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ber

Hope C o l l e g e

2004

Holland, Michigan

A student-run nonprofit publication

S e r v i n g t h e Hope C o l l e g e C o m m u n i t y f o r 118 y e a r s

Images '04 celebrates international culture Evelyn Daniel STAFF REPORTER

"Before you can read me you gotta learn how to see me. / said / Freely our mind and the rest will follow / Be colorblind. don't he so shallow." So y a r n e d ihc opening song of Images 2004: A Reflection of Culiures. "Learn-

Olim Alimov ( 05) and Marina Kovalyuk ('08) present the Russian poem, "Motherland," in both English and Russian.

ing h o w 10 sec" before making j u d g m e n t s was a conccpl iliat permeated the event this past Saturday at the Knickerbocker Theatre. Images featured acts from the U.S., Latin America, the Middle East, Albania, Ethiopia, France, Germany. India. Japan, Kenya and Russia. The event stayed true to this year's theme, "Got Friends?" by demonstrating not only the differences among people throughout the world but also their similarities. Regardless of one's country or background, all enjoyed laughter, music, dancing, and common bonds of friendship. To open ihc show and set the mood, participants entered carrying glowing lights of many different colors while the audience sat in darkness. Rather than standing still, the lights were moving, dancing, and interacting with one another to illustrate the "tapestry" of humanity, which is composed of many different elements. "I really liked the opening," said Sona Smith ('06), a participant in the first act, a dance to the song "Free Your Mind" by En Vogue. "I thought thai was very powerful." The audience witnessed a comical reenactment of a Japanese folktale, "Aka Onisan to Ao Onisan," enjoyed Russian poetry speaking of the "Motherland," and watched an African-American step show. Dancers and performers took their music from all over the world, from French

Briefs

T h e C e l e b r a t i o n of Undergraduate Research and Creative Performance is now acccpting student work. Abstracts must be s u b m i t t e d e l e c t r o n i c a l l y to amdl@hope.edu by Nov. 30. The Celebration will recognize the creative work of students produced with the assistance of a faculty mentor, as a senior project, during an internship or s u m m e r research or a performance/independent study. Details about proper format for submissions can be found at hope.edu/knowhope/ where. htnil#e vents.

love songs to Indian Bollywood pop to the distinctive Kenyan sound of "The Nixon Administration." The show included 15 different perform a n c e s and highlighted traditional attire from the Middle East, Latin America, Africa, Asia and Europe. Participants were members of multicultural groups, such as HAPA or the Black Student Union, international students or simply members of the student body who wanted l a involved. "Being an American, this introduced me to a lot of new music. It makes me want to

more IMAGES on 2

A N O H O f ? P H O T O S

BY

EVELYN

DANIEL

Discussion of race continues

Campus

Research submissions due

Above, Red Demon and Blue Demon discuss the virtues of friendship in the Japanese skit, "Aka Onisan to Ao Onisan." Right, students portray Japanese villagers in the skit.

Lindsey Manthei STAFF REPORTER

Race is still very much an issue in America today. All it t a k e s is a s t r o l l t h r o u g h Hope's campus to realize that the number of white students disproportionately outnumbers the minority population. In an effort to continue the discussion of racc relations at Hope College, the Critical Issues Symposium presented a lecture by award-winning aut h o r A l e x K o t l o w i t z on Thursday night highlighting the issues of race and segregation. Kotlowitz is the author of "There Are No Children Here," "The Other Side of the River," and "Never a City So Real." His b o o k s , f o c u s i n g on race uelations, h a v e made

Vegas Night Friday S A C will present its annual Vegas Night, "An Evening at the Ritz," on Friday at 8 p.m. in Phelps and Maas to entertain and enjoy. Professional entertainer Rob Gonzalez is the featured event, and students who attend will be entered in a drawing for an all-expenses-paid weekend trip for four to Chicago. The night will include a variety of Vegas style games. Tickets are on sale now at the Student Union Desk for S3 and will be available for $5 at the door. Be sure to sign up p r o m p t l y ; the first 98 people to sign up will be entered into a Texas Hold ' E m tournament and can win cool prizes such as an iPod or DVD player. Proceeds from the night will go to Dance Marathon.

S t . J o s e p h is h i m a regular on characterized by a radio and televipredominantly s i o n s h o w s and white, prosperous lecturing at univercitizenry. Benton sities. Harbor, located K o 11 o w i t z ' s just across the St. works have also J o s e p h R i v e r , is been f e a t u r e d in predominantly an T h e New Yorker, African American T h e N e w York town with a poor T i m e s Magazine, Alex Kotlowitz e conomy and, and Rolling Stone. t h u s , s u b s t a n d a r d h o u s i n g and "1 wanted to come (to the lecschools. ture) because I read ' T h e r e Are "These two cities are so typical No Children Here" and he's disof h o w we live in A m e r i c a — s o cussing race issues, so I thought close, yet so far," Kotlowitz said. it would be interesting," said Kollowitz's interest in race relaHeidi Libncr ('05). tions began at an early age. In his lecture, Kotlowitz spoke G r o w i n g up in an integrated mainly about "The Other Side ol neighborhood in New York City, he the River" and the struggle that assumed that people everywhere in took place in the neighboring America were as accepting of diMichigan towns of Benton Harversity as those he had grown up bor and St. Joseph in the early more LECTURE on 2 1990s.

77-

Inside m anchor® hope.ddu (616) 395-7877

Candida takes stage Arts, page 3

Making the grade Features, page 4

- •AftV ,V CAARE returns Features, page 5

Knights triumph Sports, page 8


C A M P U S BEAT

^ V n c h o r

N o v e m b e r 17, 2004

RACE from 1

Ed department receives grant for online courses p e o p l e interpret things t h r o u g h their o w n ex-

Amanda Zoratti SENIOR STAFF REPORTER

The O u a w a Area Inlcrmediale School Disiricl and the H o p e C o l l e g e E d u c a t i o n D e p a r t m e n t h a v e received $ 1 0 0 , 0 0 0 for n e w c o u r s e s f o c u s i n g on l a n g u a g e arts,

periences, both in the c l a s s r o o m and in life. The development was created from a sum-

with. A f t e r g o i n g to c o l l e g e . K o t l o w i t z realized that race still w a s an issue in A m e r i c a . "I w a n t e d deal with race in a m u c h m o r e candid w a y in

We have to break the silence because (race) will slowly such the spirit out of people. —Alex Kotlowitz

my writing. T h e problem with the d i s c u s s i o n of r ace in A m e r i c a tod a y is t h a t it o n l y t a l k s a b o u t b l a c k

der. T h o s e on both sides of the river built

A m e r i c a , not white A m e r i c a

c o n f u s e d the i s s u e . " K o t l o w i t z said. W h a t surprised Kotlowitz w a s that p e o p l e

m y t h s a b o u t e a c h other that c o n f i n e d a n d

too."

m e r " M i d w e s t Brain and Learning Institutes" and c e n t e r s on the m o s t recent brain research

K o t l o w i t z said. R a c e is a n i s s u e t h a t h a s d i v i d e d

information. E a c h c o u r s e will last 16 w e e k s a n d b e worth 3 credits. T h e planning t e a m will serve

A m e r i c a for well o v e r a century, a n d a f -

on both sides of the river were simply searching for a moral m i d d l e ground. T h e r e w e r e

ter so m a n y y e a r s of civil rights laws, the

no h e r o e s or villains, just o r d i n a r y p e o p l e

as the instructors and a l l o w the t e a c h e r s w h o

c o u n t r y still falls short o f the e q u a l i t y K o t l o w i t z b e l i e v e s e v e r y A m e r i c a n de-

w h o w a n t e d to d o right but did not k n o w

tion in the C o n t e n t A r e a s . " Each c o u r s e o f f e r e d will a m one se-

enroll to d i s c u s s ideas with one a n o t h e r and

serves, no matter the c o l o r of their skin.

