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'Wild Duck' flies in from DeWitt wings

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Henrik Ibsen's The Wild Duck, performed by members of the Hope theater department, opens tonight at 8 p.m. in the DeWitt main theater. Working from the original Norwegian script and putting it into a new translation, the cast, crew, director, and other theater department members have been working hard since mid-September to bring to Hope's campus a play by a well-known playwright. Set in Norway in the late 1890s, The Wild Duck is the poignant story of two Norwegian families, the Ekdals and the Werles. The drama focuses on the response of Hialmar Ekdal (Paul Daniels) when Gregers Werle (Bob Schultz), an old friend of Hjalmar's and an idealist, r e t u r n s after a long absence and brings up hidden secrets from the past forcing Hjalmar to face up to old realities and revaluate his life. "This is the first Ibsen in this theater, and the first one to be performed on Hope's campus in over ten years," says director, John Tammi. The Wild Duck was chosen to commemorate the 150th anniversary of Ibsen's birth. Tammi calls it a contemporary play which provides a challenge to all those involved. Academically, he adds, it will also give World Lit. students who have read and studied this play as theatrical literature, an opportuni-

NOVEMBER 17, 1978

VOLUME NO. 91 - ISSUES

Vandals wreck radio lines to frat houses, south dorms All campus residence facilities south of 12th Street remain blacked out from receiving WTAS as a result of sabatoge to high-voltage transmitting equipment Nov. Tim Emmet, general manager of the student radio station, reports that ' transmission cannot be restored until next week at the earliest, since the college maintenance department has had to order replacement parts which will not arrive until then. The sabotage, which occurred between noon and 2 p.m., was the latest of several cases of vandalism over the last four years. Senior John Hoekstra, WTAS chief engineer, states that the fuse box servicing the entire fraternity complex was "broken into and maliciously destroyed/' The padlocked box is located behind the d r y e r in the Emersonian laundry room. Hoekstra describes the location as "rather

Law effective

anchor

unprotected" but "extremely well placed" for connecting with the electrical power system of the frat complex. This connection is the basis of the transmission system since the house wiring is used in place of an antenna. "The person or persons who did this not only had access to the basement," he points out, "but must have known what they were doing since the box was clearly marked as belonging to WTAS and containing high voltage. "I sincerely hope t h a t no one got radiation burns," he adds. The lines carry 15 amps of 240-volt alternating current and 25 w a t t s of radio frequency, "either of which could kill a person." Hoekstra also states, "Since now we have to replace this with student money it makes about as much sense as someone destroying their own stereo." Through the Student Appropriations Committee, WTAS receives $4003 from

Dec. 3

Since the passing of Proposal D on Nov. 7, many rumors have been circulating around campus as to when the new state constitutional amendment goes into effect. To clear up the confusion, the

contacted the

Liquor

Control Commission in Lansing and discovered that the legal drinking age will be increased to 19 on Dec. 3 and hiked to 21 on Dec. 22 Today was the day originally slated for the age boost according to pre-election reports.

American Cancer Society Wc want to cure cancer in vour lifetime.

Top candidate to arrive The Rev. Gerard J . VanHeest will arrive at Hope Sunday as a candidate for the position of chaplain. VanHeest will speak at the morning chapel services on Monday and Wednesday and will spend time visiting various groups on campus. On Monday he will have dinner with the Ministry of Christ's People and their randomly selected students guests; t h a t evening an informal open house will be held at the Alumni House to enable students to meet him. His schedule for Tuesday includes lunch with Student Congress officers and their guests. VanHeest is the father of Tim VanHeest, head resident of the F r a t e r House, and defensive secondary coach of the football team. Currently. VanHeest is serving

ty to see it performed as a theatrical work. The cast is made up of 15 characters. 14 of whom are plaved by Hope students and the other by faculty member George Ralph, chairman of the theater department. Besides Hjalmar and Gregers, they include Werle (Ralph), Old Ekdal (Dan Huizenga), Gina (Kathie Smith), Hedvig (Deb Grimm), Mrs. Sorby (Abby Jayne), Relling (Eric Fitzgerald), Molvik (Mark Farnsworth), Graaberg (Russel Curtis), Jensen (Jon Hondorp), Pettersen (Brad Aspey), and the guests at Werle's party (Mike McFaden, Bill Swan son, and Stan Sajewski). Three other students important to this production are stage manager Ronni Nivala and seniors Carol Anderson and Cindy Lee, who designed the sets and costumes respectively. The Wild Duck will run for three weekends this year, instead of the usual two. Following tonight's and tomorrow's performance, it will pick up after Thanksgiving on Nov. 30. Dec. 1-2, and then conclude Dec. 8-9. Curtain time for all performances is 8 p.m. As well as being performed for the public, the play is entered in the American Cultural Theater Festival and will be judged by three outside critics during one of the December performances.

as pastor at a Reformed church in Delmar. N.Y. He has been there ten years, following pastorates in Palmyra. N.Y., and Schenectady. N.Y. VanHeest graduated from Hope in 1949 and from Western Theological Seminary in 1952. He has been chairman of the National Youth Committee as well as a member of the Board of Education of the Reformed Church, and chairman of the Youth Division. He is presently a member of the Board of Trustees at Hope. Dr. Lars Granberz, chairman of the Chaplain Search Committee, stated t h a t while he was very impressed with all three candidates who survived the screening process, the committee unanimously decided t h a t VanHeest is t h e top candidate.

Dan Huizenga, Deb Grimm, Paul Daniels, Kathie Smith (above, left) and Mark Farnsworth (below) rehearse on Coral Anderson's set for tonights opening of "The Wild Duck".

this year's activities fee. "They pulled all the insides out of the box and just left them hanging," says Hoekstra. "All the fuses were removed, the box handle was bent and switches broken." Emmet's initial reaction was shock and confusion. "It's such a waste because we are really sounding good this year. I just don't understand it." According to Hoekstra, Dave Vincent, a state-certified electrician who works with the maintenance department, will be making all necessary repairs possibly as early as Tuesday. Public Safety was contacted, says Hoekstra, when the problem arose. However, no one from the office would comment for the anchor in the absence of director Glenn Bareman, who is on vacation. In the past four years this equipment has been broken into and fuses removed, points out Hoekstra. Last year a padlock was placed on the fuse box, but that only solved the problem temporarily.

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Board stretches summer, plans Tuesday alterations The Tuesday class schedule may become the same as Thursday, and classes may not begin next fall until after Labor Day, if current Administrative Affairs Board actions go through. The fall calendar change was decided by the board at its Nov. 8 meeting, according to chairman David Klein, professor of chemistry. It provides for freshman orientation to be shortened, lasting up to Labor Day, and classes to begin the following Tuesday. Also, fall break will be on a Monday and a Tuesday, rather than Thursday and Friday. Otherwise, the calendar will remain fundamentally the same, Klein says. The 1979-80 calendar will be official following the January faculty meeting unless voted down by the faculty at t h a t time. The change was enacted without the usual prior circulation of a trial calendar and without the usual opportunity for open hearings and feedback from the college community. The possible change in Tues-

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^ y s c l a s s schedule, which brought up at the Nov. 8 meeting, ls expected to be one ^of the~ main topics of discussion" at next Wednesday's board meeting, Klein says. „ Scheduled„ for 9:30 . a.m. ..in the . Presidents Room, t h e meeting is 0 Pen to interested visitors. ^ h e change, recommended by Associate Dean of Students Dave VanderWel, would be an attempt to make the class schedule more consistent. According to Klein there is "a fairly strong feeling" in the college community that Tuesday's and Thursday's schedules should be the same, and there is also a need to spread out the classes among the days of the week. In preparing his recommendation, VanderWel sent out a questionnaire to faculty, staff, and Student Congress members, asking for their opinions on the Community Hour. Over 70% of those who returned the survey said Community Hour should be contmued. VanderWel stated that although. faculty enthusiasm for maintaining the program has

dropped significantly, the figures were more encouraging than I expected." Early in 1977 the Board passed a proposal to change Tuesday's and Thursday's schedules to consist of 80-minute, rather than 50-minute periods. This would allow threecredit-hour classes to fit more easily into the Tuesday-Thursday schedule, as well as providing two weekly Community Hours. However, the proposal was turned down by the faculty, and therefore never went into effect. Now the Board is re-examinin the question; however, they fee that if the proposal is made in the same form as before it is likely to be rejected again. So far the board has not been able to come up with a new, more acceptable plan, Klein says. The Community Hour, with the early and late closing times for Thursday classes, has been part of the college schedule since 1974. The August opening for the fall semester was inaugurated in 1972. Earlier, fall classes had begun around the second week of September, with final exams in J a n u a r y and second semester beginning about Feb. 1.


Hope College anchor

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Xmas tree fund aims to aid World Hunger the worship service. This year's Christmas Tree Fund Drive has also designated its proceeds to aid in the relief of World Hunger. Two development projects have been chosen to be the recipients of this year's donations. Voice of Calvary located in Mendenhall, Miss, established an outlet which supplies commodities such as furniture and clothing to the needy community at reasonable prices. Tecno-Serv is an organization which s e t s up small businesses and co-operatives to employ thousands of people in Latin America and Africa. Money will be specified to aid in t h e support of a particular project in Santa Ana, Nicaragua, involved in launching a cotton mill industry. Representatives will be chosen from t h e various dorm units, cottages and off-campus to contact all members of t h e student body during t h e week of Dec. 3-9. The World Hunger Committee's not asking that you starve yourself for two weeks and donate the money saved on t h e grocer bill to the starving masses of the world. The committee and concerned students see the word response as central to their approach of this problem. As members of the Christian community you are asked to be responsible in t h a t response, not witn expectation of great reward or success but to give because we have been given to. The above article was written at the anchor's invitation by a member of the World Hunger Committee.

by Janet Swan son The topic of World Hunger is not one of great popularity on campus, nor would it be expected from a group of people whose main concern about hunger problems is the result of insufficient "palatable fare" offered by Sa^a. The fact is, however, t h a t millions of people may never have the pleasure of biting into hamburger surprise, or experience discovering hair in their food. They don't have to face the risky business of dining at Saga, because they cannot dine at all. These people represent the poorest of poor and real victims of all that results from economic depression and hunger. The numbers are staggering, the solutions complex and relief is often faulty and inequitable at best. It is little wonder that a topic such as this is unpopular in such a culture that believes that no problem is too large or complex to solve if one works hard enough. World hunger looms as a threat to this mentality. Recently, however, a group of students and faculty on campus have been taking a closer look at the problem, studying the enormities of it all and evaluating the various responses that can be taken. Becoming aware of the problem is clearly the first step necessary and the Hope community will be given an opportunity to become concerned in the upcoming weeks. This Sunday has been designated World Hunger Sunday by the Reformed Church and the Chapel along with other co-operating churches will focus on this topic in

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Senior Mary McDonald practices her lead as Molly Tobin, in a small workshop on l & t n Street. Produced by the Holland Community Theatre.

