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Hope C o l l e g e •

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Holland, Michigan • A student-run nonprofit publication

S e r v i n g the Hope C o l l e g e C o m m u n i t y f o r 115 y e a r s

Bultman organizes Task Force on sex Goal of Task Force is to evaluate treatment of sexuality issues on campus Jen Troke S P O T U G H T EDITOR

A s p r e v i o u s l y reported in the Anchor, a sexuality Task F o r c e has b e e n initiated by J i m B u l t m a n , H o p e College president. T h e c o m mittee was formed to look at broad issues, including where Hope stands as an institution on issues of sexuality. However, the Task F o r c e was not created to consider chang-

ing H o p e ' s position on such issues as homosexuality. " W h a t I ' m concerned about with this c o m m i t t e e is not the college position on homosexuality. I think that's very clear, and this committee is not set u p to change that. This c o m m i t t e e is set up to explore h o w w e can best treat with care and compassion the entire c a m p u s community relative to issues of sexuality," Bultman said. T h e c o m m i t t e e has met twice so far, and they plan to meet again this afternoon. T h e group will start posting m i n u t e s of t h e m e e t i n g s o n knowhope.

"Most of the time our last two meetings has been spent discussing our charge and what we want to a c c o m p l i s h , " said Matt Scogin ('02), Student Congress president and Task Force member. " W e don't have a lot of time." T h e task force consists of Richard Frost, dean of students; A l f r e d o Gonzales, associate provost; Kristen Gray, director of the counseling center; Lynne Hendrix, a board m e m b e r ; Tim Brown, dean of chapel; Patricia Roehling, associate professor of psychology; Jim Piers, professor of sociology; James K e n n e d y , p r o f e s s o r of h i s t o r y ;

Steven H o o g e r w e r f , professor of religion; James Herrick. professor of c o m m u n i c a t i o n ; Colleen Evans ('03), Student Congress vice president; and Scogin. Everyone Bultman asked to j o i n the Task Force agreed to do so. and H e r r i c k a c c e p t e d the r e q u e s t to chair the committee. "I think Jim Herrick is the most skilled at group process of any person on c a m p u s . | T h e committee) needs a very strong leader who will make sure all sides are heard and will k e e p the g r o u p m o v i n g forward," Bultman said. T h e group has begun interview-

ing people who have already expressed their concerns about sexuality issues. According to members, they plan to look at the issues of sexuality on H o p e ' s c a m p u s f r o m an inclusive viewpoint that takes into account Biblical principles, other college's experiences and the opinions represented by m e m b e r s of the Hope community. They will also assess p r e v i o u s e x p e r i e n c e s of h o m o sexual m e m b e r s of the community, and they hope to accomplish this in a caring, mature way.

more TASK FORCE on 6

Dialogue on Race Series educates Hope's campus Series included panel discussions and video presentations. Angela Matusiak STAFF REPORTER

Several important racial issues were discussed in this s e m e s t e r ' s dialogue on race series, sponsored by the office of multicultural life. T h e series ran from S e p t e m b e r 2 6 to N o v e m b e r 13, concluding with "In W h o s e H o n o r ? " , a discussion on the use of Native American figures in the sports arena in America. Other topics have included property issues in minority neighborhoods and the struggles of immigrants in the United States. E a c h dialogue presented a video that was followed by a panel discussion. Glinda Rawls, interim director of the office of multicultural life has been very pleased with the student turnout to these events. " W e ' v e seen about 140 people at the dialogues, and covered a gamut of issues," Rawls said.

R a w l s has also been especially pleased with the level of eagerness and emotional responses that she has seen f r o m the students. Last Thursday, the discussion featured "First Person Plural," a video about the life of a Korean adoptee. Deann Borshay L i e m , and the struggles she met trying to c o m e to t e r m s with all the different identities she had to play in her life. A panel discussion followed the video with Korean adoptees Keisha Pike ('04) and Emily Cronkite ('04) r e p r e s e n t i n g the a d o p t e e side of cross-cultural adoptions, while Margaret Kennedy Dygas, professor of music, Gary C a m p , director of admissions, and Debra Swanson, professor of sociology, presented the p a r e n t ' s v i e w p o i n t . C r o n k i t e c o m m e n t e d "1 thought it went really well, and it was interesting to see h o w both parents and students viewed these issues," Cronkite said. T u e s d a y n i g h t ' s d i a l o g u e featured Sharron Detz as a guest fac i l i t a t o r . D e t z is f r o m t h e Anishnabe- quay Turtle Clan of the

O t t a w a I n d i a n s . S h e has been a former coordinator of the Institute of Healing Racism for the R o m a n Catholic Diocese of Grand Rapids, and is currently the Director of Native American music there. The film e x a m i n e s the justification of using cultural i m a g e s in athletics, and raises awareness of the issues of degradation that Native Americans are plagued with because of these images. T h e Dialogue on Race Series will c o n t i n u e again in February, with "Black Union." M a r c h and April will feature "Ancestors in America" (a film about Asian contributions and history in America), "Twilight" and "Journey Toward Peace." R a w l s is also excited about these u p c o m i n g discussions. S h e hopes to get more faculty involved in the d i s c u s s i o n s , and is trying to get m o r e guest facilitators. Although R a w l s has been pleased with the turnout this fall, she hopes that next spring there will be an even bigger student interest. She c o m m e n t e d

A W C H O H P H O T O BY R O B O N D R A

Jason Montgomery ('03) won second place in Saturday's All College Sing at the Knickerbocker Theater. The event consisted of ten performances. Chris Bryan ('04) won the event with his original composition, "Turning Circles". The All College Sing is a long-standing tradition at Hope.

more RACE on 2

WIG posters, table tents removed, written on Phelp cafeteria asked to replace the items they removed. Courtney Klein CAMPUS BEAT EDITOR

W o m e n ' s Issues Organization put up posters and a poster table in Phelps last w e e k , only to h a v e them removed by the Phelps staff. "Apparently the table tents were taken

d o w n immediately. T h e y were broken d o w n and put in the compactor. T h e table tents were destroyed by staff in the cafeteria" Rachel G a z d a ( ' 0 2 ) W I O President said. According to Gazda, the table tents were like the posters, but in a table tent f o r m , and that the table w e r e n ' t advertising issues, although there was an explanation of what the issue was. G a z d a believes that the tables w e r e removed by the staff because they were too racy. A f t e r the disposal of the table tents

themselves, Gazda talked to Richard Frost, dean of students. " Frost called them [Phelps workers] and told them that the posters needed to go back up. H e was pretty supportive," G a z d a said. "There hasn't been any hard feelings because Phelps paid for the reprinting costs and put the tables back up." Phelps however, was not the only place where conflict over these posters arose. Heather Verbeke ( ' 0 3 ) , W I O member, re-

ported that in Voorhees Hall, c o m m e n t s have been written on the posters there. " F o r all I know, the posters were put up in Voorhees. We put ours up, and the next day there was a message written next to each of them," Verbecke said. S o far, s o m e of t h e m e s s a g e s w r i t t e n t h r o u g h o u t V o o r h e e s hall h a v e included; " N o t all those with eating disorders are models, they are not all stick-thin, they are not all w o me n , they are people, be more consid

more WlOon 2

A* Anchor® Hope.Edu (616) 395-7877

Nykerk and Sexism InFocus, Page 3.

Prepare to laugh. That's right, it's our second annual fall edition Ranchor Ranchor, see insert.

Guerilla Girls Spotlight, Page 7.


^Anchor

C a m p u s Beat

S e p t e m b e r 26, 2001

Habitat for Humanity sponsors Sleep Out Wednesday's event aims to raise awareness about homelesness problems

lem even if it can't be directly seen in Holland. Habitat for Humanity builds on the principle that all of G o d ' s people deserve a decent place to live, and that our c o m m u n i t y is a safer, stronger place w h e n that o c c u r s , " King said. "Habitat for Humanity relies on d o n a t i o n s f r o m individuals, c h u r c h e s and organizations, and w e l c o m e s the involvement of all who support its mission." The Sleep Out is not only about inadequate housing.

C o u r t n e y Klein C A M P U S BEAT E D I T O R

Habitat for Humanity will be hosting a Sleep Out in the Pine G r o v e on Wednesday, N o v e m b e r 14lh at 11 p.m. T h e S l e e p Out is held every year in order to raise awareness about homelessness. T h i s event is open to the entire campus. Students w h o c h o o s e to participate in the S l e e p Out will bring only their sleeping bags, and will sleep in boxes provided f o r them. Habitat for Humanity hopes that having students sleep outdoors will help the issue of homelessness. In a press release, Kami King ( 4 03), Habitat for Humanity Publicity Director, shares information about Habitat for Humanity. "Inadequate housing is a worldwide prob-

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that while the faculty has been extremely supportive in encouraging students to attend these dialogues, she would like to see more indepen-

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f r o m

" H o p e f u l l y this e x p e r i e n c e will bring p e o p l e together as a group, and that will motivate people to w o r k , " King said. T h e H a b i t a t f o r H u m a i t y p r o g r a m is headed by Andrew Vanover ('02), President, and Lynne P o w e , faculty advisor. "Right now w e have three houses going up in the Holland area, and Hope students in 1996 actually funded a house." King said. For the next several months, Hope students will work every other Saturday on houses mostly within walking distance of Hope.

dent student interest. S h e w o u l d also like to see s o m e n e w f a c e s s h o w i n g up next semester,

1 c a u s e any m o r e pain. "I think there w a s a m i s c o m m u nication with what w e were doing with our ads,"Verbecke said.

erate next time, they do not selfishly hurt their o w n bodies in order to bec o m e sexy, take the opportunity to learn so that next time, you won't

t

A/VCHOR PHOTO COURTESY KAMI KING

Tracey Forbes ('03) participates in last year's Sleep Out. This year's Sleep Out will be held Wednesday night at 11 p.m. in the Pine Grove to raise awareness of homlessness, and is sponsored by Habitat for Humanity. Habitat for Humaity is responsible for helping families in Holland get better housing, and help build homes.