c o n v e r s e on the m o s t s u c c e s s f u l l e a c h i n g

" R a c e is a subject that m a n y of us are

m e s t e r and should be c o m p l e t e d for u s e

styles. ' C o u r s e s will b l e n d s u b j e c t c o n t e n t , e f f e c -

tired of talking a b o u t , " K o t l o w i t z said. It is the f i s s u r e that h a s d e f i n e d the

tive instruction ideas, and brain research to

A m e r i c a n landscape. But we h a v e to break the silence b e c a u s e it will slowly s u c k the

m a t h e m a t i c s , s c i e n c e , and social studies. T h e grant, t h r o u g h M i c h i g a n L e a r n P o r t . w a s g i v e n for " B r a i n - c o m p a t i b l e Instruc-

by next fall. T h e target a u d i e n c e is elementary and secondary teachers working t o w a r d s p r o f e s s i o n a l certification. G A I S D Assistant S u p e r i n t e n d e n t Dr.

create a better l e a r n i n g e n v i r o n m e n t and can be applied toward the 18 credits that m u s t be

D a n Jonker, a l o n g with e d u c a t i o n con-

c o m p l e t e d b y t e a c h e r s looking for p r o f e s -

spirit o u t of p e o p l e . " K o t l o w i t z ' s b o o k , " T h e O t h e r S i d e of

sultants D a v e N e i f e r and Dr. Jan D a l m a n and H o p e P r o f e s s o r s L i n d a Jordan and

sional c e r t i f i c a t i o n . LearnPort c h o s e 5 other p r o p o s a l s f o r the

the River," f o c u s e s on the d e a t h of Eric McGinnis, a young black man from

Doctor Leslie W e s s m a n , are d e v e l o p i n g

"rant, including Berrien C o u n t y* ISD, Clinton O C o u n t y R E S A . M i c h i g a n A s s o c i a t i o n of

Benton H a r b o r w h o w a s f o u n d dead after

the c o u r s e s . T h e p u r p o s e of the c o u r s e s is t o shift the thought p r o c e s s b e h i n d thinking. T h e project is based on the c o n c e p t that

School Administrators. Michigan Association f o r S u p e r v i s i o n a n d C u r r i c u l u m Develo p m e n t . and S u c c e s s l i n e Inc.

w h e r e t o start. K o t l o w i t z e n c o u r a g e d the large a u d i e n c e at the K n i c k e r b o c k e r T h e a t e r to r e c o g n i z e that the issue of race b e g i n s with t h e m and that e n g a g i n g in d i a l o g u e a b o u t race is vital b e c a u s e that is the only w a y the issue is going to be s o l v e d . In c o n c l u d i n g h i s s p e e c h . K o t l o w i t z said. "Cities are as s e g r e g a t e d n o w a s they were 4 0 years a g o . We need to tell these p e o p l e ' s stories so we can m a k e sense of the w o r l d that w e live in." In closing. K o t l o w i t z issued a c h a l l e n g e

h a v i n g b r o k e n into a w h i t e m a n ' s car in

t o the a u d i e n c e . " L o o k at the issue of race in a w a y you h a v e n ' t c o n s i d e r e d it b e f o r e . In the e n d . it

St. J o s e p h . " E v e r y o n e in St. Joseph thought Eric's d e a t h w a s an accident, but e v e r y o n e in Benton H a r b o r w a s sure that it w a s a mur-

will help us to all find c o n n e c t i o n s . "

IMAGES from 1 listen to m o r e H i s p a n i c m u s i c . " said L i n d s a y S t r a h l e ( ' 0 6 ) . a participant in " B a i l a l o . " a Latin A m e r i c a n salsa d a n c e . i t m a d e me realize that t h e r e ' s a lot m o r e out there and helped m e to b r o a d e n my horiz o n s . I got to m e e t s o m e great p e o p l e . " Strahle said. S t u d e n t s and other m e m b e r s s t u d e n t s , m e m b e r s of the f a c u l t y a n d the

uirrt;ioÂŤM c u I u h c n vuuiu c o m e togcHicr and d o s o m e t h i n g like this," said Erika O g l e s b y

lart'/avfon, and school-

H o l l a n d c o m m u n i t y , c o u l d a p p r e c i a t e the

('08).

t i m e and e f f o r t that w e n t into b r i n g i n g I m -

S a t u r d a y ' s p r o g r a m also i n c l u d e d a f r e e will o f f e r i n g a n d b a k e sale to b e n e f i t the

ing t o those in n e e d t h r o u g h o u t

a g e s together. "There were skits and song and even

AHCHOfi

the world.

PHOTOS

BY

EVELYN

DANIEL

A

f u n d r a i s e r t o aid a c o u n t r y or region in

D a r f u r region of S u d a n , w h o s e p e o p l e h a v e

crisis h a s been a tradition at I m a g e s for

d a n c e , a little bit of e v e r y t h i n g . It w a s great

b e e n s u f f e r i n g f r o m years of civil war.

that so m a n y students c o u l d get i n v o l v e d , " said S a m a r a W e b b ( ' 0 5 ) .

D o n a t i o n s w e n t to S a m a r i t a n ' s Purse, an international organization that p r o v i d e s ser-

the past several years. I m a g e s 2004 w a s s p o n s o r e d by Inter-

"It w a s beautiful h o w p e o p l e f r o m so m a n y

vices like medical care, f a m i n e relief, demili-

n a t i o n a l E d u c a t i o n a n d the O f f i c e o f Multicultural L i f e .

Left, Nixon Omollo ('06) and his band "The Nixon Administration" give their music a Kenyan sound. Right, Images participants carry in flags from around the world during the opening ceremony.

G R O W A (SOCIAL) CONSCIENCE Mackenzie fSmith C a m p u s Beat Editor

A new kind of revolution — time-tested for a century

" i t c a n only be s o l v e d b y another Revolution." T h i s is the first reaction o f

In a society s uch as ours, so a c c e p t i n g o f v i o l e n c e as a tool, the strategy o f a n o n v i o l e n t

s o m e p e o p l e w h e n their e y e s

approach may seem questionable

are o p e n e d to the tragic conditions under which so

or e v e n l a u g h a b l e . "I had almost despaired o f the

M e x i c o , N e l s o n M a n d e l a ' s anti-

p e o p l e to fight for this c h a n g e

v i o l e n c e , and yet stayed true t o

a p a r t h e i d m o v e m e n t in S o u t h

with l o v e in the f o r e f r o n t , love as

their n o n v i o l e n t ideals.

