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Paul coordinates overseas program

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Hi olland, michigan DECEMBER 9 , 1 9 7 7

VOLUME NO. 90 - ISSUE 12

Fighting film blahs A new organization has been formed to fight this s e m e s t e r ' s "no movie s e l e c t i o n " blahs. Brian E v e r t t , originator of the New Film Weekly Co-op, hopes to bring in y e s t e r y e a r c l a s s i c f i l m s on a weekly basis, in an a t t e m p t to give the campus an alternative selection of good movies. In an effort to fit e v e r y o n e ' s schedule, the New Film Weekly Co-op will 44 roll-em" both S a t u r d a y and Sunday nights, opening t h e doors at 6:30. The organization's first movie debut was December 3 featuring t h e w e l l - k n o w n m u s i c a l classic, " S i n g i n g in t h e R a i n . " On

December 10 & 11, the New Film W e e k l y Co-op will b r i n g J u d y Garland to campus, as she s t a r r e d in the original "A S t a r Is Born." Showings will be at 6:30, 8:30, and 10:30 in G r a v e s H a l l . S t u d e n t s who will need a good laugh during finals week will appreciate a study break December 17 with the Marx B r o t h e r s in "Duck Soup." The New Film Weekly Co-op, though founded by E v e r t t out of " f r u s t r a t i o n with the p r e s e n t movie situation", has no intention of actually interfering with SAC's movie program. E v e r t t prefers to bring in older movies that are still

Damman offers internships

Policies offered

Michigan Lieutenant Governor J i m D a m m a n is l o o k i n g f o r full-time s t u d e n t interns to work in his office beginning with the t e r m w h i c h s t a r t s in J a n u a r y , 1978. A letter mailed this week to a n u m b e r of colleges and universit i e s in t h e s t a t e n o t e d t h a t internship applications from women and minority s t u d e n t s a r e especially welcome. D a m m a n has used s t u d e n t i n t e r n s in his o f f i c e s i n c e he b e c a m e L i e u t e n a n t G o v e r n o r in J a n u a r y , 1975. D a m m a n ' s office noted in t h e letter t h a t the internship experience currently includes: -Handling routine constituent corespondence and case work. --Providing staff assistance to t h e various special task force groups on which the Lieutenant Governor s e r v e s as chairperson. --Developing and maintaining t h e Lieutenant Governor's correspondence, issue and mailing list files. --Assisting with the development and maintenance of comprehensive county-by-county demographic and socioeconomic data. -Accompanying and serving as a personal aide to the Lieutenant G o v e r n o r at v a r i o u s official public functions and meetings. - A s s i s t i n g in s c h e d u l i n g a n d public relations work on behalf of t h e Lieutenant Governor. " W e t r y to w o r k w i t h e a c h i n t e r n i n d i v i d u a l l y t o t a i l o r an experience which will meet t h e s t u d e n t ' s educational objectives," t h e letter said. I n t e r n s in t h e L i e u t e n a n t Governor's office are expected to work 40 hours per week and a r e not paid. T h e number of credits or s e m e s t e r hours granted depends upon t h e student's d e p a r t m e n t or college. In the past year, Damman has been assisted by students from Olivet College, Western Michigan U n i v e r s i t y , Grand Valley S t a t e College, Central Michigan Univer. sity, Michigan State University, the University of Michigan and Wayne State University. T h e D a m m a n letter suggested t h e p r o g r a m micrht be worthwhile

by Linda Joy Executive Director Michigan Consumers Council Life insurance companies often offer policies tailored to the needs of a c o l l e g e s t u d e n t . A l t h o u g h some of t h e policies may be worth i n v e s t i g a t i n g , o t h e r s can be a financial burden to an unsuspecting or unknowledgeable buyer. THE MAJORITY of people buy life i n s u r a n c e to p r o t e c t t h e i r d e p e n d e n t s from financial hardship in the event of their death. But many s t u d e n t s don't stop to think who is financially dependent on them and, consequently, may b u y t h e w r o n g t y p e of life insurance. Many also think they can save money by purchasing life insurance at a young age. In fact, premiums a r e l o w e r for y o u n g p e o p l e because of their potentially long life. By b u y i n g y o u n g , s m a l l premiums a r e spread across a long period of time. But this may be more expensive than waiting until later in life to buy insurance, if one

classics today while SAC brings in more c u r r e n t films. If this semest e r proves successful for the new organization, next s e m e s t e r film buffs on campus will enjoy such classics as "Philadelphia Story" with J a m e s S t e w a r t , Cary Grant, and K a t h r y n H e p b u r n . O t h e r older films to be shown will be " E a s t e r Parade", "Broken Arrow", "From Here to E t e r n i t y " , and t h e m u s i c a l c l a s s i c " A m e r i c a n in Paris." The New Film Weekly Co-op m e m b e r s are Brian E v e r t t , Robert Robins, Mayrie Boyce, Russ C u r t s and Mile McFaden.

stays healthy. Although the premiums will be larger, a person would have a shorter period of time to pay t h e m . WHOLE LIFE and t e r m insurance are the two basic types of life insurance. Whole life provides life insurance protection plus a type of forced-savings plan. The premiums can be borrowed against a f t e r they build up cash value. T e r m i n s u r a n c e p r e m i u m s buy only life insurance protection -- no cash value. Of the two, whole life is usually the more expensive. Most of the insurance policies offered to s t u d e n t s a r e whole life policies or t e r m p o l i c i e s w h i c h convert to whole life a f t e r a period of y e a r s . B e c a u s e w h o l e life insurance policies build up cash value, many s t u d e n t s think they are enrolling in an "investment plan" or "savings club." They don't realize until later they've signed a c o n t r a c t f o r m a n y y e a r s of premiums. SOME STUDENTS have also been caught by surprise by a t y p e (continued

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Music department presents dinner by Janet G. Shimmin to be a part of a tradition which provides a touch of our heritage. T h e menu for t h e dinner was planned by J o y H u t t a r an(J Biz Ridl. The dishes will be authentic English dishes, including capon in honey, roast beef, a Wassail Bowl, and plum pudding. During t h e dinner, each course will b e h e r a l d e d by a b r a s s fanfare; strolling minstrels will be heard. For entertainment there will be a program of early music by t h e vocal and instrumental ensembles of t h e Collegium Musicum. T h e r e will a l s o be r e n a i s s a n c e for s t u d e n t s in a wide r a n e e ot dancers. p r o g r a m s including journalism, G e o r g e R a l p h , of t h e t h e a t r e political science, public administra- d e p a r t m e n t , will s e r v e as t h e tion, communications and others. "Lord of Misrule." Traditionally S t u d e n t s i n t e r e s t e d in a n t h e "Lord" criticizes and pokes fun i n t e r n s h i p s t a r t i n g e i t h e r in at established institutions. The evening should prove to be J a n u a r y or at a subsequent t e r m in 1978 should contact t h e Office of one of fun and excitement. Dr. t h e L i e u t e n a n t G o v e r n o r , S t a t e S h a r p said "It is something w e C a p i t o l , R o o m 128, L a n s i n g , m a y w a n t t o e s t a b l i s h a s a Michigan 48909. tradition."

T h i s e v e n i n g a t 7 in D e W i t t Ballroom the Music D e p a r t m e n t will p r e s e n t a Madrigal Christmas Dinner. A Madrigal dinner is the celebration of a renaissance feast. T h e name comes from t h e practice of singing madrigals as t h e main s o u r c e of e n t e r t a i n m e n t . T h e dinner is traditionally a Christmas function, as this one will be. T h e madrigal dinner has become a t r a d i t i o n on m a n y c o l l e g e c a m puses. It provides an opportunity

Professor Dan Paul of t h e Hope College education d e p a r t m e n t has b e e n s e l e c t e d by t h e M i c h i g a n Interinstitutional Consortium for O v e r s e a s S t u d e n t T e a c h i n g to coordinate t h e s t u d e n t teaching a s s i g n m e n t s of 17 s t u d e n t s in Brussels, Belgium d u r i n g the winter t e r m . Paul interviewed s t u d e n t s from all teacher training institutions in t h e s t a t e a n d s e l e c t e d 17 t o participate in the MICOST Program. Two Hope s t u d e n t s , Glenn Johnson from Randolph, N.J. and Lois McConnell from New Canaan, Conn, w e r e among those selected. S t u d e n t s will c o m p l e t e t h e i r s t u d e n t teaching assignments under Paul's supervision in American Schools in Belgium. Paul will also t e a c h a g r a d u a t e c o u r s e for teachers in Brussels. Hope first participated in the program two years ago when six s t u d e n t s from the college were selected for a similar program in the Netherlands. Last year Professor Lamont Dirkse from Hope was selected to direct the program in Brussels and took with him two Hope s t u d e n t s during the winter term. "Dr. Paul is particularly Qualified for this assignment and his s e l e c t i o n is i n d i c a t i v e of t h e esteem held for him by Michigan

educators," stated Dr. J a m e s Bultman, chairman of the education d e p a r t m e n t . Paul joined the Hope faculty in 1966 and was promoted to full professor in t h e spring of 1976. Prior to his appointment to t h e Hope faculty, he was a teacher and administrator in t h e West Ottawa Public School system. He received the AB d e g r e e from Hope in 1950, t h e MA d e g r e e f r o m W e s t e r n Michigan University in Educational Administration in 1957, the EdS d e g r e e from W e s t e r n Michigan University in Educational Curriculum in 1964, and t h e doctorate from W e s t e r n Michigan University in Educational Leadership in 1974. During the c u r r e n t semester, Paul is on sabbatical leave studying in the area of audio-visual and materials preparation as well as d e v e l o p i n g t w o s e l f - p a c i n g social studies courses for element a r y teachers. At Hope Paul serves as chairman of t h e elementary division of teacher preparation, instructor in the area of elementary curriculum and methods, and coordinator of elementary s t u d e n t teachers. For the past several y e a r s he has been an instructor in economics education workshops in W e s t e r n Michigan.

