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VOL. 123 N O . II

HOPE COLLEGE • H O L L A N D . M I C H I G A N

SPERA IN DEO"

DECEMBER 9. 2 0 0 9 • SINCE 1887

attitude of service

Advent bri Gretchen Baldwin GUEST WRITER

Every Christmas, we are b o m barded with advertisements, sales and opportunities to buy into the corporation that our Christian holiday has b e c o m e . We are also, however, b o m b a r d e d with messages to t u r n away f r o m these commercial Christmases and r e t u r n t o the true m e a n i n g of Christmas. Somewhere lost in translation are tangible opportunities for us to actually experience a loving, giving. Christian Christmas. Luckily, for those of us w h o want to get involved in a m o r e Christian Christmas, H o p e College is bursting with volunteer opportunities, awareness events and ideas to make the holiday season less corporate. As early as October, students were preparing for the C h r i s t m a s season by participating in O p eration Christmas Child. H o p e s C a m p u s Ministry t e a m distributed shoeboxes to be picked up at various c a m p u s locations. Participants then had until Nov. 19 t o fill t h e boxes with small gifts like toys, hygiene items, school supplies and personal notes. The boxes were shipped by the p a r e n t organization Samaritan's Purse to needy children a r o u n d the world so that they would have an opportunity to experience Christm a s for perhaps t h e first t i m e in their lives.

P H O T O BY JENNA H U N G E R

OH BRING M E SOME STICKY PUDDING— The C h r i s t m a s t r e e In D l m n e n t Chapel dazzles as classes w i n d down before w i n t e r b r e a k .

O n Wednesday, Dec. 9, a group of students will meet at the DeWitt flagpole at 5:45 p.m. to h o p o n a bus and go caroling at senior citizen h o m e s around Holland. If you can't make it to this event, encourage your friends to gather a group together and contact a nursing h o m e or hospital t o go caroling or to bring cookies to residents. O t h e r Hope C h r i s t m a s t i m e events include 30-Hour Famine and G r e e n Christmas. The 3 0 - H o u r Famine began Dec. 4. Those involved raised m o n e y and went without food f r o m n o o n on Friday until 6 p.m. o n Saturday in order to remind themselves of the n e e d s of the hungry a r o u n d the world. G r e e n Christmas is being s u p p o r t e d by Hope's envir o n m e n t a l group. Keep your eyes o p e n for recycled signs a r o u n d c a m p u s with suggestions for how to make this Christmas a green initiative. M o s t of all, however, o u r attitudes are what will affect how C h r i s t m a s is presented in our culture. Reclaim a Christian C h r i s t m a s by participating in service events like these as well as simply by seeking m e a n i n g in o u r holiday and refocusii}g your attention. Celebrating C h r i s t m a s in a Christian way doesn't have to m e a n throwing all of o u r m o d e r n traditions out t h e window, but it d o e s m e a n keeping our hearts in t h e right place as we celebrate.

Study Committee issues recommendations on sexuality programming Robert Guimond Co-EorroR

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Faculty and a d m i n i s t r a t o r s have taken action to p r o m o t e c o n s t r u c t i v e conversation a b o u t homosexuality since t h e c o n troversy e r u p t e d s u r r o u n d i n g the administration's decision t o n o t allow "Milk" screenwriter D u s t i n Lance Black to speak at a Sexuality R o u n d t a b l e s p o n s o r e d event. A Nov. 24 faculty m e e t i n g was designed to discuss sexuality and recent c a m p u s events. Short pres e n t a t i o n s were m a d e by Presid e n t James Bultman, Provost James Boelkins and Professor Steven Hoogerwerf. H o o g e r w erf provided an overview of t h e significant p r o g r a m m i n g that has been d o n e in recent years related t o homosexuality. Provost Boelkins r e s p o n d e d to q u e s t i o n s s u b m i t t e d by m e m b e r s of t h e faculty followed by a period of interaction.

"The N o v e m b e r faculty m e e t ing was a c h a n c e for professors to learn t h e details t h a t went into t h e administration's decision regarding Dustin Black ... The m e e t i n g was a m o d e l for civil discourses and s h o w e d that p e o p l e with various viewpoints can disagree in a respectful way," said psychology professor a n d faculty m e e t i n g m o d e r a t o r Scott VanderStoep. "I walked away f r o m t h e meeting p r o u d to be a H o p e faculty member." In addition t o t h e faculty meeting, an ad h o c study c o m mittee m e e t i n g was f o r m e d a n d met several t i m e s d u r i n g November. "The p u r p o s e of t h e c o m m i t t e e was t o gain historical perspective o n sexuality prog r a m m i n g at Hope, to review t h e facts c o n c e r n i n g the Black situation, and to m a k e r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s that will assist o u r c o m m u n i t y in w o r k i n g together

W H A T ' S INSIDE NATIONAL

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w h e n dealing with difficult issues," said Boelkins. "The ad h o c c o m m i t t e e consisted of 12 individuals: six f r o m t h e faculty, four f r o m Student D e v e l o p m e n t and o n e f r o m C a m p u s Ministry; I chaired t h e g r o u p . Each m e m b e r of t h e c o m m i t t e e offered special c o m p e t e n c i e s t h a t would c o n tribute to t h e c u r r e n t situation." According to Boelkins, the following recommendations have b e e n m a d e to Bultman by the committee: • Reappoint a Sexuality P r o g r a m m i n g C o m m i t t e e similar to t h e o n e that o p e r a t e d between 2001 and 2007. • Charge the new Programm i n g C o m m i t t e e with designing appropriate programming on sexuality d u r i n g t h e spring sem e s t e r and b e y o n d . • A p p o i n t a small g r o u p to outline a process for approving external speakers invited by students.

In addition, t h e ad h o c c o m mittee offered t h e following suggestions for dealing with t h e o t h e r topics discussed utilizing existing b o a r d s and c o m m i t t e e s : * The C a m p u s Life Board should address t h e f u t u r e of t h e Sexuality Roundtable; • The integration of sexuality e d u c a t i o n into curricular and extracurricular programming would be best addressed by the A c a d e m i c Affairs Board and t h e Sexuality P r o g r a m m i n g C o m -

mittee; • The Sexual H a r a s s m e n t Policy Advocates s h o u l d address h o w t o make' t h e c a m p u s a safer place for all; and, • The Administrative Affairs Board should evaluate the need for a faculty/staff o m b u d s p e r s o n to address p r o b l e m s that may arise in the workplace related to sexual orientation. The r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s are p e n d i n g approval by Bultman.

Black to speak in Holland T h e r e will be a q u e s t i o n and a n s w e r session with Dustin Lance Black after a s h o w i n g of "Milk" at t h e Park Theater o n Thursday Dec. 9. Black is flying f r o m N e w York City specifically for this event. The o f f - c a m p u s event is s p o n -

Going back— 30,000 more troops needed in Afghanistan. Page 3

Got a story idea? Let us know a t anchor@hope.edu. or call us at 3 9 5 - 7 8 7 7 .

sored by H o p e is Ready. Tickets are sold out, but the organization is considering holding a second s h o w i n g o n Friday, as t h e r e have b e e n h u n d r e d s of req u e s t s for tickets. For m o r e i n f o r m a t i o n , email hope.is.ready@gmail.com.