Africa and more. T h e s e past s u c c e s s e s illuminate

the o n l y a c c e p t a b l e w a y o f

A s G a n d h i said, " A n o p p r e s s o r ' s e f f o r t s will be in

without violence, a n d their

affecting change. T h e Z a p a t i s t a s are a g r o u p o f " r e b e l s " in the southern M e x i c a n

his t y r a n n y . " O n c e the consent o f the ruled

the possibility o f c r e a t i n g c h a n g e

vain if w e r e f u s e t o s u b m i t to

many of the world's people

p o w e r o f love t o s o l v e social

e x a m p l e s p r o v i d e inspiration for

state o f C h i a p a s . Fed up with the

exist. T h e s t a t e m e n t is

p r o b l e m s , " the Rev. Martin L u t h e r K i n g , Jr. said at o n e point

ftiture c h a n g e . Gandhi's civil-disobedience

failure o f the g o v e r n m e n t t o i m p r o v e their standard o f living,

t o he ruled is gone, t h o s e in p o w e r c a n retain their position

- but h e d i d n ' t g i v e up h o p e .

c a m p a i g n in India, w h i c h lasted f r o m 1930 until i n d e p e n d e n c e

they h a v e established their o w n

only t h r o u g h the use o f vio-

g o v e r n m e n t , a n incredibly

f r o m British rule, rested o n the

participatory direct d e m o c r a c y . T h e y illustrate the truth that

lence. If that violence p r o v e s ineffective in controlling the subjects, the r e g i m e will fail

c o n t r a d i c t o r y in s o m a n y w a y s : it reeks o f f a l s e h o o d , yet rings with a b s o l u t e truth. A revolution is n e e d e d , but

K i n g w e n t on to lead the s u c c e s s ful c a m p a i g n for civil rights,

v i o l e n c e cannot b e t h e answer.

w h i c h rested largely o n n o n v i o -

V i o l e n c e is c a p a b l e only o f b r e e d i n g m o r e violence, m o r e

lent principles. Nonviolent revolution always

pain and m o r e struggle. But dramatic (radical?) c h a n g e is n e e d e d : a revolution in the m i n d s , the hearts and t h e a c t i o n s o f the people, in the political structure, a n d e s p e c i a l l y in the d o m e s t i c elite, m u s t occur.

s e e m s a n impossibility until it h a p p e n s ~ a n d it does h a p p e n .

p r e m i s e o f satyagraha. King e x p l a i n e d the idea this w a y : "satya is truth w h i c h equals love, and graha is force; satyagraha t h u s m e a n s t r u t h - f o r c e o r love-

nonviolent movements must do w h a t they p r e a c h . I f t h e y a r e t o s u c c e e d without t h e use o f force, they m u s t e m p l o y love a n d truth in their internal circles b e f o r e

a n d an o p p o r t u n i t y for just g o v e r n m e n t will present itself. Radical c h a n g e - revolution is n e c e s s a r y to m a k e this world a better place. But g o o d will not result f r o m violence. A

force." T h i s t r u t h - f o r c e calls o n p e o p l e

t h e y c a n spread it to o u t s i d e

in the past c e n t u r y a l o n e i n c l u d e s M a h a t m a G a n d h i ' s civil d i s o b e d i -

t o r e c o g n i z e the truth in their hearts, the truth that o p p r e s s i o n is w r o n g a n d action is necessary to

society. All these r e v o l u t i o n s h a v e had one t h i n g in c o m m o n : they f a c e d

nonviolent approach, one based o n love and respect for h u m a n -

e n c e in India, the Z a p a t i s t a s in

c o m b a t it. T h e l o v e - f o r c e calls

an oppos i t i on u n a f r a i d o f u s i n g

change.

T h e civil r i g h t s m o v e m e n t is o n l y one e x a m p l e . T h e list o f successful nonviolent revolutions

k i n d , will create real a n d lasting


V^nchor

ARTS

N o v e m b e r 17, 2 0 0 4

Drama students bring "Candide" to Hope Drama students race against the clock to prepare themselves for opening night Holly Beckerman STAFF REPORTER

H u r r y i n g lo gel lines d o w n , costumes done, lights and mikes working before their first performance, the cast members of Candide will soon see Ihe product of their hard work. The musical will open Nov. 19 and will also run Nov. 20 and Dec. 8 through 11. NoahDavid Lein. who plays Voltaire, a main character in the production, described Candide as a satirical melodramatic operetta. It is a musical set in the 1750s. with music by Leonard Bernstein, that focuses on a philosophical debate regaining optimism, pessimism and the existence of God. Through its fast and willy plol, Voltaire t a k e s his r e a d e r s to a variety of places throughout Europe and South America where the main characters witness injustices and

nr®

disasters. The characters struggle to find any good from these situations, but fail and find folly in optimism. Yet, il isn't until the end of Ihe novel thai Voltaire's purpose and message is revealed. Costume design director Devon Painter has been here since October 1 and will be leaving Saturday after viewing Candide. Painter is a freelance c o s t u m e d e s i g n e r f r o m N e w York w h o attended graduate school with Michelle Bombc, who now teaches theatre at Hope. Bombe. knowing she would be on sabbatical during this time, asked Painter if she would be willing to h e l p with the production. "If you do Candide count me in." Painier said. Creating this piece hasn't been easy. "Il is a hard show to do and not many choose to put this production on. Il is very demanding, expensive and requires a full orchestra, not to mention 28 cast members with a lot of costumes," Painter said. "Bui I am honored to work with the cast here. They are so tenacious. They

n

a

AMOHOff P H O T O

C O U R T E S Y

O F

HOLLY B E C K E R M A N

Abbey Youngerman fashions costumes that students will wear in the upcoming preformance of "Candide." are willing to work hard and handle this difficult production so beautifully." " O u r g o a l is l o e f f e c t i v e l y capture the essence of Voltaire's wit and fast pace which will then create little room for reflection uniil the end where it all adds up, just as the

novel does," Painier said. The actors lake on many parts throughout Ihe production and the scene changes constantly,' focusing on one place and then another. The 28 cast members get their fill of ihe "The chorus is on stage almost

as much as the lead actors," Lein said. " T h e y a r e the story. T h e chorus is what really brings each country, each location lo Candide." Lein said the group is very well bonded and find motivation in their unity, knowing ihcy have a big j o b ahead of them. Painier said that w h i l e t h o s e w o r k i n g on i h e production are busy and a little behind, she is really excited to see how the production comes together. Painier said ihe cast is really into ihe story. "These people don't quit. They h a v e an i n c r e d i b l e w o r k ethic. C a n d i d e has a difficult musical score but the students handle il so well. I'm very impressed with ihe caliber of students here and also love working with ihe professors. Students here arc very lucky." "The production here is visually stunning, the music is incredible and t h e s i n g e r s a r e f a n t a s t i c , " Painter said. "I can't wail lo see the final result." All showings begin at 8 p.m. in ihe DeWiu Theatre. Tickets are 55 and can be purchased at the Dewili box office.

Brahms Piano Trio performs as part of GPS Critically acclaimed Russian trio will play peices by Brahms, Tchaikovsky,and Shostavich Amanda Zoratti SEN»OR STAFF REPORTER

This Thursday, Dimnent Chapel brings a brilliant performance from a Russian Trio. The Brahms Piano Trio will perform at 7:30 p.m. as a part of the Hope College Great Perfonnance Scries. "They are the surprise group of the year." said Derek Emerson, the coordinator for the GPS. "People haven't heard of them, but 2 of the members are from one of the leading quartets in ihe world, and they're generating a lot of attention." The two members Emerson is referring to are violinist Alia Aranovskaya and cellist Leonid Shukaev. Both are members of the world renowned, G r a m m y - n o m i n a t e d St. Petersburg String Quartet, one ot the most

prestigious quartets today. The pair has joined a pianist, Maxim Mogilveski, who has won multiple competitions across the world, including places such as South Africa, Portugal,

and

Japan.

v.ur, o l n o

iwr.t

pupil of Anaida Sumbatian, instructor of Vladimir Ashkena/y, a well-known piano prodigy. The talent of ihe group combined with the diversity of knowledge should make for an entertaining evening. • T h e three shared the same approach to t h e m u s i c , m e l d i n g s e a m l e s s l y as an e n s e m b l e . . . was rich, c o m f o r t i n g , noble, heroic, bold, intimate, prayerful, ineffable," said Chris Pastes, Los Angeles Times Staff Reporter. ' T m very excited about this one because I diink it will catch a lot of audience members off guard." Emerson said. "They're going to expect a chamber concert and get more than that." The ensemble performs a variety of works, including pieces by Brahms, Tchaikovsky, and Shostakovich arid has played in the Los