Handel's Messiah performance slated The Hope Messiah Chorus and Orchestra will p r e s e n t t h e G. F. Handel oratorio "The Messiah" on Tuesday, December 13th at 8 p.m. in D i m n e n t M e m o r i a l C h a p e l . Roger Reitberg, associate professor of music, is the conductor of the groups. Dr. Robert Ritsema, professor of music, is t h e associate conductor working with the orchestra. Admission is free. Singing the solo roles in "The Messiah" are soprano Joyce Morrison, associate professor of music at Hope; t e n o r S t u a r t Sharp, professor of music at Hope; alto Mary Roosa Hinkel, and bass John L a w r e n c e Hinkel, both from Ann Arbor. P a u l Van S c h o u w e n will be featured as t h e t r u m p e t soloist in "The T r u m p e t Shall Sound." VanS c h o u w e n is a s e n i o r t r u m p e t m a j o r f r o m H a m i l t o n . D r . Anthony Kooiker, professor of music at Hope will be the harpsichordist. "The Messiah" is a t h r e e p a r t o r a t o r i o w h i c h is o n e of t h r e e prevalent works w r i t t e n about the

redemption. It was written in the late baroque period in 1741. The first part deals with the fulfillment of the Old T e s t a m e n t prophecies dealing with the coming of Christ. T h e Passion of Christ is t h e main t h e m e of the s e c o n d p a r t . T h e t h i r d p a r t is d o m i n a t e d by t h e a s s u r a n c e of salvation. The Messiah Chorus is made up of m e m b e r s f r o m t h e C h a p e l Choir, t h e College Chorus, a few m e m b e r s of the Hope staff, some s t u d e n t s from W e s t e r n Theological Seminary and Hope s t u d e n t s not i n v o l v e d w i t h an e n s e m b l e group. T h e Orchestra is comprised of m e m b e r s of the Hope Orchestra and S y m p h o n e t t e . The presentation of the Messiah in Holland s t a r t e d out as an annual e v e n t w i t h t h e H o l l a n d Civic Chorus. L a t e r D r . Robert Cavanaugh m a d e t h e Messiah a bi-annual e v e n t at Hope. The o r a t o r i o w a s l a s t p e r f o r m e d on Hope's campus t h r e e years ago.

Students exhibit "mark making "Mark Making," an exhibition of d r a w i n g s by f o u r H o p e A r t students, will be on exhibit in the DeWitt Cultural Center Art Gallery beginning today through December 20. The s t u d e n t s whose w o r k is r e p r e s e n t e d a r e M y r a Herr, Mark Keith, Tony Reed and Darcy S h e a r e r , all m e m b e r s of t h e Advanced D r a w i n g class under the direction of P r o f e s s o r Delbert Michel. A public reception will be held in t h e Gallery tonight at 7:30. R e f r e s h m e n t s will be provided. "Mark Making" is an a t t e m p t by the s t u d e n t s to communicate a b r o a d d e f i n i t i o n of d r a w i n g t o

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include such diverse approaches as realism, abstraction, and conceptual a r t . The works in the show can be considered as marks on r a s u r f a c e in w h i c h each a r t i s t a t t e m p t e d to organize lights and darks, colors, t e x t u r e s , shapes, and o t h e r visual elements into a coherent p a t t e r n . Included in t h e show will be a television presentation of "community drawing," in which Keith video t a p e d pedestrians on Eighth S t r e e t b e i n g i n v i t e d to m a k e m a r k s on his drawing. The show is open to the public daily.

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Left to right with "community drawing" are Tony Reed, Myra Herr, Darcy Shearer, Mark Keith.


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Hope College anchor

Second annual art competition scheduled In J a n u a r y , the Calvin College Visual A r t s Guild will again host the Michigan Intercollegiate A r t Competition. THE GUILD invites s t u d e n t s f r o m p a r t i c i p a t i n g c o l l e g e s to p r e p a r e for the exhibition to s t a r t J a n u a r y 13. T h e Visual A r t s Guild believes t h a t t h i s e x h i b i t i o n will be an excellent opportunity for s t u d e n t artists to gain some exposure in t h e r e a l m of t h e v i s u a l a r t s . E x h i b i t o r s can s h a r e i d e a s a n d expressions with each other and receive constructive criticism. A S T U D E N T d o e s not o f t e n have t h e opportunity to look at his own production as an observer. He can, in exhibition', s e p a r a t e himself from his involvement in the cons t r u c t i o n or p r o d u c t i o n of his w o r k . T h e a r t i s t is in a m u c h b e t t e r situation in exhibition to j u d g e his own a r t . The Guild feels t h a t such an o p p o r t u n i t y is i n v a l u a b l e in each i n d i v i d u a l ' s artistic development. Realizing tne varied entries such a competition attracts, t h e

Guild has chosen a judge compet e n t in all a s p e c t s of a e s t h e t i c d e s i g n . He is O . K . S e m i v a n , D i r e c t o r of E x h i b i t i o n s a t t h e Detroit Artists Market and has an M.F.A. from Cranbrook A r t s Academy. S E M I V A N is not only k n o w ledgeable in professional artists' work as a director of exhibitions, b u t also h a s e x p e r i e n c e w i t h s t u d e n t s as an i n s t r u c t o r of drawing at Wayne S t a t e University. The Calvin Visual A r t s Guild plans to exhibit the show from J a n u a r y 13 through F e b r u a r y 14. The exhibit will be displayed on the upper floor of the Calvin Fine A r t s Center. A N O P E N I N G r e c e p t i o n and a w a r d s n i g h t will be held on Friday, J a n u a r y 13, in the lobby of the Fine A r t s Center. A w a r d s will be $100, for 1st place, $50, for 2nd, $25, for 3rd, and $10, for 4th place. T h e G u i l d ' s c h a i r p e r s o n s will assume responsibility for the show and m e m b e r s of t h e Guild will staff rooms for drop-off and pick-up.

Chem. Seminar features Dr. Gerald Watt This afternoon at 3:40 in Peale Science Center, room 50, t h e r e will be a Chemistry Seminar featuring Dr. Gerald D. Watt. W a t t will be speaking on "Biological Nitrogen Fixation vs. The Haber Process" or "Who is the Better Chemist, Man or Nature?" W a t t is a graduate of Brigham Y o u n g U n i v e r s i t y w h e r e he obtained a B.S. in Chemistry and a P h . D. in P h y s i c a l I n o r g a n i c C h e m i s t r y . He t h e n s p e n t t w o y e a r s at Yale University w h e r e he worked in t h e area of Phvsical Bio-

chemistry and Metallo-proteins. In 1968 he j o i n e d t h e K e t t e r i n g Research Laboratory where he is now an i n v e s t i g a t o r in t h e Catalytic Nitrogen Fixation Mission. His research interests are concerned with t h e mechanism of action of nitrogenase and related molybdo-enzymes and studies of model inorganic complexes related to enzymes. W a t t will be in Room 201 (PSC) from 2-3:00 to talk with interested students. R e f r e s h m e n t s are at 3:30.

