Page 1

Challenging experience

Working in the whirl of D.C. by Jen Cunningham

V

V O L U M E 89 - ISSUE NO. 11

DECEMBER 3 , 1 9 7 6

Special ed. certified The Hope education department has received authorization to offer teacher certification in the special education areas of learning disabilities and t h e emotionally impaired. S T U D E N T S completing the degree p r o g r a m s will be certific a t e d in s p e c i a l e d u c a t i o n in grades k i n d e r g a r t e n through 12th as well as being Qualified to teach in the regular elementary classroom. Hope is the only MIAA college to o f f e r a s p e c i a l e d u c a t i o n program and is one of only two private institutions in Michigan to provide certification in as many as two areas. " W E A R E delighted that the S t a t e B o a r d of E d u c a t i o n has a p p r o v e d our p r o g r a m s in t h i s important area," said Dr. J a m e s B u l t m a n , c h a i r m a n of H o p e ' s e d u c a t i o n d e p a r t m e n t . " I t is a tribute to the institution, to those who have developed the proposals,

and to the human and material r e s o u r c e s of t h e local and intermediate school districts. It is our hope that we can continue to cooperate with area personnel in the staffing and supervision of this program as we strive to integrate theory with practice." The Hope's education department has for many years believed in t h e p r a c t i c e of u t i l i z i n g t h e expertise of local school personnel in the teaching of several campus courses. HOPE WILL certify six special education t e a c h e r s this Spring with an anticipated annual certification of approximately 10. "We do not desire nor are we equipped to m a s s p r o d u c e t e a c h e r s in t h i s special field," stated Bultman. "It is r a t h e r our intent to provide an o p p o r t u n i t y for s o m e u n i q u e l y qualified individuals to make an i m p o r t a n t c o n t r i b u t i o n in an expanding field."

Brav to play the Pit SAC h a s scheduled a truly unique act for presentation in the Pit this weekend. Arne Brav from Cincinnati, Ohio, will be performi n g both F r i d a y and S a t u r d a y nights beginning at 9 p.m. A R N E D E S C R I B E S his act as "acoustic entertainment." Even though this more or less implies a folksy atmosphere, "acoustic ent e r t a i n m e n t " doesn't include many folk songs. But it does include just

a b o u t e v e r y t h i n g else; b l u e s , ballads, ragtimes, jazz, contemporary and original songs, plus a w a r e h o u s e of g e n u i n e l y f u n n y songs. Audience involvement is a key ingredient of Arne's act. Arne's goal includes just one purpose: To entertain in such a fashion that when people leave at the end of a p e r f o r m a n c e , t h e y can h o n e s t l y say they had a good time.

Internships experienced by stud e n t s participating in the Washi n g t o n H o n o r s S e m e s t e r can i n v o l v e a g r e a t deal m o r e c h a l l e n g e s and r e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s t h a n s t u f f i n g e n v e l o p e s and answering telephone calls. This is demonstrated by the experience of t h r e e of last semester's students; J e r r y Giermann, Kathi Machle, and Gary Kirchner. GIERMANN FOUND this to be the case in both of his six week internships. The work in his first o n e , with C o n g r e s s m a n P h i l i p Ruppe was comprised of answering c o n s t i t u e n t s ' mail on such t o p i c s as g u n c o n t r o l or child molesting as well as researching background material on the bill against dumping tackinite filings in Lake Superior. G i e r m a n n also w r o t e p r e s s releases for radio and newspapers and at t i m e s would h e a r his original copy being read over the a i r . In r e s p o n s e to a q u e s t i o n about his experience in relation to a f u t u r e career interest, Giermann said, "this is the kind of job I want for the future." G I E R M A N N S SECOND intern ship with the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, a major business lobby group, demanded concentrated research on guidelines for members of the business community to help state and local governments cope with the fiscal crisis. A f t e r examining literature and interviewing interest groups from both the business community and t h e g o v e r n m e n t , G i e r m a n n prepared a 21 page paper on the topic to be s e n t to s t a t e and local Chambers of Commerce. RATHER THAN proposing a "negative view on how to limit government," Giermann focused on guidelines for businessmen to help state and local governments run more efficiently and thus help fight the urban crisis. "If the government begins to falter, services break down," Giermann said. "Business has the tools, resources and vested intere s t " to i m p r o v e a c o m m u n i t y r a t h e r t h a n m o v e out of it. Besides, "moving your business around is expensive." W H E N A S K E D if total immersion in one a r e a d u r i n g his i n t e r n s h i p w a s b e n e f i c i a l , Gierm a n n said t h a t it w a s a " r e a l a d v a n t a g e " t o come out of t h e internship with a thorough knowledge of one area. Gary Kirchner, who worked for the Morris Udall campaign as a radio feed operator, found that he "enjoyed politics and organizing a campaign effectively and efficiently." At first, his duties consisted of s t u f f i n g e n v e l o p e s and o t h e r clerical work, but later he was able to u s e his k n o w l e d g e in t h e communications area. B A S I C A L L Y , t h e r a d i o feed operator records the candidate's views on an issue and selects and edits out 30 second news bites for use in radio stations. The operator then either calls a state radio feed operator or a radio station and t e l l s t h e m t h a t he h a s n e w s m a t e r i a l . T h e job also i n v o l v e d c o v e r i n g M o r r i s Udall w h e n he was in town. Toward t h e end of his interns h i p , K i r c h n e r w a s h i r e d as a f u l l - t i m e s t a f f e r and d u r i n g t h e l a s t m o n t h , he w a s p l a c e d in charge of the entire radio feed operation since his supervisor, Bill Christianson, was out of town. K I R C H N E R WAS able to meet

