Page 1

'f

77th Year—11

Hope ( ollege anchor

December 4, 1964

Civilian Adviser Reports:

Fischel; Viet Picture Black WINTER AT LAST—As winter finally settled over the campus this week, student custodians such as senior James Brink found the fluffy white stuff could be heavier than it looked.

National Student Assn. Plans State Legislature •A student s t a t e legislature, now on the drawing .boards of Michig a n ' s regional, National Student Assn. chapter, will be t h e p r i m e ' business of the NSA planning session to be held at Michigan State University on J a n . 9. According to an NSA r e l e a s e , the proposed student legislature "could offer meaningful channels to students wishing to i m p r o v e the quality of the educational institutions in the s t a t e of Michigan."

Sears Roebuck Donates $1000 To Hope College An u n r e s t r i c t e d grant totaling SHKX) w a s given to Hope 'College this week by the Sears Roebuck Foundation u n d e r a new p r o g r a m of aid to privatelv supported colleges and universities. In announcing the distribution of the 1964 g r a n t s , Mr. I). G. Rector, local r e p r e s e n t a t i v e of the foundation, said that eighteen participating colleges and universities in Michigan will s h a r e in g r a n t s totaling $16,900. Purpose of the p r o g r a m is to help institutions of higher learning meet their financial needs. Altogether, m o r e t h a n GOO colleges and universities f r o m coast to coast will receive Foundation g r a n t s . The g r a n t s a r e unrestricted and allow the school to allocate their funds according to their greatest needs.

The legislature will become independent of Michigan NSA a f t e r it has been c r e a t e d and firmly instituted. the report continued. Pete Hendrickson, m e m b e r of Hope's NSA co ordinating committee. explained, "NSA hopes that t h e student legislature will become an effective lobbying body in the s t a t e legislature p r o p e r . " The J a n . 9. meeting will also seek to p r o m o t e NSA in Michigan colleges. Said Hendrickson, "Repl e s e n t a t i v e s of colleges not belonging to NSA will be brought in to create interest. They will be shown how NSA can benefit a college." Student insurance is another benefit being offered by NSA at Hope. J o h n Daane is promoting the NSA policy, which is a $10.OOO-a-year t e r m life plan for stu d e n t s under 25. The cost is twenty •dollare a y e a r . Sa d Daane about the non-profit a r r a n g e m e n t , " I t ' covers everything, including* summ e r jobs and trips a b r o a d . "

s h a r e d by the V i e t n a m e s e : to improve the c a p a c i t y of the government to govern, to increase security and to produce an active economy. T h e fact that the U.S. is still striving for these goals indicates., according to Dr. Fischel. that "today we a r e in m a n y ways back where we w e r e ten vears a g o . " Dr. Fischel attributed the inability to a c h i e v e the goals to the United States' increased bureaua c r a c y and rigidity. " W e like to think of ourselves as flexible, but this is an illusion. We like to think of ourselves as bovs who st'»nd behind t r e e s and snipe at the Redcoats. The fact is that we a r e rigid and inflexible." He went on to explain our great p o t e n t H strength in South Vietn a m . With this strength, however, "we have t a k e n haK-stens. We h a v e a t r e m e n d o u s lever of power but have used it with t e m e r i t v . " Dr. Fischel po nted out that tho w a r in South Vietnam was essentially a political w a r and not a military war. "In spite of this and the fact that everyone pays lip-service to this, we a r e committed to a military p r o g r a m ; " He .speculated that when Gen Maxwell Taylor, the U.S. ambassa-dor to Vietnam, visited P r e s i 1 dent Lyndon B. Johnson, he told

him that there were five essentials lor V i e t n a m : leadership, administration. security, discpline and responsibility in t h e people and l e a d e r s , and justice. "Spelled together- they m e a n f r e e d o m for the V i e t n a m e s e people." he said. Right now in South Vietnam we h a v e none ot t h e s e , " he said. "One comfort ng fact is that the e n e m y ' s losses are twice ours. So t h e r e is some hope that p e r h a p s the e n e m y will wear down before we will." 1):-. Fischel pointed to a n u m b e r of f a c t o r s which prohibit success in Vietnam. One is that the central South Vietnam g o v e r n m e n t in Saigon has a s e v e r e lack of communicalion with the provinces and villages. Another is that to be an a d m i n i s t r a t o r of any kind with a village means possible d e a t h . "The Viet Cong h a v e been wiping out these a d m i n i s t r a t o r s , not by the tens or hundreds, but by the thousa n d s . " he said. Dr. Fischel concluded that the U.S. has not been successful in V ietnam but that t h e r e was much more it could do. " W e have gone around p a r a d i n g as the leader of the free w»orld. The question I want to leave with you is this:'-' Why a r e n ' t we exercising the kind of leadership which we claim to have 0 "-

1964 Christmas Vespers To Be Performed Sunday The traditional opening to the Christmas season, the annual C h r i s t m a s Vespers will be presented by the Hope College music dep a r t m e n t at 4 p.m. Sunday in Dimnent Memorial Chapel. Presiding at the v e s p e r s will be Rev. David Clark.

Christmas Latin America Study Slated For Puerto Rico This Year T h e Third Annual C h r i s t m a s S e m i n a r on Latin American Affairs will be held this y e a r at the Inter-American University in San G e r m a n , P u e r t o Rico, on Dec. 18-23. Hope students may particinate in t h e p r o g r a m through the International Relations Club. The topic of this v e a r ' s s e m i n a r wi'l be " T h e Political Ideology of the D e m o c r a t i c Left in Latin A m e r i c a . " Sub-tonics include " T h e T n• -~ ' m/*••«/»on TInT»if "rto in n

• J u s t returned from a trip to South Vietnam, Dr. Wesley Fischel r e m a r k e d . " I c a m e away intensely d e p r e s s e d and d i s c o u r a g e d . The picture has no white at all but is m a d e up of greys blending t o w a r d s black." Dr. Fischel, a professor of political science at Michigan State, c a m e to Hope nnder t h e ausni^es of the International Relations Club. He h a s been an adviser to the Ngo Dinh Diem r e g i m e and his recent trip w a s sponsored bv a n u m b e r of United S t a t e s n e w s n a p e r s including the Washington Post. Dr. Fischel s a i d . t h a t he had been a cautious optimist before but that he has s^en in the last two vears a tangible deterioration of the conditions in this southeast Asian country. "The situation is not onlv c r a v e . " he said. "It i^ indeed t h e oiove^th hour. The Republic of Vietnam is d e c a v i n c and t h e situation leaves one shaken and uneasv." / Throughout his M k TV... F ' ^ V H noihted to t h e lack of p r o g r e s s in Vietnam during the last ten vears. W V n he was in t h e countrv in 1 0 54 as political a d v i s e r , it was that t h e kev to success in V i e t n a m w a s to win t h e sunnnrt and confidence of the people. " W e w^re s a ' i n s it in i 0 54. w e ' r e saving it todav in 1%4 an' 1 we'll probably be saving it in .1 0 R4." • D r . Fischel also pointed to the three main objectives of t h e U.S. in Vietnam in 1954 which w e r e