Hope student plays lead role in "The Unsinkable Molly Brown" by Ann Marie Rezelman Hope student Mary McDonald, a senior from Austin, Texas, has been selected for the lead in the Holland Community Theatre production of The Unsinkable Molly Brown, opening Nov. 28. Practicing in a tiny workshop on 18th Street, a cast of 42 people prepare the 22 scenes under the careful eye of Director Phil Sturdevant, Assistant Director Marcia Wirth and Choreographer Marilyn Matula. Publicity Director, G.M. "Bud" Thompson says this show is a "really big show. Bigger than The Sound of Music. The action never dies. Each scene has a different set-you'll never see the same set twice." Thompson explains that the show opened on Broadway in 1960 with Tammy Grimes. Shortly thereafter, a movie version was made with Debbie Reynolds playing in the t r u e story of, Titanic survivor, Molly Tobin who left her back woods home in Missouri looking for a man who will provide financial security and ends up finding love. She won't settle for happiness or rich society life but the man "Leadville Johnny Brown," played by Dan Schappee, brings ner to her senses with a smile and a song. Mary is enthusiastic about this play and the people she is working with. She describes the difference between working a show for her theatre performance major in the DeWitt Center and the world outside in the community. "The community is at a disadvantage financially because they don't have a professional theater budget. However, working under a hard-

ship often leads to creativity and a real team effort. The atmosphere is good for experimenting with acting techniques--! feel free to make mistakes. When I auditioned with a few friends ~ just for fun - I didn't know what Community Theatre was all about. It's not just a social club; sure they laugh and socialize, but they work hard and do shows and I'm glad%o be a part of it. I have the opportunity here to work with people of all ages, even a few Hope graduates. It's great when kids are played by kids and older people play the more mature roles." "My Texas accent has come in handy for once," marvels Mary. Besides being from the south, it was easy for Mary to identify with the character Molly because they are both "loudmouths at times." She went on to say that "Molly had three brothers and she fought with them. When I was growing up I spent time on my Uncle and Aunt's farm with my cousins and brothers and we all fought too. It was done in fun but it was still done." Mary mentions a line in the play (when Molly goes to France to become cultured) as a favorite, "Here we eat snails and at home we step on them," and says that she has felt just as out of place at times here in Michigan. "I do get a lot of support from my family back home though," she explains. "They are interested in what I do and they're really excited about this show. In fact, my parents are coming all the way from Texas to see it. I can't wait. They've never been here during the school year." "My Daddy even sent me a box of vitamins, 'here kid, you'll need

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these' and boy was he right! We never stop moving. Rehearsals are like the roller derby -- but I love it!" Mary has been able to get together and "work scenes" with her leading man, Dan Schappee, and that's really helped. Schappee has worked under tne direction of Phil Sturdevant before and has been able to give Mary many valuable insights. "I'm glad that Dan's a good friend and a wonderful person to work with," says Mary. "We have too many lines to learn to worry about personality conflicts." The hard work of the cast and the frenzied activity of the crew will culminate soon in dress rehearsals at the Holland Hizh Performing A r t s Center and the roduction runs from Nov. 28 to Âťec. 2. With a parting burst of enthusiasm Mary promotes "The Unsinkable Molly Brown" as a show that everyone should come and see. "Of course, it's been difficult to do a show with so many people -- trying to get everybody together for rehearsals and all" admits Mary, "but it's a really good show. Holland will love it. It's a family show; it's a fun show. I say 'hell' and 'jackass' but that's a part of Molly Brown, her speech is 'vivid' and at times 'not fittin' for a lady.' I wish my Grandmother could see it." Tickets can be purchased from Mary, any cast or crew member, at Borr's Bootery and South Shore Pharmacy. Adult tickets are $3.50 and Student and Senior Citizens pay only $2.00 to enjoy the musical. Student tickets are only available before hand. Full price will be charged at the door.

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No food, no fun over upcoming break This year Thanksgiving recess at Hope will be unusually quiet. As of now, SAC has no scheduled activities planned for the students who will remain at school over the break. Accompanying t h e recess of t h e students will be a recess from t h e Saga food services. This is due to the contract between Saga and Hope t h a t determines the meal plan prices. Accordinfl; to Keith Browning, manager of Hope's food service program, the price does not include Thanksgiving break. On Wednesday, Durfee cafeteria will be closed for the remainder of the break and Phelps dining hall will close at 6 p.m. Thursday, t h e r e will be a Thanksriving lunch at Phelps cafeteria from 12 to 1 p.m. and t h a t will end t h e service until Sunday night at 4:30 p.m.

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November 17,1978

Page 3

Hope begins fund-raising drive In order to offset college operational costs, Hope's annual fund drive is again underway. John F. Nordstrom, Director of Annual Funds for Hope, has set this year's goal at $1 million. Nordstrom, who also headed the project last year, said that because the money is operational, it is not pledged, but unrestrictively donated to use where the college feels it is needed the most. This will include such costs as scholarships, faculty and staff salaries and "anything else that it takes to keep the college going." In order to make such an undertaking effective, numerous voluntary services must devote time and effort to raise this money, Nordstrom says. In the past, these sources have generally been alumni, faculty, Keformed churches, parents and friends, and local businesses and industries. Volunteer work involving alumni will include having class representatives contacting fellow classmates, usually by letter, in an effort to begin the donations. Later, in voluntary collaboration with telephone companies, over 350 people will be involved in 32 phone-a-thons across the country. Hope's faculty and staff will also contribute to the fund drive by initiating campaigns involving local churches, businesses and industries. In December, the members will begin calling upon the churches, and in addition will be assigned a local business by

which to promote further donations. The donations and money raised are usually cash gifts, yet over 700 industries have also volunteered to match funds raised by local businesses and alumni, as high as three corporate dollars to one raised. This is quite a substantial contribution, as last year over $42,000 were received from corporate matching gifts alone. The fund drive, which began Nov. 1, has scheduled its deadline for J u n e 30, the end of the fiscal year. According to Nordstrom, if all goes as expected, over 70% of the million will have been accumulated by the end of J a n u a r y . But he then added, "the annual fund actually lives or dies by the kinds of help we can recruit." It is hopeful that the same kind of diligent volunteer services that we had last year will again this year make the million dollar drive a success.

Huisketl

gains

Registrar Jon J. Huisken has recently been named head of the summer sessions, according to Provost Dr. David Marker.

UBW pOSt

Huisken is already at work on May term; as t h e deadline for faculty submitting May term courses was Wednesday. Huisken

Philosophy prof, to speak Dr. H. Tristram Englehardt, Jr., Rosemary Kennedy Professor of Philosophy of Medicine at Georgetown University, will speak on "Philosophy and Medicine" on Thursday, Nov. 30, in Wichers Auditorium during Community Hour. Englehardt, author of MindBody: A Categorical Relation, holds a Ph.D. in philosophy and an M.D. degree, and has approached the mind-body problem both philosophically and medically. Along with serving in various editorial positions, Englehardt has helped to organize seven Transdisciplinary Symposiums on Philosophy and Medicine and in 1976 he directed an N.E.H. Seminar for

Medical Practitioners. At present, he is a member of the Medical School, the Philosophy Department, the School of Foreign Service, and the Kennedy Institute, Center for Bioethics at George town. In addition to his lecture during Community Hour, Englehardt will also meet with students on an informal basis at 1 p.m. Thursday afternoon in Chapel 12. Everyone is welcome. The next guest for the philosophy lecture series and the first one of the new semester will be Professor Paul Leroy Holmer speaking on "Philosophy and the Ministry.' This lecture will be held February 1, 1979.

expects to have a list of May term course offerings available by second semester registration time, Nov. 27 through Dec. 1. The decision to name Huisken head of the summer session, replacing Dr. Donald Williams, is the result of a general reorganization of the academic administration. This change has been under consideration for the last several years but wasn't acted upon because the academic administration felt it was not that serious. However with the decision to improve several other areas in the academic offices, Marker and others felt the time was appropriate. Marker said he felt that the coordination of the academic year would be improved if one person is responsible for the class offerings of the entire year, not directors like before. He feels it is important to have the responsibility centered in one area.

#

Mountaineering 2.

SAC plans meal The Social Activities Committee is sponsoring a dinner meeting, on Tuesday, Nov. 28th at 5 p.m., to plan the agenda for the spring semester's activities. The committee will review this year's past events and preview coming attractions. The five subcommittees (Traditional Events, Entertainment, Happenings, Publicity and Coffeehouse) will present reports where they will share expectations with the group. According to co-chairperson Maria Vaselopulos there are still openings on subcommittees.

The Busclf label Is where it all begins. Note the snowy, craggy peaks affixed thereto. They aire the mountains.

Comfort is crucial. If you mountaineer in public, pick a padded bar stool, preferably one that spins (to facilitate admiring the scenery). At home, a comfortable chair or sofa will do. Rule of thumb: if it feels good, and the police don't seem to mind, do it. Then turn on the tube or spin a time or crack a good book The choice is strictly between you and the dominant hemisphere of your brain Of course, some mountaineers say the smooth, refreshing taste of Busch is entertainment enough. r And thank goodness ey do, because it's an excellent • conclusion

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Be adventurous. Experiment. Most mountaineers have a personal preference. You'll develop one too. Food is next. Proper mountaineering, not to mention proper nutrition, requires a smorgasbord selection of snacks. Some mountaineers have suffered from a potato chip deficiency, a pretzel imbalance or other serious dietary defects. Plan ahead

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Hope College anchor

Page 4

fvkj

$50 too much to eat? Collectively we have spent weeks waiting to get into Phelps and Durfee dining halls. At times it wasn't such a bad wait while talking to friends, but at other times dinner had to be skipped completely because the line was too long and time moved on. As everyone is aware by now Phelps is going to be expanded to alleviate this problem. You may never again have to eat at the salad bar while waiting for a table.