Mosaic

many "key people" in both the Christians." This involves "finding legal council" for people who need n e w s m e d i a and t h e political arena. He took a two-hour trip to it and " t u t o r i n g and t e a c h i n g Philadelphia on several occasions. neighborhood children." THE MAGAZINE examines On one t r i p , t h e p a s s e n g e r s such issues as a Christian stance consisted solely of Mo Udall, the .n •orfnro in m d defense trip director, and Kirchner. spending. Machle's work for the Kirchner met Julien Bond and m a g a z i n e c o n s i s t e d l a r g e l y of Shirley Chisholm on that campaign s e c r e t a r i a l w o r k and e d i t i n g as trip which centered on the black well as "a phenomonal amount of community in Philadelphia. Kirchner also spent two weeks at ABC listening." Machle said that the i n t e r n s h i p w a s e m o t i o n a l l y deNews to observe their operation velopmental rather than vocationand met Howard K. Smith and ally developmental. Harrv Reasoner. T h e Washington Honors SemesT H E I N T E R N S H I P provided experience in "the best of both t e r is an interdisciplinary kind of program which a t t r a c t s s t u d e n t s worlds", that of "the news media and of politicians," Kirchner said. in the sciences as well as those in "I have a more realistic view of the humanities. More than half of how things are done in Washing- t h e s t u d e n t s i n v o l v e d in t h e ton...Politicians really want to do p r o g r a m are non-political science something, but also want to stay in m a j o r s . MOST S T U D E N T S work for a o f f i c e . " T h e y a r e s u b j e c t to "a Congressman or Senator in the multitude of influences." course of their first internship and Kathi Machle s p e n t her first then move to another area during i n t e r n s h i p w o r k i n g for S e n a t o r Mark Hatfield. "He d e m o n s t r a t e s their second internship although what a Christian politician really t h e r e are many exceptions. Stuis. Anything he says, he stands d e n t s work for eight hours per day f o r , " s h e s a i d . A m o n g o t h e r on a non-pay basis in order to gain responsibilities, Machle research- a feeling for the organization in ed and wrote a four-page paper on which they work. I n t e r n s h i p s for t h e s e c o n d the problems of old people to be sent to constituents. The paper s e m e s t e r of t h i s y e a r i n c l u d e s was approved and sent off with w o r k m g for the General Accounting Office where the s t u d e n t is virtually no changes made. MACHLE S P E N T her second p a i d , t h e U . S . C h a m b e r of internship working with Sojour- Commerce, Senators Stevens (Aln e r ' s M a g a z i n e which c o m b i n e s aska) and Hatfield (Oregon) and "conservative evangelicism" with the S t a t e D e p a r t m e n t , as well as a "liberal political ideology." The t h e S u p r e m e C o u r t . N u m e r o u s associate editor ol tne magazine, o p p o r t u n i t i e s a r e a v a i l a b l e for Wes Michaelson, was formerly an s t u d e n t s in t h e s c i e n c e s . L a s t assistant of Hatfields and is a Hope semester, a s t u d e n t worked for the National Association for the alumnus. While working with the staff. Advancement of Sciences. At the M a c h l e s t a t e d t h a t s h e m e t termination of her internship, she " C h r i s t i a n s w h o a f f i r m l i b e r a l was offered a position with the politics and women's liberation." National Academy of Sciences. AT THE PROGRAM S begin She met m e m b e r s ol the Evangelical W o m e n ' s C a u c u s which is ning in J a n u a r y and a f t e r each comprised of "women not finding internship period, t h e r e is a one to self-expression teaching Sunday two week session devoted to interviewing such governmental agenschool or baking cookies." T H E G R O U P expresses the idea cies and interest groups as t h e that "Christ calls on people to be National Rifle Association, intertotal human beings and liberates est groups in favor of controlling you from your woman's role in the h a n d g u n s , t h e E n v i r o n m e n t a l Protection Agency and Governchurch." The magazine staff m e m b e r s mental agencies concerning the place an emphasis on "equality, Media, Consumers, Agriculture, fellowship with the poor and living Housing and Transportation. Each as simply as possible." P a r t of the w e e k , s t u d e n t s g i v e a s e m i n a r s t a f f lives c o m m u n a l l y in t w o presentation on public policy or on adjacent houses in a "lifestyle as a topic related to their internship. outlined in the Acts of the early (Continued on page 2)

