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Vespers tickets available

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Admission is $2 for the general public. P a r t i a l view t i c k e t s a r e available a t half of the regular price for all of the services. People who have purchased t i c k e t s for t h e S u n d a y s e r v i c e s may exchange them for Saturday night tickets if they so choose. Tickets and ticket exchange are available in t h e Music D e p a r t m e n t office during the office hours.

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VOLUME NO. 90 - ISSUE 11

DECEMBER 2, 1977

Grant received....

Lab renovations continued H o p e h a s r e c e i v e d a $1,200 g r a n t from t h e Morley B r o t h e r s Foundation of Saginaw to assist in underwriting t h e cost of renovating the college's language laboratory. T H E G I F T was announced by E.B. Morley, J r . , president of t h e f o u n d a t i o n w h o n o t e d t h a t although Hope is outside t h e geographic area in which their foundation normally makes grants, their interest in Hope's plans to implem e n t a new l a n g u a g e p r o g r a m called the "Dartmouth Intensive L a n g u a g e Model" influenced their decision to approve a grant. T h e new language program is s c h e d u l e d t o go i n t o e f f e c t in J a n u a r y 1978 with an intensive course in beginning French to be t a u g h t by Prof. J.A. Creviere, who

also was responsible for d r a f t i n g the proposal for renovation of the language laboratory. Full implem e n t a t i o n is p l a n n e d f o r t h e 1978-79 academic year. D E A N Jacob E. Nyenhuis, dean for the humanities and t e m p o r a r y c h a i r m a n of t h e D e p a r t m e n t of Foreign Languages and L i t e r a t u r e expressed g r e a t enthusiasm about t h e grant. "These funds will enable us to purchase much of t h e badlyn e e d e d e q u i p m e n t f o r t h e language laboratory," he said. " A l t h o u g h we are seeking f u r t h e r external funding for this project, we a s s u m e t h a t the College will also have to invest some of its capital funds in the r e n o v a t i o n p r o j e c t . We plan to complete the renovation in two stages during t h e next year so we

can continue to use the facilities for all s t u d e n t s e n r o l l e d in language study." H O P E A L S O recently completed t h e conversion of part of the language laboratory into a wellequipped learning and resource center. The center contains carrels for simultaneous viewing of slide p r e s e n t a t i o n s in foreign culture and listening to a recorded description of the slides. It also has a video monitor, short wave radio, r e f e r e n c e library, foreign-language n e w s p a p e r s and magazines, and a study area. "The combination of these two facilities will greatly enrich our p r o g r a m s in l a n g u a g e a n d culture," r e p o r t e d Nyenhuis, "since they e x t e n d and expand the classroom experience on an individual-user, library-like basis."

Van Wylen speaks of Japan

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Record crowds a r e expected to view t h e Christmas Vespers this w e e k e n d . T i c k e t s for t h e t h r e e S u n d a y p e r f o r m a n c e s sold o u t without hours. T h e demand was so g r e a t t h a t another performance w a s scheduled for 8:30 S a t u r d a y evening. Tickets are still available for the S a t u r d a y performance. The cost is $1 f o r s t u d e n t s , t h e i r f a m i l i e s , f a m l t v . staff and their families.

In t h i s and t w o s u c c e e d i n g articles I will share some of t h e impressions I gained during our r e c e n t visit to J a p a n . I realize t h a t being in J a p a n for two weeks in no sense qualifies one as an e x p e r t . Yet, initial impressions have their significance because they are gained before one takes things for granted. In this first article I will touch on education, particularly college and university education. This r e l a t e s to the primary purpose of my trip, which was to participate in t h e 100th anniversary of t h e founding of Meiji Gakuin University. T h e o r i g i n s of M e i j i G a k u i n i n v o l v e a n u m b e r of s e p a r a t e i n s t i t u t i o n s , s u c h as t h e h i g h school, a seminary, and a four-year college. The university itself was e s t a b l i s h e d in 1949. T o d a y t h e t o t a l p r o g r a m of M e i j i G a k u i n involves not only a university, but t w o high s c h o o l s (one in t h e s u b u r b s and one in the city), and a junior high. There are several striking things about higher education in t h e Tokyo area. At least 80% of t h e s t u d e n t s a r e e n r o l l e d in p r i v a t e colleges and universities, and less than 20% in public institutions. In the r e s t of t h e country t h e proportion is more nearly equal. F u r t h e r , about 10% of t h e enrollm e n t in T o k y o is in C h r i s t i a n colleges. W h a t m a k e s this particularly striking is t h e fact t h a t less t h a n 1 % of t h e p o p u l a t i o n of J a p a n , which is about 110,000,000 (a country t h e size of California) identify themselves as Christian. F u r t h e r , t h e r e is v e r y k e e n c o m p e t i t i o n for admission to college. Each college gives its own admission examinations to its applicants. Last y e a r Meiji Gakuin h a d 26,000 a p p l i c a n t s f o r a f r e s h m a n class of 2,000. Actually t h e charge for t h e s e admissions examinations (about $50) repres e n t s a f a i r l y good s o u r c e of income for t h e universities. J a p a n e s e universities a r e organ-

ized by various faculties r a t h e r than d e p a r t m e n t s as we are organized. The various "faculties" correspond to t h e m a j o r s which are offered. Meiji Gakuin Univers i t y , for e x a m p l e , h a s f o u r faculties: a College of Liberal A r t s w i t h D e p a r t m e n t s of E n g l i s h L a n g u a g e and L i t e r a t u r e , and French L i t e r a t u r e ; a College of S o c i o l o g y w i t h D e p a r t m e n t s of S o c i o l o g y a n d Social W o r k ; a College of Economics with Departm e n t s of E c o n o m i c s a n d Commerce; and a College of Law. Meiji Gakuin does have a very considerable evening enrollment in these programs. A college such as Meiji Gakuin does not have a science faculty per se. It does have a s c i e n c e p r o g r a m , b u t it is not authorized by the g o v e r n m e n t to o f f e r m a j o r s in t h i s a r e a . T h e science d e p a r t m e n t s are amazingly strong, considering t h e fact that they do not offer a p r o g r a m for majors. One significant factor is t h a t at Meiji Gakuin the studentfaculty ratio is 50 to 1 (this may be somewhat misleading because t h e r e a r e many part-time faculty members); at Hope is it 15 to 1. The principal source of income for t h e s e private universities is tuition. This amounts to about 80% of the operating b u d g e t with 20% coming from the government. P r i v a t e sources of income, such as we receive for Hope through gifts, are relatively unknown in Japan. (At Hope about 6 0 % of t h e total budget, which includes room and board, is paid by s t u d e n t s , about 20% by t h e various financial aid programs, about 20% f r o m gifts, e n d o w m e n t income, and other sources.) Because competiton is so keen to g e t i n t o c o l l e g e , h i g h school s t u d e n t s s t u d y very hard for these e n t r a n c e examinations. Most stud e n t s a s p i r e t o go t o t h e b e s t university possible and t o do so t a k e t h e e x t r a n c e examinations for t h r e e or four colleges. In this way they coyer t h e r a n g e of possibilities which t h e y believe t h e y have