If we are lucky, with larger facilities perhaps the food will even improve a bit. This project is dependent on funds from Saga and funds from Y O U . Student Congress has set it up so that all or part of your admission deposit can be donated to this cause. Donate your deposit and help end long lines, full tables, and stand-up eating.

Fitness program at fault Hope's new, much-hyped Health Dynamics program is falling far short of its goals. The program thus far has proved to be unorganized and ineffective. Health Dynamics was promoted as being a year-long all-encompassing fitness program designed to start freshmen on the road to new heights of physical health. Whether they liked it or not. You see, this course is mandatory for freshmen; in other words, they are required to improve their health. It is not stated that way in class, but it is obvious to any student who values his CPA. This course, they were told, would involve academic learning, fitness testing, physical activity, and diet improvement. The first eight weeks of the program made up the academic portion. Most class periods were opened with a general question, such as "What is the health situation in America today?" or "What can be done to prevent cancer?" The class then spent the remainder of the class period discussing the topic, with various students tossing in their opinions as other students perfected their doodles. Class discussion can be a very educational experience, but in this case little was ever decided, and little new information was presented. The major source of health information were the vast amounts of dottoed-off articles the class was to read. At least one was illegible. The little lecturing that was done followed the general trend of this course in that it stressed running to the neglect of other exercises, and stressed cardiovascular fitness to the exclusion of other aspects of health. The fitness testing look three days, and included an endurance test for cardiovascular fitness; a test for lung capacity; a flexibility test; and the infamous "fat lank," which measures the percentage of body fat. The equipment used was impressive, and the tests themselves seemed accurate; however, I feel that more testing would be needed to give an accurate picture of a person's overall health. Once again the program has centered on a few specific aspects of health, to the exclusion of an entire range of health aspects, including such basics as height, weight, strength, and diet, as well as many aspects which would require a doctor's office in order to be tested. I cannot honestly evaluate the physical activity portion of the program, as it has barely begun. 1 do know that class members were given a choice between three areas for their activity, such as running, water activity, and gymnasium activity. I also know that one class, after thorough warm-ups, spent the period playing a "game" in which the two teams threw an assortment of balls across a black line at each other, the object being to have as few balls on your side as possible when time ran out. One girl got hit in the head with a football. This

"game" is not my idea of a constructive college-level activity promoting physical fitness. Another area supposedly included in the Health Dynamics program is diet. Supposedly Saga was going to get into the act and serve more sensible, nutritious food. But Saga seems to be serving up the same high-starch, high-sugar food that they served before this "dynamic" new program began. What good did it do students to be told that charred food has been implicated in cancer, when a week later their BLT was served on wellscorched toast? Saga still offers few options for the "sensible" eater. The concept behind Health Dynamics is

Mapi

a good one, and the staff seem very excited about it. But students cannot be forced to change their ways, and even if the course were not mandatory, many improvements are needed for it to achieve its goals. At present, the class is a feeble

Rebuttal to grade issue

Dear Editor, . T h e anchor editorial of Oct. 27 was entitled "Societal pressure overemphasizes grades." While I tend to sympathize with this point of view, I must say that the editorial which followed contained some of the silliest arguments I have ever heard. The hostility towards formal education shown by the writers makes me wonder why they have bothered to come to college at all. Such hostility is illustrated in the writers' tendency to assume that: 1) the faculty is the biggest obstacle to real learning; 2) that A' students are either a) haclw, b) teacher's pets, or c) herds; and 3) that writing papers only leads to "heartaches." Nonsense. From reading this editorial, 1 get the impression that the writers are being forced

to attend college. There is no recognition of the possiblity that going to classes (for which students or their parents are paying a substantial amount of money) represents a choice just as valid as working on campaigns, editing the newspaper or playing field hockey (sports were noticably absent from the editor's list of enriching activities for some obscure reason). College is not high school. Attendance is not mandated by law. All of the "experiences" cited by the editors can be gained outside of a college environment. Newspaper writing, radio announcing, acting, and the other activities mentioned are not only available on campus. What is unique about college is the opportunity to engage in structured and disciplined learning, to gain theorectical knowledge

ope college

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olland, michi&m

Published d u r i n g the college year except vacation, holiday and examination periods by and f o r the students of Hope College, Holland, Michigan, under the a u t h o r i t y of the Student Communications Media C o m m i t t e e . Subscription price: $ 8 per year. Printed by the Hi-Lites Shoppers Guide, Printing Department, Fremont, Michigan. Member, Associated Collegiate Press. O f f i c e located o n ground f l o o r of Graves Hall. Telephone 392-5111, Extension 4 6 0 0 . The opinions on this page are not necessarily those of the student b o d y , f a c u l t y or administration of Hope College.

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effort toward p r o m o t i n g fitness. Yes, students have learned some things. Yes, they were tested on some things. But t h e p r o g r a m has miserably failed to c o m e together as the "total health pro g r a m " t h a t it was intended to be. B.B.

J a n e t G. Shimmin â&#x20AC;˘

Doug Dykstra Karen VanDonkelaar ' J e n n i f e r Elliott Bob Baker J o y Dulmes Bob Baker Steve Nearpass Gary Markert, Kirk Haverkamp, T o m DePree Steve Goshorn Barb Long, Deb Hibma, Betty Buikema, Todd Hudson Mark D o u m a , Doug Harris, Terri Land Dave Pater, Ken Powell, Lisa Raak, David S c h a c k o w , Nancy Torresen, Cyndi VanderSchaaf J e f f VerBeek T o n y Kistter, Rich Farkas, Rich O s t e r h o u t

t h a t will make one's experiences more understandable. T h e final p a r a g r a p h summarizes the absurdity of the entire editorial. Es sentially it advises students to abandon any commonsense they may h a p p e n to have. Don't rationally allocate your time -- b u m yourself out. Of course theater, journalism, broadcasting, g o v e r n m e n t and Higher Horizons are valuable experiences. But if "academics" ranks so far be low these activities in value, then going to college represents mistaken j u d g m e n t on t h e student's p a r t . He or she should seriously consider "stopping o u t " (taking a semester, a year, or even five years off) or d r o p p i n g o u t . 1 a m not advocating that students should all b e c o m e bookworms. Rather. I a m suggesting that by deciding to come to college o n e has already m a d e a choice that for the next few years he or she wants, primarily, a formal learning experience. A wide variety of activities are offered as supplements to, not replacements for. this experience. Students should take ad v a n t a g e of some of t h e m , but only insofar as they do not interfere with one's pri m a r y purpose in being at college. But what a b o u t the editorial's concern as expressed in the title? Grades are over emphasized in society a n d , as a result, in t h e college itself. If the pressure of g r a d e s really interferes with one's ability to learn, there are several options. Take as m a n y courses as possible on a pass fail basis. W o r k to extend the n u m b e r ot courses which are m a n d a t o r y or optional p a s s / f a i l . T r a n s f e r to a school which does not give grades. Refuse to pick u p grades when they c o m e o u t . All of these are reasonable responses to the situation. Burying oneself in extra-curricular activities is an escape from an earlier choice to study, not a better choice. Sincerely, C . W . Gossett

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November 17,1978

Page 5

T.G.LF.

Upward Bound aims high

(Thank....Now who was that?) by Reid Thurston "THE UNEXAMINED LIFE IS NOT WORTH LIVING.'1 Socrates Are you busy? Do you feel like your life is very full and you're doing lots of things but still aren't doing what you want to be doing, or accomplishing what you wisn you were accomplishing? Often life's a jumble and the things t h a t we value as important we don't get done. I believe a major cause of this is because we don't stop and take time to pet pur head together. To be effective we need to spend time in self evaluation. Charles Hummel, author of Tyranny of the Urgent, tells of a businessman who gave him the following advice. "Your greatest danger is letting t h e urgent things crowd out the important." Our lives flow along with whatever catches our immediate attention, while the things t h a t we value as important get left behind. We re act to the situations we find ourselves in, as opposed to acting to create our situations.

Hummel goes on to quote a president of Dupont as saying, ''One minute spent in planning saves three or four minutes in execution." Time spent in reflection, evaluation, and planning makes our lives more truly reflect that which we consider important. St. Paul wrote similar instructions to the Christians in Corinth. II Cor 13:5 reads, "Examine and test and evalute your own selves, to see whether vou are holding to your faith and showing the proper fruits of it." Examining our lives is very helpful for our growth as Christ-like people. What does it mean to examine yourself? The following are some thoughts and suggestions. A certain amount of self-evaluation can happen everyday, especially if one sets aside a daily "quiet time." Talking with God may include: confession of our past failures, seeking God's desires for our lives, and prayer for events and people that are important to us. However, to better examine your life, to see if your life is what

you want it to be; to see If you are being the person God would have ou to be, consider setting aside a irger block of time, say an hour a week, or a half-day a month for the purpose of self evaluation. In prayerful meditation reflect on your life. Are you being the person you desire to Be? What areas have you grown in? What areas are you weak in? Have you been living what you believe? Be aware of what God is trying to teach you. Then in t h e same spirit of obedience and love, look towards t h e future. Set goals and objectives. Purpose to make any changes you deem necessary. Enjoy new life! By taking the time to examine our lives, we can choose to be more concerned with the important things, instead of merely with the immediate. Perhaps our attitude should be more like Martin Luther's when he wrote, "I'm so busy I simply can't get by on less than three hours of prayer each morning."

S

Letter answers $25,000 question In the early fall Student Congress was approached by the Development office with a challenge. Saga National pledged one dollar for every dollar raised by the student body (up to $25,000). This amount would be an addition to the $50,000 Saga has already pledged. Student Congress accepted the challenge.

Our next problem was deciding how to get students involved in a fund raising project. A number of alternatives were discussed before we chose t h e room deposit donation as our main program. This approach had been used successfully in building the Dow Center and the DeWitt Cultural Center. That is where we stand today. Students are raisine many questions concerning this program. This letter is an attempt to answer some of them. Q. Why should I rive Saga any money? I pay board. A. This money is not going to Saga but to the extension of the dining facilities at Phelps Hall. The enlargement of the eating area will reduce some of the tension in the overcrowded cafeteria. You will be able to find a seat quite easily, there may even be a selection. Q. But is the food going to get any better? A. Saga's cooking is never going to be like Mom's. This present kitchen was built to serve 600 boarders. There are now 1,750. The kitchen is working at more than double its capacity. Over the past few y e a r s the kitchen has been serving more and more students from an inadequate kitchen. This may have something to do with a decline in the quality or selection of food. Q. I can't afford to give $50. A. We have left open an option to give any p a r t of your room deposit. We ask you to consider how much time you have left at Hope and rive accordingly. As a final statement I would like to add t h a t the money Saga National has pledged will be lost if our fund raising drive r u n s short. That $25,000, money Saga will give us, will disappear. That is money t h a t w e d o not have to raise

or pay for through increased tuition or board fees. Student Congress does not want to lose that money.