Elizabeth Otis (portrayed by Senior Lynn Montgomery of Grand Rapids) contemplates the meaning of existence in old age following a life filled w i t h struggles. The contemporary drama " \ , Elizabeth Otis" is playing at the DeWitt Cultural Center Theatre as a part of Hope's theatre repetoire. Show dates are December 2-4 and 8-11. Tickets are $3 for adults and $1.50 for students. For ticket reservations and further information call 392-6200. The box office is open daily from 12:30-5:30 p.m.

Petra plays (and is) rock

(Hope-Cablevision Channel 12)

C O M E D I A N A N D POLITICAL ACTIVIST DICK GREGORY SPOKE SPOKE A T HOPE - O N L Y TO BE ARRESTED FOR DEMONSTRATING I L L E G A L L Y IN WASHINGTON A WEEK LATER.

MONDAY. DEC. 6 - P r o f e s s o r Robert Ritsema demonstrates little known early i n s t r u m e n t s . Also featured a r e a look at Hope's d a n c e p r o g r a m and a t r i p t o Beaver Island. 7:30 p.m. T H U R S D A Y , DEC. 9 - A r t Department chairman Delbert Michel explains some of his work. Other highlights include a rehearsal of t h e Hope woodwind q u a r t e t and a s p e c i a l p r o g r a m t o be announced. 9 p.m. Bulletin Board, a list of Hope a c t i v i t i e s is i n c l u d e d in each segment.

For the unioue scholars in our c o m m u n i t y who a r e a c o u a i n t e d with ancient Greek, a Christian rock group going under t h e name " P e t r a " might t e a s e your mind into connecting their name with "Petros," or P e t e r , one of J e s u s ' disciples. (He was the "Rock."). F A R FROM d e c l a i m i n g t h e Greek connection, the spokesman for " P e t r a " declared, "We make no bones about our Christianity, and we m a k e no bones at all about our rock and roll." Don't expect " P e t r a " to preach at you over the roar of a heavy

base, because rock and roll is, a f t e r all rock and roll. What is most distinctive about " P e t r a " is their ability to make witness and rock come together. ALL THE m e m b e r s of the band originally played with name bands around the country, including groups like Black Oak Arkansas, R.E.O. Speedwagon and Sam t h e Sham and the Pharoahs. " P e t r a " will be performing in Dimnent Chapel on Friday, Dece m b e r 3 at 8 p.m. Tickets are $4. and a r e available at t h e door.