to gain admission. S t u d e n t s devote much time and energy during their senior year to p r e p a r i n g for these examinations. Because s t u d e n t s study so hard to e n t e r the university, and because almost no one is flunked out of the university once t h e y a r e a d m i t t e d , t h e r e is a t e n d e n c y for s t u d e n t s to study much less in college than in high school. My impression is t h a t this is j u s t the opposite as r e g a r d s high school and college in the United States. T h e importance of preparing for t h e s e examinations was brought home to me in a conversation with a young man whom I had known in Ann Arbor when he was a high school s t u d e n t from 1962 to 1965 w h i l e his f a t h e r w a s a v i s i t i n g p r o f e s s o r a t t h e U n i v e r s i t y of Michigan. He r e t u r n e d to Japan immediately a f t e r g r a d u a t i n g from A n n A r b o r H i g h School and aspired to study physics at Tokyo I m p e r i a l U n i v e r s i t y , o n e of t h e best universities in Tokyo. (One of t h e i n t e r e s t i n g things I learned w a s t h a t o n e of t h e R e f o r m e d Church missionaries played a leading role in establishing this u n i v e r s i t y in t h e 1870's.) On r e t u r n i n g t o J a p a n he t o o k an additional y e a r of high school and then spent two y e a r s of study on his own, with some help from a t u t o r , simply p r e p a r i n g to pass the e n t r a n c e examinations at Tokyo I m p e r i a l U n i v e r s i t y . He was successful, and j u s t recently completed his doctorate in physics. One other very interesting thing w h i c h I o b s e r v e d is t h a t t h e c h a r g e s for t h e first y e a r are significantly higher (about double) as compared t o those for succeeding y e a r s . This additional fee for t h e first y e a r is considered as a c o n t r i b u t i o n t o w a r d t h e c o s t of providing t h e facilities which t h e s t u d e n t will use d u r i n g his y e a r s in college. This is necessary because t h e r e is relatively little emphasis on gifts, and colleges must build f a c i l i t i e s by b o r r o w i n g m o n e y

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Dr. D. Ivan D y k s t r a of the Hope p h i l o s o p h y d e p a r t m e n t w a s in Washington, D.C. Nov. 17-19 to assist in the formation of a nationw i d e b i p a r t i s a n c o m m i t t e e of Americans for t h e Canal Treaties (COACT). Heading the list of convenors of t h e formation-meeting w e r e form e r Senator Hugh Scott who until h i s r e t i r e m e n t had b e e n t h e Republican Minority leader, and Governor Averell Harriman, dist i n g u i s h e d s e n i o r s t a t e s m a n of Democratic politics. Approximately 1,200 community leaders from all p a r t s of t h e c o u n t r y w e r e present. The P a n a m a Canal Treaties, which come up for ratification vote in the Senate in early 1979, are the culmination of a movement which had its inception in the days of the T r u m a n Administration, was furt h e r e d by P r e s i d e n t Eisenhower, and reached t h e beginnings of the formal negotiation stage during

t h e a d m i n i s t r a t i o n of P r e s i d e n t Johnson. Negotiations continued, w i t h full p r e s i d e n t i a l s u p p o r t d u r i n g t h e Nixon and F o r d administrations, and were finally concluded in this first year of the C a r t e r administration. They were ratified this fall by a plebiscite of t h e Panamanian people. Keynote speakers at the Washington meeting of COACT were Vice P r e s i d e n t Mondale; former S e c r e t a r y of S t a t e Henry Kissinger; Sal Linowitz, who along with Ellsworth Bunker served as chief United S t a t e s negotiator of the T r e a t i e s ; a n d S e c r e t a r y of t h e Navy Clayton. The meetings w e r e c l i m a x e d by a W h i t e ^ H o u s e reception during which P r e s i d e n t C a r t e r a c k n o w l e d g i n g " t h e biggest crowd of people I have seen in t h e White House at one time," urged m e m b e r s of t h e Committee to be a channel for dissemination of i n f o r m a t i o n a b o u t t h e m u c h misunderstood treaties.

Winter Fantasia tickets on sale by Ann Helmus

a m a z i n g l y low p r i c e of t w e n t y dollars per couple for t h e dinnerdance combination, and just dance tickets going for only five dollars per couple. The SAC committee u r g e s you to plan a h e a d a n d purchase your tickets early. Dinner tickets are limited. A D e t r o i t Band, "CONTRAB A N D " , will be p l a y i n g a t t h e elegantly decorated Civic Center f r o m 9 p . m . to 1 a . m . F r e e r e f r e s h m e n t s will be provided by t h e Faculty Dames. Come and enjoy the f e s t i v e e n t e r t a i n m e n t of Winter Fantasia.

Climaxing next year's Winter W e e k will be W i n t e r F a n t a s i a , another great Hope tradition. You will not want to miss the delightful dinner-dance festivities, J a n u a r y 21, 1978, beginning at either the Hatch, Sandy Point, Point West, or t h e H o l i d a y I n n f o r e l e g a n t dining and topping the evening off with a formal dance at t h e Holland Civic Center. T i c k e t s go on s a l e M o n d a y morning at the Campus Activities O f f i c e in t h e b a s e m e n t of Van Raalte. They will be sold for the

Marketing authority..,

Levitt to lecture Marketing authority. Dr. Theodore Levitt will be on t h e campus of Hope on Wednesday, December 7. Levitt, Professor of Business Administration, H a r v a r d University G r a d u a t e School of Business Administration, will give a public l e c t u r e e n t i t l e d " B u s i n e s s and T h e False Messiah", at 10:30 a.m. in Wichers Auditorium. L e v i t t is p a r t i c i p a t i n g in t h e visiting l e c t u r e series, "Social Responsibility and P r i v a t e Enterp r i s e , " s p o n s o r e d by t h e H o p e D e p a r t m e n t of E c o n o m i c s and Business Administration with support from ODL, Inc., Zeeland. Levitt is the author of numerous a r t i c l e s on e c o n o m i c , political, m a n a g e m e n t , and m a r k e t i n g subjects, including the prize-winning a r t i c l e , " M a r k e t i n g M y o p i a , " in

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t h e "Harvard-Business Review." H e is a four-time winner of McKins e y A w a r d s f o r a r t i c l e s in t h e " H a r v a r d Business Review;" winner of Academy of Management A w a r d for one of the outstanding business books of t h e year, 1962; w i n n e r of t h e J o h n H a n c o c k A w a r d for Excellence in Business Journalism, and recipient of the Charles C. Parlin Award and the George Gallup Award. Levitt serves as a consultant to several large corporations in the U.S. and abroad and is an active advisor to c o r p o r a t e p r e s i d e n t s and m a r k e t i n g chiefs. Breakfast and luncheon meetings with students, faculty, administrators, and local business people a r e scheduled.

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Giving God A Bad Name

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Behind Closed Doors

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Junior recital scheduled A joint Recital will be presented t h i s T u e s d a y , D e c e m b e r 6, in Dimnent Memorial Chapel. The recital will f e a t u r e two of Hope's junior music majors, Michael R. D'Oyly, organist and Mark Hulsebos, a l t o s a x o p h o n i s t . T h e prog r a m will begin at 5:30 p.m. D'Oyly will be performing on both the Chapel's Organs. The four-manual chancel organ will be u s e d f o r w o r k s by D u p r e a n d Langlais. The Langlais is w r i t t e n for pedal solo. T h e Dutch gallery organ will be used for t h e famous "Toccata and F u g u e in D Minor" by J. S. Bach.

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H u l s e b o s will b e p e r f o r m i n g w o r k s by H a n d e l , L u n d e , a n d P a r k e r . Accompanying him will be D r . Anthony Kooiker, professor of music a t Hope and Nick Pool a jazz pianist from Muskegon. He will a l s o b e a s s i s t e d by J e n n y f e r P a r k e r , alto saxophone; BUI Suder and Michael Eldridge, tenor saxophone; Marty Wick, baritone saxophone; Noel Wing, trombone; Tom Langejans, percussion; making up a saxophone e n s e m b l e p e r f o r m i n g "Cool B l u e s " by Charlie P a r k e r . T h e p u b l i c is i n v i t e d a n d admission is free.