Well, at first I stood agape, like seeing the snake towering 10 feet above the charmer's basket; but I shouldn't have been surprised, seeing beforehand the of course well-meaning, of course over-aged doing the charming. For whatever it's worth, the assumption that "all those younguns" will break the laws concerning drunk driving is one of the grosser insults. The promoter's apparent ignorance of one of the most elementary concepts in psychology, t h a t of punishing undesirable behavior, I find most intolerable. I, being one who enjoys wines or an occasional "aperitif," have never been drunk in my life. I feel as though I've been sniped through tne heart by the electorate standing in the belfry of Notre Dame. So what to do now? That's o.k. -

HOLLAND, MICHIGAN

0

they'll just see me at Point West taking my Pina Colada intravenously. And incidentally, I wouldn't take any quiet, rural nightdrives coming home from Point West, either; foreseen is an unprecedented rise in exponent of "nymphs in the woods.' The Dark Ages are coming. Rights of the otherwise adult? Statistics triump. " 'Kurtz-he dead.' ...so that's the way part of our world ends, part of our world ends, part of our world ends, That's the way part of our world ends, Not with a bang, but a whimper..." -T.S.Eliot's "On the Beach" P.S. Oh, and Fraulein Hilde, meet me at the Waldorf, after the 1.2637 years is over. Sandra McClure

if tickets are again put up for sale. As a morally conscious fraternity, we cannot justify such an action and will therefore not participate as we have done previously. We write this letter to anger no one, nor to cause hard feelings. We write this letter to allow the administration adequate time to find ushers for this year's Vespers in the case that tickets are again available only with a purchase price. Sincerely, Timothy R. Kinney, President Mark W. Ennis, Corresponding Secretary

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Tenant Privacy Michigan legislation has added a< new bw twist to tne the old adage t h a t "< "a man's home is his castle," by stating in turn, that "a renter's apartment is his fortress." In short, landlords must not interfere with the tenant's quiet enjoyment of the apartment by violating their privacy. Ideally, the landlord should maintain the attitude that t h e rental unit is as much a home for the tenant* as is the landlord's place of residence. J u s t as the landlord would take offense at the thought of the tenant appearing at his door asking to check the plumbing, the tenant should in similar fashion, be conscious of possible infringements of his privacy.. Originally, common law rulings gave total control of the premise to the tenant, maintaining t h a t the property owner had no right to enter the apartment during the term of occupancy. The current division of rights

and responsibilities is based more on interdependent cooperation rather than self-sufficiency. Not only does the landlord have the right to enter the apartment for needed repairs, etc., but must by law make periodic checks on his rental property or with the tenants, or otherwise make himself accessible for the purpose of keeping informed of problems which may arise. However, if the landlord wishes to enter the apartment he must give prior notice and arrange to enter at the tenant's convenience. In the event of an emergency, a landlord may enter without giving prior notice with the intent of protecting his property. This aspect of the tenant-landlord relationship appears to be the most susceptable to abuse. The law is very clear and concise in regards to such infringements: even though it may be the property owner's house, it is the tenant's home.

WOODMARK

Vesper entrance fee costs ushers To the People of Hope College: Since our founding in May of 1960, we of Alpha Phi Omega, National Service Fraternity, have enjoyed doing service in the community of Holland as well as on the campus of Hope College. One of our many past projects has been t h e ushering of Christmas Vespers, a recently controversial event. At a recent Fraternity business meeting, we of Alpha Phi Omega have discussed t h e possibility of ushering at Vespers again this year. It was resolved that we would not participate in this event

P

by James Coats

Immediate reactions yyto vote on proposal "D

'pfaiidt 238 River Avenue

Sincerely Gretchen Coffill Chairman of Room Deposit Pledge Drive

"Progress is when everyone phases. The first is the academic year phase. This phase involves moves in the same direction." This is the essence of the goals the tutorial services, a cultural of the nationwide Upward Bound and social awareness program (film reviews, speakers, student Program, headed locally by Al council, projects, etc.), and trips to Soriano, whose headquarters a r e colleges and universities. in Voorhees Hall. The summer phase is t h e second Upward Bound is a program depart of the Upward Bound Prosigned to generate the skills and motivation necessary for educa- gram. This seven-week residential tional success beyond high school. program gives the Upward Bound It is specifically for the young student a chance to play t h e role of person from the low-income family a college student. He lives on the Hope campus, taking high-school who has academic potential but lacks adequate secondary school level courses in academic areas preparation. In the Holland area, and extracurricular activities. This most of these young people are phase, says Soriano, "gives the students a taste of college life." Latinos. Some of the past activities of the The Holland area Upward program have included 4-day and Bound Program is funded federally through Hope. Its goal is to 10-day survival programs in increase the academic perfor- Kentucky, which are stress challmance and motivational levels of enges designed to increase self eligible enrollees, so t h a t they may motivation. Each year a student is complete their secondary school- chosen to represent the Upward ing and successfully pursue a post- Bound Program in the Presidential Classroom in Washington, D.C. secondary educational program. Started in 1969 with 12 This year the students painted a members, the Upward Bound large mural on the side of the Program in this area now has 70 Holland Armory Building. "I feel the program has a lot to members of high school age. Many Hope students are involved as paid do with motivating and orienting tutors and assistants for the students towards college educa program. Students a r e given tion," says Soriano. "Although a rogram is never 100% successful, assistance in subjects such as feel as though we have helped math, reading, writing, and turn many a kid around." English as a second language. The program is divided into two

Is all that money you're putting into Albums going down the Tubes? It is - iff you'rt using a worn (nrtridgtl Weodmark is efftring $ 1 5 for your old curtridgo offf on nny Cartridgo purchasod until NOV. 25. Hope I.D. is necessary for this special offer.

Any Friday or Saturday through December 1978 with this coupon. (Disco charge is only collected Friday and Saturdays from 9 p.m.)

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Page 6

Hope College anchor

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Nykerk participants began Nov. 4 with an early breakfast, served and entertained by the moral guys. After the breakfast the coaches that were chosen for the class of '83 were announced: Sue Weener and her assistant Sue Ward for the song, Terri Turpin and Vicki Wilson for the play, and Meg Biggerstaff and Melissa Raak for the oration.

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Judges Linda Versteeg, Tom Bartha, Charles Canaan, Barbara Greenwood, Nona Penna, G.M. Thompson, Evelyn Smallegan, George Arwady, and Norman Kansfield had a tough decision to make while Senior Paul Daniels entertained the audience with the song "Friends" by Elton John.

Before the last not of the Alma Mater had finished resounding, the 475 Nykerk participants raced to meet each other "in the middle," some with smiles on their faces and others with tears. Everyone left Nykerk with a feeling of success; and the freshmen know they have another chance at the cup.


November 17,1978

Page 7

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Orator: Cathy Krueger

Orator: Melissa Raak

"A Barrel of Peanuts"

'The Genesis of Narnia"

Charlie B r o w n ; Julie Garlinghouse

Asian: Meg Biggerstaff

Lucy Van Pelt: Nancy MacArthur

Digory: Suzanne Galer

Linus: Julie Reinhardt

Polly: Betty Peterson

Snoopy; Nancy Edwards

Uncle A n d r e w : Karen Puschel

Patti: Debbie Bere

Jadis: Nancy Torresen

Schroeder: Sharon McKee

Cabby: Barbara J. Swanson

Sally: Tish Carr

Cabby's Wife: Susanne Hagen

Pig Pen: Maria H o f f m a n

Strawberry: Vickie Wilson

V i o l e t : Eva Gaumond

Fox: Terri T u r p i n

Frieda: Linnae Claebout

Kangaroo: Evelyn Parry

1

Panther: Kris Koop Jack-dow: K i m M o o i Rabbit: Lora Rector Narrator: Carol Jones

ALTHOUGH THE NIGHT S PERFORMANCE GOT OFF T O A S L O W S T A R T BECAUSE THE FLORIST FORGOT TO INCLUDE PINS W I T H T H E C O R SAGES, THE CLASS O F '81 O N C E A G A I N CAPTURED THE NYKERK

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Hope College anchor

Busy schedule faces musicians; Alumnus'prints exhibited Christmas performances near tHl o p e s musicians have a busy busv hedule before scneame oeiore the] tney can leave for lor T h a n k s p v i n g - and then it picks up again after t h e break with major Christmas-time events. Ticket sales be^in Monday for the traditional Christmas Vespers, with four performances this year on Dec. 2 and 3. The Renaissance Madrigal Dinner, which drew a capacity crowd in the DeWitt Ballroom at its inauguration last year, is slated for Dec. 8. Concerts in the coming week include student recitals tonight and tomorrow, a joint concert by the Symphonette and Chapel Choir Sunday, and a band concert Tuesday. Tonight at 8 in Wichers Auditorium clarinetist Sandra Blodffett, a junior from Farmington, N.J., and ianist Keith Cahoon, a senior rom Hackensack, N.J., will give a recital. Blodgett's piano accompanist is junior Michael Eldrid^e. Tomorrow at 8 p.m. in Wichers Rae Ann Syswerda and Elaine Hildebrand will join to present their recital. Syswerda is a pianist from Lansing, and Hildeorand, whose home is in Royal Oak, is a soprano vocalist. All Hope music majors are required to perform recitals during their senior year. Performance majors give recitals also. These recitals are important events in the lives of college music majors and represent long hours in the practice room, a department spokesman observes. Music by Bach, Handel, and Gluck is on the program for Sunday's concert at 8:30 p.m. in Dimnent Memorial Chapel. Dr. Robert Ritsema, professor of

F.

