49 Unexpended Appropriations, per Schedule “A-l” Legacy Funds: General Purpose ............ $ 94,729.08 Designated ................ 33,329.78 128,058.86 Total Legacy Funds Designated Funds, per Schedule “A-2” .......... 100,185.25 3,091.36 Real Estate Income Balances ............... Insurance Fund ...................... 916.92 Equity, per Schedule “A-3” ............... 19,225.26 Total General Fund Liabilities and Funds ........ $ 462,087.68 Endowment and Reserve Funds: General Endowment Funds, per Schedule “A-5” ..... $ 616,759.35 Specific Endowment Funds, per Schedule “A-6” .... 371,314.56 Specific Endowment Funds— Accumulated Income, per Schedule “A-6” .................. 34,632.78 Unallocated Gain on Sales of Investments ....... 46,696.15 72,050.00 Conditional Gifts ..................... China Reserve Fund .................... 91,614.22 General Building Fund ...... ............. 45,495.64 Medical Fund for Retired Missionaries .......... 15,048.52 $1,293,611.22 Undistributed Investment Income ............. 257.85 1,293,869.07 Total Endowment and Reserve Funds TOTAL LIABILITIES, FUNDS AND RESERVES

$1,755,956.75

NOTE: As at December 31, 1954 the Board of Foreign Missions was indebted to the Board of Pensions of the Reformed Church in America to the extent of $38,863.85. Because of a difference in the method of accounting employed by the Board of Foreign Missions, thisliabilitydoes not appear on itsbooks. According to the terms of the funding agreement of the 1953 pension plan, whereby the Board of Pensions will provide retirement benefits for 159 specified missionaries of the Board of Foreign Missions, the latteristo make fixedannual payments to the former fora period of twenty-five years. Therefore, the Board of Foreign Missions budget provides only for itsannual installment each year, regardlessof the status of itsaccount with the Board of Pensions. EXHIBIT “A”


Statement of Income, Expenditures and Appropriations For the Year Ended December 31, 1954

Income (Budgetary): Income from LivingDonors.................. $827,595.07 Income from Investments ................... 34,622.29 Income from Funds Held by Board ofDirection ....... 10,323.68 580.36 Miscellaneous ......................... Total Budgetary Income .................... $873,121.40 ExpendituresandAppropriations (Budgetary): FieldWork: Africa .................... $ 41,786.33 Arabia .................... 180,225.39 India .................... 152,675.85 Japan .................... 156,335.46 80,779.79 Overseas Chinese .............. United Mission in Iraq ........... 12,000.00 Scholarships for Foreign Students ..... 5,060.81 $628,863.63 Total Field Work 15,168.24 Other Expenses Related toMissionarieson Furlough Home Expenditures, perSchedule “B-l”: Administrative ............... $102,701.55 Education and Promotion .......... 16,009.50 Cooperation Within Denomination ..... 29,326.12 TotalHome Expenditures ............ 148,037.17 1953 Pension Plan Payment ................. 34,585.00 Cooperative Projects ..................... 26,322.86 Overseas Travel of Secretaries ................ 1,039.00 Contingent Fund (Net) .................... 1,319.25 Annuity Payments (Net) ................... 248.30 Total Budgetary Expenditures and Appropriations ...... 855,583.45 Excess of Budgetary Income over Expenditures and Appropriations ...... $ 17,537.95 Income— Legacy Funds: Legacies for General Purposes ......... $ 36,043.24 LegaciesforDesignatedPurposes ........ 7,795.33 Total Income— Legacy Funds ......... $ 43,838.57 Expenditures— Legacy Funds: From LegaciesforGeneral Purposes...... $ 11,787.95 From LegaciesforDesignated Purposes ..... ...129.16 Total Expenditures— Legacy Funds ...... 11,917.11 Excess ofLegacy Funds Income over Expenditures .............. 31,921.46 Excess of Income over Expenditures and Appropriations ............ $ 49,459.41 Allocatedasfollows: General Fund Equity, carried toSchedule “A-3” .... $ 17,537.95 General Purpose Legacies ................ 24,255.29 Designated Legacies .................... 7,666.17 Total— as above .................. $ 49,459.41 EXHIBIT “B”


REFORMED CHURCH IN AMERICA December 31, 1954

Unexpended Appropriationsfor: Africa ............... ............. $ 28,131.30 ............. 61,340.07 ............. 45,564.70 ............. 55,154.13 ............. 5,659.49 10,625.80 Domestic .............. ............. TotalUnexpended Appropriations, carriedtoExhibit“A” .. $206,475.49 SCHEDULE “A-l” DesignatedFunds: AfricaMission ..... .................... $ 5,451.26 Arabia Mission .......... 10,312.89 Baby Roll ........................... 6,285.65 CARE and Famine Relief................... 137.82 China (Amoy) Mission .................... 8,250.10 IndiaMission .......... 27,851.58 Japan Mission ..... 21,238.58 Magazine .... 202.58 Miscellaneous Designations .................. 6,229.04 R.C. A. World Service.................... 11,612.18 Sewing Guild Supplies ..................... 2,613.57 Total Designated Funds, carried to Exhibit “A” ...... $100,185,25 SCHEDULE “A-2” General Fund Equity: Balance,January 1,1954.... ... ............ $ 6,705.41 Add — ExcessofIncome overExpendituresandAppropriations, per Exhibit “B” ................. 17,537.95 $ 24,243.36 Less— Charges ApplicabletoPriorYears.......... 5,018.10 Balance, December 31, 1954, carriedtoExhibit “A” ............ $ 19,225.26 SCHEDULE “A-3”


REFORMED CHURCH IN AMERICA Schedule of Investments For the Year ended December 31, 1954

BONDS

Government Bonds: $80,000 U.S.A.Treasury,2*/8%,due 11/15/60 ....... 50.000 U.S.A.Treasury,Investment“B”,2%%, due4/1/80 11,500 U.S.A.SavingsBonds,Series“K”,2.76%,3/1/66. 25 U.S.A.SavingsBonds,Series“F”,8/1/55..... 500 U. S.A.SavingsBonds,Series“F”,9/1/55 ..... 25 U.S.A.SavingsBonds,Series“F”,11/1/55.... 250 U.S.A.SavingsBonds,Series“F”,4/1/56..... 500 U.S.A.SavingsBonds,Series“F”,12/1/56.... 25 U.S.A.SavingsBonds,Series“F”,10/1/57.... 25 U.S.A.SavingsBonds,Series“F”,11/1/57.... 25 U.S.A.SavingsBonds,Series“F”,2/1/58 ..... 15.000 U.S.A.SavingsBonds, Series“G”,2>/2%,2/1/55 . 10.000 U. S.A. SavingsBonds,Series“G”,2*/2%,3/1/56. 5.000 U.S.A.SavingsBonds,Series“G”,2'/2%,4/1/56. 10,000 U. S .A.SavingsBonds,Series“G”,21 /2%, 11/1/56.... 7.000 U.S.A.SavingsBonds,Series“G”,2V6%,6/1/57. 75.000 U.S.A.SavingsBonds,Series“G”,2Vi%, 1/1/59. 25.000 U.S.A.SavingsBonds,Series“G”,2 V z % , 3/1/59. TotalGovernmentBonds

Book Value

Market Value

$ 80,025.00 $ 79,775.00 51,178.50 48,750.00 11,500.00 11,378.00 24.30 18.50 370.00 481.00 18.50 24.30 236.25 185.00 370.00 464.50 22.50 18.50 22.50 18.50 22.10 18.50 15,000.00 14,880.00 10,000.00 9,820.00 5,000.00 4,910.00 10,000.00 9,790.00 7,000.00 6,832.00 75.000.00 72,525.00 25,000.00 24,100.00 $290,721.00 $284,057.45

Other Bonds: $15,000 Aluminum Co. of America, Sinking Fund Deb., 3 V s % t due 1964 ...................... $ 15,000.00 $ 15,431.25 5.000 Central Illinois Public Service Co., 1st Mortgage, “A”, 5,125.00 3%%, due 1971 ................... 5,056.25 25.000 Columbia Gas System Sub. Conv. Deb., 3V2%, 1964 ... 27,250.00 30,500.00 25.000 Cortland Equipment Lessors, Inc., SF Deb., “B”,4V4%, 11/1/69 ...................... 25,000.00 25,500.00 25.000 Chicago and Western Indiana R.R. Co., 1stSinking Fund, “A”,4%%, due 1982 ................ 25,770.00 26,781.25 1.000 Elgin,Joliet& EasternRwy.Co., 1stMortgage,“A”,314%, due 1970 ...................... 1,016.50 1,020.00 20.000 Great Northern Rwy. Co., General Mortgage, “C”,5%, 1/1/73 ........................ 25,050.00 24,725.00 10.000 IllinoisBellTel.Co., 1stMortgage, “A”,2%%, due 1981 10.112.50 9,650.00 5.000 Koppers Co., 1stMortgage, 3%, due 1964 ....... 5,100.00 5,093.75 35.000 MichiganConsolidatedGas Co.,SinkingFund Deb.,3%%, due 1967 ....................... 35,702.85 36,006.25 2.000 New York Towers, Inc.,Reg’d.Stamped, 2%, 2/1/60 .. 867.75 1.400.00 25.000 Northern IllinoisGas Co., 1stMortgage, 31/2%, 1979 .. 25.500.00 26,312.50 5.000 Ohio Edison Co., 1stMortgage, 234%, due 1975 .... 5,031.25 4.925.00 20.000 PhillipsPetroleumCo.,Conv. SF Deb.,3.7%, 6/1/83 .. 22.325.00 23,850.00 800 PublicServiceElectricandGasCo.,Deb.,6%, due 1998 .... 800.71 1.246.00 7.000 Rochester Telephone Corp., Sinking Fund Deb., 4%, due 7,140.00 7,140.00 25.000 SinclairOil Corp., Conv. Deb., 314%, due 1983 ..... 26,538.75 29.562.50 20.000 Standard OilofIndiana.Conv. Deb., 314%, due 1982 . 21.300.00 22.950.00 25.000 State Loan & Finance Corp., Conv. Deb., 5%, 9/15/69 25,000.00 26.125.00 15.000 Tennessee Gas Transmission. 1st Pipe Line, 3V2%, 2/1/75 15.216.00 15.112.50 20.000 Twin City Rapid Transit Co., Collateral Trust, 4%, due 1964 ........................ 16,200.00 19,100.00 1,000 Wilson & Co., Inc., 1stMortgage, 3%, due 1958 .... 1,000.00 1,010.00 Total Other Bonds ............ ...... $341,977.56 $358,566.00 Total Bonds $632,698.56 $642,623.45


REFORMED CHURCH IN AMERICA Schedule of Investments [continued) For the Year Ended December 31, 1954

STOCKS

Corporate Stocks: 333 33/100 Allis Chalmers Manufacturing Co........ 2 Anglo-Lautaro Nitrate, Class A ............ 5 Anglo-Lautaro Nitrate, Class B ............. 150 American Investment Co. of Illinois, 5.25%, Pfd... 440 Beneficial Loan Corp................... 200 Bethlehem SteelCorp.................. 100 Central Vermont Public Service Corp., 4.15%, Pfd.. 500 Chicago Great Western Railway Co., 5%, Pfd., $50 Par 400 Colorado Interstate Gas Co............... 913/lOOOths Creditors Holding Co., Pfd.......... 276 Creditors Holding Co., Inc.,6%, Pfd......... . 300 Dixie Cup Co., 5% Conv. Pfd., $50 Par ........ 200 E. I.Du Pont de Nemours & Co............ 200 Eastman Kodak Co................... 300 El Paso Natural Gas Co................. 300 General American Transportation ........... 300 General Shoe Corp. ................... 300 Halliburton Oil Well Cementing Co.......... 200 Honolulu Oil Corp.................... 300 InternationalNickel Co. of Canada, Ltd........ 175 InternationalNickelCo. ofCanada, Ltd.,7%, Pfd... 200 Kennecott Copper Corp................. 200 May Department Stores, $3.40, Pfd........... 50 Monongahela Power Co.,4.40%, Cum. Pfd....... 220 National Cash Register Co............... 20 New York Towers, Inc., Pfd.............. 600 Norwich Pharamacal Co................ 50 Ohio Edison Co.,4.40%, Pfd.............. 50 Oklahoma Natural Gas Co., Series “A”,414%, Pfd.. 200 PacificGas & ElectricCo.,6%, 1stPfd.,$25 Par ... 200 Panhandle Eastern Pipe Line Co............ 120 Peoples Gas, Light and Coke Co............ 400 Pennsylvania Power & LightCo............. 200 Phillips Petroleum Co.................. 3 Prudence Bonds Corp.................. 200 Public Service Co. of Indiana, 395%, Pfd....... 200 Sears Roebuck & Co................... 400 Socony-Vacuum OilCo., Inc.............. 100 Tennessee Gas Transmission Co., 5.10%, Pfd...... 200 TexasGulfSulphurCo................. 50 Traveler’s Insurance Co................ 300 Union Carbide & Carbon Corp............. 254 United States Fidelity & Guaranty Co......... 350 United States Pipe and Foundry Co.......... 150 Wheelingand Lake ErieRwy. Co............. 1000 Wisconsin Bankshares Corp............... Total Corporate Stocks

Book

Market

Value

Value

$ 20,400.00 $ 24,333.09 62.50 23.00 15,000.00 15,725.00 15.874.00 23,760.00 19,301.71 21,825.00 9,275.48 9,175.00 14.665.65 19,000.00 17.500.00 21,000.00 }

1.00

16.800.00 21,525.00 9,274.35 33,500.00 9,941.82 14,425.00 10,744.63 12,450.00 16.020.90 18,375.00 12.090.00 15,900.00 14,102.43 16,912.50 14.734.65 16,700.00 10.826.91 17,662.50 23,459.05 24,386.25 14,117.19 21,100.00 16.568.50 17,200.00 5.175.00 5,025.00 6,710.97 22,220.00 333.65 500.00 10.411.50 20,700.00 5.150.00 5,437.50 2.625.00 2,650.00 6.900.00 7,100.00 15,185.10 15,100.00 11.297.24 18,960.00 16.300.00 18,300.00 6,813.92 15,000.00 1.00 16.768.70 17,875.00 11,012.96 15,450.00 8,558.21 21,750.00 10.200.00 10,400.00 17,869.38 25,000.00 15,030.86 90,000.00 9.505.01 25,875.00 8,612.78 23,368.00 17,217.73 25,900.00 17.756.70 19,700.00 18.457.25 19,750.00 $518,653.73 $791,037.84 SCHEDULE “A-4”


REFORMED CHURCH IN AMERICA Schedule of Investments (continued) December 31, 1954

MORTGAGES Interest Rate

Location

Crossway Highway, Glen Cove, N. Y.. 3332 FishAvenue, Bronx, N. Y..... 2066Mapes Avenue, Bronx,N.Y.... 448New JerseyAvenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. . 6116TyndallAvenue, Bronx, N. Y... 79-85Walworth Street,Brooklyn,N. Y. ... 529Third Street,Brooklyn, N. Y.... 342-44West 30thStreet,New York, N. Y. 69-3275thStreet,Middle Village,N. Y. ... 1413 78th Street,Brooklyn, N. Y..... 357 West 117thStreet,New York, N. Y. . 160West 120thStreet,New York, N. Y. ... 38-31218thStreet,Bayside,N. Y.... 4080HillAvenue,Bronx,N. Y...... Total Mortgages ...

41/2%

41/2%

5%

6% 41/2% 4% 41/2%

41/2% 6% 5V2%

.