Club teams get new policy that also affects team sports Policy says club members will c o m s u m e no alcohol in season Rand Arwady SPORTS EDITOR

T h e c a m p u s life board of H o p e College implemented a new rule for club sport teams at Hope College during their meeting last Tuesday. The club t e a m s a f f e c t e d are hockey, lacrosse, and ultimate

THE PAINTING

A FILM BY OSCAR AND EMMY AWARD WINNER JOSHUA ROSE

frisbee. ' T h e n e w p o l i c y is t h a t c l u b teams will h a v e to sign the s a m e d r u g / a l c o h o l policy that r e g u l a r H o p e sports teams h a v e to sign," said Matt S c o g i n ( t 0 2 ) . S t u d e n t C o n g r e s s president and m e m b e r of the c a m p u s life board. T h e drug/alcohol policy that the players have to sign says that they will not do drugs o r c o n s u m e alcohol while their sport is in season. T h i s also goes for the players on the team that are 21 and older. T h e cause of this new policy has

to do with these c l u b teams receiving money f r o m the D o w center for their club sports. "Ray Smith [men's athletic director] and [Dow administrators] felt that they should be treated the same as r e g u l a r sports t e a m s b e c a u s e they are getting D o w m o n e y , " Scogin said. Captains of club teams that w e ' r e interviewed have accepted this new policy without complaints, and understand that it's best for the team. "The lacrosse team has had problems with team m e m b e r s drinking in the past, but now recognize the problem as w e remodel a new fresh team," said Billy N o r d e n ( 4 04), lacrosse co-captain. " W e feel that a healthier m o r e c o n d i t i o n e d team will raise our level of competition f o r the upcoming spring season." A possible problem with the new policy is the ultimate frisbee team, and their lack of a solid roster. "We have our regulars of 6 to 7 guys, but a lot of the other guys on the team vary week to w e e k , " said Brad Johnson (403), ultimate

frisbee cocaptain. " W e have about 4 0 people on our mailing list, but w e only send about 15 to each tournament." S c o g i n said the ultimate frisbee team was a big topic of discussion in the c o m m i t t e e meetings. " T h e only issue at our c o m m i t tee m e e t i n g s w a s if the u l t i m a t e f r i s b e e c l u b team should be treated as equal athletes to those on the f o o t b a l l or t h e h o c k e y t e a m , " Scogin said. M o s t c l u b t e a m s are l o o k i n g ahead to b e c o m i n g regular H o p e College teams at s o m e point in the f u t u r e , and this policy is to help m a k e that transition easier. " M o s t of these teams d o n ' t want to be c l u b teams forever," Scogin said. " T h e y ' r e on track to b e c o m e a real sports team at s o m e point in the f u t u r e . " T h e e x c e p t i o n is the u l t i m a t e frisbee team. "I d o n ' t see us being a varsity sport," J o h n s o n said. "I d o n ' t think there's a ultimate varsity team east of the Mississippi."

FOR I N F O R M M I O H AND TICKETS F O I THE 6 : 3 Q P M F U N D B t l S I F I G RECEPTION F E U T U I I N G JDSHDH t O S E PLUS COMPASS ACADEMT STUDENT F I L M S . PLEASE C A L L ( E 1 6 ) 4 5 S - 4 2 ] B . COMPASS ARTS ACADEMY 44 GRANDVII ( AVt SW, SUITE 0 GRAND RAPIDS Ml

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Spring Concert Survey

Please i n d i c a t e t h e b a n d w h i c h r e f l e c t s t h e g e n r e o f y o u r interest: Yes! Maybe No! Jars o f Clay Ben Folds Five Rusted Root C a e d m o n ' s Call Lifehouse

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Please r e t u r n t h i s s u r v e y t o t h e S t u d e n t Union Desk, o r email a r e s p o n s e t o c o n c e r t @ h o p e . e d u . T h a n k s !


Anchor

N o v e m b e r 14, 2 0 0 1

R

I N F O C U S EDITOR

II has been sixty-five years since the first Nykerk Competition was held in 1936. Since that lime both Nykerk and world around it h a v e changed a great deal, causing m a n y to question the tradition on which Nykerk is based. T h e first time a male challenged Nykerk gender roles was in 1990, when a male student asked to participate in Song, but because of the nature of the song that had already been chosen, the Nykerk C o m m i t t e e deemed i , / inappro - % â&#x20AC;˘ priate for him to participate. Richard F r o s t , D e a n of Students, said that in the early nineties there was quite a bit of discussion regarding gender roles in both Pull and Nykerk. "It was decided that because of the leadership capabilities that Nykerk provides for w o m e n , the current system, with women being in the majority, should stay in place. Individual interests [of men] were weighed against the overall spirit of N y k e r k , " Frost said. " H o w e v e r , it w a s also d e c i d e d that if g u y s wanted to put on a musical or theatrical performance it would be allowed alongside the competition, but it would not be included in the competition. It was also encouraged that if men would like to c o m p e t e in S o n g , Play, and Oration, they s h o u l d start their o w n s e p a r a t e event." In response to challenges, during the 1996-97 school year, the Nykerk C o m m i t t e e wrote the first ever Nykerk Constitution, which was last amended in February 2000. It maintains that, "In keeping with tradition and to maintain the maj o r i t y w o m e n ' s l e a d e r s h i p of Nykerk, the participants of Song, Play, and Oration will be f e m a l e and the Morale participants will be male. All coaches for Play, S o n g , and Oration, as well as executive committee members will be female, and all M o r a l e c o a c h e s will be

in Morale or a male wishes to participate in Song, Play, and Oration, t h e y m u s t p a r t i c i p a t e as s t a t e d a b o v e their first year and then must m a k e a formal petition to the Nykerk committee, in the semester following Nykerk, to be allowed to participate where they would like." In 1999, Josiah Dykstra ( ' 0 2 ) , w h o participated in Play Morale his freshman year, wrote and submitted a formal petition to be allowed to j o i n S o n g his s o p h o m o r e year. "I really thought that this w a s something that needed to be done, and I thought that I would be a g o o d representation," Dykstra s a i d . "The Administration [College] was b e h i n d me, but the c o m m i t t e e [Nykerk] was very reluctant, understandably. T h e y were open enough at least to consider the proposition however. Originally, the committee agreed, but then a number of weeks later they rescinded and said they had c h a n g e d their mind. I never q u i t e u n d e r s t o o d w h y that h a p pened. They never explained it very well to m e . " Historically, N y k e r k started in the m i d - 1 9 3 0 ^ w h e n w o m e n at H o p e decided that they would like to show their sportsmanship much like the freshman and s o p h o m o r e boys showed theirs in the annual Pull across the Black River. First, powder puff football was chosen, but the faculty and administration felt that the activity should be more feminine. In 1936, an event very similar to the Pull was proposed for w o m e n across a creek in the Holland Country Club. Dr. John Nykerk. the founder of the c o l l e g e ' s m u s i c d e p a r t m e n t , agreed that women were not given enough opportunities and deserved their o w n unique competition, but one that would not be too great a strain for the girls. He p r o p o s e d instead, a contest between freshman and sophomore girls containing one oratorical number, o n e musical selection, and one enactment of a oneact play. Men were involved for the first time in 1939 as stage and prop-

There's a lot to be said for tradition, but there's a lot to be said about adapting traditions. -Josiah Dykstra

male." T h e constitution also states that, "If a female wishes to participate

f O C LI S

('03), who participated in Song her s o p h o m o r e year, b e l i e v e s that Nykerk is sexist by definition. "Nykerk is sexist. The men and w o m e n w i t h i n N y k e r k a r e in predescribed roles dictated by gender. Il doesn't matter whether they are 'nontraditional' or not, they are defined by gender," Van Regenmorter said. "In the case of I S o n g , is there really relevance or merit in having women smile for two hours, wearing the exact same thing, with their legs crossed the exact s a m e w a y ? " PHOTO C O U R T E S Y MILESTONE Megan Zeneberg ('02), ' 0 4 Song Sarah Pedley plays the C o a c h , believes there is merit in male Romeo in 'OTs Play this tradition. during Nykerk 1997 " T h e girls are j u d g e d on profesw o m e n w h y not establish the same sionalism, and that is why they sit competition f o r men? T h a t ' s been up there with their b a c k s straight said abou and with smiles on their faces. It t sports for a long time. You have is by no means 'look at m e I ' m a to h a v e the same opportunities for pretty girl'. Its not about that at both m e n and w o m e n . So if they all," Zeneberg said. "Nykerk tradiwant to keep their tradition. I would tion is pretty much set in stone. Perlike to see them incorporate il." sonally, I would not want to see it R e n e e M u r s c h ( 4 0 2 ) , the 2 0 0 1 changed. T h e r e is this feeling of Nykerk General Chair, believes that being a part of something that has Nykerk is more than a tradition. been going on so long." " T o c h a n g e N y k e r k w o u l d be Jane Dickie, Professor of Psychanging more than the uniform of chology, thinks that whenever you the m e m b e r s , or t h e line u p on look at a tradition of any kind, it is Nykerk night. It would be changimportant to e x a m i n e the reasons ing N y k e r k ' s reason for existance, for doing a particular thing. and that is s o m e t h i n g w e cannot "You must ask w h o benefits by this tradition and who is hurt by this c o n d o n e . " Meridith D e Avila, the ' 0 4 Oratradition. Particularly when traditor, believes that if Nykerk is sextions limit a c c e s s to a particular ist, no harm is done. group, I think that there must be "I d o n ' t think that Nykerk is sexcareful scrutiny into w h y this must ist in the d e m e a n i n g sense. I didn't be so," Dickie said. c o m e out of Nykerk thinking that T h e N y k e r k Constitution c o n I'd been put in my place," De Avila tends, "Nykerk has never been at said. " A n d , m a y b e it is old fashits core a sexist event. T h e particiioned and sexist, but it is fun to have pants and leadership have strived guys s h o w e r you with flowers and to place women and men in noncandy." traditional roles and foster c o m m u De Avila thinks that is just part of nity." the fun. Dykstra believes that males are " N y k e r k f r o m what I have seen hurt by not being allowed to disand what I ' v e heard is a celebration play their talent. of w o m e n . It is a display of strength " N y k e r k definitely tries to put in a way," D e Avila said. people in a position. It's not sexist Dykstra still believes in his cause. in that there is a spot for men, but, " T h e r e ' s a lot to be said for trathat they dictate what that spot is. I dition, but there's a lot to be said thought that I could better repreabout adapting traditions," Dykstra sent my class and better display my said. "I think that some boy should talents in mu s ic , " Dykstra said. "If keep pursuing this until it happens." they are going to have Nykerk for

m

ew:

Sexism and traditions examined in Nykerk Erica Heeg

I O

erty m a n a g e r s , and m o r a l e g u y s were introduced in the early 1970's. J a n e Dickie, P r o f e s s o r of Psyc h o l o g y , b e l i e v e s that t h e r e a r e times w h e n to serve a particular goal, you would limit participants to o n e particular group. " A group of people that d o e s not have p o w e r in society may decide that they need to c o m e together and share and talk and encourage o n e another and provide opportunities for leadership," Dickie said. " W o m e n were not leaders at Hope. T h e y were kept out of leadership positions explicitly. Nykerk gave them a chance U>be completely in control." Dykstra believes that times are different now. " N y k e r k w a s f o u n d e d on t h e principle in the ' 3 0 ' s that w o m e n d i d n ' t h a v e fair c o m p e t i t i o n , but things h a v e c h a n g e d s i n c e then. W o m e n h a v e o p p o r t u n i t i e s that they didn't have before. M o r e than half of the music majors at Hope are w o m e n , m o r e than half of the theatre majors at H o p e are w o m e n , all but one dance major is a w o m a n . T h e y obviously h a v e the majority now," Dykstra said. C h r i s t i n a Van R e g e n m o r t e r

PHOTO

COURTESY MILESTONE

'88 Song girls are helped up the stairs, a Nykerk tradition, by their Morale in the 1988 Nykerk Competition. Morale guys support, encourage, and keep their girls smiling.


