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Curriculum proposal becomes faculty hassle by T o m Donia

83rd A n n i v e r s a r y - 1 1

December 7, 1970

Hope College, Holland, Michigan

Jose Molina troupe

Spanish dancers to perform T h e Jose Molina Bailes Espanoles, o n e of Spain's most popular song and dance companies, will appear t o m o r r o w at 8:15 p.m. in the Civic Center as part of the Hope College Great Performance Series. Molina and his group of singers, dancers and instrumentalists have a diversified repertoire of songs and dances representative of all Spanish music. T h e program will include music f r o m all of the Spanish provinces, f r o m the court of Charles 111. and f r o m the great Spanish operas and ballets. One of the distinctive features of the group is its wardrobe of f l a m b o y a n t costumes, valued at S80,000. T h e c o s t u m e s were created over a period of m o n t h s by nearly one hundred designers and c a r f t s m e n . F ew items of apparel are worn for more than a single n u m b e r in the show. T h e t r o u p e uses eighty pairs of shoes and b o o t s for each p e r f o r m a n c e , as well as myriad stacks of handmade laces, petticoats, and intricate bodices. The company, which has toured the U.S. several times since its debut in 1962, is making its second appearance in Holland.

Motions, amendments and c o u n t e r - m o t i o n s sailed through the air al last m o n t h ' s faculty meeting as the faculty considered for the first lime the proposal to revise the curriculum of the college. O V E R 100 FACULTY members showed up to discuss the lengthy d o c u m e n t , and when it was a l l over two hours later they had r e c o m m e n d e d I 2 s t a t e m e n t s to the Academic Affairs Board and had returned the proposal itself for f u r t h e r s t u d y . In addition, the faculty expressed its support lor the portions of the d o c u m e n t entitled " P r e f a c e " and "Philosophy." Of the 12 r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s t o the board, three asked for f u r t h e r study and clarification on the contract curriculum program, and two each dealt with the area curriculum plan, the date of implementation of the entire package, and the n u m b e r of stud e n t s currently enrolled in the college w h o would be affected by a change in curriculum. One r e c o m m e n d a t i o n asked for a new study on entrance requirements to the college and the idea of entering Hope with an academic deficiency. A n o t h e r statement questioned the long-term e f f e c t s of the

proposed curriculum on enrollment, departmental structure, staffing and financing. AS THE MEETING began Dean for Academic Affairs Morrette Rider read a s t a t e m e n t outlining the history of curriculum reform al the college and explaining to the faculty the alternative actions it could take as well as the implications of each alternative. R i d e r - s a i d , " O u r need is to focus the t h o u g h t s of the faculty on a specific proposal, but 1 h o p e we will use this as a device whereby critical thought in the best meaning of that term can result in positive actions or recommendations. HE DESCRIBED the background of the present proposal and n o t e d , " T h i s has been in the truest sense a faculty instigated and faculty c o n d u c t e d project through the c o m m i t t e e and board to which the major portion of the work was delegated." THE DEAN ALSO c o m m e n t e d that, "We are well along the road to an a t t i t u d e which views the s t u d e n t ' s m a j o r curriculum and the d e p a r t m e n t a l emphasis as growing to the probable detriment of liberal e d u c a t i o n . " Immediately following Rider's c o m m e n t s , t h e faculty voted 75-34 to refer the curriculum pro(Continued on page 10, column I j

Donia resigns 'anchor' post; applicants sought

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COLA DE B A T A - J o s e Molina and A n t o n i a Martinez are featured in lavish c o s t u m e s in the "Bailes Espanoles" to be presented t o m o r r o w night in the Civic Center. This is Molina's second visit to Holland as part of the Great P e r f o r m a n c e Series, and he will bring with him guitarist Francisco Espinosa, w h o p e r f o r m e d here last year for the series.

T o m Donia a n n o u n c e d last week his resignation as editor of the anchor effective January 30, 1971. He was appointed to the post, in Fall, 1969. Donia said his decision t o resign was not the result of any pressure f r o m the administration, faculty or student b o d y . "1 essentially made the decision during the s u m m e r , " he said. " T h e anchor staff has been aware of my thinking for over two months." T h e resignation came at the same time as a Student Congress initiated "investigation" into the o p e r a t i o n of the newspaper. " M y resignation is entirely unrelated to the Congress' activities," Donia emphasized. "It is u n f o r t u n a t e that the Congress has chosen to m o u n t what appears to be an attack at such a crucial time. 1 hope the leaders of Congress will be willing to put aside any differences of

opinion that may exist concerning anchor policies, and will join with the rest of the newspaper staff in an all-out e f f o r t t o provide the paper with adequate, c o m p e t e n t leadership in the many areas of p r o d u c t i o n and m a n a g e m e n t , " he said. Donia expressed thanks for the "sincere c o o p e r a t i o n and assist a n c e " he has received f r o m both the Congress and the rest of the college. "1 k n o w it will be in the best interest of b o t h the anchor and the Congress to maintain and improve the quality of the p a p e r , " he added. Donia said he plans t o work on o t h e r projects during the second semester, although he has made no definite c o m m i t m e n t s as yet. The Student C o m m u n i c a t i o n s Media C o m m i t t e e is accepting applications for the position of editor until Jan. 5. It will make its a p p o i n t m e n t early in J a n u a r y .

V-Z is poor study area; little hope for change seen Editor's N o t e : This is the second article of a two-part series concerning t h e problems of Van Zoeren Library and their possible solutions, written by Managing Editor David Dustin.

by David Dustin The Library is a nice place to visit, but it's getting harder and harder t o study there. That, at least, seems to be a c o m m o n sentiment a m o n g growing n u m b e r s of Hope s t u d e n t s and librarians. "I USUALLY COME to the library every night to do my s t u d y i n g . " said one junior girl, " b u t at times it's taken me ten or f i f t e e n minutes just to find a good s e a t . " She qualified her s t a t e m e n t by defining "a good seat" as being o n e of the single-student cubicles which are found generally along the walls in certain areas of Van Zoeren. Edward Whittaker, director of libraries, is aware of this typical s t u d y area preference. " A m e r i can s t u d e n t s seem to prefer studying p r i v a t e l y - o n e or two to a table, or else they use the cubicles," he stated. " O n c e in a while y o u get three or four s t u d e n t s at one table during e x a m t i m e . We are going t o have to provide ano t h e r seating arrangement, one

where we have more individual cubicles," added Whittaker. WHEN ASKED what he was doing about the student preference for studying alone, Whittaker replied, " w e are investigating the possibility of dividing the tables up by partitioning them off into cubicles. Perhaps this might be a solution to the problem. Anyway, we d o n ' t plan to have that many tables left in the library." He quickly emphasized that the library would not be switching completely to cubicles, t h o u g h ; "We need tables for reference work and the like. We are going to balance the student facilities between cubicles and tables." The increased premium on study s p a c e - p a r t i c u l a r l y at exam t i m e s - i s only one of the several factors which especially seem to rankle Hope students about their library. Noise is a n o t h e r . " O N L Y A NUT could have designed this place," one irate senior responded, " o r else he would have put straw on the floors, left off the doors and windows and turned it into the barn that it should have been. It's so noisy in here that I can barely take it, let along study in it. At least straw on the floor would cut down on some of the noise that floats a r o u n d all the t i m e . " A s o p h o m o r e complained that the noise made here feel very

self-conscious whenever she walked anywhere in the building. " Y o u d o n ' t really want to sound like an invasion when y o u ' r e walking around in there, but you can't help it unless y o u ' r e wearing sneakers. It makes me always feel like tip-toeing, but I d o n ' t care to look like a c o m p l e t e idiot every time I walk over to the card c a t a l o g , " she said. WHITTAKER DEFINITELY agrees that noise is a big problem that the library must overcome, but he would also add the need for air-conditioning the building. "I think that originally the plans called for the building to be aligned east and west. That way, the w i n d o w s were designed to take advantage of the prevailing east-west breezes, which would have taken care of a significant portion of our ventilation problem at p r e s e n t , " he said. " H o w ever, something went wrong, and the library ended up being constructed along a north-south axis, which means that we d o n ' t get any ventilation at all, and that the sun pours through great expanses of windows, giving the library a sub-tropical climate during spring, summer and fall," Whittaker stated. "It is well k n o w n that the library is o n e of the most uncomfortable places on campus t h r o u g h o u t that time. It is also (Continued

on page 10, column

4)


Hope College anchor

December 7. 1 9 7 0

Schools warned of impending financial crisis ( A P ) More t h a n 1,500 colleges a n d universities, w i t h 7 7 per c e n t of A m e r i c a ' s c a m p u s p o p u l a t i o n , are at o r near t h e p o i n t of having t o cut back i m p o r t a n t services f o r lack of m o n e y , the Carnegie C o m m i s s i o n o n Higher E d u c a t i o n reported Thursday. S o m e of t h e c o u n t r y ' s wealthiest and m o s t prestigious institut i o n s - including Harvard University, S t a n f o r d and the University of Michigan - were named as r e p r e s e n t a t i v e of a " f i n a n c i a l crisis u n m a t c h e d in its i m p a c t " and fast g e t t i n g worse. A L M O S T A L L higher educat i o n i n s t i t u t i o n s will feel t h e p i n c h if present t r e n d s c o n t i n u e , said t h e r e p o r t . T h e r e p o r t , c o m p i l e d by Earl F . Cheit, f o r m e r vice chancellor of t h e University of California at Berkeley, said: " T h e essence of t h e p r o b l e m is t h a t costs and i n c o m e are b o t h rising, but costs are rising at a s t e a d y or a slowly growing rate . . . whereas i n c o m e is growing at a declining r a t e . " T H E S Q U E E Z E IS m a d e worse by the s t a t e of t h e e c o n o m y , with i n f l a t i o n b o t h raising costs and i n h i b i t i n g i n c o m e , t h e r e p o r t said. H o w e v e r , it asserted that t h e crisis is " n o t simply part of a general e c o n o m i c d o w n t u r n , " but involves q u e s t i o n s of public conf i d e n c e in higher e d u c a t i o n and of t h e f u t u r e role a n d p u r p o s e of colleges and universities. C a m p u s d i s t u r b a n c e s , the rep o r t said, are " a n i m p o r t a n t new cost f a c t o r , " i m p o s i n g substantial c o s t s f o r s e c u r i t y , insurance and r e p l a c e d p r o p e r t y while h a m p e r ing fund-raising, v T H E R E P O R T indicated that belt-tightening a n d review of p ri o ri t i es by t h e colleges and universities w o u l d impr ove t h e s i t u a t i o n but t h a t increased private giving and g o v e r n m e n t aid

w o u l d be necessary t o preserve educational quality. Basing its b r o a d e r c o n c l u s i o n s on weighing of on-site studies of 41 r e p r e s e n t a t i v e i n s t i t u t i o n s , t h e r e p o r t e s t i m a t e d t h a t 5 4 0 institutions, enrolling 21 per cent of A m e r i c a n college s t u d e n t s , are " i n financial d i f f i c u l t y . " It said t h a t m e a n s t h e y have been forced t o curtail services t h e y consider important. P R I V A T E S C H O O L S are m o r e likely t o face d i f f i c u l t y t h a n public ones, the r e p o r t said. It said t h a t as of last spring 28 per cent of private s c h o o l s could be called "not in t r o u b l e , " as o p p o s e d t o a b o u t 5 0 per cent of public colleges a n d universities. U r b a n schools and s c h o o l s in t h e N o r t h were said t o be in worse shape t h a n t h e average, and in s o m e cases medical schools were causing a severe drain on parent institutions. T h e r e p o r t said 19 per cent of universities were " n o t in t r o u b l e , " c o m p a r e d to 29 pur cent of liberal arts colleges. O T H E R P O I N T S m a d e in t h e report: A b o o m p s y c h o l o g y developed in t h e late 1950s a n d early 1960s, d u r i n g which e n r o l l m e n t s , i n c o m e and expenditures multiplied. When t h e e c o n o m y cooled in t h e late 1960s m a n y c a m p u s e s were caught with big p l a n s and n o way to f u n d t h e m . " I n c r e a s e s in f e d e r a l s u p p o r t in every y e a r since 1 9 6 7 are less t h a n the increases in t h e priced level. In o t h e r w o r d s , in real t e r m s , federal s u p p o r t is d e c l i n i n g , " the r e p o r t said. T U I T I O N A N D F E E charges, which have a b o u t d o u b l e d in a d e c a d e , are nearing a s a t u r a t i o n p o i n t , in the view of m a n y administrators. Beyond that point, middle-income students

will be k e p t o u t of college and only t h e rich and t h e subsidized p o o r will be able to a t t e n d . Public i n s t i t u t i o n s are n o t allowed t o have financial deficits, hence their balance sheets might look b e t t e r t h a n those of private schools which are going in the r e d , but the public schools' " d e f i c i t s are q u a l i t y deficits and the c o n s e q u e n c e s are n o less severe f o r being h i d d e n in diluted programs."

i n s t i t u t i o n is d o i n g relatively m o r e t h a n o t h e r s t o bring i n c o m e a n d expenditures into line." A n o t h e r 1 , 0 0 0 schools, w i t h 56 per cent of the s t u d e n t s , were termed "headed f o r financial t r o u b l e , " - u n a b l e to assure t h a t t h e y can s u p p o r t g r o w t h plans o r go m u c h longer w i t h o u t c u t t i n g i m p o r t a n t p a r t s of their p r o g r a m s . AMONG THOSE were 18 s c h o o l s - ranging f r o m Harvard, with the n a t i o n ' s largest e n d o w m e n t , close t o $1 billion - t o K n o x College of Galesburg, 111., a f o u r - y e a r s c h o o l with f e w e r t h a n 1,500 s t u d e n t s . Measures being used t o ride o u t t h e s t o r m include, f o r private i n s t i t u t i o n s , c u t t i n g i n t o capital reserves built u p during the last

E L E V E N O F THE 41 sample institutions-including Stanford, New York University and t h e University of California at Berkely - were in that c a t e g o r y . But t h e report stressed that this did not reflect o n their a c a d e m i c q u a l i t y and " c o u l d indicate that t h e

Mich, officials react to report While agreeing with the general analysis of t h e record issued T h u r s d a y by t h e Carnegie Commission on Higher E d u c a t i o n , t o p officials of the three Michigan colleges and universities n a m e d in the r e p o r t disagreed over t h e imm e d i a c y of the financial plight of their respective i n s t i t u t i o n s .