USD seeks college shows College-sponsored entertainment groups of no more than eight p e r f o r m e r s are being sought bv U S O S H O W S to t o u r i s o l a t e d military installations overseas. E x p e n s e - p a i d t o u r s r a n g i n g in length from four to six weeks are scheduled to five areas: Alaska, the Orient, Europe, Mediterranean, and t h e Caribbean. A live audition and completion of a f o r m a l a p p l i c a t i o n a r e required of groups desiring to be considered for the limited n u m b e r of tours available each year. A brochure entitled "Guidelines for A u d i t i o n a n d T o u r A p p l i c a tion" has been published by the USO S H O W S Campus Music Committee (CMC). The guidelines provide specific information regard i n g q u a l i f i c a t i o n s and r e s t r i c tions, types of shows desired, prod u c t i o n s u g g e s t i o n s , d e t a i l s of touring and a step-by-step outline on how to apply. Music Depart-

m e n t s or S t u d e n t P r o d u c t i o n D e p a r t m e n t s may obtain a free copy of the CMC Guidelines by writing USO SHOWS, 1146 19th S t r e e t , N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036. T h e a t r e D e p a r t m e n t s interested in preparing a book musical or c o m e d y for a u d i t i o n ( m a x i m u m cast of 10 including manager) may also write to USO SHOWS for guidelines prepared by t h e American T h e a t r e A s s o c i a t i o n ( A T A ) Overseas Touring Committee. United Service Organizations, I n c . (USO) is an i n d e p e n d e n t , civilian a g e n c y d e d i c a t e d t o meeting the welfare and morale needs of the men and women of America's armed forces and their families worldwide. USO receives no government funds and is supported by voluntary contributions of the American public through local United Ways and independent USO campaigns.

National competition recognizes best informational materials The National Student Educational Fund is sponsoring a national competition to recognize college students who produce the best informational materials for other

Grants received Hope and W e s t e r n Theological S e m i n a r y h a v e r e c e i v e d $3,550 under the General Electric Founda t i o n ' s c o r p o r a t e a l u m n u s program. The g r a n t s match a similar amount given to the institutions by G e n e r a l E l e c t r i c C o m p a n y employees who a r e alumni of Hope and W e s t e r n . The Foundation presented $2,550 t o H o p e a n d $1,000 to W e s t e r n Theological Seminary. They w e r e among 855 institutions that received money under the program in 1976. Since 1955, when General Electric pioneered this gift matching program, s c h o o l s in t h i s c o u n t r y h a v e received $21,718,400 in combined GE Foundation Corporate Alumnus P r o g r a m matching gifts and GE employee contributions. The C o r p o r a t e Alumnus Prog r a m w a s p a r t of a $3,829,001 overall educational support package sponsored last year by the G.E. Foundation, an independent t r u s t established by the General Electric Company in 1952.

students. $12,000 in scholarships will be a w a r d e d in this national competition called the B e t t e r Information P r o j e c t : P r i z e s in e d u c a t i o n (BIPPIE). Individual s t u d e n t s or s t u d e n t g r o u p s are eligible to submit e n t r i e s in a n y m e d i a p r o d u c e d during t h e 1976-77 or 1977-78 academic years. Materials must be aimed at informing fellow s t u d e n t s about campus p r o g r a m s , opportunities and experiences. Prizes will be a w a r d e d in two categories: general information aimed at the entire s t u d e n t c o m m u n i t y (such a s o r i e n t a t i o n guides, course and teacher evaluations and financial aid manuals) and information aimed at specific s t u d e n t groups including but not limited to women, the handicapped, minorities and older students. Each of twelve winners will be a w a r d e d a trip to W a s h i n g t o n , D.C. to accept, on behalf of their school, a $1,000 scholarship, which will be given to a s t u d e n t with

financial need. Application packets and compet i t i o n r u l e s a r e a v a i l a b l e on r e q u e s t from t h e National S t u d e n t Educational Fund, 2000 P St., NW, S u i t e 305, W a s h i n g t o n , D.C. 20036. E n t r i e s m u s t be postm a r k e d no later than F e b r u a r y 28, 1978. T h e competition is supported by a g r a n t from t h e D e p a r t m e n t of Health, Education and Welfare's Fund for t h e I m p r o v e m e n t of Posts e c o n d a r y E d u c a t i o n . To d a t e , scholarships have been provided by T h e C h r o n i c l e of H i g h e r Education, the Ford Foundation, T h e F o r u m for t h e Advancement of S t u d e n t s in S c i e n c e and Technology, Inc., and The International S t u d y Travel Center, Inc. T h e College E n t r a n c e Examination Board has contributed toward t h e project's evaluation activities. T h e competition is sponsored by t h e National S t u d e n t Educational F u n d , a national non-profit group engaged in research, information s e r v i c e s and t r a i n i n g activities from a s t u d e n t perspective.

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Record numbers use hostels American Youth Hostels, Inc., America's oldest, non-profit, hiking, bicycling and outdoor recreational organization, announced that the largest number of college s t u d e n t s ever, used hostels while traveling in the United S t a t e s and Europe this past summer. A Y H is a m e m b e r of t h e International Youth Hostel Federation comprised of 50 countries that collectively operate more than 4,500 hostels (simple, dormitory-style places to stay) worldwide, w h e r e t r a v e l e r s pay $2.00$3.00 a night. AYH said t h a t many members h i p r e q u e s t s w e r e d e l a y e d because so many t r a v e l e r s waited to apply in Spring just before they departed on their trips. To avoid delays, AYH suggests applying right now for the 1978 membership, which is good until December 1978. Membership passes, honored at all 4,500 hostels worldwide are: J u n i o r (17 y e a r s a n d u n d e r ) $5.00; and Senior (18 and over) $11.00. For a free general information brochure about hosteling, w r i t e to AYH, Dept. C, Delaplane, Virginia 22025.

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December 9 , 1 9 7 7

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Insight from Japan.,..

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A cultural comparison (Tt\is is the second in a series of articles in which President Van Wylen reports on some of his impressions and observations gained during his recent visit to Japan.) . One of the things t h a t impressed us mpst during oqr visit to Japan was the, diligence and pride which the Japanese people have for their work. Almost everyone seems to feel t h a t his job is important and that it must be done well. Many of the taxi drivers wear white gloves; this appears to be a mark of their status and responsibilities as a professional driver. WE WERE also most impressed with the cleanliness of Tokyo, one of thp largest cities in the world. One gains the impression that this is a c h i e v e d in a s i g h i f i c a n t m e a s u r e simply because people do not littef. There is no graffiti on the subways and trains - a welcome contrast to t h e New York /subways. Speaking of trains and subways, J a p a n Jias an excellent mass transportation system. One of the very striking facts is t h a t the trains run remarkabjy well on time. We took a number of trains and we were never njore than a minute late. The "bullet" train from Tokyo to t h e s o u t h e r n p a r t s of J a p a n is most impressive not only in t e r m s of speed, but also in terms of cleanliness and efficiency. ONE OF the striking facts about our visit to Tokyo was to learn that one can walk the s t r e e t s of Tokyo day or night with a great s e n s e of c o n f i d e n c e in o n e ' s personal safety. Tokyo is reported to be the safest large city in the world. One of the interesting things about Japan is t h a t there is no tipping. In restaurants, a service charge is added, and nothing more is expected. When riding a taxi one simply pays the price on the meter. Someone told me t h a t he once left something in a taxi and

the driver spent considerable time locating this person in order to r e t u r n the item which had been left. When asking for an explanation of actions such as this, and also the no-tipping approach, I was told that when one gets into a taxi, the driver accepts the responsibilit y for t h e p a s s e n g e r and a s a p r o f e s s i o n a l , his d u t y is t h e personal safety and well-being of the passenger. THIS SENSE of responsibility between people extends to many relationships in Japanese society. T h i s is p a r t i c u l a r l y e v i d e n t in r e g a r d to e m p l o y m e n t . O n c e a p e r s o n is h i r e d , t h e e m p l o y e r tends to take responsibility for the employment of that person for life and only under most extreme circumstances would this employee be laid off or terminated. But, this is a mutual relationship for it is most unusual foi^ an employee to le^ve the firpi he js working for. I was told of a young man who left a position in a banking firm to take a p o r t i o n in a new, field. This was really an irrevocable decision for him b e c a u s e no b a n k i n g firm would ever employ him again once he had left a position in a bank. Several Japanese we talked to were most interested in the fact that in this cpuntry many women take employment after their children are raised. These opport u n i t i e s would be v e r y r a r e in Japan. Most women leave their positions after they are married, and do not work again in business or industry. This is changing somewhat, however, and we did meet a few y o u n g c o u p l e s w h e r e both husband and wife are continuing to work a f t e r m a r r i a g e , and even after having children. ONE OF THE things we noted is the close cooperation between industry, labor, and the government. This appears to relate to the o b s e r v a t i o n I m a d e in t h e last a r t i c l e t h a t t h e only m a j o r resource Japan has is its people.