music, will direct the Symphonette P' and Roger Rietberg, professor of music, will direct tne 64-voice Chapel Choir. will play Tne orchestral Gluck. an overture by Together t h e groups will perform G.F. Handel's Chandos Anthem No. 6 and J. S. Bach's Cantata 34, O ewiges feuer. Professor of Music Robert M. Cecil will direct the Concert Band and the Wind Ensemble in their joint concert Tuesday at 8 p.m. in Dimnent. On the Wind Ensemble's program are "Dance Variations" from Sinfonietta by Ingolf Dahl, A Little Night and Day Music by Alder, William Walton's "Popular Song" from the Facade Suite, and "Jupiter" from The Planets by Gustav Hoist. The Concert Band will play pieces by Persichetti, Erickson, Reeves, a march by Alford, and Concertpiece No. 2 Opus 114 by Mendelssohn, featuring clarinetists Betty Bice and Sandy Blodgett. The following Tuesday, Nov. 28, the Grand Rapids Symphony Brass Quintet will give a recital at 8 p.m. in Wichers. Its members include Ava Ordman, trombone, Michael Bowman, first trumpet, Fred Baker, second trumpet, Karl Hill, french horn, and Dwight M. Burch, tuba. Vespers tickets will be available to students, faculty and staff together with their immediate families, in the music department office beginning Monday at 9 a.m. The cost is $1.00. Tickets for the general public will be available Tuesday and

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t o Services o— Wednesday at $2. are Saturday, Dec. 2 at 8 p.m. and the following day at 2, 4:30 and 8 p.m. The traditional opening service for Hope's Christmas season has been held annually in Dimnent since Pearl Harbor Day, Dec. 7, 1941. At first it was on Sunday afternoon only, but by 1967 the service was so popular among campus residents and townspeople that two performances were scheduled. Crowds continued to jam the chapel and the program expanded. It was last year that the Vespers went to four performances, including Saturday night. Tickets for Vespers were offered free on a first-come-firstserved basis through 1975. It was two years ago that charges w : ere first assessed in order to control equitable distribution and help defray rising expenses, according to the explanations given at the time. A newer "tradition" is the Madrigal Dinner under the direction of Stuart Sharp, associate professor of music and chairman of the department. Begun last year, the dinner featured authentic Renaissance recipes prepared by off-campus resiaents, sixteenthand seventeenth-century music by several campus and community groups, performances of Elizabethan dances, and a variety of colorful costumes. Information has not yet been released on how students and others may sign up for this year's event.

DELS 1

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"An Alumnus Collects" is an exhibition of prints from the collection of Orville Beattie which will be in the DeWitt Art Gallery Nov. 27 through Dec. 31. Beattie, of Lake Forest, 111. is a Hope graduate and a member of t h e Board of Trustees. He has given a few works to the gallery, which will be on display, and is a collector of a number of works. This exhibition is an aspect of his collection. The show centers on the work of prominent American printers of the 1930s and 40s', known as regionalists or "American Scene" artists. The works constitute realist reaction to European abstraction. According to John Wilson, Chairman of t h e art department.

Workshops to plan lives Four seminars on such topics as career planning and iob hunting are being offered through the Career Development Office. The first seminar, Life/Work Planning, will be held on Nov. 28 and Dec. 5 in Dow 204. The other seminars are entitled Resume/ Letter Writing, Creative Job Hunting, and Interview Skills, and will each be held twice—once on

e A V O N - To become a representative call 392-6238, Mrs. Kemp, Avon manager. W A N T E D : Painters for indoor painting, some ladder w o r k . Close to campus, flexible hours. See Off-Camous Johc Phelps Lobby, 9 to 4 Mon. - Fri. WANTED: Window Designer w i t h art background one afternoon a week. Close to campus. See Off-Campus Jobs, Phelps Lobby, 9 to 4 Mon. - Fri. WANTED: STUDENTS who would like temporary or odd jobs with private employers on afternoons and Saturdays. See Off-Campus Jobs,Phelps Lobby. WANTED: Dinner party pianist, one evening. Nov. 14 or 15, 7-9 p.m. See Off-Campus Jobs, Phelps Lobby. W A N T E D : Graphic artist for {heanchor. Contact Janet G. Shimmin if you are interested. WANTED: A creative person who would be willing to write headlines for the anchor. Call Janet Shimmin at 396-3003.

FOR SALE: Ford Galaxie • new battery, new tires, body so-so, good ride. Call Lisa at 392-4786.

S A U G A T U C K

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT

faJuHiHll.... "SPICE" DANCING and COCKTAILS

FINE DINING IN A CASUAL ATMOSPHERE

Mftug OUR EXCITING GARDEN TABLE

W A N T E D : THREE openings for student who wants to work as stocker approx. 10 hrs. a week, Mon. and Fri. 5 p.m. to 10 p.m., $3.00/hr. See OffCampus Jobs. W A N T E D : Immediate opening for a draftsperson. Hours are flexible between 8 & 5, Mon. thru Fri. See OffCampus Jobs, Phelps Lobby. W A N T E D : Experienced floral designer. Approx. 20 hr/weekly, own transportation necessary. See Off-Campus Jobs. BOB'S SHOP: Handmade Guitars, Dulcimers and Aeolian Wind Harps. Also, String Instrument Repair, Guitar and Banjo Lessons. Bob Hedstrom 3923925 1 p.m. - 9 p.m. Mon. - Fri. W A N T E D : Apartment for two girls next semester. Anyone who is evacuating their apt. or has any helpful information, please contact Barb after 10 p.m. weekdays at 396-3979. FOR SALE: Brown Duchess 10-speed Girl's bike. Call 392-5111. Ex. 4339. W A N T E D : Salesman - Menswear shop, close to campus, has openings for parttime help. See Off-Campus Jobs, Phelps Lobby, 9 to 4 Mon. - Fri.

701 Washington Ave. Holland, Michigan 49423 (616) 392-8543

IL FORNO RATHSKELLER RESTAURANT AVAILABLE OPEN DAILY EXCEPT MONDAY

W A N T E D : Looking for part-time employment in the community? See OffCampus Jobs, Phelps Lobby, open Monday through Friday 9 : 0 0 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. We can help you organize your job search.

P/4NOPOULOS S/ILONS HOLL/M

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Dec. 1 and once on Dec. 8 - in the Career Counseling Office. Each workshop will also be offered four times next semester; the schedule for these ^emirc^s will be published in li.t; first anchor of 1979. Pre-registration is required for the seminars. Students can register or obtain more information by calling extension 2110.

NEEDED: Investigative news reporters for the anchor. If it sounds like something you have always wanted to t r y , call Doug Dykstra at ext. 4674.

OLD CROW

this was a period of inward turning on the part of the American culture. The search for identity of this period resulted in characteristic American subject matter. Such artists as John Steward Curry, Grant Wood, and Thomas H a r t Benton are represented in the show. A series ol etchings by Reginald Marsh illustrate stylistic developments over a number of years. The selection includes some earlier works as well, such as a number of Whistler's prints, including t h e well known "Black Lion Wharf," and a Mary Cassatt. There are also works by Currier and Ives. A reception in the gallery will be held Friday evening Dec. 1 and is open to the public.

For.... •FORMALS •INF0RMALS •PARTIES •DANCES •BANQUETS ACCOMMODATING UP TO 225 PEOPLE.

FOR INFORMATION or RESERVATIONS....Phone 857-2162 COMINO W I D N I I D A Y • N O V I M B I R 22 THANKSGIVING EVE PARTY ... $1.00 AdmiBion, 7 N Drinks

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FREE CONSULTATIONS 392-8543 fat odvict cuut Mwict 701 WASHINGTON-HOLLAND (CORNER OF 29th & WASHINGTON)


November 17,1978

Page 9

PREVIEW OF BASKETBALL, SWIMMING Youthful cagers face Tough 78-79 slate

4

Hope cagers are well on their way in preparation for the season opener against the University of Chicago on Saturday, Nov. 25. The theme this year will be youth and inexperience. There is only one senior on the team and one junior. The majority of the team will consist of sophomores and freshmen. Bruce VanderSchaaf, a W senior forward, will supply some experience. Last year, VanderSchaaf was a spot-starter and the sixth man on the team. Loren Schrotenboer, a 6' G ' V junior center, brings in some experience as he was the starting center last season. John Sutton, Keith Korver, and Mark Hospers are all sophomores who were members of the varsity team as freshmen. Sutton is a guard who could be good. "Sutton is good and quick, he can add speed to the guard position," commented Coach Glenn Van Wieren. Kevin Seeitz and Scott Benson joining the varsity unit after being members of last year's freshman team that won 14 games while losing only three. Coach Van Wieren feels that the crop of sophomores coming up is one of the best in the league. "The group of sophomores advancing to the varsity level is as good as any group of sophomores in the league." The inexperience that Hope will have this year may work to their disadvantage as the league is very tough this year. Most of the other teams in the MIAA have much of their teams from last year returning. Albion College, last year's cochampion, is labelled the team to beat this year in the MIAA. The Britons have their starting five

QUIZ The World Series 1.) This year's World Series MVP went to someone who isn't known for hitting the long ball. He is known for his timely hits and for his very steady defensive play. Can you name the 1978 World Series MVP? 2. In winning the World Series this year, the Yankees found some new heroes among the members of the team. One of these heroes led the team in hitting. He wasn't expected to start and as late as in August was playing for Tacoma. This player only played in 39 games as a Yankee. He had 7 hits in the series, only 3 fewer than his total during the regular season. Name him. 3. Reggie Jackson is known as Mr. October. He seems to improve drastically when the chips are down and the pressure is on. He added two home runs this year to up his career home run mark to 12 in World Series competition. ipei Can you name the slugger who owns the career mark for home r u n s in the World Series with

returning and only lost one member of the first eight players from last year's team. Alma, the other champion from last year, have their starting unit from last year intact. Calvin has a strong nucleus returning and Kalamazoo has their starters returning. Kalamazoo's s t a r t e r s include Dave Dame, the MIAA scoring champion last season and possibly the best player in the league. Olivet, who finished in sixth place last season, enters the season with their starting five from the previous year. They should be tougher as a team as they have had a year's experience to work together. Hope finished last season with an 11-10 record in overall competition. They were 5-7 in league play and had a fifth place finish. The team lost many close games last season and were in every game they played, never getting blown out. Coach Van Wieren is looking forward to the season. "This year's squad will be very young. The key will be to be able to be consistant as players. Our games will pit the youth against the veterans." "There are two major elements that will determine whether Hope is b e t t e r than last year or not," stated Van Weiren. "The first one is whether we can better our record over last year's or not. The second and maybe more important one is whether we can beat Calvin. We have lost to Calvin 19 straight times, a span of nine years. We want to defeat Calvin this year so the span won't extend to a decade!!" Tomorrow morning at 10 a.m. at the Dow Center, the cagers will scrimmage. It will be a 'Meet the Dutchmen' event where the students are invited to come out and preview the basketball team. The student body and faculty are encouraged to come out and get a sneak preview of the team that will represent Hope this season.

