116 board of foreign missions rca 1948

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O N E H U NDRED A N D SIXTEENTH

ANNUAL REPORT BOARD OF FOREIGN MISSIONS of the

REFORMED CHURCH IN AMERICA

THE ARCHIVES B E A R D S L E E LIBRARY WESTERN THEOLOGICAL SEMJNARY REFORMED CHURCH HEADQUARTERS — 156 FIFTH AVENUE. NEW YORK

1948


BOARD OF FOREIGN MISSIONS MEMBERS OF THE BOARD 1946-49 Rev. Albertus G. Bossenbroek, 24 Farragut Ave., Hastings-on-Hudson, New York. Rev. E. M. Eeningenburg, 141 Hamilton Ave., Passaic, N. J. Rev. Richard P. Mallery, 82-50 Kew Gardens Road, Kew Gardens 15, N. Y. Rev. Abraham Rynbrandt, Zeeland, Michigan. Rev. David Van Strien, 7601 Palisade Avenue, North Bergen, New Jersey. Rev. Anthony Van Westenburg, 220 Ballston Avenue, Scotia, New York. Rev. John C. Van Wyk, Waupun, Wisconsin, R. 1. Mrs. Martin de Wolfe, 5 Morris Avenue, Schenectady, New York. Mrs. Paul Hinkamp, 64 West 14th Street, Holland, Michigan. Mrs. M. Stephen James, 6 Bishop Place, New Brunswick, N. J. Mrs. Jacob Juist, Fairview, Illinois. Mr. Howard B. Nichols, 33 Elm Place, Hastings-on-Hudson, New York. Mr. W. Lloyd Van Keuren, 4507 Smith Avenue, North Bergen, New Jersey. Mrs. John J. Van Strien, Gardiner, N. Y.

1947-50 Rev. Harry J. Hager, 3 West 111th Place, Chicago 28, Illinois. Rev. Anthony Haverkamp, 503 Broadway, Pella, Iowa. Rev. George H. Mennenga, 186 West 12th Street, Holland, Michigan. Rev. Milton T. Stauffer, 63 Grant Avenue, Highland Park, N. J. Rev. Henry V. E. Stegeman, Orange City, Iowa. Rev. Christian H. Walvoord, Hudson, New York. . Mrs. John W. Beardslee, 25 Seminary Place, New Brunswick, New Jersey. Mrs. Henry Beltman, 5491 Nortridge Drive, Los Angeles 43, California. Mrs. Theodore Brinckerhoff, 596 Central Avenue, Scarsdale, New York. Mr. Edward Damstra, c/o Chicago City Bank & Trust Co., Halsted at 63, Chicago 21, Illinois. Mr. William T. Hakken, 1023 Fountain Street, N. E., Grand Rapids, Michigan. Mrs. Garret Hondelink, 125 Grand Avenue, Rochester 9, New York. Mrs. James Wayer, 39 Riverside Drive, Racine, Wisconsin. Mr. Samuel Woolley, c/o Bank of New York, 48 Wall Street, New York 15, New York.

1948-51 Rev. Paul Achtermann, German Valley, Illinois. Rev. William De Jong, Hull, Iowa. Rev. Harvey B. Hoffman, 291 Clinton Avenue, Hackensack, New Jersey. Rev. Joshua M. Hogenboom, 1121 Jefferson Street, Muskegon, Michigan. Rev. Floyd V. Nagel, Guilderland Center, New York. Mr. Clifford P. Case, 120 Broadway, New York 5, New York. Mr. Lawrence R. Chambers, 63 St. Johns Avenue, Yonkers, New York. Mr. Matthias Rens, Brandon, Wisconsin. continued on third cover


T h e B oard of Foreign Missions respectfully presents to the General S y n o d of the R e f o r m e d C h u r c h in Amer i c a its O n e H u n d r e d a n d Six­ teenth A n n u a l Report, the Ninetyfirst of its Separate a n d Independent Action a n d the Second of the R e o r ­ ganized Board, continuing the former W o m a n ’s B oard of Foreign Missions. 1948

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Joreword The Board takes pleasure in presenting to the General Synod this one hundred and sixteenth report. The year has been full of interest. Our missionaries, in spite of disturbed world conditions, have had a year of uninterrupted work. Several new missionaries have gone out during the year and a number of new appointments have been made. The first missionaries to Africa have arrived at their station and this new work has been actively begun. _ Dr. Potter made a significant trip to India and Arabia during the year. He was able to take part in the ceremonies which inaugurated the new Church of South India. The op足 portunity for consultation with the missionaries and their Indian associates with regard to the situation created by the'formation of the new Church was invaluable. He was able also to visit all but one of the stations in Arabia and had a memorable trip into the interior, which is offering unique opportunities to the missionaries. Due to the early meeting of the General Synod it has not been possible to include in this report full tabulated financial statements, but these will be added to the final report circulated to the churches. _ The Board is grateful for the generous support given the work of foreign missions by the members of the Church. Only a rising scale of support makes it possible to maintain work in the face of inflated costs and to add the necessary recruits demanded by challenging opportunities.

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F. M. P otter R u t h Ra n s o m L. J. Shafer


A N N U A L R E P O R T , 1948 “ A n d ye shall h e a r of w a r s a n d r u m o r s of wars; see that ye be not troubled, for these things m u s t needs c o m e to pass; but the e n d is not yet.” (Matt.

24:6.)

It has indeed been a year of wars and rumors of war. The par­ titioning of India and the inauguration of rtew national govern­ ments in India and Pakistan brought rioting and bloodshed on an unimaginable scale. Millions of people fled their homes, Hindu mi­ norities moving from Pakistan into India and Moslem minorities from India into Pakistan. Thousands were massacred by fanatical mobs before reaching their destination. Those who escaped brought little with them and most of them have no place to live and little possibility of making a living. Hundreds of thousands are still in miserable refugee camps. Christians in America and India imme­ diately organized to help meet this mass human suffering. Being Christians they could minister unmolested to Mohammedan and Hindu alike. A significant service was rendered, as reported in a later chapter. In addition to these disturbances, war between India and Pak­ istan threatened as the result of disputes over jurisdiction in two or three areas. Fortunately, while troops were involved in Kashmir, no open war has resulted. The establishment of the new government in India and the cele­ bration of its inauguration brought a wave of nationalistic feeling among the people, but, contrary to the fears of some, Europeans and Americans were not molested. Violent disturbances were almost entirely confined to the north and in our area of India the transi­ tion was unattended by violence. Relations between the Indian pub­ lic and our missionaries are, if anything, on a better basis than before. While there are many uncertainties in the field of education, for example, as to what will be required under the new government and new relationships will need to be worked out, it nevertheless seems clear that there will be freedom for Christians to preach and to make converts among the people. The new draft constitution places some restrictions on the conversion of minors, but there is no indi­ cation as yet that Christian activities among non-Christian Indians will be seriously hindered. For this we should be profoundly thank­ ful.


The civil war in China continues. It is more widely extended, with more troops engaged and with more large scale fighting than a year ago. Missionary areas in North China have been seriously affected. Large cities have not been occupied by the Communists, but many of them have been almost entirely surrounded by the revo­ lutionary army and could be taken almost at will, should the Com­ munists decide to do so. Few missionaries have been able to remain in communist areas. How many is not accurately known, but prob­ ably not more than ten. Reports of looting and ill treatment of na­ tive Christians are mounting. Some Catholic missionaries have been killed. Certain areas have been entirely evacuated by missionary personnel. It is estimated that a territory including a population of 190,000,000 has been occupied by communist armies. Missionary people cannot look with equanimity upon leaving this vast popula­ tion without missionary effort. The possibility of reentering these areas with Christian medical and social welfare groups is being explored, but one cannot be too hopeful about the prospect. This civil war, following upon the dislocations of seven years of foreign war, has brought the whole country to the verge of disaster. The central government seems unable adequately to cope with the situation and its support has seriously deteriorated. Runaway infla­ tion and fantastic prices have brought about untold hardship. Dur­ ing the year Chinese currency depreciated from approximately 5,000 to 1 to 900,000 to 1. Nevertheless it is our opinion that in spite of ineptitude and corruption, the latter historically always a part of government in China, there is more hope for the future in China in the central government than in the leadership of the revolutionists. It is not possible or, perhaps, appropriate in this report to docu­ ment this opinion and it may seem unnecessary to make the state­ ment, but the American public, under the influence of what we believe to be leftist propaganda, is in grave danger of being misled. The central government of China has at the top probably the best leadership of any Chinese government of recent times. Though its practice often denies it, it is dedicated to democratic principles and there is more hope in the long run for true democracy and freedom under this leadership than under that of the Communists in the North. While inflation, rising prices and generally unsettled conditions seriously affect our own area in South China, actual civil war is not present. There are small pockets of Communists or bandits here and there. There were, for example, recent rumors of communist activity threatening our Sio-khe station, but on the whole South China is comparatively quiet and our work has proceeded without interruption from civil war. ' Arabia also has not been free from the tension of wars and rumors of war. The decision to partition Palestine brought about strong resentment against America among the Arabs. There was some rioting in Bahrain and all through the area the atmosphere


has been tense. Our missionaries and their work, however, had become so well established in the hearts of the people that there were no untoward incidents. A few windows were broken in one building at Bahrain, but more by accident than actual intent. At Christmas time Arabs called as usual upon their missionary friends, although in one place there was some discussion of boycotting the missionary home in protest. While the situation is still full of ten­ sion we should be most thankful that the Arab non-Christian com­ munity has been able to make a distinction between national policy and the missionary. This is largely due to the years of unselfish service for Christ that lie back of the work of the Arabian Mission. Due largely to the skillful direction of General Douglas MacArthur and his able staff, and the sincere cooperation of the Japa­ nese government, the year in Japan has been free from tensions and disturbances of the character occurring elsewhere. Surprisingly enough, it is one of the islands of peace in a world sorely beset on all sides. This is, however, a somewhat artificial situation and can­ not be relied upon for the long run until basic economic and social problems are brought nearer solution. The food situation is gradu­ ally improving although still critical, but Japan’s economic future remains unsettled. This _is reflected in inflation and advancing prices. W e are still required officially to exchange dollars for yen at the rate of fifty yen for one dollar, whereas the real value is nearer 300 to 1. A revision of the exchange rate is being vigorously dis­ cussed but nothing has yet been officially decided. Japanese are still unable to leave the country, although a change in this regard is probably imminent and a peace treaty seems as far away as ever. It appears possible that the peace will be made step by step through action rather than in a full-dress peace conference, but until ques­ tions of reparation, of the amount of industry, shipping and foreign trade to be permitted have been settled, it will be difficult for Japan to stabilize her economy and look confidently to the future. The territory in Africa where our first missionaries have just gone seems also to be free from disturbance. The question of the future government of the Sudan is still undecided. Should it be transferred to the control of Egypt, as seems not unlikely, Chris­ tian work would undoubtedly be more difficult, but at present there is no change in the situation. Thus the work of our missions has been carried out in the midst of wars, rumors of war, and disturbed economic and social condi­ tions. W e are admonished by the Master not to be troubled by these things. So long as men are under sin, “these things must needs come to pass.” The preaching of the Gospel becomes more urgent and the glory of it is that the Gospel has been preached, that men and women have been brought into the Kingdom and that larger areas for missionary activity are presenting themselves. The de­ tailed story of the year in each field will make this abundantly clear.


“Except the Lord build the house they labor in vain that build it.” (Ps. 127:1.) ■

Qhapter Two

The opening section of the report of the Amoy Mission probes deeply into the causes of the current disturbed situation in China which has been reported in the first chapter. The writer of the report points out that the rift splitting Chinese life is not merely the result of civil war, but reflects a far more fundamental cultural crisis. He quotes Dr. T. C. Chao, one of China’s most respected Christian teachers, as follows: “China has had a long past during which she has undergone innumerable changes,— but never in these changes was China’s cultural foundation shaken and destroyed. The depth of China’s cultural ocean was calm and undisturbed— . But today the situation is different. Not only the edifice but the founda­ tion of Chinese culture has been thoroughly shaken and even sub­ verted. Upon what solid ground will the future of the Chinese nation be built?” The report goes on to say: “Were the missionaries to become obsessed with the inevitable concomitants of social upheaval,— chaos, corruption, dishonesty and instability,— they might in disgust turn their backs on the disorder and go home. But they know that one day there will emerge a new foundation compounded of the best and most indestructible of the old, and the best and highest of the new. The missionary knows that Christianity is that best element which some day will go into the foundation of Chinese life. The Amoy Mission has been wit­ nessing to the eternal Gospel among a people being driven to des­ peration by almost intolerable conditions. W e believe that man’s extremity is still God’s opportunity. W e have faith that God in His providence has used our efforts of the past year to contribute to the great work of evangelizing China.” All agree that there is a unique opportunity for evangelistic work in China today. Officials are friendly, schools are open, the people hear the Gospel gladly. The report points out, however, that no one can say that this opportunity has been fully grasped. Avail­ able pastors and leaders are painfully few in number and in some cases ill prepared. Besides, the workers are so involved in the daily struggle for existence that much of their energy is dissipated in feelings of insecurity, fear, frustration and sadness in witnessing the tragedy of life. This highlights the necessity of developing new and stronger leadership. There is progress to report here. The situation in the theological seminary under the leadership of Dr. Koeppe'has been clarified and it has been decided to raise the standard of the school


to adm’t only high school graduates. There have been twenty stu­ dents in the school during the year, although only four of these were of higher grade. Miss Holkeboer, with two Chinese associates, spent four months in three villages with a broad program of health, home making and evangelism. This is an experiment with a new approach to the vil­ lage which has proven its worth, but it also looks in the direction of the development of new leadership. A new type of approach has also been worked out in Sio-khe by Miss Bruce, Mrs. Vandermeer and six Chinese coworkers. The med­ ical and evangelistic staff was combined into one unit and a group went to the same village twice a month to teach, preach and heal. The results of this new effort have been most encouraging. Of course, the work of the schools is basic in the training of Christian leadership to meet the new day in China. The principals of the two high schools, Miss Carol Chen of the Amoy Girls’ School and Mr. Yu-lin Lin of Talmage College, have been in the United States, preparing for more efficient service in China. But their schools have continued to carry on with capacity enrollments. A recent graduate of Fukien Christian University heads up the special religious work in Talmage College and the whole atmosphere of the school is Christian, through the influence of the largely Christian faculty. At the Amoy Girls’ School a special week of prayer with emphasis on decision for Christ was held in the middle of the fall term. At Christmas time the equivalent of $400.00 was contributed by the students and cloth purchased with this money was distributed to the needy. Together with the distribution the girls pre­ sented the Gospel message. The several primary schools are overcrowded and buildings and equipment are in a delapidated condition. Often the basic require­ ments of sound educational practice are lacking. A special survey committee, however, has studied the situation and efforts are being made to remedy it. The Livingstone Easter Junior Middle and Primary School at Tong-an has worked out a five year program for developing the work. A fine religious program is being carried out in this-school and the school and the church work together in a most admirable way. An important part of the work for youth in Amoy is the grow­ ing Youth Fellowship, supported in part by the Youth Fellowship of our Church. Five summer conferences were held last summer. These have brought forward many recruits for full or part time Christian service. At the Amoy District Conference, for example, forty-eight decisions were made, twelve of these for full time service. An important new avenue for Christian work and for recruiting Christian leadership is the student work on the campus of the state .university at Amoy. The Rev. John Muilenburg gave part time serv­ ice there last year. Twenty-one were baptized and another ten were

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in a preparatory class at the end of the year. The Sunday afternoon service on the campus, planned by the students, is attended by 150 to 200, and Christian students conduct a Sunday School for the children of members of the faculty and staff. There are always a number of students from Amoy in the Fukien Christian University at Foochow. Thus the University de­ velops Christian' leaders who serve in the Church and in the schools’ in South Fukien. The Kev. and Mrs. Gordon Van Wyk, our repre­ sentatives on the faculty of the school, have made a strong contri­ bution to the Christian life of this University campus. The medical work of the Mission is an important part of its evangelistic thrust. On July 16, 1947 the Hope Hospital was re­ opened after the war. Dr. Clarence Holleman was directly or indi­ rectly responsible for collecting $100,000 U. S. currency from local and overseas Chinese and for securing $75,000 worth of supplies and equipment from the various relief organizations, a very sig­ nificant achievement. The School of Nursing was also opened on September 16, 1947, with twelve high school graduates enrolled. The Leng-na Hospital is also being refurbished and reorganized under the direction of Dr. Theodore Oltman. The local chamber of commerce has raised the equivalent of $2,500 U. S. currency for this work. Changchow Union Hospital is still carrying on its work in the Seminary buildings, although it is expected that the new building will be completed in another year. The School for Nursing secured government registration this year and has an enrollment of thirty. Sio-khe continues to carry on its work under the direction of Dr. So Tat-Beng, while Tong-an is only now getting under way again after the death of the Chinese doctor in charge. The four hospitals in active operation ministered altogether to 84,752 people, and public health visits have totalled more than 4,000 with 6,500 immunizations. Christian activity in the hospitals is vigorously carried on. Ten of the nurses in the Nursing School at Changchow were baptized at Easter time. It is difficult to overstate the influence of these insti­ tutions, the work of the nursing schools being especially significant. This is being appreciated by the general public in China and the report emphasizes an increasing readiness on the part of the Chi­ nese to support these Christian hospitals and nursing schools. The reoccupation of the Leng-na station, after an evacuation which extended to eighteen years, has been most stimulating to the whole Mission, says the report. Repairs on the three deserted and broken residences standing on the hill above the hospital, made from funds received from the United Advance, have rendered them “livable if not comfortable” and they are now full to capacity. The churches and outstations in the district have taken on new activity. At Se-oan the newly ordained pastor looks forward to making this, village a model Christian center and plans are being made to regain


control of the primary school in the church compound which some years ago was taken over by the county. New work has been opened at a market town along the motor road to Leng-na. In May the members of the Mission joined Leng-na Christians in celebrating Miss Katharine Green’s forty years of service in the Amoy Mission. The tribute to Miss Green took the form of a serv­ ice project comprising a reading room and recreation hall in the basement of the church. The missionary residences at Tong-an were also again occupied. Only Miss Nienhuis and Dr. Eckerson, however, were available for work in the station since the others were engaged in language study, but it is evident that the presence of these new missionaries has given hope to the war-weary and hard-pressed Christian leader­ ship of church and school. The report gives the story of each church and outstation in detail. This cannot be repeated here, but a few sentences taken at random will give some impression of the situation. The Leng-na Church carries on a strong work among the military and civil of­ ficials there. The Gan-chioh chapel has taken on new life under her new pastor. High hopes are held for this place. The Tang Poa-an Church in Changchow city shows growth and vitality. There has been a good attendance at services, a youth fellowship is active and prayer groups sustain the program of the church in fervent and effectual intercession. The church at Chio-be maintains two preach­ ing places and has one branch chapel, which is self-supporting. This church has for years had a daily sunrise prayer and Bible study group which undoubtedly accounts for much of its power. At Soasia, in the Sio-khe district, the hearers are so many that it is planned to build a new church. The church in Sio-khe exerts a splen­ did influence in the city. The An-ho Church in Tong-an has made plans for a new sanctuary and the other church in the town has raised funds locally and redecorated the church building. The other side of the picture is reflected in such statements as these: “In the An-khoe area for which our Mission is responsible, there is not a single pastor or full time qualified preacher at work. This involves ten chapels.” The five chapels associated with one of the Changchow churches “may be characterized by the term ‘life­ lessness’. W h y ? W e must come back monotonously to the one great lack of the Church,— adequate leadership.” The final sentence in the report gives the general impression derived from a consideration of the year’s work: “Although the year 1947 brought solid achievements in all branches of our work, the year must also be considered one of preparation and reorienta­ tion for ‘greater things to come’.” This is reflected in the, fact that at the end of the year surveys were being undertaken of the Ankhoe area, so long neglected, and the large field beyond Leng-na, inadequately occupied, which the London Missionary Society has asked us to take over. The years ahead should show great improve­


ment in Amoy, not only in the occupation of the field but in the development of leadership adequate to the needs. This work is only a small segment of the total Christian program in China, but our missionaries and their Chinese coworkers are striving valiantly to make sure that the new house which China must build on the ruins of a disintegrated culture may be a house which the Lord of life shall build, and not another.

“ T h a t the w o r l d m a y believe that T h o u hast sent m e . ” (John 17:21.)

The great political event of the year was the celebration of inde­ pendence on August 15th, when India finally achieved her cherished aim and emerged from the long period of tutelage under British rule. In every institution of our area there were formal celebrations and on that eventful evening there were spontaneous demonstra­ tions throughout the land. There was some disappointment among the more thoughtful because India had to be broken up and emerged as two dominions, Pakistan and India, but at least they were free now to carve out their own destiny and hope ran high. In the wave of good will even old scores against Great Britain were forgotten. She had after all fulfilled her promises and therefore the tensions which had developed in recent years were quickly released. The joy was, alas, short lived. The intercommunal feeling be­ tween Hindus and Moslems which had made necessary the partition of the country into two separate dominions, was far more deep seated and bitter than anyone had imagined. In the north, particu­ larly in the province of Punjab, which had been divided between the two dominions, age old hatreds flamed forth and scenes of un­ imaginable barbarity were enacted. Moslems fell upon Hindu minor­ ities on the Pakistan side of the border and across the line Hindus and Sikhs attacked Moslem minorities. Whole villages were wiped out and there ensued a frantic attempt of Moslems to escape to Pakistan and Hindus to India. Some eight million people were in­ volved in this tremendous migration and refugee problems beggar­ ing description quickly arose. Against such a dark background has the work of the Church been carried on in India this year and this has highlighted some of its service. The problem was an impossible one for the two domin­ ions, not yet thoroughly organized. The churches of America through Church World Service, have sent nearly two million pounds of supplies valued at over half a million dollars. Missions and


churches in India have contributed personnel, relief workers, doc­ tors and nurses. From the Christian Medical College at Vellore two doctors and two nurses went to the scene of suffering as did our fine Christian doctor, Dr. Julius Savarirayan, from the Scudder Memorial Hospital, Ranipet. A deep impression has been made by this service of Christians at a time when only a Christian could minister to both warring parties, and the value of this service of compassion has been generously acknowledged by Hindu and Mos­ lem leaders alike.- The significance of this development for the fu­ ture of the Church in India is unmistakable. By a curious coincidence, or may we not venture to say, by providential direction, the inauguration of the new Church of South India was celebrated at the very time when disorders in north India were at their height. The contrast of fratricidal conflict between two religious parties in the north and the unification of diverse Christian bodies in the south was drawn in such vivid colors as to be unforgettable. By this union; the consummation of which was celebrated in the Cathedral of St. George in Madras on September 27, 1947, the old South India United Church, through which we have been operating for nearly fifty years, was joined with the churches which have grown out of the work conducted in South India by the British Methodists and the Anglicans. The new church embraces a Christian community of a little over a million and will be one of the strong forces in the Madras Presidency with its united witness. It is impressive and significant that this movement toward union began thirty years ago with the cooperation of the various churches in a united evangelistic compaign. After three years of united planning for the spread of the Gospel the leaders were led to con­ sider the possibility of more permanent union “that the world might believe” and after twenty-eight years of thoughtful, prayerful con­ sultations, the way was found. While in some respects this was a consummation, in others it is but a beginning. These churches of different tradition and custom will require .years to grow together and at the present time all the intricate details of reorganization are being worked out. There is a new spirit and a high hope, however, as this difficult task is faced, for all realize that we have now experienced in South India the final evolution of the Church. In our work we look back to the time when the Arcot Mission, composed of missionaries alone, directed all ac­ tivities. Some twenty-five years ago,' it was succeeded by the Arcot Assembly, with liberal representation of Indian Christians, but it was still a body existing alongside the church and including all missionaries. In' 1939 further progress was made as the Assembly was superseded by bodies elected from the church membership, Indian and' missionary, without distinction, but these were still bodies functioning within a particular mission area and not funda­ mentally related to the South India United Church. The new Church of South India will function for the whole area of the church and


the various Boards created will stem directly from the church itself as we are accustomed to see the pattern in our own country. It is a milestone of tremendous significance. This is not only a unique achievement in Church union. It is a culmination of the long process of establishing the church in South India. So great in their importance have been these general develop­ ments in India that it seemed necessary to use practically all the alloted space of this report to describe them. The regular Christian work in our own area has continued steadily but we must omit reference to all its varied aspects, which were outlined in last year’s report and which will appear in a limited edition of the Arcot report separately published in India. It is impressive, however, to note against the background of momentous events, that there has been unusual activity in direct evangelistic effort. The final statistics of the year have not yet been received but in three villages alone there were some five hundred baptisms, in one case the whole village becoming Christian and erecting at its own expense the combined church and school to serve the village. The Indian Christian com­ munity has also set itself the task of raising one hundred thousand rupees (about $30,500) during the next five years, to commemorate the one hundreth anniversary of the Arcot Mission in 1953. The main purpose of this fund is to make possible further aggressive evangelistic effort in the villages of the Arcot area. There is much in India today to cause deep anxiety. The poli­ tical future is uncertain. But there are able leaders in that field. The central government in India today, in its leadership, bears com­ parison with almost any country in the world. W e thank God, also, that in His church leaders are emerging who in His strength will be sufficient for the great task confronting them. Never did they more need our support in prayer and in financial resources than today. As we unite our efforts we may look forward to the develop­ ment of a church in India which shall play a noble role in the unfolding history of that country. No report on India would be complete without reference to the death of Mahatma Gandhi. The unquestioned political leader of a great people engaged in a long struggle to achieve independence, it was in a sense politically impossible for him to identify himself with the religion of the ruling foreign power, and particularly in his later years he strongly emphasized his Hindu convictions. Yet in the spiritual qualities which he displayed and the unique manner in which he employed those qualities for profound revolution on a broad social scale, he gave evidence of the deep impression made upon his life by the teachings of the New Testament and the ex­ ample of the Cross. W e extend our deep sympathy to a stricken people deprived of a great spiritual leader who has again and again in his own life and in his death itself given meaning to the whole conception of vicarious sacrifice.


