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Wahl talks on plight of prisoners H a n s Wahl, a r e p r e s e n t a t i v e from A m n e s t y International, will speak h e r e J a n . 18 on t h e world wide situation of human rights. Amnesty International is a group of people working for the release of " p r i s o n e r s of con science" - men and women impri soned for their beliefs, color, lan guage, ethnic origin or religion, who have not used or advocated violence. According to Josie Martineau, local coordinator. Amnesty never claims direct responsibility for the freeing of a prisoner; however, "in over half of the cases which it has taken up the prisoners have either been released or their condition of imprisonment has been improved." A m n e s t y ' s work on behalf of pri soners and for the elimination of t o r t u r e has been given worldwide recognition, particularly in Octo ber 1977. when the organization received the Nobel Peace Prize. Hans Wahl is working to set up a Holland chapter of A m n e s t y . His informal lecture will be given at 8 p.m. in the faculty lounge of the DeWitt Cultural Center and followed by a coffee. Hach local Amnesty group "adopts" t h r e e prisoners from different p a r t s of the world. These prisoners' cases have been thor oughly researched by Amnesty International, according to Martineau. to e n s u r e that they qualify for adoption. Local m e m b e r s then p r e s s u r e t h e g o v e r n m e n t s concerned, primarily by writing l e t t e r s on behalf of their prisoners. Last year Amnesty International worked on behalf of 6000 individual prisoners. Martineau says.

ope college

olland, michigan D E C E M B E R 8, 1978

V O L U M E N O . 91 -- ISSUE 11

(continued

on page I)

Students' dance program Hope theatre dept. creates dedicates new Dow studio new audience education program A s t u d e n t dance show, produced and p e r f o r m e d by s t u d e n t s only, will be p r e s e n t e d Monday, Dec. 11 at 9 a.m. This is a new experience for the Hope Dance D e p a r t m e n t previously, p r o g r a m s contained only professor-choreographed pieces. T h r e e s t u d e n t s : Rae S y s w e r d a , Joy Dulmes, and Cathy Hondorp, have each u n d e r t a k e n an independent s t u d y in dance production which includes choreographing, staging, lighting, designing and providing the costumes for the dances. The t h r e e s t u d e n t s a r e s t u d y i n g under Maxine DeBruyn, lecturer in dance. Each piece is

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danced by s t u d e n t s only; giving more people a chance to particip a t e in the creative process. One of the s t u d e n t s , Cathy Hondorp, will be leaving for New York at t h e end of the s e m e s t e r to f u r t h e r her dance studies with a professional company. A n o t h e r s t u d e n t , Nancy Geld e r s m a , will p r e s e n t a demonstration on dance t h e r a p y . Geldersma is the first Hope s t u d e n t to major in this area and hopes to c r e a t e a w a r e n e s s in this facet of dance. T h e program will be p r e s e n t e d in t h e Dow Dance studio. This will be t h e first p e r f o r m a n c e to be given in the new facility.

A new Audience Education Program, c r e a t e d with the Holland community as well as Hope s t u d e n t s in mind, will commence in t h e DeWitt Art Gallery following tonight's p e r f o r m a n c e of The Wild Duck. "The purpose of the pro gram," says George Ralph, chairman of the t h e a t e r d e p a r t m e n t , "is to get the Holland community to u n d e r s t a n d t h e a t e r and how it r e l a t e s to their lives."

T h e idea was conceived by Ralph last y e a r as a way of r e s p o n d i n g to t h e needs of the community in the area of t h e a t e r . According to Ralph, it w a s evident from c o m m e n t s made by community m e m b e r s on various Hope productions that t h e r e was a general lack of a w a r e n e s s as to what t h e a t e r is all about in t e r m s of what it is t r y i n g to communicate. To alleviate this problem. Ralph,

Campus boards present unequal representation Hope s t u d e n t s a r e o u t n u m b e r e d by faculty and administration m e m b e r s on virtually every board and t h e majority of c o m m i t t e e s of t h e college. Hope has t h r e e m a j o r boards: Academic Affairs Board, C a m p u s Life Board, and A d m i n i s t r a t i v e Affairs Board. Each board has faculty, administrative, and student m e m b e r s , and also contain various inner committees. When asked why Hope's boards contained more faculty and administrative members than students. P r o v o s t David M a r k e r pointed t h a t t h e administrative-facultys t u d e n t ratio d e p e n d e d on w h a t responsibility t h e board had in various areas. For example, t h e faculty has t h e largest block on t h e Academic A f f a i r s Board, which has jurisdiction o v e r the school calendar, class schedule, and academic requirem e n t s (eight faculty, four s t u d e n t , and one a d m i n i s t r a t i v e m e m b e r ) . T h e C a m p u s Life Board contains four s t u d e n t s (along with four faculty and t h r e e a d m i n i s t r a t i v e m e m b e r s ) , while t h e administration h a s t h e largest block in t h e A d m i n i s t r a t i v e A f f a i r s Board. When asked the same question, Student Congress president David Leenhouts felt that the committee

a p p o i n t m e n t s a r e basically divided evenly between the faculty, administration, and students. L e e n h o u t s went on to s t a t e , "As far as I know, Hope has as much or more s t u d e n t r e p r e s e n t a t i o n than other MIAA schools." "We a r e very lucky to have the s y s t e m we have at Hope," Leenhouts continued. "Hope has stud e n t input, a large s t u d e n t vote, and this often m a k e s a difference in the outcome of a vote." Having a similar opinion. Cong r e s s vice-president Jon Schmidt says that the faculty and administration m e m b e r s listen intently to w h a t the s t u d e n t s have to say, and often vote according to this s t u d e n t input. In r e f e r e n c e to this. Dean Michael Gerrie s t a t e d , "As far as I know, other schools are comparable to Hope in s t u d e n t r e p r e s e n tation. Hope was one of t h e first MIAA schools to initiate a large s t u d e n t r e p r e s e n t a t i o n in the board s t r u c t u r e . " L e e n h o u t s pointed out t h a t the s t u d e n t s , faculty, or administration don't always vote in blocs. E x a m p l e s given w e r e t h e increase in parietal hours. "Two administ r a t i v e , one faculty, and the s t u d e n t m e m b e r s voted against (continued on page 3)

/

mi Left • Paul Daniels, Right - Debbie G r i m m in. . . / T h e Wild D u c k " by Henrik Ibsen.