Page 2

Hope College anchor

Student decries "selling" Vespers One of t h e most beautiful e v e n t s that I have a t t e n d e d in my t h r e e and a half y e a r s at Hope College has b e e n t h e a n n u a l C h r i s t m a s V e s p e r s Service. Last y e a r I had the joy of being able to participate to a g r e a t e r d e g r e e in t h e service because I was in one of t h e choirs. V e s p e r s always leaves me with a f e e l i n g of joy a n d c o m m u n i t y . E a c h y e a r I look f o r w a r d t o V e s p e r s as a r e m i n d e r of t h e t r u e essense of the Christmas Season. V e s p e r s will be d i f f e r e n t this year. As a result of t h e problems with ticket distribution, t n e music d e p a r t m e n t decided to c h a r g e for tickets. Because of t h e decision I feel t h a t something happened to alter t h e spirit of Vespers. It won't be simply a service of praise and worship, but a new element has been added - it will be an e v e n t w h e r e p e o p l e will h a v e t o p a y money t o worship, and to "see" us perform. W h a t is so ironical is t h a t while I've been at Hope I've been to many activities tree of charge s p o r t s events, concerts, lectures given by famous people. This y e a r t h e Hope community will have t o pay if t h e y w a n t to e n t e r into this unique Christmas experience. T h e y will be p a y i n g t o go t o church! This just doesn't sound right t o me; I a t t e n d a college which is church affiliated, w h e r e the s t u d e n t s and faculty have to pay for a spiritual experience. On t h e other side of t h e issue, as many of you might be aware, in the past few y e a r s t h e r e have been many problems with distribution of tickets - the main one being t h a t t h e r e j u s t a r e n ' t e n o u g h t o go around. T h e going belief is t h a t if people have to pay for tickets they aren't a s likely to get e x t r a ones that t h e y will not use. Consequently, o t h e r people will be able to purchase those tickets. Realistically, this makes sense.

However, I would like to think t h a t t h e r e a r e b e t t e r and more e f f i c i e n t w a y s of d i s t r i b u t i n g tickets, without having to charge. Maybe if t h e n u m b e r of unused tickets is t h e problem they could m a k e more tickets. (This does not a p p e a r t o be t h e c a s e t h o u g h because t h e Chapel is usually very full each Service.) Maybe t h e r e ' s a b e t t e r way to limit t h e n u m b e r of tickets per person as it is done for graduation, or limit t h e size of outside groups. Whatever the a n s w e r may be, it s e e m s t h a t with all t h e capable people at Hope, someone should be able to produce a c o u r s e of a c t i o n t h a t w o u l d adequately deal with t h e ticket problems. At least when it's f r e e more people, who might o t h e r w i s e miss t h e message of Christmas, might t a k e a d v a n t a g e of worship. I t ' s p o s s i b l e t h a t t h e r e is no o t h e r a n s w e r to solve t h e

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 3 Film: "The Hospital" • Winants - 7:00 & 9:30 pm. - $1.00 Theatre: 7, Elisabeth Otis" • DWC Main Theatre - 8:00 pm. -$1.50 Senior Music Recital - Wichers 8:00 pm. Coffeehouse: Ame Brav • Pit - 9:00 to 11:00 pm.

problems t h a t the music department has had with tickets in t h e past. H o w e v e r , I think as a Christian college c a m p u s we have s e t t l e d for s o m e t h i n g l e s s t h a n what our integrity d e m a n d s if we do not insist t h a t some d i f f e r e n t course of action is at least tried. If we don't I'm afraid our C h r i s t m a s Vespers, which has always been a s p i r i t u a l g a t h e r i n g of H o p e ' s people with the c o m m u n i t y to celebrate the C h r i s t m a s Season, may merely become a n o t h e r e v e n t in o u r o f t e n c o m m e r c i a l l i v e s , w h e r e we pay to be p e r f o r m e d for. At least V e s p e r s will become t h a t for me. Tami Martens

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 4 Film: "The Hospital" - Winants - 7:00 & 9:30 pm. • $1.00 Theatre: 7, Elisabeth Otis" • DWC Main Theatre - 8:00 pm. - $1.50 Coffeehouse: Arne Brav - Pit - 9:00 to 11:00 pm.

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 5 Christmas Vespers - Dimnent Chapel • 2:00, 4:30 & 8:00 pm. - $1.00

(Editors note: Our only additional observation is that since there is a charge for Vespers, perhaps it would serve Christmas best if the money was given to charity.)