Swim teams dive into season, Open with MIAA relays For the soggy hearted, strong willed men and women of Hope, Nov. 1st marked the debut of the dreaded double sessions for the 1978-79 varsity swim team. The team has been working steadily and strong towards their goal of being ready for the '78-'79 season. Their schedules open with the MIAA relays for men in Kalamazoo and the WMIAA relays for women in Alma on Friday, Dec. 1. When Coach Patnott was asked about the progress of both teams, he replied, "We've come a long way for being a first year team!" The swimming Dutchmen's first year roster is as follows: The freestyle sprinters will be Tim Jasperse and Ken Schewe. The distance freestylers are Brad Boggs, Bruce Webster, who will also swim the Butterfly, and Dave Moored, who will swim the Individual Medley (IM), which begins with four laps of the Butterfly, then 4 laps of the backstroke, 4 laps of the breaststroke and finally 4 laps of freestyle swimming. Bruce Caltrider and Mike McCarley will swim the breast

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18? 4.) The New York Yankees have been in the World Series so often that their name is becoming synonomous with the fall classic. The Yankees have won a total of 22 World Series and have lost 10. In 1960, the Yankees lost the series in seven games to a team that compiled a team ERA of 7.11! In fact, the Yankees batted .338! The Yankees lost the series in the seventh game, the ninth inninp when a home run was hit witn two outs to clinch the series. Can you name the team and the man who hit the home run? 5.) Can you name the only member of P r o Football's Hall of Fame who played in a World Series? Answers to last quiz: 1.) Headcoach Ray Smith. 2.) 1975. 3.) Calvin College. 4.) Jim DeJulio. 5.) Kicking PAT's.

school. The only race that isn't scored this way is the relay. Here the first place finisher receives 7 points and the second place finisher receives none. The first dual meet, for both men and women, will be held Dec. 9 at Adrian. The first home meet will be Jan. 24 against Calvin, starting at 5 p.m. with the women's team, followed by the men's match at 7 p.m. bpt Spectator seating is available for all meets and seating for home meets, in the Dow Center, may be accessed from the second floor. The swim teams are practicing again after being unable to use the swimming facility for some time because of filter and electrical problems.

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stroke while Craig Anderson will swim both the Butterfly and the IM. Kurt Berry will hold down the lone diving position for the Dutch. The women's swim team will find Judi Giannasca, Nancy Schelten, Karen Weidemaar, and Liz Wright swimming the freestyle laps. Linda Leslie and Nancy Vandewarer will swim the distance freestyle races, with Leslie Bethards and Leigh DeWolf swimming the backstroke and Joan Wilterdink, Beth Bischoff, and Margo Stephenson are holding down the breaststroke positions. The women's team is rounded off by three excellent divers in Lily Frasch, Lynn Bufe, and Deanna Palladino. Scoring consists of points given to the first three finishers in a particular race. First place is worth 5 points, second place is awarded 3 points, and third place receives one point. To prevent totally white-washing an opponent, no one school can sweep all three places. In the event a team does sweep the race, the third place award is automatically given to the other

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Hope, Wabash denied NCAA tournament bid The football team was denied a chance to play in the NCAA Division III post-season tournament. There were three teams chosen from this region and the voting was close, however both Hope and Wabash fell short of being chosen. Representing this region in the tournament are Dayton College, Wittenburg College, and BaldwinWallace College. These t h r e e teams were in the top ten teams in Division III, while both Hope and Wabash earned honorable mention. Despite losing out in the opportunity to play in the post-season tourney, Hope's season was one to be proud of. The Dutchmen finished with a fine 8-1 record and a championship in the MIAA. Coach Ray Smith, who enjoyed his second best record as a head coach, upped his over all record to 58-21-2 as the leader. He was very pleased with the season's outcome. In reflecting over the season. Smith felt that there weren't any disappointments at all. "We won all our bie games, the ones we played at nome." Albion, Adrian, and Kalamazoo were the home league games and all these teams were tabbed as potential champions. The Dutchmen defeated all three teams at home, including an exciting season finale against the Kalamazoo Hornets, which r a v e Hope the outright championship. This year's team tied or set 13 school records. Greg Bekius, sophomore kicker from Whitehall, was involved in seven records. Freshman quarterback, Mark Spencer, set a new mark for pass completions, and junior punter, Henry Loudermilk, set a new record for punting average. For the second straight time, Bekius completed the season without missing an extra point conversion kick. He has now

extended the record to 53 straight. Bekius, the leading scorer in the MIAA this season, tied t h e single season individual and team record for field goals. He booted five this year to match the record set in 1975 by Jim Miller. Loudermilk surpassed the record set by Gary Frens in 1966 with an average of 39.7 yards per punt. The old mark was 38.9 yards per boot. Groy Kaper was the record holder for most pass completions with 84. Spencer bettered the mark this season by one. Spencer led the MIAA in both passing and total offense and to achieve the record, he finished with an 18 of 24 passing performance in the final game. The rushing defense of the Dutchmen set a new team record. The team limited its opponents to a mere 53.2 yards per game. They finished as the top-ranked team in Division III in the nation. The old mark, set by the 1974 team, was 73.3 yards per game. The defensive secondary tied a record, set by the 1972 team, for intercepting the opponent's passes. The mark is 19. The eight victories this season ties a record shared by the teams of 1958,1959,1974, and 1975. Hope finished the year unbeaten at home. This is the second straight year that this has been accomplished. They have now won ten straight games at home and this ties the mark set by the teams from 1972-1974. The records that were set this season by the team and the different individuals show the total team effort that was portrayed throughout the season. Coach Smith emphasized the fact that the team played as a whole unit. "The season was so special because there weren't really any individual heroes. Each game

Dutchmen jocks jump toward All-Sports honor With championships in football and cross-country, Hope has jumped off to a good lead this fall on the annual MIAA All-Sports Trophy. At the end of the year the trophy is awarded to the college in the MIAA with the best overall percentage in men's sports. The possibility of adding women's sports is currently being discussed by MIAA officials, according to Gordon Brewer, Hope director of men's athletics. Hope's two outright championships have given the Dutchmen 12 points each in the trophy race. Another 10 points was gained from Hope's second place in soccer, and eight more from a third in golf, making Hope's total 42 so far. The Britons of Albion college are in second place with 31 points. The other colleges in order of rank are Kalamazoo, Olivet, Calvin, Alma and Adrian.

The winner of the trophy is determined on a point system. These points are awarded according to the teams's finish in league play. First place is awarded 12 points, second place receives 10 points and so on to seventh place or the last position which doesn't receive any points. In case there is a tie, the places are added up and the total is divided, each team receiving the same number of points. Last year, the Dutchmen got off to a quick s t a r t in the fall sports season. Their good showings in the winter and spring sports were hard to come by. Albion did well throughout the whole season and won the trophy last year. This year, the Dutchmen are looking to do better in the upcoming sports seasons, says Brewer. He points out that the addition of the swim team could add to the total.

Harriers compete in Natl race tomorrow The Harriers assured themselves of a trip to tomorrow's NCAA Division III National Championships by placing fourth in the regionals Saturday. The nationals, with 29 of the top Division schools in the nation participating, will be held tomorrow at Credit Island P a r k in Davenport, Iowa. This year, the host of t h e Nationals will be Augustana College in Iowa. When Coach Vanderbilt was asked what his team's goal for t h e Nationals was, he replied, "Our goal is to at least crack t h e top 20." Last Saturday, Hope's harriers trayeled to Cleveland, Ohio to participate in the NCAA Division i l l Great Lakes Regional CrossCountry Championships. 25-30 schools were invited to participate and only the top four finishing schools are allowed to go to the Division III National Champion-

ships. The reason for this type bf competition is to eliminate tne use of a Board of coaches who elect the four t e a m s who can go to t h e Nationals. The top five finishers for the Dutchmen were Dick Northuis, fifth place, Mark Ongley, 20th place, George Moger, 22nd place, followed by Mark Northuis and Nevin Webster, who placed 41st and 45th, out of 98 runners, respectively. The 1978 All-Conference CrossCountry Team will have two Dutchmen on it. The team consists of t h e top six runners in the Great Lakes Region. These runners are: Doug Dielcema from Calvin, this year s MIAA most valuable runner, Dick Northuis and Mark Ongley, Joel Menges from Kalamazoo, John Whitney from Alma, and Ron Lessard from Albion.

brought out new heroes," reflected Smitn. John Hartman, co-captain of this year's team, shared the same feelings about the togetherness of the team. "We played well

together and the team seemed to resemble some of the 'No-name' teams where there aren't any individual super heroes, but each week brought out someone new in t h e limelight," said Hartman.

Hartman felt that the big difference between this year's team and the souad last year was the attitude. "Everyone worked harder and worked together better this season. The underclassmen fit in well with the program and really put out." Besides Hartman, there are seven other seniors who played in their last game as a Dutchmen. The defensive line will suffer the greatest loss with three seniors departing. Middle guard Tim Jonnson, and defensive tackles Kurt Droppers and Doug Koopman will all depart through graduation. These three members anchored a strong line which was instrumental in pacing the team in record-setting pace for defense against the rush. The defensive secondary will be depleted of weak safety Steve Prediger, and linebacker and co-captain Tim Lont. Ofiensive guards Hartman and Ron Klyn, and offensive end Kent Suchecki will be the graduating members of the offp^.oive unit. In 1979 t ^ y m g Dutchmen will play five games at home in the new city of Holland municipal stadium. Sept. 8 will be the season opener next year at Watertown, Wis. against Maranatha College.