41/2%

4V2% . 5% .

,

6%

Maturity Date

3/31/56 Open Open Open 6/30/59 5/31/56 7/1/61 1/31/62 Open Open 10/1/55 1/1/58 Open Open

Book V alue

$ 10,500.00 4.850.00 50.00 2.510.00 10.650.00 10.550.00 8,956.17 22,817.48 990.00 3.070.00 1,818.51 2,226.98 174.15 333.32 $ 79,496.61

Market Book FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS Value* Value Investment ShareCertificates: 2M Aurora FederalSavings and Loan Assn., $ 2,000.00 $ 2,000.00 Baltimore, Maryland .............. 2M Cayuga FederalSavingsandLoan Assn., 2, 000.00 2, 000.00 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania ............ 3M Chicago FederalSavingsandLoan Assn., 3, 000.00 3, 000.00 Chicago, Illinois ................. 3M Colonial Federal Savings and Loan Assn., 3,000.00 3,000.00 Dongan Hills,Staten Island,New York ..... 5M Danielson FederalSavingsandLoan Assn., 5, 000.00 5, 000.00 Danielson, Connecticut ............. 2M EastEnd FederalSavingsandLoan Assn., 2 , 000.00 2, 000.00 Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania ............ 2M FirstFederalSavingsand Loan Assn., 2, 000.00 Greene County, Waynesburg, Pennsylvania ... 2, 000.00 2M FirstFederal Savingsand Loan Assn., 2, 000.00 2, 000.00 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania ............ 2M FortPittFederalSavingsand Loan Assn., 2, 000.00 2, 000.00 Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania ............ 4M HinsdaleFederalSavingsandLoan Assn., 4, 000.00 4, 000.00 Hinsdale, Pennsylvania ............. 2M LeedsFederalSavingsandLoan Assn., 2, 000.00 Baltimore, Maryland .............. 2, 000.00 2M LibertyFederalSavingsand Loan Assn., 2, 000.00 2, 000.00 Baltimore, Maryland .............. 2M Penn FederalSavingsandLoan Assn., 2, 000.00 2, 000.00 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania ............ 2M PublicFederalSavingsandLoan Assn., 2,000.00 2,000.00 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania ........... Total Federal Savings and Loan Associations Investment Share Certificates ....... $ 35,000.00 $ 35,000.00

SUMMARY OF INVESTMENTS Bonds ........................ $ 632,698.56 Corporate Stocks .................. 518,653.73 Mortgages ...................... 79,496.61 Federal Savings and Loan Associations Investment Share Certificates................ 35,000.00 Total Investments, carried to Exhibit “A” ......... $1,265,848.90 *Valued atcostbased on informationastoguaranteeofinvestment byFederalSavingsandLoan InsuranceCorporation. SCHEDULE “A-4”


General Endowment Fund Balances For the Year Ended December 31, 1954

Income AvailableforVarious Purposes Principal WithintheRegularBudget: 12/31/54 Ida Baldwin Fund ............................. $ 5,500.00 10,784.60 William C. Barkalow Fund ......................... Abbie J.BellFund ............................. 700.00 Clara De ForrestBurrellFund ....................... 4,066.96 Mary E. Bussing Fund ........................... 30,055.50 Rev.Henry E.Cobb Endowment Fund ................... 2,500.00 1,000.00 Mary StorreCoe Fund........................... JosiahE. and IdaCrane Memorial Fund .................. 600.00 ElizabethDiehl Memorial Fund ....................... 6,500.00 The Daniel and Alida Dimnent Fund .................... 6,100.00 Anna Eliza Disborough Fund ........................ 2,000.00 Martha T. Douglas Fund .......................... 3,000.00 20,521.89 The Laura E. Dunn Fund ......................... CharlotteW. Duryee Fund......................... 2,022.47 Anna E. Gaston Fund ........................... 4,532.17 8,047.64 Catherine Jane Gebhard Fund ....................... Jane Ann Gopsil Fund ........................... 14,339.08 JohnHeemstra and FamilyMissionFund.................. 4,500.00 Emily Hermance Fund ....... *................... 459.10 Elise W. Hill Fund............................. 10,198.74 Mary Hobart Fund.............................. 435.42 John Hoffman Fund ............................. 100.00 Mr. and Mrs. Cornelius Hollestelle Fund ................. 4,500.00 GarrettN. Hopper Fund ........................... 1,500.00 Abel H. Huizenga Fund ........................... 1,000.00 In Memoriam Fund ............................. 500.00 Mr. and Mrs. Henry J.Kollen Memorial Fund .............. 3,750.00 Minnie Kouvenhoven Fund ......................... 386.45 Susan Y. Lansing Fund ........................... 7,500.00 7,500.00 Mrs. Celia Lanting Fund .....r........................ Mary Louise Leonard Memorial Fund ................... 688.66 John S. Lyles Fund ............................. 50,000.00 15,000.00 Madison Avenue Reformed Church Fund.................. ClarineV. B. and Lucy A. Matson Fund ..... ............. 1,000.00 Heye Mennenga Fund ............................ 600.00 Charles E. Moore Fund ........................... 475.00 Jane T. B.Moore Memorial Fund ..................... 400.13 Ada Louise Morris Fund .......................... 3,479.57 Jane H. Morrison Memorial Fund ..................... 4,000.00 MatildaM. Nash Fund ........................... 2,000.00 John Neefus Fund ............................. 9,379.86 14,000.00 P. I.and M. V. K. Neefus Fund ...................... Mary Neefus Fund .............................. 4,045.09 North Reformed Church, Passaic, N. J.Fund ............... 29,661.97 CharlesW. OsborneFund....................... ... 5,000.00 Joseph Penfold Fund ............................ 5,000.00 Permanent Fund ............................... 14,550.00 Mrs. Edward H. PetersFund ........................ 403.77 CatherineJane Pryer EvangelisticFund .................. 1,000.00 Helen A. Rollins Fund ........................... 1,733.98 Margaret Roosa Fund ............................ 4,293.92 Anna and Margaret Roosenraad EvangelisticFund ............. 202.74 Jane A. Scardefield Fund .......................... 1,000.00 A. J.SchaeferFund ............................. 194.25 Semelink FamilyMission Fund ........................ 14,000.00 Rev.Dr.C.D. F.SteinfuhrerMemorial Fund ............... 5,500.00 Katherine M. Talmage Fund ....... .................. 5,827.37 Mary S.Van Acker Endowment Fund ................... 3,499.61 John Martin Van Buren Fund ........................ 20,000.00 Maria Hoes Van Buren Fund ........................ 20,180.90 A. C. Van RaalteMission Fund ....................... 3,000.00 Anna Townsend Van Santvoord Fund .................... 29,848.37 Alida Van Schaick Fund .......................... 26,238.79 Security Fund ................................ 71,622.69


General Endowment Fund Balances December 31, 1954 Principal 12/31/54

Income AvailableforVariousPurposes WithintheRegular Budget: (Cont’d.) Lena May Visser Fund ........................... $ 600.00 A. V. S. Wallace Fund ........................... 625.00 CorneliaM. Wallace Fund ......................... 625.00 OliveGatesWallace EvangelisticFund ................... 493.40 Mr. and Mrs. William Walvoord Fund ................... 1,000.00 Abbey L. Wells Fund ............................ 5,000.00 Annie E. Wyckoff Fund ........................... 71,399.89 ElizaA. Zabriskie Fund ........................... 4,589.37 Total General Endowment Funds, carried to Exhibit “A”.. $616,759.35 STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN PRINCIPAL Balance, January 1, 1954 ..................... $534,451.47 Add — Bequest and Permanent Gift Received .... $ 486.45 Transfersfrom OtherAccounts ........ 81,821.43 82,307.88 Balance, December 31,1954— asabove .............. $616,759.35 SCHEDULE “A-5” Specific Endowment Fund Balances For the Year Ended December 31, 1954

Funds Held forSpecificPurposes: Accumulated Designated forUse inChina: Income Principal Amoy Hospital Fund ................... $ 763.08 $ 3,643.26 2,414.58 5,000.00 Elisabeth H. BlauveltMemorial Hospital Fund ..... C. H. U. Bed Endowment Fund— Blauvelt Hospital .. 243.09 500.00 417.30 2,000.00 Mary B. Doolittle Fund ................. G. J.Kooiker Bed Endowment Fund— Amoy Hospital .... 337.95 700.00 Netherlands Committee Fund .............. 362.55 1,105.01 Martha Schaddelee Fund— Sio Khe Hospital ...... 378.21 785.00 Mary E. Talmage Fund ................. 1,563.38 5,362.19 Jasper Westervelt Fund— Neerbosch Hospital..... 481.85 1,000.00 John H. Oerter Memorial Fund ............. 940.95 1,950.00 Designated forUse inIndia: Arcot Industrial School Fund .............. 2,406.09 20,000.00 Children’sHome — Vellore ............... 1,779.76 5,864.36 Mary LottLyles Hospital Fund ............. 754.63 11,592.09 Scudder Memorial Hospital, Ranipettai: General Purpose Fund ................ 9,912.54 47,732.42 Isaac Brodhead Fund ................ 339.93 1,344.60 ElizaM. Garrigues Fund .............. 155.74 955.65 AlidaVennema Heeven Fund ............ 403.30 1,161.55 Euphemia Mason Olcott Fund ............ 260.69 1,032.15 Dr. George A. Sandham Fund ............ 760.47 5,280.69 Mary Taber Schell Hospital Fund ............ 2,097.04 42,704.49 Elizabeth R. Voorhees College Fund .......... 1,376.02 16,269.87 C. L. Wells Memorial Fund ............... 1,304.68 15,316.54


THE BOARD OF FOREIGN MISSIONS OF THE REFORMED CHURCH IN AMERICA Specific Endowment Fund Balances (Cont'd.)

Funds Held forSpecificPurposes: (Cont’d.) Accumulated Income

Principal

Designated forUse inArabia: Fund forMedical Missionary Work inArabia...... $ 1,017.99 $ 90,889.34 Oliver J. Hayes Memorial Fund— Medical Missionary Work in Arabia ................... 2,128.72 25,000.00 BahrainHospitalFunds— Arabia: General Purpose Fund ................ 175.52 7,259.00 AlfredDe W. Mason Jr.Fund............ 120.46 5,000.00 Fanny W. Mason Memorial Fund .......... 73.28 3,000.00 Lewis D. Mason Fund ............... 237.06 9,801.87 48.86 2,000.00 Lewis D. Mason Fund— SurgicalSupplies ..... Van Rensselaer Burr Jr. Fund ............ 28.30 1,200.00 Lansing Memorial (formerly Basrah Hospital Fund) .. 48.86 2,000.00 Anna M. T. Van Santvoord— Amarah LansingHospital 24.42 1,000.00 Cantine GuestHouse Endowment Fund......... 95.53 3,954.45 55.92 2,337.13 Anna F. Bacon Fund .................. Marion Wells Thomas Hospital Fund .......... 24.42 1,000.00 Hannah More Bishop Fund ................ 21.85 917.54 Margaret L. Tunnard Fund ................ 19.42 1,000.00 MinisterialEducationinIndia: 98.58 2,000.00 William R. Gordon Fund ................. 616.42 12,555.36 Christiana Jansen Fund................. 98.58 2,000.00 Joseph Scudder Fund .................. 244.76 5,000.00 G. B.Walbridge Fund.................. Essay Contest Prizes at Hope, Central and Northwestern— — 2,100.00 Stegeman Fund ...................... TotalSpecificEndowment Funds,carriedto Exhibit “A” ................

$ 34,632.78 $371.314.56

STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN PRINCIPAL Balance, January 1, 1954 .............. $369,040.26 Add— Transfersfrom OtherAccounts........ 2,274.30 Balance, December 31, 1954— as above ...... $371,314.56 SCHEDULE “A-6”


Statement of Expenditures and Appropriations for Administration, Education and Promotion and Cooperation within the Denomination For the Year Ended December 31, 1954

Administration: Executives’Salariesand HousingAllowances: Salaries

Housing Allowances

Shafer— Secretary ..... $ 5,700.00 Ruth Ransom— Secretary .... 5,449.92 B. M. Luben— Secretary ..... 5,449.92 H. G. Bovenkerk— Treasurer .. 5,449.92 Edwina Paige— Associate Treasurer 4,000.00

L. J.

Totals ..........

$1,800.00 $ 7,500.00 1,800.00 7,249.92 1,800.00 7,249.92 1,800.00 7,249.92 1,250.00 5,250.00

$26,049.76 $8,450.00 $34,499.76

Office Salaries ................ 33,330.97 8,715.52 Travel— Board Members ................. OfficeRent ........................... 7,341.52 Office Furniture ........................ 1,933.58 ContributoryAnnuity Fund, Social Security and Hospitalization 4,161.37 Postage, Telegrams and Cables .... 2,625.98 Office Contingent ........................ 2,500.00 Pensions ............................ 2,245.80 Telephone ............................ 1,727.65 Stationery and Office Supplies ................. 1,420.24 Auditing Services ........................ 1,250.00 Mimeograph Work and Supplies ................ 619.98 Miscellaneous ........................ 329.18 Total Administration $102,701.55 Education and Promotion: Printing of Pamphlets and Leaflets ....... .... $ 7,581.27 Travel among Churches by Missionaries and Secretaries.. .... 4,717.41 Publication ofAnnual Report ........... .... 1,929.77 Expenses of Field Secretary ............ .... 671.36 Summer Conferences ............ Arabia Calling (Publication) ............ Visual Aid Supplies .............. Books and Pamphlets Purchased .. Comprehensive India Film Presentation (Net) .... .... 52.59 Total Education and Promotion ........ 16,009.50 CooperationWithintheDenomination: Department ofWomen’sWork ......... .... $ 9,271.46 Department ofYoung People’sWork .... StaffConference— Stated Clerk of General Synod ... .... 5,901.00 Department of Children’sWork ... Audio Visual Office ......... Informational Material ....... Total Cooperation Within the Denomination . 29,326.12 Total, carriedtoExhibit “B” .... $148,037.17


TABULAR STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS T H R U CHURCHES AND ORGANIZATIONS D E C E M B E R 31, 1954

CHURCHES

Young Dept,of Churches andMen’s Sunday People’s Women’s Societies Schools Societies Work Special

Total

CLASSIS OF ALBANY 2,890 00 525 18 350 00 261 90 25 00 298 32 104 45 60 63 1,087 57 '37 00 46 61 158 40 33 95 19 61 23 92 60 00 5,982 54

100 00 26 52 40 00 25 00

520 15 498 00 129 50 148 00 500 00 Englewood Community .... 675 37 531 81 Hackensack, Second .. 1,915 00 175 76 HarringtonPark, 1,092 23 Hasbrouck Heights, First i;850 00 Oradell ......... 2,144 42 137 00 327 50 294 25 1,452 50 310 00 ChristianEvangelical Union Meetings .... Total ....... 12,701 49

50 00 24 16 50 00 25 00 24 60 174 00

Albany, Third .....

Union Meetings .... Total .......

199 48 25 00 60 31

6 40

1 60

23 92 500 23

8 00

637 50 50 00 40 00 177 50 160 00 10 00 30 00 155 00 11 10 46 45 40 00 10 00 23 91 20 00 77 75 1,489 21

210 00 145 00 110 00 75 00 185 00 20 00 10 00 288 75 50 00 105 00 43 00 30 00 10 00 1,281 75

3,837 50 753 10 540 00 539 40 25 00 643 32 134 45 100 63 1,730 80 123 10 198 06 301 71 45 55 49 61 71 75 80 00 87 75 9,261 73

CLASSIS OF BERGEN Cherry Hill Church on the Hill...