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 8 Women's Basketball - Armory • 5:30pm. Basketball: Aquinas - Civic Center - 8:00 pm. Theatre: 7, Elisabeth Otis" - DWC Main Theatre - 8:00 pm. - $1.50

Incompetence cited M s . V a n d e r l a a n ' s a r t i c l e on

Fewer Women in Hope

Faculty

Roles is a c l a s s i c e x a m p l e ol non-factual, false assumption and incompetent investigative reporting. "There is only one woman in a number of fields, mainly in the sciences and l a n g u a g e s , " she boldly affirms. Had Ms. Vanderlaan taken a closer look (or a look a t all, for t h a t m a t t e r ) , at t h e D e p a r t m e n t of Foreign L a n g u a g e s and L i t e r a t u r e s , she would have seen t h e "error of her ways." The D F L L counts no fewer than seven women on its staff -3 part-time and 4 f u l l - t i m e ( t h r e e of w h o m a r e tenured). As A c t i n g C h a i r m a n I am g r a t e f u l f o r , a n d p r o u d of, t h e

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 7 Wrestling Match - Carnegie Gym - 6:30 pm. Opus Reading - Pit - 8:00 pm.

professional contributions of Dr. Gisela S t r a n d , Ms. Shelley Stevens, Mrs. Jacqueline Donnelly, Margerie F a b e r , Antonia Searles, J u d i t h Vickers, and Nancy Wheeler. Respectfully yours.

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 9 Theatre: "I, Elisabeth Otis" • DWC Main Theatre - 8:00 pm. - $1.50 Last day of classes.

Dr. J . A. C r e v i e r e

Forgive me...

Washington internship.... (Continued from page 1)

I a p o l o g i z e for " a c l a s s i c e x a m p l e of n o n - f a c t u a l , f a l s e L F A s s u m p 7 7 F £ and i n c o m p e t e n t investigative r e p o r t i n g " with respect to your d e p a r t m e n t . Forgive m e o n e s t a t i s t i c a l e r r o r as I f o r g i v e you t w o g r a m m a t i c a l errors. Jill Vanderlaan

P R E R E Q U I S I T E S FOR n o n m a j o r s include Readings in Public Policy (1 hour) and Washington S e m e s t e r P r e p a r a t i o n (1 h o u r ) . Tuition is t h e s a m e as at Hope, but s t u d e n t s m u s t find t h e i r o w n lodging and meals. The course is

t a u g h t a l t e r n a t e l y by Drs. Elder and Holmes. T h e r e c r u i t m e n t p r o c e s s for s p r i n g s e m e s t e r 1978 has begun. If you a r e a sophomore or junior at Hope with at least a 2.9 a v e r a g e , your application is welcome.

Bermuda Triangle: goo-goo eyed and tonguing by Tom Allbaugh A s t h e r e a r e m a n y t y p e s of p e o p l e w a l k i n g in t h e s t r e e t s ( o u t s i d e H o l l a n d , of c o u r s e ) , so t h e r e a r e diverse styles and s o u n d s in t h e m u s i c a l w o r l d . Novelty and u n i q u e n e s s are q u a l i t i e s l o o k e d f o r in a r t i s t s . However, t h e superficial differences in a p p e a r a n c e and gimmick a r e often noticed and a p p r e c i a t e d above t h e content of t h e music. THIS B E S T e x p l a i n s t h e rea p p e a r a n c e of " B e r m u d a T r i a n gle," an off beat non-commercial band from New York. Though their p e r f o r m a n c e w a s tight, their sound full, it was t h e i r individuality, their doing " w h a t we haven't seen a b a n d do before" t h a t t u r n e d on t h e audience. This is both good and bad. It is good to be creative, t o innovate, show class and pizazz. An audience

e x p e c t s t o be e n t e r t a i n e d , a n d hear d i f f e r e n t voices come from d i f f e r e n t p e o p l e . On t h e o t h e r hand, it is bad to have t h e beauty of t h e music (or noise) overlooked because "this group is weird." AND THERE was beauty. T h e r e was intensity. And consid e r i n g t h e "Triangle's" instrumental limitations (bass, d r u m s , violin, a u t o h a r p , organ and kazoo), t h e r e was some variety. T h e a u t o h a r p best characterized t h e i r sound, tingling behind the soft soprano voice of t h e lead vocalist. Their song "My love is the wind, who knows t h e wind" b r o u g h t out t h e richness of t h e organ, bass, and voice harmony. A t t i m e s this c o m b i n a t i o n s o u n d e d like t h e " J e f f e r s o n Starship," p e r h a p s because t h e female h a r m o n i e s resembled Grace Slick in tone. THERE WERE also some problems with their a r r a n g e m e n t .