Angeles Music Guild, the Washington. D.C. Dumbarton Concert, and ihe New York City Frick Collection. " I ' m really looking forward to hearing . .t i K —v, pl.Ty,*' . ..:-i x T .rtrr: m « . music major, it's e x c i t i n g to. h a v e the opportunity to enjoy professional talent." The group has been reviewed by many critics, receiving raving reviews such as "The Brahms Trio turned to its namesake for an i m p a s s i o n e d e n c o r e , " as w r i t t e n by the Columbus Dispatch, and has won prestigious awards such as "Best Record" honors in the " S t e r e o R e v i e w " and " G r a m o p h o n e " magazines. "They haven't even recorded yet," Emerson said. "This is a new venture for the group. T h e y ' r e only in their 3 rd season, so ihe group members are still excited about what they're doing, and I think that will show up in their performance." Tickets are available at the DcWiit Theatre box office from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and cost just S5 for students.

Jazz Ensembles spice up music scene A pair of Jazz Ensembles will play pieces from Mingus, Monk, Brecker, Mehldau and Silver Neil S i m o n s SENIOR STAFF REPORTER

Several Hope students will be performing next week in a Jazz Ensemble. This includes the Be Bop E n s e m b l e , c o a c h e d by Ryan Janus and the Post Bop E n s e m b l e , coached by Brian Coyle. Tunes being performed will range f r o m "Shadow of Your Smile" and "Tune Up," to "A Mingus A Monk Us" and "Juicy

Lucy." This feature will also showcase the Vocal Jiiz/ Workshop, coached by Kristin Ward. "The combo concerts are really fun for me because there's always a sense of camaraderie between the musicians and the audience," said Glenn Lester ('05). " W h e n the listeners react positively to what we're playing, we can feed off of their energy and lake the music into places it may h a v e not have g o n e without an audience. The spirit of small-group jazz improvisation can be liberating for both player and listener," Lester suggests that some of ihe pieces that will be performed are among his favorites, and include Mingus, Monk. Brecker. Mehldau. and Silver—though he slates thai

the program is not yet finalized. "For my past three years at Hope, I've played in a combo with the small four people but this year die group is completely different. I love playing with all of these guys, figuring out how w e c a n fit t o g e t h e r o u r individual voices to make an exciting whole. W e ' r e all very interested in taking music to places that might seem little u n c o m f o r t a b l e but m a k i n g il e x c i t i n g to us a n d t o t h e audience," Lester said. T h e p e r f o r m a n c e will take place on N o v e m b e r 23, beginning at 7 p.m. at Wichcrs Auditorium in Nykerk Hall. A d m i s s i o n is free and the public is invited to attend.

The members of the Brahms Piano Trio, who will be performing tomorrow in Dimnent.

Arts Brief Student Dance Concert displays talents The department of dance at Hope College will present this semester's S t u d e n t D a n c e C o n c e r t on Monday-Tuesday, Nov. 22-23, at 8 p.m. in the Knickerbocker Theatre. The production will be choreographed and performed by students, with students participating in many of the behindthe-scenes aspects as well, assisted by Erik Alberg of the K n i c k e r b o c k e r T h e a t r e . A less f o r m a l D o w C o n c e r t will be presented on Tuesday, Nov. 30, at 7 p.m. in the main studio of the Dow Center, featuring site-specific w o r k s , w o r k s - i n - p r o g r e s s and freshman-choreographed pieces. O n e h i g h l i g h l of the S t u d e n t

Dance C o n c e i t will be the annual Dance Production class piece. It will b e the f i n a l p r o d u c t of a semester-long collaboration of 11 studenls along with Ray Tadio of the dance faculty. The interdisciplinary work e x p l o r e s the societal pressures, questions of identity, struggles, and finally paths to empowerment of today's women. Both the dancers and v i s u a l a r t i s t s i n v o l v e d a r e excited about breaking new ground in their exploration of these current issues. Many other choreographic p r e m i e r e s as well as r e - w o r k e d pieces from past semesters will be presenied at both shows.


FEATURES

% \ r L c h o r

N o v e m b e r 17, 2004

Making the graxie: In the classroom and life U

|

SPOTLIGHT

|

Holly Beckerman STAFF REPORTER

H o p e is p r i m a r i l y m a d e u p ol* iradilional e o l l e g e s l u d e n l s — i r a d i l i o n a l in ihe sense of age a n d social experienees. Dan Sherry, nursing sludeni and s e c o n d s e m e s i e r s o p h o m o r e , is one o f l h e f e w noniradiiional s l u d e n l s al-

I d a b b l e d around taking classes in phi-

losophy. political science and v a r i o u s English courses," said Sherry. "Bui none of t h e m gave a clear vocational direction, w h i c h conlributed lo m y disinterest in school. A n d I w a s n ' t a b o u t lo w r a c k up debt to figure out w h a t I wanted to d o when I grew up." He m o v e d f r o m G r a n d R a p i d s t o Holland

today and h o w t o get it d o n e . " Sherry said. "In w h a t e v e r c o n t e x t , it's all a b o u t training

traditional." Sherry said. From b e i n g a father lo a full lime sludeni

and r e a c h i n g the desired goal. M y goal right n o w is l o g r a d u a t e and begin w o r k i n g im-

to w o r k i n g full time Sherry said he f i n d s so-

mediately after. I really w a n t to work in the

lace in taking l i f e bit by bit. "if I looked al the w h o l e , the reality w o u l d b e o v e r w h e l m -

ER. Yet, through his educational career Sherry

ing. I f o c u s o n the present, w h a t I need lo d o

f i n d s ii e n l i g h t e n i n g lo look back al ihe lessons he learned. "In

in 1990 and b e g a n attending H o p e in J a n u a r y of 2003. "1 c h o s e H o p e

lending Hope. He is 37 years old and has been

for m a n y reasons, one b e i n g there

m i s t a k e n m a n y limes as being a p r o f e s s o r .

w a s no currcnl wail list for the nursing p r o g r a m h e r e . A l s o , my w i f e

Sherry h o w e v e r allends classes alongside

I h a n g out with s o m e n u r s i n g s l u d e n l s , a c o u p l e noniradiiional. but most of t h e m are

f e l l o w s l u d e n l s half his a g e . A l l h o u g h he is s u b j e c l e d lo ihe s a m e acad e m i c rigors a n d e x p e c l a l i o n s . Sherry s silu-

g r a d u a t e d f r o m H o p e in *88 and at-

alion a n d insighl c o n c e r n i n g the c o l l e g e ex-

ing in t o w n a n d going t o c o l l e g e in

p e r i e n c e is u n i q u e S h e r r y g r e w u p in C h i c a g o w h e r e h e

that s a m e town and b e i n g able lo w a l k prelty much e v e r y w h e r e a l s o

g r a d u a t e d f r o m N e w Trier High S c h o o l — i h e s a m e high school w h e r e ihe movie T h e

h e l p s m e lo h a v e s o m e w h a t of an

B r e a k f a s i C l u b look place. He Ihen wenl lo

l i m e e x i s t e n c e s — b e i n g a 37 year

Illinois Siale for i w o s e m e s t e r s , bui ihe Augusl b e f o r e his s o p h o m o r e y e a r he b r o k e his

old w o r k i n g f a t h e r and a full t i m e

hindsight I would h a v e (gone into n u r s i n g ) the first time, but I feel I have b e c o m e w i s e r and m o r e patient through lime."

t e n d e d classes at Western so I had that c o n n e c t i o n , " Sherry said. "Liv-

Sherry said. "There are lessons lo be l e a r n e d in e v e r y thing you do. Take the lime to learn the lesson, d o n ' t let it

integrated life while h a v i n g t w o full

leg and had lo w i t h d r a w lhal s e m e s i e r d u e lo

nursing s l u d e n i . " T r y i n g to k e e p a pretty b a l a n c e d

required physical Iherapy. He then iransferred lo Calvin second semesier sophomore year

social life. "1 d o n ' t s h o w up al parlies on c a m p u s nor d o 1 attend non-

a n d w e n l i h e r e f o r ihree s e m e s t e r s .

traditional

student

p a s s you by. It's not

Nursing student Dan Sherry studies like any typical student. However, this 37-year-old balances his academics as a working father as well.

functions.

just a b o u t school or life; it's about integrating the l e s s o n s you learn f r o m all your activities."