10 00 261 93 122 50 124 82 125 00 992 01

3 20

39 00 3 20

45 40

145 00 66 25 20 00 135 00 109 25 431 60 23 00 175 00 785 00 20 00 50 00 313 00 190 50 62 00 150 00 265 00 268 50 73 70 3,282 80

90 00 805 15 589 25 25 00 206 86 30 00 185 00 518 00 302 20 911 45 375 99 832 59 216 90 939 87 90 05 796 86 644 65 3,557 65 35 00 230 76 148 92 1,291 15 157 60 2,330 60 265 64 2,865 69 367 76 168 76 31 75 631 75 260 00 944 07 159 07 2,005 07 92 03 402 03 2 00 2 00 116 48 190 18 3,397 04 20,418 74

CLASSIS OF SOUTH BERGEN

Union Meetings .... Total .......

213 62 208 27 555 00 111 00 138 75 45 00 333 00 73 24 1,677 88

100 00 75 00 60 00 111 34 30 19 376 53

130 00 355 00 95 00 50 00 20 00 35 00 25 00 40 21 750 21

60 00 35 88 25 00 25 00 77 93 223 81

213 62 498 27 985 00 301 88 188 75 90 00 504 34 206 36 40 21 3,028 43


Churches and Men’s Sunday Societies Schools CLASS1S OF CASCADES Bottrel Community . Bellingham Mission .... Community Cochrane .. Edmonton ...... Hope, Lethbridge .. Lynden, First .. .. Lynden, Second Faith.. Monarch ....... Montana, First ... Nooksack Valley .. Oak Harbor ..... Yakima, First ... Calgary Mission ... Winnipeg, First ... Union Meetings ... Totals ...... CLASSIS OF

Young Dept,of Peoples Women’s Societies Work Special

71 54

71 54 2,078 78 371 10 209 36 210 52 2,136 75 1,483 25 '27 20 49 48 6,637 98

Castro Valley ..... 1 85 Modesto, Paradise 34 52 Community ..... Oakland,SobrantePark 9 25 Community ..... 913 42 Calvary ........ Sacramento,Church 25 00 of Christ ...... 44 40 San Francisco,Miraloma.. 307 22 Grace ......... Union Meetings .... 1,335 66 Totals ....... CLASSIS OF SOUTHERN CALIF. 1,124 50 Artesia, First ..... 1,400 00 Artesia, Second .... 5,777 25 Bethel ......... Mayfair Community .. 170 00 Trinity ......... 14 80 Lincoln Avenue .... 2,344 00 Hope Community ... ParkHills....... Norwalk Manor Community ..... 185 00 388 07 Paramount, Emmanuel .... Longview ....... SantaAna ParkView 405 50 Memorial ...... 38 00 Bethany ........ Tucson ......... 9 25 Union Meetings .... 6 77 Totals ....... 11,863 14 CLASSIS OF CHICAGO Worth-Alsip ...... Bethany ........ 6,581 25 Bethel ......... 350 00 Berwyn,First...... 1,625 00 Emmanuel ....... 2,125 00 Englewood, First.... 2,900 00 Faith Community ... 25 00 Gano, First ...... 1,375 00 1,385 00 Hope .......... Mt. Greenwood, First.. 2,576 10 370 70 Riverdale, Ivanhoe ... Roseland, First ..... 6,550 00 Trinity, (Italian First). West Side ....... 3,020 00 Union Meetings .... Totals ....... 28,883 05

Total

1,135 38 181 44 75 00

69 15 12 30

1,391 82

81 45

239 92 957 73

153 35 21 90 81 50 7 54 285 35 22 62 7 15 96 30 675 71

185 00

77 53 8 00 170 16

390 00 50 00 18 50 22 50 99 31 137 50

20 81

20 81 40 00

25 00 50 00 113 97 373 97 487 10 70 00 150 00 138 80 55 61

26 00 281 69

3,757 51 552 54 281 26 100 00 384 71 2,533 71 1,643 37 34 35 49 48 336 22 9,744 69 1 85 132 86 17 25 1,268 58 25 00 95 40 357 22 113 97 2,012 13

250 00

5 00

185 00 525 00 587 97

112 03

275 00 20 00

157 03

453 85 1,650 36

1,742 10 2,054 74 5,827 25 445 10 581 95 72 62 2,821 61 25 00 390 00 1,306 65 813 19 415 50 511 75 9 25 460 62 1,865 48 17,477 33

180 00 50 00 25 00 63 00 75 00 45 00 101 12 120 00 30 00 10 00 95 00 1,296 75 2,090 87

15 00 365 00 536 25 7,297 50 508 25 158 75 2,463 75 197 50 2,410 50 200 00 4,475 00 100 00 125 00 110 80 1,660 30 25 00 1,861 12 100 00 3,782 01 370 70 1,153 94 7,842 61 12 50 22 50 75 00 4,190 00 191 25 2,553 00 2,875 99 39,927 24

393 35 1,941 32 350 00 655 00 1,300 00 129 50 350 00 985 91 76 67 1,000 66 4,847 08

108 25 25 00

32 00 1,065 00 1,230 25

90 50 584 74 50 00 125 10 188 15 57 82 422 00 25 00 20 00 118 58 93 19 10 00 80 40


Churches Young Dept,of andMen’s Sunday People’s Women’s Societies Schools Societies Work Special

726 59 59 01 767 94 34 35 943 06 157 55 1,088 70 121 34 53 10 387 00 153 51 47 50 1,258 91 1,875 00

128 93 55 00 700 00

7,673 56

2,233 10

237 90

52 60

80 00

150 00 111 82 104 88 63 42 55 00 98 16 50 00 340 70 252 00 123 19

CLASSIS OF GERMANIA 36 94 Antelope Valley .... 1,221 00 Bethany, Clara City.. Bethel (Davis) .... 675 69 Bethel (Ellsworth) .. 38 93 Chancellor ....... 185 24 Delaware ........ 1 2 3 76 Dempster ....... 74 00 Ebenezer, Scotland .. 6 4 75 Eden .......... 714 00 Clay County, First... 367 57 Hope .......... 350 00 Immanuel, WillowLake... 450 89 Lennox, Second .... 237 37 Logan ......... 133 20 Monroe, First ..... 1,014 50 Salem ......... 350 00 Trinity, Sibley ..... 102 50 Zion, Amherst..... Union Meetings .... 6,140 34 Totals .......

350 00 40 84 29 62 42 60 199 17 158 43 52 23 954 49

CLASSIS OF GREENE Athens ......... Catskill ......... Coxsackie, First .... Coxsackie, Second ... Kiskatom Catskill ... Leeds .......... Union Meetings .... Totals .......

226 45 569 00 70 00 108 27 35 31 47 01 1,056 04

39 00 12 50 61 53 15 00 12 50 140 53

CLASSIS OF HOLLAND Beechwood ....... Calvary ......... Ebenezer ........ Ebenezer ........ Holland First ..... Holland Third ..... Holland Fourth .... Holland Sixth ..... Holland Bethel ..... Holland Hope :.... Holland Trinity .... Maplewood ...... Union Meetings ....

802 62 407 88 407 88 6,920 55 5,185 43 2,349 67 2,029 00 3,096 50 1,755 00 9,002 78 1,970 00 250 00

885 00 72 86 225 00 225 00 225 00 80 00 2,100 00 350 00 750 00 87 09 892 61 350 00

29 00

31 90 8 00 13 80 33 00 79 80 71 40

10 00 15 00 78 08 14 40 35 50 3 20 236 18

120 00 25 00 133 76 25 00 35 00 150 00 210 00 50 00 50 00 75 00 200 00 94 38 275 00 104 76 1,547 90

250 00 50 00 44 00 75 00 75 00 50 00 65 00 135 36 25 00 100 00 75 00 125 00 10 00 519 89 1,599 25

15 00 110 00 10 00

86 27 221 27 47 50 4 80 1 44 50 00 9 60 20 00

325 00 54 00 1,801 55 1,301 50 586 00 260 00 320 00 120 00 150 00 310 00 605 00 237 00 154 21

63 90 1,071 32 182 01 35 00 58 75 1,674 25 59 35 80 37 1,058 43 5 5 9 55 102 00 154 00 1,597 52 276 22 206 52 40 00 442 00 458 97 52 50 97 50 238 16 2,109 17 414 25 67 87 493 75 2,766 94 5 00 5 00 104 76 1,391 30 13,083 76

54 13 91 07 135 00 1,738 60 74 00 24 00 108 00 827 69 163 93 50 00 25 00 239 24 43 00 251 76 79 00 5 00 26 00 90 75 912 00 133 00 96 51 879 08 513 92 45 00 110 51 726 38 141 36 446 33 106 86 539 23 277 51 1,539 84 772 89 262 39 81 11 249 04 519 89 1,724 38 10,654 64 65 00 183 58 60 00 30 00 25 00 15 00 378 58

291 45 806 58 142 50 199 80 185 31 84 51 86 27 1,796 42

1,157 94 1,342 01 89 15 149 51 527 04

2,060 12 126 86 2.434 43 2.434 43 8,894 29 6,868 88 4,908 82 2,648 51 4,523 54 2,373 55 10,500 2,602 1,292

211 86

25 00 888 23

XtOlU' S o'©'

CLASSIS OF DAKOTA Aurora, Stickney ... Charles Mix-Platte First. Corsica, Grace ..... Dover ......... Grand View ...... Hamlin, Castlewood .. Harrison ........ Lake View ...... Litchville ........ Monroe, Sandham Mem... North Marion, Litchville.. Okaton ......... Springfield, Emmanuel .... Strasburg ....... Westfield, Hope .... Winnebago, Bethel ... UnionMeetings..... Totals .......

Total


CHURCHES

Young Dept,of Churches andMen’s Sunday People’s Women’s Societies Schools Societies Work Special

Total

CLASSIS OF HUDSON Greenport Mt. Pleasant... Linlithgo,Livingston,N.Y. Livingston Memorial, Union Meetings .... Totals .......

358 50 25 00 175 00 50 00 1,835 00 141 98 104 88 677 58 37 00 3,404 94

30 00 41 63 111 00 77 50 20 64 48 27

12 50 8 00

50 00 17 00 135 00 180 00 200 00 96 35

329 04

20 50

65 00 92 39 835 74

170 51 1,065 67 350 00 22 50

22 56 14 90

132 93 17 95 34 39 78 00 35 00 48 11 24 42 15 00 10 00 22 62 157 60 576 02

553 93 59 95 374 39 349 63 2,181 00 371 94 45 06 119 88 800 85 59 62 249 99 5,166 24

CLASSIS OF ILLIANA American De Motte.. DeMotte First..... Indianapolis, Lansing Grace ..... Bethel-Phoenix ..... South Holland First.. WichertFirst.*.... Union Meetings .... Totals .......

149 32 981 10 1,278 95 47 00 700 00 573 42 22 20 350 00 2,510 00 508 26 423 00 8,281 62 2,452 97 111 00 718 40 19,107 24

174 66 850 00 700 00 350 00 350 00 2,058 44 634 77 6,726 55

7 04 4 80 91 00 77 12 141 37 358 79

75 00 175 00 120 00 370 00 39 41 80 00 166 00 70 00 42 50 77 00 975 00 145 00 1,412 50 3,74741

446 99 52 16 638 80 2,883 13 500 00 2,263 85 555 00 138 00 22 50 750 00 50 00 62 70 675 53 39 65 17 45 634 66 30 00 590 00 4,116 00 229 09 i;514 39 60 00 880 30 88 88 515 88 280 00 11,686 06 7 25 7 25 130 18 3,440 04 111 00 2,272 27 2,874 51 32,814 50

CLASSIS OF ILLINOIS Elim .......... Fairview ........ Fulton, Second ..... Fulton Trinity ..... SilverCreek-

Union Meetings .... Totals .......

400 00 751 11 259 00 374 00 2,874 00 i;250 00 1,643 23 4,357 93 573 90 720 34 50 00 14 80 87 25 282 40 679 18 415 18 104 24 1,298 19 66 21 16,200 96

250 00 262 50 74 00 141 13 442 75 157 20 700 00 369 41 75 00 50 00 26 02 12 08 307 10 2,867 19

50 00 9 60 15 00 12 80 10 00 16 00 15 00

128 40

100 00 87 50 126 50 179 00 276 82 55 00 620 00 383 00 375 00 250 00 4 13 82 00 85 00 10 00 297 50 922 42 3,853 87

136 75 76 56 173 78 55 00 110 00 25 00 140 00 82 05 73 20 18 97 42 93 91 97 50 00 11 64 62 16 1,150 01

800 00 1,150 36 432 66 763 28 3,249 13 2,092 37 1,890 43 5,817 93 1,054 95 1,537 95 390 00 33 77 134 31 374 37 861 18 537 84 126 32 1,96495 988 63 24,200 43


CHURCHES

Young Dept,of Churches andMen’s Sunday People’s Women’s Societies Schools Societies Work Special

Total

CLASSIS OF KALAMAZOO 179 00 ‘222 00 29 25 3,950 00 Kalamazoo, First ... Kalamazoo, Second .. 2,615 00 3,475 00 Kalamazoo, Fourth .. 2,078 60 440 00 468 50 74 00 730 06 Kalamazoo North Park.... 2,000 00 399 97 1,116 63 '350 00 Portage, First ..... 1,025 13 287 00 238 30 62 13 Union Meetings .... Totals ....... 19,740 57

66 07 1,900 00 740 00 1,300 00 214 29 120 00 172 04 837 50 350 04 350 00 794 79 100 00

89 09 11 20 4 80 5 45

6,944 73

143 54

33 00

24 20 2 00 18 50 836 10 294 00 466 00 213 75 318 40 60 63 22 00 56 00 167 50 10 00 90 00 60 00 111 38 25 00 10 00 200 75 2,986 21

269 27 52 20 50 20 62 51 303 01 29 25 421 26 7,196 45 92 50 3,752 70 5,245 80 53 00 2,565 09 340 70 1,099 10 '749 13 100 00 145 24 49 24 1 , 008 10 50 00 9 50 3,014 50 8 06 38 46 37 140 45 1,697 08 510 00 100 00 113 25 2,077 55 426 69 14 69 10 00 273 30 35 00 62 13 800 00 1,000 75 2,478 67 32,293 72

CLASSIS OF NORTH LONG ISLAND 9 25 41 53 947 88 100 00 100 00 109 72 1,031 00 Flushing,Church On The Hill..... 700 00 50 00 37 00 461 00 85 65 20 00 934 00 1,209 45 '325 00 Long Island City, First.... 597 90 63 87 Newtown First, Elmhurst 211 42 NorthHempstead 1,585 00 195 50 Oyster Bay-Brookville . 900 00 Queensboro Hill 200 00 Steinway ........ 375 00 600 00 Trinity, Brooklyn, 75 00 1,847 00 148 00 355 50 Winfield Union Meetings .... 365 00 Totals ....... 13,680 67

8 00

100 00 50 00 13 56 41 48 25 00

20 40

50 00 82 50 100 00 100 00

8 00 9 60 9 25

75 00 38 59 662 57

68 81

13 00 25 00 140 00 50 00 200 00 38 00 235 00 106 00 50 00 112 50 150 00 136 00 62 50 74 50 52 50 30 00 115 00 125 00 40 00 137 50 70 00 55 00 50 00 100 00 50 00 75 50 15 00 30 00 160 16 2,498 16