Hope College anchor

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Communication breakdown In the November 18th issue of the anchor in a letter to the editor, Mr. Carl R. Daudt stated that the anchor has not been realizing its potential for being a valuable source of information. His reference was to the recent attacks on campus.

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Daudt stated that the anchor had printed very little information about the attacks. He also stated that the main purpose of the anchor was to inform its readers of current campus events and that information on the recent assaults should be published. The anchor s main source of information for the attacks is Public Safety Director Glenn Bareman. In a Community Hour forum held November 10th Bareman stated that he was hesitant in using the

student newspaper as a means of communication. He complained that in the past he has been misquoted and misinterpreted by the anchor staff. In order for the anchor to print information about the attacks, we must first be able to obtain information about them. Since Bareman is our main source of information, the staff has been able to get very little information on the attacks. The anchor has printed articles on the recent attacks to the best of its ability based on the facts and information that we were able to obtain from our sources. If the anchor is expected to live up to the potential that Mr. Daudt mentioned in his letter, we must have cooperation from Hope's administration and its officials. Without such cooperation the anchor can only be as effective as the information that we are able to get. The anchor's opinion on printing more articles on the attacks is this: without more facts and figures on the incidents, any attempt to further cover them would be ineffective

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Giving God a bad name by K. Gary Hasek to what is or isn't valuable to one's life according to each individual. Christians must not go around calling grass pink when to most people it is apparently green. If they do the obvious result will be that the people who aren't Christians will think that Christians are a bunch of misguided fools instead of those given to love, understanding and service as Jesus whould have us be. Before we go around saying "This is evill" or "That is blasphemous!" we would do well to first observe with understanding what exactly we are doing in this process of judgement. Are we rationally approaching the subject with valid criticism or are we enjoying a game of casting the first stone? I didn't agree with everything that was presented in the movie "Oh God!", however, the overall portrayal of God by George Burns and his prophet by John Denver was very valuable to me. The basic message of God via George Bums is "Tell them that I am, that I care and that they still can make it work." The church would do better to heed that message rather than to demonstrate foolishness.

Being home, as I was for the Thanksgiving holiday, gave me some opportune time to indulge in reading the local newspapers. Amidst all the local news about the new mayor and the international stories about the Begin-Sadat meeting, I spotted a space-filler article about a recent demonstration by a church in Watertown, New York. It seems that the members of the church were protesting the showing of the movie "Oh God!" by their local cinema. When the demonstrators were asked if they had seen the film they responded with a negative reply. I believe that there are too many of us "Christians" who respond in irrational ignorance to a great variety of what is part of our culture. Another example of this sort of "ignorance" has recently occurred in some churches where there has been a gathering held for the burning of certain "worldly" possessions, i.e., recordings of rock music, televisions, etc. There definitely should be some sort of discernment between the valuable things to one's life and those which are not. There is some difference of opinion, however, as

Vespers charges deplored After talking with a few people about the reasons and their opinions on this matter, we came up with a few interesting facts: 1. One faculty member claimed that Christmas Vespers is really just a concert in the form of a worship service, whatever that means. However, Vespers has traditionally been intended to be a worship service of celebration. 2. The reason for the charge is to control the number of people attending Vespers. Apparently the concern is that some people won't value their tickets enough to attend at their reserved times, thereby either overloading the seating capacity or leaving unfilled seats. 3. Two of the members of the committee who made the decision to charge for Vespers didn't know where the money was

Dr. James Malcolm Dean for Fine Arts Hope College Dear Sir: It seems that Christmas is becoming commercialized everywhere, including Hope's campus -- supposedly a strong Christian community. The reference being made is to the mandatory contribution placed on Christmas Vespers again this year. Christmas Vespers is, as tradition has determined it, a worship service to celebrate the birth of Jesus. Should we have to pay to worship such a great event?

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charge for Vespers should hold when there are many people against it. We realize that it is very difficult to make a decision that will please all those concerned. But it seems unreasonable to charge to worship God. This required gate admission charge is surely different from tithings, voluntary contributions, and other payments which allow churches to financially maintain themselves. Of course, at least this year, the public will have to do it at Hope, for even though they might disagree with the charge, they won't want to miss the fantastic senkce that Christmas Vespers is. It would be a shame though, to find that we have to pay a minimal amount to get into church anymore. Somehow, we don't think that God intended things this way. After all, God didn't ask for a down payment before He sent His Son. The Nu Beta Chapter of Alpha Phi Omega will be ushering at Christmas Vespers again this year, and again, free of charge. Most of us, though, wanted to express our strong discontent with the action on the part of our fine college. We sincerely hope things will change in the future. Sincerely, Some of the members Nu Beta Chapter, Alpha Phi Omega

The spirit of giving.... This year the Christmas Tree Fund depends on you giving of your possessions to be sold Saturday, December 10, at the Holland Civic Center. Contact your R.A.'s or the Chaplain's office for information as to how you can participate in this gift to the missions of Covenant Reformed Church in Muskegon. Thank you very much. Father Christmas

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Published during the college year except vacation, holiday and examination periods by and for the students of Hope College, Holland, Michigan, under the authority of the Student Communications Media Committee. Subscription price: $8 per year. Printed by the Hi-Lites Shoppers Guide, Printing Department, Fremont, Michigan. Member, Associated Collegiate Press, United States Student Press Association. Office located on ground floor of Graves Hall. Telephone 392-5111, Extension 4600. The opinions on this page are not necessarily those of the student body, faculty or administration of Hope College.

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that was taken in last year. At least 3,000 tickets were sold. 4. It seems that many people in the surrounding community are none too happy with the decision to charge for Vespers. 5. One faculty member stated that President Van Wylen said the charge for Vespers would not be continued after last year's Christmas Vespers. We wish to reply to these facts with the following ideas: 1. If Vespers was simply a concert, why shouldn't it be free admission like other concerts on campus and in the community? 2. We cannot seriously believe that the charge for Vespers is going to solve the problem of numbers of people attending the services. Dimnent Chapel will still be overloaded beyond its seating capacity and people who wish to attend will still be turned away. Why not just give a limited number of tickets to each person? This system should work nearly as well as charging admission, and would also allow a wider range of people to attend as it would eliminate enormous groups brought in by members of the college community. There is no charge for graduation and baccalaureate. The arrangement of limited tickets combined with allowing those who don't hold tickets to look for seats 15 minutes before the service works rather well. Or would it be possible to distribute free tickets for Vespers at the Chapel on the day of the services? Reservations could be called in ahead of time and a list prepared. As reservations were picked up they could be checked off the list and any extra tickets that had been reserved, but not picked up could be distributed on a first come, first served basis. This should eliminate overcrowding and unfilled seats. 3. We question why the decision to

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December 2, 1977

Bergstrom appears as Oedipus New York City is mighty far away from the quiet college town that is Holland, but the theatre functions in both. Hope Theatre's s e c o n d p r o d u c t i o n of t h e y e a r , "Oedipus the King," which opened last n i g h t f e a t u r e s g u e s t a r t i s t John Bergstrom of New York City in the title role. B e r g s t r o m is no s t r a n g e r to Michigan, or the Midwest, but this is his first visit to Holland. He received his professional training at J o h n F e r n e l d ' s A c a d e m y of D r a m a t i c Art in R o c h e s t e r ,

Michigan. A native of Illinois, Mr. B e r g s t r o m holds an M.A. in t h e a t r e from Indiana University. John Bergstrom comes to Hope a f t e r a p p e a r i n g on B r o a d w a y e a r l i e r t h i s y e a r as Lucious Septimius in the revival of Shaw's "Caesar and Cleopatra" with Rex H a r r i s o n and E l i s a b e t h Ashley, directed by Ellis Rabb. He has played a variety of roles, both in New York City and around the country. He won critical acclaim for his first role in New York, that of King C h a r l e s II in t h e