â&#x20AC;˘Ajnchor

Opinion

Editor's voice

N o v e m b e r 14, 2001

Your voice

m

Controversy not "media driven n

Student disagrees with column's view of truth

In his c o m m e n t s in the story about the Sexuality Task Force in this w e e k ' s issue. ( C a m p u s Beat. 1), Matt Scogin ( 4 02), Student Congress president and m e m b e r of the Task Force, said, " T h e issue [of homosexuality] over the last f e w years has been a media-driven controversy. and it's kind of gotten out of hand at times." Unfortunately, this has been a c o m m o n complaint over the past few years. As a representative of the most read m e m b e r of the H o p e College media, I have to disagree with that statement. T h e role of the Anchor, as the staff sees it, is twofold. One, to inform the students of H o p e College of what is happening in their community. If there are people in this c o m m u n i t y that disagree with the college's stance on sexual issues, then that is news, and w e are obligated to report it. T h e second role of the A n c h o r is to engage the students in thinking about the news. We use our editorials, columns and letters to the editor to present opinions about the news. Students may then c h o o s e to agree or disagree with the opinions represented. Either way, they are engaging themselves in the n e w s , and our mission is s o m e w h a t accomplished. It's true that without the media the homosexual controversy would probably not exist, but that is not our fault. If it w a s n ' t for the media, the students would not be a w a r e of what decisions were being made at this college. W h e t h e r they agree or disagree with the decisions is not in our control.

To the Editor:

Take advantage of the arts Read this w e e k ' s Arts and Spotlight section, and you'll see that there are a whole bunch of things going on in the Hope College art world. T h e r e is a play, a Visiting Writing Series, a presentation by a courageous group of w o m e n , foreign films at the Knick and as always, a ton of recitals and concerts c o m i n g f r o m the music department. O n e thing I have a l w a y s been impressed with at Hope College is the quality of the arts. T h o s e in the arts d e p a r t m e n t s are s o m e of the hardest working and creative people at H o p e College, and I really

1 both agree and disagree with the column in last w e e k ' s Anchor on the distribution of tracts (Spotlight. 10/ 7). I am far f r o m being a fan of tracts. I agree that the tracts mentioned in this article in particular s p r e a d a m i s c o n c e p t i o n of what Christianity is about and even about the beliefs of the church. O n e of my best f r i e n d s f r o m h o m e is not a Christian and nothing turns her off faster than when s o m e o n e tries to tell her that she will be d a m n e d for eternity because she chooses to believe differently than me. But I cannot help but cringe at the thought that w e should only spread a gospel of "right action and right love". We h a v e let o u r s e l v e s bec o m e lax and w e settle for this great notion of relativism. T h e idea that there is an Absolute Truth is becoming m o r e and m o r e o f f e n s i v e to people. T h i s should not be! Without an absolute truth to govern this universe, w e would destroy not only ourselves but the entire creation as well. I call God the absolute truth. T h e author of this c o l u m n tells

us not to take seriously what w e believe because we're probably wrong anyway. While I completely agree that we d o n ' t know it all, I think God has a way of revealing himself in this world. Not only can he reveal himself, he has revealed himself through the Bible. If we do not stand firm in our beliefs and do not take seriously our beliefs, w e will fall for anything. We are given free will. We choose where we want to go, what we want to do. What we forget is that there are c o n s e q u e n c e s f o r our actions. What we believe, h o w w e think, and h o w we behave all are taken into account by a just G o d . We too often forget that j u s t i c e c o m e s at a cost. I ' m glad I ' m on his side, because the c o n s e q u e n c e s for my unredeemed sins are too great for m e to bear. We love to focus on the nice old grandfather figure that sits u p in the sky and loves unconditionally all his people without punishment or reprimand. I'd say that if this were truly the case, G o d ' s g o n e soft. H e ' s a pushover. We need to w a k e u p and smell the c o f f e e and realize that damnation is real and is

a real c o n s e q u e n c e to our real actions and beliefs. For years the church existed bec a u s e people realized the real terror of hell and Christ w a s the solution to this. W h i l e I think that is the wrong focus, it is still relevant to us even today. I would rather think about a loving God w h o ' s on my side than to think of the possibilities of b e i n g d a m n e d b e c a u s e I don't believe the right things. Still, there is a legitimate argument for k e e p i n g this kind of m i n d - f r a m e alive. I ' v e tasted a hint of both heaven and hell. Frankly, for a while there it was my fear of being sent to hell that kept m e Christian. 1 might not have been too thrilled with God, but I knew the alternative was far w o r s e . S o w h i l e t h e rest of the American Christian world preaches only love and kindness from a benevolent God, I will always remember the consequences for my beliefs and actions if I were ever to turn a w a y f r o m G o d . I would encourage e v e r y o n e else to as well. A n n e O t t e m e s s ( 4 02)

Ben DeHaan

F I R S T IMPRESSIONS

appreciate their efforts. If y o u ' r e looking for s o m e t h i n g to do or feel like being expanded, you d o n ' t have to drive very far. Just check out the latest arts event at H o p e College. S e n i o r Staff R e p o r t e r

Anchor Staff

Anchor Staff

Anchor Staff

ytaff editor-in-chief Matt Cook production editor Chad Sampson campus beat editors Courtney Klein Jamie Pierce infocus editors Erica Ileeg Andy Volk sports editor Rand Arwady arts editor Beth Lomasney spotlight editor Jen Troke photo editor Rob Ondra copy editors Rebekah Oegema business manager Danielle Koski ad representative . Nick Denis production assistant Rachael Pridgeon distribution manager Ellen Vigants advisor Diana Breclaw Senior Staff Reporters: Ben DeHaan, John Rodstrom, Maureen Yonovitz Staff Reporters: Kurt Koehler, Alicia Abood, Ashley North, Angela Matusiak, Abbey Stauffer, Becca Haynes, Jared Gall Staff Photo: Clarissa Gregory The Anchor is a product of student effort and is funded through the students of Hope College, funding which comes through the Hope College Student Congress Appropriations Conxmil(ee. Letters lo the editor are encouraged, though due to space limitations the Anchor reserves the right to edit. The opinions addressed in the editorial are solely those of the editor-in-chief. Stories from the Hope College News Service are a product of the Public Relations Office. Oneyear subscriptions to the Anchor are available for $20. We reserve the right lo accept or reject any advertising.

Video Game Wars T h e biggest m a t c h - u p of the year is not Michael Jordan and the Wizards taking on the Lakers. It isn't even the US g o v e r n m e n t taking on the Taliban rebels. T h e only place that you can find this m a t c h - u p is on the shelves of video g a m e s o f t w a r e â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and that's even if you can find it. As w e s h o w e d in the A n c h o r two w e e k s ago, video games are a h u g e part of college life. With t w o new games systems being released soon, I decided to take it u p o n myself lo weigh the pros and c o n s of these devices. T h e battle consists of Microsoft teaming up with Sega to create M i c r o s o f t ' s premier system: the X - B o x . In the other c o m e r lurks a system f r o m Nintendo, k n o w n as the G a m e C u b e . Both of these systems are expected to send g a m e r s into a n e w dimension of play. T h e X-Box enters the battle

as the slight favorite. T h e system was created with the help of over 5,000 gamers and g a m e testers. It includes an Intel M H z 733 processor and an Ethernet port for incredibly fast on-line gaming. T h e large processor heavily improves the gaming graphics, which are rumored to be over three times sharper than any other console. T h e Box also holds plenty of m e m o r y with the processor, so you w o n ' t have to sacrifice your saved g a m e of Tekken for your season settings of Madden Football. X - B o x also boasts a C D burner, so you can listen to your favorite C D instead of having lo listen to that c h e a p gaming music. Finally, X-Box is capable of playing D V D ' s . G a m e C u b e is nearly as tough. It is N i n t e n d o ' s first system to use discs, unlike the original c o n s o l e systems. It uses mini-discs, though, so it'll be unable lo play D V D ' s or C D ' s . H o w e v e r , it has a great line of games lined up, and more are expected to c o m e early

next year. G a m e C u b e is also compatible with the G a m e b o y Advance. The Advance may be used as a controller on the console. Finally, G a m e C u b e has a 56K m o d e m to keep the gamers hooked on-line. With both systems hitting the store within t w o m o n t h s of Christmas, the d e m a n d for either is very high. X - B o x is releasing I million systems in the U.S. on Nov. 15lh, while G a m e C u b e is releasing 2 million on Nov. 18th. X B o x is charging $ 3 0 0 a s y s t e m , c o m p a r e d to G a m e C u b e ' s $ 2 0 0 . Both systems are expected to sell out completely the first day they hit stores, and neither c o m p a n y will ship again until after Christmas. If you want o n e of these consoles, you belter plan on waiting all night in line and fighting off customers to electronics. W e ' r e getting both for the Anchor office.