“ A n d H e s a w a great multitude, a n d H e h a d c o m p a s s i o n o n t h e m because they w e r e as s h e e p not havi n g a s h e p ­ herd, a n d H e b e g a n to teach t h e m . ”

(Mark 6:34.)

Qhapterjour This word of the gospels almost exactly describes the situation that still obtains in Japan. The people have lost their anchorage in the past, their future is uncertain, and they are tragically confused and bewildered. Which way shall they turn? Shall they return to the arid past of nation worship, shall they heed the call of a com­ munist utopia, or shall it be Christ who leads them? Looking upon the people of Japan with the mind of Christ, Christian America can but have compassion and seek to tell them of the resurrected Christ, in W h o m alone is salvation for the indi­ vidual and hope for the nation. There is no formal report from our missionaries in Japan. This chapter will attempt to give a general outline of the situation. There has been a good deal of public discussion in this country with reference to Protestant work in Japan and considerable disquiet and dissatisfaction expressed. No doubt some of this criticism is justified. No one can be satisfied with what has been accomplished in the face of the unparalleled opportunity which presents itself. However, it needs to be said that reports coming out of Japan from other than Protestant sources have been quite definitely designed to create a favorable opinion of non-Protestant work, and these seem to have been very successful in accomplishing their purpose in Protestant circles. Reports have even been circulated that the E m ­ peror was about to become a Roman Catholic. It is a fact that m e m ­ bers of the Imperial family are definitely interested in Christianity, but most of the contact so far seems to have been by leaders of our own Church of Christ. Obviously it would not be appropriate to make comparisons in a report of this kind, but it is necessary to recognize that invidious comparisons have been made and in our opinion these are unjustified by the facts. Some have questioned whether the present cooperative approach to the work in Japan may not have lessened the contribution which the churches of North America, our own Church among them, might have made. This criticism must be given serious consideration. Certainly a good deal of time has been spent in perfecting organi­ zation and we, in the Board, are convinced that the cooperative ap­ proach must be made to work as efficiently as another method, if it is to be continued. The present way of carrying on the work has, however, been the natural outcome of the situation itself and in­ volves no departure in principle from the traditional policy of our


Board and Church, viz.— that of full consultation with the Church on the field. Since that Church is at present a united Church, a Council of Cooperation has been set up in Japan and Boards in­ volved in the united Church on the field have established a method for joint consultation here, in the Interboard Committee. The or­ ganization for carrying out this policy is now complete and the next two or three years should test its validity. The relation of our missionaries to our Church remains un­ changed under this new arrangement and on the field they have the utmost freedom to proclaim the Gospel. There is also no organiza­ tional limitation on the number of missionaries whom we as a Church might send to Japan. There are at present five of our mis­ sionaries there. Miss Bogard should be leaving for the field this autumn, if her health permits, and it is likely that Mrs. de Maagd will also go out this year. What size missionary force should the Board look forward to keeping in Japan? The answer depends largely on how many will volunteer and on how many the Church can and will support, along with the obligations in other fields. Certainly at least three evangelistic families and two short-term teachers should be appointed as soon as possible. The total number to be sought would probably best be left to the future. The import­ ant thing now is to get the recruits immediately required. The united Church continues to develop its organization and vig­ orously press its evangelistic program. In the three-year evangelis­ tic campaign Dr. Kagawa reports that he has spoken to more than 400,000 people and that 60,000 have signed cards at these meetings, signifying their desire to become Christians. A substantial number of these have already joined the Church. Other speakers in the cam­ paign have also been given a wide hearing. Mr. de Maagd has been on two visits to Kyushu and has been in active contact with those with whom we were directly associated in the work before the war. On his first visit he found considerable dis­ satisfaction with the united Church, but on his last visit the situ­ ation was quite changed. This confirms the general impression re­ ceived here, that the new Church is becoming more firmly estab­ lished. A committee is working on a new creed for the Church and the tentative statement of doctrine proposed by this committee and received here gives strong reassurance. As already stated, the policy of our Board is to leave the Church on the field free to maintain its own life under the guidance of the Holy Spirit. Should a substan­ tial number of our own constituency, for reasons that seemed to us sound, decide to leave the Church, we would have to work out some plan for cooperating with them, as well as with those who remained within the Church. This contingency does not seem likely to arise at present. Our- Christian, schools have capacity enrollments and the Chris­ tian program is vigorously carried on. Adjustments to the new education system, modeled on the American plan, are being worked


out. This will add one year of high school curriculum'and one year of college. Sturges Seminary is operating in temporary buildings largely paid for by money raised in Japan. Mr. Hirotsu, who has worked with the Japan Mission in one relation or another for fortyeight years, has been acting as principal. Mr. de Maagd reports that he speaks with the vigor of a man of-fifty. The alumnae of Ferris Seminary are securing funds for some renovation of the Ferris buildings. The Rev. Shiro Murata has become president of the Meiji Gakuin, Mr. Yano having resigned to become secretary of the National Christian Educational Association. Little has yet been done to rehabilitate the badly run down plant. The full cost of recon­ structing these schools is not yet available, but from estimates so far received it is evident that the amounts provided in the United Advance Fund will be far from adequate. _ There are at present 270 missionaries of all Protestant denomi­ nations in Japan. This may seem a small number,' but to those who have been in intimate contact with the situation it represents a sub­ stantial achievement. Arrangements with the authorities in Japan had to be worked out after the war and the first of the Commission of Six, which has been responsible for all subsequent relations to SCAP, did not arrive in Japan until April 1946. In the case of every missionary who has gone out, housing has had to be guaranteed to SCAP in advance, and that in a country where most of the cities have been destroyed and where many residences still available were occupied by military personnel. A good deal of effort this year has gone into perfecting the ar­ rangement for providing a regular flow of food to Christian workers in Japan. This was referred to in last year’s report as an urgent necessity, particularly for ministers, in order to release them from outside activities required to supplement the inadequate salaries which depleted congregations are able to pay. This program of re­ lief is now being carried out with funds made available by Boards and by the relief funds of the churches, administered by Church World Service. ' The general relief program has now been in operation for about two years. This is administered in Japan through LARA, the central agency in Japan through which eleven voluntary relief agencies in the United States send relief supplies to Japan. Distribution of these supplies is supervised by a central representative committee, and the Social Welfare Ministry of the Japanese government has most efficiently carried out the distribution at no expense to the donors. About 7,000,000 pounds of food, clothing, medical supplies and other essentials, valued at more than $2,000,000, have been dis­ tributed, about half of these having been contributed by the Prot­ estant churches of the United States. This work has aided at least 2,000,000 people and more than 1,300 institutions, including hos­ pitals, clinics, orphanages, nurseries, summer youth camps and leper hospitals. More than 30,000 abandoned or sick babies have been


helped. Church World Service has also printed here and sent out 100,000 church hymnals, and the American Bible Society has sup­ plied 1,500,000 New Testaments. Mention should be made of the plans projected for a Christian University in Japan. There is enthusiasm for the project in Japan on the part of the general public and the committee there has been exceedingly fortunate in securing a most satisfactory site fifteen miles from the center of Tokyo. The board of founders in North America is being organized with representatives of supporting Boards and plans for a nationwide campaign for funds in the United States and Canada are being perfected. In order to make such a campaign successful it is necessary for the Boards to back the project with initial grants and the General Synod is requested to commend the project to pur constituency. '■

“ O h that Ishm a e l m i g h t live before Thee.” (Gen. 17:18.)

Chapter Jive There has been considerable building activity in the Arabian Mission this year. A fine new doctor’s residence has been erected at Bahrain so as to provide for the program of maintaining two doc­ tors in that station to make possible extensive touring in the in­ terior. A new obstetrical wing for the women’s hospital has also been recently opened. In Kuwait a house adjoining the hospital com­ pound has been purchased and after extensive alterations will be used to accommodate patients who are far too numerous for housing in the old limited quarters. Substantial funds are in hand, raised largely on the field, to erect a new men’s hospital as soon as build­ ing operations are more feasible. The present rapid expansion of the local oil company makes all building operations difficult and ex­ pensive. Down the coast at Muscat alterations have also been made to one of the old mission buildings so as to accommodate another missionary family, Rev. and Mrs. J. R. Kapenga having recently arrived there to supplement the efforts of Dr. and Mrs. Dykstra. Mention should be made also of the erection of a small hospital at Qatar. The local sheikh erected and equipped this hospital en­ tirely at his own expense and we now maintain an Indian doctor there, while our mission doctors from Bahrain make occasional ex­ tended visits. So we enter again upon new territory and extend the impact of the Mission upon Arabia. Mention was made in the last annual report of our hope of ob­ taining a foothold in Hassa, one of the great provinces of Saudi Arabia. Dr. and Mrs. Storm spent several months there last year


and in the course of a recent tour of inspection the Board Secretary for Arabia was able to visit this important inland province, the chief seat of oil operations in the interior. Because of the friendli­ ness of the governor, Dr. Storm was invited to bring in a small party, including the Secretary and Rev. E. Luidens and nothing could have exceeded the warmth of the hospitality received. A whole wing of the governor’s palace was placed at their disposal. Passing through the streets of the city and visiting its shops, everywhere one encountered Bedouins who greeted Dr. Storm with great cor­ diality. He has won for himself a real place in the hearts of these Arabs. This is but one of many illustrations of the wonderful way in which missionaries have won the friendship of these sons of Ish­ mael. The demonstrations were the more impressive because they came at a time when the Arab world was feeling,bitter toward Amer­ ica and highly indignant over its part in promoting the partition of Palestine. There was no restraint in their condemnation of America but they always drew the distinction between political animosity and their unshaken friendship for individual missionaries. Outbreaks against the Jews in Bahrain interfered for a time in the smooth working of the Girls’ School at Bahrain but some Jew­ ish teachers employed there were soon able to return. It was impres­ sive to see in this school and in our other Girls’ School in Basrah and the one at Baghdad under the United Mission in Mesopotamia, how Christians, Jews and Moslems attending these schools were able to work together with little of the friction occasioned by political events. There is a spirit in these schools, where pupils study the life and teachings of Christ and sing the great Christian songs, which creates an atmosphere deeply influencing the whole life of the pupils even if it does not lead to outright discipleship. The same is true of the Boys’ School at Basrah and one notable development of that school in recent years is the establishment of a club for young men, many of them graduates of the institution, which meets in one of the old school buildings, enlarged and beautified at the expense of the club itself. There these young men find the only center of social life where drinking and gambling are forbidden and there is op­ portunity for good, healthy social activities. The most important point of emphasis in this Mission is the need of recruits. Three of the evangelistic missionaries now on the field are in their final term of service. One of these, Dr. John Van Ess, is to retire next year. In recent years another has died and another retired. Five families to be replaced and over against that there is the record of only three recent appointments. On the med­ ical side, two new doctors have been sent out in recent years but Dr. Mylrea has retired and Dr. Paul Harrison returns to America this year to retire. It is not enough simply to fill their places when medical work is still so effective an avenue for opening new fields and we must take advantage of new stations in Qatar and Hassa.


The Mission has also lost four women doctors in the last decade without a single replacement. It is important that the whole church be aware of this situation and report to the Board whenever and wherever there is an opportunity to secure a suitable recruit. If every pastor would keep in mind, for example, the acute need of doctors, surely we should hear of some fine young men, released from army service, who might consider this challenge to a difficult but rewarding service in Arabia. Much of our work in Arabia is still of the pioneer type, making friends, breaking down the natural hostility of the Moslem toward the Christian, finding new territory into which we can enter with friendly service and tell the story as opportunity offers. But the little groups of Christians continue to grow, with painful slowness, as it seems to us, for the adversaries are many. But because it is so hard for the Moslem to come to open allegiance, each convert won brings special joy to the missionary. There was a touching ceremony last year when at one service in Bahrain the infant son of Rev. and Mrs. E. M. Luidens was baptized with an old slave woman, Medinah. After a long life of hardship, finally she has found her Lord, and as she tells her story there can be no question of the reality of her spiritual experience. Another striking ceremony was held this year in the little chapel at Baghdad. Rev. and Mrs. B. D. Hakken have been working there for many years, our representatives in the United Mission in Meso­ potamia, where, too, the great call is for recruits. They and one other family are the only evangelistic missionaries today active in that Mission. The chapel is really a part of their house, where the little groups of Christians can gather together quietly, much as they did in the early days of the church. At one of these services two fine young Moslems were baptized this year and added to the church. Another recent convert is considering entering the ministry. Pray for these young men, who have given proof of their loyalty for Christ such as is rarely if ever called for from us in a country of Christian customs and traditions.

“ . . . concluding

that G o d h a d called us to p r e a c h the Gospel un t o t h e m ”

(Acts 16:10.) '

Chapter Six

As this chapter is being written, word comes that our first mis­ sionaries to Africa have arrived at their destination, Akobo Post, South Sudan. The Rev. and Mrs. J. Robert Swart and Miss Wilma J. Kats sailed from New York on January 9, 1948. There were many


delays and difficulties along the way, including measles on the steamer and a rather serious attack of dysentery suffered by the Swart baby at Khartoum, but we are thankful that under the pro­ tecting hand of Providence all have now arrived at Akobo safely and in good health. Thus has begun an important advance pro­ gram undertaken by the Reformed Church. There have been fears expressed lest this new field hamper the work in the older fields. The occupation of the interior of Arabia seems imminent, comparatively unoccupied areas contiguous to the Amoy region are being surveyed and there are also areas on the fringes of Arcot which are inadequately occupied. Furthermore, the opportunity in Japan is unparalleled-and calls for special effort. Would it not have been better to have concentrated on existing fields? Will not this new venture make it impossible for our Church adequately to meet the challenge in those countries where we have been at work? , , .. . , . These questions are pertinent. When the actual decision to begin work in Africa was made, no one anticipated the situation which has so quickly developed in Japan. Furthermore, the inflation in all our fields which makes increased income necessary to carry on the same work was not anticipated. Nevertheless, the opportunity m Africa presented itself as a distinct challenge. The project called for work in one tribe in association with the United Presbyterian Mission and held out the possibility of Christianization in a com­ paratively short time, with limited personnel and a small capital in­ vestment. It was felt that this was a project that we could and should undertake. In retrospect, there should be no regrets that this work has been initiated. It is inconceivable that the Reformed Church should, remain static in its missionary outreach. It is natural that from time to time it should undertake new ventures. The last field to be entered under the Board of Foreign Missions was that in Arabia more than fifty years ago and that work was begun as an independ­ ent venture. As we look back today, we realize how poor the Church would have been without the Arabian Mission. This new project in Africa should attract new interest and new support and, instead of weakening the older work, should strengthen the evangelistic thrust of the Church at home and abroad all along the line. Furthermore, while the opportunity in Japan is unparalleled, it is unlikely that the American churches will be called upon to keep as large a missionary staff there as formerly. At one time our Church maintained two missions in Japan, the North and the South Japan Missions. There were altogether, at the high point of mis­ sionary occupation, 1610 missionaries in Japan (1924). At that time our Board maintained forty missionaries there. Present overall plans call for not more than 1000 missionaries, but larger emphasis is being put on developing native leadership. The Advance Program prepared by the Japan Committee of the Foreign Missions Confer­


ence includes the recruiting and training of 400 Japanese Christian ministers in the next five years. How many missionaries we should maintain in Japan remains to be decided as the situation develops, but, apart from larger support by the Church for the Africa Mis­ sion, there should be some leeway in the Japan program, so far as missionary personnel is concerned, for the development of the work in Africa. As has been said, our missionaries in Africa are to be associated with missionaries of the United Presbyterian Church there and, so far as possible, the work is to be directed to the Christianization of the Anuak tribe. A part of this tribe lives in South Sudan and a part in the southwest corner of Ethiopia. The physical boundary be­ tween these two sections of the tribe presents no difficulty. It is, in fact, a narrow river which can be crossed in a small boat, but the political boundary presents what might prove to be insurmountable difficulties. It is impossible to take up work among the Anuaks across this river boundary without the consent of the Ethiopian govern­ ment. As this report is being made, the Rev. Don McClure, accord­ ing to present plans, will be in Addis Ababa carrying on negotia­ tions with Haile Selassie for permission to open work there. The field is easily accessible from the Ethiopian side by air transport and if consent is given it will be possible to press the work with vigor among the tribe as a unit. Your prayers that these negotia­ tions may be successful are earnestly requested. For the present, however, our missionaries will be located at Akobo. Residences are available for Miss Kats and both the Swart and Hoekstra families. These new recruits will make it their first business, however, to acquire the language and by the time they are ready for active work it is hoped that the way will be clear for opening a station in Ethiopia in addition to the station which the Rev. Don McClure is projecting south of Akobo at Pachala. Mr. Swart writes that the jeep which supporting churches made available for him has proved invaluable. When they arrived at Khar­ toum there was a railroad strike in the Sudan, affecting trains and boats, and the party drove from Khartoum on to Akobo. The jeep pulled other vehicles out of the mud at several points, Mr. Swart reports. The Anuak tribe project has now been formally approved by both the Sudan and Ethiopian Missions of the United Presbyterian Church and an arrangement has been entered into with the United Presbyterian Board of Foreign Missions by which our Board will undertake half of the expense of the equipment of the work. It is estimated that this will amount to approximately $33,000, which can be distributed over two or three years. Thus the work in Africa is off to a promising start. Mr. and Mrs. Lee Crandall, appointed at the February meeting of the Board, will be, it is hoped, assigned to Africa. Mrs. Crandall is a trained nurse and Mr. Crandall is a graduate in agriculture, having taken ,


in addition a year at the Biblical Seminary. Other recruits, as noted in the chapter on personnel, are still needed, but the Board rejoices in being able to report to this General Synod that the work in Africa has been so well begun. Everyone will look forward to subsequent reports as the actual work gets under way.

“ . . .f o r a s m u c h as ye k n o w that y o u r labor is not in vain in the Lord.” . (1 Cor. 15:58.)

Qhapter Seven The work of the Board at home often seems humdrum as com­ pared with the work on the field for which it is carried out, but there is always the thought that if this be faithfully done in prayer it will not be “in vain in the Lord.” The Board of Foreign Missions has had two well-attended meet­ ings, in Chicago and in New Brunswick; a third meeting of the Board will have been held in New York before this report is in print. A fine cooperative spirit has been manifest at all sessions. The Department of Women’s Work of the Board, in which the particular interests of the women are conserved and promoted, has met monthly between October and May. Here, too, enthusiasm is keen and the spirit of helpfulness very marked. The Rev. Barnerd M. Luben, field secretary of the Board, has done yeoman work throughout the year, making itineraries for mis­ sionaries on furlough, arranging for mission fests, and securing interest in projects of the Board. Since May 1, 1947, thirty-seven churches have taken “regular shares” in the missionaries and thirtyfour have taken the “emergency shares” necessitated by the extra­ ordinary expenses of the times. In a significant series of conferences, Miss Ransom and Mr. Luben have met with the classical agents for foreign missions in all the Synods, discussing ways in which the agents and the Board can extend their usefulness one to the other. Out of these has grown a mimeographed manual for classical agents. The continued loyal ser­ vices of the agents are much appreciated by the Board. The Board has continued to cooperate with all the other Boards of the Church, particularly in the maintenance of an educational program for young people and for children, so that the full program of the Reformed Church, including its foreign missionary work, may be kept in sight of the entire church constituency. As voted by General Synod, February was observed as Foreign Missions Month and the last Sunday as Foreign Missions Sunday. The Church Herald carried many additional articles. Special church


bulletin covers for the first and last Sundays were prepared, some sixty thousand of each being distributed to churches requesting them. Special material for use in the church school was prepared, leading up to an offering for paper for Japan, on which Christian literature for children may be printed. To date, the offering totals $1,786.86. The value in missonary education is, of course, far be­ yond the monetary return. The special February offering of the wo­ men was toward rebuilding Yok-tek Primary School at Amoy, which at this writing totals $4,147.49. New audio-visual aids include a film on work in the Arcot Mis­ sion, “His Own Master”, and a lecture illustrated with fifty slides, also on our work in India. Under the chairmanship of Mrs. M. Stephen James, the Depart­ ment of Women’s Work has continued its active and many-sided program. Relationships with the Women’s Board of Domestic Mis­ sions clear through the Joint Committee. Miss Marion Hull, Secre­ tary, conscientiously carries the responsibilities for joint program material, public meetings, training conferences and all united .ap­ proaches to the women of the church. The Field Representation Committee, Miss Anne B. Littell chair­ man, has kept in constant touch with the missionaries by corres­ pondence, and has initiated a round robin letter among the mis­ sionaries emeritus. The Committee on Magazines and Books for Missionaries, Mrs. Peter Vanden Berge chairman, is dong constructive work bringing together the missonary, the literature he or she desires, and the person or persons glad to provide it. Quantity buying makes for economy and greater usefulness. The Hospitality Committee, Mrs. Gerard.R. Gnade chairman, literally “covers the waterfront”, meeting outgoing and incoming missionaries at all hours and sending personal messages when ac­ tual contact is not possible. The Sewing Guild Committee, Mrs. Lester Bossard chairman, during the year despatched well over seven tons of Sewing Guild supplies. Fifty-five cases went to Arabia, thirty-seven to India, and two cases were shipped to China with Dr. T. V. Oltman’s freight. Customs charges on these shipments are very heavy. Increasingly, givers of Sewing Guild materials are including funds to send them and help pay duty. Every effort is made to have the contents meet the exact needs overseas and many missionaries testify that the material sent them would be'unobtainable in their areas at any cost. A Guest Day, to which each member of the Department invited one or two other women, interested in the work of the Department, proved an enjoyable and helpful addition to the schedule. Tangible evidence of the devotion of the women to foreign mis­ sions is the $6,836.80 increase in gifts from women’s societies in eleven months.