Face to face with the students of the nation ing iheir s u c c e s s in stride, c o n f i d e n t that they can maintain

ests. A high school search p r o v i d e s i n f o r m a t i o n regarding m e m b e r s f r o m a student's f o n n e r h i g h school. A g r o u p

t h e i r j u s t - f o r - f u n w e b s i t e turned small b u s i n e s s without any

search n a r r o w s d o w n m e m b e r s f r o m related inlerests a n d

T h e f i v e col lege sludenls w h o f o u n d e d t h e f a c e b o o k are tak-

Caroline Coleman STAFF R E P O R T E R

Jenny Cencer SPOTLIGHT EDITOR

C r e a t e d b y s l u d e n l s , for s t u d e n t s . T h e F a c e b o o k . c o m ,

outside help." I n t e r v i e w e d b y c o r r e s p o n d a n l Katie DeWitt, one ol ihe

a g l o b a l search p r o v i d e s a c c e s s links to all participating sites. T h e a d v a n c e d search has the c a p a c i t y lo find m e m -

site's f o u n d e r s C h r i s H u g h e s c o m m e n t e d on the w e b s i t e and

b e r s with a certain interest, relationship status, a c a d e m i c

T h i s past F e b r u a r y several c o m p u t e r s c i e n c e s l u d e n l s

his i n v o l v e m e n t . Originally, h e and his c o - f o u n d e r s intended i h e f a c e b o o k . c o m lo, " c o m b i n e social n e t w o r k i n g capabiliTtCS with a Site siyicd lo be like a Uireclory, h o l d i n g cxlcnsive i n f o r m a t i o n a b o u t its users, such a s c o u r s e s , r e f e r e n c e s

c o n c e n t r a t i o n , birthday, and r o o m . R e g a r d i n g online safely. Boonstra e x p l a i n e d that you can c h o o s e not to interact with p e o p l e you d o not k n o w by i n c o n s p i c u o u s l y blocking t h e m or h a v i n g y o u r profile

al H a r v a r d University d e s i g n e d the d i r e c t o r y l o k e e p col-

in c a m p u s publications, c o n t a c t i n f o r m a t i o n , a n d s u m m e r

lege s t u d e n t s in touch with o t h e r c o l l e g e students. Newsweek reporler Olivia Ma said. " W h e n Mark

p l a n s , " H u g h e s said.

hidden. " T h e r e are pretty intensive privacy opt i ons , y o u can

introduced

W h e n instituted o n the H a r v a r d c a m p u s , the five students w e r e surprised b y its i n s t a n t a n e o u s popularity. "W ithin d a y s

rent s l u d e n l s t o see y o u r i n f o r m a t i o n , o r p e o p l e in y o u r

l h e f a c e b o o k . c o m in February, he n e v e r i m a g i n e d the site

of its l a u n c h i n g , we realized lhal l h e f a c e b o o k . c o m w a s go-

soon w o u l d h a v e 180,000 registered users at 37 c o l l e g e s a n d universities. In addition to listing e - m a i l addresses,

ing to be m u c h b i g g e r than w e t h o u g h t . We w e r e all a little

year, in your house, in your classes. You can limit a search so that only a friend or a friend o f a friend c a n look you

taken a b a c k by the s u c c e s s o f l h e site at the outset but quickly

up. People have very g o o d control o v e r w h o c a n see their

c e l l - p h o n e n u m b e r s a n d screen n a m e s , f a c e b o o k p r o f i l e s

got a d j u s t e d t o the fact lhal i h e f a c e b o o k . c o m w a s g o i n g to b e c o m e a central p r o j e c t of o u r lives," H u g h e s said.

i n f o r m a t i o n , " Z u c k e r b e r g said. M e m b e r s can s p e c i f y w h o can view their profiles, c o n -

As of S u n d a y e v e n i n g , F a c e b o o k h a s 6 7 3 m e m b e r s f r o m

tact information, personal facts, c o u r s e s currently enrolled

C l u b listings on H o p e ' s c a m p u s range f r o m " C o m p u l sive a w a y m e s s a g e c h e c k e r s . " t o "Fight the M a n " , " H a l o

H o p e C o l l e g e ( 2 0 6 male. 4 6 7 f e m a l e ) . C o m p u t e r S c i e n c e m a j o r T y l e r Boonstra (*07) e x p l a i n s , " I t is really cool if you

in. o r f r i e n d s by selecting w h i c h e m a i l a c c o u n t s c a n par-

2 b r o u g h t m y C P A d o w n , " "I miss Red W i n g s h o c k e y , "

can gel a lot of p e o p l e i n v o l v e d . T h a i ' s w h y w e put up flyers

ticipate. Then, m e m b e r s state w h e t h e r faculty, staff, o r particular students may read i n f o r m a t i o n . Finally, students

" N a p a h o l i c s A n o n y m o u s . " and " F o r e F r i s b e e G o l f e r s . "

in o u r d o r m , s o lhal p e o p l e w o u l d j o i n and m a k e it fun lo

c h o o s e m e m b e r s w h o h a v e certain characteristics, such

M e m b e r s can j o i n several g r o u p s at a l i m e a n d " g r o u p ies" can a l s o participate in d i s c u s s i o n s . It's the ultimate

participate in." Boonstra, a Voorhees resident, said. " W e h a v e started a battle b e t w e e n o u r d o r m and Scott Hall t o see which g r o u p

a s in their year, house, class, f r i e n d s list, o r e v e n a f e w

f o r f i g u r i n g out w h o s e f l o o r lo crash o n while you follow Phish cross-country. Il has since b e e n a d o p t e d into the so-

can gel ihe most m e m b e r s . " W h e n asked if the m e s s a g e board

provides c o n n e c t i o n s lo A m e r i c a n university students. A d a m Schneider of the Harvard C r i m s o n writes,

cial circles o f many oiher colleges.

activity, h e replied. "Yes, but I ' v e only been in it for about a w e e k . " Tyler e x p r e s s e d that the m o s t interesting thing about

an online b u d d y d a t a b a s e - l i k e p r o g r a m , m a p s out y o u r social c o n n e c t i o n s ( f r i e n d s m u s t be registered lo a p p e a r ) and a l l o w s you l o m e e t p e o p l e with w h o m you h a v e a vv/irniTvm t-xfTivJ ^uv.11 OS d Viun-S Ol ai\ iTiincsr