T h e a u t o h a r p is n o t a solo i n s t r u m e n t , except on r a r e occasions; the continued use of it wore out its novelty. Hobbit-sized Sam on t h e electric violin did some good dancing, but her fiddling didn't seem to step beyond the r a n g e of six notes. At any rate, their renditions of " N i g h t s in W h i t e S a t i n " a n d " D r e a m On" sparkled with origininality and (in this r e v i e w e r ' s opinion) w e r e b e t t e r p e r f o r m e d than by t h e original a r t i s t s . AND THEN there was the k a z o o . Oh, w e l l . A l i c e C o o p e r

played with a boa constrictor and peed on his listeners, and Kiss had fire blast out of their stage. So now - "that goon who has been googoo e y e i n g a n d t o n g u e i n g a t u s is going to pass out kazoos." T h e forest of t h e Pit came alive with hoots and howls. It's time to have fun. "This is w h a t we came for."

In s u m m a r y , t h e n , B e r m u d a T r i a n g l e ' s k a z o o c l i m a x , in f a c t their popularity in this community, point out t w o characteristics in p e o p l e . T h e a p p r e c i a t i o n of t h e silliest p a r t of t h e i r act shows the boredom in which we allow ourselves to live, apathetically, day a f t e r day.

Flowers for every student activity

T y p i n g Wanted In M y H o m e T e r m Papers, Reports, etc.,.

Phone

/ have over 10-years secretarial experience. Reasonable Rates.

281 E. 16tti, One block east of Lincoln

PHONE 772-1214

Holland, Michigan

DANCE ONLY $5.00 p*r coup/0

TUXES N O T NECESSARY!

ASK QUICKLY.... BEFORE SOMEBOD Y ELSE ASKS YOU!

1

r

Wwvte^ ^omfavbia AN A L L - C A M P U S F O R M A L DANCE J A N U A R Y 14, 1977 • 9 p m - 1 a m

music by CHOPPER

• HoMand Civic Center

A

FREE REFRESHMENTS Dance to the versatile sounds of CHOPPER in the elegantly decorated Civic Center DINNER AND DANCE t20.00 per couple

(fax and lip includtd] 7 00pm Punch Bow! 7:30pm Buffet dinner served assorted salads, relish tray, vegetables hot rolls, jellos, potatoes, gravy roast beef and chicken

limited to 75 couplt DINNER AND DANCE

120.00 iMf couoh

(fax and tip includtd]

(It can go both ways you know.)

salad, bread, beverage, potato or vege choice of: Steak and Crab. Alaakan „ King Crab. Chicken Terlyakl. Beef Vi Brochette. Top Sirloin

limittd to 70 coup/et DINNER AND DANCE tJO.OO per couph

(fax and tip included] salad, roll, bev«rage vegetable or hce choice of: slzzler steak, whlteflsh, chicken kiev, pork chop