Petrovich appointed to H.E.W. panel Dr. Michael B. Petrovich, associate professor of history at Hope, has b e e n a p p o i n t e d by the U. S. Department of Health, Education and W e l f a r e ( H E W ) to a review panel to evaluate proposals submitted to the U. S. Office of E d u c a t i o n for g r o u p p r o j e c t s abroad and foreign curriculum cons u l t a n t s in m o d e r n f o r e i g n language training and area studies, THIS PROGRAM is established to p r o m o t e t r a i n i n g and a r e a studies in institutions of higher foreign language training in the United States through visits and study by American students and s c h o l a r s a b r o a d and by f o r e i g n scholars to the U.S. Group projects abroad are designed to improve programs of t h e U . S . i n s t i t u t i o n s of h i g h e r l e a r n i n g in m o d e r n f o r e i g n languages and area studies through o v e r s e a s p r o j e c t s in r e s e a r c h , training, or curriculum development. G R A N T S for f o r e i g n consultants bring scholars from other countries to the United States for an academic year. In the past, Hope has been a recipient of both types of grant. In 1970-71, a HEW foreign consultant grant helped to bring Dr. Nikola Koljevic from the University of Sarajevo to the Hope campus. In 1972, with the help of a HEW grant, Hope established its Dubrovnik Summer School in Yugoslavia. T H E PANEL, composed of 20 American scholars and specialists in area studies of the world, will meet in a week-long session in e a r l y D e c e m b e r in W a s h i n g t o n , D.C. Petrovich will evaluate all projects relating to East European studies, including the Soviet Union. In the past several years, Petrovich served on five federal panels of scholars, including the prestigious Fulbright-Hays Doct o r a l D i s s e r t a t i o n and F a c u l t y R e s e a r c h A b r o a d p r o g r a m s , in 1974 and 1975, and the National Defense Education Act Programs (NDFL) Title VI in 1976 and 1977. A NATIVE of Yugoslavia and a naturalized citizen of the United States, Petrovich was with the U. S. Department of S t a t e five years before joining the Hope faculty in 1966. From 1974 to 1976, he was with t h e I n t e r n a t i o n a l S t u d i e s

Institute at Grand Valley State Colleges as associate professor of history ard international relations. In the last 11 years, Petrovich was actively involved in international studies as teacher in, and administrator of, the American summer programs in Yugoslavia. He holds a B.A. degree in political science from Shepherd College, and a masters degree in internat i o n a l r e l a t i o n s and a P h . D . in h i s t o r y f r o m t h e U n i v e r s i t y of Chicago.

Off-Broadway production of "And So To Bed." Prior to that Bergstrom spent four seasons with the C l e v e l a n d Play H o u s e , a c t i n g major roles in "A Doll's House," "Romeo and Juliet", "Hamlet", and "The Sea Horse", among others. Bergstrom's decision to accept the role of Oedipus was influenced by many factors. One is that he enjoys involvement with students, having taught for three years at Illinois Wesleyan. Here at Hope, B e r g s t r o m not only a p p e a r s as O e d i p u s , but is a v a i l a b l e to students for questions and discussion. He is working with several s t u d e n t s in t h e t h e a t r e d e p a r t ment and has been a guest of many classes. The opportunity to talk to a professional in the performance field is a real help to t h o s e students whose goals lead them in that direction. Bergstrom also views the role of Oedipus with great interest. "It is one of the great roles in dramatic literature. It ranks with Hamlet and o t h e r g r e a t c h a r a c t e r s . " B e r g s t r o m ' s e n t h u s i a s m for t h e play itself was obvious as he spoke (continued on page 5)

Chicano folksinger performs On T h u r s d a y , D e c e m b e r 8, Wichers Auditorium will be the scene of an unusual cultural event. J e s u s " C h u y " N e g r e t e , noted folksinger of Chicano background, will present "Cry for Justice," a p r o g r a m of f o l k s o n g s in both English and Spanish and slides,

which, according to John Philip Weston of the New York Tribune, truly mirrors "the conditions of the urban and rural Chicano, the blood, tears, and laughter of the Mexicano, and the lost feelings as well as the fighting spirit of the colonized man in America and the

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/ PAUL D A N I E L S A N D ROBERT SHULTZ, pictured here in rehearsal, appear as chorus members in Hope's production of "Oedipus the King," which opened last night in the Main Theater. The show continues this weekend and Wednesday through Saturday of next week at 8 p.m. Tickets are $1.50 for students at the Box Office.

United States. Mr. Negrete's performance will begin at 8:30 p.m. It is sponsored by the Club Latino, the Cultural Affairs Committee, and the Department of Foreign Languages

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and Literatures. There will be no admission charge. Immediately following the concert there will be a reception for Mr. N e g r e t e s p o n s o r e d by t h e Club Latino and the Club Espanol.

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Hope College anchor

Behind closed doors.... by Mike Drahos Behind t h e closed d o o r s of P h e l p ' s C o n f e r e n c e Room decisions were being made that could alter the lifestyle of every person in the world. 17 courageous Hope students braved the task before them as they focused on the vital p r o b l e m s t h a t face t h e U n i t e d States. A C T U A L L Y it w a s only t h e students planning to go on the Washington Honors Semester, discussing platform proposals that each of them had written, in hopes of getting better acquainted with some of the problems that will be faced in Washington D. C. while they are there. B u t one would h a v e n e v e r recognized this as the gnashing forces of liberalism and conservatism challenged each student as they explained their proposal. FINALLY, after four weeks of intense debate, the voting night came. "Iron gavel" Holmes called the meeting to order, which was a foreign word to each of us, and one by one we proceeded to adopt an official platform. Conley Zomermaand was the first to put his proposal on the line. His d e s i r e for a b i - p a r t i s a n examination of the Civil Service C o m m i s s i o n m e t with a m a z i n g agreement and passed by a score of 16-1. This seemed to set the pattern for the rest of the night as all but t h r e e proposals were to pass. Out of the t h r e e proposals t h a t failed one w a s a m i n o r i t y plank, and another was defeated by only one vote. T H E ONE o r i g i n a l p r o p o s a l which met with a sound thrashing happened to be my own (The big loser got to write this article). In an a c t of k i n d n e s s and moral responsibility, my proposal was to add the classification of Selective C o n s c i e n t i o u s O b j e c t o r to t h e Selective Service Act should the draft ever be reinstated. In a vote of 14-3 my proposal was mangled. The only other "original" proposal to meet with defeat belonged to Mr. C o n s e r v a t i v e himself, Dick M e d e m a . In a r e - s u b m i t t e d , toned-down proposal Medema

asked that President Carter s e l e c t i o n r e f o r m p a c k a g e be, "blocked, defeated, denounced and otherwise crunched into tiny bits." IN A CLOSE roll call vote the forces of Mulcahey, VanDeVusse, McCullough, Davenport, Drahos, DeYoung, Bradley, Muysken, and Orwig triumphed over DeVree, Drake, Byl, Zomermaand, Medema, Englehardt, Hoeksema, and Adolf, thus blocking, defeating, denouncing and otherwise crushing into t i n y b i t s Mr. M e d e m a ' s proposal. T h e final p r o p o s a l to m e e t defeat was a minority plank drawn up in d i r e c t opposition to Don DeYoung's proposal to ban Nuclear Fission Plant construction. The minority plank was defeated 12-3 with two abstensions while DeYoung's proposal passed 11-3 with t h r e e members abstaining. FOR THE most part the rest of the proposals met with a congenia l i t y not k n o w n to our g r o u p before. In Renze's proposal for gun control Medema did ask if robbery was a legitimate excuse for having a h a n d g u n , and d e r e g u l a t i o n met its expected opposition, but a s i d e Irom t h a t , t h i n g s w e n t smoothly and quickly. In two hours we had come up with the answers to all of U. S. p r o b l e m s . T h e following is t h e platform we came up with. Don DeYoung-Ban on nuclear fission plant contruction passed 11-3-3 Mike Englehardt -- Deregulating the well-head price of newly discovered natural gas passed 11-6 Jeff DeVree - Complete governmental decontrol of oil prices passed 11-5-1 Samme Orwig -- A. Foods which may be hazardous to health be allowed to remain on the market with explanatory labeling. B. Poisons and toxics be removed f r o m t h e m a r k e t for p a l a t a b l e drugs and foods C. Questionable drugs and remedies be available for consumption through prescription by doctors passed 10-5-2 Barb VanDeVusse -- Resolved that r.on^ress should PstaHish a