Zuckerberg,

a

junior

al

Harvard,

a l l o w you to list the c o u r s e s y o u ' r e taking, w h i c h c l u b s you're involved in a n d y o u r s u m m e r p l a n s . "

tool for f i n d i n g s o m e o n e lo b o r r o w lecture notes f r o m or

Buisnessweek magazine comments. "With no members h i p fee, s i g n i n g up only c o s t s lime, a c o m m o d i t y that c o l l e g e s t u d e n t s are more than willing to waste. But a s the site's m e m b e r s h i p c o n t i n u e s lo grow, the n u m b e r of p e o p l e r u n n i n g the site has r e m a i n e d the s a m e f r o m the start.

p o s t i n g takes lime f r o m h o m e w o r k a n d f a c e - t o - f a c e social

the p r o g r a m is ihe web. w h i c h m a p s the i n l e r c o n n e c l e d n e s s

limit w h o can see y o u r i n f o r m a t i o n ; if you only w a n t cur-

d e g r e e s of f r i e n d s a w a y . T h e F a c e b o o k . c o m is f r e e to j o i n a n d currently only

" Z u c k e r b e r g c o n t i n u e s to i m p r o v e the site with h e l p f r o m his r o o m m a t e Duslin A. M o s k o v i t z ( ' 0 6 ) . w h o is writing the bulk of the p r o g r a m m i n g n e e d e d to a d d the n e w

o f y o u r f r i e n d s with you in the center. S e a r c h e s r a n g i n g f r o m high schools, g r o u p s , g l o b a l a n d

s c h o o l s , " S c h n e i d e r said.

a d v a n c e d can be utilized to find s l u d e n l s with similar inter-

Zuckerberg.

Student Dance Concert November 2 2-23 8 p.m.

" [ E x p a n s i o n ] s e e m e d like the natural t h i n g to d o . " said

Hope's paper supplier uses trees from old growth forests in the U.S. as well as Indonesian rainforests. Prevent deforestation!

Knickerbocker Theatre

Environmental Issues Group

Free admission

Wed. 8:30 p.m. Lubbers 10 6


Ik

^Anchor

FEATURES

N o v e m b e r 17,2004

Could Hope do more about violence awareness? INFOCUS Erin L'Hotta INFOCUS EDITOR

What is Hope doing to remind their students that there still needs to be an awareness of danger on campus? This question was asked in the Nov. 10 Infocus article entitled, " H o p e w o m e n want incidents to be k n o w n . " Think. What is the administration doing lo increase students' awareness of danger? What about Campus Safety? What are they doing? What about a senior named Stephanie M c C a n n ? McCann is answering this question by imagining what this campus looked like ten years ago. In 1994 it s e e m e d that e v e r y b o d y cared about C.A.A.R.E.

Campus Assault Awareness, Response and Education makes comeback sault. T h e c o l l e g e even m a n dated that freshman orientation include a C.A.A.R.E. information session because they understood that the first few months of college are the most susceptible time for a woman to encounter sexual assault. "Most of what happens is not happening when administrators are on Campus. This is why sexual assault awareness sessions are mandatory during o r i e n t a t i o n . " said Karen Hall, the director of Hope's sexual harassment policy in 1995. C.A.A.R.E. didn't limit conversation about sexual assault to freshman orientation. They made sexual assault known everywhere on campus. Ten y e a r s ago, discussions about rape, alcohol and sexuality, and the dyn a m i c s ol m a l e / f e male relationships occurred very frequently on campus. Hope held date-rape workshops, self-defense programs. and mandated informational sessions on S T D incidences at Hope. In 1995 C.A.A.R.E. held discussion panels on the newly instituted sexual offense policy. That same year, they also held an informal discussion where students talked about women on campus who felt sexual indiscretion. C.A.A.R.E. also sponsored a discussion called, " H e said—She s a i d — I ' m c o n f u s e d . " This add r e s s e d d i f f e r e n c e s in t h e w a y women and men at Hope c o m m u nicate in romantic relationships. It suggested that even men at Hope, a Christian school, j o k e about not wanting a m o n o g a m o u s relationship. This was illustrated by a Hope

Thirty percent of rape victims experience major depression. Rape victims are thirteen times more likely to attempt suicide than non-rape victims. Ten y e a r s ago, C . A . A . R . E . — C a m p u s Assault Awareness, Response and Education—was an organization at its peak. It consisted of 20 students and staff selected in the spring to educate students on sexual assault in the fall. Students involved in C.A.A.R.E. underwent 9 hours of training before qualifying to host sexual assault seminars with the assistance of a trained staff member. During the first week of school, C.A.A.R.E. members scurried around c a m p u s , flooding d o r m s and academic buildings with flyers. They bounced from every residence hall to every cottage performing informational sessions on sexual as-

c a m p u s . She knows what C.A.A.R.E. could be now in 2004. She, along with Professor L e i g h WendtlandO ' C o n n o r , is in the process of bringing C.A.A.R.E. back to life by the fall of 2005. Together, they are in the process of organizing p e o p l e to get involved, forming educational ideas and gathering discussion topics. "It's really important to me that Hope is aware of this topic. Sexual assault hasn't stopped on c a m p u s , but discussion has. The fact is, I in 4 coll e g e - a g e w o m e n are sexually assaulted. Since ihis is such a large number. shouldn't this issue be talked about?" McCann said. Currently, the issue of s e x u a l a s s a u l t is a d d r e s s e d in m a n d a t o r y health dynamics classes and in the Hope football team. McCann wishes that the discussion would extend out of these two situations and across the Hope community. " M y hope is that this is a subject that all areas of campus are addressing. I think that it's important that residential life, Greek life, c a m p u s ministries, and student development all take part in discussion on sexual assault," McCann said. As residential life, Greek life, campus ministries and Student Development face this issue, an im-

Thirty-three percent of rape victims develop post-traumatic stress disorder and experience feelings of fear, emotional numbness, nightmares, or obsession. tradition of the I 9 9 0 ' s : w h e n a couple on campus was newly engaged. the girls sal in a circle and sang songs, while the guys threw their newly-wed friend into a lake. This behavior was used to illustrate that even on Hope's campus, men are discouraged from settling down with one person. Instead, they are told lo be a "player." C.A.A.R.E. was an organization thai prov ided education lo the campus, but also guidance to sexual assault victims. In 2000 a former H o p e C o l l e g e s o p h o m o r e filed sexual assault charges involving 3 men at a Hope frat party. At this parly she was forced lo perform sex and oral sex with multiple men. C.A.A.R.E. members helped her through this situation, making sure that she felt safe on campus after \hc experience. "1 f o l l o w e d her from class to class and got her some counseling...my j o b is to make sure she gets everything she needs." said Josh Spalsbury ('02), a 2000 C.A.A.R.E. member. By 2002, education on sexual assault lost e m p h a s i s . C . A . A . R . E . dropped from a staff of 20 to 5 students. By 2003, C.A.A.R.E. ceased lo exist. Is the subject of sexual assault not important on campus anymore? E v e n w h e n d a t e rapists are described as 20 percent of men who account for 80 percent of campus problems? Stephanie McCann knows what C.A.A.R.E. used to look like on this

What to do if someone forces sexual activity: - s t a y calm

- s a y " n o " strongly and seriously

- s a y "stop it, this is rape i t - l o o k for an escape route - f i g h t back or run away

- s h o u t " f i r e " to gain other's attention

- u s e passive resistance of v o m i t i n g or messing one's pants

portant part of college education, where does the average Hope studentfitin? Do you believe that the 1 in every 4 women who are sexual assault victims are important? If so, do something about it. Get involved in the discussion. If not. why care about C.A.A.R.E.?

Want to get involved in C.A.A.R.E? Contact Stephanie McCann I s

V h e h I*

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R A P t ? M

PATEAHD

What wonlci vou do? If y o u w e r e n ' t sure b o w (ar the p e r s o n y o u w e r e with w a n t e d to g o sexually?