45 60 48 00 134 55 100 00 100 00 20 00 75 00 518 89 175 00 35 00 25 00 35 00 300 00 126 77 50 00 30 00 50 00 168 04 150 00 146 00 45 00 50 00 15 00 50 00 5 00 190 00 70 00 29 50 2,787 35

67 85 114 53 1,230 43 '250 00 400 00 167 72 1,341 00 1,424 89 '275 00 72 00 598 50 320 65 20 00 1,083 56 1,571 95 '526 27 762 28 123 87 401 42 1,878 04 '443 50 1,266 00 415 00 105 00 549 60 759 25 205 00 2,112 50 233 00 453 59 525 16 19,697 56


Churches Young Dept,of andMen’s Sunday People’s Women’s Societies Schools Societies Work Special

21 74 175 66

13 06 3 20

615 00 25 00 20 00 1,055 00 187 00 95 00 160 00 267 00 10 00 12 50 130 00

50 10 10 00 12 00 80 00 14 66 50 78 50 00 7 00 10 00 10 00 154 45

665 10 173 47 131 00 1,757 36 354 00 350 16 161 78 1,131 74 65 00 591 17 45 00 70 20 70 71 1,480 69 532 40 111 00

196 74 350 00 24 00 325 00 350 00 700 00 100 00 431 55

16 26 23 17

5 00 io 66

110 00

39 25 2,429 80 950 00 539 90 1,400 00 412 50 125 00 900 00 700 00 50 00 1,050 00 250 00 700 00

3 20 41 37

25 00 119 00 2,720 50

448 99

40 00 67 50 30 00 260 37 165 00 160 00

50 00 267 00 45 24 2 25

110 00 110 00

29.075 283 52 327 05 260 00 35 00 29 43 122 87 145 00 35 00 2,471 49

40 00 400 00 265 00 285 00 280 40 134 12 ... 96 71 22 15 ... 1,887 87

100 00 80 00 600 00 250 00 110 00 20 00 50 00 466 00 140 00 125 00 250 00 200 00 60 00 566 57 50 00

90 50 51 00 131 19 215 00 75 00

1,496 15

100 00 300 00 50 00 260 30 305 70 25 69 900 00

39 40 163 75 119 00 8,012 93 762 848 105 2,151 1,260 16 2,033 25 747 00 560 00 4,175 75 2,483 52 3,715 54 5,245 00 2,271 70 623 55 2,560 87 1,235 86 431 58 139 75 31,350 56 ;3gS2

CLASSIS OF SOUTH LONG ISLAND CambriaHeights, 138 47 Community ..... 111 00 Canarsie ........ Flalbush, First ..... 690 36 Flatlands ....... 87 00 240 50 Forest Park ...... 111 00 900 00 Gravesend ....... 65 00 Greenwood Heights .. 136 11 Hempstead ....... Merrillon Neighborhood.. 45 00 New Brooklyn ..... 50 00 48 21 New Lots ....... NorthBaldwinCommunity 1,470 69 New Utrecht ...... 247 95 Ridgewood . South Brooklyn Ill 00 Twelfth Street ... 39 40 Woodlawn .. 138 75 Union Meetings 4,630 44 Totals .. CLASSIS OF NO. GRAND RAPIDS 372 64 Ada .......... Allendale, Hudsonville. 707 35 75 00 Casnovia ........ 1,600 00 Grand Rapids Third.. 1,049 92 Grand Rapids Fourth.. 1,546 00 Grand Rapids Seventh. 287 00 Grand Rapids Ninth.. 450 00 Aberdeen ........ Grand Rapids Bethany. 3,140 00 1.700 00 Grand Rapids Bethel.. Grand Rapids Calvary. 2,681 94 Grand Rapids Central. 4.700 00 Grand Rapids Fairview.... 1,956 30 Grand Rapids Knapp Avenue ... 350 00 Grand Rapids 2,438 00 Richmond Street .. 990 95 Grand Rapids Trinity.. Grant.......... 370 18 104 75 Standale, Grandville .. Union Meetings .... Totals ....... 24,520 03 CLASSIS OF SO. GRAND RAPIDS Byron Center...... 597 00 1,011 44 Corinth ........ 860 10 Grand Rapids Fifth.. Grand Rapids Eighth.. 2,800 00 830 00 Grand Rapids Beverly. Grand Rapids Everglades 8 85 75 Grand Rapids Faith.. Grand Rapids 2,400 00 Garfield Park .... Grand Rapids Grace.. 2,140 00 Grand RapidsHome Acres 1,700 00 1,941 50 Grand Rapids Hope.. Grand Rapids Immanuel.. 5,259 25 Grand Rapids Oakdale Park .... 1,434 76 Grandville, First ... 1,515 00 75 00 Grandville Olivet ... Dunnville ....... 176 83 St. Catherine First... 55 50 Union Meetings ....

Total

1,737 50 1,142 44 2,131 19 4,665 00 1,015 00 432 50 1,060 75 3,881 93 2,995 00 2,175 00 2,241 50 6,509 25 2,005 06 2,412 27 825 00 176 83 81 19 2,396 15


CHURCHES CLASSIS OF LAKE ERIE Cleveland,Brooklyn Cleveland, Calvary .. Grace, Detroit .... Detroit, First ..... Union*Meetings '... Totals ....... CLASSIS OF MINNESOTA Chandler ....... HoTlandale .......

Steen .......... Volga .~...... Union Meetings .... Totals ....... CLASSIS OF MONMOUTH

Union Meetings .... CLASSIS OF MONTGOMERY

Florida

St. Johnsville, St. John...

Young Dept,of Churches andMen’s Sunday People’s Women’s Societies Schools Societies Work Special 25 00 775 82 300 00 877 50 62 00 384 37 1,400 00 55 50 3,880 19 966 10 29 00 931 00 1,267 69 222 00 1,028 24 1,250 54 '957 99 398 22 292 49 796 82 75 85 376 19 590 48 476 52 9,659 13 177 43 101 47 900 00 111 00 99 98 69 31 37 00 1,496 19 632 61 604 33 681 21 127 71 49 30 93 74 731 75 200 00 94 51 82 25 422 00 185 00 55 50 400 00 106 23 50 79 609 50 25 16

18 00 191 61 15 00 419 06 122 50

5 50 75 00

110 00 188 28 77 50 111 50 30 00 25 00

748 17

80 50

142 15 702 43

327 00 41 02 959 88 275 00 127 09 159 00 100 00 33 12 375 00 612 89 75 00 74 47

40 00 140 00 140 00 5 00 23 58 32 00

154 46 3,313 93

16 00 6 40 402 98

34 00 25 00 35 00 94 00 180 18

21 09 6 22 165 01 22 54 18 61 132 52 25 00

12 50

110 00 11 10 Union Meetings .... Totals .......

5,272 69

571 17

12 50

95 00 20 00 190 25 70 00 116 05 145 00 130 00 60 00 50 00 10 00 886 30

43 00 95 00 1,097 43 678 53 1,045 50 783 61 681 87 1,555 00 '60 00 105 50 152 15 6,297 59

130 00 10 00 280 00 225 00 17 76 180 00 40 00 300 00 56 51 253 00 110 00 150 00 50 00 37 00 505 00 2,344 27

621 00 1,19008

1,531 65 80 02 2,310 88 2,106 72 371 85 1,367 24 1,377 02 1,389 99 587 85 692 49 1,774 51 260 85 624 86 640 48 667 98 1,126 00 16,910 39

10 00 95 00 37 50 30 00 28 00 40 00 20 00 15 00 48 60 324 10

75 00 78 65 30 00 35 00 85 00 58 20 35 00 396 85

262 43 230 47 1,016 15 171 00 162 98 150 00 147 51 122 00 48 60 2,311 14

75 00 170 00 5 00

28 00 55 00 150 00 95 67 38 35 204 03 28 00 28 00 28 00 111 00 20 00 128 60 25 00 10 00 54 50 41 00

915 79 829 33 5 00 831 21 127 71 179 47 5 00 210 09 935 78 346 09 224 08 130 25 650 01 368 50 123 04 547 21 273 75 85 79 829 00 76 16 5 00 245 00 12 50 31 10 268 91 8,255 77

34 50 5 00 78 00 125 00 95 35 20 00 35 00 60 00 25 00 10 00 25 00 140 00 10 00 5 00 135 00 12 50 268 91 1,33426

68 55

Total

199 03 62 90 100 00 25 00 95 80 17 80

20 00 1,065 15


CHURCHES

Churches andMen’s Sunday Societies Schools

Young Dept,of People’s Women’s Societies Work Special

CLASSIS OF MUSKEGON 700 00 65 65 4,701 24 50 00 141 00 3,208 10 4,522 46 1,883 99 648 00 905 00 534 25 62 00 25 89 50 35 483 78 2,461 56 2,037 58 Muskegon, Fifth ... 1,716 22 Muskegon Cetnral ... 37 00 Muskegon, Fellowship .... 811 00 211 00 Muskegon Heights, 895 75 1,818 19 New Era ....... 2,074 00 Spring Lake ...... 42 55 Union Meetings .... Totals ....... CLASSIS OF NEW YORK Ft. Washington Collegiate Church ofThe Comforter JapaneseAmerican

Prince Bay .. . East 68th Street German StatenIsland

Apache Indian, Comanche Indian, Jicarilla Apache, Dulce...

Union Meetings .... Totals .......

22 73 30,109 29 1,600 00 800 00 2,550 00 675 00 227 04 259 00 95 04 68 69 35 00 100 00 306 16 303 00 74 00 16 50 295 02 40 70 45 70 238 00 111 00 175 00 328 09 35 00 111 00

65 00 700 00

5 27

711 42 350 00 8 06 27 75 200 00 46 25 775 00 300 00 250 00 231 90 550 00 86 25 600 00 450 00

26 36 15 00

8 32 12 50

268 00 35 00 385 00 45 00 25 00 375 00 225 00 163 00 70 00 20 00 5 00 30 00 65 50 332 50 192 50 170 10 75 00 70 00 175 00 176 00 224 04 313 75

5,351 63

117 95

818 82 4,259 21

50 50

19 00

3 20

6,744 50 115 00 50 00 265 00 110 00 405 00 10 00

12 50

25 00 67 00 75 00 20 00

100 00

90 00

50 00 59 92 50 00

5 00

50 00 165 00

65 00 25 00 73 00 10 00 20 00

94 42 37 13 15 00 1,053 25 15 90 37 39 74 21 241 00 257 00 36 00 65 54 365 61 25 00 120 08 83 26 317 43 133 00 304 78 26 62 22 00 205 00 73 33 170 83 74 53 36 27 61 45 3,946 03 325 00 350 00 279 50 45 00 37 08 146 21 5 00 59 27 38 87 94 50 53 88 5 00 5 00 72 00 50 00 50 00

5 23

50 00 8,538 94

583 92

20 70

54 52 8,134 02

Total 1,062 42 72 13 80 65 6,189 99 110 90 268 39 3,662 58 5,688 46 2,303 99 684 00 1,751 96 1,269 86 75 06 108 64 370 43 678 79 3,886 49 2,689 44 2,456 10 370 52 903 00 936 00 1,363 00 2,723 88 3,021 08 42 55 74 53 36 27 22 73 880 27 43,784 11 8,672 70 1,284 00 2,979 50 985 00 374 12 900 21 95 04 83 69 35 00 159 27 382 53 514 50 149 00 16 50 428 82 45 70 50 70 430 00 136 00 348 00 553 09 20 00 35 00 111 00 5 23

109 52 5 00 1,626 54 18,904 12


CHURCHES

Churches andMen’s Sunday Societies Schools

Young Dept,of People’s Women’s Societies Work Special

Total

CLASSIS OF NEW BRUNSWICK 203 50 75 20 170 80 800 00 Hillsborough ...... 18 50 1,547 00 488 15 New Brunswick, First. 536 28 New Brunswick, Second. 1,137 45 New Brunswick, 53 40 New Brunswick, Magyar.. North Brunswick ... 74 00 Rocky Hill ....... 54 67 92 50 SixMile Run— Franklin Park .... 77 75 South River,Magyar.. 57 75 Spotswood ...... 157 42 Union Meetings .... Totals ....... 5,544 37 CLASSIS OF NEWARK 66 50 179 45 277 50 Franklin ........ 367 24 274 00 46 25 1,227 74 34 55 185 00 Newark, First ..... 111 00 Newark, Christ .... 27 67 Newark, First German... 25 00 Newark, Mt. Olivet.. 10 00 Newark, North ..... 420 00 Plainfield, Trinity ... Union Meetings .... Totals ....... CLASSIS OF ORANGE Bloomingburg .... Callicoon, St. Paul’s.

225 00 50 00 53 22 105 95 31 93 100 00

68 00

25 85 5 00

20 00

25 00 100 00

711 10

30 85

93 00 145 44 20 00

100 00

25 00 145 00 20 00 38 00 42 89 1,934 89

121 51 3 00 1 5 51 25 00 37 00 40 00 85 Oft 229 80 156 52 25 00 122 92 5 00 27 70 30 00 12 25 40 00 996 21

618 01 78 20 1,025 00 190 72 10 00 2,017 95 729 08 1,126 08 1,673 97 183 40 227 92 79 00 154 67 145 20 252 75 90 00 235 42 42 89 9,217 42

55 00 5 00 40 00 25 00 25 00 70 00 50 00 40 00 26 00 100 00 215 00 52 00

10 00 13 00 60 00 25 00 50 00 20 00 55 56 98 78 200 00 51 00

800 00 10 00 25 00 52 53 1,590 53

38 75 45 00 122 39 119 91 909 39

65 00 84 50 279 45 327 50 485 24 394 00 96 25 1,433 18 116 11 403 78 526 00 130 67 25 00 10 00 1,258 75 55 00 222 39 914 91 52 53 6,880 26

55 00 200 00 77 00 10 00 325 00 124 00 260 00 380 00 85 00 80 00

720 00 3,971 90

358 44

37 00

65 29

7 00

51 63

10 00 81 25 100 00

11 25 2,136 50 1,320 37 22 10 Kerhonkson ...... 65 77 Minisink (Montague) .... 17 89 161 49 393 02 Newburgh, Church of 162 48 63 70 191 44 745 00 Wallkill ........ 1,000 00 Walpack, Lower ... Walpack, Upper ... 743 30 12 40 200 00 Union Meetings .... Totals ....... 7,283 71

81 57 44 88 200 00 35 00

50 00 50 00

4 80

22 50 2 50 55 00 200 00 12 00 75 00 15 00 75 00 160 00 110 00

4 80

170 51 705 00 10 00 101 32 1,912 08

339 59 817 96

109 29 77 59 75 00 2 75 10 00 10 00 50 00 20 00 17 00 50 26 28 51 15 00 114 36

21 25 2,346 97 1,495 37 24 85 88 27 10 00 30 39 266 49 613 02 12 00 336 05 128 96 339 83 1,120 00 1,264 16

26 32 1,279 72 60 00 270 66 101 32 556 79 10,575 34


CHURCHES CLASSIS OF PALISADES

Trinity, W. New York UnionCity,First (West Hoboken) .. Grove ......... Union Meetings .... Total ....... CLASSIS OF PARAMUS Passaic,First Glen Rock Community.... Ho-Ho-Kus Community. .. Nyack .........

Tappan ......... Upper Ridgewood Comm. Wortendyke,Trinity Midland Park, N. J. Union Meetings .... Total ....... CLASSIS OF PASSAIC Clifton, First ..... Clifton, Lakeview Hts... Fairfield ......

Paterson, First Holland.

Wortendyke,First Holland, Midland Pk.. Union Meetings .... Total .......