The Board of Foreign Missions is doing its part in the general advance program in foreign missions sponsored by the Foreign Missions Conference and will have representatives at the June and October meetings at Columbus at which the Boards work together toward “One World in Christ.” Members of the Reformed Church will join in the great interdenominational meetings to be held in October and November in thirty-six cities throughout the United States, and hold denominational missionary rallies in several of the cities having strong Reformed Church constituencies. Dr. Paul Harrison has been chosen as one of the team of speakers who will visit these cities. The United Advance funds have been of inestimable help to our missionaries. In China residences have been repaired at Sio-khe, Tong-an and Leng-na and plans are projected for rebuilding modern apartment residences on Kulangsu to replace those torn down by the Japanese. The Yok-tek primary school building is nearing comple­ tion, the classroom building at Talmage College, projected years ago, is now being built and the Changchow Union Hospital is also in process of erection. In Japan help has been given Sturges Semi­ nary to secure temporary buildings in place of those completely de-' stroyed by fire, $8,000 has been made available for the purchase of prefabricated buildings to be used as temporary churches, and a prefabricated house is being sent out for the use of Miss Walvoord at Sturges Seminary. Other plans are projected for Voorhees College in India and for the hospital at Kuwait. Without these funds it is difficult to see how the reconstruction needs of the fields could have been met. With them the missionaries and their associates can look forward with courage and hope to the evangelistic opportunities which face them. It takes imagination to see the relation between these material structures and the work of evangelization, but to the missionaries and their associates on the field these things are basic essentials to healthy living and necessary tools with which to work in the train­ ing for leadership and the building of the Church. In all honesty, however, it must be recalled that the estimate of the Foreign Board was cut when the Advance Fund was set up and, furthermore, needs have developed in Japan and in India which could not have been foreseen when the program was projected. The Fund, as large as it was in total, will not be sufficient to complete the task of reconstruction which faces us, and the Board will find it necessary to present these needs to the Church at the proper time. Some of them have been included in this year’s budget. The Board records with sorrow the death of the Rev. Edward Dawson, D.D., for many years its revered president, and of the Rev. Luke A. Brunsting, always faithful to his duties as a member of the Board. Friends like these cannot be replaced, but their going serves to deepen the devotion and consecration of those who have been privileged to serve with them.


“ U p o n the first d a y of the w e e k let eac h o n e of y o u lay b y h i m in store as h e m a y prosper.” (Acts 16:2.)

Qhapter Sight FINANCES The summary of receipts shown on the opposite page reveals some interesting facts. The grand total, $864,021.20 is an all time record for the Board. The.unusually large figure is partly accounted for by the inclusion of $202,000 received through the United Ad­ vance Fund, which is of course reported also by the Committee on United Advance. It seemed best, however, to include that figure here also, to indicate how much was distributed to the Board of Foreign Missions during the year. The major part of this fund is being used for rehabilitation of property in China and Japan. In last year’s'report it was noted that comparisons with the preceding year were difficult, because it was the first year of the new Board of Foreign Missions following amalgamation with the Woman’s Board. This year the comparisons can be made and the splendid gains in both total receipts and total contributions from the living are most encouraging. The most important figures are shown under I, as the Board must rely upon these receipts for the maintenance of the work. The total under that heading of $528,626.57 represents an increase of $31,533.72 over the corresponding figure of the previous year, a gain of a little over 6%. The comparative giving of the various Synods, not including United Advance Funds may be studied in the tabular statements in the concluding pages of this report. The following brief summary is of interest: 194.6-4-7 1947-48 Particular Synod of Albany....... $ 30,545.19 $ 34,496.46 “ “ “ Chicago ...... 227,272.52 244,295.65 127,388.49 “ “ “ Iowa ......... 113,292.87 67,915.67 “ “ “ New Jersey .... 63,764.90 47,262.37 “ “ “ New York .... 48,121.51 It is with profound gratitude that we record the financial results of the year. The raising of the level of receipts for the regular work has made possible considerable reinforcement of the mission­ ary staff. The magnificent response to the appeal of the United Advance assures the reconstruction of much of the property dam­ aged by war. To all who have worked and sacrificed to make these achievements possible the Board, speaking for the missionaries and the hundreds of workers in many fields associated with them, ex­ presses its deep appreciation.


RECEIPTS FOR THE YEAR ENDING APRIL 30.1948 I. F or

the

R egular W

ork of the

B oard :

From Contributions: Churches, S.S. & Y.P.S... $401,899.86 Individuals ......... 9,767.55 Women’s Societies .... 86,508.96 -------- $498,176.37 Interest on Funds available for General Work of the Board............ Miscellaneous Income............

29,618.18 832.02 $528,626.57

II. F or Special O bjects O utside B udget : From Contributions: Churches, S.S. & Y.P.S... $ 23,950.54 Individuals ......... 20,003.22 Women’s Societies..... 8,999.28 United Advance ..... 202,000.00 --------

Legacies .................... Interest on Funds not Available for General Work of the Board......

254,953.04

59,179.18 21,262.41 335,394.63

Total Receipts

$864,021.20

Deducting: Legacies ........ .. Interest on Funds....

59,179.18 51,712.61 110,891.79

/

Total of all Contributions, 1948. Total of all Contributions, 1947 Gain in Contributions....... Gain in total receipts.......

$753,129.41 572,585.77 180,543.64 198,157.76


HOM E EXPENDITURES AND PER CAPITA GIFTS The details of Home Expenditures appear in the report of the Certified Accountants in the concluding pages of this report. The total, $93,356.55 is about $2,000 less than last year’s figure and is less than 11% of total receipts. Last year the corresponding ratio was 14%, the decrease being due to the heavy receipts from the United Advance Fund. This means that the percentage itself is not too significant. It fluctuates with the volume of gifts and for the same overhead twice the volume of receipts could be handled. The question of chief importance is the necessity of the expenses which are listed. Foreign Missions could be administered for far less than the figures shown, but included in the total are very substan­ tial items for education and promotion and our generous contribu­ tions toward the Department of Young People’s Work, the Depart­ ment of Children’s Work, the Staff Conference and other coopera­ tive projects. One of the chief increases in recent years has also been the item for travel of Board members, which now costs nearly $4,000. It is the considered judgment of the Board that economy in education and promotion and in particular, economy in the item of Board travel, inevitably gives rise to misunderstanding and dissatis­ faction. Only through thorough acquaintance with the work on the part of church members and wide representative participation in its administration, can this great work of the church go forward in strength. The per capita rate of receipts, calculated upon the basis of total receipts, including the Board’s share in the United Advance Fund, is $4.87 as compared with $3.78 in the preceding year. Calculated upon the basis of contributions from the living the per capita rate is $4.22 as against $3.25 in the preceding year. These figures also represent a high water mark in the history of the Board.

FIELD EXPENDITURES

.

The totals expended for the regular budgets of the Missions were as follows: Amoy, $107,843.63; Arcot, $141,497.82;. Japan, $27,797.81; Arabia, $115,223.34; Africa, $6,169.12; United Mission in Mesopotamia, $10,424.00; a grand total of $408,955.72. This is $49,382.21 in excess of the corresponding figure of the previous year.


.. p r a y ye therefore the L o r d of the harvest that H e s e n d forth laborers in­ to His harvest.” (Luke 10:2.)

Chapter Nine The missionary is the heart of the whole program. This chapter includes not only new appointments made but also the list of places to be filled. The prayers of the Church are requested that the Lord may send forth laborers into His harvest. There are 132 missionaries in the active service of the Board at the end of the Board year, 1948. Thirty are ordained missionaries, 17 are unordained men (12 of these doctors), 47 are married women and 38 are unmarried women. Of the unmarried women 2 are doc­ tors, 14 are nurses and 22 are teachers or specialists in Christian education. In addition there are 31 emeritus missionaries on the roll of the Board. There are also 14 missionaries under appointment who are still in this country.

Returned to the Field: TO C h i n a — Dr. and Mrs. Theodore V. Oltman, Rev. and Mrs. William R. Angus ' To India — Mrs. Galen F. Scudder TO Ja p a n — Miss Jeane Noordhoff and Rev. John C. de Maagd To A rabia — Rev. and Mrs. Garrett E. De Jong and Rev. Harry J. Almond

At H o m e on Furlough:

'

The following missionaries have been home on furlough during this year:

F r o m C hina — Rev. and Mrs. Henry P. De Free, Miss Ruth .

Broekema and Miss J. M. Platz

F r o m India — Miss Charlotte C. Wyckoff, Rev. and Mrs. John D. Muyskens, Miss Harriet Brumler, Miss Mary E. Geegh, Dr. Margaret R. Gibbons and Rev. and Mrs. John H. Piet. F r o m Jap a n — Rev. and Mrs. Willis G. Hoekje and Miss F. Belle Bogard

F r o m A rabia— Miss Ruth Jackson, Dr. and Mrs. Gerald H. Nykerk and Miss Harriet M. Wanrooy


N e w Missionaries: In C hina — Dr. and Mrs. Jack W. Hill In India — Mr. Dick W. Vriesman (short term) In A rabia— Mrs. Harry J. Almond, Mrs. Jay R. Kapenga, Miss Joan Olthoff, Miss Louise J. Essenberg and Miss Nellie m !Hekhuis . In A frica — Rev. and Mrs. J. Robert Swart and Miss Wilma j. . Kats

Appointees Accepted a n d in Training: To C hina — Miss Jeane W. Walvoord (Reappointed) Dr. and 1 Mrs. Donald T. Bosch, Rev. and Mrs. Ralph Ten Clay and Mr. and Mrs. Everett Kleinjans To India — Miss Dora Boomstra and Miss Alida Kloosterman

To A rabia— M iss Hazel M. Wood, R.N. Miss Eunice Post To A frica — Rev. and Mrs. Harvey T. Hoekstra

Assignment to b e Decided Mr. and Mrs. Charles Lee Crandall, Mr. Marinus Van Weele and Miss Jean B. Cochrane

Appointments Requested b y the Missions a n d A p p r o v e d b y the Board It is impossible to appoint so large a number of missionaries at once, but the following list will give an idea of the program which the Board will try to realize as funds permit. F or C hina — 1 Evangelistic Family (for Yunnan), 2 Evangelis. tic Families and 1 Woman Educator F or India — 2 Evangelistic Families, 7 Women Evangelists (2 may be wives of above), 5 Women Educators and 1 Nurse F or Ja p a n — 1 Home Economics Teacher, 1 Man Educator (for Meiji Gakuin) 2 Short Term Educators and 3 Evangelistic Families F or A rabia — 4 Doctors and Families, 2 Women Doctors, 3 Evan­ gelistic Families, 3 Women Evangelists (2 may be wives of above),3 Women Educators, I Den­ tist and 1 Laboratory Technician F or A frica — 1 Doctor and Family, 1 Agriculturist and Family, 1 Educator and Family and 2 Nurses


CLASSIS O F A L B A N Y Albany, First.......... Albany, Third......... Albany, Sixth......... Albany, Bethany...... Berne, Second......... Bethlehem, First....... Clarksville............ Coeymans............ Delmar.............. Jerusalem............ Knox................ N e w Baltimore........ N e w Salem........... Onesquethaw.......... Westerlo............. W o m e n ’s Missionary Union Total............

1,556 00 254 38 194 75 304 88

19 81 63 32 45 00

8 20

10 00

369 00 86 68 36 90 492 00 41 00 78 27 63 54 27 06 18 45 , 43 00

100 00 21 00 25 01 9 53

3,573 11

293 67

675 00 55 05 6100 183 00 8 00

170 00 10 00

50 00

2,231 00 386 49 319 07 537 88 18 20 557 00 110 68 66 90 764 00 73 10 127 03 73 07 27 06 18 45 83 00 110 60

137 25

5,493 43

..........

57 26 ...........

5 00 10 00 15 00

20 00

122 00 11 10 23 75

40 00 110 50 8 00

1,481 40

CLASSIS O F B E R G E N Bergenfield............ Bogart Memorial....... Cherry Hill........... Closter............... Englewood Community... English Neighborhood. ... Hackensack, First...... Hackensack, Second.... Hackensack, Third..... Harrington Park....... Hasbrouck Heights..... Oradell............... Ridgefield Park........ Rochelle Park......... Schraalenburg.......... Teaneck Community.... W o m e n ’s Missionary Union, Total

50 00 571 11 205 00 184 50 260 32 20 60 316 48 990 00 116 28 253 99 861 00 454 61 143 50 22 49 143 50 654 23

145 00 45 00 61 25 93 87 59 00

35 25 25 00 58 96 25 00 30 06 138 31 98 90 60 00 83 40 68 00

22 00

25 00

10 00

5 00

154 75 320 00 20 00 30 00 148 00 164 00 87 00 85 00 172 00 60 00 235 27

25 00 105 00 5 00 25 00 3 00 76 50 85 00 125 00 85 00 15 00

195 00 641 11 266 26 418 62 309 32 72 60 555 19 1,335 00 136 28 317 06 1,248 81 802 51 290 50 315 89 428 60 734123 235527

5,187 51

672.88

5 00 153 75 1,230 00 75 00 400 60 61 50 18 85

122 26 40 00 60 00 30 24 70 00

100 00 375 00 90 00 30 00 16 25

65 76 5 00 376 01 1,645 00 225 00 460 84 131 60 18 85 16 25

1,944 70

388 26

611 25

2,944 21

150 00

283 69

40 00

1,902 14

499 50

8,302103

CLASSIS O F SOUTH BERGEN Bayonne, First........... Bayonne, Third........... Bayonne, Fifth Street...... Jersey City, Bergen....... Jersey City, Faith Van Vorst.. Jersey City, Lafayette..... Jersey City, Greenville..... Jersey City, St. John's..... Women's Missionary Union... Total

65 76

CLASSIS O F C A L I F O R N I A Artesia, First............ Artesia, Second........... Bellflower, Bethel......... Los Angeles, Hope........ Clearwater-Hynes......... Mayfair Community....... Miraloma Community..... Park Hills Community..... Redlands Bethany......... Ripon, Calvary............ Sobrante-Superior......... Sonoma................. Trinity, El M o nte....... ! Women's Missionary Union... W o m e n ’s Northern Missionary Union.................

410 86 418 20 400 00 20 50

234 30

41 66

175 66

75 15

125 00 2 87 14 75 100 94

33 25 85 50 15 00 100 00 495 83 66 67

651 61

50 00 145 00 125 00

5 00

33 36 874 40

300 00 25 00 50 00 25 00 175 00

10 00

967 99 25 00 551 86 688 20. 875 00 20 50 6 00 33 36 33 25 1,094 90 2 87 104 90 200 94 495 83 66 67


CLASSIS O F C A S C A D E S Dog Pound Community.... Lynden................. Monarch................ Montana, First........... Nooksack Valley.......... Oak Harbor............. Yakima, First............ W o m e n ’s Missionary Union... Total CLASSIS O F C H I C A G O Chicago, First.......... Chicago, Archer Avenue.... Chicago, Bethany....... Chicago, Emmanuel..... Chicago, Englewood First. . Chicago, Gano.......... Chicago, Hope........... Chicago, First Italian.... Chicago, Mt. Greenwood... Chicago, Roseland First.... Chicago, West Side...... Stickney, Faith......... Worth, Aslip...... W o m e n ’s Missionary Union. Young Women's Missionary Union............... Total............. CLASSIS O F D A K O T A Aurora..... .......... Charles M i x........... Corsica, Grace.......... Dover................ Grandview............ Hamlin............... Harrison.............. Lakeview.............. Litchville............. . North Marion.......... Okaton............... Orange City, American.... Sandham Memorial...... Springfield, Emmanuel... Strasburg............. Westfield, Hope.... W o m e n ’s Missionary Union. Mission Fests: Corsica............. Grand View.......... Harrison............ Total CLASSIS O F G E R M A N I A Antelope Valley........... Bethany, Clara City....... Bethel, Ellsworth......... Chancellor............... Clay County, First........ Delaware................ Dempster............... Herman................. Hope................... Immanuel.............. . Lennox, Second........... Logan ................. Monroe................ Salem................. Scotland............... Sibley, Trinity.......... Zion, Amherst........... Women's Missionary Union..

31 96 1,966 40 40 60 134 71 205 00 748 68 797 63 3,924 88 1,025 00 200 00 6,470 00 375 00 2,300 00 225 00 1,625 00 2.064 40 3,195 09 665 85

250 00

45 50

10 25 152 08 408 63 26 65

126 04

847 51

126 04

110 89 .....

..........

216 00 95 00 47 90

...

25 00 135 10 700 00 661 66 365 64

16 00 5 00 61 66 16 00

31 96 2,216 40 86 00 160 96 488 12 1,434 87 934 28 47 90

404 40

97 66

5,400 49

80 00 20 35 100 00 201 00 20 00 75 00 95 00 52 00 21 00 8 00 192 15 5 00 162 50 20 00 245 00 152 50 ‘ 166 66 2 50 10 00 465 90

10 00 10 00 277 50

85 00

1,225 89 330 35 6,968 50 570 00 2,867 00 489 10 2,707 16 5 00 2,928 56 8,617 11 1,983 89 2 50 10 00 550 90

1,704 90

1,419 52

24,680 95

130 00 8 64 75 00

10 00

15 00 100 00 190 00 20 00 77 02 635 00

1,025 00

1,025 00 18,145 34

1,998 19

554 20 108 00 248 04 45 12

72 50 101 00 58 21

105 59 164 00 80 69 14 17 299 04 35 67 1,850 00 258 10 447 03 81 28 780 34

1,413 00

264 14 21 65 100 00 50 72 61 78

100 00 20 00 40 00 60 00

68 12 37 50 90 00

100 00

267 65

116 40

28 73

20 00

75 00 125 00 190 00 35 00 36 25

10 00 32 00

100 00 250 00

265 00

125 00 112 00 511 62 600 17

67 00

720 00 14 00 78 90 147 00 205 00 62 88 87 00 203 50 109 63 203 72 182 32 77 53 287 00 102 50 100 00 100 25

.

756 70 217 64 391 25 45 12 339 14 362 24 486 00 186 41 152 20 417 16 173 17 2.565 00 258 10 1,017 08 193 28 1.407 69 600 17 224 29 1,029 04 540 00

224 29 1,029 04 540 00 6,864 60

1,222 00

446 40

2,373 68

445 00

33 92 720 00 14 00 181 40

23 92

10 00

27 50

75 00 50 00 35 00

15 00

20 66

5 00

84 17 9 75

io’6o

68 32 10 00

79 79 89 87

100 00

ioo* 66 *

37 98 420 80

25*66

150 18

11,361 68

212 00 824 17 72 63 112 00 203 60 187 95 203 72 272 11 77 63 576 37 102 60 12&00 188 28 150 18


CLASSIS O F G R A N D RAPIDS Ada ................ Byron Center............ Casnovia................ Corinth................. Grand Rapids, Third...... Grand Rapids, Fourth..... Grand Rapids, Fifth....... Grand Rapids, Sixth (Oakdale) Grand Rapids, Seventh.... Grand Rapids, Eight...... Grand Rapids, Ninth...... Grand Rapids, Aberdeen Str.. Grand Rapids .Bethany.... Grand Rapids, Bethel...... Grand Rapids, Beverly..... Grand Rapids, Calvary.... Grand Rapids, Central..... Grand Rapids, Fairview.... Grand Rapids, Garfield Park.. Grand Rapids, Grace...... Grand Rapids, H o m e Acres... Grand Rapids, Hope....... Grand Rapids, Immanuel.... Grand Rapids, Knapp Avenue Grand Rapids, Richmond St.. Grand Rapids, Trinity..... Grandville............... Grant.................. Women's Missionary Union Girls League Union...... Total CLASSIS O F G R E E N E Athens........ CatskUl........ Coxsackie, First. . Coxsackie, Second Kiskatom...... Leeds......... Greene Classis............ W o m e n ’s Missionary Union... Youth of the Classis of Goeene Total CLASSIS O F H O L L A N D Beaverd a m ...... Beechwood...... Bentheim, Hamilton Central Park..... Dunningville..... Forest Grove.... Hamilton,First.... Harlem......... Holland,First.... Holland, Third.... Holland, Fourth. . . Holland, Sixth... Holland, Bethel.... Holland, Ebenezer.. Holland, Hope... Holland, Trinity. .. Hudsonville..... Jamestown...... Maplewood...... North Blendon... North Holland.......... Ottawa............... Overisel............... South Blendon.......... Vriesland.............. Zeeland, First.......... Zeeland, Second......... Holland Classis Mission Syndicate............ W o m e n ’s Missionary Union Total

5207 13735 65059 78803 8 49 6016 39874 4900 1,42500 1,67251 21943 2,78104 8200 1,78481 41000 61500 3.21068 12300 5000 2,99050 1,63300 30000 50000 1,46000 17500 2,67500 20500 1,70000 90000 2,01500 78200 17646 3,11000 30000 410 15158 15000 1,06900 17920 74100 1,49820 9483 78800 32,57745 5,52831 8541 14350 3406 6183 8 50 3037

2727

36367

4727

1066 io 66

10 00

500 5390 4000 1000

3780

2000

34.76633 11,83091

18340 20 00 10 00

5390 6500 60800 2745 27500 5000 210 00

30000 400 1,42055 2660 20 00 2500 100 00

8500 57338 19866 82757 10 00

6496 24166 4,63764 5,09351 480 1,54000 1825 1200 3500 1750 12701 432 912 1,74976

93500 15000 2500 12629 .... 32422 61789 45111 3500 34971 11250 5521 64551 1,55822 6000 10413 1,48584 2.69480 211 22 28815 4,53252 2880 101 20 4,60069 4200 1,28033 1,75000 76000 2,74500 35632 32895 2351 483 12 76424 4,36131 69426 33029 58144 58920 84500 200 00 7396 9265 3000 1,14239 6150 18081 10695 2,47028 90000 2500 40000 21986 25339 57500 20 00 4,25000 30000 3950 20 00 27725 100 00

3000 13500 4500 22887 17350 30750 8103 19240 39585 1250 3500 26175 18500 6350 18743 35800 5025 15100 11750 13000 10500 22937 10 00 2500 14150 42488 5250 50831

4000 7000 1000 11500 20 00 33437 50553 4000 48556 26000 16500 5800 12890 6061 28000 26000 6000 13900 8500 2496 122 00 7000 52902 9500 9800 49400 38700

10 00 110 00

500

12500 1500 2154 59773 7500 28583 3500 2500 2500 5700 3300 41634 26162 2000

11564 1500 17675 1000

54500 2500

21942 1,75702 8 49 61389 1,71287 2,11934 3,15354 2,55584 63985 4,49653 18550 8500 5,10025 78500 56750 1.87633 4,45355 28185 2,77100 2,19750 1,08846 20500 3,72437 17568 1,81738 1,29816 2,77065 94533 50831 6496 48,07857 122 68

1,79830 6731 7383 5350 1760 3037 12701 432 2,29482 1,16500 54205 1,11400 1,06244 18771 2,59810 4,86530 53937 5,43391 4,89569 3,26233 81800 2,87390 77088 84363 5,41855 1,50089 1,57126 1,15000 9892 1,50268 32731 4,18300 73986 93639 5,60900 74875 100 00

31825 24600 7225 56928 5,18295 2,82770 55,17717


CLASSIS O F H U D S O N Claverack.............. Gallatin................ Germantown............ Greenport.............. Hudson................ Linlithgo............... Livingston Memorial..... Mellenville............. Philmont. West Copake........... Women's Missionary Union. Total.............. CLASSIS O F ILLIANA Danforth................ De Motte, American....... De Motte, First.......... Indianapolis, Christian Park.. Lafayette............... Lansing, First..... ...... Lansing, Grace........... Phoenix Bethel........... Riverside Park........... Ross................... Wichert................. South Holland........... Women's Missionary Union... Young Women's Missionary Union................ Total. CLASSIS O F ILLINOIS Fairview................ Fulton, First............. Fulton, Second........... Fulton, Trinity........... Ebenezer, Morrison........ Immanuel, Morrison....... Newton, Zion............ Raritan................. Sterling, Bethel.......... Ustick, Spring Valley...... Women's Missionary Union... Central Illinois Missionary Conference............ Women's Missionary Confer­ ence of Whiteside C o ..... Whiteside Co. Mission Fest... Total............... CLASSIS O F K A L A M A Z O O Calvary, Cleveland........ Dearborn, Grace......... Decatur................ Detroit, First........... Detroit, Hope........... Detroit, Nardin Park..... Kalamazoo, First........ Kalamazoo, Second....... Kalamazoo, Third........ Kalamazoo, Fourth....... Kalamazoo, Bethany..... Kalamazoo, Bethel....... Kalamazoo, North Park... Kalamazoo, Trinity...... Martin. Portage.......... South Haven, Hope. Three Oaks....... Twin Lakes....... Texas Corners.... Trinity Inkster. Kalamazoo Youth Rally... W o m e n ’s Missionary Union.