FML— Memoir students read their work. Page 4


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THE ANCHOR

DECKMBER 9. 2 0 0 9

'Does Jesus Have Blue Eves'

T H I S W E E K AT H O P E Wednesday Dec. 9 Student Juried Art Show

Minister shares passion for Native American worship

DePree Art Center Gallery

Alyssa Barigian Thursday Dec. 10 Rockband Competition (Wii) S p o n s o r e d by W T H S a n d TEA; e m a i l W T H S to sign-up; $ 4 per t e a m ; 9 p . m . Kletz

The Jazz Arts Collective Brief concert beginning at 1 2 : 1 5 p . m . in t h e Kletz

Friday Dec. Christmas Madrigal Feast

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S p o n s o r e d by Music D e p a r t m e n t

Saturday Dec. 1 2 Women's Basketball hosts Olivet 7 p.m. DeVos Fieldhouse

STAFF W R I T E R

O n Nov. 24, Michael Peters, an ordained third generation minister and executive director of Sabaoth Ministries in G r a n d Rapids, gave a talk titled, "Does lesus Have Blue Eyes?" Surrounded by a plethora of students, faculty and c o m m u nity m e m b e r s , Peters began his presentation. Not only was he on fire for the topic of Native American Christianity, he was captivating with his actions and words. Peters had a passion to minister to Native American people. It was this passion that led him

to direct a Native American program. That called him to go o n different reservations and help those who were hopeless and in disgrace. Peters said, "They don't need my jobs; they don't need any more government money; they need you." His passion to help other Native Americans reaches far beyond the reservations. Peters' intent in coming to Hope College was to educate all who would listen. Native American Christians' style of worship may be different than the "typical" style of worship, yet they still worship the same G o d . To Native Americans, it *is

not about the structured form of worship or traditional message spoken. It is about the s o u n d s that are made with the Native American i n s t r u m e n t s such as the d r u m and flute as well as the worship based o n cultural practices. Worship is meant to h o n o r the Native American culture and Creator G o d . "I liked it because it was c o m pletely different. He brought culture into his religion, and the way he worships God is different from the way I worship God," said Brenda Cuellar ('13). The services that Peters leads are not as structured as one would like to believe. There is no

church or membership, there are no pews, and there are no m e n in suits. The services are a way to redeem the Native American culture through the "smoking of prayers" (burning of incense) and "worshipping through the use of the drum." It is these practices that make the Native American style of worship unique. Peters believes that Christians are all alike no matter what form of worship they practice. Remarking on the presentation, Farah A h m a d ('11) stated, "I thought it was really good. It was really interesting to see the Native American view of Christianity."

Monday Dec. 1 4 Study Break Breakfast Phelps Hall 9 p . m . - 1 1 p.m.

Students and faculty end semester with prayer vigil Friday

Dec.

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Prayer stations available in Graves Hall's Schoon Chapel for 12:12 Prayer Christmas

Break

begins

R e s i d e n c e Halls close a t 5 p . m .

Erlka Terlouw STAFF W R I T E R

I N BRIEF

STUDENTS OFFERED OPPORTUNITYTO ROCK OUT W T H S and TEA are hosting a N i n t e n d o Wii Rockband competition in the Kletz t o m o r r o w at 9 p.m. Proceeds will go toward supporting childron's education in third world countries. Bands have four people. Cost's $4 per band to enter. Sign-up by emailing team n a m e and band m e m b e r names to WTHS@hope.edu. Prizes will go to the winning team. Students wearing a W T H S T-shirt will receive a free soft drink f r o m the Kletz.

STUDENT JURIED ART SHOW CONTINUES The annual juried student art show at H o p e College continues through Friday, Dec. 18, in the gallery of the DePree Art Center. The event is a competitive exhibition in which students are invited to submit a piece of any media. The d e p a r t m e n t of art and art history invite a recognized artist or curator to judge the student work. This year, the juror is Jimmy Kuehnle, who received an MFA in sculpture in 2006 from the University of Texas at San Antonio.

OPUS SOUP HIGHLIGHTS STUDENT CONTRIBUTERS O p u s Soup will take place Dec. 9 at 7 p.m. in the FriedHemenway Audtitorium. The event will exhibit the^work of student artists w h o will have the opportunity to discuss their visions a n d / o r read f r o m their work.

O n Dec. 2 c a m p u s ministries invited students and faculty to join the c a m p u s in prayer. As the c a m p u s has been going through the book of G e n esis, there are several examples of people approaching G o d in prayer. Chaplain Paul Boersma recently gave t h e example of A b r a h a m pleading before G o d . Similarly, t h e H o p e College c a m p u s will be given the opportunity to approach G o d in prayer the week of Dec. 7-11 in Schoon Chapel located in Graves Hall. The vigil is being called 12:12 which originates from Romans 12:12, which states, "Be joyful in hope, patient in affliction, and faithful in prayer." The goal is to have a week dedicated to prayer Monday through Friday f r o m 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. Students and faculty interested are invited to sign up for half-hour time slots online at Knowhope. Regardless of whether your n a m e is on the sign-up sheet, the c o m m u nity may go to the b a s e m e n t of Graves in the Schoon Chapel to pray. In the newly restored Graves Hall, the prayer room is set up with many different stations. There are a total of eight different areas set aside to help facilitate prayer. These include: praying for nations, praying for the lost, praying for the fear of the Lord, praying through art, praying through nature, praying through adoration and confession and writing prayers or scripture on the walls. Each facet can help teach those interested how to pray and a few things to pray for. H o p e College is not alone in this effort to make prayer a priority o n campus. Inspiration for the prayer r o o m originates f r o m the book "Red Moon Rising." In addition, n u m e r o u s colleges across the nation have r o o m s

which are set aside for prayer. In an effort to prepare for the opening of the 12:12 prayer room, a prayer seminar was held Dec. 3 in Graves auditorium. Three different speakers were present: William Brownson, Yui H a ma da , and Brett N e w e n d o r p .

Each speaker shared about their o w n lives and how prayer has impacted them in the past. As t h e semester draws to a close students and faculty are invited to spend s o m e time in prayer and seeking the Lord for our campus. The 12:12 Prayer

room has intentions of continuing through next semester as well. So let us finish out the semester well and "work out our salvation with fear and trembling" (Philippians 2:12).

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NATIONAL

DECEMBER 9. 2 0 0 9

THE ANCHOR

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30,000 more troops to Afghanistan Dubai economic crisis President Obama presents a new strategy for Afghan war Glen Schubert GUEST WRITER

President Barack O b a m a , in an address to West Point Military Academy cadets o n ' Dec. 1, outlined his long-awaited foreign policy decision regarding the f u t u r e of t h e U S . war in Afghanistan. The two major policy decisions a n n o u n c e d by t h e president w e r e the addition of 30,000 A mer i c a n troops to t h e A f g h a n theater, along with the setting of a withdrawal date in July of 2011. O b a m a also reiterated t h e goal of war in Afghanistan, which he stated was to "disrupt, dismantle, and defeat al-Qaeda in Afghanistan and Pakistan and to prevent its capacity to threaten America and our allies in the future." O b a m a also stated in his speech that, "I make this decision because I a m convinced that our security is at stake in Afghanistan a n d Pakistan. This is t h e epicenter of t h e violent extremists practiced by al-Qaeda...If I did not think that t h e security of the United States and -the safety of the Am e r i c a n people were at stake in Afghanistan, I would gladly order every single o n e of our troops h o m e At h o m e , t h e response has varied, especially across the political aisle. M a n y Republicans offer s u p p o r t for the addition of troops but are w a r y a b o u t t h e set timeline. Many D e m o c r a t s are pleased with the withdrawal date, but unconvinced that more troops should be sent to Afghanistan. Senator John