Young Dept,of Churches andMen’s Sunday People’s Women’s Societies Schools Societies Work Special 74 00 700 00 195 00 285 68 333 00 1,042 48 1,162 50 150 00 1,615 50 2,175 22 7,733 38

55 50 14 80 100 00 262 80

1,326 00 '262 50 1,275 00 1,600 00 '275 07 1,760 75 '428 28 173 90 544 69 1,40000 '205 71 169 00 216 00 600 50 743 46 60 70 1,844 00 105 90 407 00 380 82 253 06 894 18 10 00 959 00 869 50

237 82 55 50 441 20 50 00 49 00 67 78 50 00 200 00 25 00 39 07 65 25 57 13 25 00 56 03 457 28 150 00 71 69 46 76 225 00 16 00 76 13 237 12

16,765 02

2,698 76

49 80

129 50 25 00 1,490 00 60 00 518 00 446 08 794 00 37 00 150 00 444 00 300 00 350 00 797 62

91 85 23 98 10 00

12 50

2,800 00 196 70 1,600 00 1,144 00 277 50 350 00 450 00 599 53 3,022 00 15,980 93

92 50 1 60 1 60 8 00 8 00

19 20

11 20

3 20 3 20 1 60 6 40

3 20 16 00 5 00

160 38 150 00 30 00 150 00 1 60

25 00 800 00 85 00 35 00 350 00 350 00 3500 0 2,611 21

25 00 87 50 35 00 35 00 110 00 12 00 160 00 115 00 65 00 18 00 150 00 699 61 35 72 1,547 83

202 00 103 00 842 50 55 00 10 00 240 00 235 00 555 68 655 50 120 00 63 25 51 25 150 00 1,352 48 183 61 1,518 21 254 60 38 00 47 80 15 00 93 00 1,866 50 262 51 3,245 34 35 72 1,316 37 10,879 58

150 00 30 00 20 00 288 79 90 00 54 00 50 00 65 00 152 44 176 25 15 00 85 00 55 00 153 00 124 00 31 00 45 00 155 00 25 00 110 00 37 00 40 00 26 00 62 00 131 00 46 50 148 70 2,365 68

1,718 82 353 00 20 00 2,283 37 1,755 00 404 27 1,928 53 634 98 392 51 940 94 1,470 00 337 54 274 41 410 81 799 90 924 59 66 00 161 73 2,680 28 160 90 672 00 512 71 322 97 1,210 18 52 00 15 00 1,117 13 609 81 1,847 43 46 50 148 70 1,767 94 23,647 20 5 00 5 00 278 38 15 00 15 00 50 00 88 50 66 17 20 00 30 00 43 63 64 74 74 56 40 00 10 00 224 00 30 00 5 00 20 00 23 15 35 00

25 00 5 00

79 56 156 64

85 00 40 00 70 00 50 00 76 00

35 00 15 00 52 61

35 00 50 00 83 00 78 75 60 00 5 00 50 00 55 00 40 00 51 00 125 00 1,293 75

55 47 179 50 21 50 711 80 525 00 45 00 25 00 25 00 98 46 1,050 00 3,195 54

110 00 60 00 20 00

120 00

1 92 16 02

Total

120 00

325 91 30 00 1,793 12 130 00 538 00 531 08 1,029 38 52 00 422 61 524 00 526 00 350 00 799 22 90 47 195 00 3,899 50 386 20 2,390 55 1,764 00 282 50 445 00 880 00 1,014 53 3,521 46 1,176 92 23,097 45


CHURCHES

Churches Young Dept,of andMen’s Sunday People’s Women’s Societies Schools Societies Work Special

CLASSIS OF PELLA Eddyville ....... 73 01 Knoxville ....... 186 66 Leighton, Ebenezer .. 2,087 00 MeredithDr.,Des Moines 88 00 Oskaloosa, Central .. 2,545 83 Otley .......... 917 32 Pella, First ...... 6,826 01 Pella, Second ..... 3,339 98 Pella, Third ...... 5,835 00 681 07 Sully, First ...... 1,775 48 966 53 Union Meetings .... 817 99 Total ....... 26,139 88 CLASSIS OF PHILADELPHIA Addisville ....... Philadelphia, Fifth .. Philadelphia, Talmage .... Feasterville Community.. North and Southampton.. Philadelphia, First .. Philadelphia, Fourth . Levittown ....... Union Meetings .... Totals ....... CLASSIS OF PLEASANT PRAIRIE Allison, Trinity .... Bethany, Belmond ... Immanuel, Belmond .. Bristow, First ..... BuffaloCenter..... Dumont ........ Stout .......... Meservey, First..... Ramsay Titonka .... Waterloo, First..... Waterloo, Grace.... Wellsburg ....... Zion, Chapin ..... Evansdale ....... Union Meetings .... Totals ....... CLASSIS OF POUGHKEEPSIE Beacon ......... Fishkill ......... Millbrook (Lyall MemorialFederated) .... New Hackensack ... Poughkeepsie, Arlington.. Upper, Red Hook, Union Meetings .... Total .......

400 00 37 00 582 18 155 69 1,315 00 178 95 1,389 24 816 05 190 00 134 85 86 00 5,284 96

35 71 3 20 68 00 57 00 10 00 73 00 136 00 8 00 41 30 95 94 528 15

105 45 40 00 947 06 442 37 160 50 735 65 643 16 1,381 50 180 00 438 50 169 71 694 98 6,138 88

708 53 237 00 600 00 1,946 49 452 50 185 00

118 14

65 00 25 00

42 00 122 50 775 33

230 00

4,129 52

1,057 97

185 00 844 61 75 00 928 00 195 67 441 00 74 51 1,044 00 '221 30 189 38 727 08 3,975 79 957 79 123 24 44 00 799 81 539 34 13 00 12,478 52

1,100 00

127 85 49 09 35 56 259 00 153 95 1,353 13 190 35 16 06 1,301 66 3,486 65

1 60 1 60

8 00

64 36 100 00 64 00 60 34

4 60 8 00

111 00 12 00

588 14 908 14

514 45 50 00 100 00 110 00 26 82 89 04 25 00 37 95 87 50 12 00 300 00 25 00 262 50 109 30 1,749 56

20 33 43 21 21 00 496 24

20 60

18 00

10 00

38 90 50 00

8 64

75 00 45 00 30 00 20 50 259 40

58 01 502 95 10 00 125 00 2,093 32 545 69 130 06 1,319 49 4,823 94 129 89 118 00 33 20 30 00 586 96 5 00 903 05

18 64

Total

178 46 284 67 3,469 77 128 20 4,141 33 1,300 51 9,011 66 6,328 41 9,287 43 2^542 04 1,312 39 3,014 40 42,915 81 1,021 56 143 00 270 20 672 00 2,885 95 452 50 965 33 1 60 588 14 7,000 28

193 00 4484 06 1239 36 95 00 1,203 00 195 67 741 66 182 98 1073 60 329 54 284 4? 777 08 5,214 45 1131 74 306 10 111 75 1120 14 607 55 262 50 3 25 146 55 4,955 23 19,700 15 3,125 00 25 00 20 00 75 00 126 66 21 31 25 00 100 24 6 00 25 00 1,238 66 25 00 95 36 43 75

25 00 65 00

45 00

63 00

---- \

25 00 299 65 20 00 20 00 454 65

219 75 164 0Q 35 56 45 00 284 00 153 95 1736 42 210 35 61 06 1351 66 '20 50 4,282 34


CHURCHES

Young Dept,of Churches andMen’s Sunday People’s Women’s Societies Schools Societies Work Special

Total

CLASSIS OF RARITAN

Clover'Hill ......

62 36 236 94 292 06 19 62 50 00 216 75 82 22 209 47 43 60 89 64

68 52

5 00 25 00

10 00 31 02 25 00 120 44 75 00 42 22

45 00 45 00

25 00 69 00

Somerville, Second .. Somerville, Fourth ... South Branch..... Union Meetings .... Totals .......

254 82 18 50 1,309 80 822 50 55 19 63 28 189 26 92 49 56 60 4,165 10

265 00 12 38 3 00 20 00

25 00 7 09 21 60

766 58

53 69

CLASSIS OF RENSSELAER Blooming Grove .... Emmanuel, Castleton..

424 48 1,321 63 252 62

51 50 189 50

15 00

Union Meetings .... Totals....... CLASSIS OF ROCHESTER Abbe ......... Clymer Hill ...... East Williamson .... Marion^ Second ....

Rochester, Tyre .......... Union Meetings .... Totals .......

288 00 119 82 119 07 296 32 34 37 65 00

63 10 25 00

2,921 31

329 10

2,800 00 '709 00

22 20

187 20 588 65 201 60 237 55 849 50 160 76 805 03 700 00 1,855 00 170 99 950 00 68 87 180 63 27 75 10,492 53

95 00

15 00

40 96

137 22 339 48

9 60

212 28

85 00

19 42 56 29 199 19 751 06 37 00 37 26 185 00 2,037 36

3 20 8 00 8 00

113 80

35 00 557 50 13 22 55 00 52 56 1,281 99 2,210 27

182 50 52 00 55 00 75 00 105 00 60 00 20 00 20 00 10 00 37 04 616 54

525 00 102 50 20 00 105 30 450 00 50 00 83 75 166 00 15 00 71 60 129 33 121 65 85 00 86 00 20 00 59 25 25 00 15 00 161 19 2,291 57

30 95 151 00 44 00 45 00 10 00 25 00 38 07 324 00 35 00 5 00 20 00 15 00 20 00 51 10 295 00 54 30 5 00 68 00 15 00 1,251 42

166 83 437 94 405 06 19 62 95 00 20 00 241 75 151 31 209 47 437 60 290 08 80 00 412 04 15 00 38 50 1,395 90 1,965 00 142 18 71 28 353 86 145 05 1,353 59 8,447 06

131 70 80 00 69 36

805 18 1,453 63 511 48 55 00 523 72 263 46 311 98 20 00 341 32 34 37 92 50 48 12 4,460 76

160 72 38 64 69 81 17 50 11 08 578 81

17 00 14 05 57 00 84 25 25 00 15 00 100 40 25 00 25 00 80 50 20 00 138 38 33 34 15 00 4 50 15 00 669 42

3,382 96 847 75 20 00 486 72 1,471 98 276 60 336 30 1,413 18 195 18 957 92 1,053 52 2'808 21 312 99 1,177 58 122 21 292 14 222 50 57 75 169 19 15,604 68


CHURCHES

Young Dept,of Churches andMen’s Sunday People’s Women’s Societies Schools Societies Work Special

Total

CLASSIS OF SARATOGA 222 00 8 41

Union Meetings ....

144 30 39 24 167 98 118 99 256 74 221 31 203 50 1,382 47

50 00 75 00

23 12

18 00 25 00 10 00 5 00 170 00 353 00

17 75 87 40 128 27

95 00 50 00 30 00 20 00 15 00 26 65 25 00 146 35 115 68 523 68

367 00 8 41 269 30 92 36 20 00 200 98 170 64 309 49 460 06 319 18 170 00 2,387 42

10 00 10 00 10 00

CLASSIS 6F SCHENECTADY 350 00 19 42 Helderbeirg ....... 554 98 Lisha’s Kill ...... 271 37 90 00 Princetown ...... 498 00 407 39 900 00 1,285 24 1,480 00 461 00 Schenectady, 325 85 Schenectady, Woodlawn.... 217 69 1,386 00 Union Meetings .... Totals....... 8,246 94 CLASSIS OF SCHOHARIE 60 59 193 50 735 16 138 75 12 95 106 87 Union Meetings .... 1,247 82 CLASSIS OF EAST SIOUX 1,178 73 Alton .......... 127 63 2,890 12 '255 45 148 24 NewkirkHospers.... 1,751 95 Orange City, American... 2,400 00 3,175 25 Orange CityFirst.... Orange City Trinity .. 1,900 00 282 72 177 18 Sanborn ........ 527 18 Sheldon, First ..... 1,884 17 569 35 Union Meetings .... Totals ....... 17,267 97

74 55 25 00 41 75 44 45 60 76 50 00

100 00

24 00 26 00 6 40 5 00

65 65

12 50 1 60

462 16

75 50

9 17 56 75 10 00

75 92 301 07 92 83 50 00 115 70 402 32 165 11 1,628 50 655 15 333 90 445 14 927 00 205 92 84 29 5,406 93

95 00 27 50 70 00 95 00 70 00 90 00 84 50 634 00 200 00 215 00 70 00 127 50 20 00 25 00 245 00 144 50 2,233 00

106 50 50 30 50 00 205 00 1,222 18

529 55 30 00 56 92 776 12 542 37 226 75 752 74 600 41 1,589 00 1,635 24 1,981 59 536 00 559 85 148 45 294 29 1,836 00 144 50 12,239 78

45 00 12 50 15 00 133 30 95 00 30 00 10 00 10 00 15 50 33 77 400 07

12 50 30 30 10 00 35 00 44 25 35 51 6 00 47 81 20 00 241 37

118 09 245 47 25 00 903 46 196 00 204 26 18 95 10 00 174 68 35 50 33 77 1,965 18

20 00

9 60 21 00 316 00 3 20 48 00 116 00 394 00 3 20 30 00 92 17 180 00 12 80 1,225 97

60 00 340 00 293 80 180 00 969 24 453 58 37 50 50 00 160 40 529 36 10 00 1,050 00 4,133 88

102 14 50 00 25 00 113 89 47 76 55 00 100 00 286 59

139 00 1,688 40 42 00 283 46 148 00 3,694 12 80 50 389 15 278 94 15 00 152 49 2,648 56 927 63 3,788 74 272 00 6,438 99 312 00 3,323 93 654 12 43 50 745 82 981 72 1,761 47 149 50 3,670 03 13 50 801 57 24 00 118 29 25 00 1,075 00 3,325 84 31,360 59


CHURCHES

Churches Young Dept,of andMen’s Sunday People’s Women’s Societies Schools Societies Work Special

CLASSIS OF WEST SIOUX Rock Valley,Carmel..

1,832 52 3,850 00 241 99 96 28 548 93 Hull; First ....... 5,813 11 961 04 Ireton ......... 227 57 280 87 1,656 43 979 74 2,752 33 Middleburg, Free Grace.. 1,000 11 1,808 90 10,504 86 Union Meetings .... 2,763 68 35,318 36

1,011 01 200 00

196 64 38 44 1,292 25 167 65 60 00 70 00 426 71 359 35 700 00 713 04 2,750 33 7,985 42

97 50 70 40 23 36 3 20 96 00 25 00 89 18 6 40 461 10 872 14

100 00

425 00 119 92 211 00 441 23 23 00 30 00 475 00 100 00 505 99 225 00 331 35 860 40 1,608 87 5,456 76

599 05 440 00 49 06 3 50 45 00 941 87 103 83 283 50 126 49 84 00 84 00 370 50 564 29 100 00 3,795 09

Total

3,640 08 4,985 40 607 61 138 22 2,120 54 7,196 21 1,258 72 287 57 380 87 2,937 64 1,590 58 4,131 50 2,022 15 2,517 15 14,679 88 4,933 65 53,427 77

CLASSIS OF ULSTER Blue Mountain ..... Clove, The ....... Flatbush ........ High Woods ...... Katsbaan ....... Kingston, First .... Kingston,Churchof The Comforter ... Marbletown ...... Marbletown,North (Kingston) ..... New Paltz ....... Plattekill ........ Port Ewen ....... Rosendale ....... Rosendale Plains ... St. Remy ....... Saugerties....... Shandakan ...... Shokan ......... UlsterPark (formerlyEsopus) .. Woodstock ...... Union Meetings .... CLASSIS OF WEST CENTRAL Denver, First...... Denver, Garden Home. Firth .......... Lincoln, Hope ..... prairie view Union Meetings ....