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telling you to quit smoking cigarettes T i m Johnson, middle guard, sacks Kazoo quarterback Tom Ranville. Teammate Kurt Droppers comes on to lower the boom. Droppers and Johnson are two of the eight seniors that played in their final aame against Kalamazoo. The seniors enjoyed a very successful career at Hope. Their four years included two M I A A championships, national rankings, an outstanding 2 8 - / - 1 record and they have won 16 out of '19 M I A A games.

don't listen . . . they're probably trying to trick you into

TEAM STATISTICS HOPE OPPONENTS rcffffcffffffffrtfffffcrfffffffrfrffrffffffcfffffffffffffcfffcfcffcffffrfffrcfffffrccf First Downs Yards Rushing Yards Passing T o t a l Offense Passes Avg. per Rush Avg. per Pass Avg. per Play Fumbles/Lost Penalties & Yardage Interceptions & Yardage P u n t R e t u r n s & Yardage Kickoff R e t u r n s & Y a r d a g e Punts & Y a r d a g e

Hope Opponents

144 474/1330 1433 2763 104-198-10 2.81

13.78 4.76 29-15 68-618

19-170-8.95 30-193-6.43 19-467-24.58 47-1732-36.85

109 355/479 1370 1849 112-246-19 1.35 12.23 3.96 39-18 73-532 10-103-10.3 20-135-6.75 41-430-10.49 58-1866-32.17

C u m u l a t i v e Score by Q u a r t e r s 55 66 66 54 -241 avg. 14 16 29 19 -- 7 8 a v g .

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Knicks collect Members of the Knickerbocker fraternity collected money for cancer research last Friday afternoon in Holland. Under the direction of senior Tom Pearson, the Knicks worked from 2 p.m. until sundown and ended up collecting a total of $261.00 for the American Cancer Society.

Natters split state meet following The volleyballers from Hope finished the season at t h e state tournament held last Friday in Spring Arbor. The women won their first two matches and lost the next two to end their bid to enter into the finals. The first day saw the Dutchmen pitted against Michigan Tech and Concordia College. Hope played well and was able to defeat both opponents. This sent the Hope squad to the next day's events. The second day found the team not so lucky as they ran up against some stiff opposition and dropped both matches. Lake Superior College and Hillsdale College were both able t o take advantage of the sluggish play of Hope and score victories at Hope's expense. The loss with Hillsdale was disappointing as the Dutchmen were victorious in their last meeting. The loss was a typical example of what Hope went through tnis season. The team had a lot of talent, but they seemed to play in periods of greatness or they would

slump and not play too well. Although the record was under .500, the team played better than the record shows. Many of the matches were close and went three games before Hope was defeated. The volleyballers went through many high points this season. One of the first highlights was the weekend trip to Taylor, Ind. The team defeated Kalamazoo first, then went on to battle several squads in Indiana. Hope was victorious over Taylor University and St.Francis College. The squad dropped a tough match to a good team from Indiana Tech. Another biff highlight of the season was the victory in the MIAA tournament. Hope was in fourth place at the outset and were considered possible spoilers, but nothing to worry about. Hope played very well, however, and won the tournament. To do this, they defeated the first-seeded Adrian Bulldogs twice. Coach Sandra Parker was pleased with the overall perfor-

mance of the team. "This was the best team that I have ever coached," commented Coach Parker. "They were a good unit to work with and they played well together. This year's team had more cohesiveness than teams of the past." Hope will lose two players to graduation for next year. Setter Cheryl Burke and spiker Tammy Schuiling are the only seniors on the team. Cheryl will leave a gaping hole on t h e team as it is harder to replace a setter than a spiker. Cheryl leaves with four years of varsity experience. The varsity unit consisted of t h r e e freshmen, t w o juniors, and one sophomore, besides the two seniors. Next year's team will r e t u r n with a good nucleus. The team will have some important experience t o go along with the talent. "I am looking forward to next year," said Coach Parker. "We will miss the seniors, but with the skill and experience t h a t we will have returning, we should have an exciting team next year."


PREVIEW OF BASKETBALL, SWIMMING Youthful cagers face Tough '78-'79 slate Hope cagers are well on their way in preparation for the season opener against the University of Chicago on Saturday, Nov. 25. The theme this year will be youth and inexperience. There is only one senior on the team and one junior. The majority of the team will consist of sophomores and freshmen. Bruce VanderSchaaf, a e'S" senior forward, will supply some experience. Last year, VanderSchaaf was a spot-starter and the sixth man on the team. Loren Schrotenboer, a 6 ' 6 V 2 " junior center, brings in some experience as he was the starting center last season. John Sutton, Keith Korver, and Mark Hospers are all sophomores who were members of the varsity team as freshmen. Sutton is a guard who could be good. "Sutton is good and quick, he can add speed to the guard position," commented Coach Glenn Van Wieren. Kevin Seeitz and Scott Benson joining the varsity unit after being members of last year's freshman team that won 14 games while losing only three. Coach Van Wieren feels that the crop of sophomores coming up is one of the best in the league. "The group of sophomores advancing to the varsity level is as good as any group of sophomores in the league." The inexperience that Hope will have this year may work to their disadvantage as the league is very tough this year. Most of the other teams in the MIAA have much of their teams from last year returning. Albion College, last year's cochampion, is labelled the team to beat this year in the MIAA. The Britons have their starting five

QUIZ The World Series 1.) This year's World Series MVP went to someone who isn't known for hitting the long ball. He is known for his timely hits and for his very steady defensive play. Can you name the 1978 World Series MVP? 2.) In winning the World Series this year, the Yankees found some new heroes among the members of the team. One of these heroes led the team in hitting. He wasn't expected to start and as late as in August was playing for Tacoma. This player only played in 39 games as a Yankee. He had 7 hits in the series, only 3 fewer than his total during the regular season. Name him. 3.) Reggie Jackson is known as Mr. October. He seems to improve drastically when the chips are down and the pressure is on. He added two home runs this year to up his career home run mark to 12 in World Series competition. Can you name the slugger who owns the career mark for home runs in the World Series with

Swim teams dive into season, Open with MIAA relays

returning and only lost one member of the first eight players from last year's team. Alma, the other champion from last year, have their starting unit from last year intact. Calvin has a strong nucleus' returning and Kalamazoo has their starters returning. Kalamazoo's starters include Dave Dame, the MIAA scoring champion last season and possibly the best player in the league. Olivet, who finished in sixth place last season, enters the season with their starting five from the previous year. They should be tougher as a team as they have had a year's experience to work together. Hope finished last season with an 11-10 record in overall competition. They were 5-7 in league play and had a fifth place finish. The team lost many close games last season and were in every game they played, never getting blown out. Coach Van Wieren is looking forward to the season. "This year's squad will be very young. The key will be to be able to be consistant as players. Our games will pit the youth against the veterans." "There are two major elements that will determine whether Hope is better than last year or not," stated Van Weiren. "The first one is whether we can better our record over last year's or not. The second and maybe more important one is whether we can beat Calvin. We have lost to Calvin 19 straight times, a span of nine years. We want to defeat Calvin this year so the span won't extend to a decade!!" Tomorrow morning at 10 a.m. at the Dow Center, the cagers will scrimmage. It will be a 'Meet the Dutchmen' event where the students are invited to come out and preview the basketball team. The student body and faculty are encouraged to come out and get a sneak preview of the team that will represent Hope this season.

For the soggy hearted, strong willed men and women of Hope, Nov. 1st marked the debut of the dreaded double sessions for the 1978-79 varsity swim team. The team has been working steadily and strong towards their goal of being ready for the '78-'79 season. Their schedules open with the MIAA relays for men in Kalamazoo and the WMIAA relays for women in Alma on Friday, Dec. 1. When Coach Patnott was asked about the progress of both teams, he replied, "We've come a long way for being a first year team!" The swimming Dutchmen's first year roster is as follows: The freestyle sprinters will be Tim Jasperse and Ken Schewe. The distance freestylers are Brad Boggs, Bruce Webster, who will also swim the Butterfly, and Dave Moored, who will swim the Individual Medley (IM), which begins with four laps of the Butterfly, then 4 laps of the backstroke, 4 laps of the breaststroke and finally 4 laps of freestyle swimming. Bruce Caltrider and Mike McCarley will swim the breast

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school. The only race that isn't scored this way is the relay. Here the first place finisher receives 7 points and the second place finisher receives none. The first dual meet, for both men and women, will be held Dec. 9 at Adrian. The first home meet will be Jan. 24 against Calvin, starting at 5 p.m. with the women's team, followed by the men's match at 7 p.m. Spectator seating is available for all meets and seating for home meets, in the Dow Center, may be accessed from the second floor. The swim teams are practicing again after being unable to use the swimming facility for some time because of filter and electrical problems.

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ii

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18? 4.) The New York Yankees have been in the World Series so often that their name is becoming synonomous with the fall classic. The Yankees have won a total of 22 World Series and have lost 10. In 1960, the Yankees lost the series in seven games to a team that compiled a team ERA of 7.11! In fact, the Yankees batted .338! The Yankees lost the series in the seventh game, the ninth inning when a home run was hit with two outs to clinch the series. Can you name the team and the man who hit the home run? 5.) Can you name the only member of Pro Football's Hall of Fame who played in a World Series? Answers to last quiz: 1.) Headcoach Ray Smith. 2.) 1975. 3.) Calvin College. 4.) Jim DeJulio. 5.) Kicking PAT's.

stroke while Craig Anderson will swim both the Butterfly and the IM. Kurt Berry will hold down the lone diving position for the Dutch. The women's swim team will find Judi Giannasca, Nancy Schelten, Karen Weidemaar, and Liz Wright swimming the freestyle laps. Linda Leslie and Nancy Vandewarer will swim the distance freestyle races, with Leslie Bethards and Leigh DeWolf swimming the backstroke and Joan Wilterdink, Beth Bischoff, and Margo Stephenson are holding down the breaststroke positions. The women's team is rounded off by three excellent divers in Lily Frasch, Lynn Bufe, and Deanna Palladino. Scoring consists of points given to the first three finishers in a particular race. First place is worth 5 points, second place is awarded 3 points, and third place receives one point. To prevent totally white-washing an opponent, no one school can sweep all three places. In the event a team does sweep the race, the third place award is automatically given to the other