McCain, R-Ariz., speaking for many Republicans, said that although he s u p p o r t s the addition of troops in a mini-surge, "A withdrawal date only e m b o l d e n s al-Qaeda and the Taliban, while dispiriting our A f g h a n p a r t n e r s and making it less likely that they will risk their lives to take our side in t h e fight." John Kerry, D-Mass., the Senate Foreign Relations C o m m i t t e e , s u p p o r t e d t h e goals of t h e president, especially the date f o r withdrawal. He said, "I believe t h e president defined a narrower mission tonight, not an o p e n - e n d e d nation-building exercise" The foreign response f r o m NATO allies was positive, with countries including Great Britain and G e r m a n y pledging to send m o r e c o m b a t soldiers to Afghanistan in s u p p o r t of the United States. The Taliban also responded to Obama's decision, but in a far m o r e negative manner. A s p o k e s m a n for t h e

Taliban said, " O b a m a is sending m o r e troops to Afghanistan and that m e a n s m o r e A m e r i c a n s will die." A n o t h e r Taliban official added, " O b a m a will witness lots of coffins heading to America f r o m Afghanistan." H o p e College political science professor Jack Holmes said, in regard t o Obama's speech: "I like t h e idea of sending m o r e troops. I a m not convinced in a military option that you can p u t a firm withdrawal date o n it. I think it makes m o r e sense to aim for a date and then decide if that will be the date based o n operations o n the ground" Offering a n o t h e r perspective, political science student Allison Bryan ('11) believes his decision was a "result of various pressures" f r o m different sources including t h e public, the military and congress and that, " O b a m a was caught between wanting to c o m m i t the extra resources for the c u r r e n t war and bringing t h e war to a conclusion."

I N F L U X O F T R O O P S — W i t h a t e n t a t i v e w i t h d r a w l d a t e set for July 2 0 1 1 , 3 0 , 0 0 0 more t r o o p s w i l l be deployed t o A f g h a n i s t a n .

shakes global markets Amy Alvine GUEST WRITER

O n Dec. 1, t h e central bank of the United Arab Emirates decided to intervene in t h e Dubai debt crisis, in response to t h e d e e p e n i n g financial crash in Dubai (one of the seven emirates c o m p o s i n g the United Arab Emirates). The Abu Dhabi-based bank h a s offered to provide additional liquidity to all local and international b a n k s in Dubai. The tiny Persian Gulf emirate of Dubai has long sought t o position itself as an international financial and trading center within t o d a y s global economy. In an effort t o achieve this goal, Dubai built an u l t r a - m o d e r n image with luxury hotels and resorts, high-profile sporting events,' flourishing business and s o m e of t h e most innovative real estate d e v e l o p m e n t in the world. Despite t h e high-scale luxury that was being built, t h e global e c o n o m i c crisis b r e a c h e d t h e paradise and t u r n e d t h e e c o n o m i c b o o m into a bust, resulting in t h o u s a n d s of u n e m p l o y e d . Worried entrepreneurs fled Dubai in a frenzy, leaving over 3,000 luxury c a r s a b a n d o n e d at t h e airport. W i t h this global e c o n o m i c crisis infiltrating into the emirate of Dubai, t h e d e e p e s t h u r t has been felt within the real estate m a r k e t . The recession in t h e real estate market and in o t h e r various a r e a s has given Dubai an e s t i m a t e d total debt of $80 billion, with almost 7 5 p e r c e n t ($60 billion) of the debt being o w e d by Dubai World and Nakheel, its subsidiary p r o p e r t y developer.

Fear over t h e size of Dubai's debt has sent shockwaves t h r o u g h international markets, with major stock and oil prices falling sharply. Dubai World, t h e country's largest conglomerate, w a n t s t o suspend payment o n its $60 billion debt until May 2010 at t h e earliest. The state-owned flagship investor is behind projects as ambitious as buying u p A m e r i c a n p o r t s and building Dubai's skyscrapers. Because t h e d e b t s are so large, there is c o n c e r n that n o n - p a y m e n t could trigger a n o t h e r cycle of world financial turmoil. Despite t h e U.S. dollar being a "safe haven" c u r r e n c y for c o u n t r i e s in t h e past, this view of t h e U.S. dollar, d u e to the recent e c o n o m i c recession, is being challenged. In an interview with f o r m e r broker and options trader M a x Keiser, Keiser was asked a b o u t h o w Dubai's debt could d a m a g e t h e price of the U S . dollar and affect t h e price of oil. Keiser responded, "We are currently seeing a flight to t h e dollar and s o m e profits being taken in t h e gold m a r k e t with gold and the dollar being traded o n an inverse basis." Due to this analysis, s o m e economists see that, at t h e m o m e n t , t h e dollar reaction rally d o e s not. seem to have e n o u g h power behind it. The result is that t h e U S . dollar is not the defensive c u r r e n c y that it has been in the past. Currently, as the U.S. dollar continues to fail to break t h r o u g h t o an i n - t e r m high, m o r e central g o v e r n m e n t s are beginning to question w h e t h e r or not to replace the US dollar as a global reserve currency.

Copenhagen hosts UN Climate Change Conference Cory Lakatos STAFF W R I T E R

Monday, Dec. 7, marked the beginning of the two-week long United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, hosted by the Danish capital Copenhagen. A n u m b e r of world leaders are in attendance, including Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao and Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh. President O b a m a will attend Dec. 18. The W h i t e House said O b a m a believed "that continued U.S. leadership can be most productive through his participation at the end of the Copenhagen conference" Yvo de Boer, the convention's executive secretary, has identified four essential questions that need to b e answered in Copenhagen: •"How much are the industrialized countries willing to reduce their emissions of greenhouse gases?" •"How much are developing countries such as China and India willing to d o to limit the growth of their emissions?" •"How is the help needed by

developing countries to engage in reducing their emissions and adapting to the impacts of climate change going to be financed?" •"How is the m o n e y going to be managed?" The meeting serves as a continuation of sorts to a long series of U N climate summits, starting with the 1992 conference in Rio de Janeiro. M o r e specifically, the international c o m m u n i t y is seeking an effective alternative to the Kyoto Protocol, an international anti-global warming treaty that has been ratified by upwards of 200 nations. The United States has no intention of signing the agreement. Some nations have already made their climate change intentions public. Brazil has promised to slash its emissions by up to 39 percent, and South Korea has committed itself to a 30 percent reduction. The State Council of China bas made known its plans "to reduce the intensity of carbon dioxide emissions per unit" of G D P by 40-45 percent by the year 2020. President O b a m a has proposed a 17 percent cut in

U S . emissions by 2020, followed by an 83 percent cut by 2050. The Chinese and American figures are in relation to carbon emission levels measured in 2005. International debate concerning environmental policy hasbeenplaguedbydisagreements between the most developed nations, rapidly developing nations and underdeveloped nations. The developed nations such as the U S . and Japan are responsible for the vast majority of global carbon emissions, but swiftly rising emission levels have also coincided with the Chinese and Indian economic booms of recent years. These nations argue that improvements to the quality of life for their citizens justifies their pollution and that the developed nations should shoulder the majority of the burden. However, developed nations have proved reluctant to part with the necessary money. Underdeveloped nations with negligible carbon emissions also look to the US. to lead the way through carbon emission cuts and monetary contributions.