237 34 18 50 157 43 250 00 19 71 276 45 13 58 2,211 65 1,821 28 458 97 124 43 27 05 1,944 00 29 86 435 91 80 10 33 85 11 10 264 42 29 26 5 00

12 53

32 50 2 50 5 00 52 61 15 00 10 00 25 00 5 00 150 00 150 00 100 00

18 18

57 35 47 79 20 00 34 48

39 00 20 00

45 28 90 50

13 20

15 00 55 00 10 00 20 00 5 00 40 00 10 00 47 50 34 00 784 11

400 00 699 19

123 28 20 00 20 00 159 40

387 76 108 39 301 54

10 00

28 85 5 00

31 04

8,449 89

221 37

23 20

3,394 98

545 51 25 00 717 80 980 10 350 00 193 19 104 25 2,915 85

3 00 48 45 35 20 48 00

1,136 78 2,362 83 1,035 80 802 34 7 40 8,740 13

5 00

134 65

125 00 584 91

287 37 21 00 5 00 228 22 304 00 29 71 301 45 18 58 2,381 65 2,016 56 706 82 172 22 42 05 1,999 00 29 86 4A5 91 53 85 11 10 10 00 383 18 29 26 36 04 10 00 47 50 434 00 10,177 76

4,451 53 ijo jy 2,363 97 3,804 63 1,528 59 1,159 68 107 12 699 43 1,530 15 14,674 47


CHURCHES CLASSIS OF WESTCHESTER Bronxville ....... Hastings on Hudson..

Yonkers, Park Hill, First Yonkers,Lincoln Union Meetings .... Totals....... CLASSIS OF WISCONSIN Baldwin......... Bethel, Brandon .... Forestville ....... Friesland ....... Gibbsville ....... Hingham ....... Oostburg, First ..... Randolph ....... Sheboygan-Hope .... Sheboygan Falls .... Waupun. Alto ..... Waupun, Emmanuel .. Waupun, First..... Union Meetings .... Totals .......

Young Dept,of Churches andMen’s Sunday People’s Women’s Societies Schools Societies Work Special

9,833 04 418 12 195 00 699 99 1,642 00 290 17 421 65 1,500 95 448 00 102 97 256 77 1,669 00 21 48 82 90 388 90 3,225 31 17,888 04

2,360 00 25 00 15 00 100 00 156 00 84 15 51 00 175 95 50 00 88 31 37 00

39 04

3,000 00 57 50 120 00 270 00 50 00 95 00 330 35 139 00 14 00 25 00 192 00 7 50 26 00 4,326 35

30 00 114 80 12 50 15 00 13 00 59 76 24 00 8 00 248 00 82 00 47 64 180 64 169 60 101 95 15 00 10 00 85 00 1,216 89

305 80 102 21 500 00 112 50 10 00 237 15 425 00 26 00 305 26 179 00 575 00 534 40 25 00 160 00 259 00 65 00 235 42 123 26 310 00 1,917 52 6,407 52

62 32 2,656 72 109 09 2,778 61 181 08 4,201 53 403 00 30 00 38 75 191 30 176 91 25 22 311 25 2,221 65 25 00 3,879 12 24 25 96 85 166 87 3,611 70 80 00 4,006 15 242 90 2,767 90 123 00 2,671 40 55 94 568 11 202 90 1,566 94 179 79 3,524 79 184 30 1,479 46 189 95 4,692 21 149 07 2,184 60 424 98 5,345 44 25 50 2,028 02 2,832 16 51,052 41

70 00 60 00 20 00 393 01 617 70 82 50 365 00 235 00 20 16 180 00 155 00 1,008 69 87 50 160 00 495 00 300 00 75 00 159 21 4,483 77

2,016 51 1,376 93 354 21 4,735 38 5,179 20 2,087 27 2,183 82 3,590 13 257 55 4,750 37 1,349 81 5,302 09 1,606 34 2,754 45 6,747 00 3^266 90 175 00 1,080 21 48,813 17

4,200 00 277 50 180 00 423 65 1,150 00 146 25 275 65 894 65 259 00 68 97 143 46 1,400 00 13 98 280 00 9,713 11

250 00 58 12 56 34 50 00 9 77 100 00 20 00 40 00

23 04

584 23

1,508 60 1,923 53 3,039 02 '248 00 137 55 91 09 886 24 3,155 12 26 60 3,131 57 2,607 65 1,925 00 1,782 00 405 42 756 40 2,512 09 980 56 3,497 83 1,165 16 3,686 93 33,466 36

750 00 528 98 481 43 37 60 727 25 250 00 20 00 891 50 25 00 150 00 81 75 400 00 393 27 80 00 667 06 732 11 913 53 7,12948

Total

16 00

CLASSIS OF ZEELAND ForestGrove ...... Hamilton, First ....

Overisel ........ South Blendon ..... Union Meetings .... Totals .......

1,429 37 517 14 1,276 93 227 76 106 45 1,505 00 2,218 35 2,289 50 2,100 00 1,257 27 700 00 319 30 L000 00 2^016 38 1,320 00 108 86 128 53 2,819 39 1,734 98 1,068 21 125 00 2,895 05 1,300 00 747 73 650 00 2,042 00 500 00 5,922 00 170 00 2'910 00 100 00 250 00 29,744 14 12,011 06

40 00 350 00 72 00 18 75 16 00 1 60 51 35 74 50

624 20

269 02 100 00 47 50 499 52 47 00 46 61 52 45 160 00 56 90 671 00 1,950 00


FINANCIAL S T A T E M E N T

CHURCHES PARTICULAR SYNOD OF ALBANY Albany ......... Montgomery ...... Rochester ....... Schenectady ...... Schoharie ....... Totals ....... PARTICULAR SYNOD OF CHICAGO Chicago ........ North Grand Rapids.. South Grand Rapids.. Holland ........ Uliana ......... Kalamazoo ...... Muskegon ....... Zeeland ........ Totals ....... PARTICULAR SYNOD Southern California . Dakota ......... Germania ....... Minnesota ....... Pella .......... Pleasant Prairie .... East Sioux ...... West Central ..... Totals ....... PARTICULAR SYNOD OF NEW JERSEY Bergen .........

Churches andMen’s Societies 5,982 54 1,056 04 5,272 69 2,921 31 10,492 53 1,382 47 8,246 94 1,247 82 36,602 34

Young Dept,of Sunday Peoples Women’s Schools Societies Work Special 500 23 140 53 571 17 329 10 2,037 36 128 27 462 16 75 92 4,244 74

8 00 12 50 15 00 113 80 "75 50 224 80

1,489 21 221 27 1,334 26 616 54 2,291 57 353 00 2,233 00 400 07 8,938 92

Total

1,281 75 9,261 73 378 58 1,796 42 1,065 15 8,255 77 578 81 4,460 76 669 42 15,604 68 523 68 2,387 42 1,222 18 12,239 78 241 37 1,965 18 5,960 94 55,971 74

28,883 05 4,847 08 24,520 03 2,429 80 23,682 13 7,077 40 35,169 43 6,017 56 19,107 24 6,726 55 16,200 96 2,867 19 19,740 57 6,944 73 748 17 3,880 19 30,109 29 5,351 63 33,466 36 7,129 48 29,744 14 12,011 06 264,503 39 62,150 65

1,230 25 2,090 87 2,875 99 41 37 2,471 49 1,887 87 55 93 4,563 72 2,504 38 133 34 5,087 76 4,390 74 358 79 3,747 41 2,874 51 128 40 3,853 87 1,150 01 143 54 2,986 21 2,478 67 886 30 702 43 80 50 117 95 4,259 21 3,946 03 2 , 832 16 6 , 4 0 7 5 2 1,216 89 624 20 4,483 77 1,950 00 4,131 16 40,654 26 27,776 66

39,927 24 31,350 56 37,883 56 50,798 83 32,814 50 24,200 43 32,293 72 6,297 59 43,784 11 51,052 41 48,813 17 399,216 12

1,335 66 11,863 14 1,941 32 6,637 98 1,391 82 7,673 56 2,233 10 954 49 6,140 34 9,659 13 3,313 93 26,139 88 5,284 96 12,478 52 496 24 17,267 97 5,406 93 35,318 36 7,985 42 8,740 13 2,915 85 143,254 67 31,924 06

281 69 20 81 373 97 157 03 1,650 36 1,865 48 675 71 957 73 81 45 237 90 1,547 90 1,391 30 1 , 724 38 236 18 1,599 25 402 98 2,344 27 1,190 08 4 , 8 23 94 528 15 6,138 88 20 60 1,749 56 4,955 23 1,225 97 4,133 88 3,325 84 872 14 5,456 76 3,795 09 134 65 1,353 69 1,530 15 3,917 86 27,306 25 25,558 89

2,012 13 17,477 33 9,744 69 13,083 76 10,654 64 16,910 39 42,915 81 19,700 15 31,360 59 53,427 77 14,674 47 231,961 73

12,701 49 1,677 88 1,496 19 3,971 90 5,544 37 7,733 38 16,765 02 15,980 93 4,129 52 4,165 10 74,165 78

992 01 376 53 94 00 358 44 711 10 262 80 2,698 76 2,611 21 1,057 97 766 58 9,929 40

Newark ........ New Brunswick..... Palisades ....... Paramus ........ Passaic ......... Philadelphia ...... Raritan ........ Totals ....... PARTICULAR SYNOD OF NEW YORK 329 04 Hudson ......... 3,404 94 662 57 North Long Island... 13,680 67 19674 4,630 44 South Long Island... 8,538 94 583 92 New York ....... Orange ......... 7,283 71 817 96 3,486 65 Poughkeepsie ...... 63 00 8,449 89 221 37 Ulster ......... 584 23 9,713 11 Westchester ...... Totals ....... 59,188 35 3,458 83 PARTICULAR SYNODS P. S. of Albany.... 36,602 34 4,244 74 P. S. of Chicago.... 264,503 39 62,150 65 P. S. of Iowa...... 143,254 67 31,924 06 P. S. of New Jersey.. 74,165 78 9,929 40 P. S. ofNew York... 59,188 35 3,458 83 Totals ....... 577,714 53 111,707 68

3,282 80 3,397 04 750 21 223 81 324 10 396 85 909 39 1,590 53 996 21 1,934 89 1,547 83 1,316 37 2,365 68 1,767 94 1,293 75 3,195 54 903 05 908 14 2,210 27 1,251 42 16,208 20 14,357 62

20,418 74 3,028 4: 2,311 n 6,880 26 9,217 42 10,879 58 23,647 20 23,097 45 7,000 28 8,447 06 114,927 56

576 02 835 74 20 50 68 81 2,498 16 2,787 35 448 99 16 26 2,720 50 20 70 8,134 02 1,626 54 556 79 4 80 1,912 08 454 65 259 40 18 64 699 19 784 11 23 20 39 04 4,326 35 3,225 31 211 95 21,470 36 10,374 84

5,166 24 19,697 56 8,012 93 18,904 12 10,575 34 4,282 34 10,177 71 17,888 04 94,704 3

45 40 50 00 30 85 19 20 49 80 16 02 1 60 53 69 266 56

224 80 4,131 16 3,917 86 266 56 211 95 8,752 33

8,938 92 40,654 26 27,306 25 16,208 20 21,470 36 114,577 99

5,960 94 27,776 66 25,558 89 14,357 62 10,374 84 84,028 95

55,971 74 399,216 V 231,961 73 114,927 5( 94,704 33 896,781 4f


19 54

.

“A Friend” ___________$ 500.00 “A Friend” ___________ 400.00 25.00 “A Friend” ___________ “A Friend” ____ ______ 50.00 10.00 “A Friend” ___________ “A Friend” ___________ 10.00 “A Friend” ___ 100.00 “A Friend” ______ 5.00 “A Friend” ______ 2.50 “A Friend” ______ 1.00 “A Friend” ___________ 1,500.00 “A Friend” ___________ 25.00 “A Friend” ___________ 150.00 A Friend of Mrs. DeVries 50.00 A Friend of Westfield, N. D __________ 300.00 Alford, Mr. William_____ 100.00 American Leprosy Missions, Inc.__ 1,260.00 American Youth 50.00 Foundation___ _— Angell, Miss Jessie B. __ 1,000.00 Andersen, Miss Martha _ 4.50 Baby Roll Receipts_____ 1,621.30 Baldwin, Mrs. J. F. ____ 25.00 Barford, Miss B. A. __ 5.00 Beckerink, Mr. & Mrs. E. N __________ 120.00 Bent, Mrs. Harry H . ____ 50.00 Berg, Mrs. T. Frederick _ 5.00 Bethany Presbyterian Sunday School ___ ___ 35.00 Beukema, Miss Harriet___ 5.00 Biegel, Miss Albertha____ 13.75 Bishop, Mr. E. H . _____ 10.00 Board of Foreign Missions at Ridgewood, N. J. _ 258.00 Boersma, Dr. Vernon L. _ 300.00 Bratt, Mr. & Mrs. Hero, Jr. 100.00 Brearly School____ 100.00 Brown, Dr. & Mrs. C. M. _ 25.00 1.50 Burt, Miss Dorothy_____ Business W o m e n ’s Council 50.00 Central College__ _____ 1,790.91 Chicago Missionary Committee____ 500.00 Christian Reformed Church of Chandler, Minn._____ 49.23 Church Bible Conference _ 500.00 Clemens, Mrs. H. S.____ 50.00 200.00 Cobb, Mrs. Henry_____ Cobum, Miss Clara M . __ 5.00 Cooper, Mr. John_ 50.00 Cornelissen, Mr. W . ____ 120.00 Curtis, Mrs. Edward Ely_ 25.00

Damsteegt, Mr. & Mrs. G. M __ ____________ 15.00 10.00 Davis, Mr. & Mrs. G . ___ De Jong, Mr. & Mrs. Harry 100.00 De Jonge, Mrs. Willard _ 10.00 Den Hartog, Miss E d n a _. 43.00 De Rouville, Mrs. Edna R. 15.00 DeVries, Mr. & Mrs. Leslie 50.00 550.00 D e Young, The Misses _ Dimnent, Dr. Edward L._ 100.00 First Presbyterian Church of Connersville, Ind. _ 25.00 Friends__________ ____ 10.00 Friends______________ 10.00 Friends of Mrs. Nellie Gideon ____________ 25.00 Flikkema, Mr. & Mrs. D. 35.00 Folensbee, Chaplain, R. W. 50.00 Gainsborg, Mr. & Mrs. E. 5.00 2.00 Gardner, Mrs. B . ______ Gaston, Mr. & Mrs. John . 50.00 Gemmell, Mrs. Irving A. _ 75.00 Gideon, Mr. & Mrs. M. H oward_________ 100.00 Glen Rock Board of 10.00 Education__________ Glen Rock Faculty Members______ 9.00 Gravink, Mr. & Mrs. Roy H ______________ 250.00 Green, Miss Katharine__ 300.00 Hammond, Mr. Albert W. 25.00 Harrison, Dr. Paul_____ 100.00 Hart, Dr. Louisa H . ____ 100.00 Hawkridge, Mrs. L. D . _ 25.00 Hegeman, Mrs. D. V. B. 30.00 10.00 Hesselink, Miss Alice___ Hoekman, Miss Gertrude N. ... 40.00 Hoffman, Dr. & Mrs. 25.00 James E . ___________ Hondelink, Miss Margaret E._________ 100.00 Horsham Friends First Day School____ _____ 20.00 Hotafing, Mr. Clifford__ 500.00 Howson, Miss Marjorie _ 30.00 Hudsonville Congrega­ tional Church_______ 10.00 Hudsonville High School _ 161.06 Hyronimus, Mr. John__ 15.00 500.00 Jackson, Miss Rachel___ Jensh, Mrs. Werner G. _ 12.00 Kamp, Mrs. J. C . ___ 5.00 Kisken, Mrs. W. A . ____ 7.80 Klerk, Dr. William_____ 250.00