Letters to the Editor Guidelines O p e n to a n y o n e within the college a n d related c o m m u n i t i e s T h e A n c h o r reserves the right to edit d u e to s p a c e constraints No personal attacks, poor taste or anything potentially libelous

the

Anchor

2001 fat! semester, Issue #11 of 25

Letters chosen on a first c o m e first s e r v e basis, or a representative s a m p l e is taken N o a n o n y m o u s letters, unless discussed with Editor-in-Chief Editor-in-Chief may verify identity of writer


Ranrb

Nov

Dope C o l l e g e •

Conservative, Michigan •

A stupid publication •

wmrnm G r o p i n g the Dope C o l l e g e C o m m u n i t y for 6.02 * 10 A 23 years

Something may have happened on Thursday "No comment," say college officials Chattie Sims REDUCTION EDITOR

After a long bout of complete and utter b o r e d o m . Dope students thought that there might be something happening, but their hopes were quickly squashed by the administration. "I was so excited," said Donald Neep ('04). "Everybody was talking about how something was happening on D o p e ' s campus. I even stopped watching the grass grow in the Pine Grove, which was a hard thing s e e i n g as h o w o n e of the pieces had grown .03 centimeters this w e e k . " T h e students expressed a lot of disappointment, however, when nobody w o u l d tell them what happened. "All I know is that there were all these t r u c k s driving a r o u n d and there were s o m e Public Safety off i c e r s in riot g e a r ; 1 a l m o s t got knocked over by the scuba-wearing clowns riding that walrus," said Dan Jeepers ('OS). "I wonder what

they were there for." T h e r e have been other clues to what might have happened. Yesterday, Jain L i m b o ('02) reported seeing five masked men coating the D i m w i t patio .with 5 0 p o u n d s of fish eggs. L a t e r that day. Rick S t a f f o r d (*03) noticed t w o D o p e students strapping a tennis racket to a disgruntled looking pig. It is not yet k n o w n h o w the t w o events are connected. Public Safety reported the event as a "disturbance." J i m b o Bultmanis, Dope college president, denied that anything at all was happening on D o p e ' s c a m pus. " T h i n g s are the s a m e as they h a v e a l w a y s b e e n . N o t h i n g ever happens around here, and pay no attention to the man behind the curtain," Bultmanis said. At about 9 p.m., yesterday night. Public Safety removed the yellow caution tape and the " D o n ' t worry n o t h i n g is g o i n g on here, m o v e along," sign. CAT also released a c a m p u s wide e-mail involving a spinning black

RANCHOR

P H O T O BY B O B M A N T R A

WHAT'S HAPPENIN'?i A Ranchor photographer was on hand for this event that happened on Thursday, but unfortunately, his flash malfunctioned. and w h i t e spiral with the w o r d s "You will forget that anything happened today involving a cattle prod, a bucket full of jello and two circus midgets."

D e s p i t e a d m i n i s t r a t i o n assurances, some students are still skeptical. "1 d o n ' t care what the administration says " Neep said. " I ' m go-

ing to find out what happene^, and what it has to with all of my Barry Manilow C D ' s getting covered with shortening. Copa Cabana hasn't sounded the s a m e since then."

Ranchor drops F-bomb F-word in print sends innocent Dope student into intensive care Flat Book BEDWETTER IN C H I E F

Jf f

&

slHi'5" • ANCHOR

PHOTO BY CHATTIE S I M S

BREAKIN' UP-. Tarah and Steve, before God's perfect will caused them to break up, and get back together again, and break...

Tarah dumps Steve Dope students break up for the second time, God's will. Jesse Barfield FORMER YANKEES OUTFIELDER

For the second time this m o n t h , Tarah VanVandervan ( 4 02) decided to break up with Steve Smith ( 4 02), boyfriend of o n e year, three weeks, four d a y s and fifteen point seven hours. "I totally felt like God was telling m e that this guy was not the one for m e , " said Vandervan. Vandervan maintains that the break-up

Ranchor® Dope.Edu KL5-5555

has nothing to with Smith. "This is totally about m e and Jesus," Vandervan said. "I h a v e to strengthen my relationship with H i m b e f o r e I can find peace with Steve." Steve d o e s not completely agree. "If by Him, she means her ex-boyfriend f r o m high school, then yes, she will be strengthening her relationship with him," Smith said. God could not be reached for c o m m e n t but did release a brief statement. " I sincerely thank Tarah for breaking u p with Steve," God s a i d " M y plan for the universe is now complete."

Jesus visits dry campus, turns water into O'Douls. Religion, Page 5

T h e D o p e College administration reacted with anger last week, as the last student on c a m p u s never to hear the " f - w o r d " was exposed to it in the p a g e s of the Ranchor, D o p e ' s student n e w s p a per. • "I am outraged," said Jimbo Bultmanis, Dope College president. " A f t e r all w e ' v e g o n e through to protect her, including the white noise and the soundproof rooms, it's hugely disappointing to see it all ruined with o n e printed w o r d . " T h e student, Irene V a n D u m m ( ' 0 4 ) , was quickly whisked a w a y f o r immediate hyp-

44

D o p e even farther behind rival H o b b e s College, where 5 percent of the students have not heard the f - w o r d . " I ' v e heard that H o b b e s has entire f-word free d o r m s , " Bultmanis said. " H o w are w e to b e c o m e the top liberal arts college rooted in the historic Christian faith with all these f - w o r d s floating a r o u n d ? " T h e f - w o r d has b e c o m e so c o m m o n on c a m p u s that professors are using it in class. For his course. Advanced Thermo-Nuclear Synthesis Seminar, G e o r g e Scoorsmaa, associate p r o f e s s o r of chemistry, has changed over f r o m the usual letter grading system to a system in which the best possible grade is "[expletive] brilliant," and the worst is "really [expletive] up." "I just thought the students would be able to understand me m o r e if I used profanity,"

#$%@ -The Ranchor

nosis. " W e can only hope that it w a s n ' t too late to brainwash her," Bultmanis said. T h e loss of V a n D u m m ' s innocence could have drastic c o n s e q u e n c e s for diversity at Dope. T h e ratio of f-word students to non-fword students has dropped to zero, placing

Editor falls asleep, can't perform duty Narcolepsy, Page 7.

Scoorsmaa said. Bultmanis does not plan to sit back and let the f-word destroy his vision for D o p e College. " I ' v e had e n o u g h of this [ e x p l e t i v e ] , " B u l t m a n i s said. " I t ' s time to f o r m a task force."

What's better than a cat in a hat? Culture, Page 9.

Pee Wee Herman in VWS. Playhouse, Page 11.


Tk

Radar Love

Ranchor

N o v e m b e r 38, 2001

Dope to reenact War Between the States Flat Book BEOWETTER IN CHIEF

The Dope College theater department has decided to do something a little different for their Spring production. Starting on Friday, March 1. the theater department will stage a c o m p l e t e r e e n a c t m e n t of the American Civil War. '"We've d o n e a lot of d r a m a s and musicals in the past, but for the past f e w years a lot of students have really expressed an interest in historical reenactment," said Tom Johnny, professor of theater. "So we decided to start with the Civil War, the most epic conflict in American history." As the Civil War was a h u g e war, involving the entire country in a struggle of state against stale, city against city, family against family, and brother against brother, the theater department plans on recruiting a cast of thousands f r o m the D o p e community. Most of the roles h a v e not been filled yet. " W e ' r e not w o r r i e d a b o u t it," Johnny said. " I ' m sure most of the

students share our interest in the accurate depiction of this glorious and tragic war." O n e person from D o p e w h o is fascinated by the Civil War is Jimbo Bultmanis, Dope College president. Bultmanis has agreed to take on the role of Confederate General Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson. "I think Stonewall Jackson is the most interesting of the great Civil War g e n e r a l s , " B u l t m a n i s said. "What he did at the Second Battle of Bull R u n is an inspiration to me in my leadership practices." B u l t m a n i s has already started rehearsal for his death scene in the Battle of Chancellorsville. " D i d you k n o w old S t o n e w a l l was shot by accident by his o w n s i d e ? " Bultmanis said. T h e production may put a strain on s o m e of the participants acad e m i c work because the Civil War lasted from 1861 to 1865 and never stopped for a study break. " T h a t ' s just o n e of the sacrifices you make for good theater," said

RANCHOR PHOTO BY BOB MANTRA

REENACT!N' ITz Jimbo Bultmanis, Dope College president, practices for the role of Stonewall Jackson. The campus production of ' t h e Civil War" begins in March. Tony VanderMucks (405), who plays a bloody U n i o n c o r p s e in the Battle of Antietam. "I think our professors will understand." To p r e p a r e the c a m p u s for the event, there will be a showing of

the K e n Burns documentary, "the Civil War," in the Maas Auditorium on Thursday. " N o t h i n g makes me m o r e proud than looking at black and white pictures of stoically posed soldiers and

hearing Civil War music played on the fiddle," Bultmanis said. T h e D o p e C o l l e g e production, also called " t h e Civil War," will take place in the Pine Grove. A d mission is free.

Minervian frat kicked out of campus house Fraternity suspected of Advanced Dungeons and Dragons Chattie Sims REDUCTION EDITOR

T h e M i n e r v i a n F r a t e r n i t y received a letter this s u m m e r f r o m D o p e College saying that their org a n i z a t i o n w o u l d be s u s p e n d e d w h e n school b e g a n and no longer be allowed to live in their on c a m p u s house. During the s u m m e r Richard Snow, dean of students, entered the M i n e r v i a n h o u s e and e x a m i n e d photographs. Dungeon Master guides, character sheets, and video t a p e s a l l in c o n n e c t i o n w i t h Minervian pledge activities. " T h e c o l l e g e c h a r g e d us with violations on new m e m b e r educa-

Ranchor Staff

"I k n o w that it's because [Snow] tion, involving hazing, late night w a n t s to c o m e play a g a i n , but I gaming, and the use of a random can't stand his Elven Cleric and its n u m b e r generator rather than real sword of Diocletian; evdice." Said Teddy e r y o n e k n o w s that clerPinkerton (*02), ics c a n ' t use s w o r d s . " Minervian president. "I T h e current location mean, w h o would have of the character sheets k n o w n that our battle and rule books are unwith the vicious storm known at this time. g i a n t s of V e l k e m p t "Without our characwould have lasted until ter sheets w e c a n ' t do two in the m o r n i n g ? " anything," Pinkerton S n o w declined c o m T. Pinkerton said. " M y halfling thief, m e n t , but he did d e n y Gubbins the Grand, will being in league with the not be able to use the bubble horn D e m o g o r g a n ' s Goblin Horde. that w e captured in the Ice Dragon's " U n d e r our n e w s a n c t i o n s w e cave." h a v e to notify D e a n S n o w of every A s of yesterday, the M i n e r v i a n s activity beforehand, especially filed a complaint with G e e k Life D u n g e o n s and D r a g o n s , " said L e w i s Honeycutt Jr. ( ' 0 3 ) , frater- over the suspension, loss of h o u s e and illegal seizure of role playing nity m e m b e r and dungeon master.

wl

is a non-role playing c a m p u s and materials. "Other Geek groups have gotten w e have zero tolerance for that kind in trouble for pledging violations," of devil w o r s h i p . " D e s p i t e the e v e n t s said Honeycutt, "but that have c o m e to pass, none of them lost their the M i n e r v i a n s say that house or had their Dunthey are optimistic. g e o n s and D r a g o n s ' T h i s whole situation books taken. I'll bet the reminds m e of the time only r e a s o n they took t h e m is b e c a u s e t h e that w e returned to M e l p h o r e ' s castle with Hoard of Trustees c a n ' t Fizban's cloak of find any first edition featherfall," Honeycutt b o o k s for their meetings L. Honeycutt said. " M e l p h o r e tried to now that the third edition p u t us in p r i s o n f o r is out." touching the Sacred Sphere S e m o x . A m y Harrison, director of G e e k We cast Tasha's uncontrollable life, does not intend to act on the l a u g h t e r on h i m and e s c a p e d . I Minervian's complaint. think this m i g h t w o r k on ( D o p e " W e understand that the Geeks College President Jimbo] on c a m p u s are going to drink, but the Minervians were involved with role playing games. O u r c a m p u s

Bultmanis." Bultmanis declined c o m m e n t .