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C r i m i n a l J u s t i c e C o m m i s s i o n to reform the sentencing procedures in the U. S. Criminal Code passed 11-3-3 Brian Bradley -- Re-evalute and amend four principal provisions of the Health Professions Educational A s s i s t a n c e Act of 1976; Specifically P r i m a r y C a r e Resid e n c e s , A m e r i c a n S t u d y i n g Abroad. Foreign Medical Graduates, National Health Service Corps

The Annex, in an informal and available setting, is an attempt to d e v e l o p a closer r e l a t i o n s h i p between the Financial Aid Office and the students of Hope. The student counselor, Brian Hipwell, will be available for questions and assistance, coordinating student concerns with the main office. The Annex is located in the lobby office in Phelps dormitory. T h i s s e r v i c e will be open to students on Monday, Wednesday and Thursday during the hours of 5-7 p.m. During these hours we want students to feel free to drop

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by and voice s u g g e s t i o n s , ask questions, pick up needed financial aid f o r m s or s i m p l y become better acquainted with the policies of the financial aid office. This s t u d e n t to s t u d e n t approach is to help provide more awareness concerning the Financial Aid Office and to refer student c o n c e r n s to t h e office. The Financial Aid Office invites you to drop in at your Annex. The Annex is for your use, but like anything else it won't be much unless you utilize it. Take advantage of financial aid - take advantage of The Annex.

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passed 13-2-2 Conley Zomermaand - Bi-partisan examination of Civil Service Commission passed 16-1 R y a n Adolf -- Call for joint committee to investigate Federal Level r e t i r e m e n t p r o g r a m with emphasis on military passed 15-1-1 L a r r y Byl - R e s o l v e d t h a t private investors and business corporations should be allowed the privilege of capital gains passed 8-5-4 B a r b D r a k e -- L i a b i l i t y and safety requirements for oceanic oil tankers passed 12-2-3 Ann Davenport - Meal plan and t r a v e l c o m p e n s a t i o n for Americans aged 65 or over volunteering t h e i r t i m e to n o n - p r o f i t organizations passed 17-0-1 D e b Mulcahey -- B i - p a r t i s a n evaluation by local governments be undertaken to evaluate and set standards on local noise pollutants passed 11-5-1 Paul Muysken -- Ratification of the Panama Canal Treaty passed 14-3 Renze Hoeksema -- A. Justification a n d r e g i s t r a t i o n of all handguns B. Proven levels of proficiencies in use of all rifles C. E d u c a t i o n in t h e use of all firearms passed 14-2-1 S t e v e McCullough -- New emphasis in area of mental health -- s t o p closing so m a n y s t a t e m e n t a l i n s t i t u t i o n s and s p e n d more money in developing community mental health centers passed 9-4-4

Financial aid annex opens Did you e v e r h a v e q u e s t i o n s concerning financial aid, or need financial aid documents, but didn't have the time to trot over to the o f f i c e in Van R a a l t e ? For t h e people who can't come to us, we're coming to you! T h e F i n a n c i a l Aid Office has developed an annex to serve the students during the off-hours. The Financial Aid Annex, operated by a t r a i n e d p e e r c o u n s e l o r , is a service to assist students with the financial aid process by making available financial aid information and documentation.

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Dedember 2,1977

Page 5

Dave Brubeck returns... l4

Dave Brubeck? Why t h a t ' s grandpa jazz," said a housemate. "I'll w a i t a n d s e e M a y n a r d Ferguson when he comes to town," he added. Not many it seemed felt this way as a near capacity crowd filled t h e Holland Civic Center to see Dave Brubeck and his t h r e e sons, Darius, Chris and Dan, o t h e r w i s e known as the "Two G e n e r a t i o n s of B r u b e c k . " S o m e s t u d e n t s and faculty had arrived over an hour and a half prior to t h e concert to g e t good seats, g r a t e f u l t h a t t h e y had f r e e admission. The performance began a little a f t e r 8:00, and lasted nearly two-and-ahalf hours with a ten minute intermission to give the musicians a break.

T h e N e w B r u b e c k Q u a r t e t , another highlight of the show, had utilizing electric keyboards, bass Chris Brubeck exchange his bass guitar, d r u m s , and of course piano, guitar for a trombone to much covered various jazz styles extend- enthusiasm. The newer music, for ing into o t h e r realms of music as the most part, was quite accesswell, including a bit of Ragtime. ible, relying more on a pulsing Mixing early and modern jazz - beat and intensity of playing than cool and hot, the ensemble played on i n n o v a t i o n . This was m o r e t i g h t a n d e a r n e s t l y , s e e m i n g l y popular with the younger part of w i t h o u t a n y i m p r o v i s a t i o n ; an the audience, as the trend of a integral p a r t of t h e genre. fusion b e t w e e n rock and jazz ' T a k e Five" received some of seems to be growing popular. t h e l o u d e s t a p p l a u s e in i t s reA l t h o u g h w o r k i n g as a unit, worked version. T h e q u a r t e t per- each man had several solos. Father formed one number involving a Brubeck would occasionally take complicated time signature unre- leave of his piano and let his sons h e a r s e d and for t h e first t i m e any- t a k e over, l e a v i n g some f a n s w h e r e w i t h d e f t m u s i c i a n s h i p . d i s m a y e d . One w a s g i v e n t h e D u k e E l l i n g t o n ' s " A T r a i n , i m p r e s s i o n that Brubeck w a s

SAC presents concert The Social Activities Committee has contracted with Maynard F e r g u s o n t o p e r f o r m in t h e Holland Civic C e n t e r t o n i g h t (Friday) a t 8 p.m. T h e tickets will be available in the SAC office in the b a s e m e n t of Van Raalte Hall s t a r t i n g on Wednesday, Novemb e r 16. All s e a t s a r e g e n e r a l admission, and t h e cost is only $2.50 f o r s t u d e n t s , f a c u l t y a n d staff, and $3.00 for t h e general p u b l i c . T i c k e t s will a l s o b e available a t t h e door. F e r g u s o n was born in Quebec in 1928, and he studied violin and piano at a g e four. He a t t e n d e d t h e French Conservatory of Music in Montreal, and by 1950, he was one of t h e n a m e a r t i s t s w i t h S t a n Kenton and his Orchestra, with whom he played t h e t r u m p e t . He later was t h e first-call t r u m p e t with P a r a m o u n t P i c t u r e s . He

Hope sponsors Senior Day Hope will sponsor its third high school senior day of t h e school year today, according to admissions director Thomas LaBaugh. The p u r p o s e of senior day is to introduce high school seniors to t h e academic program and campus life of Hope. S t u d e n t s will have an o p p o r t u n i t y to attend classes, tour t h e campus, meet with faculty and s t u d e n t s and participate in preprofessional conferences. Other senior days during the 1977-78 school y e a r will b e F e b r u a r y 10, March 17 and April 14.