IN A S T A T E M E N T issued T h u r s d a y , U of M Vice President and Chief Financial O f f i c e r Wilbur K. P i e r p o n t said t h e school has " a n especially serious lack of f u n d s f o r new buildings and building renovation." " T h e university has been tightening its b u d g e t s internally over

T H E U N I V E R S I T Y of Michigan, Central Michigan University and Albion College were three of t h e 41 r e p r e s e n t a t i v e i n s t i t u t i o n s studied by t h e c o m m i s s i o n . All t h r e e were included in t h e middling c a t e g o r y , " h e a d e d f o r financial t r o u b l e . " O n e s a m p l e d i n s t i t u t i o n , Flint Junior College, was included under the "not in financial t r o u b l e " c a t e g o r y , while n o Michigan i n s t i t u t i o n was f o u n d t o be "in financial d i f f i c u l t y . "

the past several years, of c o u r s e , and t h a t ' s been p a i n f u l , " he said. " B u t n o w , as t h e Carnegie r e p o r t indicates, m a n y colleges and universities, including the University of Michigan, f a c e a serious prospect of c u t t i n g back on s o m e i m p o r t a n t services, a n d , at t h e same t i m e , being u n a b l e t o p l a n f o r a n y g r o w t h in e d u c a t i o n a l programs." BOTH CMU President Dr. William Boyd a n d Albion presid e n t Bernard L o o m i s expressed a m o r e sanguine view of their i n s t i t u t i o n s ' financial p r o b l e m s . " T h e Carnegie report gives us a grace period b e f o r e a financial crisis is r e a c h e d , " Boyd said, " a n d we i n t e n d to use t h a t t i m e to o u r advantage. B o y d said t h e university is involved in r e p l a n n i n g its e n t i r e p r o g r a m , and t h a t by n e x t fall a new a c a d e m i c plan will be c o m pleted to " u p d a t e o u r p r o g r a m and be c o n s o n a n t with o u r resources." L O O M I S S A I D that Albion is " n o t in a position of having to cut back p r o g r a m s at this t i m e . " T h e M e t h o d i s t church-affiliated college has been adversely a f f e c t e d by the c u r r e n t e c o n o m i c slowdown, Loomis admitted, but he said that delays in c o n t r i b u tions caused by the recentlysettled General Motors strike would be made u p .

$2,500 by Esso Education fund

BAILES ESPANOLES Spain's most exciting Dancers, Singers and Instrumentalists

H o p e College has been a w a r d e d an u n r e s t r i c t e d $ 2 , 5 0 0 grant by t h e Esso E d u c a t i o n F o u n d a t i o n u n d e r its Presidential C o n t i n g e n c y Foundation. A n n o u n c e m e n t of t h e grant was m a d e t o college Chancellor William V a n d e r L u g t by Esso Educ a t i o n F o u n d a t i o n e x e c u t i v e dir e c t o r F r e d e r i c k deW. B o l m a n . Since its e s t a b l i s h m e n t in 1955, the Esso E d u c a t i o n F o u n d a t i o n has c o n t r i b u t e d more t h a n $33 million t o i n s t i t u t i o n s of higher learning t h r o u g h o u t the United States.

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HOPE STUDENTS, FACULTY AND STAFF - FREE w / I D . PRESENTED BY THE HOPE COLLEGE GREAT PERFORMANCE SERIES

TUBS., DEC. 8, 1970 8:15 P.M.

Holland Civic Center 150 West Eighth Street

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d e c a d e . But this source is fast d r y i n g u p . At K n o x , f o r e x a m p l e , $ 4 0 0 , 0 0 0 in reserves were t a p p e d to m a k e u p last y e a r ' s deficit. T h i s year o n l y $ 2 5 0 , 0 0 0 is left. O T H E R S T E P S include canceling d e v e l o p m e n t plans, soliciting m o r e s t u d e n t s , holding d o w n or r e d u c i n g hiring of faculty and a d m i n i s t r a t o r s a n d t r i m m i n g alloc a t i o n s to a c a d e m i c d e p a r t m e n t s and s t u d e n t s activities. T h r e e Michigan schools were a m o n g the s a m p l e areas w h e r e it was f o u n d i n s t i t u t i o n s of higher learning were h e a d e d f o r financial trouble. T h e t h r e e are Albion College at A l b i o n , Central Michigan University at Mount Pleasant, and t h e University of Michigan at Ann Arbor.

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" A T T H I S M O M E N T we are not in financial d i f f i c u l t y , but this d o e s not mean we s h o u l d n ' t be c a r e f u l in o u r planning. By F e b r u ary we h o p e t o have c o m p l e t e d a five-year p r o g r a m . T h e n we'll be in a position to say what o u r long-range plans a r e . " Loomis, who became Albion's president last S e p t e m b e r , said he q u e s t i o n e d the r e p o r t s ' c o n c l u s i o n t h a t Albion was " h e a d e d f o r financial t r o u b l e . " N o t i n g t h a t n o t h i n g in his files indicated t h a t m e m b e r s of t h e c o m m i s s i o n had had discussions w i t h any college officials, L o o m i s said, "We will a p p r o a c h the c o m m i s s i o n in the near f u t u r e t o ask h o w t h e y arrived at their c o n c l u s i o n s . " "1 C A N ' T S A Y we're in love with the Carnegie r e p o r t , " L o o m i s a d d e d , " b u t it certainly d o e s give a cause f o r reflective t h i n k i n g . " In its r e p o r t , the c o m m i s s i o n r e f e r r e d specifically to U of M, saying; " I n f l a t i o n and a p o o r o u t l o o k because of the a u t o industry will be r e f l e c t e d in state s u p p o r t of the university. A d m i n i s t r a t o r s say the o u t l o o k is dismal. Next year, it will n o longer be possible t o k e e p b u d g e t a r y savings. " T H E U N I V E R S I T Y is suffering f r o m a critical lack of capital f u n d s , a n d , s i m u l t a n e o u s l y , is subj e c t t o new d e m a n d s in areas such as ecology. " T h e p r o b l e m of h o w to supp o r t l o w - i n c o m e s t u d e n t s is bec o m i n g a c u t e , b o t h because of increased c o m m i t m e n t and because charging higher fees is t h e only m a j o r possibility of increasing i n c o m e . "Federal support f o r hard sciences has d r o p p e d . A d m i n i s t r a tors foresee federal c u t s in research, fellowships and s t u d e n t aid. " A l t h o u g h at t h e time of t h e interview campus disturbances had not yet had direct e f f e c t on a p p ropriations, administrators believed t h e r e would be in effect."

III. agronomist ivill be featured in two seminars Dr. A m b r o s e W. Burger, professor of a g r o n o m y at the University of Illinois, will present t w o seminars on c a m p u s this week. He will speak on the " D y namics of A u t o t u t o r i a l T e a c h i n g " at 4 : 3 0 p.m. t o d a y in r o o m 3 0 3 of the Science Hall, and on "World F o o d P r o b l e m s : Attack on S t a r v a t i o n " at 1 0 : 3 0 a.m. T u e s d a y in Winants A u d i t o r i u m in Graves Hall. Burger has received n u m e r o u s a w a r d s in the fields of e d u c a t i o n and a g r o n o m y d u r i n g his more than t w o d e c a d e s of teaching.

KENTUCKY FRIED CHICKEN of HOLLAND 40 W. 16th St., Telephone No. 396-1471

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December 7, 1970

Hope College anchor

Page 3

Deadline is Dec. 31 for dropping deferments Draft-age m e n wishing to d r o p d e f e r m e n t s and be reclassified into Class l-A s t a t u s to take advantage of a year-end policy ann o u n c e d last m o n t h by t h e Selective Service System have been given until m i d n i g h t , Dec. 31, to file f o r the reclassification. Such requests must be received by local boards by t h a t date or carry a p o s t m a r k d a t e d Dec. 3 1 , 1970, or earlier.

PAS DE DEUX—Tim Walters as the conniving courtier (center left) and George Ralph as the bourgeois gentleman (center right) admire their admirers in this scene from the theater department production of Moliere's c o m e d y . The play o p e n s this week in the Little Theater.

^Bourgeois Gentleman'

Theatre production starts Wed. T h e t h e a t r e d e p a r t m e n t will present t h e 1 7 t h - c e n t u r y c o m e d y The Bourgeois Gentleman Wednesday t h r o u g h S a t u r d a y in S n o w A u d i t o r i u m . P e r f o r m a n c e s will be at 8 p.m. W e d n e s d a y , T h u r s d a y and F r i d a y , and 3 and 8 p.m. Saturday. When t h e play, written by t h e Frenchman Moliere, was first p e r f o r m e d in Paris in 1670 it was called a " c o m e d y - b a l l e t , " and in fact included a full ballet w h i c h alone ran f o r over an h o u r . T h e H o p e t h e a t r e p r o d u c t i o n will not c o m p e t e w i t h t h e original in running t i m e or in spectacle, but it will retain such characteristic stylistic devices as interludes in song and d a n c e . WITH M A N Y O F T H E p u r e l y spectacular e l e m e n t s pared a w a y , Moliere's d r a m a reveals itself as a whimsical p o r t r a i t of a well-to-do middle-class citizen trying foolishly to m a k e his way i n t o high society. J o u r d a i n , t h e bourgeois gentleman of the title, on the o n e h a n d e n c o u n t e r s a host of s y c o p h a n t s who encourage him in his delusions in order to f u r t h e r their o w n ends, a n d on t h e o t h e r h a n d must deal with t h e practical-minded d o w n - t o - e a r t h m e m b e r s of his own h o u s e h o l d w h o seek t o ward off t h e m o r e d i s a s t r o u s c o n s e q u e n c e s of his excesses. These e n c o u n t e r s lead t o a series of increasingly zany c o m p l i cations, c u l m i n a t i n g in a b o g u s c e r e m o n y w h i c h J o u r d a i n believes has elevated him to t h e noble position of T u r k i s h " m a m a m o u chi." MOLIERE'S USUAL satiric t h r u s t s are e v i d e n t , against p r e t e n tiousness w h e r e it exists in t h e middle class, against superciliousness w h e r e it exists in t h e aristocracy. But he t r e a t s t h e subject m o r e gently than he d o e s in m a n y of his most f a m o u s plays, such as Tartujfe. Whereas Moliere f r e q u e n t l y passes j u d g m e n t o n his characters al t h e end by bringing the o f f e n d e r s to justice, here he leaves the " m o r a i " of t h e play more ambiguous. Scholarly speculations a b o u t The Bourgeois Gentleman have

included t h e interesting t h e o r y that Moliere used as real-life models f o r his drama t h e J o u r d i n family of c l o t h m e r c h a n t s w h o were w e l l - k n o w n t o Parisians in the s e v e n t e e n t h c e n t u r y . Donald F i n n of t h e t h e a t r e faculty directs t h e p r o d u c t i o n . Michael G r i n d s t a f f is designer, with J o h n T a m m i staging t h e dance n u m b e r s . G e o r g e R a l p h , also of t h e f a c u l t y , plays the title role. Walter Mahovlich is musical director. T H E CAST O F over f o r t y includes S h a r o n T u c k e r as J o u r dain's nagging wife, P r u d e n c e Selover and Michael Boonstra as the y o u n g lovers; Kay H u b b a r d and Brad Williams as t h e wily servants; Jim Stills as the swag-

gering fencing m a s t e r ; Richard P a t m o s as t h e m e a n d e r i n g philosopher; Doug N e w m a n n as a swish dancing m a s t e r ; J i m Butler as t h e stolid music m a s t e r , T i m Walters as the conniving c o u r t i e r ; D e b o r a h Noe as the c o y w i d o w ; David Huang as t h e insolent tailor and Gerry Swieringa as t h e m i g h t y Mufti. P e r f o r m a n c e s are at 8 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday, with a S a t u r d a y benefit m a t i n e e at 3 p.m. Proceeds f r o m t h e m a t i n e e will go toward building a f u n d to be used in bringing guest artists t o the c a m p u s . Tickets, c u r r e n t l y on sale in the l o b b y of Van Raalte Hall, are $ 1 . 5 0 for s t u d e n t s , f a c u l t y and staff.

Hope debaters win eight matches at Bradley meet H o p e College d e b a t e r s w o n eight of 10 m a t c h e s at t h e Bradley University speech t o u r n a m e n t t w o weeks ago. T h e Bradley t o u r n a m e n t , the largest collegiate event-of its k i n d , a t t r a c t e d d e b a t e r s f r o m 6 7 colleges and universities. T h e H o p e a f f i r m a t i v e team of Chad Busk and Vicki Ten Haken defeated teams from Illinois Central, Culver S t o c k t o n , S o u t h ern Illinois and Illinois Wesleyan while losing t o DePauw University. T h e negative team of Paul Bach and Joan L a u t e n s c h l e g e r d e f e a t e d teams from Western Illinois, Upper Iowa, Harding and Kansas Central while losing t o S o u t h e r n Illinois. H o p e s t u d e n t s also received 13 excellent and o n e superior rating

certificates f o r p e r f o r m a n c e s in individual events. The s u p e r i o r rating, t h e highest p r e s e n t e d , w e n t t o Busk in the a f t e r d i n n e r speaking c a t e g o r y . Receiving excellent c e r t i f i c a t e s were Phil - Drake, in a f t e r d i n n e r speaking; Miss Ten H a k e n , Miss Lautenschleger and Linda Drake in oral i n t e r p r e t a t i o n ; Dave Helmus, Karl Esmark and Bach in the e x t e m p o r e division; and Bach and Esmark in the listening c a t e g o r y . Eight Hope s t u d e n t s participated in the S t a t e Novice Debate tournament at Kellogg Comm u n i t y College in Battle Creek last w e e k e n d . Mike Cooper received an excellent certificate, while the team of Mary Ponstein and Charles Cossett were u n d e f e a t e d in t h r e e r o u n d s of c o m p e t i t i o n .

For you-breakfast 11:30 a.m.

until

Come in for a coke, a dinner or your favorite sandwich, you are always welcome.

P R E V I O U S TO changing this policy on d r o p p i n g of d e f e r m e n t s .

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T a r r pointed out that all deferm e n t s are issued for limited periods of time, generally f o r one year, and that it is the responsibility of the registrant to submit d o c u m e n t a t i o n f o r an extension of his d e f e r m e n t . In t h e absence of d o c u m e n t a t i o n , the new local board memorandum instructs local b o a r d s t o p r o m p t l y reclassify registrants i n t o l-A. This means that registrants wishing to c o n t i n u e their d e f e r m e n t s should submit t h e s u p p o r t i n g d o c u m e n t a tion t o their local boards.

Second semester registration ends on Dec. 18 Registration f o r the 1971 spring semester is now taking place for currently-enrolled stud e n t s and will c o n t i n u e through Dec. 18. A t e m p o r a r y registration office has been set up in the basement corridor of the Physics-Math Building with hours from 8 : 0 0 - 1 2 : 0 0 a.m. and 1 : 0 0 - 4 : 0 0 p.m. Seniors register first, followed by juniors, s o p h o m o r e s and freshman. Class schedules for t h e spring semester are available at the Records O f f i c e , and program advising f o r s t u d e n t s will t a k e place through Dec. 16. —

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WHILE RECOGNIZING that y o u n g men h o l d i n g l o t t e r y numbers over their local b o a r d " h i g h " could effectively limit their vulnerability t o t h e d r a f t by being classified i n t o l-A by t h e year's end, Tarr s t a t e d that " t h e law allows y o u n g m e n to elect whether t h e y will a p p l y for a d e f e r m e n t and those y o u n g m e n granted d e f e r m e n t s should be able to d r o p t h e m if t h e y d e s i r e . " Tarr said t h e new policy was issued because various boards throughout t h e c o u n t r y were scheduling t h e i r last meetings of the year at d i f f e r e n t times. By defining a specific c u t o f f d a t e , t h e new policy allows all registrants an equal a m o u n t of time t o take advantage of t h e reclassification offer.

T h e t y p e s of d e f e r m e n t s affected by t h e m e m o r a n d u m are high school and college deferments, o c c u p a t i o n a l d e f e r m e n t s , agricultural d e f e r m e n t s , p a t e r n i t y and hardship d e f e r m e n t s . T h e l-Y classification, u n a c c e p t a b l e for military service except in national emergency, is not a f f e c t e d by this new policy. Men classified l-Y are not able to voluntarily d r o p this classification.