Changing W o r l d , " " T h e Struggle for D e m o c r a c y , " " G r a d u a l i s m vs. Radical Change," and "Latin Am o rica and the Alliance for Progress." T h e cost of t h e trip is $140, including transnortation ( d e n a r t i n g f r o m and returning to New York Citv). room and all m e a l s except bre-kfast. Registration f o r m s and f u r t h e r i n f o r m a t i o n m a v be obtained f r o m D r . Paul F r i e d . IRC faculty ad-

The B r a s s Choir, u n d e r the direction of Robert Cecil, will open the p r o g r a m with .traditional carols. U n d e r the direction of Dr. Robert C a v a n a u g h , t h e Chanel Choir will sing "Virga J e s s e Floriut" by Anton B r u c k n e r , " T h e S h e p h e r d ' s Farewell" to * the Holy F a m i l y " , by Hector Berlioz and " W e l c o m e Y u l e " by Ulysses Kay. The Chancel Choir will sing Orlando Gibbons' " T h i s Is the Record of J o h n , " and C. P. E . Bach's " M a g n i f i c a t . " They a r e directed by Mr. Roger Davis. The W o m e n ' s Choir under the direction of Mr. J a m e s Tallis will sing the " M a g n i f i c a t " by Michael H a ^ d n , " M a d o n n a and C h i l d " by Anthonv Donato and " T h e Snruce T r e e C a r o l " by R i c h a r d W a r n e r . Roger Rietberg will direct the Men's Choir in "Now Sing We, Now R e j o i c e , " a 14th c e n t u r y Germ a n carol, and " I n t h e Bleak Midwinter". by Gustav Hoist. Faculty, c h a i r m a n for t h e vespers is Roger. Davis of the music department.

BOOKWORMS^—The freshman supervised study sessions began Monday, frosh with low grade points were required to attend three threehour sessions a week. *


December 4, 1964

Hope College anchor

Page 2

Sinfonia To Sponsor All-College Dance "Winter R h a p s o d y , " an all-college Christmas d a n c e , will be held Dec. 11 at 8:30 p . m . in Phelps Dining Hall. T h e d a n c e , sponsored by the Sinfonia Music F r a t e r n i t y , will be in a semi-formal a t m o s p h e r e with

the Henry B a a r Band from Grand Rapids, Mich. T h e t h e m e of Christmas will be c a r r i e d out in special entertainment and in C h r i s t m a s tree decorations. Amzie P a r c e l l , c h a i r m a n of the

event, stated that tickets will, be on sale in Van Raalte Hall next week at $2 per couple. Assisting P a r c e l l a r e Kelvin Baker, chairman of decorations; George Hubbard, c h a i r m a n of publicitv; Mark L e m e n e s , c h a i r m a n of r e f r e s h m e n t s . *

What every girl should know about dating men who drive convertibles. •. and sundry other dangerous situations •

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Always clap your hands with glee when your date suggests putting the top down on a convertible —only a prude objects to arriving at a party wildly wind'blown.

Lute Snips and Short Snorts The

held at t h e Dec. 17 m e e t i n g of the Spanish Club. E n t ? r t a i n m e n t will include g a m e s , C h r i s t m a s cust o m s and r e f r e s h m e n t s of both cultures. T h e b r e a k i n g of Spanish pinatas will be the highlight of the evening. ,

First. Fraterbocker J a m m i e

will take place tonight from 8 p . m . to midnight in Carnegie G y m . A " J a m m i e " is a d a n c e with m u s i c provided by two bands playing alternating sets. The d a n c e will be a c a m p u s function and will be. open to all s t u d e n t s . Dress is casual and the cost is SI stag and $1.50 drag.

Washington

A f i l m and panel discussion a r e

s c h e d u l e d for t h e next meeting of the Student Education Assn. to be held Dec. 9 at 7 p.m. in the Julianna Room. The film, titled " F r e e d o m to L e a r n , " concerns the p r o b l e m of w h e t h e r or not the t e a c h e r should be allowed to teach controversial topics. A discussion will t a k e place a f t e r t h e movie. R e f r e s h m e n t s wi'l be served and all students a r e invited.

The

The Chapel Choir will present a short p r o g r a m at M c C o r m i c k ' s P l a c e in Chicago the evening of Dec. 5. They will be singing for t h e 4th annual 1000 nlate b a n q u e t of Rest H a v e n , a R e f o r m e d Church sponsored hospital and nursing home. T h e choir, under t h e direction of Dr. Robert C a v ^ n a u e h , will sing Schutz's " F h r e sei dir. C h n s t e . " H a v d n Morgan's " H o p e Thou in God. U l v s s e s Knv's " W e l ^ r n e Y u l e . " RoMig's " O * Clan Y o u r H a n d s " and Christiansen's a r r a n g e m e n t of " B e a u t i f u l S a v i o r . "

And, of course, join in enthusiastically A

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Semester

Scholars

Tom S t r a t s m a and Dick E m m e r t will discuss their e x p e r i e n c e s in Van Raalte 306 at 9:00 p . m . on Wednesday, Dec. 9. They plan a lecture outlining t h e p r o g r a m in gener al , with slides of t h e American University in Washington, where they spent the s e m e s t e r . P a r t of t h e p u r p o s e of this prog r a m will he to acquaint s t u d e n t s generally with t h e Washington Sem e s t e r plan. Those interested in f u r t h e r information should see Dr. Alvin V a n d e r Bush.

Second

Annual

C a r o l Sing,

sponsored by the Associated Women Students activities b o a r d , will be held in t h e Pine Grove at 8:30 p . m . on Dec. 13. According to Chervl R i c h a r d s o n , c h a i r m a n for the event, the carole r s will g a t h e r about a C h r i s t m a s t r e e to sing a Varietv of songs, ranging f r o m " J i n g l e Bells" to the traditional C h r i s t m a s lu m p s . Sonho m o r e Harvey Lucas will lead the half hour of caroling. Cocoa and doughnuts will be served to t h e carolers in Phelps Hail a f t e r t h e singing.

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52-54 E. Eighth St.