Bergstrom appears as Oedipus (continued

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about w h y he chose to t a k e t h e r o l e , " T h e p l a y w r i g h t h a s capt u r e d something really special -- in both t h e play and t h e character. It is a g o o d r e n d i t i o n of h u m a n nature, and this play was w r i t t e n in t h e 5th C e n t u r y B.C. So much of the play is in t h e past, t h e i n f o r m a t i o n c o m e s o u t in t h e unraveling of t h e story. This is w h a t m a k e s the play so powerful -its compactness. Compactness is w h a t m a k e s t h e t n e a t r e so exciting." Coming all the way to Holland, Michigan to do a role has its disadv a n t a g e s however -- especially if you're m a r r i e d . But, t o u r s and e n g a g e m e n t s which take an actor away f r o m home a r e a reality t h a t p e r f o r m e r s must deal with. This, however, does not m a k e it any e a s i e r . M r . B e r g s t r o m ' s w i f e is also an actress. As he talked about t h e difficulty, and inevitability, of separation, Bergstrom r e m a r k e d t h a t t h e r e was some consolation in t h e fact t h a t separation s e r v e d as a kind of renewal for t h e relationship. T h e a t r e itself causes a lot of separation, even among friends. B e r g s t r o m sees t h e t h e a t r e as a world which p r o m o t e s quick friendships and t h e n d e m a n d s long separations. All t h a t , though, is taken into account as he sees it, " t h e t h e a t r e is a l a r g e f a m i l y , s e p a r a t e d geographically, who have a wonderful t i m e when t h e y get t o g e t h e r . " All of this may seem like a huge demand on a p e r f o r m e r . Commenting on it Bergstrom said, "While involved in a snow you must t h r o w

formed his own band, and spent more t h a n ten years recording and p e r f o r m i n g before touring Engl a n d a n d I n d i a . H e r e c o r d s on Columbia Records, and has such hit t u n e s as "MacArthur Park", " S t a r T r e k " and most r e c e n t l y "Gonna Fly Now" from the motion picture "Rocky." F e r g u s o n is perhaps one of the g r e a t e s t t r u m p e t p l a y e r s of all time, and it is indeed a pleasure to be able to bring him here to Hope this fall. I hope that you will all be a b l e t o t a k e a d v a n t a g e of t h i s e v e n t . If I can be of any help to you, please let me know at ext.

2111. MAYNARDFERGUSON In Concert H O L L A N D CIVIC C E N T E R Friday, December 2,1977 8:00 p.m.

New Bio course T h e Biology D e p a r t m e n t will offer a new two-hour course next s e m e s t e r . Biology 295 C P l a n t Growth, will be an introductory level course covering in nontechnical t e r m s , the hows and whys of g r o w i n g plants. Topics include seed germination, plant growth r e q u i r e m e n t s , p r o p o g a t i o n s of house plants, natural plant distributions, agriculture, and political implications of agriculture (agripower). Agri-economics a r e involved in many elections and controversial legislation; and basic understanding of plant growth should help persons to make b e t t e r decisions in those situations. T h e course has no prerequisites and is open to all s t u d e n t s . It will be t a u g h t by Dr. Van F a a s e n .

yourself into the production, but when it's over..." When it's over you do t h e other things t h a t you enjoy. F o r those of you who feel t h a t an actor lives, eats, drinks, and sleeps in t h e t h e a t r e and has no outside interests, Bergstrom's i n t e r e s t s extend to sports, including F r i s b e e and jogging in Central P a r k . He e n j o y s jazz, but was quick to remark, "I'm not so much a musician as a listener." Acting, performing -- t h a t is his p r o f e s s i o n , h o w e v e r . O t h e r of B e r g s t r o m ' s credits include the creation of the role of Lt. Bonheur in t h e w o r l d p r e m i e r e p e r f o r mance of Kevin O'Morrison's "The Morgan Yard"; Milo in "Sleuth"; "The Best Man", a play about p r e s i d e n t i a l c a n d i d a t e s which toured during t h e s u m m e r of 1976; and Arrabel's "The Labyrinth." He has also worked in commercials, including one for p e a n u t b u t t e r which he r e m e m b e r s r a t h e r v i v i d l y for t h e t w o d a y s a n d innumerable peanut b u t t e r sandw i c h e s it t o o k t o c o m p l e t e t h e f i l m i n g . He h a s a l s o b e e n s e e n nationwide in t h e daytime serial "As T h e World T u r n s . " A s k e d about his e x p e r i e n c e here, Bergstrom commented, "I am v e r y impressed with Hope College and t h e d e p a r t m e n t . " T h e d e p a r t m e n t has not only e n j o y e d having B e r g s t r o m here at Hope, b u t is g r a t e f u l for his input with t h e students. T h e guest artist p r o g r a m which brings Mr. Bergs t r o m t o Hope is a project of t h e T h e a t r e P a t r o n program, a service which Hope T h e a t r e greatly appreciates. According to director Donald F i n n , t h e p r o d u c t i o n will m a k e e x t e n s i v e u s e of m a s k s t o

The anchor needs you T h e anchor needs you. We have an opening for a paid staff m e m b e r for next s e m e s t e r . T h e position is t h a t of copy editor. Applicants for t h e position must be able to work approximately 10 hours per week. Previous experience in journalism is helpful but not required. Anyone interested in this position should contact Bob Baker at t h e anchor' office, e x t . 4600 or 396-1044. The anchor is also in need of a m b i t i o u s w o r k e r s in all a r e a s . T y p i s t s , l a y - o u t w o r k e r s , copy r e a d e r s , and, most of all, reporters. A cartoonist is also needed. The only r e q u i r e m e n t for t h e s e positions is that you are able to w o r k a s n e e d e d . If you a r e interested in working at any of t h e s e p o s i t i o n s , c o n t a c t Bob Baker.

lending his legend to f u r t h e r his s o n s c a r e e r s . B u t t h a t w a s all r i g h t . A n y o n e a s p r o l i f i c as Brubeck has been, doesn't need to p u s h h i s c a p a b i l i t i e s on s t a g e . Outside of wishing he had played his magic piano a bit more exclusively, t h e performance was enjoyed by all. A standing ovation

COURSES OF GENERAL INTEREST FOR THE SPRING SEMESTER 1978 FROM THE PHYSICS DEPARTMENT Astronomy (Ph 113) • Topics include the solar system, stars, pulsars, black-holes, galaxies, and cosmology. The course is designed for the non-science major and includes observational work with our telescopes. Physics of Sound and Music (Ph 114) - The physical principles describing sound and musical phenomena are discussed by a musician who is also a physicist. Music synthesis and the properties of instruments are examined experimentally. General Physics I (Ph 121) - This is the beginning semester of general physics using calculus. The second semester will be taught next fall along with a laboratory. (Ph 141) Scientific Programming I (Ph 295) - An introductory course in computer programming for science students that is an alternative to CS 180. Assumed, is a background of one semester of calculus and one semester of general physics. The methods of programming scientific problems will be taught. States of Matter (Ph 362) - A description of the states of matter from a classical and' a quantum mechanical viewpoint. Applications to plasmas, superconductors, and superfluids will be included. General Physics and calculus are prerequisites.