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THE ANNOUNCEMENT is c o n t a i n e d in i n s t r u c t i o n s issued to local board p e r s o n n e l b y Dr. Curtis W. Tarr, N a t i o n a l Director of Selective Service. T h e s e instructions alter previous policy which stated that t h e application had t o be in t h e h a n d s of local board personnel p r i o r to a D e c e m b e r meeting of t h e local b o a r d . T h e i n s t r u c t i o n to local boards will be of interest to m e n w h o hold high n u m b e r s in t h e 1970 draft l o t t e r y . S h o u l d a y o u n g man hold a n u m b e r higher t h a n that reached by his local board - No. 195 has been set as t h e highest n u m b e r which a n y local board can reach - it is t o his advantage t o voluntarily give u p his d e f e r m e n t for a I-A classification. In these cases, he will move t o a lower draft priority g r o u p o n J a n . 1, 1971, with o t h e r m e m b e r s of the 1970 first p r i o r i t y g r o u p with unreached numbers.

registrants holding d e f e r m e n t s were generally unable to voluntarily relinquish them as long as they c o n t i n u e d to meet the criteria for d e f e r m e n t , except at the end of the d e f e r m e n t period w h e n (hey could cancel them simply by not s u b m i t t i n g t h e necessary documents for an e x t e n s i o n .

LET US OUTFIT YOUR PERSONALITY . . .

Comer of 8th and College

7 EAST SEVENTH ST.

6:30a.m.-7 p.m. Monday-Saturday

Open Evenings 'Til 9 p . m .

HEADBANDS


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Hope College a n c h o r

D e c e m b e r 7, 1970

Reform and research The faculty meeting last m o n t h was a curious example of more than 100 intelligent adults coming together to express concern yet failing t o articulate that concern. The subject of the meeting was, of course, the curriculum reform package passed by the Academic Affairs Board the week previous to the meeting. The reform proposal has been the topic of conversation in faculty meeting places ever since it was originally w r i t t e n last April. Yet, for all the time that the faculty had to mull over the proposal, surprisingly little really relevant criticism came out of the November meeting. The result: almost no faculty members were pleased w i t h the results of the meeting. Many faculty members were openly critical of the meeting and a few others seemed resigned to accept the meeting as "they way things are." The specific results of meeting were the 12 "recommendations" the faculty handed to the A A B . A l l 12 were w r i t t e n before the meeting, and none was changed in any way during the meeting. Only t w o of the

anchor editorial "recommendations" proposed during the night failed to pass. What the faculty in effect did was to say to the A A B , " O k , prove to us that the proposal is w o r t h passing. We have some objections, but it's your proposal." The faculty then proceeded to t h r o w the whole question into the lap of the A A B . The meeting started out w i t h the faculty picking apart each "recommendation" to see if each was worthwhile. That's w h y the first t w o statements did not pass-there were reservations about them. But f r o m that point on, the faculty began to do less questioning, apparently feeling that A A B should be given innumerable directives, f r o m which the board could choose those it wished to act upon. Thus the faculty was inarticulate in its demands f r o m the taard. When this fact w a / p o i n t e d out by Wayne VanderByl, a student member of AAB, he was received seriously by few faculty members, and rudely by some. One faculty member must have felt he was infinitely more important a person than VanderByl as he shouted out, "You're out of order." Sorry, Mr. Faculty Member, you were the one who was "out of order." If you don't want to listen to the truth, then at least let others speak it. Besides being inarticulate, the faculty asked for some very specific information from the A A B - i n f o r m a t i o n that simply cannot be provided w i t h certainty until the curriculum reform is actually tried. A t the same time the faculty asked some very broad questions-questions that have been raised by every committee that ever studied education at Hope College. They will never be answered to everyone's satisfaction until someone comes up w i t h a definitive statement on liberal education. Finally, at least some of the faculty questions could have been raised earlier. Only two faculty members showed up for the A A B meeting when the curriculum proposal was acted upon. Faculty input into the proposal as it progessed f r o m stage to stage was not adequate. This was not the fault of the ad hoc committee that wrote the reform bill, but the faculty itself which failed to articulate its concerns earlier. In spite of the unhappy results of the November meeting, the A A B will have to act. As we mentioned, some questions it may never be able t o answer to everyone's satisfaction. Nevertheless, it should make an attempt at answering as many questions and doubts as possible. Therefore, we recommend that the board have a definite plan of attack. Our recommendations t o the board are not further questions or objections to the proposal, but rather a way of going about the business of solving some of the problems that the faculty has questioned. F i r s t - a n d the easiest-of these is that the A A B announce to the entire faculty each and every meeting dealing w i t h the proposal. These announcements should include the specific points in the proposal that the board plans t o discuss. Second, we recommend that one or two members of the board (or a small group appointed by the board) research similar

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: u H i p t l curriculum plans at other institutions. The research should include questions about how the plan operates, when it went into effect, what previous curriculum the other schools had, and what problems were encountered in changing over from one curriculum structure to the other. Third, we recommend that the board contract or arrange w i t h the Office of Institutional Research or similar group to conduct preliminary studies into the effect of changing the curriculum. This could hopefully take the form of extensive surveys based on a " d u m m y " curriculum. That is, the researchers would take a representative sampling of students, ask them to plan d u m m y schedules and even write dummy contracts. Perhaps some of the faculty who are earnestly interested in seeing the outcome of such a study could volunteer to serve on a d u m m y contract committee that would evaluate the students' contracts. Such a study w o u l d give solid—if not absolute—evidence of the kind of effects a curriculum change w o u l d have on scheduling, faculty loads, feasability of the proposed administrative structure for the contract program, etc. It w i l l be a massive job, but it may be the o n l y way to predict w i t h any certainty whatsoever the kind of problems and solutions which the curriculum change would bring. Conjecture-even informed c o n j e c t u r e - b y committee or board members will not convince a d o u b t f u l faculty. Fourth, we recommend that the board appoint a committee, or reappoint the ad hoc committee, to further delineate the operation and structure of the Introduction to Liberal Studies course. Granted," that job was going to be left up to a special committee charged w i t h implementation of the proposal, but it looks like the faculty just doesn't want to wait on this item. In fact, proposing a course outline, etc., may be the only way t o even get such a course considered by the faculty. Fifth, the board might appoint a few individuals to start assigning courses to worlds in the area curriculum. While the kind of hassle about specific assignments should be avoided, the persons working on such a project might either find that the present definitions of the four worlds are sufficient for the job of making assignments, or it might find that there are holes to fill in the definitions. If the latter is the case, dealing with real courses in the present curriculum and attempting to fit them into a proposed curriculum might offer additional insight into the study of definitions. Again, this point like number three above involves a sort of "dummy" implementation. Perhaps that is more meaningful than mere rhetoric (for mere rhetoric can be countered by the faculty with mere rhetoric). Finally, the board will want to include in its final package a statement about which students would be affected at such time as the curriculum revision should take affect. This problem w i l l be easy to solve, since the question was raised and answered in the A A B meeting when the reform proposal was passed. It only remains t o be put in writing. We ask the board to note that all of the above suggestions are made not to complicate the board's task or to add additional "recommendations" to its already burdensome list. Rather, the above are offered as strategy, i.e., a way of answering the questions the faculty raised. This will take time. But the results may prove more satisfying to everyone. Particularly the suggestions that the proposal be implemented in a " d u m m y " fashion w i t h limited participation will provide evidence, not just guesses, about the both short- and longrange effect of a curriculum revision. The faculty will f i n d it d i f f i c u l t to refute such evidence unless it does its o w n research in similar fashion. The idea here is, of course, not to "get this one by the f a c u l t y , " but t o end up w i t h a workable plan which satisfies all parties-including students and administrators. The board may not wish to do all the work itself. Indeed, it should not hope t o accomplish such a task. Those faculty members who are dissatisfied w i t h portions of the proposal as it now stands should be willing to volunteer their time t o improve it. If the above recommendations are followed, the board w i l l have taken the proposal much farther than perhaps it intended. Maybe that's not a bad idea.

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The no knock by Art Buchwald There was a s h o o t - o u t in P h o e n i x t w o weeks ago w h i c h has n a t i o n a l implications. T h e police, taking advantage of a " n o k n o c k " law, raided a h o u s e where t h e y suspected h i p p i e s had narcotics. U n f o r t u n a t e l y , at the t i m e of the raid the h i p p i e s had m o v e d o u t and a married c o u p l e had moved in. Since the raid t o o k place at 1 : 3 0 in the m o r n i n g , t h e h u s b a n d refused t o believe t h e m e n were police and shot o n e . He in t u r n was s h o t . T h e police sergeant said a f t e r t h e raid, " I t was a m i s u n d e r s t a n d i n g . T h e c o u p l e p r o b a b l y felt t h e y were d e f e n d i n g their h o m e against s o m e hippies, a n d t h e o f f i c e r s t h o u g h t t h e y w e r e fighting s o m e c r i m i n a l s . " NOW, OPPONENTS of the " n o k n o c k " law have a l w a y s claimed the big danger of it was t h a t if the police e n t e r s o m e o n e ' s h o m e w i t h o u t k n o c k i n g t h e y could get shot. Since t h e C o n s t i t u t i o n p e r m i t s y o u to d e f e n d y o u r own h o m e , it is possible t h a t m o r e p o l i c e m e n will be shot than nar cotics will be f o u n d . This will m a k e the c o p s u p t i g h t , and so, to p r o t e c t themselves, they'll start s h o o t i n g first, and b e f o r e y o u k n o w it there will be b l o o d b a t h s all over the c o u n t r y . THE R E A S O N LAW e n f o r c e m e n t o f f i cials say t h e y need the " n o k n o c k " law is t h a t , if t h e y k n o c k first, the suspects inside the h o u s e will flush nar cotics evidence d o w n the toilet. Only a s t r o n g " n o k n o c k " law, t h e y claim, can prevent a n y o n e f r o m dashing t o t h e b a t h r o o m . This s o u n d s reasonable b u t , as we have seen in P h o e n i x , it can o n l y lead t o a s h o o t - o u t , because the people inside the house can never be certain that the p e o p l e crashing i n t o their h o m e are p o l i c e m e n .

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THERE IS A SOLUTION to this problem which we think could satisfy the law-and-order p e o p l e , as well as t h e innocent home owner. I a m proposing t h a t the " n o k n o c k " law be stricken f r o m the b o o k s and replaced with a " n o f l u s h " law. T h i s is h o w it would w o r k : T h e police w o u l d still have t o get a warrant t o e n t e r s o m e o n e ' s h o m e . T h e y w o u l d also have to k n o c k b e f o r e e n t e r i n g . . But if it were a n a r c o t i c s or gambling raid, t h e y w o u l d have t o s h o u t at the t o p of their voices, "77J/S IS a raid. Anyone who flushes the toilet will be arrested.'''' O N E POLICEMAN w o u l d be s t a t i o n e d by t h e water m e t e r nearest the h o u s e or a p a r t m e n t to m o n i t o r a n y f l u c t u a t i o n in w a t e r pressure d u r i n g the raid. When the police e n t e r the a p a r t m e n t , t h e y will have t h e a u t h o r i t y to c h e c k the b a t h r o o m s . If a n y o n e flushes d u r i n g the raid, he will be a s s u m e d t o have c o m m i t t e d a c r i m e , and this evidence will be a c c e p t e d by t h e cour t as prima-facie e v i d e n c e of guilt. T h e " n o f l u s h " law may be c o n s i d e r e d by civil libertarians as an invasion of privacy, but it is certainly m o r e a c c e p t a b l e t h a n a " n o k n o c k " law, and safer, t o o . I made this suggestion at the annual m e e t i n g of the A m e r i c a n Bar Assn. in St. Louis in a speech last s u m m e r , b u t they only laughed at m e . S o I've decided t o take my case t o the p u b l i c . Would y o u rather have the police crash in on y o u at 1 o ' c l o c k in the m o r n i n g w i t h o u t warning? Or w o u l d y o u r a t h e r first hear a k n o c k on the d o o r and give u p y o u r b a t h r o o m privileges while t h e y ' r e searching through your home? Copyright 1970, Los Angeles T i m e s

COLLEOI

anchor

O U A N D , MICHIGAN

PRESS

PuhUshed weekly during the college year except vacation, holiday and examination periods by and for the students of Hope College, Holland, Michigan, under the authority of the Student Communications Media Committee. Subscription price: $5 per year. Printed by the Composing Room, Grand Rapids, Michigan. Member, Associated CoUegiate Press, United States Student Press Association and Associated Press. Office located on ground floor of Graves Hall. Telephone 392-5111, Extension 2301 and 2285. Hope0CoUege ^

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BOARD OF EDITORS Editor Managing Editor Advertising Business Manager

REPORTERS Boh Roos. Mary Houting, Eileen Verduin, Mark Van Oostenberg, Oiuck LeFurge.

Tom Donia Dave Dustin Tim DeVoogd Ron Deenik

PHOTOGRAPHERS Tobey Sanford, Rob Benchley, Tom Siderius, David Huang, Mike Boonstra, Deb Noe.


Hope College anchor

December 7, 1970

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'Call It Sleep : honesty transcends the mere episodic Editor's Note: This week's aA7c/7or review is written by Critiques Editor Gerald Swieringa. He reviews Call It Sleep by Henry Roth (Avon Books, $.95). by Gerald Swieringa If t h e r e can be singled o u t o n e f a u l t which blemishes t h a t genre of fiction called t h e A m e r i c a n Jewish novel, it m a y be generally termed the homage payed to h u m o r rather than honesty. Henry R o t h ' s Call It Sleep a s t o u n d s t h e reader with its h o n e s t y , and this, if f o r n o o t h e r r e a s o n , is e n o u g h t o m a k e t h e novel t h e best example of American Jewish writing y e t p r o d u c e d . W R I T T E N I N 1934, Call It Sleep is only n o w being realized by t h e public as w o r t h y of A l f r e d K a z i n ' s unreserved l a u d i t u d e s . <4A classic of psychological f i c t i o n , " he called it, and rightly so. T h e novel deals w i t h t h e i m p r e s s i o n s of a six-year old Aus tr ian J e w i s h i m m i g r a n t , David Schearl, w h o s e Americanization is d r a m a t i z e d

t h r o u g h o u t the b o o k . David is the c o m p o s i t e Jewish h e r o : intellig e n t , impressionable, a n d t h e o n l y child of a m a t r i a r c h a l Jewish f a m i l y - a F r e u d i a n case s t u d y . Philip R o t h w o u l d have b e g u n and e n d e d here, but H e n r y R o t h sees in his h e r o s o m e t h i n g of a much vaster significance. As Walter Allen states, " R o t h ( H e n r y ) makes us sharply a w a r e ... of t h e d e g r a d a t i o n , t h e d i m i n u t i o n in h u m a n d i g n i t y , t h a t was o n e aspect of t h e i m m i g r a n t ' s lot as he moved f r o m a society w i t h a t r a d i t i o n a l c u l t u r e t o a n o t h e r with n o c u l t u r e at all." It is the A m e r i c a n d r e a m of a m e l i o r a t i o n p o r t r a y e d in t h e daylight of its failure. Call It Sleep is harsh, h o n e s t l y h a r s h . Yet R o t h has achieved a sort of petic t r a n s c e n d e n c e t h a t is of itself a d o m i n a n t f e a t u r e of t h e A m e r i c a n c h a r a c t e r . Above the s t i n k i n g w r e t c h of t h e vessel Peter Stuyvesant delivering its h u m a n cargo t o the N e w Y o r k t e n e m e n t s , " T h e gulls wheeling b e f o r e her

College to sponsor debate on marijuana A p a r l i a m e n t a r y d e b a t e on the q u e s t i o n of legalizing m a r i j u a n a will be held in Wichers Audit o r i u m T h u r s d a y at 7 p.m. Parliamentary d e b a t e , has a u n i q u e f o r m that involves active audience participation. Debating will be s t u d e n t s Paul Bach and J i m Stills, f a c u l t y m e m b e r s Dr. Earl Curry and Dr. R o b e r t B r o w n , Holland physician Dr. Phillip Parker and city Chief P r o b a t i o n O f f i c e r George Steggerda. After the introductory speeches, any person in the audience is allowed to ask q u e s t i o n provided the speaker will yield his time.