December 4, 1964

Hope College anchor

Pafe S

Off The Cuff

r

Beyond the Academic.... by Robert Donia Thus ,ar in this series of a r t i c l e s c o m p a r i n g the ideal Hope College to the real one, we have discussed two

a s p e c t s of college life:

a c a d e m i c and the religious.

the Now

we turn to a third, that of extrac u r r i c u l a r activities. In describing an ideal extrac u r r i c u l a r p r o g r a m , we find it meeting t h r e e basic needs. We will look into e a c h of these three needs and see if the c a m p u s is providing for the meeting of t h e m .

e MONUMENT—The base lor the A Phi () monument reached completion this week in preparation lor the installation of an ISOO-pound anchor on campus as a symbol of the college.

jaiiiMiuiic o

o

by Kathleen Verduin For most Hope College students, speaking a foreign language is usually r e s t r i c t e d to the classroom, but twenty Hope women lining in the college's two language houses a r e learning to m a k e e v e r y d a y conversations in G e r m a n and French. " D e u t s c h e s H a u s " and " L a Mai: son F r a n c a i s e " a r e residential houses adjoining t h e campus where i n t e r e s t e d women m a y live in o r d e r to develop proficiency in a foreign hinguage. Ten girls inthabit e a c h of the houses, which a r e supervised bv student resident advisors Mary Hakken, Marilvn H o f f m a n . JoAnne Kemink, and Tina Velthuizen. Lending authenticity to t h e language houses a r e two Swiss exc h a n g e students. Maja Eterlin f r o m G e r m a n - s p e a k i n g Basel, and Daniele G o t t r a u x , f r o m the, F r e n c h speaking city of L a u s a n n e . Under their supervision the girls in "La • M a i s o n " and " D a s H a u s " m a y h a v e weekly l i t e r a t u r e discussions of F r e n c h fables, learn i h e German version of t h e Virainia reel or collect, such useful expressions as "I'm "starved." Touches of F r e n c h and G e r m a n culture c h a r a c t e r i z e the houses, from college a n n o u n c e m e n t s written in F r e n c h or G e r m a n to continental periodicals and r e c o r d s by Edith Pief and " L e s Djinns Singe r s . " The piano and collection of French r e c o r d s at t h e F r e n c h . House w e r e d o n a t e d by Hope professor of F r e n c h Miss Nella Meyer. Not all women-living in t h e language houses are F r e n c h or Germ a n m a j o r s , but a d v i s o r s ' report that ease -in conversation is inc r e a s i n g . although s e n t e n c e s are freqi-ently a comic juxtaposition of foreign and English words. " W c speak French b e a u c o u p . " laughed Miss H o f f m a n , advisor at t h e F r e n c h House. At the " D e u t s c h e s H a u s " r e s i d e n t s a r e fined "pienn i g e " < pennies "if they lapse into English during specified hours. The two Swiss coeds who a r e enrolled at Hooe under t h e Institute of International Education p r o g r a m , w e r e surprised tc find they would live in a house instead of a dormitory. "I couldn't imagine living at school in the first p l a c e . " said Miss lijtterlin. "since in Swtzerland school is for lessons. Most Swiss

OIISCS

First, t h e r e is a need for an active social life. T h e college studeiu of today needs the opportu*

(MTrr Cullurc

s t u d e n t s live with their families or in a p a r t m e n t s . I was worried about a d j u s t i n g to a l a r g e dorm a n d was glad to find myself in a house with nine other g i r l s . " The Swiss girls' impression of t h e United States was s o m e t i m e s surprising to Hope students. While A m e r i c a n s usually consider t h e m selves citizens of a " m e l t i n g p o t , " the two s t u d e n t s w e r e immediately impressed by the s i m i ' a r i t i e s of speech, styles and traditions in different a r e a s of the U. S. "Switzerland i s s m a l l country, but we h a v e four national lan guages. and the d i f f e r e n c e between linguistic sections are quite strik

i n g , " said the two. Besides Germ a n . F r e n c h and Italian, t h e Swiss national languages include R o m a n s c h e . a unique dialect derived from Latin and spoken in the r e m o t e hills of the country by about one per cent of the population. Miss Etterlin and Miss G o t t r a u x a r e enrolled in subjects which, t h e y said, are less frequently offered in Switzerland t h a n in this country. Interested in anthropology. Miss G o t t r a u x is studving sociologv and A m e r i c a n intellectual history while Miss Etterlin plans a newsoaoer c a r e e r and is studying journalism.

Two Hope Debaters Win Awards In Novice Tournament Nov, 21 The Hope College D e b a t e squad won five of six battles at the Novice Debate T o u r n a m e n t in Ann Arbor, Nov. 21. . With , d e b a t e r s . f r o m 15 colleges ".and " universities," 140 strong, the four Hopeites considered the* topic " R e s o l v e d : That the F e d e r a l Government should establish a National Public Work for the Unemployed."

Victoriously taking the a f f i r m a tive against Northern Michican University, F e r r i s and Detroit Tec were M a r c a Voigt and Boyd Bercnds. "Both d e b a t e r s w e r e given Excellent Award c e r t ' f i c a t e s . . Carol Van Lente and Ken Walz won over Universitv of Detroit and N o r t h e r n Mjchiean University on the negative. The two lost to Wavne State."

nity to gain release from the nressure of studying. We find t h a t generally the social needs of t h e c a m p u s a r e being met by sufficient activities, although facilities for t h e s e a r e often i n a d e q u a t e . Hopefully this will soon he remedied by the SCSC building. Student Senate and t h e f r e s h m a n class are both sponsoring some activities a n d , of course, the f r a t e r n i t i e s and sororities conduct most of their functions in the social area of c a m p u s life. The second purpose of e x t r a - c u r -

ricular activities is to provide t h e student, through involvement in many groups, with a wider vision of his world along with practical experience in problem-solving and organization. In one sense t h e situation on this c a m p u s is a d m i r a b l e in this reg a r d . The liberality of t h e administration in r e g a r d to allowing ext r a - c u r r i c u l a r activities approaches the ideal: as students we h a v e opportunities for Self-expression in many a r e a s that we have only begun to realize. But in a n o t h e r sense the ideal is f a r f r o m r e a c h e d . Manv groups exist which h a v e the potential to develop a widely cultured background. The trouble is that the people in t h e s e groups t e n d to be those interested in that field in t h e classroom as well, so t h e net result is not nearly as g r e a t as the opportunity. Let's face the facts: v e r y few of those in the h u m a n i t i e s t a k e t h e lime to attend an occasional meeting of the Tri Beta or C h e m club when these groups have p r o g r a m s . Likewise, manV science s t u d e n t s h a v e neglected the opportunities available to t h e m in IRC, the political clubs a n d other groups in the h u m a n i t i e s a r e a s . The development of a " W e l t a n s c h a u u n g " — a "world view"— is an integral p a r t of t h e educational process and Hone students a r e missing m a n y e x t r a - c u r r i c u l a r opportunities to do this. The

third

reason f o r e x t r a - c u r -

ricular activities is to involve students during college in t h e act of serving others. A Phi 0 , Higher