Kuite, Miss Helen R. --- Kuyper, Ronald & Joel__ Lenington, Rev. George C. Leonard, Dr. Martha F. _ Leuning, Mr. H. H . ____ Lovender. Rev. B. B.___ MacNeill, Rev. & Mrs. William N. _________ Mabon, Rev. Arthur____ Macomber, Mrs. S. L . __ _ Mansen, Mr. A. F. ----Marquis, Miss Sarah--- McCollum, Mrs. S a m ___ Medendorp, Mr. & Mrs. John______________ _ Michigan Teachers Chris­ tian Fellowship______ Moody Bible Institute __ Moore, Rev. B. C . ----- Mt. Zion E. & R. Church, Ladies Guild________ Muyskens, Rev. & Mrs. J. D . ______________ N e w Brunswick Theologi­ cal Seminary ________ Northheld Conference__ -Northfield School ChurchNorth Fourth Street Christian School _ _ — . Norton, Mr. William--- Olcott, Dr. & Mrs. C. T._ Orwell Federated Sunday School________ ___ _ Orwig, Mr. P. C . ______ Palmer, Mrs. Edna H. __ Parks, Mr. & Mrs. W. J__ Parks, Miss Dorothy M . __ Pennsylvania Medical Missionary Society__ Platz, Miss Jessie M . --Porter, Mr. & Mrs. Hugh _ Poughkeepsie Council of Church W o m e n _____ Presbyterian SundaySchool in Beauharnois, P. Q. _ Prins, Rev. & Mrs. J. ___ Punt, Mrs. Arie, Sr.____ Raju & Kamala F u n d ___. Raymond, Mrs. W. K. __ Reepmeyer, Mrs. William.. Remmetts, Mrs. J._____ Rens, Mr. & Mrs. W . ___ Rose, Mr. & Mrs. J. J. __ Roskens, Miss N . _______ Sanson, Miss Kittie M . __ Schank, Miss Sarah A . __ Scheidenhelm, Mrs. F. W. Scudder Association____ Scudder, Rev. F. S.____

700.00 15.00

20.00 525.00 325.00

10.00 110.00

10.00 10.00

20.00 125.00 25.00 500.00

20.00 6.00 218.00

10.00 140.00 150.00

12.00 40.00

20.00 10.00

100.00 44.00 50.00 25.00 80.00 30.00

20.00 8.75 15.00 4.04 23.12 1.60 250.00 590.29 3,000.00 5.00 5.00 500.00 25.00 15.00 25.00 5.00 15.00 600.00

10.00

Sprick, Mr. H . _________ Stegeman, Mr. H. P. ___ Stickney, Mr. & Mrs. J. _ Stukes, Mr. Cleo_______ Steketee, Rev. J. B . ____ Stryker, Miss Florence__ Stryker, Miss Mildred Edna Swart, Mr. & Mrs. W. __ Talman, Rev. Lyman A. _ Taylor, Miss Minnie ___ Tellman, Mrs. G. H. ___ Terhune, Mr. & Mrs. H. _ Two Members of Riverside Church____ Trinitarian Congregational Church, W o m e n ’s Guild Vanden Berg, Dr. & Mrs. R. J. _______________ Vander Meer, Mrs. Alma _ Vander Molen, Mr. & Mrs. Peter______________ Vander Ploeg, Miss Jeanette_____________ Vander Schaaf, Rev. J. J. Vander Wol, Mr. A. J.__ Vander Ting, Mr. R . ___ Van Doormik, Mr. Merwin Van Emmerik, Miss Cunera Van Peursem, Mr. MartinVarious Churches for a Friend_____________ Veltman, Dr. & Mrs. J. F. Vercoe, Mrs. P . ____ __ Veermeer, Mrs. E. G. __ Van De Vrede, Miss Edna Verhage, Miss Nellie___ Waddell, Mrs. M a r y ___ Walswear, Mrs. Cornelius.. Walvoord, Miss Marianne.. Warnshuis, Dr. & Mrs. A. L . _______ _______ Wayer, Rev. & Mrs. James Wehrli, Mrs. L. ________ Wellner, Mr. & Mrs. W. C. Wells, Mr. Charles R.___ Western Presbyterian Church of Washington, D. C ____ _______ _ Wiley, Mrs. Harley B . _ Williams, Miss Ruth C. _ Wilson College Club of N e w Jersey_________ W o m e n ’s Assembly of General Synod______ W o m e n ’s Open Meeting _ W o m e n ’s W o r k _______ Woodmanse, Mrs. L. E._ Wyckoff, Mr. De Witte _

35.00 100.00

362.50

10.00 3.70 5.00

20.00 100.00

10.00 500.00 40.00

111.00 100.00

10.00 100.00

40.00 109.75 35.00 25.00 200.00 111.54 7.50 10.00 100.00

208.30

10.00 30.00 700.00 25.00 75.00 150.00 5.00 60.00 63.89 100.00 12.00 175.00 400.00 5.00 5.00

10.00 6.25 85.04 466.76

20.00 25.00

10.00


Wyoming Presbyterian Church _________ Yeutter, Mrs. C. S.__ Youth Conferences: All Indian _______ Camp Babcock___ Camp Foster_____ Camp Geneva III .. Camp Geneva VIII .. Cascades ________ Central California Denton Lake II__ Green Lake------

200.00 25.00 13.20 21.00 135.00 26.83 62.33 65.31 125.00 53.00 86.96

Green Lake I _______ Hope _____________ Hope I Reunion_____ Iowa Falls ________ Minnesota __________ National _____ ___ — Oakwood ___________ West Sioux _____ __

57.50 417.09 20.00 56.52 295.00 239.39 124.22 23.80

Zante, Mrs. Harold D. Van Zeeland Public School __ Zwiep, Mrs. Donald____

25.00 15.00 2.00

Total______

$30,722.73

A S U G G E S T I O N F O R LEGACIES Gifts bequeathed to the Board of Foreign Missions make possible much of the work on all fields. For any who wish to make provisions in their wills for this im­ portant work, the following form is suggested:

1 give and bequeath to the Board of Foreign Mis­ sions, Reformed Church in America, a corporation organized and existing under the laws of the State of New York, the sum of___________________ dollars to be applied to the uses and purposes of said Board.


‘Directory A F RICA MISSION General Address: via Malakal, Upper Nile Province, Sudan ACTIVE Went Out

Arnold, Mr. Paul E., R.D. #1, N e w Paltz, N. Y __ ________ 1951 Arnold, Mrs. Laurel D., R.D. #1, New Paltz, N. Y. ________ 1951 Crandall, Rev. C. Lee, Jr., Akobo Post__________________ 1949 Crandall, Mrs. Katharine B., R.N., Akobo Post____________ 1949 Ekster, Mr. Lambert B., Bishop Gwynne College, Mundri, via Juba__________________________________________ 1953 Ekster, Mrs. Catherine J., Bishop Gwynne College, Mundri, via 1953 J u b a _________________________________________ Hoekstra, Rev. Harvey T., Akobo PosL_____________ ____ 1948 Hoekstra, Mrs. Lavina H., Akobo Post________________ 1948 Hostetter, Rev. Paul E., American Mission, Omdurman_____ 1955 Hostetter, Mrs. Winifred H., American Mission, Omdurman 1955 Huisken, Miss Lillian, R.N., Akobo Post__________________ 1949 Kats, Miss Wilma J., Akobo Post_______________________ 1948 1955 Schuiteman, Miss Arlene, R.N., Nasir____________________ Sikkema, Mr. La Verne A., Akobo PosL_________________ 1952 Sikkema, Mrs. Lorraine V., Akobo Post_________________ 1952 Swart, Rev. J. Robert, Pibor Post__________________________ 1948 Swart, Mrs. Morrell W., Pibor Post_____________________ 1948 A R A B I A N MISSION General Address: American Mission EMERITUS Barny, Mrs. Margaret R., 530 East 20th St., N e w York 9, N. Y ______________________________________ Dykstra, Rev. Dirk, D.D., R.R. 5, Holland, Mich______ Harrison, Paul W., M.D., Penney Farms, Fla. °0 (1950-1952) Harrison, Mrs. Anna M., Penney Farms, Fla. °° (1950-1952) Kellien, Miss Charlotte B., 5800 N. Nevada Ave., Colorado Springs, Colo-- ----------------------------

These addresses are as of September 15, 1955.

1898-1939 1906-1953 1909-1954 1917-1954 1915-1954


Pennings, Rev. Gerrit J., D.D., Orange City, Iowa______ 1908-1952 Van Ess, Mrs. Dorothy F., c/o W. D. Brewer, American E m ­ bassy, Kuwait, P.G.__________________________ 1909-1955 Van Peursem, Rev. Genit D., D.D., 104 West High St., SomerviUe, N. J______________________________ 1910-1947 Van Peursem, Mrs. Josephine S., R.N., 104 West High St., Somerville, N. J._________ _________________ 1910-1947 ACTIVE Went Out Allison, Mrs. Mary Bruins, M.D., P.O. Box 80, Kuwait, Persian G u l f___________________________________________ 1934 Begg, Mr. Douglas M., P.O. Box 1, Bahrain, Persian Gulf (Short term)____________________________________ 1955 Begg, Mrs. Eunice P., P.O. Box 1, Bahrain, Persian Gulf (Short term)____________________________________ 1949 Boersma, Miss Jeanette, R.N.,Muscat, Persian Gulf________ 1944 Bosch, Donald T., M.D., Muscat, Persian Gulf____________ 1951 Bosch, Mrs. H. Eloise B., Muscat, Persian Gulf____________ 1951 Dalenberg, Miss Cornelia, R.N., P.O. Box 1, Bahrain, Persian Gulf___________________________________________ 1921 De Jong, Rev. Garrett, E., P.O. Box 1, Bahrain, Persian Gulf___ 1926 De Jong, Mrs. Everdene K., P.O. Box 1, Bahrain, Persian Gulf- 1926 Dekker, Mr. Wilbur G., P.O.Box 1,Bahrain, Persian Gulf______ 1951 Dekker, Mrs. Anna Mae H., P.O. Box 1, Bahrain, Persian Gulf_ 1951 De Young, Miss Anne R., R.N., P.O. Box 1, Bahrain, Persian Gulf 1945 Draper, Bernard L., M.D., 723 Cherry St, S.E., Grand Rapids, Mich. (Under appointment) Draper, Mrs. Jacqueline B., R.N., 723 Cherry St, S.E., Grand Rapids, Mich. (Under appointment) Dunham, Rev. James W., P.O. Box 1, Bahrain, Persian Gulf.-- 1953 Dunham, Mrs. Joyce DeB., P.O. Box 1, Bahrain, Persian Gulf— 1953 Gossehnk, Rev. George, P.O. Box 53, Basrah, Iraq ** (1925-1929) 1922 Gosselink, Mrs. Christina S., P.O. Box 53, Basrah, Iraq.--------- 1929 Heusinkveld, Maurice M., M.D., Amarah, Iraq-------------1946 Heusinkveld, Mrs. Elinor C., R.N., Amarah, Iraq.---------- 1946 Holler, Rev. G. Jacob, Jr., P.O. Box 53, Basrah, Iraq 00 (1949­ 1951)________________________________________ 1946 Holler, Mrs. Louise E, R.N., P.O. Box 53, Basrah, Iraq------ 1947 Holmes, Miss Madeline A., P.O. Box 80, Kuwait, Persian Gulf— 1952 Hoogeveen, Miss Lavina C., P.O. Box 1, Bahrain, Persian Gulf 1954 Jackson, Miss Rachel, P.O. Box 53, Basrah, Iraq------------- 1921 Jackson, Miss Ruth, P.O. Box 1, Bahrain, Persian Gulf------- 1921 Kapenga, Rev. Jay R., Muscat, Persian Gulf-------------1944 Kapenga, Mrs. Marjory U., Muscat, Persian Gulf----------- 1947

•*Service Intermitted.


Luidens, Rev. Edwin M., Amarah, Iraq__________________ 1944 Luidens, Mrs. Ruth S., Amarah, Iraq____________________ 1944 MacNeill, Rev. Donald R., P.O. Box 80, Kuwait, Persian Gulf 1951 MacNeill, Mrs. Evelyn M., P.O. Box 80, Kuwait, Persian Gulf 1951 Nykerk, Gerald H., M.D., Amarah, Iraq__________________ 1941 Nykerk, Mrs. Rose W., Amarah, Iraq__ ___________________ 1941 Schmalzriedt, Miss Allene C., R.N., P.O. Box 1, Bahrain, Persian Gulf_________________________________________ 1955 Scudder, Lewis R., M.D., P.O. Box 80, Kuwait, Persian Gulf__ 1937 Scudder, Mrs. Dorothy B., R.N., P.O. Box 80, Kuwait, Persian Gulf _________________________________________ 1937 Staal, Rev. Harvey, 1848 Godfrey Ave., S.W., Grand Rapids, Mich.________________________________________ 1949 Staal, Mrs. Hilda V., 1848 Godfrey Ave., S.W., Grand Rapids, Mich._________________________ _______________ 1949 Storm, W. Harold, M.D., P.O. Box 1, Bahrain, Persian Gulf.__ 1927 Storm, Mrs. Ida P., R.N., P.O. Box 1, Bahrain, Persian Gulf___ 1936 Tanis, Miss Marilyn J., R.N., P.O. Box 1, Bahrain, Persian Gulf 1955 Thoms, W. Wells, M.D., 205 N. Thayer St., Ann Arbor, Mich__ 1931 Thoms, Mrs. Ethel S., 205 N. Thayer St., A.nn Arbor, Mich.___ 1931 Veldman, Miss Jeannette,R.N., Amarah, Iraq_____________ 1930 Voss, Bernard J., M.D., P.O. Box 1, Bahrain, Persian Gulf___ _ 1951 Voss, Mrs. Mae J., P.O. Box 1, Bahrain, Persian Gulf________ 1951 Voss, Miss Christine A., R.N., 1022 Fuller Ave., S.E., Grand Rapids, Mich.______________________________ _•___ 1949 U N I T E D M I S S I O N IN I R A Q Hakken, Rev. Bernard D., 1/2/231, Sinak, Baghdad, Iraq____ Hakken, Mrs. Elda V.,1/2/231, Sinak,Baghdad, Iraq _______

1922 1922

A R C O T MISSION General Address: South India EMERITUS Farrar, Rev. William H., 325 Vine St., Hammonton, N. J._ Hart, Miss Louisa H., M.D., Sackville, N e w Brunswick, C a n a d a __________________________________ Honegger, Mrs. Lavina D., Kodaikanal_________ Rottschaefer, Rev. Bernard, D.D., 9027 Guatemala Ave., Downey, Calif. _____________________ ________ Rottschaefer, Mrs. Bernice T., 9027 Guatemala Ave., Downey, Calif.____________________