and they can compete in world markets only if there is close cooperation between industry, labor, and t h e g o v e r n m e n t . While we were in Tokyo there was a strike of t h e r a i l r o a d w o r k e r s ( t h e y struck from 4 a.m. to 7 a.m. one morning) just long enough to show their power, but at a time and for a period that would bring minimal inconvenience and disruption! One of the greatest joys about our visit to J a p a n was t h e graciousness and delightful manners of the Japanese people. Mrs. Van Wylen and I have never quite experienced anything like this. I realize that these manners are a matter of culture and that they do not in t h e m s e l v e s r e p r e s e n t a d e p t h of a r e l a t i o n s h i p . Yet, I b e)\'\l i e v e t h a t our lives, both as individuals and communities, could be significantly enriched by practicing s o m e of t h e g r a c i o u s n e s s which marks the Japanese. I S H O U L D NOTE, h o w e v e r , that this grace and charm does not mean the Japanese are soft when it c o m e s to b a r g a i n i n g . I h a v e learned from Japanese businessmen that the Japanese are fair, but very tough bargainers when it comes to business transactions. While we were in Japan the dollar was at a very low point as c o m p a r e d to t h e J a p a n e s e yen, which meant that Japanese goods were more expensive for us to purchase. The reason for this is simply the fact that Japan has built up a tremendous trade surplus with the United States. Actually this has led to concern for t h e economic f u t u r e of J a p a n b e c a u s e t h i s means that the prices for Japanese goods are going higher and they will, therefore, be able to sell less in the world markets. The laws of economics certainly have a way of taking over! AS ONE TRIES to understand the Japanese and compare them to Americans, one realizes that there is one v e r y basic d i f f e r e n c e

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b e t w e e n J a p a n and t h e U n i t e d States. Japan is a country of one race culture (even the Japanese admit that non-Japanese do not fare too well in Japan). The United States, of course, is a mixture of many different races and cultures. All of our large cities were settled with certain ethnic neighborhoods. In addition, we have the tragic situations associated with slavery, all of which h a v e led to many internal tensions in this country. One wonders what will happen

in the United States in another century. Will we tend to become a r a t h e r homogeneous people, such as t h e J a p a n e s e , or will our c u l t u r a l and racial d i f f e r e n c e s persist for generations to come? Certainly for the present we have to learn to live with a diversity which is q u i t e f o r e i g n to t h e situation in Japan. Such advantages, which a more homogeneous life and culture offer, will have to be achieved in the United States in other ways.

Censorship in Private Schools The distinction between private and public schools is often a key factor in determining whether or not student journalists enjoy the full protection of t h e First Amendment. The Amendment protects individuals, including s t u d e n t s , from c e n s o r s h i p by local, s t a t e and federal governments. Since public institutions are government agencies, and act as arms of the state and local authorities, they may not violate the First Amendment rights of students. However, since private institutions are not gove r n m e n t agencies, student journalists at private schools may not directly claim the benefits of the F i r s t Amendment. C e n s o r e d s t u d e n t s at p r i v a t e schools and colleges must employ reasoned argument and political pressure to gain the freedom of e x p r e s s i o n g u a r a n t e e d to t h e i r counterparts in public schools. Academic Freedom: Many private schools would not think of censoring a student because to do so would violate the fundamental p r e c e p t of m o d e r n e d u c a t i o n ;

namely, freedom of thought and expression are an essential part of the learning process. Citizenship Training: Experiencing f i r s t - h a n d t h e r i g h t s and responsibilities of democratic citizenship is the best way to understand the workings of democracy. Schools engaged in censorship fail to teach students the fundamental v a l u e upon which a d e m o c r a t i c society rests. State Schools Are Better?: Free speech is an important component of q u a l i t y e d u c a t i o n . P r i v a t e schools failing to recognize those rights afforded students at public schools simply do not measure up. Freedom of Religion and Press: Parochial schools have an obligation to support the spirit of the First Amendment's provision for freedom of speech out of respect for the Amendment's protection of freedom of religion. A religious institution, whose very existence is protected by the First Amendm e n t , should not d i s r e g a r d t h e Amendment's other guarantees. A contract? : S o m e p r i v a t e schools may describe s t u d e n t pub-

Policies offered....

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of life insurance policy known as t h e " d e f e r r e d premium policy." I n s u r a n c e a g e n t s a r e a w a r e of t i g h t s t u d e n t b u d g e t s , so t h e y sometimes offer students a fiveyear policy which allows them to pay back the first year's premium in t h e fifth year. This sounds like a f r e e year of insurance to many s t u d e n t s , but they have really signed a promissory note to the insurance company for a five-year loan. If they t r y to drop t h e policy, they find either part or all of the debt is due immediately. Some of t h e deferred premium policies o f f e r a f i f t h - y e a r b o n u s which helps t h e student pay the loan for the first year's premium. But this bonus, often r e f e r r e d to as

from page 1)

l i c a t i o n s in c a t a l o g u e s or o t h e r material. These descriptions may c o n t a i n l a n g u a g e which tells students their freedom of expression will not be abridged. This language may represent a contract between the school and student editors which limits the school's power to censor. Politics: Private institutions are often sensitive to pressure brought to bear by organized groups of s t u d e n t s and f a c u l t y . If g r o u p s o p p o s e d to c e n s o r s h i p publicize their views to the school's administrators, trustees, and the public at large, private schools may abandon censorship efforts.

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an endowment, has already been built into the price s t r u c t u r e of the policy. LIFE INSURANCE is a complicated subject, so investigate the different types of policies before deciding on a certain one. Like any contract, know exactly what's involved before signing. Question any t e r m s which are unfamiliar and get opinions from seveal different insurance agents. For more information, contact the Michigan Insurance Bureau at its toll-free number, 1-800-292-5943 or write for t h e free brochure, "A Consumer's Guide to Life Insurance in Michigan," at P.O. Box 30220, Lansing, MI 48909.

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Christmas and Giving

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Salvation comes to the Scrooge, but it comes a bit late. Having finished with exams, the Scrooge finally has the time to recover from exams and wake up to the realization that it is Christmas, and that there is some of this Christmas spirit left to be absorbed. In somewhat of a frantic, hurried rush to make up for past "Scrooge-ish" actions, our friend is found buying gifts which represent this new-found spirit of giving. In short, our society's Scrooges have turned Christmas into a quick-and-easy-prepackaged celebration which is now based on the exchange of material gifts. Of course, Christmas is the time for giving, but what types of gifts should we be There is, however, somewhat of a con- giving? At least in a sense of tradition, we flict. During exam time, there is a tendency ought to base the kinds of gifts we give on for each student to become thoroughly the First Christmas Gift. In no way are we wrapped up in her or his own studies and able to copy that Gift, but we can base our thus forget that this is the season in which gifts on love and giving of the self. we must take time to give to others. Giving In all the parables which talk of giving, is the true spirit of Christmas, and we have it never matters how expensive or impreslost that spirit. sive a gift may be; it only matters that the What happens is the pressures of exams gift is given from the heart. turn us into temporary Scrooges as we atAnd what does that have to do with tempt to do our best in our studies. Now, exams and the hectic schedule of a student? there is nothing wrong with working to All that can be said is that we nHist reachieve scholastic wonders or outsmart all member to think of others, especially at of Hope's professors if those are one's goals. this time, and do what we can for them. What is wrong is when these goals beWork hard for your classes; study for come so important that they turn one into exams, but by all means show to others a self-centered book worm who has no time that you are a part of the spirit of to remember Christmas: a Scrooge. Christmas.

As we near the end of the first semester, we are truly feeling the stress of studies and last minute details tightening around us. Exams are less than a week away, Christmas shopping must be done, and preparations for the holidays must be made. In short, most everyone is extremely busy, and we're all looking forward to the relief we'll feel when Christmas vacation begins.

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Welcome to the Grand Illusion .. .Come on in and see what's happening Pay the price get your tickets for the show... Step in and see, it's Hope College to me. The thrills, the chills, and the daring devils. From Central to Columbia, the beauty of the campus, the challenge of passing through the Pine grove. So few women dare.

port to success in any endeavor undertaken. The academics aren't exactly easy but nothing overwhelming, I can assure you, and our tuition is below that of area competitors so you'll have no problem absorbing the costs. ...But someday soon we'll stop to ponder What on earth's this spell we're under We made the grade and still we wonder Who the hell we are!