Westrate's

Horizons, Young Life and other groups a r e e x a m p l e s of t h i s type of activity. T h e s e groups are doing a great service in involving Hope students in serving the rest of mankind. T h e r e is room for g r e a t e r involvement, however, and the g r e a t e s t unused opportunities lie with the Greek societies. F r a t e r nities and sororities at least make a pretense of being c o n c e r n e d with the process of serving and developing a wider perspective, but in fact little of this is t r a n s l a t e d into action. Literary m e e t i n g s and occasional service p r o j e c t s a r e evidence that these groups feel some obligation to be involved in non-social a r e a s . Ideally, these groups should have many things to concern them beyond m e r e l y sponsoring structured social activities. In a tough-minded college community, nothing should be sacred and this applies to extra-curricular as well as t h e a c a d e m i c p a r t s of college life; each must continually fulfill genuine needs in the lives of s t u d e n t s and provide adeq u a t e rationales for their existence or face a t t a c k f r o m other quarters. Right now the Greek societies need to provide those rationales. Certainly the purposes of every Greek societv will contain some r e f e r e n c e to high ideals. But purposes are no substitute for perf o r m a n c e . and the f r a t e r n i t i e s and sororities need to do s o m e serious rethinking about their role on campus. The 1FC h a s done some fine work so f a r in eliminating some of (he obiectionahle p a r t s of f r a ternltv initiation, and t H s group has the potential to provide real leadershio in giving a ren^w^d sense of purpose to the. Grepk erouos. Still, the resnons'biMty lies with each individual s o o H v to m o r e clearlv outline t h ^ id o als thev stand for and how they a r e achieving t ^ e m . The ideal in '(hose exfr^-curricular a r e a s is f a r f m m r e a c h e d , and the gr^at^st notential for reaching that ideal lies with f r a t e r n i t i e s and sororities.

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J.


Page i

GLCA Latin America Study Proves Beneficial To Meier " P e o p l e are really the s a m e all o v e r " is the conclusion Carol Meier reached a f t e r spending eight weeks in Mexico last year. Miss Meier. 19-year-old sophomore from Detroit, lived in Guana j u a t o . Mexico, la^t s u m m e r and studied at the university there under the auspices of t h e Great Lakes Colleges program. Her courses included Spanish Gram-

CAROL MEIER mar, "Understanding Mexico" (civilization) and Mexican Literature. Most other students participating in the p r o g r a m were f r o m the G r e a t Lakes a r e a . Others were f r o m California and the E a s t e r n states. Miss Meier and the others studied in an 18th centurv m o n a s t e r y in t h e mountains which t h e universitv had converted. All classes w e r e taught in Spanish by Mexican professors. The Hope coed had had two y e a r s of high school Spanish and one on t h e college level, but still found it difficult to become acciustomed to h e a r i n g the

language spoken by natives and to speaking it herself. However, a f t e r a few weeks she b e c a m e more proficient. Miss Meier and her r o o m m a t e lived with a Mexican family, a widowed senora and her two daughters. Living with the family, she participated directly in Mexican culture, sho said. F i e s t a s . Saints' Days and community picnics in the mountains filled the students' leisure time. Mexico is a traditionally Catho lie country, and most of the Mexicans Miss Meier met were Catholic. She attended the one Methodist church in G u a n a j u a t o only a few times, because it was so different from A m e r i c a n Protestant c h u r c h e s , "probably because of the defensive attitude it took concerning the Catholic c o m m u n i t y , " she stated. Miss Meier hopes to become a secondary school Spanish t e a c h e r and feels that her experience in Mexico was " v e r y beneficial, especially the opportunity to live with the people and converse with them in Spanish. Anyone planning to go on in Spanish should definitely look into the Great Lakes P r o g r a m . " s h e concluded.

TONIGHT "The Confessions of Felix Krull" will be presented as the next Mortarboard movie tonight at 7 and 9 p.m. in the Music Auditorium. Based on Thomas Mann's novel of the same name,- the story is of a roguish con-man who commits everything from petty thievery to gross military m sconduct. Horst Bucholz, a noted German actor, plays the role of Felix.

1

On Singe: First Impressions (Little Theatre's first production, 'Androcles and the Lion,' was unique in the large number of novice actors taking part. In the following article freshman Linda Patterson gives her impressions of her first dramatic efi'ort.) by Linda Patterson Being a typically naive frosh. I happily agreed to be in the play "Androcles and the Lion." little realizing the e x t r e m e amount of time and work which would be involved. Upon being told to come up to the "Little T h e a t r e " for the first rehearsal, I tried to find out exactly w h e r e and what it was. I had heard it r u m o r e d that there was a fourth floor to the science building and that the 'Little T h e a t r e ' was there, located in what, was often t e r m e d the " a t t i c " but fearing this to be only another of the numerous deceptions employed on sfisceplible f r e s h m e n . ! decided to investigate for myself.

Each night t h e fatigue would get g r e a t e r until the m e r e mention of the play m a d e - m o " want to cringe. 1 saw people spending hours and hours sewing costumes and building, props and scenery and adjusting lights and music. I wondered what the purpose for all these activities was. What did these people get out of this expended time and energy, these people who barely got credit or acknowledgment for tneir work?. But I continued to go through motions; all the while wondering and questioning.

Realizing that I would have to walk out under this blinding light to face that unknown wall of moving darkness. I suddenly had the s t r a n g e feeling that my legs w o u l d n ' t - b e able to move and that my mouth wouldn't open to utter anv intelligible sounds. Swallowing, the tightness inside my throat only pulled tighter.

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LINDA PATTERSON the applause. It sounded w a r m and full. I was filled with an unexplainable emotion that m a d e me want to shout for joy and cry at the s a m e time. But I couldn't do e i t h e r because I was being stretched and pulled by an emotion which couldn't be defined by a shout or a tear. At that moment I sensed the life all around m e ; suddenly, for the first time, I felt at one \\ith the people .1 had worked with for weeks. All of us w e r e there together. Together we had I rived for one united goal; together we had overcome obstacles and for. a moment we were ' . n o in our victory. Someone across the stage smiled at me and I smiled back because t h e r e was an u n d e r s t a n d i n g ; there were no b a r r i e r s . I t h e n knew what it was we had worked for. The people who worked behind the scenes bec a m e just as important as those who w e r e in front, bccause together we had strived for tbe s a m e goal. In obtaining this goal we found an understanding and a t r u e communication. This single m o m e n t of oneness m a d e all-those m a n y m o m e n t s of d i s h a r m o n v and meaningless action become meaningful. Thev b e c a m e meaningful because thev helped to fulfill this purpose of communication. The communication c a m e . It took t i m e lots and lots of t i m e s of r e h e a r s a l s and hard work. It c a m e , but it was only one m o m e n t among m a n y . Soon, the lights t u r n e d off. t h e applause ended, the cast left t h e stage in various directions. The lights and t h a t m o m e n t of oneness a r e MOW behind me, lurking about in the small cluttered rooms of the Little T h e a t r e . I left them behind me. but I know I'll be back for more.