1897-1935 1895-1939 1910-1951 1909-1954 1909-1954


Scudder, Mrs. Margaret B., Kirkside, Roxbury, N. Y. Scudder, Miss Ida S., M.D. Kodaikanal °8(1895-18991890-1944 Te Winkel, Miss Sarella, 511 Daniel St., Orlando, Fla. Van Doren, Miss Alice B., Kirkside, Boxbury, N. Y_____

1903-1951

ACTIVE Went Out

Biegel, Miss Albertha J., R. N., Madanapalle, Chittoor District, Andhra________________________________________ 1946 Boomstra, Miss Dora, 10745 Wentworth Ave., Chicago 28, 111. 1949 Brumler, Miss Harriet, R.N., 1940 Philadelphia Ave., Grand Rapids, Mich._____________________________ ____ 1923 Cooper, Mr. Edwin R., Katpadi, North Arcot District_______ 1953 Cooper, Mrs. Elaine P., Katpadi, North Arcot District_______ 1953 De Bruin, Rev. Cornie A., Mission Compound, Katpadi, North Arcot District_______ 1926 De Bruin, Mrs. Frances L., Mission Compound, Katpadi, North Arcot District-----1926 De Valois, Mr. John J., 174 West 15th St., Holland, Mich. ___ 1920 De Valois, Mrs. Bernadine Siebers, M.D., 174 West 15th St., Holland. Mich. _______________________________ 1936 De Vries, Mr. Benjamin, Mission Compound, Katpadi, North Arcot District__________________________________ 1929 De Vries, Mrs. Mildred V. Mission Compound, Katpadi, North Arcot District__________________________________ 1929 De Weerd, Miss Esther J., 2110 Nelson Court, Kalamazoo, Mich. 1928 Geegh, Miss Mary E., Madanapalle, Chittoor District,Andhra_ 1924 Gibbons, Miss Margaret R., M.D., Punganur, Chittoor District, A n d h r a _______________________________________ 1926 Jongewaard, Miss C. Willamina, Palmaner, Chittoor District, Andhra________________________________________ 1925 Kooy, Miss Gladys M., Palmaner, Chittoor District,Andhra___ 1946 Korteling, Rev. Ralph G., Punganur, Chittoor District, Andhra.. 1925 Korteling, Mrs. Anna Ruth W., M.D., Punganur, Chittoor Dis­ trict, Andhra___________________________________ 1925 Levai, Rev. Blaise, Jr., Ph.D., 30 Arni Road, Vellore, North Arcot District__________________________________ 1946 Levai, Mrs. Marian K., M.D., 30 Arni Road, Vellore, North Arcot District____________________________________ 1953 Maassen, Miss Wilma C., Chittoor, Chittoor District,Andhra__ 1952 Marsilje, Miss Lois, M., R.N., Ranipet, North ArcotDistrict__ 1939


Muyskens, Rev. John D., Chittoor, Chittoor District, Andhra ** (1919-1923)_________________________________ 1915 Muyskens, Mrs. Dora J., Chittoor, Chittoor District, Andhra-- 1923 Noordyk, Miss Wilhelmina, R.N., 156 Fifth Ave., N e w York 10, N . Y __________________________________________ 1917 Piet, Rev. John H., Ph.D. 1207 Seneca St., S.W., Grand Rapids, Mich. ------------1940 Piet, Mrs. Wilma V., 1207 Seneca St., S.W., Grand Rapids, Mich. 1940 Rottschaefer, Miss Margaret, M.D., Wandiwash, North Arcot District____________________ __________________ 1909 Scudder, Galen F., M.D., Pine Mountain Settlement Hospital, Pine Mountain, Harlan County, Ky. __________ 1919 Scudder, Mrs. Maude S., Pine Mountain Settlement Hospital, Pine Mountain, Harlan County, Ky. ________________ 1919 ffSmies, Miss Lillian, R.N., Vellore, North Arcot District------ 1939 Ten Brink, Rev. Eugene L., Tindivanam, South Arcot District 1946 Ten Brink, Mrs. Ruth L., Tindivanam, South Arcot District__ 1946 Vande Berg, Rev. Harold J., Madanapalle, Chittoor District, A n d h r a ____________________ _______________ __ 1946 Vande Berg, Mrs. B. Yvette L., Madanapalle, Chittoor District, A n d h r a _____________________________ — -------- 1946 Van Vranken, Rev. Herbert E., Ranipet, North Arcot District— 1917 Van Vranken, Mrs. Nellie S., Ranipet, North Arcot District-- 1917 Van Vranken, Miss Marjorie A., Vellore, North Arcot District— 1948 Wells, Miss Doris A., Ranipet, North Arcot District_________ 1930 Wierenga, Rev. Cornelius R., D.D., Vellore, North Arcot District 90(1920-1923)_____________________________ 1917 Wierenga, Mrs. Ella K., Vellore, North Arcot District_______ 1923 Wyckoff, Miss Charlotte C., Muttathur; Anantapuram, South Arcot District__________________________________ 1915 Zwemer, Mrs. Sara W., c/o T. W. Zwemer, M.D., 8340 Alburtis Ave., Whittier, Calif.----------------------------- 1923 Zwemer, Frank L., M.D., 156 Fifth Ave., N e w York 10, N. Y. (Under appointment) Zwemer, Mrs. Ann, R.N., 156 Fifth Ave., N e w York 10, N. Y. (Under appointment) JAPAN MISSION General Address: Japan EMERITUS Darrow, Miss Flora, 609 Orizaba Ave., San Francisco 12, Calif_________________ _____________________ 1922-1948 Hoekje, Mrs. Annie H., 635 Alden Road, Pilgrim Place, Claremont, Calif.___________________________ 1912-1949*

**Service Intermitted. tfBecame member of mission in 1952.


Kuyper, Rev. Hubert, 816 - 14th St., Boulder, Colo_____ Kuyper, Mrs. May D., 816 -14th St., Boulder, Colo_____ Noordhoff, Miss Jeane, 303/2 East Third St., Orange City, Iowa _____________________________________ Peeke, Mrs. Vesta G. 3686 San Simeon Way, Riverside, Calif_________ : Taylor, Miss Minnie, 1018 North Hobart Boulevard, Los Angeles, Calif._____________________________

1911-1946 1912-1946 1911-1952 1893-1931 1918-1937

ACTIVE Went Out

Bogard, Miss F. Belle, Kobe College, Okadayama, Nishinomiya, Hyogo K e n __ _________________________________ 1936 Brink, Miss Suzanne H.,Ashton, Iowa____________________ 1950 Bruggers, Rev. Glenn, 137 Kami Arata Cho, Kagoshima._____ 1952 Bruggers, Mrs. Phyllis V., 137 Kami Arata Cho, Kagoshima___ 1952 de Maagd, Rev. John C., 37 Bluff, Yokohama 80(1934-1937)__ 1928 de Maagd, Mrs. Marian M., 37 Bluff, Yokohama 88 (1934-1937) 1928 Flaherty, Mr. Theodore E., 345 Sanko Cho, Shirokane, Shiba, Minato-ku, Tokyo _______________________________ 1949 Flaherty, Mrs. Mary W., 345 Sanko Cho, Shirokane, Shiba, Minato-ku, Tokyo_________________________________ 1953 Harmelink, Miss Fenita M.,37Bluff, Yokohama____________ 1955 Hesselink, Rev. I. John, Jr., 107 Ohori Machi, Fukuoka______ 1953 Hesselink, Mrs. Etta T., 107 Ohori Machi, Fukuoka_________ 1953 Kleinjans, Mr. Everett, 761-1 Chome, Kami-osaki, Shinagawaku, Tokyo 1948 Kleinjans, Mrs. Edith K., 761-1 Chome, Kami-osaki, Shinagawaku, Tokyo______________________________________ 1948 Korver, Mr. Ronald G., Meiji Gakuin, Shiba, Minato-ku, Tokyo 1948 Korver, Mrs. Ruby B., Meiji Gakuin, Shiba, Minato-ku, Tokyo_ 1952 Moore, Rev. Boude C., 15747 Rayen St., Sepulveda, Calif. ‘(1941-1950) 1924 Moore, Mrs. Anna McA., 15747 Rayen St.. Sepulveda, Calif. ‘(1941-1950) 1924 Norden, Rev. Russell L., Shinseikan, 1-Gofuku Machi, Fukuoka 1953 Norden, Mrs. Eleanore S., Shinseikan, 1-Gofuku Machi, Fukuoka 1953 Oilman, Miss C. Janet, 2918 Regent St., Berkeley, Calif_____ 1914 Siter, Miss Verlaine R., Baiko Jo Gakuin, Shimonoseki (Short term)----------------------------------------- 1953 Tanis, Rev. Paul H., Meiji Gakuin, Shiba, Minato-ku, Tokyo___ 1953 Tanis, Mrs. Marjorie G., Meiji Gakuin, Shiba, Minato-ku, Tokyo 1953 Van Wyk, Rev. Gordon J., 761-1 Chome, Kami-osaki, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 1946 Van Wyk, Mrs. Bertha V.. 761-1 Chome, Kami-osaki, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo____ 1946


Walvoord, Miss Florence C., Baiko Jo Gakuin, Maruyama Cho, Shimonoseki 88 (1950-1955) _______________________ Zander, Miss Helen R., 37 Bluff, Yokohama_______________ WORK

WITH THE

OVERSEAS

1922 1928

CHINESE

EMERITUS Beekman, Miss Edna K., 201 West Catharine St., Milford, Pa_______________________________________ Boot, Rev. Harry P., D.D., 408 College Ave., Holland, Mich. ____________________________________ Boot, Mrs. Anna H., 408 College Ave., Holland, Mich-De Free, Rev. Henry P., D.D., 200 West 10th St., Holland, Mich.______________________________________ De Free, Mrs. Kate E., 200 West 10th St., Holland, Mich. Green, Miss Katharine R., 6 Antrim Ave., Suffern, N. Y.— Koeppe, Rev. Edwin W., D.D., 121 West 12 St., Holland, Mich._____________________________________ Koeppe, Mrs. Elizabeth R., 121 West 12 St., Holland, Mich. ---------- ------------- -------------Nienhuis, Miss Jean, R.N., 8 East 14th St., Holland, Mich. Otte, Mrs. Frances P., 17 East 13 Street, Holland, Mich. — Vander Linden, Miss Leona, 506 East Liberty St., Pella, Iowa ___________________ _______________— — Voskuil, Mrs. Mary S., 419 West Saddle River Road, Ridge­ wood, N. J._________________________________

1914-1953 1903-1940 1908- 1940 1907-1948 1907-1948 1907- 1950 1919-1955 1919- 1955 1920- 1953 1887-1910 1909- 1947 1908- 1944

ACTIVE Went Out

Anorne

AVCV.

William V V Xillcliil T AC l •J 1^ P)

T.Pcrasni P.T. ClO 1 y i AlViav v i u c i y 7 X. •A •— —

— -— — — —

Angus, Mrs. Joyce B., Legaspi, Albay, P.I---------- — --Broekema, Miss Ruth, Christian Hospital, Chunghua, Formosa.Bruce, Miss Elizabeth G., Fourseas Hotel, 75 Waterloo Road, Kowloon, Hong Kong_____________________________ deVelder, Rev. Walter, P.O. Box 5915, 160 Waterloo Road, Kowloon, Hong K o n g ____________________________ deVelder, Mrs. Harriet B., R.N., P.O. Box 5915, 160 Waterloo Road, Kowloon, Hong Kong ______________________ Hong Kong ___________________________________ Esther, Rev. Joseph R., 69 East 13th St., Holland, Mich-----Esther, Mrs. Marion B., 69 East 13th St., Holland, Mich----Hill, Jack W., M.D., Corominas Compound, Mango Ave., Cebu City, Cebu, P.I__________________________________ Hill, Mrs. Joann V., Corominas Compound, Mango Ave., Cebu City, Cebu, P.I.__________________________________ Hofstra, Richard, M.D., Section 2, #94, Chung Shan Pei Lu, Taipei, Formosa 88(1951-1954)____________________

**Service Intermitted.

1925 1924 1921 1929 1938 1938 1946 1946 1947 1947 1922*


Hofstra, Mrs. Johanna J., Section 2, #94, Chung Shan Pei Lu, Taipei, Formosa 0* (1951-1954)_____________________ 1922 Holkeboer, Miss Tena, LL.D., 984 Benavides, Manila, P.I___ 1920 Kragt, Rev. Earl N., 718 Georgia St., Manila, P.I___________ 1955 Kragt, Mrs. Hazel V., 718 Georgia St., Manila, P.I__________ 1955 Muilenburg, Rev. John P., Silliman University, Dumaguete City, P.I._________________________ __________________1946 Muilenburg, Mrs. Virginia T., Silliman University, Dumaguete City, P.I. ________________________________ 1946 Poppen, Rev. Henry A., D.D., 156 Fifth Ave., Ne w York 10, N. Y. 1918 Poppen, Mrs. Dorothy T., 156 Fifth Ave., N e w York 10, N. Y. 1918 Poppen, Rev. Henry A., D.D., 917 South Westnedge St, Kala­ mazoo, Mich.__________________________________ 1918 Poppen, Mrs. Dorothy T., 917 South Westnedge St., Kalama­ zoo, Mich._______________ 1918 Veenschoten, Rev. H. Michael, 718 Georgia St., Manila, P.I__ 1917 Veenschoten, Mrs. StellaG., 718 Georgia St, Manila, P.I_____ 1917 Walvoord, Miss Jeane W., R.N., Christian Hospital, Chunghua, Formosa **(1936-1948)___________________________ 1931• *

•*ServiceIntermitted


1955-58 (to t a k e office O c t o b e r

1st)

Mrs. William Babinsky, 419 W. Saddle River Road, Ridgewood, New Jersey Mrs. Irving H. Decker, 46 Crescent Place, Yonkers 4, New York Rev. William C. De Jong, Trinity Reformed Church, Pella, Iowa Mr. Harold J. Dobbs, Hickory Hill, Far Hills, New Jersey Rev. Arnold Dykhuizen, 1901 S. Grove Ave., Berwyn, 111. Mrs. M. Howard Gideon, 5671 North Westnedge, Kalamazoo, Michigan Rev. M. Gerard Gosselink, Jr., 25 Joy Boulevard, Baldwin, L. L, New York Mr. E. Leroy Hand, 141 Lafayette Parkway, Rochester 10, N. Y. Rev. Harvey B. Hoffman, 291 Clinton Place, Hackensack, New Jersey Rev. Peter J. Muyskens, Box 266, Coopersville, Michigan Mrs. Andrew Patrick, Ballinger Street, Herkimer, New York Mr. Wendell Phillips, Port Jervis, New York Mrs. Gordon Van Eenenaam, 1302 Ransom Street, Muskegon, Michigan Rev. Harry Ver Strate, 70 High Street, Metuchen, New Jersey HONORARY

MEMBER

Rev. John W. Beardslee, Jr., 93 College Avenue, New Brunswick, New Jersey STAFF OFFICERS OF T H E

BOARD

156 F I F T H A V E N U E New York 10, N. Y. Tel. CHelsea 2-3650 E x e c u t i v e S e c r e t a r y ....................... Miss E x e c u t i v e S e c r e t a r y ...................

Rev. Barnerd M. Luhen

T r e a s u r e r a n d E x e c u t i v e S e c r e t a r y ...... Rev.

Henry G. Bovenkerk

Associa t e T r e a s u r e r ....................... Miss F i e l d Secretaries— t h r e e E a s t e r n S y n o d s .. Rev.

— t hree W e s t e r n

Ruth Ransom

Edwina Paige

Leonard A. Sibley, Sr. Fishkill, N. Y. S y n o d s ........To be appointed