with the aid of the t h e a t r e department. developed the Audience Education P r o g r a m . The first event, (this evening's meeting), will be a discussion of Ibsen's ihr Wild Duck lead by the t h r e e c o m m i t t e e m e m b e r s : Dr. J a m e s Cook, professor of New T e s t a m e n t at W e s t e r n Theological Seminary; Daniel V a n d e r a r k , an English t e a c h e r at Holland Christian High School; and Ms. Jackie Donnelly, a Hope g r a d u a t e who teaches F r e n c h . T h e meeting is open to anyone i n t e r e s t e d . The c o m m i t t e e m e m b e r s , chosen by Ralph, w e r e selected from the community with t h e idea that they would u n d e r s t a n d t h e community's needs b e t t e r than the t h e a t e r d e p a r t m e n t . As m e m b e r s of the community, they will represent their own viewpoints, concerning each play. However, they will be aided by t h e t h e a t e r d e p a r t m e n t when necessary, and each m e m b e r will be given a copy of the script in advance and will a t t e n d the final d r e s s rehearsal and possibly one or two other rehearsals, so their ideas will not be total conjecture. In developing this program, the c o m m i t t e e m e m b e r s plan to use several approaches. One approach will be to lead a discussion such as t h e one tonight. As a second approach, the c o m m i t t e e is considering t h e idea of inviting particular community groups or organizations to the plays which seem especially pertinent to t h e groups and then holding an informal discussion session a f t e r w a r d s at which time t h e m e m b e r s may meet the cast, director, crew, etc. A third possible approach would be to draw up a discussion guideline, when r e q u e s t e d , which a group leader could follow. Though this p r o g r a m originated with Hope's t h e a t e r d e p a r t m e n t and s t u d e n t s are encouraged to participate in it, its main emphasis is toward the community of Holland in t h e hope of providing a flexible p r o g r a m designed to meet t h e needs of t h e community as a t h e a t e r audience in t h e best ways possible.


Hope College anchor

Page 2

Update on the 12 days of Christmas O n the first day of Christmas m y world gave to m e . . . 900 corpses-men, w o m e n and childrenf o u n d piled three d e e p in a foreign countryside. O n the s e c o n d day of Christmas m y world gave to m e . . . Mayor Mosconi and city superintendent Milk-shot d o w n in cold b l o o d by an a n g e r e d assassin. O n the third day of Christmas m y world gave to m e . . . 350 d r o w n e d V i e t n a m refugees as they fled their h o m e l a n d in search of a better lifestyle.

O n the fourth day of Christmas my world gave to m e . . . T w o Mid d l e East countries that refuse to re-negotiate a draft p e a c e treaty. O n the f i f t h day of Christmas my world gave to m e . . . Political and social unrest t h r o u g h o u t the lands-terrorists shooting at governm e n t police in Iran, political disturbances in N i c a r a g u a and Bolivia and racial segregation in South Africa. O n the sixth day of Christmas my world gave to m e . . . T o r n a d o e s in the southern U . S . leaving d e a t h a n d destruction in their paths and d a m a g i n g earthquakes in Mexico.

O n the seventh d a y of Christmas m y world gave to m e . . . 150 d e a d w h e n two planes collided over the city of San D i e g o in the nation's worst air disaster. O n the e i g h t h day o f Christmas my world gave to m e . . . More than 300 million starving children w h o because o f an i n a d e q u a t e diet will never in their lives feel alert, energetic; have the ability to learn of the desire to s u c e e d . O n the ninth day of Christmas my world gave to m e . . . Chemical contaminated livestock, c h e m i c a l wastes that saturate our lakes and waterways and foul air that blankets our cities. O n the tenth day of Christmas my world gave to m e . . . Scandals a n d misdealings in public agencies, corruption in g o v e r n m e n t , suspicion and lack of trust in political leaders. O n the eleventh d a y of Christmas my world gave to m e . . . A d w i n d l i n g dollar, c o n t i n u i n g inflation, higher prices, u n e m p l o y m e n t , labor disputes and an i m b a l a n c e of world trade. O n the twelfth day of Christmas my world gave to m e . . . A d e a d Detroit p o l i c e m a n , a seriously injured C h i c a g o c o p , the skid-row slasher, Son of S a m , a n d an area family left homeless following the folly of an arsonist-all a part of the never e n d i n g carnival of crime.

Tickets for science seminars? 1 u n d e r s t a n d the financial points m a d e by Ms. Morrison in her letter to the anc/ior published D e c . 1, 1978. W h e n w e switched f r o m f l a m e to electric heat sources t h e cost per unit heat source j u m p e d a b o u t ten times. T h e cost of petri plates has tripled in five years. Test tube prices have d o u b l e d in two years. A small, but serviceable, scanning electron m i c r o s c o p e cost m o r e than $ 2 0 , 0 0 0 . T h e ultra c e n t r i f u g e was another $ 2 0 , 0 0 0 item. T h e list goes on and on. It is very expensive for us to do business if we d o our business well. But, lab fees and outside f u n d i n g provide us the m o n e y with which we operate.

I understand the time costs. Our students s p e n d m a n y hours in the laboratory p e r f e c t i n g techniques, learning new materials, and practicing their techniques as they gather data. W h e n all that work s u p p o r t e d by all that e x p e n s e culminates in a presenta-

tion, we are very p r o u d of our students also. Ms. Morrison's d e p a r t m e n t m a y be "the O N L Y d e p a r t m e n t presenting the bulk of its p r o d u c t i o n without m o n e t a r y r e i m b u r s e m e n t " but we are J U S T O N E of those d e p a r t m e n t s which has never c h a r g e d a n y b o d y anything to attend o n e of our programs. W e even provide a free c u p of c o f f e e and a cookie to those a t t e n d i n g our seminars. Science is just as important a part of one's liberal e d u c a t i o n as are the arts. W e require both of our students. Unfortunately, o n e is not as fashionable as the other a n d is soon n e g l e c t e d . A cultured person must be conversant with the arts, but his illiteracy in the sciences is accepted. Perhaps the way For m o r e people to have m o r e contact with the sciences is for us to distribute tickets to our seminars, and even charge for t h e m . Perhaps Ms. Morrison's d e p a r t m e n t has f o u n d the key to assuring a liberal e d u c a t i o n . W e must be willing to observe and learn. Sincerely, Peter V a n Faasen