ExecutivesecretaryDe Boer has given voice to these expectations, "Rich countries must put at least $10 billion on the table to kickstart immediate action up to 2012. And they must list what each country will provide and how f u n d s will be raised to deliver very large, stable and predictable finance in the future, without having to constantly negotiate it every few years."

Despite De Boer's high expectations and the attendance of n u m e r o u s prominent figures, prospects for the Copenhagen conference are rather bleak. International meetings held earlier this year in Barcelona and Singapore acknowledged the unlikelihood of any legally binding agreement.

Climate Change Background "The m o s t r e c e n t a s s e s s m e n t r e p o r t f r o m t h e Intergovermental Panel o n C l i m a t e C h a n g e says that the earth's average t e m p e r a ture h a s risen by 0.74 degrees in t h e period f r o m 1906 to 2005, and that the average t e m p e r a t u r e will c o n t i n u e to rise," said t h e M i n i s t r y of Climate and Energy of D e n m a r k . Predicted w o r l d w i d e c o n s e q u e n c e s of global w a r m i n g : - M o r e d r o u g h t s and m o r e flooding - Less ice and s n o w - M o r e e x t r e m e weather incidents - Rising sea level For m o r e i n f o r m a t i o n o n climate c h a n g e or t h e C o p e n h a g e n C l i m a t e S u m m i t , visit t h e Intergovernmental Panel o n Climate C h a n g e website at: h t t p : / / w w w . i p c c . c h / i n d e x . h t m or t h e United N a t i o n s C o p e n h a g e n C l i m a t e C h a n g e C o n f e r e n c e website at: http://en.copl5.dk/frontpage


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DECEMBER 9, 2 0 0 9

Life In Technicolor: Class's journey through memoir writing with Dr.Trembley Elena Rivera GUEST WRITER

"It's a little scary to have people read what you write — that's h o w it is with any kind of creative writing, but m e m o i r especially. It's so personal, b e c a u s e i t s a b o u t you. You really p u t your-, self out there w h e n you write memoir," said Kate S c h r a m p f e r ('12), a m e m b e r of Dr. Elizabeth Trembley's English 358 m e m o i r course. The work t h e s t u d e n t s p u t into t h e class c u l m i n a t e d in t h e stage p r o d u c t i o n of FML — Fracture My Life. The s h o w took place o n Dec. 7 at 7 p.m. o n t h e DeWitt mainstage and was directed by Michelle B o m b e , chair w o m a n of t h e t h e a t e r d e p a r t m e n t . The script itself w a s c h o s e n and edited by the class, and all s t u d e n t s had work included; s o m e were in various pieces t h r o u g h o u t t h e p e r f o r m a n c e , and s o m e are in large, full pieces. A m a n d a Karby ('11) said, " W e c a m e up with t h e title 'FML — Fracture My Life' for t h e perf o r m a n c e b e c a u s e not only d o we think it's a h u m o r o u s p u n o n an a l r e a d y - p o p u l a r I n t e r n e t fad, but w e felt t h a t t h e t h e m e of f r a c t u r e s and f r a g m e n t a t i o n w a s really i m p o r t a n t to o u r work." Raina Khatri ('10) said of the process: " W o r k i n g o n t h e script h a s b e e n hugely r e w a r d i n g . The whole class exudes talent. Read-

ing everyone's pieces and discussing w h a t should go in t h e script and in what o r d e r was a fantastic experience." Jacqueline Jara ('10) said, "It's a little scary (having personal m e m o i r s read and acted o u t in f r o n t of an audience) but I think, as a whole, t h e script is really beautiful, and t h e r e is a lot of honesty, and I a m glad 1 get t o be a p a r t of it all." Luciana V a n D o r t ('10) was a little nervous, b u t is "so h a p p y that o u r stuff will b e heard." M e m o i r writing takes a differe n t kind of skill t h a n say, writing p o e t r y or s h o r t stories. Jara said, "As a creative writer, I'm really interested in t h e relatively n e w g e n r e creative n o n - f i c t i o n and m e m o i r is really a strain of that. It's really a challenge t o d r a w f r o m m y o w n experiences and to write t o w a r d s finding s o m e kind of m e a n i n g in t h o s e experiences. A n d to also, in that process, find s o m e t h i n g that is m o r e t h a n just t h e r a p e u t i c for m e , to find a way t o share t h a t j o u r n e y with s o m e o n e else t h r o u g h words." V a n D o r t spoke of t h e therap e u t i c p o w e r of writing m e m oir: " T h r o u g h m e m o i r and waiting for t h o s e m e m o r i e s to p o p into my head, I have discovered that t h e r e are a lot of stories inside of m e t h a t I don't let myself t h i n k a b o u t . M e m o i r has helped m e deal with s o m e

of t h e m o r e difficult m e m o r i e s that 1 don't even k n o w w h e r e to start processing. It's a c o n s t r u c t i v e way t o heal." Khatri talked of the unique place m e m o i r holds, t h a t "it's w r i t t e n to be read by others. Having it read a m o n t h after polishing it off is like instant gratification publishing. Few writers are ever this lucky." Finally, t h e m e m b e r s of Trembley's class a r e glad t h a t FML — their voices can be their big heard, t h r o u g h their m e m o i r s and t h e t h e a t e r perform a n c e FML. S c h r a m p f e r h o p e s that by p u t t i n g her m e m o i r out there p e o p l e will gain "appreciation of life — t h e big things, t h e little things, e v e r y t h i n g in bet w e e n . It's so easy t o f o c u s in o n t h e hard, ' f r a c t u r e d ' p a r t s of o u r lives t h a t a lot of t i m e s we forget t o look at t h e beauty of life, forgetting that even t h o s e f r a c t u r e s can b e beautiful." Similarly, Jara said, " W r i t i n g m e m o i r is an incredibly f r e e in g experience. In trying to m a k e sad stories accessible, 1 f o u n d h u m o r , and in h u m o r o u s stories, I f o u n d d e e p e r m e a n i n g , it s like

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KATHLEEN CARLSON

S t u d e n t s f r o m Dr. Elizabeth Trembley's English class before performance. peeling away layers, there is alt h e m and t o have t h e m share ways m o r e t h e r e and s o m e t i m e s t h e i r lives with me." you don't see it until t h e retellIt s e e m s like t h e effects of Trembley's m e m o i r class won't ing. I, h o p e t h a t in h e a r i n g o u r stories, p e o p l e will find m e a n i n g be forgotten, living o n in t h e in their o w n stories and m a y b e h e a r t s of this m o d e r n - d a y D e a d P o e t s Society. feel a c o n n e c t i o n to us t h r o u g h o u r stories." The tight-knit class's experiO Captain! My Captain! Our e n c e can b e nicely s u m m e d u p fearful trip is done; by Jara: " O n e of t h e m o s t beautiful things a b o u t m e m o i r is t h a t The ship has weather'd every rack, the prize we sought is it forces p e o p l e t o be h o n e s t won... and t o reveal themselves. I feel h o n o r e d t o have been given t h e o p p o r t u n i t y t o be a p a r t of such Walt W h i t m a n , "O Captain! an a m a z i n g g r o u p of w r i t e r s and M y Captain!" -ttf L»tr dUlcr to i• >« liA~ tricl*

'Rabbit Hole': Play balances life's harsh realities with refreshing humor Caitlin Seay STAFF W R I T E R

Love. Conflict. Loss. All t h e best qualities of a good d r a m a are a p a r t of H o p e College's n e w est show, "Rabbit Hole." W i n n e r of t h e 2007 Pulitzer Prize, "Rabbit Hole" balances t h e harsh realities of life with a r e f r e s h i n g h u m o r . W r i t e r David LindsayAbaire's play is " c o n t e m p o r a r y a n d fresh — f u n n y and s m a r t — it's h o w p e o p l e really speak, and that m a k e s t h e play really r e n t able," said actress Brittany Stock ('10). The s h o w is t o u c h i n g a n d thought-provoking. "Rabbit Hole" follows a couple, H o w i e and Becca, w h o are after an accident c h a n g e s t h e i r lives p e r m a n e n t l y .