Channels of Communication As the head of the other major news source on campus I feel I should share some of my personal feelings on your editorial of December second. Our news department at WTAS is also in the position of needing cooperation from the administration for news. During the period of the attacks we found Mr. Bareman extremely cooperative in releasing all the information he had to us the day it happened or at most a day or two late. This included "privileged" information for our private use only. T h e Dean's office and the Holland Police also cooperated fully. These three sources were equally knowledgeable on the attacks and even if the anchor has somehow alienated one of them there are others from which information can be gathered. We have always been able to broadcast

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t It seems strange to me to hear the anchor complain about lack of cooperation from the administration when the majority of all articles published in the anchor are written by the college's Public Relations Department. Sincerely, John P. Hoekstra

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Glenn Shoup lyrics by: Dennis DeYoung - "STYX" T h e cultural experience of seeing epics performed, live, about town. "West Side Story" in the Burger King parking lot and the enchanting tale of "Jack the Ripper" just the other side of I4th Street. All this only a short distance from campus, for the convenience of the students. ...But don't be fooled by the radio T h e T.V. or the magazines They'll show you photographs Of how your life should be But they're just someone else's fantasy... "Yes, seniors, this is Hope College, and I'm your illustrious admissions officer. This is Hope College in brief. It looks just the way the board of directors told me to make it look. What'a ya think? ...America spells competition Join us in our blind ambition Get yourself a brand new motor car... "Hope is a worldly' recognized small college. Your diploma will serve as your pass-

at least 5 mini-documentaries of "hard" campus news a week. We have yet to run into a person that has been uncooperative or feels that he or she has been misrepresented by our staff.

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Published during the college year except vacation, holiday and examination periods by and for the students of Hope College, Holland, Michigan, under the a u t h o r i t y of the Student Communications Media Committee. Subscription price: $8 per year. Printed by the Hi-Lites Shoppers Guide, Printing Department, Fremont, Michigan. Member, Associated Collegiate Press, United States Student Press Association. Office located on ground f l o o r of Graves Hall. Telephone 392-5111, Extension 4600. The opinions on this page are not necessarily those of the student b o d y , faculty or administration of Hope College.

Editor Associate Editor Assistant Editor Photography Editor Assistant Photography Editor Sports Editor Business-Ad Manager Subscriptions Manager Cartoonist Copy Editor

When someone spends thirty years reminding people to be careful with fire, and he does it for no other reason than to save our forests, he makes a lot of friends. Even if he's just a bear.

Reporters . . . Jill Vanderlaan, Samme Orwig, Karl Bierbaum Gary Hasek, Robert Baker, Lois Maassen, Ronni Nivala J a n e t G. Shimmin, Robert Niedt, Glenn J o h n s o n

A Public Service o< This Newspaper , & The Advertising Council

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Bob Baker Samme Orwig Lois Maassen Steve Ward Jeff Smith Karl Bierbaum Jill Vanderlaan Mike D'Oyly Gary Hasek Dianne T h o m a s

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The last hurrah? by K. Gary Hasek Dear Hope College, "Better is the end of a thing than its beginning." - Ecclesiastes 7:8 Thus saith the preacher in one of my favorite books of t h e Bible. Whether it is t r u e of this column or not, I will not say. Anyway, since t h e end of my college career is upon me this month and also my career as a college n e w s p a p e r columnist, (this t h e third of it's kind t h a t I've w r i t t e n , the others being "as it is in h e a v e n " and "back from the hogs,") I decided to give an a p p r a i s a l of m y " H o p e Experience." It all began SVz y e a r s ago when I t r a n s f e r r e d to this "liberal a r t s " college f r o m a c o m m e r c i a l a r t school. " O h t o b e . l i b e r a l l y educated!" I thought. I desired knowledge about many things and to be able to learn t h e s e many things in, what the Hope catalog states, a "dynamic Christian community - s t u d e n t s and teachers vitally concerned with a relevant faith t h a t changes lives and transforms society." So, w h a t did I get? Well, t h e r e sure was a lot of knowledge t h a t I was going to have to consume, but I think t h e y really didn't tell the t r u t h about t h e r e s t . As far as t h e environment goes, the windmills and tulips a r e all very quaint but no one told me about t h e factory a r o m a s of pickles and paint. The Christianity I encountered was too often consisting of lukew a r m n e s s or near fanaticism. It didn't a p p e a r very "dynamic" as the catalog had said. Then t h e r e w e r e those unique social c r e a t u r e s called fraternities and sororities. Living with a f r a t my first year at Hope gave me plenty of opportunity to experience their lifestyle. It seems to me t h e s e o r g a n i z a t i o n s a r e somewhere in b e t w e e n glorified "scout" groups and modified s t r e e t gangs. Not t h a t t h e r e a r e n ' t some fine i n d i v i d u a l s a n d f r i e n d s of m i n e within th e m , but some of their mob-scenes seem to be incongruent with w h a t I was duped into believing the school was to be. Although t h e r e a r e some faculty m e m b e r s s t r i v i n g for t h e cataloged "ideal" of Hope's Christianity, t h e r e seems to be a vast number of people who find it f u r t h e s t from their desire to fulfill. It seems p r e t t y obvious to me

t h a t t h e natural sciences have it well over all the r e s t of the departments. I truly appreciate the knowledge gained f r o m t h a t part of my education, however, I wish the a r t d e p a r t m e n t , t h e slot which I placed my m a j o r in, had half the money and available facilities to work with. T h e rule against t h e drinking of a l c o h o l i c b e v e r a g e s on c a m p u s , forbidden by both administration and seemingly heaven alike, was always an i n t e r e s t i n g rule to me. I r e m e m b e r hiding a bottle of wine in my dorm room whose contents was used for the celebration of the L o r d s s u p p e r , a s well a s an occasional bibbing, and imagining g e t t i n g caught with it in my room and having to go to the dean to explain, "But, w e w e r e only trying to do w h a t Christ told us to do. "Sorry kid," he'd say, "rules are rules." and I would go off branded for life as an illegal d r u g user. D o r m s are a very strange set up to me. Living in t h e m , I presumed, w a s s u p p o s e d t o e n c o u r a g e res p o n s i b l e l i v i n g t o g e t h e r . But when you have cleaning ladies c l e a n up y o u r m e s s in t h e bathroom for you and R.A.s telling you w r o n g from right, the responsibility is not so well developed. I doubt if most people a t Hope will live their lives out in the "real world" with maids to clean the p o s t - d r i n k i n g v o m i t up in t h e i r bathrooms, and special advisors counseling them on life. In closing I'd like to say that t h e r e a r e a lot of good people at Hope, administration, faculty and s t u d e n t s . Hope is still redeemable. As J e s u s said "With God all things are possible." T h e s t r e s s upon acadamia, howe v e r , n e e d s t o be e a s e d . S o m e good friends of mine have left you because of it. Some people, even now, a r e breaking down mentally, emotionally, physically and spiritually because of it. More people need to spend time in their rooms, in t h e K l e t z or in a local b a r communicating with each other. Too many people a r e troubled and lonely at Hope. T h e r e needs to be a real concern and reaching out to one another in love. W e l l , so m u c h f o r my l a s t column for the anchor. It is fitting to end this with some words from my Lord, since this has been a " r e l i g i o u s " c o l u m n . " I t is finished!" John 19:30. Shalom, K. Gary Hasek

by Gayle Boss It was one of t h e most pleasant Sunday a f t e r n o o n s I've spent in my two and a half years at Hope. L i k e all m o s t m e m o r a b l e moments, it was so because I snapped t h e r u b b e r band of the habitual. In this case I forsook my nonstop Sunday afternoon study session to d r i v e w i t h a c l a s s of '77 filmappreciating friend to the Bijou, a small, obscure, film-not movie t h e a t e r in a northeast neighborhood t h a t , with its slightly seedy s t r e e t s , is t h e l a c e - r a v e l e d slip showing, beneath the evening dress of E a s t Grand Rapids. SQUEAKING by on a near cost budget, t h e t h e a t e r is operated by a retired fine-film fancier whose p r o f i t s a r e m e a s u r e d in t h e appreciation of a select group of patrons who here can see "films," motion pictures created with artistic care, in preference to movies, those mass-produced solely for big box office receipts. Yet, one can b r e a t h e easily at t h e Bijou. The air is f r e e of t h e stuffiness t h a t surrounds those in musty mothballed tweed who balance steel-rimmed reading spectacles on up-turned noses and of t h e s t a l e n e s s l i n g e r i n g a f t e r those shaggy pseudo-intellectuals who describe a can of beans in t h r e e syllable abstractions. TO T H E r e f r e s h i n g c o n t r a r y , young husbands and wives herding pink-cheeked children, whitehaired g r a n d m o t h e r s in autumndyed Sunday best, jaunty, bluejeaned high schoolers, and bookdazed college s t u d e n t s in search of an escapade g a t h e r in the lobby to read t h e eight-by-ten glossies in t h e Great Movies picture album or peer over each others' shoulders at the posters in smiling casuality. Uninhibited college s t u d e n t s b e h i n d t h e c o u n t e r a v i d l y exchange favorite s t a r s and perform a n c e s w i t h p a t r o n s , a n d sell popcorn and run projectors on t h e s i d e . C u s t o m e r s t h e m s e l v e s , by open ballot, select the upcoming $1.75 Sunday matinees they wish to see. BEHIND a crimson velvet curtain, one hundred or so flip down s e a t s face a half-conventional size s c r e e n f l a n k e d by h a n d - p a i n t e d black and white silhouettes of t h e g r e a t s t a r s t h a t serve as subjects for pre-show identification puzzles and trivia quizzes. If ever, in fact, a film was produced for t h o s e f u r t h e s t from t h e boast of high brow "expertise," it is the one K a t e and I drove to the Bijou to see. Meet Me In St. Louis, the 1944 Academy Award winner f e a t u r i n g a tender at