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Christmas Vespers, a p e r f o r m a n c e seen by capacity crowds, is in the midst of a great moral d i l e m m a for s o m e Hopeites. Because of moral issues, we of A l p h a Phi O m e g a N a t i o n a l Service Fraternity did not participate in Vespers this year. W e w o u l d like to e x p l a i n our reasons in m o r e detail. O u r fraternity disagrees with the anchor in describing Vespers as a "religious, musical p a g e a n t . " W e feel strongly that it is indeed a worship service. 1 ne d e f i n i t i o n of Vespers is a worship service put to music usually h e l d in the evening. It is interesting to n o t e that the h e a d i n g on the Vespers p r o g r a m is intitled "Order of Service" T h e f o r m a t of Vespers also includes an introit, invocation, benediction and postlude, w h i c h is similar to the order of W o r s h i p for the R e f o r m e d C h u r c h of A m e r i c a . W e agree that the m o n e y o b t a i n e d

from Vespers is not h o a r d e d and is put to a very worthwhile cause. Our Fraternity suggests that if expenses are high, a "free will" o f f e r i n g could be t h e m e t h o d for covering expenses. W e d o not question the m o t i v e of the Music D e p a r t m e n t for c h a r g i n g admission. It is the most effective way to fill the C h a p e l . It is wrong, however, to charge admission to a worship service and in our o p i n i o n Vespers is a worship service. If Vespers is a concert, as the music d e p a r t m e n t implies, it should lack the title a n d f o r m a t of a service. At this t i m e Christmas Vespers is a musical worship service with a required admission fee. Sincerely, Mark W i l l i a m Ennis Secretary T i m o t h y Russell Kinney President

o p e college

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Published d u r i n g the college year except vacation, holiday and e x a m i n a t i o n periods by and for the students of Hope College, H o l l a n d , Michigan, under the a u t h o r i t y of the Student C o m m u n i c a t i o n s Media C o m m i t t e e . Subscription price; $8 per year. Printed by the Hi-Lites Shoppers Guide, Printing D e p a r t m e n t , F r e m o n t , Michigan. Member, Associated Collegiate Press. Office located on gr ound floor of Graves Hall. Telephone 392-5111, Extension 4 6 0 0 .

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Editor Assistant Editor Photography Editor C o p y Editor Subscriptions Manager Business-Ad Manager L a y o u t Editor Sports Editor Cartoonists Photographer Copy Staff Reporters

J a n e t G. S h i m m i n D o u g Dykstra Karen V a n D o n k e l a a r J e n n i f e r Elliott B o b Baker Joy Dulmes Bob Baker S t e v e Nearpass Gary Markert, Kirk Haverkamp, T o m DePree Steve G o s h o r n Barb L o n g , Betty B u i k e m a , T o d d H u d s o n Mark D o u m a , Terri Land, Teresa P e n h o r w o o d ,

Dave Pater, Ken P o w e l l , Lisa Raak, David S c h a c k o w , N a n c y Torresen, C y n d i VanderSchaaf Clark C o d i n g , S u e Ward, J e f f V e r B e c k T o n y Kistler, Rich Farkas, Rich O s t e r h o u t

Sports

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t r a t i o n of Hope College.

control his o w n foolish actions. W i t h the grace of G o d , n o t h i n g too serious h a p p e n e d , outside of a s m a s h e d plant, w h i c h we h o p e to resuscitate. B u t , it could've h a p p e n e d ! Be t h a n k f u l to G o d you didn't kill s o m e o n e or blind t h e m for life. T o o many people are hurting each other already in this world. I don't think we n e e d any m o r e contributions, n o m a t t e r how "generously" offered. I don't believe you m e a n t any real h a r m , but you're g r o w i n g u p now. Maybe it's time you acted like it? Peace N a m e w i t h h e l d by request.

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Fraternity defends boycott of Vespers

The opinions on this page are not necessarily those of the student b o d y , faculty or adminis-

Vandalism Creates rage T o the Obviously Adult Gentlemen w h o get their kicks out of throwing rocks through dorm windows when they're skunk drunk. T a k i n g into consideration your youth a n d your obviously inebriated c o n d i t i o n , I can forgive you for your act of senseless vandalism. You s h o u l d know, however, that your little practical joke was far from harmless. It c a m e u n c o m f o r t a b l y close to either blinding o n e of us, or killing o n e of us, neither of w h i c h I w o u l d take m u c h pleasure in. I d o u b t very m u c h if you w o u l d care to g o through the rest of your life blind b e c a u s e of s o m e o n e w h o couldn't

T o m Jennings tries out the validity of osmosis as he studies for those pre-exam all-nighters.

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Page 3

December 8,1978

Students dominated (Thank....Now who was that?) W facility on boards

T.G.I.F.

p a r t of this. In t h e Old T e s t a m e n t Solomon was held in honor I once had a high school t e a c h e r because of his wisdom which was w h o claimed t h a t for six days each b e s t o w e d upon him by God (I week she w a s a scientist but on Kings 4:29, I l C h r o n . 1:7-10). S u n d a y she had to put all her P r o v e r b s consistently t e a c h e s us k n o w l e d g e away in o r d e r to to seek knowledge and Ecclesiw o r s h i p God. I did not believe this a s t e s tells us t h a t t h e source of t h e n nor do I now believe she had knowledge is from God (Ecc. 2:26). to put a w a y her knowledge to Also two of t h e books of t h e m a k e faith possible. Apocrapha hail wisdom and giving I am a philosophy m a j o r h e r e at k n o w l e d g e along with Hope and a Christian. And being a sound guidance for daily living Christian, I find, does not limit me (Wisdom of Solomon and Ecclesiintellectually nor does it contradict a s t i c u s / W i s d o m of Ben Sirach). T h e New T e s t a m e n t continues my knowledge of t h e world. In fact, being a Christian, for me, to emphasize the d e v e l o p m e n t of enlightens and develops my the mind. Luke r e c o r d s how J e s u s " g r e w to m a t u r i t y , and he was u n d e r s t a n d i n g and knowledge. T h e Bible emphasizes clearly filled with wisdom" (Lk. 2:40) as t h a t we a r e to be whole people well as t h a t " J e s u s increased in developing for the glory of God wisdom, in s t a t u r e , and in favour with God and men" (Lk. 2:32). and it is very clear t h a t our learning and knowledge a r e to be a Also, Isaiah r e f e r s to J e s u s when by Larry Mannino

BOB'S SHOP: Handmade Guitars, Dulcimers and Aeolian Wind Harps. Also, String Instrument Repair, Guitar and Banjo Lessons. Bob Hedstrom 3923925 1 p.m. - 9 p.m. Mon. - Fri.

f-i 'ilkMrNill

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N E E D E D : Fueling Driver - Drive truck to fuel and park on company grounds Mon. & Fri. 4 p.m. on for 4 to 6 hours

A V O N : The more you sell the more you earn. For details, call 392-6238. Mrs. Kemp, Avon manager.

a night â&#x20AC;˘ $ 3 . 5 0 / h r . N E E D H O L I D A Y $$$? Many jobs be ginning now going on through Dec. See Off-Campus Jobs, Phelps L o b b y .

W A N T E D : Graphic artist for {hzanchor Contact Janet G. S h i m m i n if you are interested.