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to have sex fall to recognize as rape http://dallybeacon.utk.edu/artlcle.php/7498

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O P I N I O N

N o v e m b e r 17, 2 0 0 4

Your voice

Editor's voice Now is not the time for discouragement As ihc scmcslcr winds clown and ihe work begins lo pile up. many sludcnls are likely reconsidering iheir original college plans. And while this is typical for Ihe average first year student, I know of several people, now in their junior or senior year, s e e m to be pretty down on themselves lately. Because of some circumstance or another, they feel as if they cannot succeed in what they want lo do and begin to feel like failures. A friend of mine who is currently a junior recently found out that she cannot be certified as an elementary teacher with a Spanish degree f r o m Hope because the stale of Michigan will not allow it. Needless to say, she is now in ihe process of entirely rethinking her major. Why w a s n ' t she informed aboul this sooner? How many other sludenls will discover in Iheir final years here that they cannot graduate with their iniended major because of withheld information? On a similar note, when I first read ihis week's letter to ihe editor. I couldn't believe thai a teacher would prevent a student from doing something he or she wanted to do and had spent so many years working lo achieve. College, especially the senior year, can be a very uncertain lime as sludenls begin to think seriously about their futures. Shouldn't we be encouraging instead of standing in each other's way? I am by no means saying thai professors should be dishonest or lell sludenls only what they want to hear. I am merely saying that there's no reason to lead people on for two to three years and ihen proceed lo lell them that everything they worked for is totally meaningless. In the meantime, let's work to help each oiher oul. There are four weeks of class left this semester and everyone has aboul a million ihings to do. It's easy lo ignore or brush aside other people's problems in favor of our own. During ihese crazy times, when our first inslinct is lo be discouraging, how much more beneficial could il be to give someone a hand? This past weekend, after spending many hours on homework followed by running a meeting. I was boih suiprised and pleased to discover that someone had folded my laundry for me. I am sure thai everyone 1 know here would not hesilate to help me with anyihing 1 needed. Bui ihis favor from someone I have probably never met was completely unexpected and I cannot express enough gratitude for ihis random act of kindness. How much belter could this campus, ihis world, be if we helped people up instead of kicking t h e m when they're down?

Anchor Staff editor-in-chief Maureen Yonovitz campus beat editor Mackenzie Smith arts editor Jordan Wolfson infocus editor Erin L'Hotta spotlight editor Jenny Cencer business manager Christy Hug distribution manager .Garrison Dyer production assistant Sean Daenzer advisor Mark A. Lewison

Student questions character judgment as basis for degree To the Editor: Something is not right H E R E . Imagine it, you're six months away from graduating from Hope College and one single professor stands between you and your future. This one professor can single handedly decide if you are going to be a good teacher, if he ihinks that you deserve to teach or not. So what if he says no? You are not approved to student teach, and offers you a BA in nothing from Hope as a result. Not to mention that you've put four years of your life, give or lake one hundred thousand dollars, and your goal for your career into this place, now they d o n ' t wanl lo let you sraduate?

Well kids, it happens, il happened to someone I know and care about. After three years of her college career one professor decided he didn't like her C H A R A C T E R and is telling her she cannot be approved lo sludenl leach, ihis having N O academic basis whatsoever. 1 wasn't aware that a college was allowed lo j u d g e y o u r c h a r a c t e r in i h e graduation process. I thought your " p ' s and q ' s " on the report card ended in middle school, al this point Hope c a n ' t even legally release your records lo anyone but you as a sludent. never have I heard of a character grading scale, ihis sounds like discrimination. Where do ihey d r a w the line then, if Hope can judge one's character, do we have

a character rubric for Hope graduates, .whcrc's the personality lesi we all have lo pass in order lo leave this c a m p u s with our Hope diploma, do we gel a gold slar too? The fact that something like this can happen lo you as a senior in college is completely unacceptable and not only r e f l e c t s poorly on Hope College but on all of us that support it as sludcnls. I encourage you to know your rights as students and k n o w w h a t you are b e i n g graded on. It is up to us as students to make sure that our college is doing what is in our best interests, is this in yours?

-Sara

Wade ('05)

Lecture to Feature Michigan Business Leader Robert T. Harris, Chairman and CEO of Alliance Associates will share his experiences with the Hope College community T h e George F. Baker Scholars in conjunction with the department of Economics. M a n a g e m e n t and Accounting presents an executive lecture featuring R o b e r t ! . Harris. Harris is the C h a i r m a n and C E O of Alliance Associates, a food service c o m p a n y based in Coldwater, Michigan. Most noted for its work with the Savea-Lot and Pet Supplies Plus chains, the story of Alliance Associates' success, as told by Harris, is of great local significance.

H a v i n g been involved in the food industry his entire career. Harris m a k e s an earnest effort to be knowledgeable and on the cutting-edge of the industry. With an emphasis on the academics of business, Harris" address will be a great learning opportunity for Hope students and faculty.

T h e lecture will be on Tuesday, N o v e m b e r 23. at 3:00 pm, in Peale 1000.

Got an opinion? Let your voice be heard!

Senior Staff Reporters: Neil Simons, Amanda Zoratti

Staff Reporters; Shannon Mee, Lindsey Manthei, Andrea Vandenburgh, Caroline Coleman, Evelyn Daniel, Juiie Lancaster, Jen Gouid, Eiissa VanNest, Nick Engei, Holly Beckerman

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Letters to the Editor Guidelines O p e n t o any.one w i t h i n t h e college a n d related c o m m u n i t i e s T h e A n c h o r reserves t h e right t o edit d u e to s p a c e c o n s t r a i n t s No p e r s o n a l a t t a c k s , p o o r taste o r a n y t h i n g potentially libelous L e t t e r s chosen o n a first c o m e first serve basis, o r a r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s a m p l e is t a k e n No a n o n y m o u s letters, unless discussed with E d i t o r - i n - C h i e f E d i t o r - i n - C h i e f m a y verify identity of w r i t e r

The Anchor is o product ofsiiidcnl effort and is funded through the sludenls of Hope College, funding which comes through the //"/" College Student Congress AppmpriuHons Committee Utters to the editor are encouraged, though due to space limilalions the Anchor resen ts the light to edit The opinions addrewed in the editorial are solely those of ihe editor-in-chief Stories from the Hope College News Service ore a prtduct of the Public Relations Office. Onesear subscriptions to the Anchor an' available for $20. We nwenr the righl lo accept or reject any advertising.

/ / ; < A n 2004 fall semester,

c h o r Issue #9 of 26

T h e A n c h o r reserves the r i g h t t o r e f u s e p u b l i c a t i o n of any letter s u b m i t t e d L e t t e r s over 500 w o r d s in length will not b e c o n s i d e r e d f o r publication

Mail letters to the Anchor c/o Hope College, drop them off at the Anchor office (located in the center of Dewitt, behind W T H S ) , or e-mail A n c h o r @ h o p e . e d u


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N o v e m b e r 17, 2 0 0 4

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UZZis ^Idd's Wool Co S'V E a s t

Street

Give 'til it heals.

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a y a r n f o r all r e a s o n s .

T H E A N C H O R W A N T S YOU! Have you ever wanted to see your name on the front page of the paper? Here is your chance! C o m e to our meeting tonight at 8 : 3 0 p . m . in t h e A n c h o r office...It's in DeWitt behind the radio station and Student Union Desk. C o m e find out what it takes to be part of a newspaper staff! Ank staff + Anj - thanks for holding d o w n the fort while i was away, much obliged - The Chief Llama llama duck!