Ranchor Staff

Ranchor Staff

Staff

Ranchor Staff

Fun With the Ranchor staff: Match the staff members with their score on thespark.com's purity test (we won't tell you the answers because our m o m s read this paper). ex. Jesus. 55% 84% Matt Cook \ Chad Sampson \ 66% Courtney Klein \ 83% 92% James Pierce \ Erica Heeg \ 59% Andy Volk \ 69% Rand Arwady \ 78% Beth Lomasney \ 81% Jen Troke \ 53% Rob Ondra \ 63% Rebekah Oegema \ 84% Danielle Koski \ 71% Nick Denis \ .67% K Ben DeHaan 100% 68% Clarissa Gregory Becca Haynes 43%

Average Score = 69.75%

PAP ERIN' IT: Some members of the Ranchor staff prepare to meet another deadline. They are, from left to right, Michael Keaton ('02), Editor in Chief, Marissa Tomei ('OS), InFocus Editor, Robert Duvall ('03), Sports Editor, Glenn Close (404), Copy Editor and Randy Quaid ('03), Ad Representative.

Ok. we're going to make this as clear as possible, because every lime we release an issue of ihe Ranchor. some people read il and go huh? Did Ihis stuff really happen?" The answer is. no. of course not. The Ranchor is a work of satire, parody and foolishness. It is our attempt not to take ourselves so seriously and blow o f f some of the steam built up over a semester of stressful news covering. We hope you enjoy il. All opinions expressed in Ranchor articles are those of the individual writers.

///Ranchor 2001 fail semester, Issue #1 of 2


lk

IsTovember 39, 2001

Ranchor

Loms

Gender rolls; it's not just a pun anymore Biff Farmer MEPOSIAN EDITOR

After so many years. Dope College students w h o eat at Flips cafeteria three times a day, continue to c h o o s e dinner rolls with gender characteristics in mind. ' T i l admit it. I pick the roll that l o o k s heartier," said B o b P a r k e r ( 4 03), an avid eater of dinner rolls with slathered butter. "I like to pretend I'm back h o m e on the farm, and there c a n ' t be any discrimination in an old-fashioned family dinner." T h e Flips staff is divided on the gendering issue. Steven Year, a traditional e m p l o y e e , f i n d s n o t h i n g wrong with the roll placement in the basket. 4t lf w e were in that basket as long as they were, w e ' d depend on each o t h e r and b e c o m e o n e s o l i t a r y unit," Year said. Hank E m e w s , hired by Flips last year for his strong ideas on diver-

sity, d e s c r i b e s s t u d e n t s as, "not even noticing when the more feminine rolls j u s t sit to the side and watch." "1 stand behind the salad bar and just h o p e that s t u d e n t s will look past that designated ' s a n d w i c h r o l l ' , " E m e w s said. "The division has lessened, since I ' v e begun protesting, but there is still that societal placement." T h e dinner rolls continue to slfare the same basket, regardless of their situation as oppressor or oppressed. Yet, the more physically endowed r o l l s sit o v e r the s l i g h t e r r o l l s, w h i c h are only resurfaced w h e n students are after o n e thing : their dipping quality. Frieda C h o o s e , the president of the Liberation Union, has been defeated lime and time again in her efforts to disbar the gendering of rolls in Flips cafeteria. t4 Every time I ' m in there, I ' m constantly rearranging the rolls so

that they o c c u p y equal, same-level spots in the basket," C h o o s e said. "Still, their positions have already been designated to them by our society which is hell-bent on keeping lighter rolls in s e c o n d a r y positions." C h o o s e h a s tried m a n y techniques to make the Dope c o m m u nity aware. " I ' v e sent out mass e-mails. I ' v e even organized a flat-basket making rally," C h o o s e said. Whether or not the D o p e administration intends to do something about this alleged gendering is not known at this time. Also, the Flips c a f e t e r i a b o a r d has d e c l i n e d to c o m m e n t on the issue. C h o o s e urges students to take a s t a n d w h e n it c o m e s t o a l l g e n d e r i n g in Flips c a f e t e r i a , not simply the rolls. t4 We need to look at everything. Students need to consider their last grilled cheese, for example. T h e y

RA/JCHOR P H O T O BY L A R R Y A P P L E T O N ROLLIN' IT: The alleged gendering in Flips cafeteria is most noticable by the position of rolls in the basket. need to ask themselves, "Did I disregard gender characteristics when I c h o s e that grilled c h e e s e ? "

C h o o s e said. 44With open minds w e can m a k e the most traditional meal an equal opportunity experience."

Dating rumors found on Student puts his the Dope College campus trust in Csonka & feels the light

Bob Mantra

T H E REAL S U M SHADY

An e m a i l w a s s e n t o u t f r o m C a m p u s C l e a r w a t e r R e v i v a l regarding a r u m o r that t w o or more Dope students may have been involved in the dangerous act of "dat-

Chattie Sims THE DEEP ONE

Student Jeremy Beeman's ( 4 05) life was totally changed by reading a c o m m a n d to "Feel his presence" written on the stairs to the Dim Witt Center this Tuesday. "Well, 1 w a s walking up the stairs and I read the message in

ing." T h e email r e a s s u r e d s t u d e n t s that the c a m p u s w a s c o m p l e t e l y celibate. " W e ' r e doing everything w e can to preserve the purity of the student body in general," said Spleen of the Chapel Dr. Pink. According to a frantic call m a d e to Public Chastity M o n d a y night, t w o s h a d o w y f i g u r e s w e r e seen within each other's personal space. 44 We received the call and res p o n d e d , but by the time w e arrived the s u s p e c t s had f l e d t h e s c e n e , " said Sergeant S t r o n g of Public Chastity. H e also believes that visitation hours may have been broken as well. Dr. Pink expressed his concern about the gradual decline of students morals over the years. "It's a shame how this younger generation swings. Girls s h o w i n g their arms? That would earn a lass a rap on the knuckles with a ruler," Pink c o m m e n t e d . " And where do they get off wearing pants? M y f e m a l e parishioners always wear floor-length dresses."

RAKCHOFf P H O T O BY BALKI B A R T O K O M O S LOVIN' / T : Susan Peeps ('03) and Wally Ferguson ('02) are rumored to be dating just for the fun of it. T h e email contained some tips to help you to avoid the dangers of dating. First, only talk to m e m b e r s of your o w n gender. S e c o n d , read only the Bible, as a)l other books are heresies. Third, purchase and use the X B O X , as it prevents you f r o m having a life. Following these guidelines will guard you against

the evils of dating. If you must get married. C a m p u s C l e a r w a t e r R e vival urges you to h a v e your parents arrange your marriage to benefit your family by acquiring land and prestige. T h e Counseling Center as well as C a m p u s C l e a r w a t e r R e v i v a l are available for students w h o may feel defiled by the recent events.

Don't drink and withdraw.

side walk chalk," said Beeman. "Suddenly I felt that my life had meaning. I could feel his p r e s ence, the wonderful presence of m y f a vorite football player L a r r y

on D o p e ' s campus, but not everyo n e was happy about this. "I don't understand the need for sidewalk me s s a g e s on a c a m p u s w h e r e most of the s t u d e n t s already believe in Larry C s o n k a , " said Tim G r e e n , Dean of Chapel. " I w a s really o f f e n d e d by the side w a l k s i g n s , " said Richard VanVandervan ( 4 0 2 ) . "1 can understand people liking Larry Csonka, but they need r e m e m b e r that other football players, like Dan Marino, are just as valid." Earlier today John Runner, director of Dopes cover up department, released a statement s a y i n g that maybe the " h i s " in " f e e l

Csonka." CSONKIN' IT: The great Students and powerful Larry Csonka. noticed a (This image appeared to c h a n g e in Beeman and fortunately, Beeman he was able to photograph it.) from the his p r e s e n c e " w a s n ' t r e f e r i n g start. 44 Larry Csonka. 1 was trying to walk to class R u n n e r is now hiding fearing today," said Abe 44Wonker" 4 B e e m a n ' s wrath. Dixon ( 01)."I saw this guy B e e m a n says that there will be writting Feel Larry C s o n k a o n m o r e s p r e a d i n g of the truth by the side walk. It was then that I means of sidewalk writting. His knew that Larry C s o n k a was the next couple of messages designed answer to that emptiness inside to c o n v i n c e p e o p l e of L a r r y of me. Save me oh great St. Larry Csonka's greatness are. " H e is the Csonka." way the truth and the life", "Trust After Beeman finished his side in his l o v e " a n d " H e d o e s n ' t walk c o m m a n d s there was a redoubt your existence". surgence of faith in Larry Csonka

K-ZOOIN' IT: This man once graduated from Portage High School. His whereabouts are currently questionable. Contact the Ranchor if you find him at 395-7877 (it works.)


Tk

Some Sinatra?

Rarichor

N o v e m b e r 40, 2001

John Paul II makes visit to Dope College Pontiff overbooks heaven Sonja Kuznova Shpekin T H E BASS PLAYER

Ever s i n c e P o p e J o h n Paul II vis-

"In s uch a time as this", he said, ' i t is i m p o r t a n t that we all look within o u r s e l v e s and allow ourselves to be c l e a n s e d f r o m o u r unrighteousness."

r e s p o n d e d to the c o n c e r n by saying, "I will k e e p h a n d i n g [ p a r d o n s ] out as l o n g a s t h e r e a r e p e o p l e w h o ask for t h e m . " M a n y regular attendees of D i m -

ited D o p e C o l l e g e last w e e k , m a n y

H o w e v e r , t h e controversial part o f his visit o c c u r r e d w h e n , at the

wit chapel are c o n c e r n e d that there will only be a c e r t a i n n u m b e r of

people have been complaining.

e n d of the service, he o f f e r e d to the

s p a c e s in h e a v e n , and, b e c a u s e of

c o n g r e g a t i o n p a r d o n s f r o m their sins.

the limited spaces, they m i g h t h a v e t o be p e n a l i z e d .