The t w o c o p e with loss in very different ways, w h i c h c a u s e s their m a r r i a g e t o begin t o fray a r o u n d t h e edges. T h e grief and f r u s t r a t i o n of their situ a t i o n is s o m e t h i n g that a n y o n e w h o h a s ever lost a loved o n e can relate to. The play's plot is rich with tension and conflict t h a t will k e e p t h e a u d i e n c e craving m o r e . The s h o w features s e n i o r Alex M a r t i n as Howie, senior Brittany Stock as Becca, s o p h o m o r e Rachel Parada as Nat, f r e s h m a n Ryan Phillips as Jason and j u n i o r Jackie Richards as Izzy. Besides t h e sterling talent of H o p e s t u d e n t s , t h e s h o w also features t h e work of guest scenic

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GRIEVING FOR THE BETTER GOOD—

Jackie Richards B r i t t a n y S t o c k (above), and Alex M a r t i n and B r i t t a n y S t o c k (beiow) share t h e i r m e t h o d s of m o u r n i n g w i t h t h e a u d i e n c e . P H O T O S BY M I C H E L L E

and properties designer Daniel Stratton, w h o recently g r a d u a t e d from Northwestern University's graduate stage design p r o g r a m . The Studio Theatre in Dewitt where the show is p e r f o r m e d is a relatively small space. "We're in such a small space t h a t we had to push off into t h e audience, and t h e difficulty was finding r o o m for t h e audience," said Stratton, "That w a s kind of a trick, but we landed o n it." Stratton has c r e a t e d a set t h a t really c o m p l e m e n t s t h e t h e m e s

of t h e show. Just as t h e show is dealing with life loss, Stratt o n h a s c r e a t e d "this really beige neutral world; it's like t h e life has been sucked out of it." Also w o r k i n g o n t h e show is director Daina Robins of Hope's

theatre program. Robins h a s m o s t recently directed the shows "Big Love" and "1940s Radio Hour." Stratton f o u n d t h a t " W o r k i n g with Daina is a w e s o m e — she's really d e v o t e d to (the play) and it's nice to work with a director who's got a s t r o n g i n v e s t m e n t in a piece." H o p e a n d t h e Holland area s e e m t o have had an i m p a c t o n Stratton, w h o said, "People are extremely g e n e r o u s and kind here," and "I've b e e n really impressed with this school. P e r f o r m a n c e s are s c h e d u l e d W e d n e s d a y t h r o u g h Saturday, Dec. 9 t h r o u g h 12, all with an 8 p.m. c u r t a i n in t h e DeWitt C e n t e r studio theatre. There will also be talk-backs BOMBE with various H o p e faculty members following each performance. Tickets for "Rabbit Hole" are $7 for regular admission, $5 for H o p e faculty and staff and $4 for s t u d e n t s and senior citizens. They are available at t h e H o p e College ticket office Ipcated in t h e main lobby of t h e DeVos Fieldhouse, w h i c h is o p e n weekdays f r o m 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. In addition, t h e t h e a t r e lobby ticket office in t h e DeWitt C e n t e r will be o p e n o n perform a n c e nights at 7 p.m. T h e ticket office may be c o n t a c t e d at (616) 395-7890.


P E ATURES

THE ANCHOR

5

WHEN FINALS FIGHT BACK Andrea Eddy & Brennlgan Gllson G u e s t W r i t e r & F e a t u r e s Co-Editor

Finals are nearly here. Profs have been training for next week all se mester. They aren't putting up with sub-superior grades any longer; they've come to wipe your GPA clean. You're shaking in your Uggs. They've scared all those no-shave-November hair remnants completely off your face. They're prepared to win ... but it will not be this day! This day, WE FIGHT! Put on your armor. Our time is now. How should you equip yourself, you ask? Simple. Take a look at the four categories of your life that you must nourish and keep strong!

STAY HEALTHY To do well on exams, you'll need to be sure your mind is working correctly. This is really a no-brainer. Don't overload on sweets, but make sure you're getting the recommended amount of grain, vegetables and fruit. Thinking about pulling an all-nighter? Don't. It can severely mess with your sleeping habits; instead, set a stopping point for the night and be sure to get your seven to nine hours of sleep. Also, don't forget to exercise! Not only does it promote better sleep, but i t also improves your mood and boosts your energy level.

Itl- SMART Finals week isn't officially for five days. GET AHEAD (if you can)! Prioritize, find out which exams are when (if you haven't already) and start locating all the study materials you're going to need. But here's the kicker - be sure to limit yourself! Give yourself a 10-minute break after every two hours, if not sooner, of studying. Rest your brain, so i t ' l l be ready to store even more (useless?) facts.

VAKll

TIMI' FOR FRIEXDS

Don't become a hermit. Make sure you're still talking to the outside world (no, Facebook chat does not count). If you don't have time to go out with your friends then start a study group! Get a group together and head to JPs or the international lounge. If you're going to be miserable fighting for sanity amidst all these exams, at least you'll be together (to complain AND encourage)! And, since you still need to eat... make a dinner date! Don't forget the asparagus!

NOURISH YOUR SOUL We are physical and relational beings, but don't forget that we're also spiritual beings. If you've found yourself sinking amidst others during the final(s) battle, you can always pray or meet with someone from Campus Ministries or the Counseling Center. Campus Ministries is located across from Lubbers on 10th Street; the Counseling Center is located in Student Development in DeWitt.

Graphics by Emily Dammer


B THEANCHOK

—VOICES

DECEMBEK 9. 2 0 0 9

Musings on mutual misunderstandings

Grace & Peace Grace Olson Columnist

Karen Patterson Co-Editor-in-Chief

A reminder to myself when school seems extravagant

The Holidays: a time for change? The holidays are a wonderful time of the year. There's just something about Thanksgiving and Christmas that brings people together and makes everything seem just a little warmer and cheerier. Perhaps it's the way Christmas lights twinkle against a blanket of pure, white snow, or maybe it s the soothing effects of listening to Christmas carols while sipping hot cocoa under a blanket. "Regardless, there is something special about this time of the year. However, the holidays can also be a time when changes in family dynamics become glaringly obvious. For those who have experienced change. Thanksgiving and Christmas can be about as cheery as walking across a bed of nails in sub-zero temperatures barefoot. Maybe that's a bit of an exaggeration, but for the first time in my life, my family experienced a serious shift in the family dynamics that caused us to dread the holidays. For over 25 years, the Patterson family celebrated Thanksgiving dinner and Christmas brunch at G r a n d m a a n d Grandpa Patterson's house, where delicious food was served, gifts were exchanged and quality family time was spent. This year the house that served as the vessel of many fond memories stands empty and is for sale. Though it's been nearly a year since the passing of my grandparents, it may as well have been a week since my family realized how different this holiday season was going to be. My family is not the first, nor will we it be the last, to undergo change at the holidays, though. Whether it's a death in the family, a divorce or even a marriage, the holidays are a time when we grapple with what's happened and figure out how to move forward without forgetting the good times we've had. I have a good friend whose parents are in the midst of a divorce. For her, the home that she is supposed to be able to flee to for comfort lacks the stability that she needs in this difficult time.' Another friend's older brother got married this summer and she expressed