Secret CIA document released A recently-released Central Intelligence Agency m e m o r a n d u m says f o r m e r U-2 Pilot Francis Gary Powers conducted himself "in a r e s p o n s i b l e m a n n e r " a f t e r his capture by the Russians in 1960 and did not "communicate significantly damaging" intelligence information to his Soviet captors. D E T A I L S of t h e previously " S e c r e t " CIA d o c u m e n t a r e c a r r i e d in t h e l a t e s t i s s u e of C a r r o l l t o n P r e s s ' s Declassified Documents News, which suggests that t h e data on P o w e r s in the Agency's files may have been behind P r e s i d e n t C a r t e r ' s direct i v e t o b u r y t h e f o r m e r pilot e a r l i e r t h i s y e a r in A r l i n g t o n National C e m e t e r y . The News s a y s t h a t t h e CIA memo, dated N o v e m b e r 2, 1961, from Gen. C.P. Cabell, acting CIA d i r e c t o r , t o t h e n - S e c r e t a r y of S t a t e D e a n Rusk, "laid t h e groundwork for t h e later exchange of Powers and Soviet S u p e r s p y , Col. Rudolf Abel." P o w e r s was under sentence a t t h e time in Russia for violation of Soviet espionage laws, and A b e l w a s in a n A m e r i c a n prison for similar violation of U.S. laws. INCLUDED IN t h e information which P o w e r s did n o t t e l l t h e Russians, according t o t h e Cabell memo, w a s data about "third-country overflights of a n a t u r e which could b e e m b a r r a s s i n g t o t h i s government." T h e CIA m e m o r a n d u m on

P o w e r ' s demeanor in the Soviet Union is one of more than 11,000 d o c u m e n t s which a r e now available through Carrollton Press's Declassified Documents Reference S y s t e m . O t h e r s r e p o r t e d on in the c u r r e n t issue of Declassified Documents News are: * A CIA memorandum which s u g g e s t s a new reason behind the g o v e r n m e n t ' s controversial d r u g experimentation program: to induce amnesia in CIA employees with " t r e m e n d o u s amounts of inf o r m a t i o n " who w e r e about to either r e t i r e or leave the Agency for o t h e r reasons. • S e v e r a l 1962 and 1963 docum e n t s on the problems of President K e n n e d y in dealing with the " h u m a n rights" issue of apartheid in South Africa. "At t h e h e a r t of t h e issue," s t a t e s a memo from the t h e n - S e c r e t a r y of S t a t e D e a n Rusk, "is how we r e l a t e to those countries whose internal arrangem e n t s and practices a r e not only foreign to our way of thinking but, in many cases, r e p u g n a n t t o us." • A 1949 l e t t e r t o P r e s i d e n t T r u m a n by then-Attorney General J . H o w a r d McGrath which r e p o r t s on F B I w i r e t a p s o r d e r e d by P r e s i d e n t Franklin D. Roosevelt as early as May 21, 1940, against " t r a i t o r s t o their country." • A CIA " S e c r e t / E y e s Onlv" m e m o r a n d u m r e p o r t i n g on t h e 1963 South Vietnamese coup and on a telephone call f r o m P r e s i d e n t Diem to t h e American E m b a s s y in

Saigon to d e t e r m i n e w h e r e the U.S. stood on t h e coup. Another CIA " S e c r e t / E y e s Only" telegram contains an "evaluation" of U.S. Ambassador Henry Cabot Lodge and Gen. Paul Harkins during the coup. *A 1954 White House memorandum which laid down this battle plan for P r e s i d e n t Eisenhower to use in the event of an attack on Taiwan by t h e Chinese Communists: "In t h e e v e n t of unprovoked Chinese aggression in Southeast Asia, Congress will be asked to declare a s t a t e of war; t h e U.S. will then launch a full-scale air and naval attack, using 'new weapons.' The U.S. will seek support for this action from other F r e e World nations." T h e s e and o t h e r d o c u m e n t s r e p o r t e d on in t h e c u r r e n t issue of Declassified Documents News, a r e p a r t of Carrollton P r e s s ' s expanding collections of once-classified U.S. g o v e r n m e n t documents which a r e now available to the public and to libraries across t h e country. For f u r t h e r information contact Elizabeth Jones, Phone 703-5255940.

MERLE NORMAN COSMETICS 21 East 8th Street Holland, Ml 49423 Phone 396-1671

FREE MAKE UP CONSUL TA TION BY APPOINTMENT

t w e n t y J u d y G a r l a n d a n d child show-stealer M a r g a r e t O'Brien, was certainly never intended to be the year's outstanding artistic s t a t e m e n t in motion pictures. IT IS t h e s t o r y of t h e w e l l - h e e l e d , socially c o n s c i o u s Smith family, which is controlled espionage-style (for the sake of feigned male-superiority appearances) by its five pragmatic females, and whose happy St. Louis lifestyle is threatened by a move to New York City. A Renoir-style romanticism paints a breathtaking 1904 St. Louis World's Fair background with whirling, turn-ofthe-century gaiety. A triumph of technicolor, it is indeed a very p r e t t y picture to w a t c h . O p p u l e n t d i s p l a y s of l a y e r e d c h i f f o n in c a k e - f r o s t i n g w h i t e s h i m m e r i n g in s p r i n g s u n l i g h t , and s c e n e s of s w o l l e n sensuality created by the play of softly diffused light and shadow fairly bulge the screen in an effort to b u r s t loose. EVEN the most puritan are set in a perpetual swaying motion by the sparkling-with-delight musical score t h a t smiles with songs like t h e gaily waltzing title tune, the t a r t , pulsating "Trolly Song," and t h e cradle-rocking "Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas." T h i s m a g i c a l b l e n d of h e a r t swelling storyline, instinctively hummable r e f r a i n s and enchanting delicacy of detail m a d e Meet Me In St. Louis an i d e a l i z e d , h a p p i l y e v e r - r e t r e a t for audiences living in t h e stark, steel-trap todays of t h e war y e a r s . PERHAPS the laughterrationed war days are not so far removed. To see Meet Me In St. Louis w a s an enchanting world of escape for this stoop-shouldered college s t u d e n t as well. But maybe "escape," suggesting a scared-rabbit r u n n i n g f r o m r e a l i t y , b e l i e s what I mean to say. It is not a subtle form of silverscreen hypnosis. To the contrary, it soothes and settles communal f e a r s of paralyzing uncertainty.

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And that generationlessness r a n k s it as a Bijou "film" selection. MEET ME In St. Louis instills an elated sense of Control, heard above the soundtrack in whispered audience predictions of what-willhappen-next along the familiar love-story plot path. Yet, at t h e same time, there are startling twists and t u r n s and stumps-inthe-shadows seen just in time to step around r a t h e r than stumble over. The screenplay, relating the real love s t o r y t h a t u n i t e s a h a p p y family and a way of living, drops clues along the way in the bread c r u m b form of r e p e a t e d phrase f r a g m e n t s , catch words and melody lines that keep t h e viewer on the right track. For example, as an excuse to prolong the afterparty presence of the barefaced boy next door, in hopes of luring him i n t o a g o o d - n i g h t k i s s (although nice girls won't let themselves be kissed until a f t e r t h e y ' r e engaged), J u d y Garland, as t h e coyly i n g e n u o u s E s t h e r S m i t h , asks him to help her turn out t h e lights. AFTER a shadowy serenade at the banister, just when he'll surely take his cue, he pumps her hand, blurts that she has a strong grip for a girl, and d a r t s out a slamming screen door. L a t e r , "Esee" finds herself on his front porch in an uncharacteristic, lump-in-thet h r o a t loss of confidence, pumping (continued on page 7)

THE NEW FILM WEEKLY CO-OP pnoudltf

pnttoxU...

"A STAR IS •

Starring Judy Garland

WOMEN'S

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STUDIES GROUP PHELPS CONFERENCE ROOM

M S . , DEC. 13,1977 11:30 to 1:30 Come and hear what ifs all about Give us your ideas!