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Tharin travels in west Dr. J . Cotter Tharin, chairman of t h e g e o l o g y d e p a r t m e n t a t Hope, has recently r e t u r n e d from a trip w e s t . He first went to S t . Louis w h e r e he evaluated proposals submitted t o t h e E n e r g y R e s e a r c h and D e v e l o p m e n t Agency for funds to be used in energy education. Tharin then proceeded to Seattle w h e r e he took part in the annual meetings of the Geological S o c i e t y of A m e r i c a . W h i l e in Seattle, Tharin s e r v e d as co-chairm a n of a s y m p o s i u m e n t i t l e d : " G e o l o g y of t h e E x p l o r e r s of W e s t e r n North A m e r i c a . " This w a s t h e c h a r t e r s e s s i o n of t h e History of Geology Section of the Geological Society.

"heighten the intrinsic d r a m a of t h e language." T h e text, a modern adaptation by Anthony Burgess, should be "easily understandable to everyone," Finn said. Burgess is author of the novel "A Clockwork Orange." The first classical piece to be d o n e a t H o p e in m a n y y e a r s , "Oedipus the King" can be seen tonight and tomorrow in t h e Main T h e a t r e , and next week Wednesday-Saturday. Curtain is at 8 p.m. and t i c k e t s are $1.50 for s t u d e n t s and $3.00 for adults.

CABLEVISION12 LISTING; DECEMBERS-9 M O N . , D E C . 5: 7:30 p . m . MOSAIC R e r u n : Public School E l e m e n t a r y A r t with Karen Hicks. T U E S . , D E C . 6 : 8:00 p . m . S P E C T R U M : In t h e Kitchen with Pat Eldean, preparing sukiyaki. T H U R S . , D E C . 8: 9:00 p . m . MOSAIC: Behind t h e scenes of Masque, a n i n t e r v i e w w i t h s t u d e n t playwright, director Mike Smit. Also, U p d a t e on Physical Education Center with director Dick P e t e r s o n . 10:00 p.m. - S P E C T R U M Rerun.

•«

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AVON can help you pay tuition bills. Sell in your spare time. Men and women are invited to call Mrs. Janet Kemp, Avon Manager, 392-6238

brought t h e q u a r t e t back for an encore, and will no doubt bring him back to Holland in the f u t u r e . Most people w e n t away with smiles on their faces, some previously unacquainted with Jazz. T h e n i c e s t p a r t of t h e c o n c e r t though was t h a t the musicians themselves w e r e smiling.

THE THOUGHTFULNESS SHOP" Downtown Holland

© 1976 Hallmark Cards, inc.

j


Hope College anchor

Page 6 recreational activities; organized aerobic activities and health fitness clubs which will promote individual participation through peer encouragement; the availability of the new Physical Education Center for informal recreational activities over 100 hours per week; r e f e r r a l s from t h e Health Clinic, Counseling Center, and residence halls' staff of s t u d e n t s who have

P.E. Center brings about new program T h e opening of the Dow Health and Physical Education C e n t e r next fall will also bring abouf an i n n o v a t i v e p r o g r a m aimed at combining health fitness and skill development at the u n d e r g r a d u a t e level at Hope. T h e goal of the program is to develop the knowledge, habits, and skills which lead to a life-long c o m m i t t m e n t to health fitness. T h e e n t i r e s t u d e n t b o d y will participate. 44 This p r o g r a m h a s d e v e l o p e d out of our commitment to underg r a d u a t e , residential, liberal a r t s e d u c a t i o n in t h e c o n t e x t of Christian faith," said Hope President Gordon J . Van Wylen. "An essential dimension of this education is the development and wellbeing of the whole person- mind, body and spirit. This sense of wellbeing underlies our understanding of health fitness and p r o m p t s our excitement about the program." T h e program will i n t e g r a t e the resources of the colleges departm e n t of physical education, recreation and athletics, health and food services. T h e program will be divided into f i v e a r e a s . F i r s t of all will be screening and evaluation. In this initial step the screening and health assessment of all incoming s t u d e n t s by the Health Clinic will t a k e place. This will be accomlished through a review of their e a l t h h i s t o r y a n d m e d i c a l re-

I

cords, and an examination when appropriate. Special attention will be d i r e c t e d t o w a r d i d e n t i f y i n g s t u d e n t s with a condition requiring a special p r o g r a m or those who, for other reasons, cannot articipate in a regular program of ealth fitness. P a r t two of the p r o g r a m is the foundational knowledge provided by a one-semester course, "The Foundations of Health Fitness." T h e o b j e c t of t h e c o u r s e is t o provide a sound academic unders t a n d i n g of h e a l t h f i t n e s s a n d personal experiences on which a lifelong commitment can be based. T h e first half of the s e m e s t e r will mix lectures with laboratory experiences which will reinforce the concepts covered through p a r t i c i p a t i o n . T h e c o n c e p t of health fitness, the role of nutrition and diet, the value of different f o r m s of e x e r c i s e , p r i n c i p l e s of motor fitness, and muscle strength and endurance are some of the a r e a s to be covered in lectures. T h e l a b o r a t o r y will p r o v i d e a personal evaluation of a student's l e a l t h and m o t o r p e r f o r m a n c e itness by testing body composition, cardiovascular efficiency, muscle s t r e n g t h and endurance, a n d m o t o r p e r f o r m a n c e skills. S t u d e n t s will be required to keep a p e r s o n a l log of e x e r c i s e and dietary habits to evaluate their p r e s e n t p a t t e r n s of behavior and to b e g i n m o v i n g t o w a r d t h e

C

development of habits which will carry over into t h e remainder of their lives. During t h e second half of t h e s e m e s t e r t h e staff will work with each i n d i v i d u a l t o d e v e l o p a personal program of exercise and nutrition. The next step of the program will be a reouired skills course which the s t u d e n t is ureed rge to take immediately following the complet i o n of t h e F o u n d a t i o n s c o u r s e . The purpose of this course is to enable s t u d e n t s to f u r t h e r develop skills so t h a t physical activity will become an enjoyable and regular part of their lives. Because the overall goal of the program is t h e development of a lifelong c o m m i t m e n t to health fitness, the fourth s t e p is t h e most important. Here t h e s t u d e n t must make the decision to voluntarily c o n t i n u e t h e p r o g r a m in h e a l t h fitness a f t e r the completion of t h e required courses. In o r d e r t o h e l p t h e s t u d e n t continue the program, an atmosphere on campus will be developed which promotes and encourages participation in a health fitness program. This a t m o s p h e r e will be achieved by providing an opportunity to continue skill developm e n t by e n r o l l i n g in a d d i t i o n a l skill courses; the availability of a c o m p r e h e n s i v e a n d v a r i e d program of intramural and organized

euag $2.50/HOUR; Close to campus. See Off-Campus Jobs, Phelps. Clerk doctor's office. Need to have excellent typing skills. Now four hours Wednesday afternoons but will work up to more hours by June. See Off-Campus Jobs, Phelps. LOST IN KOLLEN HALL laundry room. 101 Geology book. Please leave book with Kollen head resident or call 392-6269. Reward. NEED A JOB FOR SECOND SEMESTER? Taking applications now. See Off-Campus Jobs, Phelps Hall. 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. LIGHT TRUCK DRIVER - will hire two people to split Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to noon work load. $3/hour. See Off-Campus Jobs, Phelps Hall. EXPERIENCED TYPIST able to pass accuracy test. Ten hours per week. Flexible schedule. Monday through Friday. See-Off Campus Jobs, Phelps.