32778 12464' 1,06600 16328 8253 15713 6150 1,98286

3150 2388 5200 2665

5000

1200

1500 6300

1853

1000

1000 " 206

5000

500 14800 17500

10,20330 4,99098

40400

19069 17500 40290 33279 28118 8000 8750 1609

9446 6,78148 1,56615 1,11251 16260 18527 19425 55066 50751 11815 1,110 00 1,99000 1,54150 1,72707 90000 1,93700 1,31000 1,29017 15646 2,40000 15700 2500 87418 90500 38789 28232 10123 54735 59551 1025 10056 6300 11421 6952 1025 5,98152 -32-

4100

2000

1500

300 2150 6 40 3916 6 40

7646 2500 5000 1040 12 50

2000

6400 12 50 800 1000

1385

47194 7550 16125 15000 4900 8425 19250 200 18 4700 5500 9925 17825 60700 17010

33778 2000 83114 8888 1,28326 20193 1000 9753 24066 6150 21 68

21 68

15256

13182 14206 82203 82700 92984 100 00 74366 15367 13775 10569 1,08425 85000 24600 70000 20500 34184 14350 99128 64619 4,76817 1,12453

13980 1.38485 87500 18500 2,38358 19473 65469 19921 67016

2000

12500 5000 16526

3700 3103

1125 3500 1125 6000 1654 50000 221 20 9149 29822 2,06928 1,37598 100 00

2,69436 34938 1,88231 1,19984 94633 35394 2,22675 1,18118 60509 11500 26429 2,46372 6,89590 261 59 29822 19,04354

42180 1,69766 1,25746 46832 4.62288 73452 1,16928 37121 10750 70965 13077 4995 9840 9446 1,98405 1,52572 11,93386 16900 110 00 122 12 29646 8600 8410 272 51500 1,31500 20700 19425 9200 20.00 500 1200 13077 4995 9840

16080 4350 2800 12600 4200 3100 77936 17200 26601 14800 27600 5300 21780 8570 5660 500 4400 1511 3300 19586

5000 3500 3000 100 00 32000 2500 1,110 00

4500 2600 8200 14585 14500 10 00 14500

1.51091 22877 25725 72666 70806 1,24100 4,63086 2,83657 3,63301 1,59463 3,85000 292 50 1,11798 1,46859 52940 1,34446 2025 313 56 23778 1511 4325 1385 19586


CLASSIS O F N O R T H L O N G ISLAND Astoria, First............ Astoria, Second........... College Point............ Colonial, Bayside......... Douglaston.............. Far Rockaway........... Flushing, First........... Flushing, Church-on-the-HUl. Glendale................ Hicksville............... Jamaica, First............ Jamaica, St. Paul’s........ K e w Gardens............ Locust Valley............ Long Island City, First.... N e w Hyde Park.......... Newtown, First........... North Hempstead......... Oyster B a y ........... ... Queens.................. South Bushwick.......... Steinway................ Trinity................. West Sayville, First....... Williston Park........... Winfield................ W o m e n ’s Missionary Union... Total

4100 102 00 47277 7500 5784 1,48174 43200 1500 8200 7570 1500 11605 3343 4000 5613 30750 35310 4909 43447 4100 102 00 7000 41000 12300 9887 5,08469

1000

7500 4446 5000

4500 7000 2050 100 00

2050 1500

45046

1300 2500 6500 3000 30000 3850 23750 3500 .28800 6000 5000 7750 2750 110 00 100 00

2850 5500 3100 8150 1500 2000 6000 1,95800

1500 300 2500 12500 1500 500 750 7250 6000 1000 1000

210 00

5400 12700 54777 10500 31500 9934 1,74424 59200 10500 12646 41370 1500 18105 9343 12500 15613 47750 50810 7759 71447 11660 102 00 101 00

59150 15860 13387 6000 7 , 8 4115 34800

CLASSIS O F S O U T H L O N G ISLAND Baldwin, North Baldwin Community............ Brooklyn, Canarsie......... Brooklyn, First........... Brooklyn, Flatbush First... Brooklyn, Flatbush Second... Brooklyn, Flatlands ........ Brooklyn, Grace.......... Brooklyn, Gravesend...... Brooklyn, Greenwood Heights. Brooklyn, N e w Brooklyn. ... Brooklyn, N e w Lots....... Brooklyn, N e w Utrecht.... Brooklyn, Ridgewood..... Brooklyn, South Brooklyn. .. Brooklyn, Twelfth Street. ... Brooklyn, Woodlawn...... Garden City, Merrillon Neighborhood............... Hempstead.............. St. Albans, Cambria Heights.. Woodhaven, Forest Park... W o m e n ’s Missionary Union... Total.

9635 8200 10500 53024 1500 4240 3075 90000 6000 1470 31578 12300 4375

1335 ‘ 7745 1000 10000

100 00

1888 4822 2050 12300 2,66957

200 80

10135 500 8700 500 56250 15500 82260 1,23682 3500 1,80206 2000 500 23775 18200 .... 3075 23566'“'1566 1,22745 7200 1200 .... 4000 3500 500 2470 60078 18500 1000 1000 18300 5000 1000 4375 15000 5000 1888 7462 6 40 1500 500 4800 2750 8500 1000 21800 5100 5100 6 40 2,71932 26750 5,86369

CLASSIS O F MONMOUTH Asbury Park........... Colt’s Neck............ Freehold, Second........ Keyport............... Long Branch........... Old Brick............. Red Bank, First........ W o m e n ’s Missionary Union

9325 10655 50000 14350 9709 2414 6150

Total.............

1,02603

2932 8525 11457

750 2500 8750 10600 6000 20 00 5000 8100 43700

200

3500 500

500 4700

10275 16087 62250 25460 15709 4914 19675 8100 1,62460


CLASSIS O F MONTGOMERY Amsterdam, First.... Amsterdam, Trinity.... Auriesville.. Canajoharie Cranesville. Currytown.... Florida Minaville. Fonda........ Fort Plain..... Fultonville.... Glen.......... Hagaman..... Herkimer..... Johnstown..... M o h a w k ...... Owasco....... Stl Johnsville.... Sprakers.............. Stone Arabia........... Syracuse, Second........ Thousand Islands....... Utica Christ........... West Leyden........... W o m e n ’s Missionary Union Total............. CLASSIS O F M U S K E G O N Allendale...... .... Atwood........... Barnard.......... Conklin.......... Coopersville....... Covenant......... Falmouth......... Ferry Memorial.... Fremont...... .... Grand Haven, First. . Grand Haven, Second Grand Haven, Hope. Laketon-Bethel.... Moddersville....... Moorland............. Muskegon, First........ Muskegon, Fifth........ Muskegon, Forest Home... Muskegon, Central...... Muskegon, East Lawn... Muskegon, Fellowship... Muskegon, Trinity...... Muskegon, Unity....... N e w Era.............. Rehoboth.... ........ Spring Lake........... W o m e n ’s Missionary Union Girls’ League........... Total CLASSIS O F N E W A R K Belleville....... Brookdale...... Central........ East Orange, First Franklin....... Irvington, First... Irvington, Second. Linden......... Marconnier..... Montclair Heights. Newark, First... . Newark, Christ... Newark, North......... Newark, Trinity........ Plainfield, Netherwood. ... Plainfield, Trinity....... W o m e n ’s Missionary Union. Total.............

15567 14113 211 58 4715 13701 27526 13663 6249 7373 29479 20500 8200 700 11503

2056 2600

725 3675 1538 700

1000

’320 ’480

2000

5878 5000 700 500 3333 6000 8300 9000 6500 2250 5000 9200 4800 2200

6620

500 7657 1500

2,07312

13294

1800

8946 1,09602

56062 70000 7266 6160 1,62340 41000 5451 7500 82731 3.62535 '2,44000 20000 36900 2893 1,12559 60750 4100 1,31250 24100 7621 3794 10250 10286 24760 66200

17945 5201 52040 6500 1000 11866 6941

2000

100 50

2466 2000 2000

85000 1530 26000

15,60498 3,22112 8200 18640 20500 26436 8200 16405 51746 1469 5000 30176 29056 5123 46000

3407 1000

2,66960

30995

5435 6000 7653

5000 2600 1600 5000

14910 3025 65500 13300 1075 2500 20400 13250 11000

55240 1000

365'66

1000

16500 24500 12500 3750 5000 24500 13880 1500 23900 84464

3500 22700

4060 12 80 2500 30440 3,66504 1,20440 5000 300 14000 500 2500 10800 6500 3800 2300 1000

220 00

8500

2 00

5000 250

8000 1300 1075 16000

8300 2515 2050

6410 100 00 75000 2015 100 00 4664

1707

10 00 80000 10 00

2500 7500 3657 1,64357

500 1600 10 00 4000 10 00 4500 2000

10000

63000 1900 3500 500 500 94000

25208 21713 700 211 58 5215 3333 19701 36826 23588 12749 14943 38404 29700 16018 3600 20 00 19503 1300 1075 24300 2515 6120 2050 8946 3,39665 87557 84910 15492 6150 3,37520 60800 7526 21866 1,11072 3,77785 2,91500 20000 38900 3893 6410 1,47559 1,52850 7715 1,81450 32514 12621 3794 1,19750 24166 31850 1,17380 84464 2500 23,89994 16607 20440 16000 22600 35371 28000 23905 67698 3769 16000 1,15176 <Ps 2900 1,12556 1000 16123 53000 4157 5,55302


CHURCHES

Young Churches andMen’s Sunday People’s Women’s Special Societies Schools Societies Societies

Total

CLASSIS OP NEW BRUNSWICK

New BrunswickSuydamStreet Rocky Hill ........

Board'ofForeignMissions

22550 12 21 86 74 45100 4100 4100 99638 14497 47500 96081 7326 2348 4508 7681 3936

6250 5000 2500 990 2500 3208

100 00 20 00 12 00 20 00

8 62

12205 3,81465

35648

8 62

8300 2680 24520 7885 6 00 32000 6000 332 50 39500 4300 9000 1700 500 13403 4030 3049 1,89717

37100 12 21 18054 74620 12976 4700 1,44188 100 00 22705 90760 6000 1,43581 6500 16826 6 00 1700 4848 6008 21084 7966 3049 8 62 12205 20700 6,28392 1700 2500

CLASSIS OP NEW YORK Middle...........

50000 100 00 80000 74000 26114 47500 3485 9224 1625 13350 2500 5000 1650 24415 4100 7222 16400 4979 5500 13211

3500 2500 5000 516

6066

2,47500 42500 85000 15000 10500 40000

6 00 20 00

4300 1500 500 500 3800

5000 4000 60,00' 87^50j,

6 00 10 00

9230 12 50

1432 Indian Youth Conference at Winnebago Indian Mission. Women’sMissionarySociety Denton LakesYouth New BrunswickYouth Youth Conference at General CedarLakeYouthConference Young People’s Conference Minnesota & Northwestern Youth Conference at Camp HudsonDistrict,C.E.Union St. Nicholas Professional &

52l0 4184

Total.......... 3.69669

3300 ra

2500 4000 9238 4480 10618

35698

1500 2500 37036 4,71580

83100 3,80600 65000 2500 1,18500 3250 92250 44114 2500 95000 3485 9740 2125 16360 .. 4300 6500 3000 6000 66 00 1650 24916 4100 7722 24200 10979 500 66 00 31191 12 60 4031 4031 1432 6 04 504 6210 4184 3300 2600 4000 16143 16143 9238 4480 10618 4800 1600 1600 100 00 12500 81828 9.85811 4800 1500


CLASSIS OF ORANGE Bloomingburg..... Cuddebackville.... DeerPark....... Ellenville....... Grahamville...... Kerhonkson...... Mamakating..... Montgomery..... Newburgh....... Newburgh,Churchofthe Saviour....... New Hurley.. New Prospect Shawangunk.. Walden... Wallkill... WalpackLower...... WestEnd........ Woodbourne....... Women's MissionaryUnion Total

'4464

5451 1257 3075 1400

2,73777

15647

9000 47285 1000

3700 5250 5500 13000 8000 1600

8 00

9465 7000 200 00

14568 2500 57333

CLASSIS OF PARAMUS Acquackanonck... 1,86249 21760 Clarkstown...... 1500 Covenant...... 12434' 1514 GlenRock Community 41000 15843 Hawthorne...... 91100 7200 Hohokus....... 20500 NorthPaterson... 1,00750 3861 Nyack........ 317 75 3946 Paramus....... 13861 6917 Pascack....... 29944 6000 Paterson,Second... 1,55000 6000 Pequannock..... 4100 Piermont....... 17000 1500 Pompton....... 16400 PoraptonPlains... 14350 6230 Ponds.......... Ramapo....... 15153 Ridgewood,First.. 46100 40000 SaddleRiver........ SpringValley........ 9600 5000 Tappan........... 252 15 36 17 UpperRidgewoodCommunity 1,08473 24500 Warwick.......... 37667 10119 Wanaque.......... 2050 6 97 WestNew Hempstead... 8000 WortendykeTrinity.... 16125 Wyckoff.......... 20500 Women's MissionaryUnion... Total 10,22346 1,70618 -36-

1000

1353 70240 45465 3050 10958 1845 28261 70000 1000

18306 5000 1,39466

24176 7000 12250 20287 2452 1,05702 600 23815 3000 20 00 5246 1000 18306 12962 4,46842

7500 21340 5260 42 50 7500 69488 1140 1950 16000 800 6000 400 12500 7800 2704 1,60378

9728 94280 35300 66 34 4250 43615 200 00 2,48128 1960 84742 1825 1000 71168 8000 1,14596 7800 30000 7,23016

’ib'66

3000

888

1000

5000

15025 13530 90250 12240 ‘3246

CLASSIS OF PALISADE BergenBoulvard...... 9728 CentralAve.,JerseyCity.... 82000 ColumbiaEvangelical.... 13160 Coytesville......... Guttenberg......... Hoboken.......... 26650 New Durham Grove.... 1,50500 Secaucus TrinityWestNewYork.... 48742 UnionCity,Hope.... 10 26 WestHoboken, First... 49200 Wooddiff........ 91596 Women’sMissionaryUnion Total 4,72601

o

700 9125 15000

188

1353 61115 26001 2050 10958 1845 18261 17715

780 384

3000

500

42500 30000 13000 11428 5000 3000 5000 8000 8000 10700 2500 5500 15200 10150 2500 4500 16750 4137 110 00 6200 1800 16578 10 00

3750 4500 5000 6260 2,20693 12 50

1500

1000

7500 2,57909 2500 7000 26948 10 00 69271 1,03300 23500 5500 1,15111 10 00 44721 28778 60144 500 1,61000 6600 24000 31600 2500 33230 2500 19653 7000 1,08850 4187 25600 10 00 86032 1,34773 3233 68097 2747 9000 26589 16516 43015 6000 48248 14,68155


CLASSIS OF PASSAIC AUwood Community.... Athenia........... Boonton.......... Clifton,First........ Clifton,FirstHolland.... Clifton,LakeviewHeights.... Garfield........... LincolnPark,First..... LittleFalls,First...... LittleFalls,Second..... Lodi,FirstHolland..... Lodi,Second........ Montville.......... MountainLakes...... Passaic,FirstHolland... Paterson,FirstHolland... Paterson,SixthHolland... Paterson,Central..... Paterson,People'sPark.. Paterson,Riverside.... Paterson,Union...... Preakness.......... Wortendyke,FirstHolland... Women’sMissionaryUnion... Total

12300 18670 17100 49320 5330 21320 1995 5567 8200 40265 12300 4100 70000 1,75000 1250 1,60000 1,68450 10000 8820

26756

2000

5053 11 58 1000 88 95 3337 1500 15000 1120

1034 12500 13785

8,16743 1,43382

34927 10943 7420 14350 11164 1,05523 10380 5125 26650 8200 1421 2,36103

1500

4000 70000 5000

CLASSIS OF PELLA Bethany Bethel.. 12144 41552 CentralOskaloosa..... EbenezerLeighton..... 1,38200 72495 11944 Eddyville.......... 2792 273 MeredithDrive....... 1864 NorthDesMoinesCommunity. 972 40000 15000 Otley............ 1,000 00 1 , 4 0 0 0 0 Pella,First......... 15114 Pella,Second........ 1,56000 4 , 3 8 0 0 0 Pella,Third......... 4328 PrairieCity......... 1,12598 2 25021 886 05 Sully............ PellaClassisMissionFest... 87266 Women's MissionaryUnion. Women’sMissionary Conference YoungWomen'sConference 12.55400 2.68758 Total CLASSIS OF PHILADELPHIA Addisville......... Blawenburg....... CloverHill........ Feasterville........ Harlingen........ Neshanic......... NorthandSouthampton... Philadelphia,First.... Philadelphia,Fourth... Philadelphia,Fifth.... Philadelphia.Talmage.. Stanton.......... ThreeBridges........ Women’sMissionaryUnion PhiladelphiaClassis... Total.

320 io66

500 7566 10820

9500 2500 21500 3000 2500 1000 5000 4000 8900 3500 5000 10500 2500 9375 6000 1500 5000 6000 4000 4000

2566 500 5447 1000 2000

96000 29250 5000

14300 29170 24973 74478 10330 32715 2995 15404 14200 69612 12300 £4100 P5620 79000 2,57500 8750 2,66375 2,03700 1600 6034 29000 35756 34105 2100

21 00

1,19375 1,42697 12,33017 3100 1000 1500 5259 2857 2,7 7 8875 12500 18899 3765 2836 75700 2000 ,00717 6000 3 69340 57000 2, ,66000 27500 5 1,59666 48967 4301 1,8 7256 11426 202 58 6000 6000 2 0 , 2 9564 3,72701 1,19158 21 00

7300 2567 3040 6 40

13547

10515 4088

1000

13410 55364

800

1500 18706 48380 6955 700 18700 52150 41226 1,00500 19700 30400 11426 202 58

5825 10000

3500 9600 7500

300 83677

1000

1800

1430 3600 1000

5000 25938

1566’

67363

7530

53697 15031 7420 14350 21164 7100 1,293S3 10380 60489 7500 27650 300 14700 25988 1421 3,96473


CLASSIS OF PLEASANT PRAIRIE Alexander.. Aplington.. Bethel.. ... Baileyville.. Bristow... BuffaloCenter. Dumont... Ebenezer... Elim..... Forreston.. Immanuel.. Meservey.. Normandale... Parkersburg.. Pekin,Second Peoria... Ramsay.... SilverCreek Stout... Washington. Waterloo... Wellsburg.. Zion Women’sMissionaryUnion Youth Conference.... Total CLASSIS OF POUGHKEEPSIE Beacon.......... Fishkill.......... Hopewell......... Hyde Park........ Millbrook........ Poughkeepsie... :.. Poughkeepsie,Arlington... Rhinebeck.. '...... UpperRed Hook..... Women’sMissionaryUnion, Total........ CLASSIS OF RARITAN Annandale...... Bedminster...... Finderne....... HighBridge...... Lebanon....... NorthBranch..... Peapack........ Pottersville...... Raritan,Third.... Somerville,FirstRaritan Somerville,SecondRaritan. Somerville,FourthRaritan. Readington........ Rockaway........ SouthBranch....... Women’sMissionaryUnion, Total

86 42 91187 41000 6500 41328 22100 6361 41000 17939 46700 98146 20500 8200 10569 60884 2,15000 35000 20500 2400 32226

8,25172

9009 2050 2501 4250 20500 82377 < 6549 2087 4556

14428 20 00

2720

8 03 9376 100 00 18000 2500 17300 .....

.....

....

1000

8200 2980

■1000

.7500 5000 6150 2800

7500 2500 320 5000

94537

500

534 2267

2606

10237 5000 3867 4100 24674 84049 93977 88 71 7465 1783

4297 2144 1615 4006 1422 2500 2599 751 3500 25000 540 11.00 1271 2500

2,56627

53245

100 08

2500 35040 1,22703

1733

1,33879

500 8500 5500 500 500 9750 900 500 4200 19930 20 00 500 10500 500 500 6707 17500 12500 2500 2500 4250 3000 8966

500

500

2 00

2500 500

3450

14109 4600 .... 5400 500 7960 2125 500 68 59 4260 1500 22000 68 50 500 89727 2000 8549 2900 4987 1500 6590 4495 4495 31370 1500 1,69516

1500 2800 2500 2500 9260

7900 18000 54500 300 2500 17500 33286 1020 1,52536 320

450

9142 99687 60928 8460 41828 34570 8064 50376 28439 71400 1,35376 23500 500 26900 15049 500 70091 2.47500 55000 291 50 8520 41476 3000 8966 2500 10,80902

1500 2375 2725 1000

1700 1000 21500 400 4500

8903 16652 1615 19118 10225 16529 6600 2599 35025 1,06869 1,94977 101 11 1100

112 36

26283 33286 36700 6,001 28


CLASSIS OF RENSSELAER BloomingGrove..... Chatham......... Emmanuel........ Ghent,First....... Ghent,Second...... Greenbush........ Kinderhook........ New Concord....... Nassau.......... Schodack......... Stuyvesant........ Women’sMissionaryUnion Total

36166 68963 200 11

6964 20631 20807 5221 18170 3600 2,00432

480

1536 5280

2500

29762

2980

500

13325 2500 2050 ..... 13380 .... 6447 2372 458 1785 14356 4030 32800 7000 8096 33 12 8200 98654

10 00

4622

CLASSIS OF ROCHESTER 1,94875 Abbe.. 2704 25088 Arcadia Buffalo...... 4509 4 8 4 2 ClymerHill... 54050 23978 EastWilliamson— 11833 Interlaken.... 9066 14368 Marion,First... 37781 202*55 Marion,Second.... 22 26 2935 Ontario...... 9688 38540 Palmyra..... 2 0 3'64 70000 Pultneyville... 81500 450*81 Rochester,First.... 25488 Rochester,Second.. 1,70000 Rochester,Brighton 4668 22043 Sodus....... 18145 Tyre........... 2 922 4320 Williamson........ • MissionFestatMarion,N.Y.. 13777 Women'sMissionaryUnion... Young Women’sRally... Young Women’s Missionary League. 7,71440 1,63606 Total CLASSIS OF SARATOGA TheBoght. Buskirks.. Cohoes_ FortMiller Ganesvoort........ Greenwich........ Northumberland..... Saratoga......... WestTroy,North... .. Wynantskill....... Women’sMissionaryUnion Total

15535 7025

7460 10365

21457

5500 ' ‘s'66

‘866

980

3700 5000 12475 10 00 2500 3000 8533 59768

22500 7888 500 3065 15500 3500 7900 23448 2500 4500 11500 16402 10750 9100 5925 2500 4400 12366

270 500 8550 1,64244

10300

760 3000 500 500 2500

2640

6900 6150 3500 20 00 5500 3586 38936

1000 12266

26960 6000 8533 7250 3,00192

2,25375 42090 4100 13767 96328 2000 15333 31834 '566 82484 1000 7661 53728 1000 1290 1,03154 121 00 1,55083 36238 1,79100 37116 3500 20645 11642 13777 12366 270 500 1 1 , 4 2 581 34741 2500 6410 3100 1341

9766

20 00

2640

59160 76988 30376 1760 10664 33733 33782

3500 13266

15825 2050 33446 88 19 20 00 7358 21291 42970 20596 17012 3586 1,74953


CLASSIS OF SCHENECTADY Altamont.. 10601 Amity.... 820 Glenville,First. Helderberg......... 38086 Lisha'sKill......... 28116 Niskayuna......... 23165 Princetown......... 13524 Rotterdam,First..... . Schenectady,First..... 27675 Schenectady,Second.... 1,012 00 Schenectady,Bellvue... v. 61500 Schenectady,Mt. Pleasant... 12300 Schenectady,Rotterdam Second.......... 4894 Schenectady,Trinity.... 27791 Schenectady,Woodlawn.. 23950 Scotia,First........ 43976 Women’sMissionaryUnion... Total 4,17597 CLASSIS OF SCHOHARIE Beaverdam........ Berne........... Howes Cave,Second... Lawyersville....... Middleburg........ Prattsville........ Schoharie......... Sharon.......... Women’sMissionaryUnion Total........