to m e how empty the table felt at Thanksgiving without his boisterous presence. She and her brother are particularly close, and I know that even though she can look forward to spending Christmas with him and her sisterin-law, it is difficult for her to imagine Thanksgiving from now on without her brother. And while this all may seem rather negative and gloomy, I wish to find the light and cheer — this is Christmas that we're talking about after all. Change is a natural part of life, and in the last year I have been reminded more than in any other time in my life that I can neither run from change nor stop it from occurring. If you find yourself in a similar situation — navigating the unchartered waters of changing family dynamics at the holidays — I encourage you to embrace the change rather than run from it. As the saying goes, "there's no time like the present," and let's be honest, what do you really have to lose from allowing yourself to be strctcKcd? At the very worst you might cry a little and miss the way things used to be. The Christmas season is one of my favorite times of the year. The only thing that I love more is those gorgeous spring days when the sun beats down and finally warms you to the core, but I digress. This Christmas season is a reminder for my family of what we have gained and what we have lost. Do we miss my grandparents? Yes, every single day. But rather than choosing to pity ourselves, we've bonded together to rejoice in my cousin's recent engagement to a wonderful man as we'll as the other good things that have happened in our lives. This C h r i s t m a s 1 hope that you choose to do the same: find the bright spot in what may be a bleak situation. And who knows, maybe this Christmas will be the one you remember the best.

Last week, as I left Van Wylen with a stack of books for an art history research paper, I caught a glimpse of myself in a window. Nothing much extraordinary: a student in a green jacket leaves a library with a pile of books. But the books! Suddenly, I realized that such a sight is globally, a rarity. W h o in the world has the luxury of studying for fun? W h o says, "Yes, I think I'll spend my afternoon researching the Dada movement"? Yet I get the pleasure of becoming a minor expert on Dada. As 1 pondered this, I recognized how much of my life is a luxury. At Thanksgiving, I didn't think twice about traveling home. I had no potentially fatal journey through enemy territory or over a minefield to fear. Not only did I have the option to travel, but I was able to choose my mode of transportation — car or train — a decision limited only by how much I cared to spend. And I'm considering seminary next year: that I even have the option puts me in the 1 percent of people worldwide who have a college degree (or v h o \« ill h iw nn#> hy Mny invunv). On Maslow's hierarchy, I've roasted vegetables for lunch, I've paid my rent and the heat's still on I've had coffee with a friend and now I can move on to determining whether or not seminary is "right for me." Of course, I hope my motivation is purer than that; 1 hope I'm listening carefully to hear God's call to seminary. But still — my basic needs are satisfied and I get to make choices. Historically, and today worldwide, a person's family occupation has determined the course of her life. If this were my case, I'd be tilling the fields of my greatgrandparents' Minnesota farm, but instead of inspecting soybean leaves and wondering if we're going to lose

the farm, I'm studying creative writing of all things, and planning to attend seminary. Don't get me wrong: I'm not suggesting that we quit college and revert to a world of blacksmiths and tailors. Don't carelessly abandon your spring classes and run off to Africa in the name of solidarity with the poor. While we should attend to and identify with impoverished people, I am convinced that we need our courses in order to do that well. I believe that my professors are teaching me to think more carefully about the world and about my role in it. Art history not only exposes me to significant artistic movements, but it also teaches me to read both visual and verbal texts, a skill that proves its worth when I'm able to perceive the truth in a newspaper article. And if I don't pay attention in global politics, I might ignorantly support companies with irresponsible business practices and contribute to the system that prevents Jamaican fathers from providing for eir families and Malawian mothers • fm e m obtaining enough maize tn tccd their children. So we need to go to class. We need to pay attention. We must learn. We must also be aware of our utter privilege, but we shouldn't forsake that privilege hastily: that not everyone can attend college doesn't imply that no one should. Instead, we must take what we've learned, consider it and live our lives with intention. Having finished her paper on Dada, Grace is dreaming of baking a batch of ginger cookies and cutting out paper snowflakes.

ANCHOR

Karen wants a pony for Christmas, a snazzy summer internship, and maybe a European country while we're at it...

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VOICES

DECEMBER 9, 2 0 0 9

THE ANCHOR

7

From the inside out

Beautiful Feet

Rob Guimond Campus Co-Editor

Bryant Russ Columnist

Something bigger going on Psychic Jiu-jitsu Before we begin, let's get a small piece of business out of the way: 1 am a nerd. W h e n I finished the Harry Potter books, 1 ran around the house in my Pis shouting spells with my toothbrush. There's just something about a good book or film that gets me acting crazy. "Braveheart" is my favorite movie of all time. When my brothers and I used to watch it, we'd barely make it halfway through before we had to run outside or set up a wrestling match in the living room. Maybe it's because I'm a nerd, or maybe it has something to do with being a boy — all I know is that I get pumped and can't sit still whenever something epic is going on around me. The thing about good books and movies is that the characters are caught up in something great, something epic, something bigger than themselves. Not only this, but people like Harry Potter and William Wallace have big parts to play. Their actions will change the lives of many. They are powerful. As a kid, I was pretty disappointed when I realized that real life moves a good deal slower than the movies. W h e n you close the book or turn off the TV, you find that everything going on around us is a lot less important, and if we have a role to play in anything, it's a minor one. The things we do don't really make much of a difference. We, unlike the characters we love, are not powerful. And then something happens that gives us all a shake. You find a friend in tears, or hear about a kid back h o m e who committed suicide. In times like these the veil is lifted, and we see for just a split second that something bigger is going on. And

JPetteK

to the

Sometimes in the evening, I'm sitting in The Anchor office, working on a paper and listening to Christmas music, and, all of a sudden, a rogue lock of hair, hair which I sometimes let grow to uncomfortably long, strangely curly lengths — the case in this particular moment — tickles my ear. It makes my ear itch. At this point, I sometimes think that bugs are trying to infiltrate my ear drum. I think of earwigs. I have a friend that often talks about how she and her sister thought that earwigs crawl into people's ears at night and eat their brains. I wouldn't doubt it. Earwigs are gross, but I've never talked to one. So I don't know their intentions when it comes to h u m a n brains. One time, when I was a little gaffer, my sisters and I were eating Cheez-Its at my Grandpa Guimond's house. He was bald. That's my paternal grandpa, so I don't worry much. Somehow, the box of delicious cheese-infused crackers toppled over. An earwig cravyled out of the box. W e stopped eating the Cheez-lts. I swallowed a fly at my Grandpa Guimond's house once, when I was lying in bed. I was 4 years old and awfully upset about my unfortunate late night snack. 1 spent the next couple of hours trying to remember what happened to the old lady in the song "There Was an Old W o m a n that Swallowed a Fly." I couldn't remember the song, so I composed my own. Most of the lines were, "1 swallowed a fly, and I think I might die." Eventually, the ballad awoke my sister, and she told me that 1 was being stupid. So I decided to fall asleep. And 1 did. The room I slept in at my grandpa's house was my dad's old room. The wallpaper