Reprinted

PEANUTS ol'HERE H A V t

The final curtain went down and I heard

It seemed as though we had r e h e a r s a l s com ing out of our ears. We r e h e a r s e d and went over and rehearsed some more until our movements on stage seemed merely to become auto matic actions.

I stood waiting behind the stage w h e r e I'd stood so m a n y times before, but this time it was ' h e stage. I saw a tense blackness, 1 watched as these lights f u s M slowly to a burning brightness until there was only a white blanket of light contrasted with the open blacker darkness beyond.

T H A T SHOULD

The lights were on me. Somehow I forgot the r e h e a r s a l s , the m a n y , many r e h e a r s a l s when we walked through our p a r t s but yet didn't feel them. I forgot the t i m e s when 1 could no longer control my a n g e r ; t h e times when the cast felt so far a p a r t . I forgot because t h e w a r m vibrating lights were on me.-and suddenly 1 was living a life apart from my own and for the firs* t i m e it was real. T h e hours and hours of mechanized r e h e a r s a l s fell into place. The spark of life gave m e a n i ^ e ; it was no longer m e c h a n i s m for it was reality"

This little " j o g " up the s t a i r s soon c a m e to be quite habitual and while my e n d u r a n c e was greatly strengthened over the weeks, my dislike of stairs likewise b e c a m e more pronounced.

Then suddenly it was opening night. Us presence seemed unreal. This was' a part of the ilieater t h a t I didn't know; this was a part of the t h e a t e r that as yet wasn't a part of me. I told myself that this was what we had been building up to, but somehow I couldn't quite c o m p r e h e n d its reality or meaning.

MEXICAN STUDIES—Some GLCA students chat while others practice dance steps in the large patio of La Valenciana, a large 18th century monastery converted into a university near Guanajuato, Mexico.

But somehow I found that 1 could move. I could feel t h e w a r m light upon me and I could teel myself coming alive. Every nerve seemed awakened as I walked and talked and moved. 1 sensed t h e tense excitement before me—the I used mass of people—because I sensed them •feeling what I was feeling; I sensed their understanding.

The stairs seemed endless. E a c h step caused me to doubt further the reality of this tabled and obscure 'Little T h e a t e r . ' However, a f t e r arriving at the fourth floor, breathless and somewhat weak at the knees. I was greeted by t h e sight of the brown wooden planks of a stage, low overhanging b e a m s and various props, posters and what-not strewn about the small partitioned rooms. After a d j u s t i n g my e y e s to the dimness of these rooms and catching my breath c o mew h a t . I realized that what I was seeing w s indeed this 'Little T h e a t r e . '

And while 1 wondered and questioned, I found, myself spending more and more time up in the Little T h e a t r e , not realizing that slowly the cluttered rooms were becoming a part of me and t h a t a transition was occurring. Earlier I was t h e r e because it was m a n d a t o r y ; soon I c a m e because I could not stay away.

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December 4, 1964

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I>ecember 4, 1964

Hope College anchor

Guest Editorial:

Page 5

The Carltonian

Making the Grade: Worth n? I

l o a d ol Ins s t u d i e s . H e perceives a law ol d i m i n i s h i n g r e t u r n s s e t t i n g in w i t h t h e p u r s u i t ol t h e h i g h g r a d e . H e h a s s t a r t e d *1 n o \ e l a b o u t t h e s e c o n d b i r t h ol | e s u s o n a small college c a m p u s to a girl n a m e d Mary C h i i s t e n s o n . H e wants to p r o d u c e t h r e e plays a n d l i n i s h six s h o r t s t o r i e s . H e is r a t h e r impractical.

N A R t C E N T C O L U M N in t h e C a r l t o n i a n , t h e n e w s p a p e r o l C a r l t o n C o l l e g e in Nonhlield, Minn., Larry (irouse paints a

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coinloi table, m o m e n t a r y Ice ling ol not knowi n g w h e r e h e is.

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and grasping the slippery suiiace with super-

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h e leels is c r e a t i v e a n d n a t u r a l . Yet, h e k n o w s h o w m u c h h e is l e a r n i n g a n d l e a r s s o m e basic i n a d e q u a c y . H e will a d j u s t i n time. ( f i a d e s a r e necessary, he muses. T hey show h i s s u p e r i o r i t y . T h e y a r e so . . . p e r manent.

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i.MDl.S AT T L N D I N C CLASSES,, he d r o p s a r o u n d at s e v e r a l 1. M . g a m e s . H e ' \ isits o t h e r s t u d e n t s ' r o o m s p e r i o d i c a l l y

just as t h e y , o n o c c a s i o n , visit h i * - T h e y m u l l Your boys are certainly good at foul shots.

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MICHIGAN

Published weekly of thr college year except vacation, holiday and examination periods b\ and for thr students of Hope College, Holland, Mich., under the authority of the Student Senate Publications Boa-d Entered as second class matter at the post office of Holland, Michigan, at the special rate of postage provided for in section 1103 of Act ** Congress, Oct. ), 1917. and authorized Oct. 19. 1918. • Subscription: per year. Printed. Zeeland Record, Zeeland. Michigan Member: Associated Collegiate Press. Michigan . Collegiate Press Asm. Represented for national advertising by National Advertising Service Office:Ground Floor of Grax>es Hall. Phone: 196 2122.