It c o u l d be a s k e d w h y p e o p l e would c o m p l a i n a b o u t a visit f r o m such a blessed m a n as the P o p e , but

"I c o u l d n ' t b e l i e v e it," said Fa-

"I got p a r d o n e d a long t i m e ago,

it turns o u t his visit c a u s e d m o r e

ther J o h n Miller, of the Dolland area

and the m e r e fact that I ' m a n up-

c o n t r o v e r s y than g o o d .

d i o c e s e , ' T h e P o p e k n e w full well that there a r e n ' t e n o u g h s p a c e s in

perclassmen should assure me a s e c u r e p l a c e in the k i n g d o m . H o w -

h e a v e n f o r all o f t h e p e o p l e h e

ever, with the s u r p l u s of [passes) to

freely h a n d e d p a r d o n s to. T h e r e ' s

h e a v e n , I ' m w o r r i e d m y spot w o n ' t

g o i n g to be an o v e r f l o w i s s u e . "

be r e s e r v e d for m e w h e n I need it"

" I t ' s j u s t a c r y i n ' s h a m e " said Billie-Jo Smith ( ' 0 5 ) . D u r i n g his visit, the P o p e held a special service in D i m w i t C h a p e l , which w a s o p e n t o the c o m m u n i t y . T h e f o c u s of his m e s s a g e w a s t w o -

T h e c h a p l a i n ' s o f f i c e d e c l i n e d to comment.

said Daniel V a n d e r s c h m a a z m a ('02).

f o l d : First, he e n c o u r a g e d the at-

A c c o r d i n g to e s t i m a t e s , t h e r e

V a n d e r s c h m a a z m a is a m o n g a

t e n d e e s to reach o u t to all p e o p l e

w e r e o v e r 1500 p e o p l e a t t e n d i n g the P o p e ' s service, and it is only lo-

group of students w h o are suggesting the P o p e not p a r d o n f r e s h m e n .

gisticaJly possible t o o f f e r 1000 par-

" F r e s h m e n d o n ' t need to get into

d o n s per congregation, but the Pope

h e a v e n , " V a n d e r s c h m a a z m a said. "I

with k i n d n e s s , and secondly, he enc o u r a g e d t h e m to r e p e n t f r o m their sins.

k A

H A r / C H O F f P H O T O BY C L A R I S S A E X P L A I N S IT ALL

BLESS/N' IT: John Paul II addresses the Dope campus from the balcony of the president's house. know I didn't when I was a fresh-

c a m p u s . T h e y stated that, a s long

man

as p e o p l e need g o o d n e s s and cornp a s s i o n , the P o p e is f r e e to continue p a r d o n i n g w h o m e v e r he pleases.

D o p e ' s H o a r d of T r u s t e e s c o m m e n t e d in a w r i t t e n letter t o t h e

Lunch staff becoming violent towards students Don't forget your ID card Payzly Matters E M O EDITOR

Several students have been com-

PHOTO COURTESY

PUBLIC G Y R A T I O N S

s l a m m e d m e o n the g r o u n d , k n o c k -

T h e sporadic hazing by the lunch

ing the w i n d o u t of m e , " said K i m Tirkman ('04).

w o r k e r s d o e s n ' t stop at the discouraging verbal r e m a r k s and r u d e g e s -

T h e l u n c h l a d i e s s a y that they

tures t o w a r d s r a n d o m s t u d e n t ID photographs.

k n o w n o t h i n g of t h e s e a t t a c k s or verbal h a z i n g and are very o f f e n d e d

plaining about the dramatic de-

A p p a r e n t l y , there h a v e b e e n t w o

c r e a s e in t h e f r i e n d l i n e s s of t h e F h e l p s C a f e t e r i a card s c a n n i n g la-

r e p o r t e d c a s e s of s e v e r e attacks, b y

' T h e s t u d e n t s are p r o b a b l y j u s t

the lunch ladies, o n s t u d e n t s w h o

trying to stir u p s o m e a c t i o n in the

dies. There have been numerous

h a v e f o r g o t t e n their lunch cards.

reports of d e g r a d i n g g e s t u r e s a n d

"I g o t u p to the s c a n n e r and realized that I w a s a m o r o n and had

f o o d service d e p a r t m e n t again. It's not like w e need a n y m o r e , t h i n g s

n e g a t i v e c o m m e n t s , f r o m the work-

COMBIN' IT OVER: Cara! Larac was the presenter this Monday for the Distinguished Lecture Series in Hair and Scalp Care.

s m i l e , " said Susan P e r k e n s o n , (05).

by t h e s e false a c c u s a t i o n s .

ers, about the student ID photographs.

f o r g o t t e n my lunch c a r d . I w a s j u s t

are always really exciting over h e r e , " said the lunch ladies. " H o w -

starting t o ask the lunch lady if I

ever, w e are sick of b e i n g called

"I w a s w a l k i n g into F h e l p s early,

c o u l d just give her my student n u m -

lunch ladies. A f t e r all, w e also serve

at a r o u n d 4 : 3 5 f o r d i n n e r . I w a s alone w h e n I g a v e my card t o the

b e r instead of w a l k i n g all the w a y

b r e a k f a s t and d i n n e r . "

lady to get s c a n n e d . A s she h a n d e d

back to m y r o o m , w h e n s h e gently g r a b b e d m y wrist and s l a p p e d my

c o m p l a i n t s r e g a r d i n g the lunch

the card back t o m e I o v e r h e a r d h e r

hand. I thought she was kidding

m u m b l i n g s o m e t h i n g about m e hav-

a r o u n d . . .than she w e n t ballistic o n

ing a ' f a t ugly f a c e ' with ' n a p p y

m e and twisted my arm a r o u n d ; it

r e a s o n s , s t u d e n t s are a d v i s e d to not

hair.' W h e n I w e n t t o c o n f r o n t her,

g o to eat at F h e l p s alone. U s e the

she just turned to m e and said, ' h a v e

f r e a k e d m e out s o I tried to get her o f f m e . T h a t ' s w h e n she c a m e o u t

a g o o d o n e ' with a g r a n d m a - l i k e

from behind her podium

a n d d o n o t f o r g e t your m e a l c a r d s .

and

Though there have been many w o r k e r s actions, n o n e of t h e s e occ u r r e n c e s c a n b e p r o v e n . For s a f e l y

b u d d y s y s t e m t o its full a d v a n t a g e

Mean & Nerd Mean & Nerd Have you ever gotten your feelings hurt by a fellow Hope student? Mean & Nerd

Mean & Nerd

&

r'j*

" Y e a h . T h i s one t i m e at A n c h o r B a n d , this b o y c a l l e d m e ' M a d D o g ' . I w e n t after h i m . "

" N o . H o p e students are nice to m e . But m y football c o a c h called m e a sissy."

"Yes."

&

-â&#x20AC;˘^Eugfene/R

e r h o f f III

05)

- D e l o r a Wiper ('05)

- V i n n y P. Vinstra ( ' 0 5 )

[ E u g e n e r e f u s e d to c o m m e n t fur-

Mean & Nerd

ther on his e x p e r i e n c e s . H e w a s o v e r c o m e b y his o w n e m o t i o n s . ]

"Yes. S o m e t i m e s p e o p l e s n i c k e r at m e w h e n I p a s s them. It m a k e s m e feel f u n n y , and I really d o n ' t like it at all. D o you think that y o u c o u l d

"I d o n ' t get m y f e e l i n g s hurt. But t h o s e f r e a k s with m u l l e t s sure get it a r o u n d h e r e . "

m a k e them stop? M y twin sister Ura

- S a l l y Vanderveen ('03)

new

Mmn & Nerd


Arts

Vsjachor

N o v e m b e r 14, 2001

Hope theater offers challenging adaptation Maureen Yonovitz S E N I O R STAFF R E P O R T E R

T h e Hope Theater Departmenl has a reputation of accepting challenging play adaptations. and then using their directing and acting tools to master them. Their second p e r f o r m a n c e of the season will be no different. On Friday, N o v e m b e r 16,2001, Peter R a b y ' s adaptation of Nikolai G o g o l ' s comedy, " T h e G o v e r n m e n t Inspektor" will make its debut. C o n t i n u i n g p e r f o r m a n c e s are S a t u r d a y , N o v e m b e r 17, and Wednesday through Friday, N o v e m b e r 28-30 at 8 p.m. A final p e r f o r m a n c e will be Saturday, Dec e m b e r 1, at 2 p.m. All p e r f o r m a n c e s will take place in the DeWitt Center M a i n Theatre. Originally written as " T h e Inspector General" in 1836, this particular adaptation takes place around the turn of the 20th Century. T h e fact that the play centers around a specific time in history is o n e of the reasons it was chosen. E v e n the actors are getting into the spirit of the time period. "Since the play is so time specific, all the

girls have to wear corsets which 1 think is very interesting," said Kalhy Cleveland ('02), w h o will be playing the director of charities. T h e play is a c o m e d y about a g r o u p of corrupt bureaucrats w h o hear of an upcoming surprise visit by a government inspector. In the midst of their attempts to please a man they believe is the inspector, they are interrupted by a message f r o m the real in-

l

spector. T h e r e are twenty-six cast m e m b e r s in the show, and all are l o o k i n g f o r w a r d to the a u d i e h c e ' s response to this h u m o r o u s , yet complex, play. "I can't wait to perform b e f o r e an audience," said Peter Beck ('03), w h o will be playing the role of the mayor. "It is difficult being in rehearsal so many hours, you start to wonder if people are going to fall asleep or if they will even find it remotely f u n n y . " Beck is confident, however, that the audie n c e will find this play both funny and entertaining. "It is really going to be a kick and I hope that w e get a lot of good energetic audiences because they are going to be treated to a re-

A/ZCHOFt P H O T O BY C L A R I S S A G R E G O R Y Daniel Allen Kwiatkowski (404 ) and Tim Heck (404 ) rehearse in costume for the upcoming play, "The Government Inspektor," by Nikolai Gogol. ally great show," Beck said. But according to John Tammi, director, this play isn't all about the laughs. It is very complex and has been described as " o n e of the most difficult plays in the world." "It's both funny and it's dark," Tammi said.