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Hope College anchor Page 10

Wabash The football team was denied a chance to play in t h e NCAA Division III post-season tournament. There were t h r e e teams chosen from this region and the voting was close, however both Hope and Wabash fell short of being chosen. Representing this region in the tournament are Dayton College, Wittenburg College, and BaldwinWallace College. These three teams were in the top ten teams in Division III, while both Hope and Wabash earned honorable mention. Despite losing out in the opportunity play. in the post-season . w to p tourney, Hope's season was one to •p be proud of. The Dutchmen finished with a fine 8-1 record and a championship in the MIAA. Coach Ray Smith, who enjoyed his second best record as a head coach, upped his over all record to 58-21-2 as the leader. He was very pleased with the season's outcome. In reflecting over t h e season, Smith felt that there weren't any disappointments at all. "We won all our big games, the ones we played at home." Albion, Adrian, and Kalamazoo were the home league games and all these teams were tabbed as potential champions. The Dutchmen defeated all three teams at home, including an exciting season finale against the Kalamazoo Hornets, which gave Hope the outright championship. This year's team tied or set 13 school records. Greg Bekius, sophomore kicker from Whitehall, was involved in seven records. Freshman quarterback, Mark Spencer, set a new mark for pass completions, and junior punter, Henry Loudermilk, set a new record for punting average. For the second straight time, Bekius completed the season without missing an extra point conversion kick. He has now

extended the record to 53 straight. Bekius, the leading scorer in the MIAA this season, tied the single season individual and team record for field goals. He booted five this year to match t h e record set in 1975 by Jim Miller. Loudermilk surpassed the record set by Gary Frens in 1966 with an average of 39.7 yards per punt. The old mark was 38.9 yards per boot. Groy Kaper was the record holder for most pass completions with 84. Spencer bettered the mark this season by one. Spencer led the MIAA in both passing and total offense and to achieve the record, he finished with an 18 of 24 passing performance in the final game. The rushing defense of the Dutchmen set a new team record. The team limited its opponents to a mere 53.2 yards per game. They finished as the top-ranked team in Division III in the nation. The old mark, set by the 1974 team, was 73.3 yards per game. The defensive secondary tied a record, set by the 1972 team, for intercepting the opponent's passes. The mark is 19. The eight victories this season ties a record shared by the teams of 1958,1959,1974, and 1975. Hope finished the year unbeaten at home. This is the second straight year that this has been accomplished. They have now won ten straight games at home and this ties the mark set by the teams from 1972-1974. The records t h a t were set this season by the team and the different individuals show the total team effort that was portrayed throughout the season. Coach Smith emphasized the fact that the team played as a whole unit. "The season was so special because t h e r e weren't really any individual heroes. Each game

brought out new heroes," reflected §mjt^ John Hartman, co-captain of this year's team, shareo t h e same feelings about the togetherness of team. "We played well

Dutchmen jocks jump toward All-Sports honor With championships in football and cross-country, Hope has jumped off to a good lead this fall on the annual MIAA All-Sports Trophy. At the end of the year the trophy is awarded to t h e college in the MIAA with the best overall percentage in men's sports. The possibility of adding women's sports is currently being discussed by MIAA officials, according to Gordon Brewer, Hope director of men's athletics. Hope's two outright championships have given the Dutchmen 12 points each in the trophy race. Another 10 points was gained from Hope's second place in soccer, and eight more from a third in golf, making Hope's total 42 so far. The Britons of Albion college are in second place with 31 points. The other colleges in order of rank are Kalamazoo, Olivet, Calvin, Alma and Adrian.

The winner of the trophy is determined on a point system. These points are awarded according to the teams's finish in league play. First place is awarded 12 points, second place receives 10 points and so on to seventh place or the last position which doesn't receive any points. In case there is a tie, the places a r e added up and the total is divided, each team receiving the same number of points. Last year, the Dutchmen got off to a quick start in the fall sports season. Their good showings in the winter and spring sports were hard to come by. Albion did well throughout the whole season and won the trophy last year. This year, the Dutchmen are looking to do better in the upcoming sports seasons, says Brewer. He points out t h a t the addition of the swim team could add to the total.

Harriers compete in Nat'I race tomorrow The Harriers assured themselves of a trip to tomorrow's NCAA Division III National Championships by placing fourth in t h e regionals Saturday. The nationals, with 29 of the top Division schools in the nation participating, will be held tomorrow at Credit Island P a r k in Davenport, Iowa. This year, t h e host of t h e Nationals will be Augustana College in Iowa. When Coach Vanderbilt was asked what his team's goal for t h e Nationals was, he replied, "Our goal is to at least crack t h e top 20." Last Saturday, Hope's harriers traveled to Cleveland, Ohio to participate in t h e NCAA Division III Great Lakes Regional CrossCountry Championships. 25-30 schools w e r e invited to participate and only t h e top four finishing schools a r e allowed to go to the Division III National Champion-

ships. The reason for this type bf competition is to eliminate the use of a board of coaches who elect the four teams who can go to the Nationals. The top five finishers for the Dutchmen were Dick Northuis, fifth place, Mark Ongley, 20th place, George Moger, 22nd place, followed by Mark Northuis and Nevin Webster, who placed 41st and 45th, out of 98 runners, respectively. The 1978 All-Conference CrossCountry Team will have two Dutchmen on it. The team consists of t h e top six r u n n e r s in the Great Lakes Region. These runners are: Doug DieKema from Calvin, this year s MIAA most valuable runner, Dick Northuis and Mark Ongley, Joel Menges from Kalamazoo, John Whitney from Alma, and Ron Lessard from Albion.

together and t h e team seemed to resemble some of t h e 'No-name teams where t h e r e aren't any individual super heroes, but each week brought out someone new in the limelight," said Hartman.

H a r t m a n felt that the big difference between this year's team and the squad last year was the attitude. "Everyone worked h a r d e r and worked together b e t t e r this season. The underclassmen fit in well with the program and really put out." Besides H a r t m a n , there are seven other seniors who played in their last game as a Dutchmen. The defensive line will suffer the g r e a t e s t loss with three seniors departing. Middle guard Tim Johnson, and defensive tackles K u r t Droppers and Doug Koopman will all depart through graduation. These three members anchored a strong line which was instrumental in pacing the team in record-setting pace for defense against the rush. The defensive secondary will be depleted of weak safety Steve Prediger, and linebacker and co-captain Tim Lont. Offensive guards Hartman and Ron Klyn, and offensive end Kent Suchecki will be the graduating m e m b e r s of the offr- oive unit. In 1979 t' " . y m g Dutchmen will play five games at home in the new city of Holland municipal stadium. Sept. 8 will be the season opener next year at Watertown, Wis. against Maranatha College.

cut it short? American Cancer Society| If

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• T i m Johnson, middle guard, sacks Kazoo quarterback T o m Ranville. Teammate K u r t Droppers comes on t o lower the boom. Droppers and Johnson are t w o ot the eight seniors that played in their f i n a l game against Kalamazoo. The seniors enjoyed a very successful career at Hope. Their f o u r years included t w o M I A A championships, national rankings, an outstanding 28-7-1 record and they have won 16 o u t of 19 M I A A games.

TEAM STATISTICS

HOPE

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OPPONENTS

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( • r f f f c f c f f f f f f c f f c f c f f f f f c r c c r f c f f f f f c c f c c f c f f c r f f f c c c f f c f f f f f c c f r f f c f f f f c f r f r f r f c c f c c

First Downs Yards R us hing Yards Passing T o t a l Offense Passes Avg. p e r Rush Avg. per Pass Avg. per Play Fumbles/Lost Penalties & Yardage Interceptions & Yardage Punt R e t u r n s & Y a r d a g e Kickoff R e t u r n s & Y a r d a g e Punts & Y a r d a g e

Hope Opponents

144 474/1330 1433 2763 104-198-10 2.81 13.78 4.76 29-15 68-618 19-170-8.95 30-193-6.43 19-467-24.58 47-1732-36.85

109 355/479 1370 1849 112-246-19 1.35 12.23 3.96 39-18 73-532 10-103-10.3 20-135-6.75 41-430-10.49 58-1866-32.17

C u m u l a t i v e Score by Q u a r t e r s 55 66 66 54 -241 a v g . 14 16 29 19 -78 avg.

26.78 8.67

AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY

Knicks collect Members of the Knickerbocker fraternity collected money for cancer research last Friday afternoon in Holland. Under the direction of senior Tom Pearson, the Knicks worked from 2 p.m. until sundown and ended up collecting a total of $261.00 for the American Cancer Society.

Netters split state meet following season trend The volleyballers from Hope finished the season at the state tournament held last Friday in Spring Arbor. The women won their first two matches and lost the next two to end their bid to enter into the finals. The first day saw the Dutchmen pitted against Michigan Tech and Concordia College. Hope played well and was able to defeat both opponents. This sent the Hope squad to the next day's events. The second day found the team not so lucky as they ran up against some stiff opposition and dropped both matches. Lake Superior College and Hillsdale College were both able to take advantage of the sluggish play of Hope and score victories at Hope's expense. The loss with Hillsdale was disappointing as the Dutchmen were victorious in their last meeting. The loss was a typical example of w h a t Hope went through this season. The team had a lot of talent, but they seemed to play in periods of greatness or they would

slump and not play too well. Although the record was under .500, t h e team played better than the record shows. Many of the matches were close and went three games before Hope was defeated. The volleyballers w e n t through many high points this season. One of t h e first highlights was the weekend trip to Taylor, Ind. The team defeated Kalamazoo first, then w e n t on to battle several squads in Indiana. Hope was victorious over Taylor University and St.Francis College. The squad dropped a tough match to a good team from Indiana Tech. Another big highlight, of the season was t h e victory in the MIAA tournament. Hope was in fourth place at t h e outset and were considered possible spoilers, but nothing to worry about. Hope played very well, however, and won t h e tournament. To do this, they defeated the first-seeded Adrian Bulldogs twice. Coach Sandra P a r k e r was pleased with the overall perfor-

mance of the team. "This was the best team that I have ever coached," commented Coach Parker. "They were a good unit to work with and they played well together. This year's team had more cohesiveness than teams of t h e past." Hope will lose two players to graduation for next year. Setter Cheryl Burke and spiker Tammy Schuiling are t h e only seniors on t h e team. Cheryl will leave a gaping hole on t h e team as it is h a r d e r to replace a setter than a spiker. Cheryl leaves with four y e a r s of varsity experience. The varsity unit consisted of t h r e e freshmen, two juniors, and one sophomore, besides the two seniors. N e x t year's team will r e t u r n with a good nucleus. The t e a m will have some important experience to go along with the talent. "I am looking forward to next year," said Coach P a r k e r . "We will miss the seniors, but with the skill and experience t h a t we will have returning, we should have an exciting team next year."

Profile for Hope College Library

11-17-1978  

11-17-1978