N E E D E D ; Warehouse Workers - 3 ; 3 0 p.m. to midnight. Mon. - Fri. for the m o n t h of Dec. Some heavy lifting. $4.86/hr. See Off-Campus Jobs, Phelps

W A N T E D : A creative person w h o w o u l d be willing to write headlines for the anchor. Call Janet S h i m m i n at 396-3003.

Lobby. FOR S A L E : Sansui A m p l i f i e r model au505 75 watts, asking $120 or best offer call Russ: 396-1152.

N E E D E D : Investigative news reporters for {he anchor. If it sounds like some thing you have always wanted t o try, call Doug Dykstra at ext. 4674.

N E E D : One or two male roommates to live in a 3 bedroom house 2 miles off campus. Y o u w i l l need your o w n car. Pay only 1/3 of heating. Call 392-1723

N E E D E D : 1 male to share house w i t h 3 other students. $80 a m o n t h plus Vi utitilies. Available immediately. Call: 392-8302 for more i n f o r m a t i o n .

Ask for Larry.

^ HOLLAND

he prophecies t h a t a spirit of wisdom, insight, and knowledge would be upon Him (Is. 11:1-3). And J e s u s himself commanded us to be "like s h e e p a m o n g wolves... cunning as s e r p e n t s and yet as h a r m l e s s as doves" (Matt. 10:16). Christianity is not devoid of s e n s e nor is it a religion for t h e ignorant. Never does being a Christian set up the dichotomy' claimed by my old teacher. Christianity is based on faith and knowledge j u s t as a n y t h i n g else in this world. Believing in Christ and His r e s u r r e c t i o n does not contradict knowledge as the philosopher David Hume may have claimed, but it does s u r p a s s knowledge. Faith and knowledge go hand in hand. They a r e two sides of t h e s a m e coin. T h e intellectual person does not d e m o n s t r a t e a lack of faith nor does the person who claims many things by faith d e m o n s t r a t e stupidity. Faith is not to be seen as having a lesser worth than knowledge. Why? Because faith is at t h e foundation of all knowledge, even science. I have learned in philosophy t h a t e v e r y t h i n g boils down to a value judgment and t h a t we believe in principles or laws. We do not know them empirically. T h e law of causality which all of science r e s t s on is one example of this. Science cannot prove this law although science employs it. This law is useful thus they believe in t h e law since it a n s w e r s many questions. It is a faith often overlooked, y e t necessary -a faith in a u n i f o r m e d / o r d e r l y world. On t h e o t h e r hand, knowledge or intelligence is not to be criticized. Knowledge is imp o r t a n t in u n d e r s t a n d i n g t h e s c r i p t u r e s . It would be foolish t o hold a college d e g r e e from Hope and never go beyond a kinderg a r t e n knowledge of the Bible. Immanuel K a n t r e f e r r e d to t h i n g s associated with a knowledge of

(Continued from page I) the r e s t , " L e e n h o u t s said. In addition to this, each of t h e t h r e e factions w e r e internally split recently when deciding on t h e new core r e q u i r e m e n t s in the Academic Affairs Board, and s e t t i n g up rules for the sororities and fraternities in the C a m p u s Life Board, L e e n h o u t s said. He also noted that t h e s t u d e n t s often a r e divided on an issue, as was t h e case with f r a t e r n i t y rules recently. E v e n more e n t h u s e d , L e e n h o u t s said t h a t t h e A p p r o p r i a t i o n s Comm i t t e e has 100% s t u d e n t vote. T h e A p p r o p r i a t i o n s Committee, headed by Congress vice-president J o n Schmidt, divides t h e s t u d e n t activities fee up among t h e various organizations and allocates money for other s t u d e n t e v e n t s and activities. Dean Michael Gerrie pointed out, however, that t h e C a m p u s Life Board must a p p r o v e t h e appropriation budget. "In t h e past years," he said, "it has been a m a t t e r of giving their budget a r u b b e r s t a m p , with no m a j o r

God as "practical reason." It is this knowledge t h a t t h e Bible c o m m a n d s us to seek. As a scientist or a philospher we are not to have a faith in one place and an intelligence s o m e w h e r e else. We a r e to be whole, unified people. Our knowledge of God should be developed along with our knowledge of t h e world. In this way we will, as Paul says, "grow strong, so t h a t Christ may live in your h e a r t s through faith, and then firmly planted in love and built on love, you will with all t h e saints have s t r e n g t h to g r a s p t h e b r e a d t h and t h e length, the height and t h e depth; until, knowing t h e love of Christ, which is beyond all knowledge, you are filled with t h e u t t e r fullness of God." (Eph. 3:16-19).

objections." L e e n h o u t s cited t h e Judicial Board as a n o t h e r example to s u p p o r t his opinion. T h e Judicial Board contains seven s t u d e n t m e m b e r s with votes, and two faculty r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s . T h e Judicial Board h e a r s stud e n t cases w h e r e t h e s t u d e n t has pleaded "not guilty" to an adminisistration c h a r g e against t h e m . If a s t u d e n t pleads guilty, he has the option ot receiving a punishment decision by an administration m e m b e r of t h e Judicial Board, according to Dean Gerrie. F u r t h e r m o r e , the Judicial Board h e a r s appeals from s t u d e n t s who feel a faculty or administration m e m b e r has made an unfair decision or placed unfair punishm e n t on t h e m . " T h e idea behind t h e s t u d e n t judicial board," L e e n h o u t s said, "is t h a t the s t u d e n t is judged by his peers." T h e seven judicial m e m b e r s are Congress m e m b e r s appointed by S t u d e n t Congress. Leenhouts claims t h a t Congress "very carefully selects t h e s t u d e n t s , a f t e r much discussion." Different opinions a r e r e p r e s e n t e d , if possible, on t h e board (a "Greek", a liberal, a conservative, a cross section of classes), according to Leenhouts. " S t u d e n t s have a big say about money spent, t h e judicial process, residential life, and t h e courses one must take," L e e n h o u t s said. "The only thing t h a t h u r t s us is that we have a good s y s t e m but become apathetic about our democracy."

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Olivia Newton-John

SUMMER PROGRAM 6 WEEKS (JULY & AUGUST) INTERN PROGRAM 12-14 MONTHS PURPOSE: to provide an English language program for Taiwanese university students. to provide a situation in which Taiwanese Christian students may grow in Christian m a t u r i t y and non-Christian students may be introduced t o the Christian faith. to provide broader perspective through a cross-cultural experience.

REQUIREMENTS: - college graduate, single and under 30 years of age interested in teaching English (experience not necessary); have good grasp of English grammer, spelling, composition and pronunciation. - have a thorough knowledge of the Christian faith and the a b i l i t y and desire to communicate it to others.