SAT. ft SUN. DECEMBER 10 t 11 GRAVES HALL Admittance - $1.50 Shows start at 4:00, 6:45, 9:30

Don't go home empty-handed... Take gifts from el artesano Gifts from el artesano make interesting traveling companions. And, after the long haul, they make equally interesting gifts. Stop in and look over our fine selection of Columbian Handicrafts...and check out our prices on woolens and baskets. The new shipment is in and the assortment is tremendous.

el artesano Direct Importers of Columbian Handicrafts . 19 E. 8th St Across from Teerman's Open Every Evening til 9:00.


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Tolkien: The Silmarillion $10.95 Dean: The Record Cover Album $10.95 Vonnegut: Slapstick $4.96 Silverstein: The Giving Tree.....$4.95 Dickey; God's Images $19.95 Mc Bride; The White Lions pf Tmribavati...$10.95 Sommers (ed.) Atlas of Michigan $24.95

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These are only a few of thp many gift books we have, come in gnd see our Christmas display.

• Star Wars • Star Trek • Sierra Club Trail • Sierra Club Wilderness • Sierra Club Engagement • Friends of the Earth Wilderness • Kilban Cat Calendar • Pride of Cats • James Herriot • C.S. Lewis • Dance Calendar • The Sea Engagement • Smithsonian Engagement -- and more!

MUGS - JEWELRY SWEATSHIRTS - T-SHIRTS GLASSES - HATS - JACKETS

THE BOOKSTORE IS THE CAMPUS STATION FOR...

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his hand in apology for an u n j u s t left j a b to t h e iaw. S h e c h o k e s t h a t he has a very s t r o n g g r i p for a boy, in r e s p o n s e to which he invites h e r to (yes!) h e l p him t u r n o u t t h e l i g h t s , which, of c o u r s e , a r e a l r e a d y off. J u s t as faint s t r a i n s of t h e familiar s t a i r s t e p lovesong which s e e m s to trigger this straight-arrow Ameri can boy's flight instinct a r e detect e d , he g r a b s a k i s s in o n e p a s s i o n a t e lunge of d a r i n g - d o one n e v e r s u s p e c t e d t h e shy goose to possess. T H K W H O L K film is a succession of such m a s t e r f u l l y developed s c e n e s in which t h e a u d i e n c e is involved in unison m o v e m e n t s of head n o d d i n g f o r e k n o w l e d g e , lunga c h i n g anticipation and spine-tingl i n g s u r p r i s e in j u s t t h e r i g h t p r o p o r t i o n s o as n o t t o be f r u s t r a t e d by a d e l i b e r a t e l y s h o c k i n g d i s r e g a r d for all expectations, nor bored by t h e mindless m o n o t o n y of f u l l y g u a r a n t e e d predictability. T h i s p r i n c i p l e e x t e n d s to t h e cast as well, all of w h o m a r e easily identified as c h a r a c t e r t y p e s , but w h o s a v e t h e m s e l v e s f r o m t h e sin of s t e r e o t y p e by d i s p l a y s of individual s i n g u l a r i t y in off-guard moments. Child-actress Margaret O'Brien as t h e five-year-old T o t t i e y e a r old Tootie S m i t h is t h e film's finest e x a m p l e . Her cutsie-pie quips and precocious c a k e w a l k a r e o f f s e t by her h e a r t - w r e n c h e d h y s t e r i a and un r e s t r a i n e d r e v u l s i o n at t h e prospect of forced r e m o v a l from her childhood s e c u r i t y . YKT, of all t h e m a j o r c h a r a c t e r s it c a n b e s a i d t h a t t h e r e is e m b o d i e d within t h e m enough of t h e s t a n d a r d to r e n d e r t h e m r e c o g n i z a b l e , but e n o u g h of t h e u n i q u e to m a k e t h e m believably individual. In s h o r t , t h e y a r e real -as real to t h e Bijou a u d i e n c e in 1977 as t h e y w e r e to a u d i e n c e s in 1944. It is t h i s which d i s t i n g u i s h e s a film f r o m a movie--it m i r r o r s experience across eras. And t h a t , if you will, is w h a t I m e a n w h e n I call s e e i n g Meet Me In St. Louisai t h e Bijou a S u n d a y a f t e r n o o n of e s c a p e . It is a film t h a t , for all its idealized s u m p t u o u s n e s s , is e n g a g i n g b e c a u s e it is, if not in detail, in principle, like life. B e c a u s e it is c r e d i b l e , it o f f e r s t h e chance to relive life with a whole new set of possibilities in another era. SO T H A T w h e n t h e lights come on and Victorian St. L oui s of 1904 fades into the past, the actual e x p e r i e n c e of t h e n e w w a y of s e e i n g life as a delight t h r o u g h t h e t w i n k l i n g e y e s of E s t h e r , Rose, A g n e s , and Tootie S m i t h can be c a r r i e d b a c k t o t h e s t a c k of Sunday afternoon homework a w a i t i n g m e at H o p e in 1977. Such a film w a s medicinal for t h e gloom and fear of t h e w a r y e a r s . So, too, it can be for t h e gloom and f e a r m o r e t h a n seldom felt in a college c a r e e r .

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Help world's poorest families THE DDFN will finally open its doors to any interested students of Hope College who wish to join. First meeting for possible DDFN members will be December 15, 1818. All students are eligible as long as they know what DDFN means, which table at Skiles belongs to the club, and must have a bowling average of above 16. Contact D. Ivan Claus or S. Sorry at 17-24-36 before midnight, 12/8/77. ATTENTION STUDENTS: Van Zoeren Library asks you to please return your borrowed books to them before the end of the semesster. In order to make this an easier task, collection bins are being placed in many of the dorms. If you don't feel like trudging through the snow to get them back on time, use these facilitating conveniences. OFF-CAMPUS JOBS has many jobs for those staying in the Holland area over break. Stop by Phelps 8:30-4:30 Monday through Friday. NEEDED: Caligrapher. Call 392-3533 between 8 and 5. Ask for Mr. Kaminski. Pays well. THE KNICKERBOCKER Fraternity cordially invites all to view the Mel Brook's comedy ' T h e Twelve Chairs," plus some cartoons featuring the Pink Panther. The movies will be shown on Saturday and Sunday, December 10 and 11 in Wichers Auditorium. Showings are at 7 and 9 p.m.; admission will be one dollar. POINT WEST is looking for some good people. A recent motel addition has created a need for part and full time help. Shifts include midnight to 8 a.m., 4 p.m. to midnight, and weekends. If you're a sharp individual adept at meeting the public, interested in progressive, expanding company, you may be the person we're seeking. Call Mrs. Brooks at 335-5894.

FINALS GOT YOU DOWN?

Christmas movies T h e A r c a d i a n f r a t e r n i t y is sponsoring Christmas Movies to b e s h o w n t h i s F r i d a y and S a t u r d a y , the ninth and tenth. The movies to be shown are "Rudolph t h e Red-Nosed Reindeer" and "Silent Night." Both films are in color a n d p r o m i s e t o be e x c e l l e n t Christmas entertainment. The cost is one dollar for adults and f i f t y c e n t s for c h i l d r e n , 14 and under. All p r o c e e d s f r o m t h e s e

m o v i e s will b e g i v e n to t h e A r c a d i a n C h r i s t m a s F u n d for Children, which is used to make Christmas a little more enjoyable for those in need. Showings on Friday will be in Wichers Auditorium at 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. Showings on Saturday will be in Peale, Room 050, a t 10 a.m., 1 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. Tickets are available from any Arcadian or at t h e door.

VanZoeren Library receives collection an e x p e r t in S o u t h e a s t A s i a n studies. His other area of interest w a s in s t u d e n t i n v o l v e m e n t in i n t e r n a t i o n a l r e l a t i o n s a n d in study-abroad programs. Dr. Fishel spoke several times at Hope College and worked with Dr. Paul Fried in the international relations office. Dr. Fried was ins t r u m e n t a l in securing the collection from the Fishel family. T h e collect ion consisted of 1,500 books and many excellent r u n s of journals in history and political science. The College received permission from Mrs. Fishel to sell the books and journals which were already in its library. Some of the f u n d s obtained from these sales will be used to bind t h e journals w h i c h will be a d d e d to t h e collection.

Van Zoeren Library at Hope has received a substantial gift collection from the library of t h e late P r o f e s s o r W e s l e y L. F i s h e l of Michigan State University. Dr. Fishel was a member of the political science d e p a r t m e n t and RIDERS WANTED: To the Schenectady, N.Y. area for Christmas Break. Big car; can carry six in comfort, although I would like to carry less. As of 12/2/77 there are four vacancies. For info call 335-2113. WANTED: Sex mitment. M.O.

without

Com-

CLOTHING repaired, remodeled, or made to order. Call 3964887.