H e c h e c k s t h e p o s t ollice b o x l o u r t i m e s .i d a ) e v e n t h o u g h t n e m a i l c o m e s in t w i c e . H e sits w i t h p e o p l e h e d o e s n ' t k n o w ( a l m o s t e v r r y o n e ) at d i n n e r a n d l e a v e s as s o o n as poss i b l e . In m i x e d d i n i n g h e sits w i t h five o t h e r bovs, always w i s h i n g he h a d n ' t . H e is rev o l t e d by a r t i f i c i a l i t y , b u t w i t h o u t r e a l i z i n g is r e v o l t e d by s i n c e r i t y . H e is v e r y s o p h i s t i c a t e d . H e wants to write ( i c a t i v e l y , but c a n ' t find t i m e w i t h t h e

Dear anchor Editor... 1 r e f e r to M r . Donia's article published in the Nov. 13 issue of anchor. I would like to d r a w his attenton to the f a c t that the science students are far from "hibernating in the Science Building." A science student h a s to put in f a r m o r e work than a h u m a n i t i e s student for the s a m e n u m b e r of credits. Consequently, he c a n ' t afford to waste his precious time running around the c a m p u s . " T h e h e r m i t s in the science building" are not unexposed to the rel g:ous, political, t h e a t r i c a l and musucal aspects of college life as Mr. Donia proposed. F r o m what Ihave observed these past y e a r s , \ great proprotion of the top-notch students who h a v e g r a d u a t e d a r e science m a j o r s . Would uMr. Donia deny that Dave Mouw, Bob Tigalaar. Chuck Christensen, Doug Walvoord and m a n y other science . m a j o r s a r e well-rounded in their education? The anchor, being put out by humanities students, naturally tends to publicize the activities of such students and Ihe activites of the science students h a v e a l w a y s been pushed aside or completely 'Snored so that on the s u r f a c e it does appear to the g e n e r a l public that these student a r e only concerned with what's in the test tube.

acknowledg-

bother to publicize them.? How m a n y s t u d e n t s know of the Science Open House where projects of the s t u d e n t s a r e exhibited and explained or of the Regional Conventions of AED <Pre-med.t and Tri-Beta? So in conclusion. I wouid like to s a y . once again that science s t u d e n t s a r e not as unclutured as you think and I would also like to remind us that the strength of this college lies in the science d e p a r t ment. Helen Tan

W

H L N HK l i M L R G L S Irom the library alter t h e final b u z / e r i n t o t h e cold e v e n i n g w i n d , he looks at the disquieti n g c l o u d s , t h e t o w e r s ol t h e c h a p e l , t h e c l o c k on Willis a n d the lights i r o m the t o w n a n d l e e ' s s o m e t h i n g i n s i d e of h i m t h r o b b i n g a n novinglv. H e takes alka seltzer a n d goes to bed. A m I p r e j u d i c e d a g a i n s t h i m ? Yes, of course. Kxcept lor the high g r a d e average, this i d i o t is m e . o r at least a n e x t r a p o l a t i o n ol w h a t I ' m a l r a i d ol b e i n g . T h e r e a r e p a r t s ol 111is ( h a r a c lei in ail ol us. I his c o m p e t i t i o n a m o n g s t u d e n t s is u n h e a l t h y . c a u s i n g a n u n n a t u r a l v i e w ol l i f e anc! k n o w l e d g e . It is selfish, m a l i c i o u s a n d ;ii t h e s a m e t i m e s e l l - d e s t r u c t i v e . W e a r e isolated a n d b e c o m e abstruse. O h , baby! y o u ' d b e t i e r b e l i e v e t h e w h o l e a c t i o n : its h u r t i n g

anchor Readers Speak Out Whether the cause is suppressed aggression or g e n e r a l hostility, or simply conformity to t h e i m m e d i ate g r o u p situation, it doesn't m a k e much d i f f e r e n c e . The result is little more than an inconsiderate childlike form of behavior which does nothing for t h e e n j o y m e n t of the g a m e . I n s t e a d , it w a r p s the spirit of the college and helps destroy t h e m o r a l e of the t e a m . Last, but not least, it discredits Hope College itself and the s t a n d a r d s of c h a r a c t e r which it proclaims L e t ' s grow up, fellows.

should always be folded properly when taken down; .not dragged along the ground, wadded up a r d thrown over the back of a c h a i r for storage. If the custodians are so o v e r w o r k e d , we will v o l u r t e e r to p e r f o r m this service in the proper m a n n e r . This m a v s e e m 'ike a t r i t e m a t t e r ; however, t h e r e a r e still a few people in this country who believe in patriotism. John A. Houseman Ronald W. DeYoung Neal W. Sobania

With little thought that perhaps they were preventing others around them from enjoving t h e g a m e , these clean-cut self-stvled c h e e r l e a d e r s displayed a b l i n d n e s s to w h a t actually w a s happening that would m a k e anyone wonder w h e t h e r t h e y w e r e watching the g a m e at all.

What these people lack is not The various clubs and h o n o r a r y Christian ethics. What thev lack societies of the science d e p a r t m e n t is simple courtesy. F u r t h e r m o r e , such as the Chemistry Club, Pre-' thev lack anv vestige of m a t u r e med Club and Tri-Beta do hold c h a r a c t e r . T h e r e is a p l a c e for interesting meetings that a r e often * enthusiasm at a basketball g a m e , supplemented with movies and dis- ^ but, u n f o r t u n a t e l y , some people cussions led by authoritative perseem to lack the m e a n s for showsonnel. These meetings a r e usually ing it. open, not only to m e m b e r s , but to What m i g h t a p p e a r to t h e m to the entire college. be e n t h u s i a s m actuallv is a form But do humanities students boof attention-getting t h a t is. regretther to attend, or does the anchor fully, m o r e e n c o u r a g e d t h a n not.

We wish to bring to your attention an act of disrespect to our country and all t h a t she s t a n d s for. On our way to chapel this morning we were taken a b a c k by the sight of our nation's flag, which is flown each d a y f r o m t h e flacoole next to t h e chapel. The flag, which r e p r e s e n t s so much of our c o u n t r v ' s heritage, is torn a r d s h r e d d e d along the outer " d i ^ . This condition r e p r e s e n t s a s e v e r e breach of t h e Flag Code, 'arc! is. in actuaMtv, tvpical of the lethargic attitude of too m a n y A m e r i c a n s today. We feel that if the studonts c a n ' raise $3500 for SCSC. then most certainly the Student S e n a t e can afford to p u r c h a s e a new flag. We also feel that a letter of this nature,, on such a serious m a t t e r , should fiever h a v e had to been written. This e r r o r should have been corrected long ago. Also, another m a t t e r nortaining to this s u b l e t is the lack of c a r e and r o s P e c l shown to the Hag. We beli o ve it is known t h a t the f a g should never touch t h e ground and

A1 B r u n s t i n ^

This y e a r ' s anchor is lacking a c o ' u m n which we feel is valuable because it was e n j o y a b l e and in-, f o r m a t i v e to the many who r e a d it. Why do we no longer see " G r e e k .Week?"

Rich Koster Wednesday evening, during an already frustrating basketball g a m e , a certain s e g m e n t of the spectators a p p e a r e d to be the source of a very irritating string of abuses, cuts, and poesy jests, all a p p a r e n t l y intended for men in gold uniforms or black-and\vhite striped j a c k e t s . .

throw in the towel and e v e r y o n e move off to a s t a t e school. But there were faculty members the-e- also! What kind of thirst for knowledge does this represent'.'