Dr. James Cone to lecture Friday on black theology Dr. J a m e s H. C o n e , associate p r o f e s s o r of theology at Union Theological S e m i n a r y in New Y o r k , will deliver an a d d r e s s Friday at 6 : 4 5 p.m. in Winants Auditorium. His topic is " b l a c k t h e o l o g y on r e v o l u t i o n , violence and reconc i l i a t i o n . " Prior t o his l e c t u r e , C o n e will hold an i n f o r m a l discussion at 3 : 3 0 p.m. in the Kletz. C o n e has served as a visiting p r o f e s s o r of A f r o - A m e r i c a n history at t h e University of t h e Pacific and has lectured at over 27 colleges and universities. He has t a u g h t at five schools and published t w o b o o k s . Black Theology and Black Power in 1969 and A Black Theology of Liberation this year. He has also c o n t r i b u t e d t o n u m e r o u s j o u r n a l s and magazines. C o n e ' s a d d r e s s is the third u n d e r t h e aegis of the Religious C o n v o c a t i o n Series, s p o n s o r e d by the Religious Life C o m m i t t e e . Previous speakers have been Dr. G e o r g e Kelsey of Drew University and Dr. H o w a r d H a g e m a n , p a s t o r of the N o r t h C h u r c h of N e w a r k , N.J.

p r o w rose with slight creaking cry f r o m t h e green w a t e r , and as she c h u r n e d away f r o m t h e s t o n e q u a y s k i m m e d across her p a t h o n i n d o l e n t , scimitar w i n g . " T h e f e s t e r i n g squalid and t h e una b a s h e d festive - w h e r e else but in America? A G E N U I N E T R I U M P H of Call It Sleep is R o t h ' s h a n d l i n g of t h e distinctive N e w Y o r k immig r a n t ' s dialect. T h r o u g h o u t t h e b o o k whenever he allows his c h a r a c t e r s t o speak in English, this dialect is i m p o s e d to a highly a u t h e n t i c detail. " G ' w a n a n ' we'll l e t c h y g o , " promised Pedley. ^G'wan! Shnkp'" " i n j u s t p u d id i n ? " " Y e a . Like I s h o w e d y u h . " " A n ' d e n y u h ' l l led me g o ? " " S u r e . G ' w a n . Id ain' g o n n a h o i t c h a . Ye'll see all de movies in de woil! A n ' vawderville t o o ! G ' w a n b e f o r e a car c o m e s . " " S u r e , an 'all de angels.' " IN C O N T R A S T T O t h e dialect used w h e n English is s p o k e n . R o t h lends his c h a r a c t e r s an a r t i c u l a t e Yiddish - and never are the c o n t r a s t i n g c u l t u r e s m o r e

p o i g n a n t l y p o r t r a y e d t h a n in t h e speech of their m e m b e r s . David's m o t h e r says f o r instance, " I t is s u m m e r ... t h e w e a t h e r grows w a r m . W h o m will y o u refresh with the icy lips the water lent you?" David, as t h e c e n t e r of t h e narrative, is as finely d r a w n as a n y c h a r a c t e r in r e c e n t A m e r i c a n f i c t i o n . Call It Sleep is told a l m o s t exclusively f r o m his point of view, recalling t h e a c h i e v e m e n t s of H e n r y J a m e s a n d Mark T w a i n . T h e virtues of this point of view are obvious. David r o a m s freely t h r o u g h b o t h his e n v i r o n m e n t and his consciousness, r e c o u n t i n g t h e marvel and p a t h o s of the immigrant child. HE IS DEVOTION ATELY a t t a c h e d t o his m o t h e r , w h o s e c o m p a s s i o n f o r him e x t e n d s far b e y o n d the c o n v e n t i o n a l b o u n d s of t h e m o t h e r - s o n relationship. His father, cruel, hard and d e m a n d i n g , is all t o o o f t e n t h e catalyst of t r a u m a . I n d e e d , t h e t h r e e years covered in t h e novel may easily be dismissed as a c h r o n o l o g y of crises.

draft

Mastering the

T h e d e b a t e is t h e first of several intended to bring t o g e t h e r s t u d e n t s , faculty and local citizens t o discuss c u r r e n t issues. T h e dep a r t m e n t of c o m m u n i c a t i o n , cos p o n s o r with Pi Kappa Delta, conceived of the series in an a t t e m p t to create interest in d e b a t e on c a m p u s . M. Harold Mikle, associate professor of c o m m u n i c a tion, will guide the series. Mikle s t u d i e d p a r l i a m e n t a r y d e b a t e at O x f o r d University in England d u r i n g the s u m m e r . M o d e r a t o r for t h e T h u r s d a y night s h o w d o w n will be senior J o h n Windover.

But t h e t o n e of naturalistic h o n e s t y which pervades the novel p r e c l u d e s this a s s u m p t i o n . O n c e again t h e native h o n e s t y of R o t h elevates his work from the episodic to t h e empirical. T h e cries are t r e a t e d as f a c t / not melodrama. REGARDING THE Jewish h u m o r . R o t h is p e r h a p s n o t as b l a t a n t as his successors. His h u m o r lacks t h e d r y , esoteric quality c o m m o n l y e x p e c t e d f r o m t h e Jewish writers t o d a y ; n o n e t h e less it is a warm c o m p e l l i n g h u m o r , as m u c h at h o m e within the narrative as t h e Jewish m o r b i d i t y which foils it. If t h e r e is o n e place in t h e novel when o n e feels t h e h o n e s t y is sacrificed and a d r i f t t o w a r d s e n t i m e n t a l i t y d e t e c t e d , it is at t h e very end. Here R o t h m u s t c o m p r o m i s e s o m e a u s t e r i t y to avenge his h e r o , and t h e r e f o r e sends him to bed in a o p t i m i s t i c u n c e r t a n t y . Yet is is an u n c e r t a i n ty at the very core of the A m e r i c a n d r e a m itself, an uncert a i n t y which begins with the j u t t e d p r o m i s e of L o n g Island, a n d e n d s in sleep.

by John Striker and Andrew Shapiro Copyright 1970 by J o h n Striker and A n d r e w Shapiro

During a recent interview w i t h this r e p o r t e r . D r a f t Director Curtis T a r r r e m a r k e d : " T h e r e ' s a substantial feeling in the c o u n t r y , I u n d e r s t a n d , against c o n s c i e n t i o u s o b j e c t i o n , a feeling t h a t y o u ' d r a t h e r not help a c o n s c i e n t i o u s o b j e c t o r if t h e r e ' s a c h a n c e t o help s o m e b o d y else. In Michigan the o t h e r day 1 talked t o the state d i r e c t o r of selective service, and he said a fellow c a m e into his o f f i c e and said, 4I just finished m y civilian work as a C.O. I'm t h e f a t h e r of t h r e e , happily m a r r i e d , but 1 c a n ' t s u p p o r t m y family . . . N o b o d y w a n t s t o hire a conscientious objector.' That's a tragedy." Michael P e t r o v i c h , assistant Y E S , IT IS. A n d t h e r e is irony p r o f e s s o r of h i s t o r y , is o n e of 11 scholars in Balkan s t u d i e s t o be in t h e d i r e c t o r ' s very r e c o g n i t i o n a w a r d e d a grant for research in of t h e tragedy. Tarr himself is Yugoslavia by the I n t e r n a t i o n a l i n a d v e r t a n t l y helping t o cause the tragedy by failing to end a repreResearch and E x c h a n g e s Board. He has been g r a n t e d leave f r o m hensible and long-standing policy t h e H o p e faculty f o r the spring of Selective Service: t h e so-called " d i s r u p t i o n " policy governing a s e m e s t e r of 1971 and will spend t h a t semester and the s u m m e r C . O . ' s civilian w o r k . f o l l o w i n g c o n d u c t i n g research in C.O.'s in class 1-0 ( o p p o s e d t o s o u t h e r n Yugoslavia. His work b o t h c o m b a t a n t and n o n c o m b a will c e n t e r o n the history a n d . t a n t military service) may be c u l t u r e of the city of D u b r o v n i k . called u p o n to p e r f o r m t w o years Petrovich has been involved in of civilian work in lieu of inducdeveloping t h e Balkan studies tion. T h e Selective Service act and p r o g r a m at H o p e and has carried r e g u l a t i o n s require only that t h e o u t eastern E u r o p e a n s t u d y t o u r s civilian work be in t h e n a t i o n a l f o r t h e college and the G r e a t h e a l t h , safety or interest. T h e r e is Lakes Colleges Association f o r the a b s o l u t e l y no m e n t i o n of disruptpast several s u m m e r s . He serves in ing a C . O . ' s life. WHILE THE STATE directors b o t h an administrative and teaching role f o r t h e G L C A Yugoslav of selective service m a i n t a i n lists p r o g r a m , for which H o p e acts as of a p p r o v e d civilian w o r k , local d r a f t b o a r d s have t h e final say. agent college. Other Hope faculty members T h e y decide u l t i m a t e l y which j o b w h o have p a r t i c i p a t e d in p o r t i o n s an individual C.O. can t a k e . T h e of t h e Yugoslav p r o g r a m i n c l u d e o n l y guidance a b o a r d has in Dr. J o h n H o l l e n b a c h , Dr. Paul deciding w h e t h e r a p a r t i c u l a r j o b F r i e d , J o h n T a m m i , Donald F i n n is a p p r o p r i a t e lies in Local Board and Harrison R y k e r . Memorandum No. 64. General D u r i n g his leave, P e t r o v i c h will H e r s h e y issued this LBM in 1 9 6 2 , and T a r r has not yet seen fit t o c o n t i n u e his w o r k f o r b o t h H o p e College and t h e University of change it. LBM No. 6 4 provides in p a r t : C h i c a g o , w h e r e he is a d o c t o r a l "Whenever possible [civilian] candidate.

Petrovich granted

leave for spring semester research

w o r k should be p e r f o r m e d o u t s i d e of t h e c o m m u n i t y in which t h e registrant resides. T h e position should be o n e t h a t c a n n o t readily be filled f r o m the available labor f o r c e . . . and should c o n s t i t u t e a d i s r u p t i o n of the registrant's normal way of life s o m e w h a t c o m parable t o the d i s r u p t i o n of a registrant w h o is i n d u c t e d i n t o the Armed Forces." T H I S " D I S R U P T I O N " policy implies a vindictive j u d g m e n t on t h e part of Selective Service: n a m e l y , that civilian work which p u n i s h e s serves the " n a t i o n a l int e r e s t . " In essence, LBM No. 6 4 asks d r a f t b o a r d s t o treat a C.O. as if he were being sent to a civilian b o o t c a m p . Such a policy t e n d s t o de-emphasize, if not ignore, a C.O.'s individual talents and the availability of work that exercises and develops t h o s e talents. How does the "disruption" policy benefit the national h e a l t h , s a f e t y or interest? T o pose this q u e s t i o n is t o ask, in e f f e c t , w h e t h e r t h e " d i s r u p t i o n " policy is a u t h o r i z e d by the Selective Service act and regulations. In this r e p o r t e r ' s o p i n i o n it is n o t . ONE recently Hackney

C O U R T , however, has decided o t h e r w i s e . In v. Hershey the federal

trial cour t f o r t h e middle district of N o r t h Carolina held that LBM N o . 6 4 is valid. T h e case involved a C.O. w i t h b o t h skills and e x p e r i e n c e in labo r a t o r y , research and related m e d ical fields. T h i s C.O. was w o r k i n g as an inhalation therapist supervisor at the N e w Y o r k University Medical C e n t e r . His work had b e e n a p p r o v e d as a c c e p t a b l e civilian work in the n a t i o n a l h e a l t h , s a f e t y and interest by b o t h t h e s t a t e d i r e c t o r s f o r N o r t h Carolina ( w h e r e t h e C . O . ' s d r a f t b o a r d was) and New Y o r k City ( w h e r e the medical c e n t e r was).

THE DRAFT B O A R D disagreed. It n o t e d in t h e C . O . ' s file: " L o c a l Board is not satisfied with j o b at New York University Medical C e n t e r because this would not disrupt registrant's way of l i f e . " Incredibly e n o u g h , the b o a r d assigned the C.O. to hospital work in N o r t h Carolina which the co u rt later f o u n d to be " o f a r o u t i n e nature which require(s) little training and n o f o r m a l e d u c a t i o n . " T h e c o u r t also f o u n d that t h e C.O.'s new work was " m i n i mal and did not e m p l o y his capabilities, talents and training . . . " As a result a y o u n g man may sweep floors in N o r t h Carolina, while a hospital in New York goes w i t h o u t a specialist. This p r o c e d u r e has got t o s t o p . Officially s a n c t i o n e d d i s r u p t i o n u l t i m a t e l y c o n t r i b u t e s t o the very public a t t i t u d e which Tarr calls a tragedy. If a C.O. is f o r c e d to p e r f o r m useless civilian w o r k , will he ever be regarded w i t h respect? And what d o e s he have t o show f o r his t w o y e a r s of waste and degradation when his civilian work is over and he seeks a real j o b ? N o w o n d e r T a r r hears stories a b o u t C.O.'s w h o c a n n o t s u p p o r t their families. T H I S T R A G E D Y which can last f o r years begins with the official policy of d i s r u p t i o n f o r d i s r u p t i o n ' s sake. Y o u can help end this policy. Write to us. We have already i n f l u e n c e d policy changes t h r o u g h this c o l u m n . Of course, we will n o t send y o u r letters directly t o Tarr. We a l w a y s preserve the c o n f i d e n t i a l i t y of your communications. However, we can use t h e sheer v o l u m e and general s e n t i m e n t of y o u r mail as evidence that repeal of LBM No. 6 4 is long o v e r d u e . Send all l e t t e r s t o " M a s t e r i n g t h e D r a f t , " Suite 1 2 0 2 , 6 0 East 4 2 n d Street, New Y o r k , N.Y. 10017.

The Best of Peanuts PEANUTS

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INFORMATION

11-19


December 7, 1970

Hope College anchor

Page 6

For summer institutes

NSF announces grants T h e N a t i o n a l Science F o u n d a tion ( N S F ) has a n n o u n c e d t h a t H o p e will h o s t three S u m m e r Ins t i t u t e s in 1971, including a new o n e in " O c e a n o g r a p h y and the Limnogeology of t h e Great I akes ** H O P E HAS H O S T E D s u m m e r i n s t i t u t e s in m a t h e m a t i c s and c h e m i s t r y f o r several years. T h e

Faculty recitals to commemorate Beethoven's birth Charles A s c h b r e n n e r , assistant p r o f e s s o r of music, will p e r f o r m three of Beethoven's sonatas T h u r s d a y in D i m n e n t Memorial Chapel at 8 : 1 5 p.m. T h e recital is one of t w o being p r e s e n t e d this week by the music d e p a r t m e n t to c o m m e m o r a t e the bicentennial of B e e t h o v e n ' s birth. T h e second is a Beethoven c h a m b e r music c o n c e r t , a recital by m e m b e r s of the music d e p a r t m e n t f a c u l t y , which will be pres e n t e d S u n d a y in Wichers Audit o r i u m at 4 p . m . Participating in the program ' will be R o b e r t Ritsema, cellist, a c c o m p a n i e d by pianist J o a n C o n w a y , and Carroll Lehman, baritone, accompanied by pianist A n t h o n y Kooiker. This will be L e h m a n ' s first a p p e a r a n c e as a new m e m b e r of the music department faculty. Also f e a t u r e d in t h e recital will be a f a c u l t y q u i n t e t consisting of Gail Warnaar on o b o e , Paul Grishke on clarinet, Paul Lein on bassoon, R o b e r t Cecil on h o r n and A s c h b r e n n e r on piano.