3802 6793 5007 9512 12000 20 50 3075 2017 44266

1000

6600

2500

4942 14042 287 1025 3367

11300 2000 2750 8500 1000 7500 5200 7000 2500 9500 1000 4000 28948 250 12 12500 18500 4500 7300 4000 2000 8 75 2925 10500 7566 6230 3500 1,57965 32575

22901 2820 2750 47586 47415 30165 29024 4000 56623 1,38712 84500 19600 88 94 85608 26875 61976 6230 6,25679

2800 6086 1500 6922 3500 1000 1700 1600 2793 26801

7389 14889 7582 22781 16500 3550 7800 5517 2793 877 51

20 10

480

2500 9189

CLASSIS OF EAST SIOUX Alton........ 1,12069 21638 American,Primghar... 10847 1862 Archer........ 13326 15667 Boyden....... 1,90000 41600 Firth......... 10721 70000 FreeGrace...... 23339 43719 Holland....... 1,99902 47178 Hollandale...... 33789 83000 Hospers....... 1,13347 54114 Ireton........ 12473 7267 Matlock....... 12300 10000 Melvin........ 7731 4 025 Newkirk....... 95393 33579 OrangeCity,First.. 6,03073 1,08646 Pella......... 23195 11781 PrairieView..... 94020 12956 Sanborn........ 11708 17769 Sheldon....... 46500 40000 Sheldon,Bethel... 11596 Sibley,First..... 26426 9261 Worthington,American 259 11 MissionFests: Holland,Firth& Pella... 60675 SiouxCo......... 64221 Primghar& Archer.... 5025 Sibley,Melvin& Matlock... 8978 Holland,Firth& Pella Women’sMissionary Society......... Total 18,04969 6,45658

480

7910 800

3200 1778 13300 2720 7000 5000 4500 5106 13000 15000 2500 2500 20 00 12960

5800 3900 400 55400 17000 7900 43300 19800 21800 6000 17160 400 9400 1,06300 12800 13818 1400 8300 10000 400 3075

400 99274 3,64743

600 1000

2500 500 525

2000

7025

2500 2000 11000

4018 5000 1000

4000 6000 5000 2035 5000 6027

1,49917 16609 32193 3,01200 1.03517 88258 2,98100 1,43589 1,94261 31240 44556 12156 1,55372 8,38019 55276. 1,25329 32877 1,12760 27623 36087 28986 60675 64221 5025 8978

400 52580 29,67224


CHURCHES

Young Churches andMen’s Sunday People’s Women’s Special S o cieties Societies Societies Schools

Total

CLASSIS OF WEST SIOUX

East& West SiouxYoung East& WestSiouxWomen's MinnesotaMissionary MissionFests: SiouxCo.........

47500 86770 50001 22347 13800 4416 1,23814 6 30 14372 2214 7R7fil 42117 5,52572 1,45000 24600 45000 5670 21789 5610 4075 79603 14531 25559 16272 1,85000 70000 5000 1,92590 54110 11015 1,60000 96610 2,000 00 3454 1,39679 84787 2,65358 68 97 3056 17263 100 88 15921

7500 6500 7002 2500 7200 66 00

2640 2500 66 00 6 40 2 60

29000 14140 12500 7960

28750 5400 20 00 10 00

10 00 10 00 101 06

7500 37500 38300 15800 1900 3500 50000 4650 12960 38000 19413 52800 34600 3070 18014 460 2500 3000 4100

3500 47225 4430

2,06422 39738

40000

15333 20 00

2500 886 20

42245 2755 46965

30000

6250 7675 64220 23,55806 6,70190 1,43542 6,31377 3,07679

84760 1,48671 46149 7916 1,33920 6 30 27586 1,65578 7,89697 89830 31999 15685 1,66067 46481 2,69960 2,38730 84798 4.27030 2,90985 6524 2,57735 3.20743 9397 23319 30109 30000 2,46422 39738 6250 7675 64220 41,08594

CLASSIS OF ULSTER 21446 1250

Kingston,Churchofthe

7517 13296 9117 20094 1019 29962 9 A0 7 3 10030 30750 9967 6447 900 1518 911 4951

GirlsLeagueUnion.... Total.......... 2,20207

2996 500 10 81

350

10 62

4776 4650 1801 2571

2388

278

10 00

1 00

19815

5900 500 2500 10 00 6000 2500 15388 250 15000 12500 5500 1500 10500 6500 500 2550 500 10 00 7500

2500 5238

1418

1,000 06

30342 22 50 2500 10 00 14517 500 13296 14148 11 00 37482 20 00 2331 41959 42462 34349 16680 500 422 50 10 00 6500 2388 122 68 9018 3450 500 2518 7600 1 oc 1189 6051 1418 2500 6200 3,51466 500 500


CLASSIS OP WESTCHESTER Bronxville........ Cortlandtown....... Greenville........ Hastings......... Mount Vernon...... PeekskUl......... Tarrytown, First..... Tarrytown,Second.... Yonkers,CrescentPlace_ Yonkers,LincolnPark.. Yonkers, ParkHill,First... Women's MissionaryUnion Youth RallyatYonkers_ Total

2,100 00

6560 5222 6107 15580 5572 36712 15375 8344 70000

3,79472

7000 3340 ”7050 20 00 20 00

16293 2050 1013 2000

42746

3,85000 2,36000 8,38000 4500 14400 7500 12722 15500 28657 8500 260.80 2600 10172 210 00 10 00 75005 8400 25825 5000 14357 480 250 730 9000 io66 82000 4400 4400 344 344 8 24 4,71650 2,38000 11,32692

CLASSIS OF WISCONSIN Alto............ 3,17222 44604 3693 35190 4,00709 Baldwin........... 1,07800 70000 5500 40300 13600 2,37200 Brandon,Bethel...... 27039 51745 7000 16305 2145 1,04234 CedarGrove... ..... 3,04381 23183 400 38025 48101 4,14090 Clinton,Emmanuel..... 19040 3841 750 2500 26131 Faith............ 10005 950 10955 Forestville......... 5634 361 2650 10 00 9645 Friesland........ •••. 56545 17348 1 6 9 5 8 9 0851 Gibbsville....... . 1,20518 200 00 3 4 0 0 3 5 4 5 0 3 6 7 6 1 , 8 3044 Grace,Fond duLac.... 4561 1600 6161 Greenleafton........ 2,16858 4 0 5 0 1 7 8 0 0 4 0 7 0 0 2 , 7 9 08 Hingham.......... 1,53761 200 00 • 6750 40531 10517 2,314 559 Milwaukee......... 87840 3000 5 6 9 5 0 5 0 00 1 , 5 2 7 9 0 Oostburg ........... 1,13541* 25000 42032 9950 1,90523 Racine........... 2565 5835 10 00 8 0 00 2 5 0 0 1 9 9 0 0 Randolph....... . 48721 100 00 480 11500 1865 72566 SheboyganHope...... 2,47716 20 00 1 0 4 5 0 10 00 2 , 6 1 1 66 SheboyganFalls...... 51496 5000 20 00 8250 2302 69048 Waupun, First....... 3,31868 ’ 45348 6000 52650 13305 4,49171 Waupun, Emmanuel.... 45702 3 0 0 0 4 4 2 0 5 7 86 58908 MissionFests: Alto, Brandon, Fond du Lac, & Friesland, Ran­ dolph& 2WaupunChurches 41171 41171 Forestville......... 3453 34 53 Emmanuel......... 2369 2369 Sheboygan County..... 30000 3 0 000 EasternWisconsinYoung Women's MissionaryUnion 2 2 1 3 5 2 2 1 35 WesternWisconsin GirlsLeagueUnion... 1 4 2 5 0 1 4 2 50 CentralWisconsin GirlsLeagueUnion.... 2 5 9 7 2 5 9 7 YoungWomen’sMissionary League......... 1 2 5 0 1 2 5 0 EasternWisconsin Women’sMissionaryUnion 3 8 1 9 4 1 5 2 5 6 5 3 4 5 0 WesternWisconsin Women's MissionaryUnion 25568 2084 27652 Minnesota-Wisconsin Women's MissionaryUnion .... 1 0 0 0 0 100 00 “A friend".......... 750 .... 750 Total 23,49806 3,45265 85505 5,15273 1,81287 34,77136 -


FINANCIAL STATEMENTS CLASSIS

Young Churches s Special andMen's Sunday People’s Women’ Societies Schools Societies Societies

Total

PARTICULAR SYNOD OF ALBANY ,49343 13725 5, 800 1,481 40 7311 29307 Albany .......... 3,356 29482 912 1,74976 12500 2 4727 367 Greene .......... 3 39665 76 57 3, 1800 1,09602 ,07312 13294 Montgomery ....... 2 , 00192 5 9 7 68 7 2 5 0 2 9 8 0 297 6 2 2 , 0 0 4 3 2 Rensselaer ........ 7,71440 1,63606 1 1 , 4 2581 8550 1,64244 34741 1,74 Rochester ........ 953 3 8 9 3 6 1 3 2 66 2 6 4 0 214 5 7 986 5 4 Saratoga ......... 4,17597 6 , 2 5679 3500 1,57965 32575 877 14042 Schenectady ....... 51 2 6 8 01 7 0 2 5 4 8 0 9 1 8 9 4 4 2 5 6 Schoharie ........ 3 4 , 4 9 6 4 6 8 , 8 0 4 3 2 1 , 2 8 7 3 9 210 6 2 2 , 8 5 4 4 4 2 1 , 3 3 3 6 9 Total ........ PARTICULAR SYNOD OF CHICAGO 24,68095 1300 1,70490 1,41952 4 18,14534 1,99819 1,244 Chicago .......... 3 1 66 4,63764 5,09351 8,07857 ,57745 5,52831 Grand Rapids...... 32 5,17717 5 , 1 8 2 9 5 2 , 8 2 7 7 0 5 6 9 2 8 1 1 , 8 3 0 9 1 4 , 7 6 6 3 3 Holland .......... 10,20330 4,99098 40400 2,069 28 1,37598 5 19,04354 Uliana .......... 1 1,93386 1 , 9 8 4 0 5 1 , 5 2 5 7 2 7 6 4 6 1 , 5 6 6 1 5 6 , 7 8 1 4 8 Illinois .......... 15,45490 5,98152 22625 2,77874 2,26885 26 710 26 Kalamazoo ........ 15,50498 3,22112 30440 3,66504 1,20440 23, 89994 Muskegon ........ 23,49806 3,45265 85505 5,15273 1,81287 34, , 77136 Wisconsin ...... . •• 2 4 4 , 29565 2 7 , 1 7 5 3 3 1 7 , 5 2 8 5 5 156,93184 38,56983 4,09010 Total ....... PARTICULAR SYNOD OF IOWA 5930 1,37625 330 00 5,06627 2,34911 65161 3 California ...... 97 66 5,40049 847 51 12604 40440 3,92488 Cascades ....... 44500 11,35168 446 0 2,37368 6,86460 1,222 00 100 4 Dakota ........ 4 7 5 1 8 3000 3,70721 0 0 420 8 0 2 , 6 8 1 2 3 Germania ...... 3547 3,72701 1,19158 20,29564 12,55400 2,68758 1 Pella ......... 3450 10,80902 35040 1,22703 8,25172 94537 992 Pleasant Prairie .. 74 3,64743 52580 29,67224 18,049 69 6,45658 East Sioux ..... 3 , 0 7679 41,08594 6 , 3 1 3 7 7 1 , 4 3 5 4 2 6 , 7 0 1 9 0 2 3 , 5 5 8 0 6 West Sioux ...... 5 , 7 3132 127,38849 1 9 , 5 4 4 7 5 3 , 9 4 5 7 5 1 9 , 9 3 3 3 5 7 8 , 2 3 3 2 9 Total ...... PARTICULAR SYNOD OF NEW JERSEY ,30203 4000 1,90214 49950 8 5,18751 67288 Bergen ........ 2,94421 61125 1,94470 388 26 South Bergen .... 1 ,62460 4 7 0 0 4 3 7 0 0 1 1 4 5 7 1 , 0 2 0 0 3 Monmouth ...... 1,64357 940 00 5,55302 2659 50 30995 Newark ........ 6 , 28392 2 0 7 0 0 1 , 8 9 7 1 7 8 6 2 3 5 6 4 8 3 8 1 4 6 5 New Brunswick .. 2704 1,60378 300 00 7,23016 4,72601 573 33 Palisade ....... 1 4 , 6 8155 482 4 8 2 , 2 0 6 9 3 0 2 5 0 1 , 7 0 6 1 8 1 0 , 2 2 3 4 6 Paramus ....... ,33017 0820 1,19375 1,42697 12 8,16743 1,43382 11 Passaic ........ 3 , 9 6473 7 5 3 0 6 7 3 6 3 8 00 836 7 7 2 , 3 6 1 0 3 Philadelphia ..... 1,52536 36700 5,00128 10 20 2 56627 53245 Raritan ........ 42,67659 6,92469 27458 13,694.58 4,34525 67,91567 Total ...... PARTICULAR SYNOD OF NEW YORK 3700 2.69436 5000 47194 15256 1,98286 Hudson ........ 1,95800 348 00 7,841 15 5,08469 450 46 North Long Island ... 2 6 750 5,86359 0 2,719 32 2,66957 200 80 37604 South Long Island ... ,85811 36 4,71580 81828 9 3,59669 35698 New York ...... 1 2 9 52 4,46842 5000 1,39466 2,73777 15647 Orange ........ 1 .69516 1 5 0 0 3 1 3 7 0 5 0 0 2 2 6 7 1 , 3 3 8 7 9 Poughkeepsie .... 6200 3,51466 5238 1,000 06 2,20207 19815 Ulster .... :... 1 1 , 32692 2 , 3 8 0 0 0 4 7 1 6 5 0 8 2 4 427 4 6 3 , 7 9 4 7 2 Westchester ..... 4 7 , 26237 4 , 0 5 7 3 0 1 7 , 2 8 9 9 8 5 4 2 3 8 1 , 9 6 5 5 5 23,40716 Total ....... THE PARTICULAR SYNODS 8,80432 1,28739 34,49646 21,33369 2,85444 21662 27 P. S.ofAlbany .... "5 244,29565 175 33 17,5285 6,93184 38,56983 4,09010 19, P.S.ofChicago .... 15 ,54475 5,73133 127,38849 3 , 9 4 5 7 7 1 9 , 9 3 3 3 5 78,23329 P.S.ofIowa ...... " 2,676 59 6,92469 274 56 13,69458 4,34525 67,91567 P.S.ofNew Jersey .... 4 23,40716 1,965 55 54238 17,28998 4,057 30 47,26237 P.S.ofNew York .. 322,58257 70,24786 9,06943 86,50896 32,94982 521,35864 Total


GIFTS FROM INDIVIDUALS 1947-1948

.

"A Friend” .......... $ 6.00 Elings, Rev. D. A....... 6.00 *'A Friend” .......... 25.00 arrell, Mr. James A..... 10.00 Almond, Mr. Harry A.. . 20.00 F Fiebeger, Julia A....... 6.00 “A member of the Board” .. 10.00 Fitzsimmons, Mr. and Mrs. American MissiontoLepers .... 2,220.00 ............ 100.00 G e o r g e Angell, Miss Jessie B..... 990.00 Foreign Missions Fellowship, Anonymous .......... 1,000.00 Wheaton College Chapter, Anonymous .......... 26.00 Wheaton, Illinois ...... 60.00 Anonymous .......... 160.00 Ford Motor Company .... 10.00 Anonymous .......... 10.00 French, Mrs. Lawrence H... 6.00 Anonymous .......... 1.00 Fulling, Marguerite ....... 10.00 Baby Roll ........... 1,480.88 Gaston, Miss Annie E.. 25.00 Backenstos, Misses Elizabeth and Gaston, Mr. and Mrs. John_ 257.00 Katherine .......... 1,000.00 Glover, Mr. and Mrs. P. W. R. 25.00 Baker, Miss Josephine. 10.00 Gluck, Mrs. George... 10.00 Baldwin, Mrs. G. E... 25.00 Goodnow, Miss Minnie....... 175.00 Bell, Mrs. E. Gordon ..... 10.00 Graves, Dr. and Mrs. C. A., in Beninga, Mr. and Mrs.'.. 2.00 memory of- Mrs. Catherine Best,Mr. and Mrs. Charles B. .. 10.00 Scotten ............ 10.00 Beuker, Mr. John ....... 26.00 Haenggi, Mrs. Mary N...... 80.00 Bible Study Classes of Hull, Hager, Mrs. Titus W ..... 2,100.00 Iowa High School..... 84.00 Hakken. Mr. William T.... 60.00 Boersma, Mr. and Mrs. Ted' ... 10.00 Halsey, Miss Katherine T... 25.00 Bogard, Rev. and Mrs. David .. 5.00 Hart, Miss Louisa, M. D..... 78.88 10.00 Hashiguchi, Mrs. Grace Kiyo .. Boot, Miss Ethel ....... 1.00 Boot, Rev. H. E........ 15.00 Hegeman, Mrs. Louise De Mund 6 5 . 0 0 Bor, Mrs. John ........ 10.00 Henklemen, Miss Flora ..... 10.00 6.00 Hoeksema, Mr. Martin ...... Bouma, Winnie H....... 5.00 Broekema, Miss Ruth..... 25.00 Hoekstra, Mr. and Mrs. James.. 30.00 BrinckerhofF, Mrs. Theodore ... 5.00 Holler, Mr. and Mrs. George Bruins, Mrs. H. M....... 10.00 J.. Sr... ........... 60.00 Business Women’s Council of Hondelink, Miss Anne .... 10.00 60.00 Hondelink, Mrs. Garret.... New York City ...... 6.60 Callan, Mrs. William .... 10.00 Hondelink, Miss Margaret E. .. 30.00 Cantine, Miss May B..... 5.00 Hope College Faculty Members 53.86 Chadwick, Mrs. A. A. 37.60 Hope College Students .... 2,016.00 Chicago Missionary Union . 600.00 Hopper, Mrs. A. W ....... 10.00 Christensen, Mr. David H... 2.80 Hospers, Mr. W. H...... 400.00 Clark, Miss Emma B.. *... 26.00 Howie, Mrs. James W ...... 800.00 Closter, New Jersey, ”131 Club” 333.00 Hudsonville, Michigan High Cobb, Mrs. Henry E...... 200.00 S c h o o l G r a d u a t i n g C l a s s . . . . 1 0 7.78 Coburn, Miss Clara M..... 295.00 panese Christian Institute, Coker, Mrs. David R. .... 100.00 JaNew York City ........ 125.00 Cole,MissesElizabethandHelene 10.00 Johnson, Mrs. Stewart ...... 2.00 Coleman, Estate of Horace C. .. 1.000.00 Jones, Mr. Robdiff V..... 10.00 Coleman Foundation ..... 1,000.00 Karl, Mrs. Jacob ....... 15.00 Colt, Mrs. William L.. 5.00 Kavanagh, Mr. and Mrs. J. E. 10.00 Conant, Margaret ....... 50.00 Kempf, Mr. Louis A........ 5.00 Conant, Mr. Richard ..... 50.00 Klahsen, Mr. and Mrs. George 10.00 Cooper, Mr. Alfred D..... 10.00 Kluvers, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph .. 76.00 Cooper,Mr. and Mrs. Clarence.. 10.00 Konrath, Mr. and Mrs. John H., Craft, Laura ...... 35.00 Jr............ 7.00 Crawford, Mrs. Douglas J.. 25.00 Kovac, Miss Dorothy ....... 5.00 Cunningham, Mr. William .... 5.00 Lennox School, New York City Damsteegh, Mr. and Mrs. G. M. 10.00 (through Miss Wyckoff) ... 200.00 Darby, Ethel Reigeluth .... 10.00 Lepeltak, Mrs. E......... 40.00 Daughters of the King Sunday Levai, Mr. and Mrs. Blaise, Sr. 45.00 School Class, Holland, Michi­ Luben, Mr. Wayne W ....... 65.00 gan ............. •57.50 MacLeod, Mrs. Malcolm J... 25.00 Day Company, John (through Magazine Fund (through Mrs. Dr. John Van Ess) .... 89.10 Galen F. Scudder) ....... 12.00 Dawson, Misses Edna and Elsie 5.00 Marquis, Miss Sarah ....... 50.00 De Free, Rev. and Mrs. H. P. 40.00 Maxwell, Iowa Woman’s Coun­ De Right, Mr. and Mrs. Ray .. 5.00 cil of Christ Church ..... 25.00 De Wind, Mrs. George .... 6.00 McDonald. Miss Mary D... 20.00 De Young, Miss Helen .... 60.00 McKee, Mrs. N. T......... 10.00 Dinger, Mrs. John ...... 5.00 Medrow, Mr. Harry L....... 15.00 Dix, Mrs. Lucie H.... 10.00 Missionary Monthly ....... 500.00 Dunn, Miss Margaret ... 5.00 Moody Bible Institute ...... 60.00 Duryee, Miss Lily N... 100.00 Moore, Dr. Ruth Crouse ..... 20.00 Dykstra, Matilda E... 100.00 Muyskens,Rev. andMrs.John D. 90.00


1.00 Nash, Miss M. M........ New Brunswick Theological 64.00 Seminary Students ..... New Brunswick Theological Seminary Society of Inquiry 125.00 75.00 Northfield Church School ... Northwest Carmel Community Sunday School, Charlotte, 25.00 Michigan .......... Norton, Mr. William J.,in mem­ ory of Mrs. Sara Jackson of 10.00 Phelps, New York ..... Olcott, Dr. and Mrs. Charles T. 100.00 Open Meeting of the W.B.D.M. and D.W.W. held at Marble Collegiate Church, N.Y.C., on 255.85 November 3rd, 1947 .... Open Meeting of the W.B.D.M. and D.W.W. held at Marble Collegiate Church, N.Y.C., on 210.30 April 19th, 1948 ...... Orwell Federated Sunday School, 32.00 Orwell, Pa.......... 37.50 Pasternack, Mrs. Richard ... 5.00 Phillips, Miss J. Tracy.... 10.00 Piet, Rev. John H....... 15.00 Poison,Mrs. James A..... Presbyterian Church of Upper 6.75 Red Hook, New York ... 250.00 Punt, Mr. and Mrs. Arie ... 10.00 Reed, Mr. Glenn ....... Rens, Mrs. Bert, in memory of 10.25 Mrs. H. Redeker ...... Rens, Mr. Matt (through Alto Reformed Church, Waupun, Wisconsin) ......... 3.050.00 5.00 Roberts, Mrs. A. M....... 100.00 Robertson, Mr. Hugh S.... 10.00 Romaine, Mr. Demarest, Sr. ... 15.00 Rose, Mr. A. Richard..... 50.00 Roskens, Miss Hilda ..... 1.80 Royalties on “Golden Milestone" 6.00 Schanck, Sarah ........ Scudder,Mr. Samuel D. (through 5.00 Scudder Association)'.... 28.00 Scudder, Rev. Walter T.... 5.00 Shaffer, Mrs. Howard .... 40.00 Smies, Miss Geraldine .... Smith, Mrs. Irving E. and Miss 5.00 Marguerite ......... 250.00 Smit, Mr. and Mrs. John... Society of Women, Congrega­ tional Church, Summer Hill, 5.00 New York .......... 25.00 Stauffer, Dr. Milton T. .... 30.00 Stegemen Family Syndicate .... 2.16 Steketee, Rev. John B.....