A few t ; m e s in the past, things were m u m b ' e d or at best w r tten about the unsuspicious, be'ieving mind of the a v e r a g e student at Hope CoPege. A recent event point ed up this gull bility of the average Joe Collegiate. Last Nov. one of the m a s t noted a s t r o n o m e r s of our day spoke on c a m p u s . After his his uncompounded but intriguing lecture about " G a l a x i e s and M a n k i n d , " Dr. Hariow Shapely went to Phelps Hal! w h e r e he began telling stories vaguely related to astronomy a f t e r only a few questions by s o m e students and a faculty m e m b e r . The s o r r y p a r t is that this m a n . representing a vast reservoir of knowledge, challenged the need of God in this Universe! Since this is c o n t r a r y to the notions of Christianity and our c o m m o n her^ itage t h e r e couid have and should h a v e been manifold and various questions. But the students got bent easMy and complied to this challenge and it w e n t totally unansw» ered and unquestioned. If we cannot a n s w e r such challenges, Hope College might as well

Sororities and f r a t e r n i t i e s consittute an i m p o r t a n t and large segment of the student body, and thus, the activities in which they e n g a g e characterize a p-ominent aspect of r t u d e n t life. As AWS officers, we a r e speaking not only in the interest of the Greek group, but for all the students on c a m p u s . . . p a r t i c ularly the women s t u d e n t s whom we represent. A school p a p e r has a duty to keep students informed of all c a m pus events whether they a r e cultural, a c a d e m i c or social. As it is now. the anchor has become oriented to the pseudo-inteliects of the next generation. We of the Associated Women Students emphatically urge the reins t a t e m e n t of " G r e e k W e e k " and or a c o m p a r a b l e column devoted to soc al activities on Hope's c a m p u s The E x e c u t a t i v e Board of AWS: Sally SteketevJ Ginger K r y g e r Cherly Defendorf M a r y E len Bridger Ruth Systsma Sherri Lundahl Gail Grotenhuis


Page 6

December 4, 1964

Hope College anchor

Dutch Lose to Valpo, 83 - 64 by J a m e s Mace After a concerted first half effort, Hpoe's old n e m e s i s , sloppy passing and leaky d e f e n s e , c a u g h t up with the Flying D u t c h m e n and g a v e Valparaiso an 83-G4 win over the Dutch in t h e initial start of the season for both clubs Wednesday at the Holland Civic C e n t e r . Hope s t a y e d right with t h e Valpo five up until the final two minutes of the first half when the visitors picked off s o m e s t r a v D u t c h p a s s e s and went off to an eight-point lead at intermission. Previous to this, however, the lead see-sawed back a n d forth until the waning m o m e n t s . A combination of strong rebounding by 6 7 " Roy Anker and f r e s h m a n Floyd Brady plus deadeye- shooting by co-captains Dean Over-

m a n a n d Clare Van Wieren kept •the Dutch even for the first eight, ' e e n m i n u t e s . .. . —

. .

• •

S o m e loose ball handling and two wild passes gave V a l p a r a i s o the boost they n e e d e d , and Ken Rakow and : Vern Curtis popped in two buckets apiece to give the visitors a 45-37 cushion w h e n t h e t e a m s left the floor at t h e half. Hope couldn't regain their first half touch when t h e t e a m s res u m e d play and with Rich E y n o n leading the way w th seven points V a l p a r a i s o widened its s p r e a d to 62-45 m i d w a y through t h e second half. V a l p a r a i s o continued to keep the Dutch hopping with well-timed plays and excellent ball h a w k i n g by guard Tim Smith, who stole the ball four t i m e s .

O v e r m a n got hot with about seven m i n u t e s r e m a i n i n g but Valparaiso continued to d r i v e Ihe f r e e throw lane and m a i n t a i n e d its 20 point s p r e a d for the rest of the contest.

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Coach DeVette used all of his players in t h i s first g a m e of the season, and f r o m a first g a m e look the Dutch m a y be really tough for the rest of the c a m p a i g n . F r e s h m a n Don K r o n e m e y e r , who played t h e final few m i n u t e s and showed excellent ball control, and junior Dutch Poppink, who worked well off the b o a r d s , w e r e two of the brighter lights a m o n g t h e reserves. Leading the Dutch for the malority of the g a m e w e r e O v e r m a n . Van Wieren and B r a d y . O v e r m a n notched 14 m a r k e r s while Van A'ieren had 13. B r a d y , who had li points, also led the t e a m in rebounding and with more experience should be one of the top Light p l a y e r s in the league. Center Ken Rakow led Valpo with 27 points, while Eynon netted 22 and Curtis chipped in with 14. T h e other Dutch s c o r e r s included: Anker, G; Buys, 5; P o t t e r , 4; Poppink. 4; Walters. 3; Klein, 2; and K r o n e m e y e r , 1. In the junior v a r s i t y g a m e t h a t p r e c e d e d t h e v a r s i t y contest, the Valparaiso J V ' s topped the Hope J V ' s 80-69 behind a 26-point effort by J i m S c h r a d e r .

j KEBCUND—Dutch ccgers B II Potter (52) and Roy Anker (50) tangle with a Valpo player in the season's opener Wednesday.

Bosworth Relates (Joe Bosworth, a Hope sophomore last year, traveled to Japan th s fall as a p tcher on the 20member L'. S*. baseball team accompanying Olympic ^Jhle'es to Japan. In the following article he

FROSH ACE—Floyd Bradley (32), a 12-point score*' Wednesday, drives for Ihe basket in the g a m e against Valparaiso. Chris Buys (20), and Clare Van Wieren (54) prepare for possible rebounding tasks.

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relates h ; s experiences on the tour, in whi^h he pitched 30 innings and

• • • • # • • • • •• • • # « • • • • # • •• # • # • 4* # • • • • • • •% . # • #,• • % • % # • • • # • romp'led #• a 4-0 record.) by Joe Bosworth