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must be flexible, sensitive in human relationships, out-going, able to take initiative, and in good health.

Most of the cost w i l l be covered by the Reformed Church in America. Candidate interviews on college campuses are tentatively scheduled f o r late January or early February. For an application or more information see your college chaplain or w r i t e now t o : O f f i c e of Human Resources Reformed Chruch in America 475 Riverside Drive New Y o r k , New Y o r k 10027

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Programmers take fifth Hope placed fifth a m o n g 25 t e a m s in a r e c e n t intercollegiate c o m p u t e r p r o g r a m m i n g competition. T h e e v e n t was t h e fourth annual east-central region p r o g r a m m i n g at K e n t S t a t e U n i v e r s i t y . Michigan S t a t e University w a s the w i n n e r of t h e competition for t h e f o u r t h consecutive year.

Hope participants w e r e senior David Boundy, junior Andrew Birner, senior T h o m a s Rigterink, and junior K e n n e t h Bekkering. T h e coach of t h e t e a m is H e r b e r t D e r s h e m , c h a i r m a n of t h e departm e n t of c o m p u t e r . Each t e a m was given four problems to solve by computer p r o g r a m s in a four-hour period.

Bareman to aid state Glenn B a r e m a n , director of publie s a f e t y , has been appointed to a s t a t e w i d e d o r m i t o r y fire safety rules advisory c o m m i t t e e . T h e committee will advise t h e S t a t e ' s F i r e S a f e t y Board on pro posed rules for college d o r m i t o r i e s

which up until now have not been included in school fire s a f e t y rules. B a r e m a n has been a m e m b e r of t h e Hope staff since 1972. His responsibilities include coordination of t h e college's fire safety program.

Econ department slates 'Productivity' talk series D r . W a r r e n Law, professor of economics at H a r v a r d Business School, will p r e s e n t the first in a s e r i e s of lectures dealing with the topic "Declining Productivity" Monday in D e W i t t T h e a t r e . L a w will lecture on "The Riddle of P r o d u c t i v i t y " at 10:30 a.m.; the l e c t u r e will be followed by a luncheon in P h e l p s Conference Room at noon. T h e second lecture, entitled "Declining Productivity-the P r o b l e m with Many Causes," will be p r e s e n t e d M a r . 12 by Dr. A l b e r t Rees, professor of political economy at Princeton University. R o b e r t Zager, vice-president of t h e W o r k in America I n s t i t u t e , will conclude the s e r i e s on A p r . 18 with a lecture entitled, "Is Pro-d-t-v-ty Really a Dirty Word?" T h e lecture s e r i e s is offered by Hope's d e p a r t m e n t of economics

and business and u n d e r w r i t t e n by a g r a n t from ODL, Inc., of Zeeland. " F o r over 200 y e a r s , t h e American economy has p e r f o r m e d as a huge social and economic escalator," says Dr. B a r r i e Richardson, chairman of t h e departm e n t of economics and business a d m i n i s t r a t i o n . "Over t h e last decade, t h e r a t e of productivity has fallen from our historic rate of over t h r e e p e r c e n t to less than one and one-half p e r c e n t . "If t h e productivity slow-down continues, it will a g g r a v a t e inflation, hinder our capacity to sustain social security benefits for an aging population and reduce our competitive position in world markets." The l e c t u r e r s will discuss these problems and offer possible solutions.

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T h e p r o b l e m s r a n g e d from doing a r i t h m e t i c in d i f f e r e n t bases to playing a g a m e similar to bingo on t h e c o m p u t e r . T h e t e a m solving t h e m o s t problems correctly was t h e w i n n e r . The Michigan S t a t e t e a m w a s t h e only t e a m completing all four problems. Five t e a m s completed t h r e e p r o b l e m s correctly. The o r d e r of finish of t h e s e five t e a m s w a s d e t e r m i n e d by t h e time needed and n u m b e r of trial runs required to complete t h e problems. T h e o r d e r of finish of t h e s e five t e a m s was P u r d u e University, Case W e s t e r n R e s e r v e University, Ohio S t a t e University, Hope, and K e n t S t a t e University. T h e two highest placing t e a m s , Michigan S t a t e and P u r d u e , will r e p r e s e n t t h e eastcentral region in the national contest in F e b r u a r y at Dayton, Ohio.

Potter win awards A ^ J T/"— Seniors R o V bve M r t 4 Acri and Ken P o t t e r have been selected as Outs t a n d i n g Social Studies S t u d e n t T e a c h e r s by t h e Michigan Council for t h e Social Studies. Each y e a r t h e Council selects from each nominating college or university in Michigan, outstanding s t u d e n t s who plan to e n t e r t h e teaching field in t n e area of social

4 « • I » -.1 AI_ -

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s t u d i e s at t h e elementary or the secondary level. Selection criteria for the award include quality of scholastic record, recommendation from the professor supervising the candid a t e ' s s t u d e n t teaching, participation in c a m p u s life, and potential for contributing to the teaching of social studies.

Prisoner plight discussed by Wahl (Continued

from page 1)

As background for t h e work of the peace organization Martineau offers this s t a t e m e n t by Dietrich Bonhoeffer, a German P r o t e s t a n t theologian who was executed by t h e Nazis in 1945: "To be a Christian does not mean to be religious in a particular way, to cultivate some particular form of asceticism (as a sinner, a penitent, or a saint), but to be a

man. "It is not some religious act that makes a Christian what he is, but participation in the suffering of God in the life of t h e world." Martineau points out that the UN Declaration on Human Rights was adopted 30 y e a r s ago this Sunday, yet " t h e worldwide pict u r e r e m a i n s grim."

Pine grove boasts living fossil thanks to imagination of prof, student by Teresa Penhorwood Anyone s u g g e s t i n g t h a t humans a r e u n o b s e r v a n t could quickly prove their point right h e r e on Hope's campus. A t r e e in t h e Pine Grove, which looks different from t h e r e s t , is often passed by w i t h o u t even being noticed. Most of us a t Hope don't realize t h a t g r o w i n g directly behind Grave's Hall is a once t h o u g h t to be extinct Metasequoia Glyptostroboide tree, T h e Metasequoia is a t r e e which was a b u n d a n t 25,000 y e a r s ago. Until 1945 the t r e e was known only t h r o u g h fossils found of it in J a p a n and Korea. But then, quite unexpectedly, J a p a n e s e soldiers fighting in World W a r II, stumbled upon some living Metasequoia t r e e s in t h e moist valleys of C e n t r a l China. Thus, the Metasequoia, commonly known as t h e D a w n Redwood, is called a "living fossil." How did Hope acquire a t r e e such as this? In t h e 1960's a Hope biology professor, William Oostenink, was talking with a s t u d e n t of his, J e r r y J o h n s t o n , about t r e e s t h a t could add t o t h e b e a u t y of t h e Pine Grove. They hit upon the idea of a Metasequoia. To Oostenink this didn't s e e m very probable because he knew how r a r e t h e Metasequoia was. But, J o h n s t o n t h o u g h t t h a t his p a r e n t s , who owned a n u r s e r y

near Adrian at the time, had a t r e e of this t y p e in stock. He was immediately rushed down to his home to see if t h e t r e e was indeed a Metasequoia. It was, and the J o h n s t o n family donated it to Hope. William Dornemann, a new professor at Hope from Colgate U n i v e r s i t y in Hamilton, N.Y., the school w h e r e Oostenink is presently teaching, says that Oostenink is very proud of Hope and t h a t at the t i m e the Metasequoia was planted, d r a g g e d t h a t it w a s t n e only t r e e of its kind e a s t of the