guess what? O u r role is no minor one. H i is summer I got to see firsthand the immense power of h u m a n beings. I got to see how a few wor4s from a sixth grader can change a life forever. As a camp counselor, I talked to camper after camper who had been hurt — seriously wounded — by the words of another. I remember one kid named Alex who burst into tears as we went for a walk. "Is it wrong to hate somebody?" he asked. He then told me about a kid in his gym class who makes fun of his height and calls him names everyday, and how it had really changed the way Alex acted in class. "I used to like school," he confided. "Now I just keep quiet hoping not to be noticed." We are powerful. Seriously powerful. As C.S. Lewis put it, "There are no ordinary people. You have never talked to a mere mortal. Nations, cultures, arts, civilizations—these are mortal, and their life is to ours as the life of a gnat. But it is immortals that we joke with, work with, marry, snub, and exploit—immortal horrors or everlasting splendors." But here's the cool thing: our words can also impart life. This very minute you can use your words to positively impact somebody's life forever. That's why the Bible has so much to say about encouraging one another — it's a big deal. Proverbs 18:21 says, "The tongue has the power of life and death." So what's it going to be?

showed cowboys riding horses and lassoing various animals. It was yellow and faded and had not been changed since my father's youth. He told me once that he wanted to be a cowboy when he was younger. Then, I did too. Now, I think I might want to own a carnival. I dig bumper cars. A couple of years ago, my friend and I talked to a female carnie that ran the baseball throw booth. She had nice teeth, despite the stereotype. She was crabby, at first, but eventually became friendly. She told us about her love for the male carnie that ran the game three booths down, the dart throw. She also told us that the Skerbeck Brothers own two carnival circuits. The other circuit had the dime game. 1 love and miss the dime game, b u t it would not come back because the other carnival circuit had issues with the authorities — marijuana trouble. The PoPo was, then, harshly strict with the new carnival circuit. O u r carnival friend was upset because she had to buy more potpourri to cover up her drug habits. Potpourri is expensive, and carnies earn a relatively small amount of money. I felt bad for her. My ear itches, and I wonder how working for The Anchor will help me own a carnival someday. But it doesn't matter much because the chairs in The Anchor office are comfortable. That might be what it's all about, in life. The cooks f r o m Phelps walk by The Anchor windows on their smoke breaks. I scratch my ear.

This came from the depths of my soul. That was a joke.

Bryant enjoys reading Narnia aloud with his glorious friends.

M e r r y (Christmas and M a p p i ) |\jew V

e a r

t o all! • -/^nchor staff

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Student speaks out against homosexual bullying To the Editors: To those of you who, when confronted with your opinions on homosexuality, delve into the Bible looking for words like "abomination" and "sinful" I have a question for you: Aren't there better, more productive, loving ways we could spend our time? Is nit-picking through the Bible and interpreting passages to suit one's predetermined opinions really the best course of action? Aren't there bigger issues here? And here's another general question to ponder: W h a t are people really so afraid of? That the American family won't look like it did on "Leave it Beaver" with a man and woman raising 2.5 children? That maybe

people will be a bit more equal and be given the same rights as everyone else? That what goes on behind closed doors isn't the same as their neighbors? Does that scare you? Here's something that should scare you: In October of 1998, 21-year-old University of Wyoming student Matthew Sheppard was kidnapped, driven out to a remote area, beaten with the butt of a gun, all while being yelled at and harassed. He was then tied to fence and left in the cold for several days, eventually dying. All of this, because he was gay. And don't think Hope is i m m u n e to such hatred and homophobia. In the spring of 2006 a male Hope College student became the victim of assault, when two

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other male Hope students inflicted physical pain upon him. The attack was reportedly motivated by the student's sexual orientation. Now even if for some reason you do still think that homosexuality is an "abomination," instead of narrowmindedly focusing on that notion, why not try a little love instead? Why not use your time effort in an attempt to eliminate such hate crimes? Do people really deserve such treatment? I would hope not. So please, if you hear something, say something. Stand up for your friends and neighbors. Don't let people get away with this homophobic bullying. Sincerely,

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8

DECEMBER 9 , 2 0 0 9

THE ANCHOR

T H I S W E E K IN SPORTS Friday Hockey

Dec.

11

Basketball teams approach conference play Kaci Kust STAFF W R I T E R

H o p e vs. J a c k s o n C.C. 8 : 3 0 p . m .

Men's Basketball H o p e vs. P u r d u e N o r t h - C e n t r a l 8 p . m .

Saturday Men's Basketball

Dec.

12

Both t h e men's and w o m e n ' s basketball t e a m s are off t o very p r o m i s i n g s t a r t s for t h e season. The w o m e n r e m a i n u n d e f e a t e d , and the m e n have already beaten their biggest rival, along with t h e n u m b e r six nationally r a n k e d

H o p e vs. O h i o D o m i n l c a n / M a r y g r o v e 3 p.m.

Women's Basketball H o p e vs. O l i v e t 7 p . m .

IN BRIEF

S W I M TEAMS COMPETE ATWHEATON The men's a n d w o m e n ' s swim t e a m s traveled to W h e a t o n College over t h e w e e k e n d for t h e W h e a t o n Invitational. The men's t e a m took first place out of six t e a m s at t h e m e e t with 907 points, while t h e w o m e n finished in t h i r d o u t of seven t e a m s with 701 points, a m e r e n i n e points b e h i n d W h e a t o n .

MIAA PLAYERS OF THE WEEK Women's Basketball Carrie Snikkers ( M l ) Center

team. O v e r Thanksgiving break, in the 173rd m e e t i n g b e t w e e n H o p e and Calvin, t h e Flying D u t c h m e n c a m e o u t with a win. The g a m e had an unusual ending. After Calvin rallied f r o m a 16p o i n t deficit, t h e score was tied at 70 with 2:17 left in t h e game. At 1:53, C h r i s Nelis ('10) hit a three to break t h e tie, a n d t h e n free t h r o w s gave H o p e t h e 77-70 lead with 20 s e c o n d s remaining. Calvin, again m a n a g e d to battle back a n d b r o u g h t t h e g a m e within three p o i n t s with 2.5 s e c o n d s remaining. H o p e i n b o u n d e d t h e ball, but it w a s stolen by t h e Knights, who, with a b u z z e r shot f r o m t h e corner, s e e m e d to tie t h e score. However, the Calvin b e n c h had called for a t i m e o u t w h e n t h e i n b o u n d pass w a s stolen, and t h e r e f o r e t h e officials waved off the t h r e e - p o i n t e r a n d put o n e s e c o n d back o n t h e clock. T h e K n i g h t s missed t h e t h r e e p o i n t a t t e m p t to tie t h e game, and H o p e took t h e win. T h e