NSF will grant a t o t a l of $ 1 5 6 , 8 4 2 for t h e three 1971 instit u t e s f o r j u n i o r and senior high school t e a c h e r s of science and mathematics. Dr. Eugene C. Jekel, p r o f e s s o r of c h e m i s t r y , will return f r o m a one-year leave of absence t q again direct t h e i n s t i t u t e in c h e m i s t r y , f o r which Mope will be granted $61,350. THE INSTITUTE for mathematics teachers will again o p e r a t e u n d e r the direction of Dr. Jay E. F o l k e r t , p r o f e s s o r of m a t h e m a t i c s and c h a i r m a n of t h e d e p a r t m e n t . T h e N S F will grant $ 5 2 , 1 4 0 f o r the mathematics institute. T h e N S F also a n n o u n c e d its intention to continue to support t h e m a t h e m a t i c s institute t h r o u g h 1 9 7 3 and t h e c h e m i s t r y i n s t i t u t e t h r o u g h 1972. T h e new i n s t i t u t e in oceanograp h y and t h e limnogeology of t h e G r e a t Lakes will be directed by Dr. J. C o t t e r T h a r i n , c h a i r m a n of t h e geology d e p a r t m e n t . T h e N S F grant of $ 4 3 , 3 5 2 will allow 4 0 j u n i o r and senior high school science teachers t o study at H o p e f o r six weeks, July 5 - August 13, 1971. T H A R I N WILL BE j o i n e d on the i n s t i t u t e staff by Dr. William F r e n c h , assistant professor of geo l o g y ; Dr. David Klein, c h a i r m a n of t h e c h e m i s t r y d e p a r t m e n t ; and Dr. Ron Ward, chairman of t h e biology d e p a r t m e n t at G r a n d Valley State College. "I am particularly p l e a s e d , " said T h a r i n , " t h a t H o p e is able t o increase t h e n u m b e r of N S F

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i n s t i t u t e s it will host next s u m m e r at a t i m e w h e n t h e N S F is c u t t i n g back because of lack of f u n d s . " T H A R I N A L S O considers t h e new i n s t i t u t e i m p o r t a n t to t h e disciplines involved because " e a r t h and general science teachers are generally poorly trained in o c e a n o g r a p h y and geographical limnology ( l i m n o g e o l o g y ) " and because " n o college or university o p e r a t e s an earth or general science i n s t i t u t e which focuses o n t h e fresh w a t e r e n v i r o n m e n t . " D u r i n g t h e institute, t h e geology d e p a r t m e n t ' s facilities - including t h e 3 7 - f o o t research vessel Infinity / / and several smaller c r a f t - will be utilized in Lake Michigan and Lake Macatawa, particularly t h e Pine Creek Bay area of the latter, and in heretofore unexamined Kelly Lake, located a few miles w e s t - s o u t h w e s t of Holland. Tharin expects participants to be able t o apply t e c h n i q u e s learned d u r i n g the i n s t i t u t e to their teaching, since " m o s t teachers are l o c a t e d near s o m e b o d y of w a t e r - a lake, p o n d or s t r e a m . "

Medal and a question ( A P ) A 19-year-old Wisconsin girl h o n o r e d by President N i x o n with a medal f o r public service, told him T h u r s d a y she q u e s t i o n e d his sincerity " u n t i l y o u get us out of V i e t n a m . " Debra Jean Sweet, o n e of f o u r y o u n g people p r e s e n t e d medals f o r bravery or service by Nixon at a White H o u s e c e r e m o n y , seized t h e c h a n c e t o l e c t u r e t h e chief executive.

As he h a n d e d over her medal, t h e unsmiling Miss Sweet r e s p o n d e d in a s o f t voice t h a t was barely audible t o n e w s m e n . However, she later told r e p o r t e r s this is w h a t she said t o the President: "I find it hard t o believe in y o u r sincerity in giving the a w a r d s until y o u get us o u t of Vietnam." Nixon replied, " W e ' r e doing t h e best we c a n . "

Voter registration okayed

18-year olds given go-ahead (AP) Michigan Atty. Gen. F r a n k Kelley ruled t o d a y t h a t qualified persons over 18 years of age may be registered t o vote u n d e r t h e Federal V o t i n g Rights Act. Kelley said election officials may not r e f u s e to register t h o s e b e t w e e n 18 and 21 but suggested that such registrations be kept s e p a r a t e until final disposition of the issue by t h e U. S. S u p r e m e Court. ALTHOUGH MICHIGAN voters rejected a p r o p o s e d 18year-old vote a m e n d m e n t to t h e state c o n s t i t u t i o n Nov. 3, Kelley n o t e d that t h e Federal act, w h i c h is " t h e s u p r e m e law of the l a n d , " supersedes the Michigan age requirement. " S i n c e it is necessary u n d e r Michigan law f o r qualified electors t o be registered, it is i n c u m b e n t u p o n election officials t o register as electors all persons w h o are qualified a n d , in so doing, t h e y m a y n o t . r e f u s e t o register a person b e t w e e n t h e ages of 18 years and 21 years f o r failure t o

meet the age r e q u i r e m e n t , " Kelley's ruling said. THE A T T O R N E Y general's o p i n i o n was c o n t a i n e d in a l e t t e r to S t a t e Rep. Jackie V a u g h n HI, D - D e t r o i t , w h o had asked t h e s t a t u s of t h o s e b e t w e e n 18 and 21 as t h e S u p r e m e C o u r t prepares t o rule o n t h e c o n s t i t u t i o n a l i t y of t h e V o t i n g Rights Act. Kelley said f u r t h e r that Michigan law requires that in o r d e r t o vote o n e m u s t be registered not later than the fifth Friday preceding t h e election. ' i t must also be n o t e d that school districts and o t h e r governm e n t a l u n i t s will hold elections at various t i m e s t h r o u g h o u t 1971, t h e a t t o r n e y general said, adding that generally t h o s e elections are f o r voting u p o n primaries and elect i o n of local officials, millage o r o t h e r proposals. "THE S T A T E d i r e c t o r of elections advises that he p r e s e n t l y k n o w s of special elections w h i c h have been called t o be held in t h e m o n t h of J a n u a r y , 1971, in half a

THE

m

d o z e n districts t h r o u g h o u t t h e s t a t e , " he said. " I n order to q u a l i f y t o vote at any such election, registration prior to Jan. 1 would be r e q u i r e d , " Kelley said. "1 would t h e r e f o r e suggest t h a t , as an 18- 21-year-old p e r s o n m u s t register prior to t h e issuance by t h e S u p r e m e C o u r t of its decision, t h e registration card be kept separate f r o m registration cards of o t h e r electors so as t o be readily available f o r disposition following issuance of t h e c o u r t ' s decision..." Kelley said it would be i n a p p r o p r i a t e f o r him t o rule o n t h e c o n s t i t u t i o n a l i t y of the F e d eral act. since it n o w is p e n d i n g b e f o r e t h e n a t i o n ' s highest c o u r t . He n o t e d , however, t h a t G o v . William Milliken - o n advice f r o m Kelley's o f f i c e - has told U.S. A t t y . G e n . J o h n Mitchell t h a t Michigan i n t e n d s to c o m p l y w i t h t h e Federal law dealing with 18 year olds w h e n this p o r t i o n of t h e act t a k e s e f f e c t Jan. 1, 1 9 7 1 , unless it has b e e n declared unconstitutional.

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G A R Y C. H O L V I C K DICK W I N D E M U L L E R 392-2454


H o p e College a n c h o r

December 7 t 1970

AAUP speaks out College costs may be reduced on faculty freedoms

Degree in three years

(AP) T a k e h e a r t , D a d , if y o u still have y o u n g s t e r s at h o m e w i t h college aspirations. T h e bill might be reduced by 25 per cent if present t h i n k i n g in s o m e higher education circles b e a r s f r u i t . Some university presidents agree the t i m e is ripe t o m a k e changes t h a t will cut s c h o o l t i m e 25 per c e n t f o r t h e f o u r year bachelors degree and possibly t w o years f o r t h e l o f t y Ph.D. bringing d o w n t h e c o s t t o b o t h parents and t h e s c h o o l s t h e m selves. R E F E R R I N G TO t h e tight and gloomy financial c o n d i t i o n of m o s t universities, b o t h private a n d public, Dr. Glen Terrell of Washington S t a t e said: " I t h i n k t h a t fiscal c o n d i t i o n s ... will m a k e it necessary t o d o s o m e t h i n g like this. It will f o r c e us t o d o i n n o v a t i n g t h a t we are n o t inclined t o d o . " Terrell was c o m m e n t i n g o n a Carnegie C o m m i s s i o n f o r Higher E d u c a t i o n r e p o r t released t h i s w e e k t h a t called f o r a r e s t r u c t u r ing of t h e degree s y s t e m , largely u n t o u c h e d f o r 8 0 years, to r e q u i r e f e w e r years in t h e c l a s s r o o m . THE REPORT also suggested c r e a t i o n of t w o new degrees b e t w e e n t h e B.A. and Ph.D. • Master of P h i l o s o p h y a f t e r five or six years, q u a l i f y i n g t h e recipient to t e a c h in high s c h o o l and lower division in college. * D o c t o r of Arts, envisioned as e q u a l t o a Ph.D., but w i t h e m p h a s i s on a b r o a d e r field of basic k n o w l e d g e a n d less o n research as r e q u i r e d b y t h e P h . D . It w o u l d p r e p a r e t h e recipient f o r t e a c h i n g at t h e university level.

AUTHORITIES S A Y t h e need for changing t h e d e g r e e s t r u c t u r e already is well r e c o g n i z e d and a b o u t 75 universities e i t h e r have or are s t u d y i n g t h e possibility of c r e a t i n g a degree b e t w e e n t h e b a c h e l o r and d o c t o r a l degrees. Yale University, f o r e x a m p l e , has revised its c u r r i c u l u m f o r a Master of P h i l o s o p h y degree t h a t qualifies t h e r e c i p i e n t f o r t e a c h i n g but d o e s n o t r e q u i r e t h e a d d i t i o n al t w o years f o r t h e thesis t h a t leads t o a d o c t o r a t e . C o m m e n t i n g t h a t new degrees already are in use a n d spreading. Dr. B y r u m E. C a r t e r , c h a n c e l l o r of t h e B l o o m i n g t o n c a m p u s of I n d i a n a University, said, t4 l d o n ' t t h i n k t h e r e is any d o u b t t h e r e are a s u b s t a n t i a l n u m b e r of Ph.D. p r o g r a m s t h a t t a k e an excessive n u m b e r of y e a r s . " SOME E D U C A T O R S are calling f o r even m o r e radical reduct i o n s in t h e t i m e s p e n t in s c h o o l , especially f o r an e x p e n s i v e medical degree. While a Yale s p o k e s m a n did not f o r e s e e s h o r t e n i n g t h e t i m e t o o b t a i n a degree, h e n o t e d t h a t each year Yale a d m i t s a b o u t 5 0 s t u d e n t s w h o are given s o p h o m o r e s t a n d i n g because tests have s h o w n t h e y have acquired k n o w l e d g e in three or m o r e s u b j e c t s b e y o n d what is o f f e r e d in f r e s h m a n courses. T h e Carnegie C o m m i s s i o n rep o r t , p r e p a r e d b y a panel t h a t included p r e s i d e n t s of such schools as N o t r e D a m e , Harvard and the University of N o r t h Carolina, said r e d u c t i o n in t h e t i m e spent in s c h o o l can b e a c c o m p l i s h e d " w i t h o u t sacrificing educational quality."

protection

organized

by college students

to add campus television

station

Draft convictions down, Sel. Ser. officials reveal (CPS) F i g u r e s released r e c e n t l y by Selective Service officials reveal t h a t t h e r a t e of c o n v i c t i o n f o r violations of t h e d r a f t laws have fallen t o a b o u t o n e - t h i r d of t h e t o t a l n u m b e r of cases d e c i d e d f o r t h e first nine m o n t h s of fiscal year 1970. During fiscal year 1968 ( J u l y ' 6 1 - J u n e ' 6 8 ) the rate of c o n v i c t i o n s was 6 4 . 8 per c e n t . Fiscal year 1 9 6 9 s h o w e d a d r o p in these figures t o 4 7 . 2 per cent, and the figures f o r t h e first t h r e e y e a r s of fiscal 1970 w o r k o u t t o 3 3 . 6 per c e n t . Due t o t h e fact that t h e n u m b e r of cases has been steadily increasing, f r o m 1,153 decisions d u r i n g fiscal 1 9 6 8 l o 2 , 0 6 9 d u r i n g the first t h r e e q u a r t e r s of fiscal 1970, t h e actual n u m b e r of c o n v i c t i o n s is increasing. In 1965 there were 156 c o n v i c t i o n s ; in 1968, 7 4 7 in 1 9 6 9 , 8 8 4 ; and in t h e first nine m o n t h s of 1 9 7 0 , 695. T h e decline in the rate of c o n v i c t i o n s can be a t t r i b u t e d t o the g r o w t h of the n u m b e r of skilled d r a f t lawyers, the far greater f r e q u e n c y of errors at o v e r w o r k e d local b o a r d s , r e c e n t liberalization of t h e laws t h r o u g h c o u r t decisions and t h e greater p r e p a r e d n e s s of present d r a f t law violators f o r c o u r t fights.

FBI tromps Philly freaks

STAT,0NERS

A police van waiting on t h e sidelines t o o k t h e t w o i n j u r e d players t o the hospital. O n e suffered a c o n c u s s i o n and t h e o t h e r had eleven stiches in his head.

station, t o a f o o t b a l l game, and now may be a little sorry t h e y did. W H I L E T W O O F their players collided h e a d s o n t h e field, a 2 4 year old pacifist, W a y n e Lauser, was trying t o get i n t o t h e g a m e . T h e FBI had s t e p p e d u p their search f o r Lauser ever since t h e Philadelphia Bulletin had published a s t o r y in w h i c h Lauser said he was waiting f o r t h e m t o pick him u p . But WMMR commentator Jerry Stevens was worried a b o u t his s t a t i o n ' s image and w o u l d n ' t let Lauser in t h e game. So Lauser left the FBI to fight t h e f r e a k s o n the field.