Mississippi. Although a relative of the great California Sequoias (the giant Redwoods), t h e Metasequoia will not grow to be so large. In the a u t u m n the needles on the t r e e t u r n golden color and fall. Today, it is relatively easy to acquire a Metasequoia. Although found natively only in Central China, it can grow just about a n y w h e r e . It a d a p t s very easily to most climates and will survive just about a n y w h e r e in the United States.

i...

ALL ABOUT BOOK BUY-BACK For most college freshmen the end of Fall Semester is the first experience they will have w i t h book buy-back (aside f r o m nasty rumors they may have heard f r o m upper classmen). Many of these students come f r o m high schools where books are either loaned free or have a small rental fee attached and hence have become accustomed to returning all of their books at the end of the semester. This is not the case in college, where books are purchased outright by students and resale values are determined by a variety of market conditions - and this can sometimes be a rude realization. Perhaps some inf o r m a t i o n on the subject w i l l help ease the shock. W H A T IS BOOK B U Y - B A C K ? Book buy-back is an o p p o r t u n i t y for students to recover some of the money they have spent for course books they do not wish t o keep in their personal libraries. This process recycles books f r o m those wishing t o sell t o those wishing to buy and allows the bookstore t o o f f e r used books as well as new ones. Over half the titles used at Hope are reused at some other t i m e , but w i t h new editions, changing titles and gaps between the times a course is offered, students can more likely expect t o sell back about 25% of their books at the end of the semester. JHQW DOES B U Y - B A C K WORK? During the last t w o weeks of the Spring and Fall Semesters a buy is held at the bookstore. There are t w o buys going on at the same time. First the store buys books that are being used the f o l l o w i n g semester at Hope. This Is the bookstore buy and the prices paid are 50% of the current selling price on paperbacks and 60% on hardcovers. The quantities bought are sometimes l i m i t e d by projected class enrollments and the number of books the store already has on hand.

The second buy is done for the Follet Used Book Co. in Chicago and the prices are the wholesale values listed in their " B l u e B o o k " buying guide. In general, these prices range between 5% and 30% of the current selling price. The bookstore does not encourage students to sell books in this manner unless there seems to be no Indication that the book will be used again at Hope. WHY W O N T T H E B O O K S T O R E BUY A L L MY B66KS? In a given semester there are several factors that can cause a book not t o be bought back at the 50%-60% price offered by the bookstore. Some of them are: 1. The professor has not yet submitted a book order. 2. The book Is not being used the following term at Hope. It is a good idea to t r y again at the next buy-back before selling t o the used book company. 3. The book adoption has been changed because some better book has become available. The bookstore no longer needs the book but it may be bought for the used book company. Follett's Used Book Company lists thousands of textbooks which they w i l l buy, but even they do not buy everything. For example novels and religious titles are almost never listed. Also when a new edition appears the old edition has no value even to the used book company. There Is never a guarantee that textbooks purchased by students w i l l be used again by any instructor anywhere in the c o u n t r y . Students should not buy books w i t h the expectation of reselling every one -- that happens In very few cases. The real value of a book is obtained by studying It carefully and If It can be resold when no longer needed then that Is an extra bonus.

Book Buy-Back starts Monday, December 11 BRING YOUR I.D.

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This Metasequoia Glyptostroboide Is living in the Pine grove after being thought to be extinct until 1945. It was brought t o Hope by a former biology professor.

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December 8, 1978

Grapplers pinned to 5th place in tourney Hope's wrestling squad finished over Kelly Low of in fifth place while hosting t h e victory S o u t h w e s t e r n . Hope Invitational last S a t u r d a y . Hope had four other w r e s t l e r s Ten schools e n t e r e d t h e tournaplace in the Invitational. Dan ment. D e k k e r secured second place Ferris' g r a p p l e r s accumulated the most team points with a total honors at 126 pounds. Paul Garmiof 713/4. Wheaton of Illinois rian g r a b b e d fourth place in the followed with 6174 points. T h e 150 pound weight bracket, as did r e m a i n d e r of t h e point totals a r e Mike Sutton in the 158 pound as follows: Kalamazoo 44. South- class. Garry Visscher took fourth w e s t e r n Michigan 44, Hope 34 72, place honors in t h e heavyweight Adrian 3372, G r a n d Rapids Baptist b r a c k e t . K u r t Brinks, a f r e s h m a n , wrest3172, Sienna Heights 23, Calvin ling at 190 pounds suffered a 10 72, Grand Rapids School of Bible s e p a r a t e d shoulder and will be lost and Music 0. Hope had one w r e s t l e r win a for t h e season. T h e Invitational was set up to championship as P e t e White, a allow unlimited e n t r i e s per weight f r e s h m a n from Northbrook, 111. class and e v e r y w r e s t l e r was c a p t u r e d the 150 pound weight class. White received a uye in t h e g u a r a n t e e d two matches. Hope will face Adrian and Ohio first round and d e f e a t e d Paul Getz N o r t h e r n in a triangular meet at of Adrian in t h e second. In the Adrian Dec. 9. T h e g r a p p l e r s first semi-finals White outpointed Eu gene Allen of F e r r i s and in t h e home meet is Dec. 13 against championship match scored a F e r r i s .