From the Estate of Margaret Beattie .. Hanna Boon .... Sarah A. Bussing . James L. Dings ... George D. Hulst ... Anna Langeland ... Celia Lanting.. . J. Henry Legters . Caroline Masterton . Garret Miller ..

Stellingwerf, Mr. and Mrs. George............ 50.00 Stewart, Mrs. John B..... 25.00 Stouffer, Mrs. L........ 1.55 Stratton,Mrs. Albert E.... 10.00 Stryker, Miss Florence .... 5.00 Swart, Rev. J. Robert.... 40.00 Taylor, Miss Marion ...... 2.00 Taylor, Miss Minnie...... 2,075.00 5.00 Teal,Mrs. J.Babcock..... Teerman, Mr. and Mrs. (through Miss Coburn) ....... 40.00 Terhune, Frances and Herman 61.50 Theget, Mrs. Winnie ..... 75.00 Trapp, Bessie E........ 5.00 Tucker, Mrs. William E.... 15.00 “Two Old Friends” ...... 600.00 “Two Old Friends” ...... 200.00 United Council of Church Wom­ en of Poughkeepsie, New York 25.00 “V.W.” ............ 160.00 Van Ess, Rev. John (through John Day Co.) ....... 87.15 Van Peursem Family ...... 500.00 Vande Berg, Mrs. B. L."... 160.00 Vander Ploeg,Miss Jeannette .. 100.00 Vande Zande, Mrs. Maurice .... 35.00 Van Strien,Mrs. David.... 10.00 Veldman, Dr. and Mrs. Harold 250.00 Verhage, Miss Nellie B.... 100.00 Vosburgh, Mr. and Mrs. John .. 65.00 First Waldensian Sunday School, New York City ....... 26.75 Warren,Mr.andMrs.WilliamT. 20.00 Wayer, Rev. and Mrs. James .. 100.00 Webster, Mrs. William H... 10.00 Westveer, Miss Jeannette .. 8.00 Wezeman, Dr. and Mrs. Paul H. 15.00 Wieland, Miss Susanne .... 1.00 Williams, Miss Ruth ..... 5.00 Wilson, Miss Elizabeth T.... 5.00 Wilson, Miss Helen B. .... 5.00 Woman’s Board at Lawrence Hospital,Bronxville,New York 25.00 Women’s Assembly ...... 155.06 Woodmansee, Mrs. Louis E.. 10.00 Wyckoff, Mr. Ernest H.... 60.00 Wyckoff, Through Miss Charlotte C............... 50.00 Wyoming Church, Millburn, New Jersey ............ 20.00 Yonkman, Dr. Frederick... 100.00 Yu-lin, Mr. Lin ........ 25.00 Zenk, Rev. Willis N...... 10.00 “X-Y-Z” ............ 160.00 $29,770.77

LEGACIES From the Estate of $ 1,202.44 Anna Morris .......... $ 500.00 1,499.54 MargaretV.Nuttall...... 2,000.00 ’ 6.000. 00Alice Oldis .......... 1,000.00 500.00 Johanna Oosterhof ...... 562.39 372.19 Susan R. Read ........ 1,010.83 1.000. 00Joseph H. Skillman...... 138.76 7,500.00 Jennie Van der Zyl ...... 603.20 50.00 Caroline R. Van Nuis ... 27,000.00 466.64 Jessie Ward .......... 5,571.42 201.78 Martha Ward ......... 2,000.00 $59,179.18


RECEIPTS OF THE BOARD SINCE 1857, IN PERIODS OF FIVE YEARS, WITH TOTALS AND AVERAGES Totalfor Averagefor Years Receipts ' FiveYears FiveYears Increase Decrease Total,1858-1862.. $134,055 49 $26,811 10 Total,1863-1867.... ♦278,501 40 55,700 28 $28,889 18 Total,1868-1872.. 328.525 01 65,705 00 10,004 72 Total,1873-1877.. 316,046 95 63,209 97 $2,495 63 Total,1878-1882.. 341,884 10 63,376 82‘ 5,167 45 Total,1883-1887.. 403,544 12 12,332 06 80,708 88 1888...... .. tl09,946 11 1889...... .. 93,142 24 1890...... .. 117,090 14 1891...... .. 116,265 45 1892...... .. 112,163 59 548,607 53 109,721 50 29,012 62 1893...... .. 136,688 10 1894...... .. 106,571 48 1895...... .. Ull,288 00 1896...... .. 154,139 42 1897...... .. 111,111 89 619,798 89 123,959 77 14,238 2 7' 1898...... .. 124,301 18 1899...... .. 126,838 36 * 1900.. .... ..♦147,213 78 * 1901....... .. 173,204 12 1902....... .. 167,911 73 739,469 17 147,893 89 23,934 12 1903...... .. 158,89494 1904...... .. 142,474 79 1905...... .. 150,239 94 1906....... .. 174,464 74 1907...... .. 179,232 60 805,307 01 161,061 40 13,167 51 1908....... .. 197,468 26 1909....... .. 205,372 64 1910....... .. 207,404 59 1911...... .. 282,231 86 1912....... .. 284.269 36 1,176,746 71 235,349 34 74,287 94 1913...... .. 255,838 47 1914...... .. 321,942 58 1915..... .. .. 300,752 52 1916.... :... .. 309,419 86 1917...... .. 302,453 02 1,490,406 45 298,081 29 62,731 95 1918....... .. 325,292 08 1919...... .. 345,462 82 1920....... .. 478,614 66 1921...... .. 593,942 88 1922....... .. 445,182 90 2,188,495 34 437,699 07 139,617 78 1923...... .. 562,450 49 1924...... .. 544,808 39 1925....... .. 532,146 69 1926...... .. 553,364 00 1927...... .. 510,977 32 2,703,746 89 640,749 38 103,050 31 1928...... .. 507,584 64 1929...... .. 606,572 00 1930....... .. 518,626 45 1931...... .. 575,735 90 1932...... .. 475,118 51 2,683,637 50 536,727 50 4,021 88 1933...... .. 309,835 41 1934...... .. 296,064 90 1935...... .. 316,832 72 1936...... .. 277,148 83 1937...... . .. 319,670 87 1,519,552 73 303,910 54 232,816 96 1938...... .. 338,485 51 1939...... .. 306,176 78 1940...... .. 323,422 50 1941...... .. 329,097 74 1942....... .. 378,141 61 1,675,324 14 335,064 82 3l,154 28 1943...... .. 341,266 56 1944...... .. 395,399 74 1945...... .. 434,853 87 1946....... .. 519,903 57 1947...... .. 665,863 44 2,357,287 18 471,457 43 136,392 61 1948...... .. 864,021 20 *In addition $56,500 were given by Mr. Warren Ackerman to remove the debt resting on the Board. {From 1895, receipts of the Arabian Mission are included, tIn addition $45,335.06 were given forthe Endowment of the Theological Seminary in theArcot Mission, throughtheeffortsofRev. Jacob Chamberlain, D.D.


THE BOARD OF FOREIGN MISSIONS, R. C. A. '

Auditors' Statement May 17, 1948.

The BoardofForeignMissions.R. C.A., 166FifthAvenue, New York 10.N. Y.

'

Gentlemen: : We have examined financial statements of the Board of Foreign Missions, R. C. A., fortheyearended April 30, 1948.These statements accompany thisreportand aremarked Exhibits "A”,“B” and "C” and Schedules #1, #2 and #3. In connection with our examination ofthe financial statements we obtained confirma­ tions of cash balances on deposit, counted petty cash on hand and examined documents relatingtoorobtainedconfirmation ofallinvestments. We received lettersofconfirmation from the custodian bank as to securities in safekeeping and from servicing agents with respecttocertainmortgageinvestments.We alsoobtainedlettersconfirmingcertain invest­ ment documents held by others and examined otherinvestment documents on hand in the Board’soffice. We examinedortestedtheaccountingrecordstotheextentwe deemed appropriateand made a general review oftheaccountingmethods, but we didnot make a detailedauditof the accounts. We did not attempt to determine that all items of credits for revenue and charges forexpenditureshad been entered inallcasesintheappropriate accounts, or that there had been compliance with all conditions and restrictions under which funds have beenreceived. InvestmentsoftheBoard atApril 30,1948, includingdeposits in various savingsinsti­ tutions,arelistedon Schedule#2. The amounts shown on thisschedulefor “currentvalue” of certain investments at or near April 30, 1948 have been based on available published information. These valuations are not intended to represent the actual amounts realizable upon saleofthesecurities. As a result of redemptions and sales of investments and compromise settlements of mortgage principal during theyear under review, a net lossof $13,569.00 (excessofbook valuesoverproceeds) was realized.The Board hasallocatedthisnetlossasfollows: To Trust Funds ....................... $5,794.42 Less— Profitsallocatedtospecial Funds........ 29.67 $ 5,764.75 To Unallocatednetlossrealizedon investments............ ■

7,804.25 $13,569.00

Trust Funds have increased during the year by a net amount of $3,705.58, as follows: Principalreceipts: Mrs. CeliaLanting Fund............. $7,500.00 D.Dimnent Fund................. 2,000.00 $9,500.00 Less— Net losson investmenttransactionsallocated toTrust Funds................ 5,794.42 Net increase inTrust Funds ......

$3,705.58


TheaccountforConditionalGifts (annuityfunds) hasremainedwithoutchange during theyearunderreview. Changes during the year in the account for “Unallocated net lossrealizedon invest­ ments”may besummarizedasfollows: Balance,May 1,1947 ...................... $15,452.01 • Add— Net loss charged to this account on investment trans­ actions ..... ..................... 7,804.25 Deduct—Refunds applicabletoprioryears*salesofinvestments Balance,April 30, 1948— Exhibit ”B” .....

$23,256.26 229.77 $23,026.49

As shown on Exhibit “A”,general purpose legacies amounting to $39,326.21 were received during the year and special purpose legacies were received totaling $19,852.97. Included in special purpose legacies was a residence property located in Grand Rapids* Michigan and valuedby the Board at$7,500.00.This hasbeen transferred from the legacy account toTrust Funds account where itisincluded at April 30, 1948 as the Mrs. Celia Lanting Fund. The amount of$6,978.89shown atApril30,1947 as “Matured Annuities**was remitted duringtheyeartotheArcot Missiontocoverpartofthecostofbuildinga nurses'home. During theyear a legacywas receivedby theBoard in theform ofan undivided onethird of one-sixth interest in various securities in the Estate of George D. Hulst. In the absence of a satisfactory valuation, this item was recorded in the books of account at no amount withtheintentionofdeferringentryofan amount intheaccountsuntilliquidation oftheitem. Receipts and disbursementsof funds handled solelyasaccommodations are shown only on Exhibit“C**andarenotincludedinRevenueorExpenditureson Exhibit“A”. Inouropinion,thefinancialstatementsreferredtointhe firstparagraph ofthisletter, when considered inconjunction with theforegoing information, fairlypresent a summary oftheBoard’srevenueand relatedcharges as recorded in the accounts forthe year ended April 30,1948 and itsfinancialcondition asatthatdate. Respectfully yours, ** LOOMIS, SUFFERN & FERNALD. CertifiedPublicAccountants.


THE BOARD OF FOREIGN MISSIONS, R. C. A. Statement of Revenue and Charges Against Revenue May 1,1947toApril80,1948 EXHIBIT "A” REVENUE RevenueallocatedtoGeneral Fund: Collections ................... Incomefrominvestedfunds (general): SecurityFund...................... Trust and General Funds ...............

$498,176.37 $ 2,608.41 18,614.25

Income from Funds heldby BoardofDirection,R. G.A.: Trust Funds— Board ofForeign Missions, R. C. A. desig­ natedasbeneficiary .................. $ M. A. QuickMemorial Fund............... Miscellaneous income ...................... TotalofaboverevenueallocatedtoGeneral Fund Income from investedfundsheldforspecificwork: For use inChina....................... $ For useinIndia........................ For use in Arabia...................... ForministerialeducationinIndia.............. For annuitieson ConditionalGifts.............. For missions....................

318.39 8,177.13

21,122.66

8,495.52 832.02 $528,626.57

802.67 6,456.62 5,077.60 784.30 4,507.09 227.88

17.864.96

Legacies: For general purposes ..................... $ 39,326.21 For specificwork....................... 19,852.97

59,179.18

DesignatedGifts: Gifts— Exhibit "C” ...................... $255,002.71 Income from investments— Exhibit "C” ........... 3,357.78 258,360.49 Totalofaboverevenue $864,021.20 CHARGES AGAINST REVENUE ChargesallocatedagainstGeneral Fund revenue: Mission work (includingappropriations): African Mission ... ................. $ 6,169.12 Amoy Mission...................... o 107,843.63 Arcot Mission ...................... 141,497.82 JapanMission...................... 27,797.81 Arabian Mission..................... 115,223.34 UnitedMissionInMesopotamia............. 10,424.00 $408,955.72 Intereston fund balances.................. 182.68 Home expenditures—Schedule #1 ........... . 98,356.66 Overseastravelofsecretary ................ 2,427.78 Foreign Mission Conference ................. 1,920.00 Contributions tomissionaryassociations ........... 18,196.66 Anglo-American Committee ................. 600.00 Total of above charges allocatedagainst General Fundrevenue................ $526,639.18


Expendituresofincomefrominvestedfundsheldforspecificwork: Kemittedtomissions..................... » $ 8,974.04 Paymentsofannuitieson ConditionalGifts......... 5,210.37 Charges againstlegacies: 6,775.45 Disbursement of general purpose legacies..... .... Disbursementof specialpurposelegacies.......... 1,083.75 Transfer to Trust Funds of special purpose legacy—mission residenceGrand Rapids,Michigan ........... 7,500.00 143,906.32 Disbursements ofDesignated Gifts— Exhibit “C” ....... Totalofabovecharges .................... . 699,089.11 Excess of above revenue over above charges— for year ended April 80, 1948 ................ ...... $164,932.09 Foregoingexcessrepresentedby: Increasesin: General Fund: Revenue (asshown herein) .......... .. $528,626.67 Charges againstrevenue (asshown herein) .... 525,639.18 Excess of revenue over revenue charges— Ex­ hibit "BM .................. $ 2,987.39 Trust Funds—accumulated income........... 4,145.95 Amounts duemissions—unremitted income....... 227.88 Legacies forgeneral purposes.............. 32,550.76 Legaciesforspecialpurposes............ .. 11,269.22 DesignatedGifts...... 114,454.17 $165,635.37 Decreasein: • ConditionalGifts—accumulatedincome......... 703.28 $164,932.09


THE BOARD OF FOREIGN MISSIONS, R. C. A. Balance Sheet April 30, 1948 EXHIBIT “B" ' ' ASSETS Cash inbanks and on hand.......................... $ 91,851.07 Investments— ScheduleNo. 2 : Bonds (other than real estate mortgage bonds), corporate stocks and Federal Savings and Loan shares— at book * value (valuebasedon publishedinformation, atornear April 30, 1948— $1,292,624.40) ............. $1,297,519.33 157,266.19 Mortgages, realestate, etc.— atbook value........ 16,996.35 1,471,781.87 DepositsinsavingsinstitutionsinNew York,N. Y..... Amounts receivableand sundry advances: * Amount on deposit with investment custodian ...... $ 9,761.53 Payments foraccountofmissionariesand others..... ' 9,815.37 Accounts receivable for.funds transmitted or disbursed as accommodations— Exhibit “C” ............. 1,907.98 Advance to Arabian Mission, not including $4,328.66 classi­ fied below ........................ 500.00 Advance to employe..................... 550.00 22,534.88 Prepaidexpensesand deferredcharges: DeferredchargesforremittancetoArabianMission.... $ 4,328.66 Payments applicabletofutureyears*appropriations... 1,512.10 5,840.76 $1,592,008.58 LIABILITIES AND FUND BALANCES Income tax withheld ........................ 370.60 $ Unremitted funds handledas accommodations— Exhibit “C” ... 1.950.97 Unremitted balances due missions ................. 5,838.00 Income on investments— deferred ................. 310.52 Reserves for estimated future requirements: Postponed travelof missionaries .............. $ 8,300.00 Retirement pension plan .................. 45,058.11 Other future projects ................... 29,399.89 Insurance contingencies .................. 1,169.60 83,927.60 Principaland Funds: Income fundedrevenue Total Fundsheldforspecialpurposes: TrustFunds— ScheduleNo.3 .. $28,957.09 $316,806.29 $ 344,763.38 Conditional Gifts (unmatured annuityfunds)— Schedule#3 1,316.03 94,922.50 96,238.53 Mission Funds ........ 1,978.41 41,362.48 43,340.89 Designated Gifts— Exhibit “CM 307,879.65 307,879.55 Specialpurpose legacies... 16,151.17 16,151.17 $32,251.53 $776,121.99 $ 808;S73.52 Funds availableforvarious purposes within regularbudget: • Trust Funds— Schedule #3 ....... $502,591.72 Security Fund .............. 71,622.69 General purpose legacies ........ 117,842.72 692,057.13 TotalofFunds (otherthan General Fund Surplus) ............. $1,500,430.66 General Fund Surplus: Balance, May 1, 1947 ..... .. $ 19,219.34 Add— Excess of revenue over revenue charges for the yearended April30, 1948-­ Exhibit “A** ...... 2,987.89 Balance, April 30,1948 ..... 22,206.73 $1,522,637.38 Deduct— Unallocatednetlossrealizedon investments... 23,026.49 1,499,610.89 $1,592,008.58


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THE BOARD OF FOREIGN MISSIONS, R. C. A. '

Statement of Home Expenditures

May 1,1947 toApril 80,1948 EXHIBIT "A" Schedule#1 Audio-visual education .............................. $ 990.71 Accountbooks,stationeryand supplies.................... 997.66 1,368.12 Annual report .................... Audit ofBoard accounts ............................. 1,600.00 290.49 Books purchased ................................. Circularsand miscellaneousprinting:....................... 1,158.10 DepartmentofChildren’sWork.......................... 2,130.00 Department of Women’sWork: Jointcommittee expenses; Publications and postage ........................ 943.17 Salaries .................................. 8,007.23 Conferencetravel............................... 221.69 Costume and entertainment expense..................... 169.45 Expense— Field Secretary ............................. 2,010.00 Miscellaneous expense ..................... 840.68 Neglected Arabia (publication) ......................... 22.50 Officefurnitureand repairs ............................ 1,336.68 Officers'salaries: F.M. Potter— Treasurerand Secretary................... 6,000.00 L. J. Shafer— Secretary ............................ 6,000.00 Edwina Paige— Associate Treasurer ...... 3,000.00 Barnerd M. Luben— Field Secretary ........ ;............ 4,500.00 Ruth Ransom— Secretary .......................... 4,500.00 Officeand othersalaries........... 19,620.40 Pamphlets and leaflets.............................. 5,478.25 Postage, telegrams and cables.......................... 2,109.98 StaffConference— Stated Clerkof.General Synod................ 2,013.80 Rent and careofNew York office........................ 3,793.56 Payment toretirementfund forofficeworkers.................. 564.49 Special officeassistanceand pensions...................... 1,877.66 Telephone expense ................................ 1,177.94 Travel expenseamong churchesand conferences................ 2,753.03 TravelofBoard members and annual meeting expense............. 3,981.94 Youth department ................................. 3,909.12 Total— Exhibit “A” ................... ... $93,356.55


THE BOARD OF FOREIGN MISSIONS, R. C. A. Statement of Investments April 80, 1948 EXHIBIT "B” Schedule#2 ' BONDS (OTHER THAN REAL ESTATE MORTGAGE BONDS) Currentvalue Book UnitedStatesGovernment Bonds and otherobligations: (seenotebelow) value Treasury certificates of indebtedness: $ 80.000.48 $ 80,001.14 SOM Series H, % % , due July 1, 1948 ... 195,061.85 195,026.79 195M ” A, 1 Y 8 % . due January 1,1949 ... 60,037.18 60,006.32 60M ” C, 1%%, due March 1,1949 .. 60,040.59 60,007.54 60M ” D, 1%%, due April 1,1949 ... Treasury notes: 15M Series A, 1%%, dueJanuary1,1949 Treasury bonds, 2%%: $600 due 1964-69 . 23M " 1967-72 . Savingsbonds— SeriesD: 10M due March 1950 Savings bonds— SeriesF: $42,500 due April 1954 25 ” August 1955 .. 500 ” September 1955 25 ” November 1955 250 " April 1956 _ 500 ” December 1956 25 M October 1957 . 25 " November 1957 25 ” February 1968 Savingsbonds— SeriesG,2%%: 15M due July 1953 .. August 1953 .. 5M 3M October 1953 .. .December 1953 10M March 1954 ... $11,500 April 1954 .... 19M July 1954 .. 33M . $100 ” August 1954 . 15M '* December 1954 15M ” February 1955 10M ** March 1956 ... BM ** April 1956 .... 10M ** November 1956 7M 75M ** January 1959 , March 1959 ... 25M

15,001.96

16,006.98

504.06 23,071.88

500.00 23.000.00

9.200.001

7,500.00

34,935.001 19.651 393.001 19.401 194.001 380.001 18.851 18.721 18.721

31,460.00 18.60 370.00 18.50 185.00 370.00 18.60 18.50 18.50

15.000. 00 14.370.001 6. 000.00 4.790.001 3.000. 00 2.874.001 10.000. 00 9.550.001 11,500.00 10,982.501 19.000. 00 18.145.001 33.000. 00 '31.4l6.001 100.00 95.201 15.000. 00 14.235.001 1 5 . 000. 00 14.235.001 10.000. 00 9.470.001 6.000. 00 4.735.001 '10.000.00 9.510.001 7,000.00 6.692.001 75.000. 00 73.350.001 25.000. 00 24.460.001 $ 677,716.07 $ 682,215.19

Otherbonds: $3,600, American Tel. & Tel. Co.—conv. deb., 2 % % t due 1961,temp. ctf. ............. $ 3,838.50 9,950.00 10M Associated Electric Co.—deb., 5 % , due 1961 5M The Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Rwy. Co.— 6,075:00 gen. mtge., 4%. due 1995 ......... 20M Australia, Commonwealth of, external loan of 19,650.00 1925, 5%, due 1955 ....... ..... 6M The Baltimore& OhioR. R. Co.— 1stmtge.,B. 4,775.00 5 % , due 1 975, stamped ............ 2M Bellows Falls Hydro-Elec. Corp.— 1st mtge., 2,080.00 6 % , due 1 958 ...............