"To what extent w e can capture that complexity is what I ' m looking forward to seeing." Tickets for " T h e G o v e r n m e n t Inspektor" m a y be p u r c h a s e d by c a l l i n g the DeWitt ticket o f f i c e at (616) 395-7890.

Visiting Writers to give series grand finale Alicia A b o o d STAFF REPORTER

T h e last c h a n c e of the semester to be inspired by a Visiting Writer is quickly approaching. Poet Richard Jones and fiction writer Lan Samantha Chang will read at the Knickerbocker Theater t h i s T h u r s d a y , N o v e m b e r 15, at 7 p.m. J o n e s ' poetry has won him internat i o n a l a c c l a i m , as well a s t h e P o s n e r Award and two I AC

volume of criticism on Robert Bly. His has had pieces featured in "Poetry," " T h e American Poetry Review," and "TriQuarterly." H e is currently the dir e c t o r of t h e c r e ative writing prog r a m at D e P a u l U n i v e r s i t y in C h i cago Illinois and the founder of "Poetry East." C h r i s t i n a VanRegenmorter ('03), student assistant to the Visiting Writers Series ( V W S ) , calls Jones "a truly j o y f u l

poet." Literary Awards. His "Communicatwork has been read in ing both insight and five d i f f e r e n t lani n s p iration, Jones g u a g e s , and he has PHOTO COURTESY VWS w r i t e s with c o m written eleven b o o k s Poet Richard Jones will read from passion, choosing of poetry, i n c l u d i n g his latest collection, "Blessings". t o l o o k at t h e his latest collection, p e o p l e and events "The Blessing: N e w surrounding him within the context of a real, and Selected Poems. Earlier publications though sometimes wrenching, grace," include " C o u n t r y of Air," " A Perfect T i m e , " VanRegenmorter said. and " A t Last We Enter Paradise." Lan Samantha C h a n g ' s recent publication, Aside f r o m poetry, Jones has edited a book "Hunger; A Novella and Short Stories" reof essays entitled "Poets and Politics" and a

a a • *—« t • C* TX I A 1 ^ M . — ! semester — . , . , had deserved. sA S\ f T" % / A ceived the California B o o k Award. C h a n g is " W e ' r e really looking forward to this reada first-generation Chinese-American, and she ing being a p o w e r f u l closeout to a fantastic was raised in Appleton, Wisconson. Her work semester," said Melfocuses on the expeissa Huron ( 4 03), stur i e n c e s of C h i n e s e dent assistant to i m m i g r a n t s as they V W S . " W e ' v e run a d j u s t to life in the into s o m e roadblocks United States. A that h a v e only turned graduate of Yale and out to serve the Series Iowa Writers Workin a w a y w e n e v e r s h o p , s h e is the redreamed possible." cipient of fellowships T h e p u b l i c is infrom the Radcliffe vited to the r e a d i n g Institute, Standford and admission is free. U n i v e r s i t y , a n d the M u s i c by t h e Hope National E n d o w m e n t C o l l e g e C h a m ber for the Arts. J a z z E n s e m b l e will "For years, our precede the reading at family tiptoed around 6 : 3 0 p.m. Following a great hole of silence the reading, all are infrom the past," Chang vited to a r e c e p t i o n said. " I learned that PHOTO COURTESY VWS and book signing with the past was someLan Samantha Chang's "Hunger," t h e w r i t e r s in t h e thing to be avoided at won the California Book Award. Knickerbocker lobby. all costs. But at the Supplementary same time, I hungered to know more about it, because it w a s the o n l y c l u e to u n d e r s t a n d my p a r e n t s , w h o m I loved deeply." T h e Visiting Writers Series staff anticipates J o n e s and C h a n g to provide the finale this

Dancers to showcase talents Ashley North STAFF REPORTER

D a n c e s t u d e n t s will h a v e full reign over the 2001 Fall Student D a n c e Concert, m a k i n g intricate, artistic choices. At the Knickerbocker Theater on M o n d a y and Tuesday, N o v e m b e r 19 and 2 0 at 8 p.m., this unique opportunity f o r d a n c e students will further explore choreographic, performing, and production elements, while entertaining the H o p e community. D a n c e m a j o r s and m i n o r s are strongly encouraged to take part in the show. T h e student choreographers are responsible for signing u p for rehearsal space and f o r conditioning their cast. T h e y conceive and rehearse their work with assistance and guidance f r o m the departmental chair and other assigned faculty.

T h e students are in charge of every detail, f r o m c o s t u m e s to lighting plots. B e f o r e a piece hits the stage, faculty m e m b e r s glimpse an informal showing and place the n u m b e r s in the show as they see fit. P i e c e s f r o m the a d v a n c e d stud e n t s are u s u a l l y in this f o r m a l show. Other pieces m a y be placed in an informal s h o w further in the semester. Students may have the opportunity to gain credits as a choreographer. Others, specifically Treasure G i v a n ( 4 02). c h o r e o g r a p h out of sheer passion. "It's just something I really love doing," Givan said. W h i l e Givan is majoring in education and only minoring in dance, she finds lime in her schedule to coc h o r e o g r a p h a piece titled, " O l d Habits" with fellow dancer Hannah

Bira ( 4 02). "It has been a very creative proc e s s of i m p r o v i s a t i o n a n d j u s t throwing ideas out there," G i v a n said. "It has definitely been a different experience, but all along it has been our goal. T h e combination of the strong personal connection b e t w e e n the d a n c e r s , and j u s t k n o w i n g w e created it, is a very satisfying feeling." C h r i s t i n e L u t z ( 4 0 1 ) has been working hard f o r the last month and a half, preparing a piece to the music of the band " N i n e Inch Nails." "It is an important opportunity for dance students to build performing skills," Lutz said. " T h e honest work and integrity w e have put into our pieces makes it very important to us as well." Both nights of the concert are open to the public. Admission is free.

events include a panel discussion with the writers on the day of the reading at 3 p.m. in Lubbers L o f t , and an Afterwards session with Natalie Dykstra on N o v e m b e r 16 at 3 p.m. in the Granberg room of VanWylen Library.

WHAT'S UP? Hope Happenings:

Out & About;

Guerilla Girls 11/15,11 a.m. DeWitt Center

Lyle! ( H o p e student band)

V W S : Jones & C h a n g 1 1 / 1 5 , 7 p.m., j a z z 6 : 3 0 Knickerbocker

Fall film series: " T h e Gleaners & I" 7 p.m. & 9 p.m. nightly Knickerbocker

Senior Vocalist Q u i n c y Marr 11/17, 8 p.m. Knickerbocker W o m e n ' s Chorus 11/19, 8 p.m. Dimnent Memorial Chapel Student Choreographed Dance 11/19-20, 8 p.m. Knickerbocker C o f f e e House, Kletz Wednesdays, 9-11 p.m.

1 1 / 1 4 , 1 0 p.m. T h e Rosebud: G r a n d Haven

Susan Atefat Peckham & Joel P e c k h a m give reading 11/24, 2 p.m. Barnes & N o b l e , Grandville 616-531-1825 44th St. Village Inn Karaoke Thurs., Fri., Sat., 9:30-1:30 a.m., singers m u s t be 21 D a n c e ; Grand R a p i d s ' newest dance club 616-752-8159


V^nchor

ISTovember 14, 2 0 0 1

TASK F O R C E f r o m 1 T h e task force is not going lo be a closed conversation; it's going lo be a conversation with lots of different people." Frost said. Bultman feels it will not be easy to obtain the opinions of everyone interested in the issues. It will take some time not only to engage these people, but also to process what they say," Bultman said. T h e g r o u p ' s main purpose is to discover the most effective ways to talk about the sexuality issues that have c o m e up over the last several years on H o p e ' s campus. There has been s o m e considerable discussion about this on campus, not only in the time that I ' v e been here, but well b e f o r e that. It has been kind of a festering issue, not just the homosexuality issue-

Classihed

that certainly is part of it- but also just human sexuality in general." Bultman said. Bultman said that the Board of Trustees has already publicly stated their position on homosexuality. T h e y feel their position is parallel to that of the R e f o r m e d Church in America. T h e y make a distinction between homosexual orientation and h o m o s e x u a l practice, which they think is contrary to Biblical teaching. " A s the i s s u e a b o u t the G a y S t r a i g h t A l l i a n c e m a d e its w a y through the c o m m i t t e e system last year, it just seemed to me that there was enough discussion about it that it would be helpful to have a group focus m o r e directly on the issue of s e x u a l i t y " Bultman said. Scogin and Evans were chosen

Mardi Gras. Reps needed....travel free, e a r n $ $ $ . G r o u p D i s c o u n t s

can best treat the c a m p u s c o m m u nity with the care and compassion r e l a t i v e to issues of s e x u a l i t y , " Bultman said. "I don't think that it's too long a t i m e ; it m a y be t o o short." According to members, they will endeavor to serve the c o m m u n i t y through l o o k i n g at all the viewp o i n t s on b e h a l f of c o m m u n i t y

standpoint than before. T h e i s s u e |of h o m o s e x u a l i t y ) over the last few years has been a media-driven controversy, and it's kind of gotten out of hand at times,"

members. We need the prayers and support of the entire c o m m u n i t y , " F r o s t said. Evans shares Scogin's views of the Task Force. I feel that this Task Force is not only valid but also necessary. Taking a closer look at the basics of Christian sexuality will benefit the Hope students as well as the entire Hope c o m m u n i t y , " Evans said.