Cagers to host Goshen, looking for end to streak T h e Hope q u i n t e t hosts Goshen College tomorrow night in t h e Civic Center. T h e Flying Dutch men will be a t t e m p t i n g to t u r n around their p r e s e n t t h r e e game skid. T h e Dutchmen have played the squad from Goshen t h r e e times since 1975 and they hold a 2 1 adv a n t a g e over t h e m . Hope was t h e victor in last y e a r ' s contest coming out with a 91-75 verdict. In the early p a r t of t h e season, Hope's biggest problem a p p e a r s to be t h e inability of the g u a r d s to provide sufficient offense and leadership. This has let the opponents sag off on defense and help defend t h e frontline players. T u e s d a y night, the Dutchmen traveled to Delaware. Oh. and

played the Battling Bishops of Ohio Wesleyan University. Ohio e n t e r e d the g a m e unbeaten in two o u t i n g s and their g a m e with Hope kept their record unblemished. T h e Bishops shot a fine 53% from the field, leading them to a 90-74 decision over t h e Dutchmen. Hope was led by Loren Schrot e n b o e r . a junior center, who was the only Hope player to reach double figures. S c h r o t e n b o e r hit on 20 points for t h e highest individual output this season. T h e Dutchmen dropped their home opener to Aquinas 86-71 and lost on t h e road to Concordia 67-49. Both g a m e s showed t h e inefficiency of the g u a r d s and the poor shooting of t h e Hope squad.

KHN drinks for M.D. T h e Knickerbocker Drinking for D y s t r o p h y p a r t y , a r a t h e r unorthodox kind of fund raiser, collected appr oximately $35 last S a t u r day night to fight t h e disease. The money was raised by having an offc a m p u s party at which guests brought their own drinks, then donated their e m p t y bottles and cans, which the Knicks later re-

t u r n e d for the deposit. Although t h e amount raised was small, t h e Knicks feel that this is c o u n t e r e d by the fact that a large n u m b e r of people gave up substantial deposits, reflecting a concern for t h e cause instead of spending S a t u r d a y night in t h e usual unproductive manner. They wish to thank everybody who attended.

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The Hope I n v i t a t i o n a l gave a preview t o w h a t appears t o be a m u c h i m p r o v e d D u t c h m e n u n i t . B y r o n " t h e a n i m a l " Prielipp shows the i n t e n s i t y in w h i c h the D u t c h grapplers displayed t h r o u g h o u t the tour-

Canipus formal set in DeWitt for 7 9 kickoff This year in accordance with the new tradition, a formal and e n t e r t a i n m e n t e x t r a v a g a n z a , called "A W i n t e r ' s Night D r e a m " will be t a k i n g place instead of Hope's W i n t e r Fantasia. A variety of t a s t e s will be entertained by two bands; "Chance" in t h e D e W i t t ballroom and "Special G u e s t " in t h e Kletz. A relaxing a t m o s p h e r e in the pit will be c r e a t e d by a mellow group of musicians. R e f r e s h m e n t s will be served. Pre-dance dinners will be available at Point West, The Hatch, Sandy Point, and Prince's. Tickets for the dance, slated for J a n . 20, from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., will be on sale from Monday, J a n . 15 t h r o u g h Wednesday, J a n . 17 in the SAC office, in t h e basement of Van Raalte. The cost is $20 per couple for the dinner and dancing or $5 per couple for the dance alone.

Photographs of Rome on exhibition at seminary "Rome," an exhibition of thirtyt h r e e photographs by Margo Vanderhill. 1968 Hope g r a d u a t e , may be seen in the main concourse of W e s t e r n Theological Seminary, t h r o u g h Dec. 22, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. A sensitive p h o t o g r a p h e r . Van derhill has caught both the grand scale of the monuments, as well as t h e details, both a r c h i t e c t u r a l and human, of Roman life. Architectur ally she observes that "Rome" is not a city for purists. Ancient and modern a r c h i t e c t u r e cannot be s e p a r a t e d . Each era has accommod a t e d . assimilated or appropriated earlier s t r u c t u r e s for its own use." Vanderhill has t a u g h t a r t in Michigan and Iowa since her graduation from Hope. She currently teaches a r t at Unity Christian High School in O r a n g e City, la. The photographs w e r e taken while

on the W e s t e r n Christendom Seminar to Rome sponsored by the Seminary.

Faculty comer J . Sidney Downy, assistant professor, d e p a r t m e n t of economics and Business administration, was p r e s e n t e d with t h e 1978 J a y c e e Distinguished Service Award at the Holland club's Bosses Night dinner at Point West on Tuesday, Nov. 28th.

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Hope College anchor

Women defeat Hillsdale, enter B-ball tourney 1-0 T h e women cagers host t h e Hope Invitational Tourney tonight in t h e Dow C e n t e r . T h e action will commence at 6 p.m. with Grand Rapids Baptist playing Muskegon CC. Hope will be matched up with Glen Oaks College in t h e second game, s t a r t i n g at 8 p.m. The women e n t e r t h e tourney with a perfect record. They won their season opener, d e f e a t i n g Hillsdale College 55-41 in the Dow Center. The g a m e got off to a slow s t a r t with both t e a m s feeling each o t h e r out. This is t h e first t i m e in t h r e e y e a r s t h a t Hillsdale's women have participated in basketball. T h e y showed signs of being a first y e a r t e a m , with n u m e r o u s t u r n o v e r s and hurried shots. Hope s t a r t e d out a bit shakey as they made their s h a r e of t u r n o v e r s also. During the first half, Hillsdale was able to move out in front with some hot shooting from t h e outside. Hope played a tough zone defense. Hope s t a r t e d out in a zone defense which was employed fullcourt. Hillsdale was able to break t h e defense with some hot outside shooting. The C h a r g e r s built an early lead and w e r e able to control most of t h e first half. L a t e in the first half, Hope s t a r t e d taking the ball to t h e C har ger defense. Sue G e b h a r t , t h e only senior on the t e a m , played tough under t h e boards, scoring n u m e r o u s times to get Hope back in the game. Hope battled back and took a 25-24 lead at the half. The second half s t a r t e d out with both t e a m s running, however t h e home team pressed their oppon e n t s and w e r e able to build a 10 point a d v a n t a g e . A f t e r dropping behind by 10 points, t h e C h a r g e r s slowed their game down and played with a more deliberate pace. They w e r e able to battle back within t h r e e points. A f t e r Coach Irwin called a time-out and settled t h e Hope squad down, t h e D u t c h m e n took t h e m o m e n t u m away from t h e

C h a r g e r s and cruised to a 55-41 victory. G e b h a r t and f r e s h m a n guard J o d y Foy paced t h e Hope attack with 15 points each. F r e s h m a n f o r w a r d F a y e Berens added nine points to t h e cause, with many of her points coming from t h e outside. Six other m e m b e r s of t h e D u t c h m e n squad w e r e able to d e n t t h e scoring column. T h e loss for Hillsdale was their second of t h e season in as many s t a r t s . " T u r n o v e r s m a d e t h e diff e r e n c e in t h e game," commented t h e C h a r g e r coach. " W e had 20 in t h e first half and you simply can't win when you turn t h e ball over that frequently." Hope's s t r e n g t h a p p e a r e d to be their ability to run t h e fast break. Many times, they w e r e able to beat t h e C h a r g e r s down t h e court, r e s u l t i n g in lay-ups or 2-1 and 3-2