$ 3.998.82 10,526.00 5,412.60 21,513.75 3,527.50 1,979.40


Other bonds— (Cont’d):

Currentvalue Book (seenotebelow) value 20M Canadian NationalRailway Co.— 5%, due1969, $ 21,700.00 $ 22,256.80 government gtd. ............... 5.100.00 5.087.50 6M CelaneseCorp.ofAmerica—deb.,3%, due 1965 C e n tral Illinois Public Service Co.— 1st mtge., . 6M 5 .056.25 5.225.00 A, 3%%, due 1971 ............ 20M Chicago & Western Indiana R. R. Co—cons. 21 100.00 2 1 .650.00 mtge., 4%, due 1952 ........... 1M Elgin, Joliet & Eastern Rwy. Co.— 1st mtge., 1,016.50 1.047.50 A, 3%%, due’1970 .............. . 6M Great Northern Rwy. Co.— gen. mtge., N, 4.887.60 4,831.25 3%%, due 1990 .............. 10M IllinoisBell Tel. Co.— 1stmtge.. A, 2 % % , due 10.112.60 9.812.50 . 4M Kansas Power & Light Co.— 1st mtge., 3^%, 4,389.40 4.360.00 due 1969 .................. 6.100.00 5.075.00 6M Koppers Co.— 1stmtge., 3%, due 1964 .. . $2,812.50 Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie 3,946.27 1 , 5 4 6 . 8 7 R. R. Co.— gen.mtge., inc..A, 4%, due 1991 $1,125.00 Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste. Marie R. R. Co.— 1st mtge., cum. inc., A, 4%%» 2,117.96 1,049.06 due 1971 20M Missouri Pacific R. R. Co.— 1st & ref. mtge., 16,000.00 16.850.00 F, 5 % , due 1977 4M MontrealIslandPowerCo.-•1stmtge.,A,5%%. 4.060.00 3.720.00 due 1957 .................. 4M National Steel Corp.— 1st (collateral) mtge., 4 .070.25 4 . 1 5 0 . 0 0 2 % , due 1 965 .............. . 4M New York Water ServiceCorp.— 1stmtge.. A, 3 .970.00 3 . 9 4 0 . 0 0 5%, due 1951 ............... 5.031.25 4.800.00 5M Ohio Edison Co.— 1st mtge., 294%, due 1975 The P e n n s y l v a n i a R . R . C o . , c o n v . d e b . , 3 ^ 4 % , 15M 14.981.25 14.925.00 due 1952 ................ . $1,500 Prudence-Bonds Corp.— 1st mtge., 8th series, 85% paid, extd., 5%%, due 1950, reg., with 218.93 225.00 3 sharesofstock.............. 20M Public Service Co. of Colorado— conv. deb., 21.600.00 2 2 . 400.00 3%, due 1962 ............... 20M St. Louis, San Francisco Ry. Co.— 1st mtge., 17,575.00 1 7 . 2 46.25 A, 4%, due1997,temp.ctfs......... 5M Texas Electric Service Co.— 1st mtge., 294%* 5 . 0 50.00 4 . 9 0 0 . 0 0 due 1975 .................. 5.425.00 5.037.50 5M Union PacificR. R. Co.—deb.,2%%, due 1976 4 , 0 00.00 4.120.00 4M Wilson& Co.,Inc.— 1stmtge.,3%, due1958 ... $ 2 3 4 , 8 9 2.58 $ 228,095.68 ,

60 100 100 4 300 200 50 200 50 60 100 300 50 276,913 50 250 200 100 200 50 100 125

CORPORATE STOCKS AlliedChemical & Dye Corp.......... American Gas & ElectricCo.......... American Telephone & Telegraph Co..... Atlantic City ElectricCo............ Atlantic Refining Co........ ..... (Bank ofthe) Manhattan Company..... Central Vermont Public Service Corp.— 4.15% Commercial Credit Co.— 3.60% cum. conv. pfd. The Commonwealth & Southern Corp.— $6 pfd. ConsolidatedEdisonCo.ofNew York, Inc.— $5 cum. pfd................... ConsolidatedNaturalGas Co........... Continental Can Co., Inc........... Continental IllinoisNational Bank & Trust Co. of Chicago................. Creditors Holding Co.,Inc.— 6% pfd.... E.I.du Pont deNemours & Co........ ElectricBoat Co.— $2.00 conv. pfd....... The ElectricAuto-LiteCo........... General Motors Corp.............. Gulf Oil Corp................ . •• Hershey ChocolateCorp.— $4cum. conv. pref... Idaho Power Co................. Insurance Co. of North America.......

11.430.00 $ 10,532.10 3.787.50 3,528.49 15.350.00 15,901.61 70.00 71.12 13.125.00 11,491.06 4.900.00 5,787.50 4.100.00 5,125.00 18.600.00 22,270.00 5.225.00 5,162.50 5,256.25 4,985.85 4.950.00 4,624.21 10.800.00 11,479.74 4.050.00 5,246.88 — a 1.00 8.712.50 9,274.35 9.250.00 9,019.58 10,000.00 12,606.73 5.550.00 2,977.60 14.450.00 11,650.00 5.775.00 5,422.76 3.100.00 4,273.13 12.750.00 8,200.00


Currentvalue Book (seenotebelow) value 300 InternationalNickel1Go.ofCanada, Ltd.... $ 8,737.50 $ 10,826.91 176 International Nickel Co. of Canada, Ltd., 7% pfd................ ..... 24.062.50 23,459.05 5 Lautaro Nitrate Co., Ltd...... ...... .40) 2 Compania Salitrera Anglo-Chilena ..... 16.25) 62.50 200 Thomas J. Lipton, Inc.,$25 par, 6 % cum. pfd. 4.925.00 6,065.06 100 ManufacturersTrust Co.,New York..... 5,493.75 4.987.50 60 McCall Corp.................. 1.712.50 3,023.02 80 Melville Shoe Corp.— 4% conv. pfd...... 8,880.00 8.880.00 64 Minneapolis, St. Paul and Sault Ste. Marie R.R. Co.—seriesA, V. T. C........ 607.60 1,744.67 50 Mohawk Carpet Mills, Inc........... 1,981.25 3,020.62 50 Monongahela Power Co.— 4.40% cum. pfd.. 4.675.00 5.175.00 125 Montgomery Ward & Co., Inc......... 7,218.75 4.966.00 300 National Cash Register Co.......... 12,180.27 11.812.50 7 Northern StatesPower Co.— 7% cum. pfd.. 672.00 647.50 50 Ohio Edison Co.— $4.40 pfd.......... 4,887.60 5.160.00 50 Oklahoma Natural Gas Co.— seriesA, pfd.. 2.575.00 2.625.00 200 PacificGas & ElectricCo.— 1st,6% pfd.... 6.800.00 6.900.00 200 PhiladelphiaElectricCo.,3.80% cum. pfd... 19.600.00 20.540.00 150 Standard Oil Co. (New Jersey) ....... 11,831.25 4,983.25 100 Union Carbide & Carbon Corp........ 11.276.00 9.505.01 160 United States Fidelity& Guaranty Co.... 7.575.00 6,812.50 100 United States Gypsum Co....... ... 10.076.00 10.535.00 250 United States Pipe & Foundry Co.. . 12.500.00 10,063.12 300 Westinghouse Electric Corp.......... 8.700.00 8,947.23 100 F. W. Woolworth Co.............. 4,275.00 4.575.00 $ 351,812.65

2M 2M 3M 3M 5M 2M 2M 2M 2M 4M 2M 2M 2M 2M

FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION INVESTMENT SHARE CERTIFICATES Aurora FederalSavings& Loan Ass'n,Baltimore, Md. .. $ 2,000.00* >• ” »* Philadelphia, Pa. Cayuga »» 2,000.00* Chicago Chicago,111... 3.000. Colonial Dongan Hills, S.I.,N.Y.. 3.000. Danielson Danielson, Conn.. 5.000. East End Pittsburgh,Pa. .. 2.000. First Greene County, Waynesburg,Pa. 2,000.00* First Philadelphia, Pa. 2 000 00 FortPitt Pittsburgh, Pa... 2 000 00 Hinsdale Hinsdale, 111. ... 4.000. Leeds Baltimore, Md. .. 2 .000.00* Liberty Baltimore, Md. .. 2 ,000.00* Penn Philadelphia, Pa. 2 ,000.00* Public Philadelphia, Pa. 2 ,000.00* $ 35,000.00 , ,

. .

* *

Total bonds (other than real estate mortgage bonds), corporate stocks and Federal Sav­ ings & Loan Association investment shares — Exhibit “B” ............... $1,292,624.40

$ 345,411.56

$

2.000.00 2,000.00

00* 3.000. 00* 3.000. 00* 6.000.00 00*

00 00

2,000.00 2,000.00 2,000.00 2,000.00

00* 4.000. ’

2 .000 . 2 ,000.00

2,000.00 2,000.00

$ 35,000.00 ' $1,297,519.33

NOTE— Current value shown above has been based on available pub­ lishedquotationsatornear April 30,1948,except thoseindicated by references as follows: 1Value based on official published redemption table— amount as at April 30, 1948. *Valued at cost based on information as to guarantee of investment by Federal Savings and Loan Insurance Cor­ poration. *Current value not shown inasmuch as published price at or near April 30, 1948 not available.

00 00


MORTGAGES 40 Central Avenue, Hempstead, L. I.,N. Y. Crossway Highway, Glen Cove, L. I.,N. Y. 8832 FishAvenue,Bronx, N. Y......... . ••••*4 Franconia Avenue & 45th Avenue, Flushing, L. I.,N. 1 891 IrvineStreet,New York City,N. Y.... 60KilburnRoad,Garden City,L.I.,N. Y....... MansfieldPlace& East 24thStreet,Brooklyn, N. Y. ... 2066Mapes Avenue, Bronx, N. Y........ 448 New JerseyAvenue, Brooklyn, N. Y... 1895 Park Avenue, New York, N. Y........ PulaskiStreet& 68thAvenue. MiddleVillage,N. Y. 27StonerAvenue, GreatNeck,,L.I.,N. Y. . 6116 Tyndall Avenue, Bronx, N. Y.... 77-85 Walworth Street,Brooklyn, N. Y. ... 1620 East 13th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. .... 1058 East 14th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 67-49 69th Lane, Maspeth, Queens, N. Y. ... 69-8275thStreet,MiddleVillage,N. Y... 1413 78th Street,Brooklyn, N. Y...... 97-3785th Street,Ozone Park, L.I.,N. Y. .. 27West 93rdStreet,New York, N. Y.... 357West 117thStreet,New York, N. Y.. 160West 120th Street,New York, N. Y.. 128West 130th Street,New York, N. Y.. 619-21 East 136th Street, Bronx, N. Y...... 38-31218thStreet,Bayside,L.I.,N. Y...... One-thirdinterestinmortgageowned jointlywith Woman’s Board of Domestic Missions: 4080 Hill Avenue, Bronx, N. Y.....

Maturity dates .. Matured ..Apr. 1, 1951 .. Matured ..Feb. 1, 1949 .. Matured ..July 1. 1948 ..Oct. 1, 1959 ..May 1, 1952 .. Matured ..Apr. 1, 1953 .. Matured ..Mar. 1, 1949 ..July 1, 1954 ..June1, 1951 .. Matured .. Matured ..Aug. 1,1950 .. Matured .. Matured .. Matured ..Mar. 1, 1954 ..Oct. 1, 1950 ..Jan. 1, 1958 ..June1, 1962 .. Matured ..Aug. 1, 1950 Matured

Book value $ 1,180.00 11.421.00 6.870.00 4,062.50 3.480.00 6.250.00 7,818.83 2.076.00 3.284.60 2,989.21 2.181.25 4.450.00 13.175.00 12.575.00 2.120.00 4.826.25 1.750.00 1.316.25 3,948.75 1.450.00 > 3,674.34 4.068.61 6,337.33 5.400.00 12.285.00 2.640.00 633.33 $131,162.05

. MORTGAGE BONDS AND CERTIFICATES St. Marks Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y.— Lawyers Title & Guarantee Co., mtge. $ 5,344.29 #273821 .................................. 1,645.70 TaylorAvenue, Bronx,N. Y.—TitleGuarantee& TrustCo.,mtge.#117531 .. 453.61 291-3SeventhAvenue,New York,N. Y.,B/M #20312 ............ 174.62 2050-6EighthAvenue,New York,N. Y.,B/M #30291 ............ 1,214.72 316West93rdStreet,New York, N.Y.,B/M #30709 ............ 370.00 New YorkTitle& MortgageCo.—ctf.#3616, seriesQ ............ 37.40 New YorkTitle& MortgageCo.— ctf.#4004,seriesQ ... ......... 2M New York Towers, Inc.— stamped $800 paid, 2%, due Feb. 1.1960, reg., 1 , 2 01.40 with stock attached .................... Y ■**; Nassau-SuffolkBond & Mortgage Gte. Co.—sundry certificates,book valueof which has been liquidated ........................ $ 10,341.64 REAL ESTATE 12.60 $ Florida property ................... 3,760.00 Kollen property— Holland, Michigan .... ;.. 4 , 6 00.00 917 SouthWestnedge Avenue, Kalamazoo, Michigan . 7,600.00 1848GodfreyAvenue, S.W., Grand Rapids, Michigan $ 15,762.50 MISCELLANEOUS ( B o o k value no t yet determined)

Mortgage participation certificate of Irving Trust Co., for $153.52— mortgageofMinsker Realty Co.,on premises at 240% East Houston Street,New York, N. Y...... $ One-fifthinterestin$5,000noteand mortgageon propertyat 24 Beach Street,Nutley, N. J............ . •• Trustee’scertificateofthe First StateBank, Holland, Michi­ gan, for$2.96and receiver’scertificateofPeople's State Bank, Holland, Michigan, for$42.60 ........ :v. One-thirdofone-sixthundividedinterestinvarious securities intheestateofGeorgeD.Hulst.............

Book value

$

Total mortgages, real estate, etc. (at book value)— Exhibit “B” ...................

$ 157.268.19


The Bank forSavings.................... $ 9,176.93 Excelsior Savings Bank ................... 7,819.42 Total depositsin savings institutions— Exhibit “B” Total investments— Exhibit “B” .........

g

9

16,996.86 $1,471,781.87


THE BOARD OF FOREIGN MISSIONS, R. C. A. Statement of Fund Balances 1 Trust Funds and Conditional Gifts April 30, 1948 EXHIBIT “B” Schedule#3 Accumulated Total income Principal Trust Funds: Held forspecialpurposes: Designated foruse in China: Amoy Hospital Fund ........ . ••$ 830.98 $ 3,643.26 Elisabeth H. Blauvelt Memorial Hospital 5.000.00 Fund ................. 1,136.86 C. H. U. Bed Endowment Fund— Blau­ 115.22 500.00 veltHospital ............ Mary B. DoolittleFund....... . •• 108.14 2,000.00 C. J. Kooicker Bed Endowment Fund— 700.00 160.28 Amoy Hospital ............ 79.32 1,105.01 Netherlands Committee Fund .... . •• 17 85.00 8 . 6 0 MarthaSchaddeleeFund— SioKheHospital 196.16 5,7 362.19 Mary E. Talmage Fund......... Jasper Westervelt Fund— Neerbasch Hos­ 226.43 1 000.00 pital ................. 442.27 1,950.00 • John H. Oerter Memorial Fund.... Designated forusein India: 148.85 20 000.00 Arcot Industrial School Fund ..... 317.34 1,047.46 Children's Home, Vellore .......... Mary Lott Lyles Hospital Fund^ ......... 3,597.62 11.592.09 ScudderMemorialHospital,Ranipettai: '1,803.66 36.481.10 General Purpose Fund ..... 1,049.38 791.45 IsaacBrodhead Fund...... 1.008.65 894.71 Eliza M. Garrigues Fund... . 1,161.55 Alida Vennema Heeven Fund ... * 1,032.15 Euphemia Mason OlcottFund... 1,091.73 5 .043.65 Dr. George A. Sandham Fund... 3,841.50 9. 704.49 Mary Taber SchellHospital Fund.... 1.445.85 3 1 5 . 412.50 Elizabeth R. Voorhees CollegeFund -503.94 C. L. Wells Memorial Fund ..... 113.96 16,316.54 DesignatedforuseinArabia: . Fund for Medical Missionary Work in __ Arabia................ 9,119.72 82,885.92 BahrainHospitalFunds—Arabia: 186.86 7.259.00 General Purpose Fund .. ..... 37.19 6 000.00 AlfredDe W. Mason,*Jr.Fund... 22.28 3.000.00 Fanny W. Mason Memorial Fund .... 50.83 9,801.87 Lewis D. Mason Fund....... Lewis D. Mason Fund— surgical sup­ 00 14.85 2.000. plies ..... ......... 8.89 1.200.00 Van RensselaerBurr, Jr.Fund.. . Lansing Memorial (formerly Basrah) 14.85 2,000.00 Hospital Fund ...... . ••... Anna M. T. Van Santvoord—Amara 7.43 1,000.00 Lansing Hospital ........ •••• 29.39 8,954.46 Cantine Guest House Endowment Fund 1 7 .36 2,337.13 Anna F. Bacon Fund .......... -7.43 1 000.00 Marion Wells Thoms Hospital Fund ...... 917.64 6 .80 Hannah More Bishop Fund...... . 7.43 1 000.00 Margaret L. Tunnard Fund....... $28,957.09 $294,250.93 $323,208.02 Ministerial education in India: $ 2,000.00 William A. Gordon Fund . 12.555.36 Christian Jansen -Fund ... 2,000.00 Joseph Scudder Fund.. 5,000.00 G. B. Walbridge Fund .... $ 21.555.36 * 21,555.36 $ — ,

,

,

,

,

TOt1uTr ^ ^ ™ t d^-8DeCia!*28,957.09 *315,805.29 *344,763.38


Available forvarious purposes within regular budget: IdaBaldwin Fund.............. William C.Barkalow Fund 1......... AbbieJ. BellFHznd... .......... ClaraDe ForrestBurrellE\ind....... Mary E. Bussing Fund ........... Rev. Henry E. Cobb Endowment fSind... Mapr Storre Coe Fund ........... JosiahE. and IdaCrane Memorial Fund.. William L. De Fouw Fund ......... Elizabeth Diehl Memorial Fund ....... The Daniel Dimnent Fund .......... Anna Eliza Disborough Fund .. ..... MarthaT.Douglas Fund..... ..... CharlotteW. Duryee Fund ............ CatherineJane Gebhart Fund........ Jane Ann Gopsill Fund........... John Heemstra and FamilyMission Fund .... Emily Hermance Fund ........... Mary Hobart Fund.............. John Hoffman Fund............. Mr. and Mrs. Cornelius HollestelleFund.. Garret N. Hopper Fund ........... AbelH. Huizenga Fund........... In Memoriam Fund.......... ...!. Mr.andMrs.HenryJ.KollenMemorial Fund.. SusanY. LansingFund ............ Mrs. Celia Lanting Fund.. ........ Mary LouiseLeonardMemorial(Fund.... John S. Lyles Fund............. Madison Avenue Reformed Church Fund.. ClarineV.B.and LucyA.Matson Fund... Heye Mennenga Fund... .*........ Charles E. Moore Fund ........... JaneT.B.Moore Memorial Fund...%.. Ada LouiseMorris Fund........... Jane H. Morrison Memorial Fund.... .. John Neefus Fund .............. P. I.and M. V. K. Neefus Fund....... Mary Neefus Fund.............. North Reformed Church, Passaic, N. J.,Fund Charles W. Osborne Fund ......... Josephine Penfold Fund........ 1.!!. Permanent Fund ...............’. ** Mrs. Edward H. PetersFund........ CatherineJane Pryer Evangelistic Fund.. Helen A. Rollins Fund ..... .... MargaretRoosaFund......... !!!!!!! Anna and Margaret Roosenraad Evangelistic Fund ................... A. J. Schaefer Fund............ [ Semelink Family Mission Fund....... Rev. Dr, C. D. F. Steinfuhrer Memorial Fund Katherine M. Talmage Fund........ John Martin Van Buren Fund....... Maria Hoes Van Buren Fund..... ...!] A. C. Van Raalte Mission FHind....... Anna Townsend Van Santvoord Fund... AlidaVan Schaick Fund........... Lena May Visser Fund .........!! *" A. V. S.WallaceFund.......... * Cornelia M. Wallace Fund.......!.!!! OliveGates Wallace Evangelistic Fund .... Mr. and Mrs. William Walvoord Fund... Abbey L. Wells Fund ............ Annie E.WyckoffiSind..........*]* ElizaA.ZabriskieFund......... [[[[ Total Trust Funds available for various Purposes^Bwithin regular budget_ Total Trust Funds

Income $ 5,500.00 taken 10,784.60 into 700.00 General 4,066.96 Funds 30,055.50 Surplus 2,500.00 1,000.00 600.00 698.92 6.500.00 5.000. 00 2.000. 00 3.000.00 2,022.47 8,047.64 14,339.08 4.500.00 459.10 435.42 100.00 4.500.00 1.600.00 1.000. 00 500.00 8.750.00 7.500.00 7.500.00 688.66 60,000.00 15.000. 00 1 000.00 600.00 475.00 400.13 3,479.57 4.000. 00 9,379.86 14.000. 00 4,045.09 29,661.97 5.000. 00 5.000. 00 14,650.00 403.77 1.000.00 1,733.98 4,293.92 202.74 194.25 14.000. 00 5.500.00 5.827.37 20.000.00 20,180.90 3.000. 00 29,848.37 26,233.79 600.00 626.00 625.00 493.40 1.000.00 5,000.00 71,399.89 4.589.37 ,

$502,591.72 502,591.72 $28,957.09 $818,398.01 $847,355.10


ConditionalGifts (unmatured annuity funds) : Accumu- $ 500.00 MadelaineApgar............ lated 500.00 Aux. Fort Plain, N. Y.......... income 100.00 NettieBaker............... not 1,000.00 J. F. Baldwin.............. s e g r e * 500.00 Helen Balkins............ . •• gated— 600.00 SueV.Beyer............... s e e 600.00 M. S. Blauvelt .............. total 1,000.00 ElizaP. Cobb.............. b e l o w 4 , 000.00 Virginia T. B. Cobb .......... 1,700.00 Mr. and Mrs. EoelDe Young...... 1 , 000.00 Rev. and Mrs. RichardD. Douwstra.. 3.000. 00 C. B. Drury ............... 2 60.00 Mrs.G.H. Dubbink........... 100.00 Anna Hagens'.............. 100.00 LizzieHagens.............. 500.00 L. D. Hegeman ............. 500.00 Cornelia Hospers ............ 10 000.00 John Gerardus Fagg—inmemory of.. 1.000.00 Rev. and Mrs. S. J.Menning...... 2 000.00 - M. M. Nash ............... 1,000.00 Grace Palen ............... 500.00 Alice D. Pettinger ........... 1 ,000.00 J. H. Phillips.............. 6 000.00 AriePunt................ 600.00 S.D. L.Relyea.............. ‘ 4,672.50 William Schmitz ............ 1,000.00 G.G.Seibert............... 2,000.00 Mary S. Shafer ............. 40,000.00 MinnieTaylor.............. 4.000. 00 S. Te Winket .............. 200.00 R. E. Van Blarcora ........... 1. 000. 00 Cornelius Van Zee.. ......... 200.00 J. F. Voorhees.............. 2,000.00 C. Walvoord ............... 500.00 H. Walvoord............... 500.00 Annetta Westervelt ........... 2 000.00 Edward Whiteside ........... Total Conditional Gifts (unmatared an­ nuity funds)— Exhibit “BM .... $ 1,316.03 $ 94.922.50 $ 96,238.53 ,