ALL WEEK LONG, radio s p o t s announced the proposed game, which m a n y p e o p l e t h o u g h was a j o k e . O n e spot in particular riled the FBI: " A s t h e y a p p r o a c h e d the p i g . . . skin, w h a t ensues? T h e c o n f r o n t a tion . . . " " T h e y o b j e c t e d t o pigskin. T h e y never said t a k e it off t h e air, but would have b e e n happier if we d i d , " said Stevens, w h o first received t h e call f r o m a T o m G r e y , a clerk at FBI h e a d q u a r t e r s w h o challenged the s t a t i o n t o the f o o t ball game. DESPITE THE FACT t h e r e were n o u n i f o r m s to tell t h e players a p a r t , it w a s n ' t very hard. T h e FBI w o r e b l u e shirts. And s h o r t

# HOLLAND, MICHIGAN S E R V I N G WESTERN M I C H I G A N SINCE 1900 DOWNTOWN NEXT TOPENNEYS

Mobt OimqsL

• GIFTS • PLAYING CARDS

RESTAURANT

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ALL BROWSE AROUND

WE HA VE SOMETHING

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academic c o m m u n i t y imposes . . . an obligation t o respect t h e dignity of o t h e r s , to a c k n o w l e d g e their right to e x p r e s s d i f f e r i n g opinions, and t o f o s t e r and d e f e n d intellectual h o n e s t y , f r e e d o m of inquiry and i n s t r u c t i o n , and free expression on and off the c a m p u s . " As a result, " T h e expression of dissent ... may not be carried o u t in ways Which injure individuals or damage institutional facilities o r disrupt the classes of o n e ' s t e a c h e r s or colleagues." . T h e A A U P s t a t e m e n t calls o n college a n d university faculties t o " j o i n w i t h o t h e r m e m b e r s of t h e academic community in the d e v e l o p m e n t of p r o c e d u r e s t o be used in t h e event of serious d i s r u p t i o n , " and t o e n s u r e f a c u l t y " c o n s u l t a t i o n in m a j o r decisions, particularly t h o s e related t o t h e calling of e x t e r n a l security f o r c e s to t h e c a m p u s . " It e n c o u r a g e s each college and university f a c u l t y " t o assume a m o r e positive role as guardian of academic values against u n j u s t i f i e d assaults f r o m its o w n m e m b e r s . " To this end, the AAUP s t a t e m e n t suggests t h a t faculties give s y s t e m a t i c a t t e n t i o n to t h e d e v e l o p m e n t of " a m o r e versatile b o d y of a c a d e m i c s a n c t i o n s , " including warnings and reprim a n d s , in a d d i t i o n t o t h e u l t i m a t e sanction of dismissal. In all s a n c t i o n i n g e f f o r t s , t h e s t a t e m e n t c o n c l u d e s , " i t is vital that proceedings be conducted with fairness t o t h e individual, that f a c u l t y j u d g m e n t s play a crucial role and t h a t adverse j u d g m e n t s b e f o u n d e d on d e m o n strated violations of a p p r o p r i a t e norms." T h e A A U P , which is h e a d q u a r tered in W a s h i n g t o n , D. C., has f o r fifty-five years b e e n active in setting s t a n d a r d s of a c a d e m i c f r e e d o m and responsibility f o r t h e t e a c h i n g p r o f e s s i o n . Its 1940 Statement of Principles on Academic Freedom and Tenure, prepared j o i n t l y w i t h t h e Association of A m e r i c a n Colleges, is endorsed by over 8 0 e d u c a t i o n a l and p r o f e s s i o n a l societies and c o u n t l e s s colleges and universities. Its 1966 Statement on Professional Ethics o u t l i n e s the basic responsibilities of f a c u l t y m e m bers. B o t h d o c u m e n t s have been approved by the Hope AAUP chapter.

But loses suspect...

I I

Grand Valley

council

SCHOOL SUPPLY AND GREETING CARD CENTER fr

T h e A m e r i c a n Association of University Professors last m o n t h emphasized t h a t " t h e f a c u l t y ' s r e s p o n s i b i h t y to d e f e n d its freed o m s c a n n o t be separated f r o m its responsibility t o u p h o l d t h o s e f r e e d o m s by its o w n a c t i o n s . " In a s t a t e m e n t o n " F r e e d o m and R e s p o n s i b i l i t y " developed against t h e b a c k g r o u n d of c a m p u s tension and u n r e s t , t h e elected council of t h e 9 0 , 0 0 0 m e m b e r organization of p r o f e s s o r s o f f e r s t h e active c o o p e r a t i o n of t h e A A U P in seeking a d h e r e n c e t o basic n o r m s of professional responsibility a n d a c a d e m i c freedom. The statement, approved unanimously by t h e A A U P C o u n c i l , declares t h a t " m e m b e r s h i p in t h e

( A P ) G r a n d Valley S t a t e College officials have asked the Federal C o m m u n i c a t i o n s Commission t o a p p r o v e a Western Michigan e d u c a t i o n a l television s t a t i o n on C h a n n e l 35. Arend D. L u b b e r s , t h e s c h o o l ' s president and a H o p e g r a d u a t e , told a news c o n f e r e n c e t h a t a b o u t $275,000 has been pledged t o w a r d s t h e goal of $ 5 0 0 , 0 0 0 needed t o help get the s t a t i o n operating. He said t h e r e m a i n i n g $ 2 2 5 , 0 0 0 will be sought f r o m area residents b e f o r e a t t e m p t i n g t o o b t a i n a m a t c h i n g federal grant. L u b b e r s said t h e s t a t i o n also 1,000 enrolled b y J u n e in t h e hopes to obtain $500,000 from Eastern U n i t e d S l a t e s . the U.S. D e p a r t m e n t of Health B u t k y s said he organized t h e E d u c a t i o n and Welfare t o , h e l p council f o r business and e c o n o m with e q u i p m e n t and installation. ics m a j o r s , t o give t h e m a cause T h e college p r e s i d e n t said the and a social m o v e m e n t that w o u l d s t a t i o n coul d be on the air "six t o enrich their present and i n f l u e n c e eight m o n t h s a f t e r all financial their f u t u r e . hurdles are c l e a r e d . " L u b b e r s said " T h e physical sciences and present plans call f o r the s t a t i o n engineering s t u d e n t s have ecology to telecast in c o l o r , 10 h o u r s and pollution as their c a u s e , " daily, five d a y s per week d u r i n g B u t k y s said. " T h e arts, h u m a n i t i e s and political m a j o r s t u d e n t s have its first year of o p e r a t i o n . the V i e t n a m war, peace a n d revolution as their cause. Law a n d social science s t u d e n t s have civil rights, civil liberties a n d antip o v e r t y as their p a r t i c u l a r c a u s e . " B e t t e C l e m e n s , d i r e c t o r of Pennsylvania's B u r e a u f o r Consumer Protection, another speaker at Villanova's Intercollegiate Con(CPS) T h e FBI t r o m p e d t h e sumer Protection Symposium, freaks, 4 4 - 0 , i n j u r e d t h r e e of their said, " Y o u n g p e o p l e are a n own men and lost a d r a f t resister u n t a p p e d s o u r c e in the battle f o r t h e y ' v e b e e n looking f o r in Philabetter products." delphia. It was t h e f o o t b a l l game of t h e season. T h e FBI challenged WMMR, Philadelphia u n d e r g r o u n d radio

Consumer

( A P ) College y o u t h l a u n c h e d a N a t i o n a l S t u d e n t C o n s u m e r Prot e c t i o n C o u n c i l F r i d a y aimed at w i p i n g o u t s h o d d y p r o d u c t s and business c h e a t s . ' Its professor organizer called it " a new f r o n t i e r t o b r e a k t h r o u g h t h e barrier t h a t restrains h o n e s t dealing in t h e m a r k e t p l a c e . " T h e m o v e m e n t mobilized at Villanova University a f t e r s o m e 3,000 students heard consumer a d v o c a t e R a l p h N a d e r call t h o s e o n A m e r i c a ' s c a m p u s e s " t h e main s u b j e c t s of e x p l o i t a t i o n . " "Students spend more money on worthless products than any o t h e r g r o u p in t h e c o u n t r y , " N a d e r said. " T h e r e is n o reason why students in every s t a t e c a n n o t organize t o p r o t e c t t h e m selves as c o n s u m e r s . " T h e c o u n c i l is t h e brainchild of Dr. A d o l p h S. B u t k y s , associate p r o f e s s o r of b u s i n e s s a d m i n i s t r a t i o n , w h o h o p e s t o have at least

TO ACHIEVE THIS goal, it suggested a c c r e d i t i n g high s c h o o l s t o give first-year college w o r k to high school s e n i o r s and r e m e d i a l summer school for those who don't complete the work. Stressing his p o i n t , c o m m i s s i o n c h a i r m a n Clark Kerr d e c l a r e d , " T h e last y e a r of high s c h o o l is now largely w a s t e d . " Washington S t a t e ' s Terrell said awarding t h e B.A. degree in t h r e e years "is n o t c h e a p e n i n g t h e degree but is pressing part of t h e training d o w n in t h e high s c h o o l level." EDWARD H. LEVI, president of t h e University of Chicago, likewise is calling f o r s h o r t e n e d t i m e in t h e classroom a n d is asking f o r a college degree in general e d u c a t i o n a f t e r t w o years of s t u d y . T h e c o m m i s s i o n e s t i m a t e d it would save $3.5 billion t o $5 billion a year in university o p e r a t i n g c o s t s a n d a n o t h e r $5 billion in c o n s t r u c t i o n costs in t h e next 10 years.

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hair. And sneakers. ( T h o u g h there were a few n o n c o n f o r m i s t s w h o w o r e track shoes and grey sweatshirts.) The freaks, on the other hand, wore e i t h e r n o shoes, sneakers, military b o o t s , w o r k b o o t s , or shoes. Assorted styles of shirts, including o n e black satin, and sweatshirts, b e l l b o t t o m s , a t u x e d o with tails, a d e r b y and c o w b o y gun and h o l s t e r were the attire f o r t h e f r e a k s . A n d , of c o u r s e , the hair, it was kinda long. It was a s u n n y , crisp fall a f t e r n o o n • w i t h t h e smell of leaves b u r n i n g , o n l y it was a d i f f e r e n t kind of leaf and a d i f f e r e n t kind of smell. F e w fans w o n d e r e d why t h e r e w a s n ' t m u c h spirit. " T H E FBI IS M O R E organized, t h e y have b e e n playing lor y e a r s , " suggested o n e guy. " Y o u j u s t g o t t a put t h e right stuff in their w a t e r , " suggested another. O n e WMMR player c a m e off t h e field c o m p l a i n i n g he was l4 so-o-o s t o n e d , " b u t instead of asking f o r w a t e r , asked f o r m o r e d o p e . S o m e c o n c e r n was expressed a b o u t discussing plays in a h u d d l e . 44 Hey, that's conspiracy," s h o u t e d o n e fan. At another play, s o m e o n e s h o u t e d , " O f f sides . . . 70-year felony." One motorcycle enthusiast w a n t e d t o play and b r o u g h t his headgear w i t h him. But t h e o t h e r players m a d e him r e t u r n t h e h e l m e t to t h e sidelines. " N o hard hats t o d a y . "


Page 8

December 7, 1970

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December 7, 1970

Hope College anchor

Page 9

1 *

r j t

WHITE HOUSE PERFORMANCEâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;President and Mrs. Nixon pose with members of the H o p e College Chapel Choir after a performance at a White House worship service Nov. 22. Choir director Dr. Robert Cavanaugh is at left. Msgr. T h o m a s J. McCarthy of Palos Verdes, Calif., who officiated at the service, is at right. Because of space limitations.

j

only part of the choir could go to Washington. Members were selected to sing for the President on the basis on seniority. The invitation came after a White House aide heard the choir sing at an earlier concert in New York.

Suggests draft at 18

Tarr considers new draft age (AP) Draft director Curtis W. Tarr is considering asking Congress, on recommendation of his youth advisers, to lower the minimum draft age from 19 to 18. Selective Service said the change is one of 36 suggested by 109 young draft advisers in a meeting in Washington last June. Of the recommendations, Tarr rejected only two outright. One would have authorized psychological testing of applicants for conscientious objector status, the other would have allowed judicial review of draft appeals at state and local levels. A REPORT f r o m Tarr's office Wednesday said lowering the draft age and assigning lottery numbers at age 17 might help young men plan their f u t u r e by removing some of the doubt about being inducted. " H o w e v e r , " the report added, "it is anticipated that changes of this nature and magnitude will face opposition from those who honestly feel such action will not be in the best interest of the nation. "Dr. Tarr has thus directed that this matter be made part of the Selective Service package of possible legislative changes which could, at the appropriate time, be presented to Congress for consideration." Other recommendations either were implemented, held for f u r t h e r review or referred to the White House and Congress.

THE REPORT SAID Tarr also is considering these suggestions: - M a k i n g government appeal agents responsible only to the draft registrant. - A p p o i n t m e n t of regional attorneys " t o advise local boards, state directors, and U.S. attorneys as to the relevant law." - L o w e r i n g the minimum age of draft board members. Tarr is considering reducing the requirement from the present 30 years to 26. -Establishment of special panels to help draft boards assess conscientious objector applications. - B e t t e r public service opportunities for conscientious objec-

tors doing work in lieu of military service. -Removal of the present requirement that a man carry his draft card with him. The proposal for psychological testing of conscientious objector or applicants was rejected upon advice from Tarr's legal counsel and after disagreement from conscientious objection citizens' groups. Tarr refused to seek judicial review of draft appeals at state and local board levels, saying such additional delays and complications "might unfairly benefit the better-educated and more affluent registrant at the expense of others."

Attention Students.. . It is w i t h great pleasure t h a t w e present t h e c o n v e n i e n c e of washers and d r y e r s to y o u in y o u r d o r m basement. W i t h g o o d care t h e y s h o u l d n o t give y o u any t r o u b l e . If t h e r e is a p r o b l e m , use t h e c a r d left room.

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WASHERS ARE $ ,25 PER HALF HOUR DRYERS ARE $ .10 FOR 20 MINUTES Phone 392-9240 in case of emergency For dry cleaning we have

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Ii

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BOOTERV


December 7, 1 9 7 0

Hope College anchor

Page 10

Faculty clashes

No funds in sight

over curriculum

reform proposal;

Library's problems will stay

asks restudy We're l o o k i n g f o r specific comments." One faculty member shouted " Y o u ' r e o u t of o r d e r . " A m o t i o n by Harrison R y k e r t h a t the d e a n f o r academic a f f a i r s s u b m i t t o the faculty within t w o w e e k s a f o r m to be used f o r adding recommendations to the list was d e f e a t e d . " T h i s s o u n d s like we could d o this b e t t e r by having a pre-college c o n f e r e n c e and h o l d i n g f o u r open h e a r i n g s , " said Williams. He was a p p l a u d e d . Dr. J o a n Mueller asked, " W h e r e have all these r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s been?V R e c o m m e n d a t i o n s f r o m Holl e n b a c h and V a n P u t t e n moving t h e d a t e of i m p l e m e n t a t i o n f o r t h e c u r r i c u l u m revision f r o m Fall, 1 9 7 1 , t o 1 9 7 2 were placed o n t h e floor. Miss Mueller recalled R i d e r ' s o p e n i n g c o m m e n t s that he c o u l d override the d a t e of implem e n t a t i o n if necessary. Williams supported Miss Mueller in opposing the two recommendations, b u t Hollenbach c o u n t e r e d by saying, " T h e dean should n o t be p u t in t h a t p o s i t i o n ; w e s h o u l d excercise our own judgment here." T h e r e was m o r e discussion, and several f a c u l t y m e m b e r s said t h e y w a n t e d t o see t h e I n t r o d u c t i o n t o Liberal S t u d i e s course o u t l i n e d b e f o r e passing on the e n t i r e proposal. T h e m o t i o n to delay implem e n t a t i o n passed. V a n P u t t e n asked t h a t t h e idea of a c a d e m i c deficiency be s t u d i e d . " I t ' s just something that's been h a n d e d d o w n , " he said. Presently a s t u d e n t m u s t have t a k e n certain s u b j e c t s in high school, a n d if h e is a d m i t t e d t o the college w i t h o u t t h e requisite b a c k g r o u n d he m u s t take courses to make up those areas. A final m o t i o n , p r o p o s e d in the last m i n u t e s b e f o r e the 9 : 3 0 p . m . a d j o u r n a m e n t , expressed facu l t y s u p p o r t f o r the p r e f a c e and p h i l o s o p h y of t h e proposal. T h e v o t e was 52 in favor, 4 8 o p p o s e d .