l!(M

/ s 11.1//

\HI.I: l\ CAMI'l S A( TIMTIhS OhllCt,

I l\

R\

1/ / / //..|//

Jbint West

limited to IX couplet


Page 3

December 3, 1976

Smith orchestrates dynamic rest "I AM i n t e r e s t e d in d y n a m i c r e s t . W h e n one a c c o m p l i s h e s a ly produced a process sculpture at David Smith- Greenwood, profs l a t e of rest, the dynamism of all Case W e s t e r n Reserve University essor of sculpture and ceramics, a r o u n d him is a s t o u n d i n g . T h e in Cleveland, Ohio. The sculpture, will be producing a dance/sculpcells of the living, the atoms of the entitled CandleClay was produced ture event in t h e Pit on December unliving vibrate and signal with as p a r t of t h e 'iOth Show -A 8. There will be t h r e e performP e r f o r m a n c e Event. Artists from new clarity. ances at 7 p.m., 8 p.m. and 9 p.m. "By constructing situations of various colleges and universities T h i s e v e n t e n t i t l e d " A v a l a (Za active rest, and through the use of w e r e i n v i t e d to c r e a t e e v e n t s Olgu)" has been funded by the rhythmic motion, the animism of o r i g i n a t i n g in m u s i c , d a n c e , Cultural Affairs Committee and the inanimate reveals itself. There sculpture or film media. involves s t u d e n t s from the departare no elements which are static, ments of music, t h e a t r e , art and H i s i n t e r e s t in m u l t i - m e d i a stationary or stagnant. A chair has dance. It is based on an experience "happenings" is rooted in a curious moved, and, while it appears to be the artist had in Yugoslavia while and u n c o n v e n t i o n a l s t a t e called unmoving, is in a constant state of on a Fulbri^ht Research Abroad " d y n a m i c r e s t " w h i c h he eluciabout-to-move. Grant. dates in a s t a t e m e n t released after I AM INTERESTED therefore the CandleClay production: SMITH GREENWOOD recentin both forms of inertia, and focus on that moment when one becomes the other. The monumentality of these tiny occurences can best be w i t n e s s e d f r o m a p o s i t i o n of emptiness and rest. An accurate a s s e s s m e n t of a v i o l e n t a c t i o n cannot be integrated while participating in that violent action. "I am interested in agressive passivity (or passive agression?), in effectively changing one's actual environment and/or one's perception of that environment through controlled sub-activity. Sub-activity includes those m o v e m e n t s which follow t h e p a t h of l e a s t r e s i s t a n c e ; which flow b e t w e e n the intended and the attempted; the desire and the struggle. "EACH BEING and each object h a s its v o c a b u l a r y of " m o s t natural" movements or non-movements. (A herd of cattle grazing, a flock of flamingoes eating, a group of farm laborers picking, a case of beer bottles waiting; each individual within its group has the same SMITH'S PROCESS SCULPTURE (PERFORMED AT CWRU) task and the same mechanism with which to perform it. Unintended ENTITLED "CANDLECLAY". r h y t h m s and uncalculated symmetries result.) I am interested in

etra

NOW C O M P L E T E , THE FOREST IN T H E PIT BOASTS I T A L I A N L I G H T S FOR UPCOMING AVALA ( Z A O L G U ) .

orchestrating these and structuring the ways in which they are presented to the senses. Craftsmanship and visual experience are still c e n t r a l . "If this s t a t e m e n t seems like a word game, you are not at rest."

IN CONCERT

%

ROCK AND ROLL AT IT'S BEST...,,,Tickets

available

at the Door!

FRIDAY. DEC. 3. i976....Hope College Auditorium C> Believe in Music $4.00 per person Tickets available at:

(all stores)

c> Records Unlimited (Rogers Plaza)

O Hope College Bookstore

HOLLAND, MICHIGAN

Wood Writing Instruments A distinctivG gift for him or her.

O Record and Tape ( W o o d l a n d Mall)

O Calvin College Bookstore

it*

STATIONERS

ST

| ' DOW TOWN DOWN W NEXT TOPENNBYS TO


Page 4

Hope Hoopers lose three hearlbreakers by Doug Irons The Hope basketball team took it on t h e chin over the Thanksgiving break, losing close games to E g y p t , Illinois B e n e d i c t i n e a n d Tavlor. OF T H E E g y p t g a m e , Coach

Russ DeVette said, UI thought it was a really good game. They had very good individuals, but didn't play well as a t e a m , which is why we were in it. They had some great individual efforts; they blocked eight of our shots, which may have been the difference."

" W e d i d n ' t feel b a d l y a b o u t losing ( t h e D u t c h b o w e d 81-84 a f t e r leading 41-31 at the half), but we felt we could have won it." Substitute Bruce VandersChaaf lead Hope scoring with 18 points. BOTH THE Illinois Benedictine

m

1 i. - i tt • ijn-ffl I

and Taylor games were part of the Wheaton tournament. Against Illinois Benedictine, the eventual winners of the tournament, t h e Dutch lost by only four points, 96-92, t h e s a m e m a r g i n t h a t Illinois defeated Wheaton by in t h e tourney finals. Chris "Airball" Peterson lead Hope in scoring in that game with 28 p o i n t s , followed by J i m Holwerda with 22, Scott P e t e r s o n with 12 m a r k e r s and Jack Hunt with 10. "WE CAME within one point t h r e e times in the second half, but just couldn't pick it up from there. They made two f r e e throws at the end to make it a four point win, instead of two," D e V e t t e said. The Taylor game was a depressingly similar story. Hope was behind 40-44 at the half, but came back to tie t h e game several times in t h e second half, (as late as

the 60's) finally falling back for good half-way through t h e second half. REFLECTING ON t h e s e games loser Coach D e V e t t e felt that the team shot fairly well both nights, averaging 45-46 percent of their shots from the field, but t u r n o v e r s were probably the thing most responsible for the difference. "From here on, when we're in that position to win or lose, we have to win," D e V e t t e asserted. "With Illinois Benedictine, it was 71-70 at one point. T h r e e times we pulled within one. We just couldn't take control, and move into the lead. IT'S GOT to be psychological. At least now we have a little bit better idea of where we're going, what we're doing. T h r e e of our next four games are at home, and I t h i n k we can b e a t C o n c o r d i a away." Things could be looking up.