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Eight h o u r s of ocean had passed b e n e a t h us. but as we a p p r o a c h e d Tokyo t h e g l i m m e r of liahts s e e m e d boundless. Touchdown! the f i r m n e s s of new land, the L a n d of the Rising Sun, J a p a n . We. the U. S. Olympic Baseball T e a m , had accepted the invitation of t h e J a p a n e s e to " h o n or" baseball in d e m o n s t r a t i o n g a m e s as p a r t of the 17th Olympiad. We w e r e financially sup- ported b y . ' c o n t r i b u t i o n s • s e p a r a t e f r o m the Olympic F u n d . Our t e a m had been chosen during an eightmonth selection period f r o m major league scouting reports. On Oct. 10. following five d a y s of p r a c t i c i n g and receptions, t h e finest a m a t e u r a t h l e t e s in t h e world officially convened a n d - t h e opening c e r e m o n i e s of the O h m piads c o m m e n c e d : 8000 brightly suited a t h l e t e s r e - e n a c t i n g the G r e c i a n tradition—a m a g n i f i c e n t spectacle of color and international e x c i t e m e n t . Then on S u n d a y the 11th. our baseball t e a m w a s escorted to Meiji Jingu S t a d i u m , a d j a c e n t to lhe r k National Stadium and t h e Olvmpiad cauldron. Our first g a m e against the J a p a n e s e College A l l S t a r s followed a p a r a d e and s n e e c h e s bv d i g n i t a r i e s and ended in a 2-2 tie, in a c c o r d a n c e with a J a p a n e s e rule of no extra innings. The second g a m e of our doubleh e a d e r a g a i n s t t h e Non-Pro Champions, an a m a t e u r baseball t e a m f i n a r c e d bv l e a d i n g J a p a n e s e industries. a c c ' a i m e d t h e U.S.A. victor, 3-0. The day so anxiously awaited s e e m e d happilv fulfilled, since it had giv o n m e the coveted honor of being the s t a r t i n g p i t c h e r in t h e first g a m e in J a p a n . After a d a y of r e s t and r e l a x a tion, our t e a m boarded a bus to begin t h e second p h a s e of our c m s i d e : an e i g h t d a v "good-will t o u r " of the m a j o r cities of Southern H o n s h u , the m a i n island of Jaoan. Due to a disaonoirting rain-out in N u m a z u Citv, we t r a v eled directly to H a m a m a t s u and the S a g a n n o J a p a n e s e Style Hotel and stopped onlv brieflv at t h e hot springs a r e a of H a k o n e Sna. T h e S a g a n n o introduced us to the delights of J a p a n e s e living;

t h e dai'.y hot springs bath, sleeping on the floor, and t h e re- ; laxing m a s s a g e . Apparently t h e • living a g r e e d with us. for our Trst g a m e on the road p r o v e d to be a lop-sided 9-1 victory. Our arrival in Nagoya r e t u r n e d us to western-style hotels and put us in the c e n t e r of a large s ghtseeing auea as well. This included Kyoto and N a r a . both rich in J a p a n e s e history with a n u m b e r rtf Shinto and Buddhist t e m p l e s . After a S a t u r d a y of sightseeing we r e t u r n e d to Nagoya for a doubleh e a d e r a n d r e c e i v e d our first upset. 2-1. at the hands of t h e Mazda (an e n t e r p r i s e similar to General Motors) Non P r o t e a m , which showed us s o m e good pitching and outstanding fielding. The next and final stop on our tour w a s to O s a k a , a city l a r g e r than Chicago. It w a s again my turn to pitch a n d l i i c k i b ' we won both g a m e s of a d o u b l e h e a d e r , 12-0 ami 3-1. In Osaka I met a friend of m y f a m i l v . Mr. Iwai. w h o took m e to O k a y a m a City along the Inland Sea. T h e t r a i n ride w a s c r o w d e d with typical J a p a n e s e scenes—lush green hills and t h e . o m n i p r e s e n t rice p a t t i e s filling t h e v;'llovs and s t r e t c h i n g over t h e hillsides. J a p a n is a beautiful c o u n t r y in any s e a s o n : yet. the J a o a n e s e f a v o r a u t u m n with its suitable t e m p e r a t u r e s and the c r i m s o n a r t i s t r y of the countryside. Once having r e t u r n e d to Tokvo. we w e r e supposedlv f r e e to r e h x ; however, it w a s only the beginning of a r a c e to see as much of • t h e Olympics a s t i m e allowed. I w 1 's most anxious to see t r a c k , g y m n a s t i c s and basketball arid s u c c e e d e d in doing so. In t r a c k . 1 w a s able to see four world records set in t h r e e relav r a c e s and the exciting m a r a t h o n , but nothing could c o m n a r e to the tension as it mounted in the f'nals of m e n ' s gymnastics—a thrilling experience. On Oct. 24. Ihe closing enromonies w e r e held. T h n v c o r r H e t ^ d a l e ^ n d for me a s t h e a t h l e t e s . ' p a rading arm-in-arm. d^m'>n^tri^d t h e concord and good will wh'^h had grown a m o n g them in t^eir two w e e k s of competition. Fo^ovvins a gala S a y d n a r a pa»-tv. t h ^ r e w a s a c o m m o n farewell s ^ d n ^ s s but also the satisfaction of having p a r t i c i ^ t e d in t h e " g r e a t e s t show on e a r t h . " Tn m v vouth^ul estimation. I can thirk of no event, no festival nor organization wMch toda 1 - W i Q s so t r u t h f u l l v to our id o o 1 oci"s. What other occasion or organiration proves to all its o b s o r v e r s , all s p e c t a t o r s and all participants

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(hat t h e h u m a n r a c e is one people, divided only by time a n d t h e constrictions of its own history?'iThe Olympic torch is not only t h e symbol of an athletic festival which has s p a n n e d time — 776 B.C. to 1; 64. It is also the light of a truth ich d i c t a t e s to us that behind b o u n d a r i e s and walls, b e h i n d . d i f f e r e n c e s in c u s t o m s a n d l a n g u a g e and behind the brittle crust of s t r a n g e r s , foreign and otherwise, b^ats a h e a r t in h a r m o n y with the world as o n e .

J O E BOSWORTH L a t e r , boarding an Air F o r c e DC-G in the chilly m o r n i n g h o u r s at T a c h i k a w a , " t h e Young Y a n k s " headed for Korea, an u n e x p e c t e d addition to our trip. In Seoul t h e t e a m was to play four g a m e s in t h r e e days. Korea, we soon realized. was a country lacking t h e industry a n d consequently the m o d e r n c u n v e n i e r c e s of J a p a n . Yet to our a g r e e a b l e s u r p r i s e , t h e K o r e a n people w e r e the most responsive -and alert H seball f a r s before w h o m we had e v e r played. Our four g a m e s contained the excitement of a World Series. This was one of our u n f o r t u n a t e l y few f a v o r a b l e m e m o r i e s of K o r e a as w e r e t u r n e d to J a n a ^ and waited for our h o m e w a r d flight, s o m e only a little a r x i o u s , o t h e r s s t a r v ing f r o m h o m e s i c k n e s s . . In closing, I t h r k e a c ^ p e r s o n privileged enoueh to involve himself with t h e Olympics in anv w a y owes a s i n c e r e and e r o c i o n s t h a n k you ( " d o o m o a r i g a t o " ) in J a p a n e s e ) to t h e people of J a p a n . If there is a p e r f e c t w a " to host such an e x t r a v a g a n z e . t h e J a p a n e s e h n v e m a s t e r e d it. A eoM m " d a l to them and a personal t h a n k ' ou f r o m m e for a month t h a t will fill a lifetime.

12-04-1964  
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