(Continued from page 1) posal back to the AAB. A m o t i o n t o resolve i n t o c o m m i t t e e of the whole was nearly d r o w n e d in the c o n f u s i o n t h a t f o l l o w e d t h e first vote, but t h a t m o t i o n was defeated. T h r e e f a c u l t y m e m b e r s rep o r t e d t h a t t h e y had brought specific r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s t o the meeting. J a m e s V a n P u t t e n , Jr., Dr. J o h n H o l l e n b a c h and Jean Creviere read their s t a t e m e n t s and the f a c u l t y began to consider each A RECOMMENDATION f r o m Creviere t h a t any new ad hoc committee the board might a p p o i n t should i n c l u d e representatives f r o m nine d e p a r t m e n t s was discussed, a m e n d e d and eventually d e f e a t e d o v e r w h e l m i n g l y . A s e c o n d suggestion f r o m Creviere t h a t t h e A A B detail the " s h o r t c o m i n g s of t h e present curr i c u l u m " c a m e t o t h e f l o o r . Dr. Donald Williams c o m m e n t e d t h a t 4 i see b e f o r e m e an a t t e m p t t o nit pick a w a y at t h e larger issue so that e v e r y o n e w h o d o e s n ' t trust each o t h e r has his s a y . " Creviere's suggestion was d e f e a t e d . In o n e v o t e t h e f a c u l t y t h e n approved recommendations from Creviere, H o l l e n b a c h and Van P u t t e n r e q u e s t i n g t h a t the a d m i n s t r a t i o n of t h e c o n t r a c t curricu l u m p r o g r a m be r e s t u d i e d . T h e m o t i o n also carried an a m e n d m e n t which expressed f a c u l t y supp o r t f o r t h e idea of a c o n t r a c t plan. STUDENT WAYNE VANDERbyl was given t h e f l o o r . He expressed c o n c e r n on behalf of the AAB t h a t t h e directives the faculty was passing were not definitive. " I ' v e h e a r d w o r d s tonight such as ' r e s t u d y , ' 'revise,' 'reconsider' and ' r e d e f i n e . ' We've already r e s t u d i e d , revised, reconsidered and r e d e f i n e d . We're only so m a n y p e o p l e , and we can only d o so m u c h . We've t a k e n this (proposal) as far as we think we can.

A COMMON COMPLAINT raised by s t u d e n t s c o n c e r n e d the lack of general reading m a t t e r in the library. " T h e r e j u s t isn't any straight literature over t h e r e , " c o m p l a i n e d a n o t h e r senior. C h a n c e l l o r William V a n d e r L u g t feels t h a t t h e present state of the library is s u f f i c i e n t f o r the needs of H o p e College. " O u r library is quite a d e q u a t e , " stated Vander Lugt. " I t c o n t a i n s the t h i n k i n g of t h e ages. T o d a y the w o r l d changes so rapidly t h a t t o d a y ' s i n f o r m a tion may n o t be w o r t h m u c h t o m o r r o w . What is i m p o r t a n t is that t h e s t u d e n t s m a k e use of the b o o k s t h a t we have n o w , " he added. "I WOULD QUESTION the necessity of a d d i n g 1 5 , 0 0 0 - 2 0 , 0 0 0 books and periodicals (the a m o u n t suggested by Assistant D i r e c t o r of Public Services L e R o y L e b b i n in t h e first p a r t of this series which a p p e a r e d in t h e last issue of t h e anchor) t o o u r library each y e a r , f o r I feel t h a t a liberal arts college requires primarily a c o r e c o l l e c t i o n of m a n ' s k n o w l e d g e , " a d d e d t h e C h a n c e l l o r . "I would consider graduate schools as b e i n g m o r e t h e t y p e of institut i o n s which w o u l d have a greater need f o r t h e latest w o r k s in each field. "I was d i s a p p o i n t e d last year when 1 read s o m e w h e r e of t h e fact t h a t 6 8 per c e n t of H o p e ' s s t u d e n t s felt t h a t t h e y had learned more f r o m their contacts with their f e l l o w s t u d e n t s t h a n t h e y had f r o m t h e f a c u l t y and b o o k s . Maybe I'm old f a s h i o n e d , b u t t h e value of b o o k s was always stressed in m y e d u c a t i o n - b o o k s are y o u r companions, your friends," the chancellor stated. THE FACT THAT the survey s h o w e d s t u d e n t s learned less f r o m the faculty and books bothers the c h a n c e l l o r greatly. " W h y should we strive t o m a i n t a i n a low stud e n t - t o - f a c u l t y ratio w h e n t h e record seems to show that the greater p o r t i o n of t h e H o p e stu-

(Continued from page I ) well k n o w n t h a t t h e sub-tropical c l i m a t e is n o t c o n d u c i v e t o t h e best interests of the library users, t h e b o o k s and especially t h e m i c r o f i l m . We have already lost several rolls of m i c r o f i l m d u e to c r a c k i n g because of i m p r o p e r storage c o n d i t i o n s caused by t h e escessive heat and h u m i d i t y , " he added. "IN MAY OF 1 9 6 9 t h e r e was a survey t a k e n which u l t i m a t e l y m a d e a r e c o m m e n d a t i o n t o install air-conditioning and c a r p e t i n g in certain a r e a s , " c o n t i n u e d Whittaker. " T h e cost f o r c a r p e t i n g was e s t i m a t e d t o have been a b o u t $ 5 , 5 2 0 , installed. T h e business o f f i c e e s t i m a t e d that air-conditioning would cost around $ 1 0 , 0 0 0 . I included these things o n my capital e q u i p m e n t b u d g e t r e q u e s t last y e a r ( W h i t t a k e r ' s first y e a r as d i r e c t o r of libraries, succeeding John May), b u t was turned down. I intend to include t h e m on it again this y e a r , " h e stated. If t h e need f o r a i r - c o n d i t i o n i n g in t h e library a p p e a r s far f r o m t h e m i n d s of H o p e s t u d e n t s interviewed d u r i n g t h e early d a y s of D e c e m b e r , p e r h a p s it is u n d e r s t a n d a b l e . Several aspects of Van Zoeren's periodical and b o o k holdings were t h e subject of complaints, h o w e v e r . "THE PERIODICAL c o l l e c t i o n c o n t a i n s all t h e titles t h a t a middle-aged m i n i s t e r might r e a d , " m a i n t a i n e d a senior h u m a n i t i e s m a j o r . "If y o u w a n t a n y t h i n g of a specialized research n a t u r e , f o r g e t it unless it c o n c e r n s c h e m i s t r y y o u ' d almost be b e t t e r o f f d o w n at Herrick (Public L i b r a r y ) . " A n o t h e r s p o k e u p : " I f I'm doing a paper on some modern p o e t , I can usually f i n d a c o u p l e reviews of his w o r k , b u t I'll run i n t o all k i n d s of t r o u b l e l o c a t i n g a c o p y of it ( t h e w o r k ) t o read f o r m y s e l f , " he s t a t e d .

d e n t ' s e d u c a t i o n c o m e s f r o m elsew h e r e ? " V a n d e r L u g t asks. Still, the c h a n c e l l o r d o e s n ' t feel t h a t H o p e should change t h e e m p h a s i s on its style of e d u c a t i o n because of this p r o b l e m . " W h e n a s t u d e n t c o m e s here, he is m a t u r ing a great deal and c o n t i n u a l l y developing. We still s h o u l d k e e p t h e e m p h a s i s o n library k n o w ledge." When asked w h e t h e r any plans had b e e n m a d e f o r a n e w library facility, VanderLugt replied, " T h e r e h a s n ' t been m u c h talk a b o u t it as y e t . Right n o w w e ' r e primarily c o n c e r n e d w i t h p l a n s f o r t h e p r o p o s e d a c a d e m i c science c e n t e r a n d physical e d u c a t i o n building." T H E C H A N C E L L O R feels t h a t t h e p r o b l e m s posed by t h e need f o r c a r p e t i n g and a i r - c o n d i t i o n i n g t h e library can be o v e r c o m e . " I t w o u l d n o t have t o be an insurm o u n t a b l e p r o b j e c t . It c o u l d be d o n e if w e assigned s o m e b o d y t o w o r k o n it. I feel t h e s e t h i n g s ( a i r - c o n d i t i o n i n g and c a r p e t i n g ) are q u i t e n e c e s s a r y , " he s t a t e d . " H o w e v e r , so far t h e y h a v e n ' t c o m e u p in any e x e c u t i v e council meetings, and t h e r e isn't a n y t h i n g in t h e b u d g e t f o r t h e m t h i s y e a r . " Clarence H a n d l o g t e n , business m a n a g e r a n d treasurer of the college, s p o k e a b o u t t h e need f o r a i r - c o n d i t i o n i n g in the library. "I d o n ' t feel t h a t this is o n e of t h e m o r e i m p o r t a n t p r o b l e m s at h a n d . We are still t r y i n g t o t a k e care of o u r b u i l d i n g n e e d s and i m p r o v e o u r physical p l a n t , " H a n d l o g t e n said. " W e must think a b o u t t h e p r o p o s e d a c a d e m i c science c e n t e r , the physical education building and t h e n we still have a little t o d o c o n c e r n i n g t h e SCSC. We've b e e n h e r e 100 years w i t h o u t airc o n d i t i o n i n g . If we j u s t i f y airc o n d i t i o n i n g t h e library, w e c o u l d j u s t as easily e n d u p air-conditioning the whole campus. For that matter, our offices aren't even a i r - c o n d i t i o n e d , " H a n d l o g t e n concluded.

CHRISTMAS BARGAINS

r

$1.00

SCOTT! ES FACIAL TISSUE

VALUE

200

ZODIAC SHOWER CAP LIMIT

I

ONE

2

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2

330

r

69c

89c

oz.

470

$1.09

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800"

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$1.49

_ l

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670

$5.95 - $4.95 • $3.95

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ONE

770

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$1.49

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ANDREA DUMON CONTAC LENS WETTING SOLUTION

770

r$1.00 OFF

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B O T T L E OF 25

GILLETTE SOFT & DRI

CHRISTMAS CARDS *2.00 NO COUPON REQUIRED

VALUE

35 VALUE

CORICIDIN COLD TABLETS

990

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12

130

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FRUIT OF THE LOOM PANTY HOSE

2

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490

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JUST WONDERFUL HAIR SPRAY

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DOWNTOWN DISCOUNT 43 EAST EIGHTH STREET L

660


December 7, 1 9 7 0

Hope College anchor

Bosman:committed naivete in a fignrehead's role r.J:*

r

' .

m _

a

_ .

-T-I

Editor's Note: This week's a/7c/7or essay is w r i t t e n by Junior Gil Vernon. He talked w i t h Holland Mayor Nelson Bosman, and later recorded some of his impressions of the interview.

I 'J a y &" ?

by Gil V e r n o n As I and my p h o t o g r a p h e r walked across C e n t e n n i a l Park to our interview with Mayor Bosman, I started a c h o r u s of t4 We are off t o sec the Wizard, the w o n d e r f u l Wizard of O z . " As we were walking up the stairs of city hall t o the m a y o r ' s s e c o n d f l o o r office, the photographer turned to me a n d said, " F u n n y thing, it d o e s n ' t look like E m e r a l d C i t y . " I WAS T O I N T E R V I E W t h e m a y o r . My j o b was t w o f o l d ; find o u t w h a t kind of c i t y , in t h e m a y o r ' s eyes, Holland is, and find o u t a b o u t the m a y o r . I must a d m i t I went t o t h e interview with s o m e p r e j u d g e d ideas a b o u t the a n s w e r s I was going to get to my q u e s t i o n s c o n c e r n i n g social and political p r o b l e m s . I got t h e t y p e s of answers I e x p e c t e d . T h e y were typical of a politician and a m i d d l e A m e r i c a n . Many times t h e m a y o r d i d n ' t have answers, and w h e n he did he k n e w only what he w a n t e d to k n o w . Most replies were based on what I call illusion a n d naivete. BEFORE GOING any further, y o u must u n d e r s t a n d s o m e t h i n g a b o u t me and s o m e t h i n g a b o u t the m a y o r . I w r o t e this essay f r o m my point of view, f r o m m y set of values. My j u d g m e n t of Mayor Bosman and Holland is based on my p r e c e p t i o n of h o w things should be. More i m p o r t a n t y o u must realize and u n d e r s t a n d the m a y o r ' s p o s i t i o n . He is a part time chief a d m i n i s t r a t o r of the city. He is not responsible f o r policy f o r m a t i o n . T h e system of govern- • m e n t that the city of Holland uses is t h e c o u n c i l - m a n a g e r f o r m , in which if a m a y o r is retained r e d u c e s him to a c e r e m o n i a l head. He also presides over meetings of the city council. N o n e t h e l e s s the j o b is a hard one. He receives $5 per m e e t i n g of council - t h e r e are t w o meetings a m o n t h - plus $ 1 0 0 for being m a y o r tor a total of approxim a t e l y $ 2 2 0 per year. Mayor Bosman s u p p l e m e n t s his i n c o m e as a radio engineer and pari o w n e r of W H T C . H O L L A N D , BEING a town of average population (26,144), f a c e d m a n y of the same p r o b l e m s that larger U. S. cities face. 1 began my q u e s t i o n i n g with t h e e n v i r o n m e n t a l p r o b l e m . To my s u r p r i z e m u c h progress has been initiated in this area. T h e m a y o r feels the city as a w h o l e is very " p o l l u t i o n conscious'." C o n s t r u c tion is u n d e r w a y f o r a multi-million dollar a d d i t i o n to t h e sewage treatment plant.