. 8 A U O A T U C K

OLD CROW BAR FIAHINO HOB MIGHT

\ W I L L THE REAL T U R K E Y RAISE BOTH HANDS? (GUESS WHICH ONE IS OUR BONA FIDE TOM TURKEY.)

EVERY

WEDNESDAY & FRIDAY

DEL'S

BUNTE'S PHARMACY

GUITARS-BANJOS MANDOLINS A N D FIDDLES STRING INSTRUMENT CONSTRUCTION/REPAIRS

COSMETICS

23 E. 8th St., Holland

54 East 8th Street

40c DRINKS and 40c BEERS 8:00 till 11:30

Thei Shutters

Admission

*1,00

280 E. Eighth

PET CANDLE

®

Florida's Answer to the Pet Rock. PET CANDLE comes to you with complete set of operating instructions to t r a i n y o u r PET C A N D L E to s i t up, stand, light up, and fly.

HoiUncUMich 4X23

{/MCaniKQ.... cc

HOME COOKED MEALS SERVED FROM 11:30 P.M. 'TIL 2:00 P.M.

ii

ONE OF MICHIGAN'S MOST FANTASTIC ROCK-N-ROLL GROUPS.

SATURDAY is COLLEGE NIGHT

THE LATEST IN CONTEMPORARY STYLES

A v a i l a b l e in S m a l l . M e d i u m , a n d L a r g e Sizes.

FREE A D M I S S I O N W I T H S T U D E N T I.D.'s

PET CANDLE 110 G i r a l d a Ave.. Coral G a b l e s . F l o r i d a 33134 Small

$1.00 plus

50c

postage

& handling

3

Medium

S2.00 plus

75c

postage

& handling

C

Large

S3.00 plus

95c

postage

& handling

Name Address City

State r

Zip

' 1976. Pet C a n d l e . Inc.

P/1NOPOULOS S/1LONS HOLMND 701 Washington Ave. Holland, Michigan 49423 (616) 392-8543

WORK OVERSEAS FOR THE O.S. GOVERNMENTI All fields - a few months, or permanent positions. Europe - Japan • Africa - Australia - South Pacific Far East - South America. The U.S. Government is the largest employer of Americans overseasl To allow you the opportunity to explore woriung for the U.S. Government overseas, the following book has been researched and written. "HOW TO fiCT A J M OVERSEAS WITH THE IMTED STATES COVEUIIEIIT." This book discusses employment requirements and activities of 13 different U.S Government Agencies in complete detail... and you will be told whom to contact at each one concerning current eversMs employment opportunities. Also complete information on; • Teaching Opportunities • Complete information on the Peace Corps - who and where to apply • Employment on U.S. Government Ships • Employment at the Panama Canal Zone - What type of positions they hire and whom to contact. • Career opportunities in the State Department and United States information Agency. • Opportunities and Qualifications as a Foreign Service Officer. • How and where to apply for Embassy positions - Men - Women - Secretaries - Office Help - Staff Personnel - etc., etc. • What type of positions different Civil Service Departments hire for overseas employment and whom to contact.

PRECISION HAIR CUTTING FOR

MEN & WOMEN

• list of Federal Job information Centers Hation Wide. • Further Information on Employment in Engineering . Accounting . Teaching • Personnel Administration • Recreational • Library Work . Maintenance • Supply . Management • Agriculture • Medical • Skilled Trades • Semi-Skilled and MUCH, MUCH MOREIII ORDER NOWI DON'T DELAYII ^ PayC,W, , #

0¥#r,e

Road, Suite C, Burbank, CA. 91504. Add 50* for mailing. • N t o r f h W .Hk r " t b « * h ,

3,

* • W t r f States Oevenmeat" " Collegiate Research Institute, 1727 Scott ^

^

^

J .-.•JL J,

12-03-1976