Cagers walk over Concordia points and claiming 11 rebounds. All of t h e 11 Dutchmen did break into the scoring column, creating t h e balanced attack. First year mentor Glenn Van Wieren explained, "We w e r e good at both ends of t h e floor - we w e r e good on d e f e n s e and o f f e n s e . " Hope collected 65 percent of the rebounds and shot 56 percent from the floor. This however was not the case on Monday night as the Flying Dutchmen dropped their record to 1-1, losing to Lake Forest College, "We w e r e good on defense, but had no offense," Van Wieren said. L a k e F o r e s t w a s 19-4 l a s t season, t h e fifth best record in D i v i s i o n I I I . W i t h m o s t of l a s t years t e a m returning. Lake F o r e s t d e f e a t e d t h e D u t c h by a 63-56 margin.

L a s t S a t u r d a y o n e of H o p e ' s most demanding athletic sports opened its season against Grand Rapids Baptist College and came away with victory in hand. The match s t a r t e d out with Hope b e h i n d as a f o r f e i t a t 118 and Hope's John VanderKolk being pinned in the second period of his 126 lb. class match. The tables t u r n e d at 134, Byran Prielipp for Hope beating his opponent badly, 14-6. At 142, Paul Garmirian also d e c i s i o n e d , B a r t Rizzo o u t d o i n g t h a t p e r f o r m a n c e r e c o r d i n g his first pin of the year, coming at 4:23 0 f t h e second period. At 157 BC had no wrestler making the score 1942, t h e D u t c h m e n on the now move. The 167 lb. class saw Hope's M i k e S u t t o n sink in t h e r i g h t combination effectively making his 4 B c opponent see t h e lights', Cal K o r t m a n a t 190 f o l l o w i n g s u i t ending his match a t 2:45 in the second period his opponent supinejy stymied by Dutch superiority, quickest match of the afternoon came at the hands of t h e BC heavyweight pinning Hope's Mark R a t e r i n g in 1:33. B u t t h e r e a l

Friends of Animals, Inc., a New York-based national humane conservation organization, today announced a scholarship p r o g r a m for university s t u d e n t s . Tne p r o g r a m is aimed at focusing interest on t h e relationship of humans to other life forms as well as inducing s t u d e n t concern for t h e work of Congress. Annual scholarship a w a r d s in t h e a g g r e g a t e amount of $8,000 will be given those s t u d e n t s who submit t h e finest essays in support of a federal legislative campaign to end human exploitation of animals. The 1977-78 essay contest will center on t h e Williams-Long bill in the Congress which would ban t h e i n t e r s t a t e shipment of furs from any s t a t e or nation which has not b a n n e d t h e leg-hold t r a p , t h e d e v i c e u s e d t o c a t c h a n d hold fur-bearers such as raccoon, bobcat, coyote and other animals wanted by t h e f u r industry. The scholarship program was made possible by a g r a n t from Regina Bauer Frankenberg, a

t r a g e d y occurred in t h e 177 lb. weight class as Hope's Cliff Nicholson painfully had to refrain from r e t u r n i n g to t h e mat because of very sore ribs with some possible c a r t i l a g e d a m a g e in t h i s a r e a . Hopefully he will heal and be able to lend his very capable talents to t h e Dutchmen's efforts at a later date. The final score of the match was Hope 31-Baptist College 24. H o p e ' s n e x t h o m e m a t c h is F e b r u a r y 1st against Olivet.

PARK

DOWNTOWN HOLLAND

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Doors Open-6:45

O P E N D A i 4 » Y 11 A . M . S U N D A Y 5 P.M.-11 P.M.

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l/VE DELIVER TO YOUR DORM! Spscialijiiu^

SCORE CARD BASKETBALL Last Week HOPE 87, Concordia 53 Lake Forest 63, HOPE 56 WRESTLING Last Week HOPE 31, G.R. Baptist 24

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Poromount Pictures Presents

islands in the Stream United Arlisls Based on a book by ERNEST HEMINGWAY

54 East 8 t h Street

director of FoA and president of its Washington lobby, the Committ e e for Humane Legislation, Inc. Miss F r a n k e n b e r g ' s motivation for t h e g r a n t , s h e s a i d , w a s to " e n g e n d e r concern for the environm e n t and non-humans in young people." She noted that "new technology p r o v i d e s a l t e r n a t i v e s to the exploitation of animals for food, material, sport and scientific research." "And," Miss F r a n k e n b e r g continued, "we w a n t to encourage t h e young people who will be in c h a r g e of a n e w w o r l d which includes t h e earth and animals in its ethical scheme to expedite the t r a n s i t i o n t h r o u g h r a t i o n a l and p h i l o s o p h i c a l i n f l u e n c e on t h e people and t h e Congress." T h e scholarship a w a r d s will be m a d e to students, u n d e r g r a d u a t e or g r a d u a t e , majoring in the fields of p h i l o s o p h y , j o u r n a l i s m , law, economics, theology, a n d / o r political science. Official e n t r y blanks a r e a v a i l a b l e by w r i t i n g : T h e Regina Bauer F r a n k e n b e r g Schol a r s h i p C o m m i t t e e , F r i e n d s of A n i m a l s , I n c . , 11 W e s t 6 0 t h S t r e e t , New York, NY, 10023.

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I have over 10-years secretarial experience. Reasonable Rates.

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A haunting vision of reincarnation based on the best-selling novel

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BUNTE'S PHARMACY

year." Send t h e n a m e s and addresses on your gift list, with a contribution for each card, to CARE, Dept. HOL, Box 482, Detroit, Mi.48231. C A R E sends t h e cards to you, or, if you prefer, indicate how they s h o u l d b e s i g n e d a n d t h a t you w a n t t h e m mailed directly to the ersons being honored. Allow time or mailing. S o m e e x a m p l e s of how much good c o n t r i b u t i o n s can do: $5 s e r v e s Mp to 30 children a daily bowl of nourishing porridge for a month; $15 builds space for two more children in a rural school; $25 p r o v i d e s a g r o u p of f a r m e r s training to grow more food, or gives thousands of children nutritious food, helping them grow into healthy, productive adults. "For every dollar donated by t h e public," W h i t t e m o r e emphasized, " C A R E last year delivered over nine dollars worth of aid. This w a s made possible by contributions of food by t h e U.S. and other g o v e r n m e n t s a n d by s h a r i n g o p e r a t i n g costs o v e r s e a s with host agencies. This season share the j o y s of t h e h o l i d a y by h e l p i n g those who need it most to help themselves."

Essay contest to support animals

Grapplers topple GRBC by Glenn Johnson

The Flying Dutchmen opened t h e 77-78 b a s k e t b a l l c a m p a i g n w i t h an i m p r e s s i v e v i c t o r y l a s t S a t u r d a y n i g h t in t h e Civic Center, defeating Concordia College by a w h o p p i n g 34 p o i n t s , 87-53. The Dutch jumped out to a quick 10-2 lead, and from t h e r e Concordia never came closer than four. Hope built a 24 point bulge by halftime over a t e a m t h a t has already defeated Calvin by nine points in Grand Rapids. Senior captain Jim Holwerda led all s c o r e r s w i t h 19 p o i n t s . H e collected five rebounds as well. F r e s h m a n John Sutton came off the bench to throw in 17 points, 12 of which came in the first half. Junior guard Scott Peterson added 15 points while grabbing seven rebounds. Sophomore center Loren Schrotenboer was the last Dutchman in d o u b l e f i g u r e s , p u m p i n g in 11

"This coming holiday season you can help t h e poorest of the poor f a m i l i e s a r o u n d t h e w o r l d by sending special g r e e t i n g s to r e l a t i v e s , f r i e n d s and b u s i n e s s associates through CARE's unique gift card plan," Susan Whittemore, Michigan Director of t h e international aid and development agency, said today. "Attractive CARE announcem e n t holiday g r e e t i n g c a r d s inform each person on your list t h a t you have given to CARE in his or her honor to help o t h e r s suffering from hunger, poverty, disease," W h i t t e m o r e explained. "In more than 30 developing count r i e s in A f r i c a , A s i a , L a t i n America and the Middle E a s t , your gift to C A R E helps d e s t i t u t e families not just survive but work their way out of poverty. " Y o u can p r o v i d e food for hungry children, materials, equipm e n t and training for villagers to build s c h o o l s , w a t e r s y s t e m s , health and nutrition centers, plus vital agricultural projects to grow m o r e food. A n d via C A R E MEDICO you help send physicians and nurses to teach modern medical methods t h a t will save many t h o u s a n d s of l i v e s y e a r a f t e r

RESTAURANT & BILLIARDS FACILITIES • 102 RIVER • HOLUND


12-09-1977