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P H O L L A N D MAYOR N E L S O N BOSMAN T h e r e is s o m e d e b a t e over w h e t h e r or not this t y p e of plant will be as c h e a p and effective as an alternative t y p e of p l a n t , but the point is i m p o r t a n t t h a t action was t a k e n . A gas p r e c i p i t a t o r has been installed in the Municipal P o w e r Plant to cut d o w n on air p o l l u t i o n . T h e Heinz f a c t o r y has plans to build its o w n sewage treatment plant. The mayor c o n s i d e r s t h e e n v i r o n m e n t a l activists at the college an " a s s e t " t o the city. "We are very f o r t u n a t e to have such m e n , " he said. ON T O H O U S I N G and discrimination. According to Mayor Bosman there are s o m e 5 , 0 0 0 t o 6 , 0 0 0 Spanish-Americans in the area. "How many blacks in H o l l a n d ? " 1 asked. " V e r y f e w , " he replied. " W h y ? " I asked. "I don't k n o w . " Holland passed an o p e n housing law t w o years ago, and according to the mayor anyone can live in Holland if he wants. " T h e law is on the b o o k s , " I said, " b u t what a b o u t subtle f o r m s of discrimination and unwillingness on the part of realtors t o sell t o m i n o r i t y g r o u p s ? " "1 just d o n ' t dare s a y , " he h u f f e d . THE CITY'S PROGRAMS for depressed housing is not very progressive. In response to my q u e s t i o n a b o u t what was being d o n e , the m a y o r referred to the placard o r d i n a n c e . T h e placard o r d i n a n c e allows t h e city to inspect housing and d e t e r m i n e w h e t h e r or not the house is in

a c c o r d a n c e with c o n d i t i o n s prescribed by the o r d i n a n c e . If a particular house d o e s n ' t meet the standards, the o w n e r is m a d e aware that he c a n n o t sell or rent the house until he m a k e s improvements. If he fails t o i m p r o v e the p r o p e r t y , t h e house can be t o r n d o w n . The act of telling people that t h e y are living in p o v e r t y , as if t h e y needed t o be t o l d , is the only aid which slum dwellers receive f r o m t h e c i t y . I asked t h e m a y o r h o w a family of f o u r or m o r e living on the subsistent i n c o m e of $ 3 , 0 0 0 per year is s u p p o s e d t o impr ove its p r o p e r t y . His a n s w e r : " I d o n ' t k n o w . T h a t ' s the p r o b l e m . You have got to k e e p things u p . " T H E CITY H A S BEEN working with the D e p a r t m e n t of Housing and U r b a n D e v e l o p m e n t for low-income housing but the project has been juggled a r o u n d for m o r e t h a n three years and t h e mayor didn't "dare say" how m u c h m o r e delay t h e r e would be. I moved t o a c o u p l e of p o i n t s of national interest to break the b o r e d o m of t h e "1 d o n ' t k n o w ' s " and the "1 d o n ' t dare s a y s . " On

the q u e s t i o n of c a m p u s violence the m a y o r was very sensitive. In reaction to J a c k s o n State and Kent S t a t e he said, " I t is t o o bad. No o n e is justified in being s h o t . " When he was asked if he would handle violence in the same m a n n e r , he said, " N o , I would not. I would d o everything not to do it that w a y . " 1 A S K F I ) HIS H O N O R what he thought a b o u t busing. He immediately explained in several s e n t e n c e s h o w a Mr. VanderKolk used t o run a bus service and the p r o b l e m s in subsidizing it were great. A f t e r his speech I i n f o r m e d him that I was referring to busing to end segregated schools. " O h , Oh, O h , I think it is g o o d . T h e y should bus s t u d e n t s when they are no m o r e than a half a mile away and t h e kids that walk over busy roads should ride l o o . " I coughed and cleared my t h r o a t . One out of two isn't bad. Urban renewal was our next topic. Plans lor urban renewal f o r Holland in the f u t u r e are centered a r o u n d a d o w n t o w n shopping mall. T h e council has passed a mall in principle b u t no details have been set. T h e question of w h e t h e r or not there were some o t h e r areas that need renewal more than the d o w n t o w n area, such as those areas of depressed housing, was raised. The m a y o r replied with a h y p o t h e t i c a l situation. He explained that the city o p e r a t e s on a $7 million a year budget and even if t h e city were given $ 2 0 million it could be spent in less t h a n a y e a r ' s time. I ask t h e m a y o r w h a t priorities might be set and in what order. T h e priorities, he said, were sewage and water systems, a new water plant, e q u i p m e n t , a new police s t a t i o n , a new city hall and then urban renewal in respect t o proverty housing. I P O I N T E D O U T that proverty was not restricted t o problems of housing but also included education and j o b discrimination. I asked him what would be d o n e about those p r o b l e m s . In an a b s o l u t e t o n e , he said, " T h e r e is p o v e r t y in all fields. It's too b a d , but we will always have i t . " I asked him if he felt a responsibility t o try t o eliminate p o v e r t y . " I t has been t r i e d . " he said, " T h e Bible says you will always have the p o o r with y o u . " O n e o t h e r area of question was that of city-college relations. 1 asked him if the city or t o w n s p e o p l e c o n s i d e r e d the col-

lege a " b u r r in t h e s a d d l e " in facilitating social change. His answer was " N o . " He feels the college is a valuable asset t o Holland and that any town that d o e s n ' t have a college is missing s o m e t h i n g . He looks to the college as the c i t y ' s social conscience. He has great respect lor the work d o n e in the areas of juvenile d e l i n q u e n c y , e n v i r o n m e n t a l problems and by Higher Horizons. HIS R E S P E C T for the institution of higher learning and what it stands for indicates that he may not be as closed m i n d e d to social change as most of us would like to m a k e him out to be. He is not c l o s e d m i n d e d but he is naive and unin f o r m e d . I here is o n e basic d i f f e r e n c e b e t w e e n Mayor Bosnian and most of us in t h e land of ideals und that is c o m m i t m e n t . He has been involved in city g o v e r n m e n t f o r 25 years and has been m a y o r f o r the last ten. He is n o w 6 3 years of age and will retire f r o m city g o v e r n m e n t at the end of his present term in April. He is c o m m i t t e d and d e d i c a t e d . It is easy to criticize. I t ' s h a r d e r to do s o m e t h i n g a b o u t it. T h e r e is a little Wizard in all of us and it will take all of us t o give all of ourselves if we are ever t o see Fmerald City.

GLCA Bogota rep to visit Hope Tues. and Wed. The administrator for t h e (ireat Lakes Colleges Association Latin American program in Bogota will be on c a m p u s Tuesday and Wednesday to talk with s t u d e n t s interested in applying f o r the program. Dr. Karl L e n k e n s d o r f of Antioch College, the United S t a t e s a d m i n i s t r a t o r for the Bogota program, will be available for interviews through the O f f i c e of International E d u c a t i o n . He will also take part in a special program T u e s d a y night in Phelps Conference Room. A supper at - 5 : 3 0 will begin the evening, followed by the films A Problem of Power and Migration, Urbanization and Marginality al 6 : 3 0 . L e n k e n s d o r f will lecture on Bogota at 7 : 3 0 . P a r t i c i p a n t s will then be invited to see the Jose Molina Bailes Espanoles in t h e Civic C e n t e r at 8 : 1 5 p.m.

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Hope College anchor

December 7, 1970

Hope senior listed as MIAA team repeater Mope middle guard Ted Rycenga, a senior, was listed a m o n g the five r e p e a t e r s on this y e a r ' s Michigan Intercollegiate A t h l e t i c Association f o o t b a l l t e a m , d o m i nated by c o - c h a m p i o n s Adrian and Alma. Three of the o t h e r r e p e a t e r s are f r o m Alma. They are o f f e n s i v e tackle Larry G r e g o r y , linebacker Ron Zins and defensive back Steve List. T h e o t h e r p l a y e r n a m e d f o r a second time t o the team is A d r i a n ' s Jim Wallace. Both o f f e n s i v e and defensive t e a m s were selected by the league s c o a c h e s , with 12 seniors, five j u n i o r s , six s o p h o m o r e s and a freshman named. Four other Hope players landed s p o t s on the team. On the o f f e n s i v e team, they were end Jim Lamer, a j u n i o r , and tackle Bart Merkle, a senior. D u t c h m a n on the defensive team are backs G r e g Voss, a f r e s h m a n , and D o u g Smith, a sophomore. Albion senior Dave E g n a t u k was voted the league's most valuable player. T w o q u a r t e r b a c k s were h o n o r e d when the c o a c h e s d e a d l o c k e d a f t e r balloting twice. Selected were s o p h o m o r e s.gnal

THE S T U D E N T C H U R C H W I L L WORSHIP Dimnent Memorial Chapel Preacher -- Chaplain Hillegonds Organist - Roger Davis enrver Cod stirs himself niid moves, he seems lo provoke the earthquake shock and the tempest. It's rather like turiiiug over a huge stone in the woods and watching the vermin scatter. He disturbs the greed that wants nothing better than to sit on its moneybags, lie routs out all the evil things that like cover and the dark. Men with their arms flung un in their faces fight back at him. lie sits the world by the ears. People say it s the devil...and Jesus said it was the Kingdom of Cod."

callers T o m Bell of Adrian and Larry Pfaff of K a l a m a z o o . Pfaff set a new MIAA passing record the past season c o m p l e t i n g 74 of 155 passes f o r 1,042 yards. Rushing records were set at three schools. Hope's Voss established a new MIAA single season rushing r e c o r d , gaining 1,074 in all ol the D u t c h m e n ' s games. Egnatuk rewrote the Albion r e c o r d , gaining 1,028 y a r d s in 251 carries. Adrian senior Ron Labadie also b r o k e a school mark in gaining 9 7 8 y a r d s in nine games. He led the league in scoring a n d was Michigan's second leading collegiate scorer with 13 touchdowns.

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Hope, Calvin hooters named to MIAA team C o - c h a m p i o n s H o p e and Calvin d o m i n a t e the first Michigan Intercolleaia e AThlpH. f n" rnnfp^lrAi Association allr.lvin rvn i A A players o n thc t e ^ while H o p e placed three and Albion t w o . D u t c h m e n Rick L o p e x , a freshm a n , and seniors Art Hudak and Manuel Cuba were v o t e d to the team by the coaches. Only three of the first team selections are seniors and t w o of t h e c h o i c e s are freshmen. Most valuable players was Albion's Jim Francis. He was selected t h e Briton's most valuable player by his t e a m m a t e s f o u r straight years and was c a p t a i n of the squad f o r the last three years. He b o o t e d 10 goals in 12 g a m e s this season and finished with a career total of 46. Three Hope booters were selected to the second team. T h e y are senior Dave Clark and s o p h o mores John White and T o m Gru ndvig.

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a t t e m p t t o find a l i n e u p that w o u l d click S a t u r d a y night. A f t e r j u m p i n g off to a quick 4-0 advantage, H o p e lost t h e lead and never again regained it. O n e of t h e t w o f n n ir>o 1 ~«11 ~ ,J ? ^ technical f o u l s called against A q u i n a s e n a b l e d H o p e to n a r r o w the gap t o 3 8 - 3 6 at i n t e r m i s s i o n . In the s e c o n d half the D u t c h could not stay with the sharpshooters from Aquinas who o p e n e d u p leads of over a d o z e n p o i n t s . A s e c o n d half s p u r t led by Marty S n o a p b r o u g h t the Flying D u t c h m e n t o w i t h i n five p o i n t s of A an11inoc q u i n a s with w/ifh a b o u t two-and-ahalf m i n u t e s left in t h e g a m e .

Hope College dropped its s e c o n d g a m e of t h e y o u n g season S a t u r d a y night in its h o m e o p e n e r with Aquinas, 7 9 - 7 2 . T h e D u t c h lost their season o p e n e r earlier in the week at C o n c o r d i a in a close c o n t e s t , 73-70. Head coach Russell D e V e t t e used m a n y c o m b i n a t i o n s in a f u t i l e

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First place in a r c h e r y was w o n by the Arkies, while the C o s m o s and t h e F r a t e r s t o o k second a n d jCC rPrice ilcc Uof I third. t h e AArkies " 1 U U - lLee me mes earned t h e highest individual score

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(Very Insidious Plan to Push Pizza)

MARTY SNOAP PLAYED one of t h e best g a m e s of his career S a t u r d a y . He hit 10 o u t of 16 f r o m the f l o o r to lead the D u t c h w i t h 23 p o i n t s . S n o a p ' s alert passing and aggressive s h o o t i n g w e r e o n e of t h e bright s p o t s of t h e night f o r H o p e fans , x l o m Wo Iters t u r n e d in a performance highlighted by 16

Cosmos. The individual winner in

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over|' e included tTv^separate pro• |' 1 W grams of o m p e t i t i o n , one one aa m grams of ccompetition, moonng. the f r a t e r n i t i e s and o n e which included Kollen Hall and t h e various cottages. T h e lead in. f r a t e r n iit y . all-sports , . c o m p e t i t i o n is n o w held j o i n t l y C o s m o p o l i t a n s and Areadians, each with 21 Vi p o i n t s , while Kollen wing 3 A , with 22 points, leads in independent competition. T h e F r a t e r s o c c u p y third place in the f r a t e r n i t y c o m p e t i t i o n with 16 PQints 2 _jind_Crispell C o t t a g e

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A q u i n a s shot a sizzling 57 per cent f r o m the floor, while H o p e hit on o n l y 38 per cent of their shots. T o a large degree t h e s t o r y of t h e game can be f o u n d in H o p e ' s p o o r s h o o t i n g record. MARK SIMONS, a 6u '--/7 " formrw a r d , led A q u i n a s with 26 p o i n t s . He was followed by Paul G n e p e r with 16, c e n t e r Charles M a t h e w s with and Larry S c h a f e r with 10.

Dan Shinabarger backed S n o a p with 18 points. L o r e n z o H o w a r d , t h e only o t h e r Hope player t o hit d o u b l e figures, had an even 10. r a v e l tt0o SSt. t H ! /oo pp ^e will ttravel - JJoosseepphh Wednesday f o r a n o t h e r t o u g h game. Next S a t u r d a y t h e D u t c h will be h o m e to e n t e r t a i n Ann Arbor

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H o p e ' s m a t m e n lost to S o u t h ^ t e r n Michigan CoUege, 26-20,

collegiate Athletic * Association c o m p e t i t i o n in J a n u a r y .

5 - T while6 S i n " ™ ? f . n - > . h " Kollen 2B (3-3-1) t o o k fourth. Kollen wing 3A was first in b o t h tennis and golf c o m p e t i t i o n .

0re " ^ ' * 1 Crowd Saturday t> a f t e r n o o n in Carnegie G y m n a sium. T h e loss gives H o p e a nonconference record of 1-2 in p r e p a r a t i o n l o r Michigan Inter-

Ho ,e s wres,lin f ' g s t r e n g ' h lies in its middle-weight wrestlers. In O j • < . . . . S a t u r d a y ' s meet all 2 0 p o i n t s scored c a m e f r o m t h e middleweights, and all the p o i n t s were scored o n pins. Last year's s t a n d o u t s , s o p h o m o r e Rick Vanderlind and senior captain Karl N a d o l s k y , pinned their o p p o n e n t s . F r e s h m a n Eric Bratt and j u n i o r Rick Hine also won o n pins. F r e s h m a n Rick S t e e n b e r g e n lost by decision and was t h e only middle-weight man not to score. A l t h o u g h H o p e was u n a b l e to get any scoring f r o m t h e light- or heavy-weight wrestlers, t h e t e a m does have experience and p o t e n t i a l . S o p h o m o r e light-weight J e r r y Lauver, c o m i n g f r o m a good year last year, was pinned by his Southwestern opponent. Junior K e n G r a l o w , w h o was u n d e f e a t e d in his weight class as a f r e s h m a n , was also pinned. F r e s h m a n Pete Rengel lost by decision. The heavy-weight class, consisting of two f r e s h m e n , lost w h e n b o t h were pinned. Freshman Dan Dykstra was pinned by an o p p o n e n t w h o o u t w e i g h e d him by almost 5 0 p o u n d s . F r e s h m a n Ed Sanders, c o m p e t i n g in his first year, was pinned by his m a n as well. T h e next wrestling meet f o r H o p e is Dec. 9 at V a l p a n y s o College in Indiana.

campus gamjiuA

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r e b o u n d s . No o n e else had m o r e t h a n t h r e e r e b o u n d s . Even t h o u g h t h e D u t c h were o u t r e b o u n d e d 3 6 - 3 2 , they did not lose t h e g a m e for lack o f board s t r e n g t h .

IlIiAGE m

FINE TOGS... FREE GIFT WRAPPING 1 EAST SEVENTH ST. WEEKDAYS 1=00-9:30 SAT. 9:30-5:30

12-07-1970  
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