DELS GUITARS-BANJOS MANDOLINS AND FIDDLES STRING INSTRUMENT CONSTRUCTION/REPAIRS 23 E. 8\h St., Holland

SCOREBOARD

offensive a d v a n t a g e s . HOPE

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3-0- 6 5-5-15

Bulthouse Gebhart Rietberg Barney Miknis Berens Henry

1-0-

2

7-1-15 0 - 1 0 - 1

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1 - 0 -

4-1 2 - 0 -

Total

23 - 9 55 HILLSDALE 2 - 0 4 *3-0- 6 1-1- 3 3-0- 6 9-0-18 2-0- 4

Rygiel Appel Tilman Schenkelberg Moore Palazeki Total

20-1-41

MEN'S BASKETBALL TUESDAY LEAGUE W Phelps West 3 Kollen H 3 Gators 2 Seminary I 2 Arkie 2 2 Basketeers 2 Doesburg 1 Cosmos 1 Buzz Boys 1 Seminary H 1 Kollen Bucks 0 Kollen I 0

L 0 0 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 3 3

THURSDAY LEAGUE Frater A Titans Cosmo Coalition Emmersonian Arkie 1 Eddies Blazers Longspurs Knick House Faculty

0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2

2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0

FRIDAY L E A G U E Arkie 3 Orca 69'ers D u r f e e B-B Durfee Dunkers Zwemer Theatre Bull Moose I Frater B H i n d m a n ' s Bombers Columbia Durfee 3 Arkie 4

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SPORTS QUIZ (1.) Can you name t h e leading scorer in t h e NBA this season? This s a m e person won t h e scoring title last season. He is a m e m b e r of a t e a m in t h e Central Division. Can you also n a m e t h e t e a m t h a t he plays for? (2.) L a s t y e a r t h e n u m b e r one pick by t h e D e n v e r N u g g e t s saw limited action. This y e a r he is playing for S e a t t l e and is leading the team to t h e top of the Pacific division. Can you name t h e player o r> rl • r\ rv /^/-vl 1 /-v ... I. T - L and t h e college from which heU came? (3.) In 1971, t h e record for the longest winning s t r e a k in professional basketball was broken. Can you n a m e t h e t e a m t h a t did not lose a g a m e b e t w e e n October 31. 1971 and J a n u a r y 9, 1972, defeating 15 of t h e 16 other t e a m s in the league, and how long was the streak? (4.) In t h e history of the NBA, t h e r e have been seven rookies who b r o k e into the league in a flurry. T h e s e seven players scored over 2,000 points in their first y e a r . A m o n g t h e s e are: Wilt C hamberlain of Philadelphia, Walt

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Lora Hanson throws in two of her six points. She quarterbacked the offense leading the women to a win in their season debut.

Swimmers get their feet wet; women place third T h e swim t e a m s officially began their first season last S a t u r d a y at the MIAA Relays. This meet is primarily "a fun meet, with no p r e s s u r e . It's w h e r e you go to see what you can do!" says Coach J o h n P a t n o t t . This y e a r t h e men's relays w e r e held in Kalamazoo, with t h e women's meet a t Calvin. Due to heavy snow and poor road conditions, Adrian was unable to make t h e trip to both t h e men's and women's relays and Kalamazoo's women's t e a m was unable to travel to Calvin. The final result of t h e men's competition found Kazoo on top with 118 points, Albion with 67, Alma tied with Calvin at 58, and Hope in fifth place with 32 points. The highlight of t h e men's relays saw Hope s e t t i n g a new pool record in t h e 500-yard freestyle relay with a time of 4:39.46, b r e a k i n g t h e old record, held by Kalamazoo, of 4:41.79. T h e four Hope s w i m m e r s in this e v e n t w e r e Ken Schewe, who swam 50 of t h e 500 yards, followed by Tim J a s p e r s e , swimming 100 yards, with Craig Anderson swimming 150 yards, and Dave Moored swam t h e anchor leg of 200 y a r d s . T h e r e s u l t s of t h e women's meet is as follows: Albion-114 points; Calvin-74 points; Hope-70 points; and Alma with 68 points. The women swam very well and kept t h e point s t a n d i n g s close with a few first place finishes and several second places. Lynn Bufe and Lily F r a s c h , Hope's two fine women divers, dove their way into t h e

INTRAMURAL

record books as they set a new pool diving record by collecting 186.85 total points. Because s o m e of t h e women's m e e t s a r e t h e same day as the men s, but in d i f f e r e n t places, Mrs. B a r b a r a Boss has become the w o m e n ' s t r a v e l i n g coach. Boss is an experienced coach as she has coached several y e a r s at Holland High. The next m e e t , for both men and women, will be t o m o r r o w at Adrian. The m e n ' s m e e t will begin at 1 p.m. followed by t h e women's at 3 p.m. This non-league meet, according to coach P a t n o t t , "should be a good close opening meet."

RMMT-A COLOR 7 V Call 396-1877

H0L1AND TV A ELECTRONICS

Bellamy of New York, Oscar R o b e r t s o n of Cincinnati, and Geoff P e t r i of P o r t l a n d . The other t h r e e m e m b e r s of this illustrious group a r e still active in the NBA. Can you n a m e t h e t h r e e active players and t h e t e a m t h a t each one broke in with? (5.) T h e old ABA is now d e f u n c t . Since t h e league disbanded, t h e r e a r e only four teams t h a t w e r e able to survive the falling out of t h e league. These r . . . four t e a m s w e r e absorbed into the NBA. Can you n a m e t h e s e teams? A n s w e r s to last week's quiz: (1.) Tom L a n d r y , Don Shula, Bud G r a n t . (2) T h e Oakland Raiders. (3). F r a n c o Harris. (4). Earl C a m p b e n ! ' ^ ) . Delvin Williams

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S A U G A T U C K

IL F0RN0 RATHSKELLER i RESTAURANT AVAILABLE for....

OLD CROW I OPEN FRIDAY & SATURDAY

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fo AW... from.... HOLLAND

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT

OPEN DAILY

EXCEPT MONDAY

FINE DINING IN A CASUAL ATMOSPHERE

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"SPICE DANCING and COCKTAILS

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OUR EXCITING GARDEN TABLE

• FORMALS • INFDRMALS • PARTIES • DANCES • BANQUETS ACCOMMODATING UP TO 225 PEOPLE.

"S/nce 1900" STATIONERS

DOWNTOWN H O L L A N D , MICH.

FOR INFORMATION or RESERVATIONS....PIione 857-2162

Profile for Hope College Library

12-08-1978  

12-08-1978