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‘

DIRECTORY AMOY MISSION

General Address for letters: Fukien Province, China It is advisable to send letters by air mail. Went out * Mrs. Frances P. Otte, W a r m Friend Tavern, Holland, Mich...................................... 1887 * Miss Lily N. Duryee, 174 Summit Avenue, Summit, N. J.. 1894 *Rev. Frank Eckerson, D.D., Tong-an... ........... 1903 * Rev. Harry P. Boot, D.D., 408 College Ave., Holland, Mich. 1903 * Mrs. Anna H. Boot, 408 College Ave., Holland, Mich... 1908 * Rev. Henry J. Voskuil, 47 Huntington St., New Brunswick, N. J................................... 1907 * Mrs. Mary S. Voskuil, 47 Huntington St., New Brunswick, N. J........... 1908 * Rev. Henry P. De Pree, D.D., 66 East 12th St., Holland, Mich............................... 1907 * Mrs. Kate E. De Pree, 66 East 12th St., Holland, Mich... 1907 Miss Katharine R. Green, Kulangsu, A m o y .......... 1907 * Miss Leona Vander Linden, 506 E. Liberty St., Pella, Iowa 1909 Miss Edna K. Beekman, Kulangsu, A m o y ........... 1914 Rev. H. Michael Veenschoten, Changchow........... 1917 Mrs. Stella G. Veenschoten, Changchow............. 1917 Rev. Henry A. Poppen, D.D., Changchow............ 1918 Mrs. Dorothy T. Poppen, Changchow............... 1918 Clarence H. Holleman, M.D., Kulangsu, A m o y ........ 1919 Mrs. Ruth E. Holleman, Kulangsu, Amoy. ........ 1919 Rev. Edwin W. Koeppe, D.D., Changchow........... 1919 Mrs. Elizabeth R. Koeppe, Changchow............... 1919 Miss Tena Holkeboer, Kulangsu, A m o y ............. 1920 Miss Jean Nienhuis, R.N. Tong-an......... ...... 1920 Miss Elizabeth G. Bruce, Sio-khe... ............. 1921 Richard Hofstra, M.D., Changchow....... 1922 Mrs. Johanna J. Hofstra, Changchow............... 1922 Mrs. Alma M. Vander Meer, R.N., Sio-khe........... 1923 Miss Ruth Broekema, Leng-na.................... 1924 Rev. William R. Angus, D.D., Leng-na.............. 1925 Âť Mrs. Joyce B. Angus, Leng-na.................... 1925 Theodore V. Oltman, M.D., Leng-na........ ....... 1929 Mrs. Helen M. Oltman, R.N., Leng-na............... 1929 Rev. Walter de Velder, Leng-na......... ......... 1929 Mrs. Harriet B. de Velder, R.N., Leng-na........... 1938 Miss Jeannette Veldman, R.N., Kulangsu, A m o y ....... 1930 Miss Jessie M. Platz, R.N., Skillman, New Jersey...... 1930 * Emeritus


Miss Jeane W. Walvoord, R.N., Changchow (1936-1948) H Miss Anne R. De Young, R.N., Kulangsu, A m o y ...... Rev. John P. Muilenburg, Kulangsu, A m o y .......... Mrs. Virginia T. Muilenburg, Kulangsu, A m o y ........ Rev. Joseph R. Esther, Tong-an.................. Mrs. Marion B. Esther, Tong-an.................. Miss Gladys M. Kooy, Tong-an............. Rev. Gordon J. Van Wyk, Fukien Christian Univ., Foo­ chow ............. ................. Mrs. Bertha V.' Van Wyk, Fukien Christian Univ., Foo­ chow ..................................... • Miss Frances E. Van Eenennaam, Leng-na.......... • Mr. Demarest Romaine, Jr. (Short Term), Changchow... Jack W. Hill, M.D., Tong-an...................... Mrs. Joann V. Hill, Tong-an......... ......... . •• * * Donald T. Bosch, M.D.; 156 Fifth Ave., New York 10, N. .................................. ..... * * Mrs. Eloise B. Bosch, 156 Fifth Ave., New York 10, N. Y. •* * Mr. Everett Kleinjans, 35 Taft St., Zeeland, Mich...... * * Mrs. Edith K. Kleinjans, 35 Taft St., Zeeland, Mich.... * * Rev. Ralph Ten Clay, Westfield, North Dakota........ * * Mrs. Jane R. Ten Clay, Westfield, North Dakota......

1931 1945 1946 1946 1946 1946 1946 1946 1946 1946 1946 1947 1947

1948

ARCOT MISSION General Address— M a d r a s Presidency, India . Went out .■*Miss Julia C. Scudder, Coonoor................ . •• 1879 * Henry J. Scudder, 47 Huntington St., New Brunswick, N. J. (1894-1897, 1914-1919)1..... ........ ••••• 1890 * Mrs. Margaret B. Scudder, 47 Huntington St., New 1897 Brunswick, N. J. (1914-1923)1................. * Miss Louisa H. Hart, M.D., Sackville, N. B., Canada.... 1895 * Rev. William H. Farrar, 325 Vine St., Hammonton, N. J.. 1897 * Mrs. Elizabeth W. Farrar, 325 Vine St., Hammonton, N. J. 1897 * Rev. Walter T. Scudder, 547 Riverside Drive, New York, N. Y ................... ..... .......... . •• 1899 * Miss Ida S. Scudder, M.D., Vellore............ •••• 1899 Miss Alice B. Van Doren, United Theological College, Ban­ galore, Mysore ................ ■_............ 1903 1909 Rev. Bernard Rottschaefer, D.D., Katpadi........... Mrs. Bernice M. Rottschaefer, Katpadi............. 1909 * Emeritus * * Under appointment 1 Service intermitted


Miss Margaret Rottschaefer, M.D., 156 Fifth Ave., New York 10, N. Y ............................... 1909 * Miss Sarella TeWinkel, 511 Daniel St., Orlando, Fla. (1936-1938)1 .................... 1909 Mrs. Henry Honegger, Vellore.................... 1910 Miss Charlotte C. Wyckoff, 924 West End Ave., New York, N. Y ...................................... 1915 Rev. John D. Muyskens, 9 Seminary Place, New Bruns­ wick, N. J. (1919-1923)1...................... 1915 Mrs. Dora J. Muyskens, 9 Seminary Place, New Bruns­ wick, N. J................................. 1923 Rev. Herbert E. Van Vranken, Tindivanam.......... 1917 Mrs. Nellie S. Van Vranken, Tindivanam........... 1917 Miss Wilhelmina Noordyk, R.N., 156 Fifth Ave., New York 10 ................................... 1917 Rev. Cornelius R. Wierenga, D.D., Vellore (1920-23)1... 1917 1923 Mrs. Ella K. Wierenga, Vellore................... Galen F. Scudder, M.D., Ranipet................... 1919 Mrs. Maude S. Scudder, Ranipet.................. 1919 Mr. John J. DeValois, 156 Fifth Ave., New York, 10, N. Y. 1920 Mrs. Bernadine Siebers DeValois, M.D., 156 Fifth Ave., New York 10, N. Y ........................... 1936 Miss Harriet Brumler, R.N., 624 Giddings Ave., Grand Rapids, Mich. .............................. 1923 Mrs. Sara W. Zwemer, Chittoor.... .............. 1923 Miss Mary E. Geegh, 411 Central Ave., Holland, Mich... 1924 Miss C. Willamina Jongewaard, Palmaner........ ,.. • 1925 1925 Rev. Ralph G. Korteling, Punganur................ Mrs. Anna Ruth W. Korteling, M.D., Punganur........ 1925 Rev. Cornie A. De Bruin, Ranipet................. 1926 Mrs. Francis L. De Bruin, Ranipet................ 1926 Miss Margaret R. Gibbons, M.D., 420 Adams Ave., State College, Pa................................. 1926 Miss Esther J. DeWeerd, Muttathoor, via Villupuram... 1928 1929 Mr. Benjamin DeVries, Katpadi.................. Mrs. Mildred V. DeVries, Katpadi................. 1929 Miss Doris A. Wells, Chittoor..................... 1930 Miss Johanna G. DeVries, R.N., Vellore............. 1937 Miss Lois M. Marsilje, R.N., Ranipet......... ..... 1939 Rev. John H. Piet, Vellore........................ 1940 Mrs. Wilma V. Piet, Vellore...................... 1940 Rev. Blaise Levai, Vellore............... ....... 1946 Mrs. Anna Mae Roth, Kodaikanal.......... 1946 Miss Albertha Biegel, R.N., Madanapalle............ 1946 * Emeritus T Service intermitted


Rev. Harold Vande Berg, Madanapalle.............. Mrs. Yvette Vande Berg, Madanapalle.............. Rev. Eugene L. Ten Brink, Katpadi............... Mrs. Ruth L. Ten Brink, Katpadi.................. Mr. Dick W. Vriesman, Tindivanam............... * * Miss Dora Boomstra, 10745 S. Wentworth Ave., Chicago,

1946 1946 1946 1946 1947

111....................................... * * Miss Alida Kloosterman, c/o Vander Wende, 2045 Arnold Ave. SW, Grand Rapids 9, Mich........... ......

JAPAN MISSION Went out 1 * Mrs. Vesta G. Peeke, 19510 Stratford Road, Detroit 21, Mich...................................... Rev. Willis G. Hoekje, D.D., 564 George St., New Bruns­ wick, N. J.................................. 2 Mrs. Annie H. Hoekje, 564 George St., New Brunswick, N. J....................................... * Miss Minnie Taylor, 1018 N. Hobart Blvd., Los Angeles, Calif...................................... Miss Jeane Noordhoff, 1090 Funabashi Cho, Sitagaya, Tokyo .................................... * Rev. Hubert Kuyper, 816 Fourteenth St., Boulder, Colo... * Mrs. May D. Kuyper, 816 Fourteenth St., Boulder, Colo... . Miss C. Janet Oltman, 37 Bluff, Yokohama........... * Miss Flora Darrow, 609 Orizaba Ave., San Francisco 12, Calif...................................... Miss Florence C. Walvoord, Baiko Jo Gakuin, Maruyama Machi, Shimonoseki, Japan..................... Miss Helen R. Zander, 37 Bluff, Yokohama.......... Rev. John C. de Maagd, 37 Bluff, Yokohama......... Mrs. Marion M. de Maagd, 917 S. Westnedge Ave., Kala­ mazoo, Mich................................. Miss F. Belle Bogard, 408 West First St., Pella, Iowa-* Emeritus * * Under appointment 1 Transferred to Japan Mission, 1893 2Transferred to Japan Mission, 1912

1887 1907 1908 191° 19H 1911 1912 1914 I922 1922 1928 1928 1928 1936


rf

.

ARABIAN MISSION Went out * Rev. Fred J. Barny, 89-01 212th St., Queens Village, N. Y. 1897 * Mrs. Margaret R. Barny, 89-01 212th St., Queens Village, N. Y .................................... 1898 Rev. John Van Ess, D.D., Basrah, Iraq.............. 1902 Mrs. Dorothy F. Van Ess, Basrah, Iraq............. 1909 * Miss Jane A. Scardefield, Fern Park, Fla............. 1903 1906 Rev. Dirk Dykstra, D.D., Muscat, Arabia............ Mrs. Minnie W. Dykstra, Muscat, Arabia............ 1907 * C. Stanley G. Mylrea, M.D., Kodaikanal, South India.... 1906 Rev. Gerrit J. Pennings, D.D., Amarah, Iraq......... 1908 Mrs. Gertrud S. Pennings, Amarah, Iraq............ 1912 Paul W. Harrison, M.D., 156 Fifth Ave., New York 10, N. Y ................. 1909 Mrs. Anna M. Harrison, 156 Fifth Ave., New York 10, N. Y ............ 1917 * Rev. Gerrit D. Van Peursem, North Branch, N. J...... 1910 * Mrs. Josephine S. Van Peursem, North Branch, N. J... 1910 Miss Charlotte B. Kellien, Basrah, Iraq............. 1915 Miss Ruth Jackson, Bahrain, Persian Gulf.......... 1921 Miss Rachel Jackson, Basrah, Iraq............. 1921 Miss Cornelia Dalenberg, R.N., Bahrain, Persian Gulf... 1921 Rev. George Gosselink, Basrah, Iraq................ 1922 Mrs. Christina S. Gosselink, Basrah, Iraq............ 1929 William J. Moerdyk, M.D., 132 West 11th St., Holland, Mich........... 1923 Mrs. Cornelia L. Moerdyk, R.N., 132 West 11th St., Hol­ land, Mich....... 1923 Rev. Garrett E. DeJong, Kuwait, Arabia............ 1926 Mrs. Everdene K. DeJong, Kuwait, Arabia.......... 1926 • W. Harold Storm, M.D., Bahrain, Persian Gulf........ 1927 Mrs. Ida P. Storm, R.N., Bahrain, Persian Gulf....... 1936 W. Wells Thoms, M.D., 156 Fifth Ave., New York 10, N. Y ...................................... 1931 Mrs. Ethel S. Thoms, 156 Fifth Ave., New York 10, N. Y. 1931 Lewis R. Scudder, M. D., Amarah, Iraq............. 1937 Mrs. Dorothy B. Scudder, R.N., Amarah, Iraq........ 1937 Gerald H. Nykerk, M.D., Kuwait, Arabia........... 1941 Mrs. Rose W. Nykerk, Kuwait, Arabia.............. 1941 Rev. Harry J. Almond, Basrah, Iraq (1946-47)1...... 1943 Mrs. Beverly K. Almond, Basrah, Iraq.............. 1947 Rev. Edwin M. Luidens, Bahrain, Persian Gulf..... 1944 Mrs. Ruth S. Luidens, Bahrain, Persian Gulf........ 1944 * Emeritus 1 Service intermitted


Rev. Jay R. Kapenga, Muscat, Arabia.............. Mrs. Marjorie U. Kapenga, Muscat, Arabia.......... Miss Harriet M. Wanrooy, R.N., R. # 1, Ada, Mich..... , Miss Jeanette Boersma, R.N., Amarah, Iraq......... Maurice M. Heusinkveld, M.D., Muscat, Arabia......... Mrs. Elinor C. Heusinkveld, R.N., Muscat, Arabia.... Mr. G. Jacob Holler, Jr., Basrah, Iraq. (Short Term).. Miss Joan Olthoff, R.N., Kuwait, Arabia........ . Miss Nellie M. Hekhuis, R.N., Bahrain, Persian Gulf-Miss Louise J. Essenberg, R.N., Kuwait, Arabia...... * * Miss Eunice Post, Harris, Iowa................... * * Miss Hazel M. Wood, R.N., R. # 2, Box 116, North Wilkesboro, N. ...................................

1944 1947 1944 1944 1946 1946 1946 1947 1947 1947

UNITED MISSION IN MESOPOTAMIA Went out * Mrs. May De Pree Thoms, 232 Pine Ave., Holland, Mich. (1913-1918)1 .......................... ••• 1906 Rev. Bernard D. Hakken, Baghdad, Iraq............ 1922 Mrs. Elda V. Hakken, Baghdad, Iraq............... 1922

AFRICA ' Went out Rev. J. Robert Swart, Akobo Post,«Anglo-Egyptian Sudan 1948 Mrs. Morrell W. Swart, Akobo Post, Anglo-Egyptian Sudan .................................... 1948 Miss Wilma J. Kats, Akobo Post, Anglo-Egyptian Sudan. 1948 * * Rev. Harvey T. Hoekstra, Grand Haven, Michigan...... --* * Mrs. Lavina H. Hoekstra, Grand Haven, Michigan..... ... * Emeritus * * Under appointment 1 Service intermitted The above list contains the names of missionaries now connected with the various Missions, whether in the field or at home expecting to return, with their addresses. Emeritus missionaries and those under appointment are also included. Letter postage to all foreign countries named above, five cents for the first ounce, three cents for each additional ounce or fraction thereof. Air mail postage 25 cents for each half ounce, except that one-page “Air Letter” covers can be purchased from any Post Office for 10 cents.


CLASSICAL AGENTS FOR FOREIGN MISSIONS Albany........ Rev. Paul E. Ammerman, 41 Marwood St., Albany, N. Y. Berglen ....... Rev. John Hawkins, Bogota, N. J. South Bergen -- Rev. Marvin B. Cady, 93 Persall St., Jersey City, N. J. California ......Rev. James Niewsma, 522 Walnut St., Bellflower, Calif. Cascades ...... Rev. Alex Van Bronkhorst, Box 134, Nooksack, Wash. Chicago....... Rev. R. D. Meengs, 3229 Wenonah, Berwyn, 111. Dakota ....... Rev. B. D. Dykstra, Orange City, Iowa. Germania ......Rev. Ralph Cordes, Davis, South Dakota Grand Rapids-- Rev. J. A. Dykstra, 851 Iroquois Dr., Grand Rapids, Mich. Greene........ Rev. J. J. Van Heest, R. D. 1, Catskill, N. Y. Holland....... Rev. Marion Klaaren, R. 5, Holland, Mich. Hudson ....... Rev. Christian Walvoord, Hudson, N. Y. Uliana ........ Rev. Peter Westra, 817 176th St., Hammond, Ind. Illinois........ Rev. Jacob Juist, Fairview, Illinois. Kalamazoo ..... Rev. James A. Stegeman, 301 George St., Decatur, Mich. N. Long Island ... Rev. Richard P. Mallery, 82-50 Kew Gardens Rd., Kew Gardens 15, N. Y. S. Long Island__ Rev. L. M. Lindsay, 145 Neck Rd., Brooklyn, N. Y. M o n m o u t h ..... Rev. Alvin A. Hook, Freehold, N. J. Montgomery ... Rev. J. Foster Welwood, Herkimer, N. Y. Muskegon...... Rev. Harold Ringenoldus, 1808 Ray St., Muskegon, Mich. Newark ..... ...Rev. H. W. Schenck, 81 Mt. Hebron Rd., Upper Montclair, N. J. New Brunswick ..Rev. George Moore, Franklin Park, N. J. New York...... Rev. Edgar F. Romig, 245 W. 77th St., N. Y. C., N. Y. Orange ........Rev. John W. Tysse, Wallkill, N. Y. Palisades...... Rev. Gerard C. Pool, 2607 Palisade Ave., Union City, N. J. Paramus ...... Rev. Clarence Howard, Mahwah, N. J. Passaic ....... Rev. E. M. Eeningenburg, 141 Hamilton Ave., Passaic, N. J. Pella ......... Rev. Anthony Haverkamp, Pella, Iowa Philadelphia ... Rev. George Scholten, Neshanic, N. J. Pleasant Prairie ..Rev. P. H. Achtermann, German Valley, 111. Poughkeepsie... Rev. George D. Wood, Hopewell Junction, N. Y. Raritan ....... Rev. Thomas Pace Haig, Somerville, N. J. Rensselaer......Rev. A. B. Boynton, Schodack Landing, N. Y. Rochester ......Rev. Harvey Staal, Ontario, N. Y. Saratoga ...... Rev. H. J. Burggraaff, 1511 First St., Watervliet, N. Y. Schenectady .... Rev. Anthony Van Westenburg, 220 Ballston Ave., Scotia, N. Y. Schoharie ......Rev. S. W. Duitsman, Berne, N. Y. East Sioux......Rev. Henry V. E. Stegeman, Orange City, Iowa West Sioux.... . Rev. Enos E. Heeren, Valley Springs, South Dakota Ulster ........ Rev. Arthur Oudemool, 52 Main St., Kingston, N. Y. Westchester .... Rev. A. G. Bossenbroek, Farragut Ave., Hastings-on-Hudson, N. Y. Wisconsin......Rev. R. J. Lubbers, 324 Buffalo St., Sheboygan Falls, Wis.


COMMITTEES FINANCE COMMITTEE Mr. Edward Damstra Mr. William T. Hakken Mrs. Howard Schade Mr. Samuel Woolley

Mrs. J. W. Beardslee, Chairman Mr. Howard Nichols Mr. Clifford Case Mr. Lawrence Chambers

FIELD COMMITTEES China Dr. Milton Stauffer Mrs. G. Hondelink Dr. A. L. Warnshuis— Honorary

Rev. Anthony Van Westenburg, Chairman

Mrs. Henry Beltman Rev. Paul Achtermann Rev. J. Hogenboom

Member

India Mrs. Chester Moore Dr. A. L. Wamshius— Honorary Member • Rev. John W. Beardslee— Honorary

Mrs. Martin de Wolfe, Chairman Rev. Floyd Nagel Mr. Matt Rens . Rev. J. C. Van Wyk Mrs. Paul Hinkamp

Member

Japan Rev. David Van Strien, Chairman Mrs. Theodore Brinckerhoff Mrs. Henry Pietenpol

Rev. Harvey B. Hoffman Rev. George Mennenga Rev. Henry V. E. Stegeman

Arabia Rev. Richard P. Mallery, Chairman Rev. Elton Eeningenburg Mrs. Abraham De Young Rev. Christian H. Walvoord Mrs. David Bogard Mrs. Jacob Juist Dr. Samuel Zwemer— Honorary M e m b e r Representatives for United Mission— Rev. Richard P. Mallery, Mrs. David Bogard

Africa Rev. A. G. Bossenbroek, Chairman Mrs. James Wayer Rev. Harry J. Hager

Mrs. Howard C. Schade Rev. William DeJong Mr. Lloyd Van Keuren

CANDIDATE COMMITTEE Rev. Abraham Rynbrandt, Chairman Mrs. John W. Beardslee Mrs. Henry Pietenpol

Rev. Richard Mallery Mrs. Paul Hinkamp Rev. Harvey B. Hoffman


EDUCATION AND PUBLICITY Rev. Paul Achtermann, Chairman Mrs. J. J. Van Strien Mrs. Abraham De Young Rev. Elton Eeningenburg Mrs. Henry Pietenpol

Mrs. James Wayer Mrs. Jacob Juist Rev. Joshua Hogenboom Rev. Floyd Nagel Rev. George H. Mennenga

MISSIONARY RESIDENCES Rev. Henry Stegeman, Chairman Mrs. John W. Beardslee Mr. William T. Hakken Mrs. Abraham De Young Rev. Anthony Haverkamp Mrs. Henry Beltman Rev. W. J. Van Kersen— Honorary M e m b e r ■

NOMINATING COMMITTEE C. H. Walvoord, Chairman Mrs. John W. Beardslee Mrs. Henry Pietenpol

Mrs. James Wayer Rev. Floyd Nagel Rev. Abraham Rynbrandt


NOTES


NOTES


continued from first cover

Mr. E. F. Sheppard, 25 Mountain Avenue, North Plainfield, New Jersey. Mrs. David Bogard, Little Falls, New Jersey. Mrs. Abraham De Young, Allegan, Michigan. Mrs. C. Moore, 400 East 67th Street, New York, New York. Mrs. Henry W. Pietenpol, 709 Peace Street, Pella, Iowa. ' Mrs. H. C. Schade, 43 Bedford Road, Tarrytown, New York.

HONORARY

MEMBERS

Rev. J. W. Beardslee, 25 Seminary Place, New Brunswick, N. J.

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD President................ Vice-President............ Vice-President............ Recording Secretary....... Exec. Secretary a n d Treasurer Exec. Secretary........... Exec. Secretary........... Field Secretary........... Associate Treasurer........

... .Mr. William T. Hakken .... Mrs. M. Stephen James __ Rev. Richard P. Mallery Mrs. Theodore Brinckerhoff ......... Dr. F. M. Potter ....... Miss Ruth Ransom ......Dr. Luman J. Shafer ...... Rev. B. M. Luben ...... Miss Edwina Paige

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Rev. David Van Strien— Chairman Mrs. J. W. Beardslee Rev. A. G. Bossenbroek Mrs. Theodore Brinckerhoff Mr. Lawrence Chambers Mrs. Martin de Wolfe Mrs. Abraham De Young Mr. William T. Hakken Rev. Harvey B. Hoffman Mrs. M. Stephen James

Rev. Richard Mallery Rev. Floyd V. Nagel Mr. Howard B. Nichols Mrs. David Bogard Rev. Abraham Rynbrandt Mr. Lloyd Van Keuren Mrs. J. J. Van Strien Rev. Anthony Van Westenburg Mr. E. F. Sheppard

MEDICAL ADVISERS Harold E. Veldman, M.D., 1418 Plainfield Avenue, N. E., Grand Rapids, Mich. Associated Mission Medical Office, 150 Fifth Avenue, New York 11, N. Y.