L # C B M

Students' Right-to-Know: Real events h a p p e n i n g on YOUR campus

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Posted Tuesday, November 16

M a k i n g t h e w o r l d a b e t t e r p l a c e starts w i t h individuals w h o give their time, talents and dedication t o cultural understanding. C o n t a c t t h e Peace Corps t o d a y , a n d change y o u r idea of w h a t " c h a n g i n g t h e w o r l d " is all a b o u t .

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Buy a sweater.

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www.peacecorps.gov 800-424-8580

Suspicious Silualion - The RD's husband at Gil more Hall reported that two while males, college aged, were throwing chairs inside the hall. They were let into the building by a resident, the resident did not know who they were. Posted Monday. November 15 Stolen Properly - A staff member at the Hawoith Center reported that two chairs were stolen off the loading dock at the Ha worth Center. The chairs were demo chairs for the Devos Fieldhouse project. Suspicious Situation - A siudenl received a number of prank phone calls, the person calling was speaking a foreign language, possibly had the wrong number. Suspicious Situation - A number of forks were taken from Ihe Phelps Cafeteria and placed in ihe grass outside. Posted Friday. November 12 Found Property - A student officer reported that she found a weed eater while ticketing near Columbia Apartments.

Hungry? Eat at the

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Failte Hope Students.

LISTEN TO 8 9 . 9 F M 2141, ( o t u a

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Posted Thursday. November 11 Properly Check - The NE gym door was found unsecured. The building was checked and secured, also there was a quantity of peanut M & M ' s on the gym floor.

Thank you for reading The Anchor Now go recycle it.

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T H E VOICE OF HOPE COLLEGE

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'Anchor I s s u e 10 of 26, p u b l i s h e d w e e k l y

N o v e m b e r 17, 2004

Hope icers come up just short against Calvin Hope comes back from a two-goal deficit only to lose in the waning seconds Nick Everse STAFF REPORTER

T h e Hope M e n ' s hockey learn learned a liiile about themselves Saturday afternoon. Facing defending National Champion Calvin, the D u t c h m e n played with the Knights f o r most of the game, falling just short in a 4-3 loss in front of 2.140 frenzied fans at VanAndel Arena. Hope proved it is one of the lop teams in the nation, competing fiercely with an undefeated Calvin team. T h e loss dropped the D u t c h m e n to an overall record of 9-2-1. Hopes strong showing cemented them as a national c h a m p i o n s h i p contender, something the Dutchmen players look a w a y from Saturday's joss. "1 think w e proved w e have enough skill to win nationals," said Dutchmen sophomore right-winger/defensemen Chris Strauss. "We have the heart, we j u s t have to go out and p e r f o r m on the ice. We have a young team, a lot of freshmen and sophomores, but were very skilled." Hope got on ihe board early, scoring at just 3:29 of the first period on a goal by Center Jon Shaver assisted by R W Kevin Nelson. T h e goal g a v e Hope the early m o m e n t u m .

but Calvin controlled the pace of play f o r most of the first period. Hope goalie Paul Cynar w a s spectacular in some sjrelches. keeping the score 1 -0 with a bevy of a m a z i n g saves. The pressure paid off for Calvin when forward Jeff C r a w f o r d scored on a nifty m o v e to tie the score I -1. T h e game got more physical to start the second period, as both teams landed some big hits. W i t h C a l v i n a p p l y i n g p r e s s u r e . C y n a r made a sprawling stop, but couldn't corral the ensuing rebound and Calvin winger Aaron O h k e m a knocked it in for a 2-1 lead. A costly loo many m e n on the ice penally w a s assessed to Hope at 6 : 4 0 of ihe second period. On ihe ensuing p o w e r play Calvin took advantage, capitalizing on a turnover d o w n low to put ii pasl Cynar for the 3-1 advantage. In the first and second periods Calvin w a s controlling the neutral zone, winning il almost 70 percent of the time. Despite the deficit at hand. Hope c a m e out with renewed energy for the final period of play. The Dutchmen started controlling ihe neutral zone and getting to loose pucks, making all the hustle plays. Their efforts paid off when third period goals by Peter Rusche and Steve Reid lied the score 3-3 and appeared to send the g a m e into overtime. Calvin was undeierred and with just 10 s e c o n d s r e m a i n i n g j u n i o r Nick Vcrkuyl scored after an interception near center ice.

FOREM

AMCHOff P H O T O

BY

NICK

E V E R S E

Hope hockey players assume their positions in their game against Calvin this past Saturday. The Dutchmen fell to the Knights with a final score of 4-3, dropping their overall record for this season to 9-2-1. VerKuyl look ihe puck up the left side and rocketed It past Cynar f r o m the left point for the decisive score. T h e loss devastated a Dutchmen team that appeared to be on the verge of a huge victory for the program. "I know everyone on our team is brokenhearted." said Strauss, a s o p h o m o r e from Barrington, Illinois. " We don't want to feel the e m o t i o n s w e fell after ihis g a m e ever

T h e D u t c h m e n will get a c h a n c e at redemption when they host Calvin on January 29. Strauss knows they'll be ready for another shot at the Knights. We just have to learn f r o m this game and put our attitude toward the rest of the season and beating them next time." Hope resumes play on N o v e m b e r 19 at h o m e against Saint Clare Community College.

again."

' Cross Country Nov. 2 0 N C A A Nationals at U W Eau Claire

11 -27

Women's Basketball Nov. 19-20 Tournament at Rockford, 111.

Volleyball NCAA Championship

Nov. 2

alvm

M e n ' s Bj Nov. 23 at Elmhurst Nov. 26-27 Select Bank Tournament at VanAndel Arena

The A n c h o r wants YOU!

Women's cross country finishes

I n t e r e s t e d in s p o r t s ? Like to w r i t e ? Love taking p i c t u r e s ?

sixth; Dutchmen

We are looking for SPORTS EDITORS and WRITERS!

football gains honors

(Bonus: Sport editor's a paid position!) This weekend, Tina Pike ( ' 0 5 ) qualified with a lime of 21:48.5 to compete in the N C A A Division III Cross Country Championships. Pike finished fourth al the Great Lakes Regional. Pike's teammate Anne Hoekslra ('08) placed 27 ,h with a time of 22:44.3. Hope finished in ihe team results with 175 points, placing them sixth out of 2 6 teams. T h e m e n ' s cross country placed seventh out of 3 0 teams. Jeff Weber placed 27 ,h in ihe individual results with a time of 25:29.7. T h e Flying Dutchmen football team lost to Alma College 47-24, ending Hope's quest to repeat as M I A A champions. Hope ended second with five league wins and two losses, in a ihrce-way lie with Albion and Olivet. Phil M o r s e ( ' 0 5 ) w a s p r e s e n t e d with the Pete Schmidt Memorial Scholar-Athlete Award from the M I A A . Morse was honored along wilh eighl of his teammates who were granted first and second team

Contact us at anchor@hope.edu or ex. 7S77 Tina Pike ('05) qualified for the NCAA Division III Cross Country Campionships. Pike finished fourth while the team took sixth place overall. honors. Defensive back Andy Snyder ('05), w i d e receiver Jack Schrock ( ' 0 5 ) and d e f e n s i v e l i n e m a n B r y a n S c h e f f e r s ( 0 5 ) w e r e all granted first-team honors. Snyder received the honor for the second year in a row. Offensive tackle Josh DeHaan ('06). linebacker Paul H o e k s e m a ('05). defensive back Joe Diekevers ( ' 0 6 ) , p u n t e r Seth Kovarik (*05) and placckicker Nate Barnett ( ' 0 6 ) were all granted second team honors.

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11-17-2004