Flying D u t c h m e n now have a t h r e e - g a m e advantage in t h e allt i m e series. Following t h e victory over Calvin, H o p e e a r n e d a n o t h e r significant win Friday night by defeating previously u n b e a t e n and nationally ranked W h e a t o n 77-52. Each H o p e player got in t h e game, with 12 players m a k i n g it into t h e scorebook. Will Bowser ('11) led t h e t e a m with 15 points, followed by f r e s h m a n Jared Mysliwiec with 13. Senior C h r i s Nelis a d d e d 10 points, along with t e a m high eight r e b o u n d s . David K r o m b e e n ('12) led t h e t e a m with five assists, and f r e s h m a n Nate Snuggerud added three blocked shots, while j u n i o r Peter B u n n had t h r e e steals. The Flying D u t c h m e n led by as m a n y as 29 p o i n t s and also outrebounded Wheaton 4527. H o p e shot a s e a s o n - b e s t 55 p e r c e n t (29/53), including 9-for13 f r o m t h r e e point range. The men's t e a m will expect c o n t i n u e d success, and according to Snuggerud, t h e W h e a t o n g a m e was a big test for that. " W e are expecting a lot of things out of this team," he said. " W e proved with a win over W h e a t o n that n o t h i n g is o u t of o u r reach." Flying D u t c h U n d e f e a t e d The w o m e n ' s t e a m c o n t i n u e s

i HOTO COURTESY OF nOPfc H E A R T B R E A K E R â&#x20AC;&#x201D; David K r o m b e e n ( ' 1 2 ) t a k e s t h e ball t o t h e b a s k e t In Hope's o v e r t i m e loss t o Carthage on Saturday. their u n d e f e a t e d season (5-0) with a n u m b e r o n e national r a n k i n g according to USA Today/ESPN. The Flying Dutch's u p c o m i n g games include Trine and Olivet, followed by t h e H o p e Classic T o u r n a m e n t , in w h i c h they will face Finlandia t h e first night, a n d t h e n t h e w i n n e r of Lake Forest vs. C h i c a g o t h e next night. According t o j u n i o r Erika Bruinsma, t h e w o m e n expect for this success t o c o n t i n u e . " W e look at t h e season as a m a r a t h o n r a t h e r t h a n a sprint," she said. "We. have a very good t e a m that gets along well, so we

e x p e c t m o r e success d u r i n g t h e rest of t h e season." In the g a m e c o n s i d e r e d Hope's first m a j o r test of t h e season, against Aquinas, t h e w o m e n set a fieldhouse record of 54 p o i n t s scored in t h e first half. Junior Carrie Snikkers r e c o r d e d her 13th career double-double, and a total of 14 players scored while 15 g r a b b e d at least o n e rebound. "The past few g a m e s have b e e n good," Snikkers said. " O u r t e a m has slowly started t o b e c o m e m o r e c o n f i d e n t and we are all starting t o figure out how to relax a n d play."

DEVETTE REMEMBERED Hope College alumnus, coach, and t e a c h e r Russ B. DeVette p a s s e d away o n Nov. 2 3 after a longtime illness. A memorial service w a s held in his h o n o r o n Dec. 4. As a s t a n d o u t athlete, DeVette was a m e m ber of t h e first men's basketball t e a m to go u n d e f e a t e d in M I A A play. H e w a s also n a m e d t h e first M I A A M o s t Valuable Player in men's basketball. DeVette coached various H o p e football, baseball, men's basketball, a n d w o m e n ' s track t e a m s to a c o m b i n e d 14 M I A A c h a m p i o n ships. The m a i n g y m n a s i u m in DeVos Fieldhouse is n a m e d t h e "DeVette-VanWieren G y m n a sium" in recognition of DeVette and his wife Doris, along with c u r r e n t basketball coach G l e n n VanWieren a n d his wife Jackie. The annual Russ DeVette Holiday T o u r n a m e n t in basketball is also n a m e d after him.

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H o p e College versus Calvin College is a big deal n o m a t t e r what s p o r t t h e two c o m p e t e in. T h o u g h t h e men's basketball rivalry is t h e g a m e m o s t likely to c o m e to m i n d d u e to t h e a m o u n t of publicity it receives, hockey g a m e s b e t w e e n H o p e a n d Calvin are just as intense. Even t h o u g h this g a m e may have t h e m o s t bragging rights o n t h e line, t h e o p p o n e n t doesn't alter t h e team's p r e p a r a t i o n . "The t e a m m u s t p r e p a r e the s a m e as we d o every week," coach C h r i s Van T i m m e r e n said. "'We look at t h e m as just a n o t h e r pair of games." W h i l e t h e o u t c o m e of these g a m e s may m e a n m o r e t o t h e s t u d e n t b o d i e s of H o p e a n d Calvin, t h e t e a m is ultimately more concerned with the

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outcome than the opponent. "For us, a w i n is a win," Van T i m m e r e n said. "Sure, a win over Calvin might m e a n a little m o r e , b u t only for bragging rights." Game One H o p e f r e s h m e n w e r e t h e story of the evening o n Friday w h e n t h e Flying D u t c h m e n soared past t h e Knights, 4-2. Justin Johnson ('13) scored t h r e e goals, giving h i m a hat trick and c o n t r i b u t i n g significantly to Hope's win. A n t h o n y G a s p a r o t t o ('13) and C o u r t Fall ('13) b o t h had two assists o n t h e night, bringing t h e point total f r o m all t h r e e players t o 38 after Friday's game. T h o u g h H o p e w a s able t o leave G r a n d Rapids with a win added to their record Friday, t h e r e w e r e s o m e m a j o r difference b e t w e e n playing at t h e Jolly Roger Rink, Calvin's h o m e arena, c o m p a r e d to o t h e r a r e n a s t h e t e a m h a s played in. "Play at Jolly is a t h r o w b a c k t o t h e past," Van T i m m e r e n said. "The b o a r d s are m a d e of w o o d so they d e a d e n t h e bounce." Traditionally, the ice at Jolly Roger is soft, w h i c h c a u s e s t h e rink t o fog up as t h e g a m e goes o n . Van T i m m e r e n said t h e t e a m effectively dealt with this situation even t h o u g h it may have played a role in t h e o u t c o m e of t h e game. "It w a s a factor but we a d j u s t e d well," Van T i m m e r e n said. G a m e Two Saturday night's game

r e m a i n e d u n e v e n t f u l for t h e first 32 m i n u t e s a n d 26 s e c o n d s of play. At that p o i n t . Fall b r o k e t h e silence o n t h e s c o r e b o a r d and gave H o p e a 1-0 lead. Jake G r e e n ('13) followed up with a s e c o n d goal a few m i n u t e s later assisted by Brett Kopinski ('11) and M a t t S c h r a d e r ('10). Sean LaDouce ('13) s t o p p e d everything t h e Knights t h r e w at him, 21 shots in all, t o record his t h i r d s h u t o u t of t h e season and e n s u r e a Flying D u t c h m e n victory. "Sean w a s a wall tonight," Van T i m m e r e n said. "He saw the puck well and reacted to e v e r y t h i n g they t h r e w at him.

W e really have a special t a n d e m in L a D o u c e and (David) Nowicki ('12)."

The f r e s h m e n were at it o n c e again o n Saturday. Along with Green's goal in t h e second period, he also had an assist o n Schrader's goal in t h e third. J o h n s t o n and G r e g Afendoulis ('13) b o t h had assists o n Fall's tie-breaking goal. The fan s u p p o r t at the g a m e o n Saturday did not go u n n o t i c e d by t h e t e a m . " W e really appreciated all t h e fans that c a m e o u t to Jolly Roger and t h e Edge to s u p p o r t us," said Van T i m m e r e n . "It certainly helped."

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12-09-2009