Cagers open against Concordia Hope's basketball team opens t h e 1977-1978 c a m p a i g n a g a i n s t Concordia tomorrow at the Civic C e n t e r . This will be the first time in 26 y e a r s t h a t Russ DeVette has not led t h e Flying Dutchmen. This s e a s o n G l e n n Van W i e r e n will coach t h e Dutch. On the floor t h e Dutchmen will

be led by seniors Jim Holwerda and Chris P e t e r s o n although P e t e r s o n will not join the team until a f t e r Christmas because of pneumonia. Holwerda is a very consistent performer, averaging 16.1 points a game last season sixth in the league. J u n i o r s S c o t t P e t e r s o n and

Van Wylen speaks of Japan (continued from page 1) from banks. The amount of this i n i t i a l c h a r g e is used t o r e p a y t h e s e d e b t s . One b y - p r o d u c t of this practice is that t h e r e is very little t r a n s f e r from one university to another, because if a student did so he would again have to pay this " e n t r a n c e fee." Meiji Gakuin, along with most universities in the Tokyo area, has only a few residence halls. Most s t u d e n t s live a t h o m e a n d commute to the campus. The train, subway, and bus system in Tokyo is excellent. Yet the distances are r e a t and many s t u d e n t s and acuity m e m b e r s spend an hour to an h o u r and a half on p u b l i c transportation going to and from the university. T h e s a m e is t r u e f o r m a n y elementary, junior high, and high school s t u d e n t s . M a n y of t h e s e s t u d e n t s a t t e n d schools s o m e distance away from their home a n d s p e n d c o n s i d e r a b l e t i m e in t r a v e l . A l m o s t all e l e m e n t a r y , j u n i o r h i g h , a n d high school s t u d e n t s wear uniforms and it is very striking to see subways, trains, and sidewalks filled both morning and evening with school children in these uniforms. I visited with a friend, who had been a g r a d u a t e s t u d e n t at the University of Michigan some years a g o , w h o w a n t e d to s e n d his seventh grade son to a particularly ) r e s t i g i o u s j u n i o r h i g h school o c a t e d s o m e d i s t a n c e f r o m his lome. To do so, this boy gets up shortly a f t e r 5 p.m., leaves home

at 6 a.m., walks 15 minutes to catch a bus to a railroad station, and then t a k e s t h r e e d i f f e r e n t t r a i n s en r o u t e to school. He r e a c h e s school t w o h o u r s a f t e r leaving home. In t h e evening he r e v e r s e s this process. The reason f o r all t h i s t r a v e l is s i m p l y t o enable this son to have the best possible junior high education. J a p a n is a country which has very limited natural resources and has a large population relative to its size. Its major resource is its p e o p l e . Y e t , it c o m p e t e s v e r y successfully in the world m a r k e t s and is one of the leading industrial nations. T h e r e are a number of r e a s o n s w h y t h i s is so, b u t c e r t a i n l y o n e of t h e m is t h e e m p h a s i s on e d u c a t i o n and t h e diligence of the J a p a n e s e people in pursuing education diligently. J a p a n , of course, does not have all t h e answers. But, a study of their s y s t e m and the diligence with which the J a p a n e s e pursue excellence in education is a very r e w a r d i n g and educational process for those of us from the United S t a t e s . The literacy r a t e in Japan is one of the highest in the world and it certainly enjoys outstanding s u c c e s s in t e c h n o l o g y a n d business. In the two succeeding articles I will s h a r e s o m e o b s e r v a t i o n s a b o u t c e r t a i n a s p e c t s of t h e cultural life and a t t i t u d e s toward work, and also some religious perspectives of t h e life and people of J a p a n .

ground music for Christmas party. See Off-Campus Jobs for details.

WIUSI a RICOMMIND

RJC PRooucn

HOPE o

LA CROSSE CLUB SPRING 1978 Sfuvtt OK Im- 'Put" CONTACT: BRAD-4761 or GALE - 4744

Bruce Vanderschaaf will back up the two seniors, but the other s e v e n m e m b e r s of t h e s q u a d a r ^

BAKER'S HELPER: 4:30-7:30 a.m. Monday through Friday. Close to

either freshmen or sophomores, m e a n i n g t h e t e a m is v e r y

9oes through the holidays and into

inexperienced.

second

Van Wieren believes this team is more balanced than the ones of the recent past. They have a v e r a g e size, the tallest is only 6'6", they are good shooters and have good speed. Their quickness will allow them to press and they will run as much as possible. But they are young and they will make mistakes. Van Wieren commented t h a t they w e r e "rough around the

Phelps.

.

campus, no experience necessary. Job semester.

Off-Campus Jobs, m

STEPHEN: Save that handydandy for twenty-three more days. CLOTHING repaired, remodeled, or order. Call 396-4887. - - - - - - - -. - ;—.- L B0C <: 1 ca n help tm * ! '\'f 1 ' ' backwards I hke my Idy-

made t0

T h e D u t c h m e n s s c h e d u e is tough; they open against a team t h a t had already beaten Calvin. T h e l e a g u e is t e r r i f i c . C a l v i n , without Mark V e e n s t r a , and Albion a r e picked t o tie.

I

THE DDFN CLUB will meet at their

t a b | e jn S k i l e s t 0 p a s s o u t t.shirts a n d o r

g a n j z e t he

atten(j.

bowling team: be sure to

Tonight! Interested parties not

jnvjted! BARB: Your door looks fine.

Hope college Social Activities Committee

Sfc,

fmcMHU... Cross Country SKI TOUR OUTING

IN

fflAVHARP.

PCRGUfOn

and his band HOLLAND CIVIC CENTER FRIDAY, DEC. 2 - 8:00 P.M. DOORS OPEN AT 7:00 P.M.

Tickefffi

Allen' S BARBER SHOP AUTHORIZED PROFESSIONAL HAIR REPLACEMENT CENTER

health or emotional problems which call for a change in their physical activities; a continual e m p h a s i s on t h e N u t r i t i o n a l A w a r e n e s s P r o g r a m and f i n a l l y t h e introduction of a campus-wide f . publication on t h e health fitness )jrram. program. The final area is t h e evaluation of t h e p r o g r a m . T h e effectiveness of t h e p r o g r a m will be evaluated t h r o u g h a p r o g r a m of p h y s i c a l m e a s u r e m e n t , questionnaires, and t h e i n v o l v e m e n t of p r o f e s s i o n a l consultants. The new p r o g r a m sounds very complex and costly. It is. But it also is a p r o g r a m that promotes health fitness and skill development in an out of shape society.

A day in Allegan woods with instruction and tour. Transportation provided. Hot cider and donuts afterwards. Leave Reliable at 10:00 a.m., arrive back at 3:30 p.m. $10.00 per person Rentals available at reduced prices. Register by December 7 The quiet world of ski touring is yours for the simple desire to get away from it all... your ski touring pleasure is measured by the equipment used Let us pleasure you with the finest equipment made

FAMOUS BRANDS: Skilom • Birke Beiner • Haugen •

... FOR HOPE COLLEGE ^ STUDENTS, FACULTY & STAFF

COMPLETE HAIR STYLIW LAYER CUTTING BLOW DRYINt

$300

• Asnes • Swix

/arv/nen • lanoy

Complete outfitteri for X-Country Skiing.

FOR GENERAL PUBLIC

All seats are general admission - Parking free 17 W. 16TH HOLLAND

APPOINTMENTS DAILY

Call 396-5095

Tickets available...

W00DMARK SOUND

HOPE COLLEGE

8th Street - Holland

Campus Activities Basement of VanRaalte Hall

CLOSED M O N D A Y

...ana AT

THE DOOR

C Y C U 4 MCI M A I I t 254 River Ave., Holland, Ml 49423 Tel. 616-396-4684 Open 9:30 til 9 p.m. till Christmas

12-02-1977  
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