Scogin said. T h e Task Force will report to the president on its findings in March. T h e Task Force is to make a reco m m e n d a t i o n to me, and I would envision that there would be s o m e helpful suggestions as to how we

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to serve on the c o m m i t t e e because they are the two highest elected students on c a m p u s . Although there are only t w o students in the group, Scogin did not feel that this would be a problem. H e is looking forward to stopping hurtful disagreements and approaching issues such as homosexuality f r o m a m o r e c o m p a s s i o n a t e

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Spotlight

^'Anchor

N o v e m b e r 14, 2 0 0 1

Guerrilla Girls fight inequality in arts Abby Stauffer

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STAFF REPORTER

A group of masked feminists will address racism and sexism in the art industry tomorrow morning in the Dewitt Studio Theater. The Guerrilla Girls, a band of female artists who are f a m o u s for their unorthodox methods of activism, will speak at 11 a.m. about the group's efforts to fight discrimination. They will also be available for a question and answer period in a W o m e n ' s Studies class, according to event coordinator Rachel Gazda. "A big misunderstanding is the assumption that the art world is immune to discrimination, because it is seen as liberal and progressive," said Gazda, Women's Issues Organization president. The group was invited to appear at Hope to address these issues. "Being aware that discrimination exists even in the art industry is important," Gazda

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said. The group is known for using humor, wit, and sarcasm to attract attention to its message. Members wear gorilla masks to obscure their identity and to keep the focus on the issues. According to the organization's official website, www.guerillagirls.com, the group began making public appearances around the nation in 1985 to increase awareness about inequality in the art industry. They have produced over 70 posters, billboards, and other printed objects to spread their message to the general population, and the Guerrilla Girls have declared themselves

CMtSHU GUIS I*

PHOTO C O U R T E S Y O F W I O

The Guerilla Girls have been challenging the art world for over 15 years; they will be at Hope this Thursday. " T h e Conscience of Culture." Gazda said that she began working to coordinate the event last April after reading the Guerrilla Girls' book, "Confessions of the Guerrilla Girls." " I read the book and thought it was fabulous," Gazda said. "There seems to be a lot of support and excitement for the event, es-

pecially from people involved in Women's Studies and the Art Department." T o m o r r o w ' s presentation will include a short video and slides of the group's poster campaigns and is open to the public free of charge. T h e question and answer period is also open to the public, and will be held at 1:30

p.m. in room 219 of the Peale Science Center. T h e event is sponsored by a number of college departments and organizations including student development, W I O , the cultural affairs committee, the Great Performance Series, encounter with cultures, and the departments of psychology, theater, art and art history, and w o m e n ' s studies.

Water Ski Club: wipe-outs and success The Hope Water Ski Club faces tough competition mixed with good memories on the road. Jen Troke SP OTLIG HT E D I T O R

There is only one way Hope College students can fly over 4 0 feet in the air without a parachute and still not break a bone: the H o p e Water Ski Club. "The idea [of the club] is to represent Hope in the collegiate tourn a m e n t s , " said Scott R o b e r t s o n ('04), a club member. The club members compete in tournaments across the Midwest during the fall and spring seasons. So far this year, they have participated in the Ball State Fling in Van Wert, Ohio, the Dual Conference Meet at Purdue University and the Great Lakes Conference Meet. They competed against major universities such as Western Michigan

University, Purdue University, the University of Michigan, Michigan State University, and O h i o State University. Although the team is not always at the top when it comes to winning tournaments, the club is more about developing skills and having fun. "Though competitive in nature, the Water Ski Club is about fun. We don't care how we do overall as long as each member goes out and tries their hardest and comes back on shore with a smile," said Steve Van Dyk ('03), the team captain. Although the idea of forming a water ski club had been attempted several years ago, the response was limited. An informational meeting was held last spring for anyone interested in joining, and about 20 students showed interest. The Water Ski Club is now made up of Van Dyk, Robertson, Timothy S p e y e r ( ' 0 4 ) , Jack K l u n d e r ('05), Josh VanNamen ('05) and several other guys for the male

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PHOTO C O U R T E S Y O F T H E WATER SKI C L U B

Jack Klunder ('05) takes a jump at ski club tournament.

team. Kayleen Vannette ('04) is the w o m e n ' s t e a m . T y p i c a l l y , each team member owns his or her o w n equipment, and each participates in the three traditional events of the c o m p e t i t i o n : S l a l o m , Trick, and Jump. "Slalom competition is scored by the number of buoys a skier rounds at different speeds and rope lengths. Each skier has a maximum speed, and once that is reached, they begin to shorten the rope until the skier can no longer ski around all six buoys," Van Dyk said. T h e j u m p event is an effort to fly as far as possible off a five-foot ramp. Trick competition is scored by the tricks a skier does on specially designed skis. Tricks vary f r o m 360's to flipping over boat wake. " W h e n you are out competing, it is an individual performance, yet the team gets scored as a whole, much like a track or cross country meet," Van Dyk said. The team is scored together, and each member contributes. "It's halfway between individual and a team tournament," Robertson said. T h e competitive side is intense, but team m e m b e r s have fond memories of tournaments. "I t h i n k o n e of m y f o n d e s t memories happened this past September at the Ball State Fling when sophomore Jack Klunder jumped for the first time ever. He crashed his first and third jumps, but j u m p number two was a 40+ foot j u m p , and for a first time jumper, that is incredible," Van Dyk said. O n e of R o b e r t s o n ' s f a v o r i t e memories is from the Dual Conference Meet. Former coaches from Purdue University have a mentor

PHOTO C O U R T E S Y O F Tl

WATER SKI C L U B

Coach Brent Overmire, Tim Speyer ('OA) and Josh VanNamen ('05) pose with the skis at a club tournament. relationship with the Hope club. "Our so-called coaches brought a Jacuzzi b e h i n d their RV," Robertson said. "It was a warm welcome." The Water Ski Club is not officially recognized by the college, but they hope to change that soon. They plan on applying early in the spring semester for official recognition. The only possible obstacle Van Dyk sees is the fact that the tournaments are held on weekends, which means

participants must compete on Sundays. "I think (weekend-long tournaments are] a good thing because we get to stay down there all weekend and kind of be away from college life and just relax and ski and hang out," Klunder said. Students interested in the Water Ski Club should call Van Dyk at 772-7228 or Speyer at x6410. They will contact the students when the seasons starts again this spring.


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Issue 11 of 25, published weekly

' p o r t s ^ NTovember 14, 2 0 0 1

Swimming sweeps Alma John Rodstrom SENIOR STAFF REPORTER

Both the Hope College men's and w o m e n ' s swim teams posted victories over Alma College last Saturday in a dual meet. T h e m e n won by a score of 12782, and the women c a m e out on top 126-112. T h e men are now 4 - 0 on the season and 3-0 in the M I A A , w h i l e the w o m e n improve to 2-2 overall and 21 in the conference. "We went into the meet with the mentality of s w i m m i n g hard and h a v i n g f u n , " said G a r y Albrecht ('02), Hope m e n ' s co-captain. 4 4 It was a routine meet, and I think everyone s w a m really well." On the m e n ' s side, nine different Dutchmen touched the wall first in an e v e n t . L e a d i n g t h e F l y i n g D u t c h m e n were Daniel B o u w e n s ('03), 1,000 f r e e (10:46.19); Jeff Vroegindewey ('05), 200 free

(1:50.23); J a k e Taber ('04), 5 0 free (22.44); Malt Waterstone ('05), 200 IM (4:37.21); John Vinke('03), 100 butterfly (56.86); C h r i s H a m s t r a ( ' 0 4 ) , 100 free ( 4 9 . 4 6 ) ; Brad N o r d e n ( ' 0 4 ) , 100 b a c k s t r o k e (56.52); T i m D e H a a n ( ' 0 3 ) , 5 0 0 f r e e (5:13.74); and Ross Geurink ('04), 100 breaststroke (1:01.75). T h e w o m e n ' s team had seven different swimmers, three of which were freshmen, capture first place. C o m i n g in first for the Flying Dutch w e r e Beth F r e d e r i c k s ( ' 0 5 ) , 100 free (55.43), Sarah Smith ('05), 5 0 free (25.89), and Kari Foust ('05), 100 back (1:04.90). O t h e r H o p e w i n n e r s w e r e Erin Vanden Berg ( ' 0 3 ) , 4 0 0 IM ( 4 : 5 8 . 9 2 ) ; L a u r a Smith ('02), 1,000 free (11:56.48), a n d J e n n i f e r S t r a c h ( ' 0 4 ) , 100 breaststroke (1:15.86), and Michelle Smith ('04), 200 free (1:58.70).

ANCHOR ALL-STAR

T h e Flying D u t c h m e n brought in several good recruits and are looking to have yet another strong season this year. " W e h a v e a solid group of kids that c a m e in a n d they a r e really w o r k i n g hard this year," Albrecht said. " O u r goal as a team, as a whole for the M I A A is just to enjoy it, have f u n , and swim as hard as w e can." Hope s w i m m e r Brian Slagh ( ' 0 3 ) has recently been n a m e d the N C A A Division III national swimmer of the w e e k by C o l l e g e s w i m m i n g . c o m . Slagh received the award for his perf o r m a n c e t w o weeks ago in a double dual meet victory over Calvin College and Olivet College. In d o i n g so, his t i m e s a l r e a d y qualify him f o r the Division III national championships in the 2 0 0 and the 5 0 0 yard freestyle. S l a g h ' s times in the 200 and 5 0 0 w e r e conditional qualifying perfor-

Adloff ('02) was voted the M I A A ' s most valuable offensive football player. He is just the third player in M I A A football history to be named to the all-league first team all four years. Adloff leaves Hope with many Hope football records.

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—iMa ANCHOR

PHOTO BY ROB ONDRA

A Hope swimmer swims the butterfly during the meet Saturday against Alma in the Dow Center. mances for the Division III national championships. "I think this year is probably o n e of the years that w e will have the most guys going to the N C A A ' s "

Alberecht said. " W e ' v e got a couple of relays that are going to be really good. I k n o w that we are looking at definitely placing in the top 10, if not the top five easily."

Football falls at Albion

Ben DeHaan

SENIOR STAFF REPORTER

BRIAN ADLOFF

/•

In a do-or-die competition, when the g a m e is over, you either have e v e r y t h i n g or you h a v e nothing. T h i s is w h a t t h e H o p e f o o t b a l l team's situation was as they walked o n t o the field at Albion Saturday. An undefeated c o n f e r e n c e record, the M I A A title, and a trip to the N C A A playoffs w e r e on the line, but in the end Albion was the o n e leaving with the glory, c r u s h i n g Hope 42-11. T h e loss halted H o p e ' s winning streak at seven games. Hope has not w o n at Albion since 1982. " W e just c o u l d n ' t get anything g o i n g , " said D e a n K r e p s , H o p e head coach. "Too many things happened too quickly, and turnovers hurt us, t o o . " T h e Brits dominated H o p e on the g r o u n d , as A l b i o n r u n n i n g back Dan Dreyer rushed for 208 of the team's 275 rushing yards, and scored t w o t o u c h d o w n s . H o p e was held to 95 total rushing yards and no rushing t o u c h d o w n s . H o p e ' s passing g a m e struggled all day. Phil Butler ( ' 0 4 ) , w h o entered the g a m e leading the M I A A in p a s s i n g e f f i c i e n c y , c o m p l e t e d only 15 of 4 0 passes f o r 175 yards, along with five interceptions. Jason Helsen ( ' 0 4 ) replaced Butler in the second h a l f , c o m p l e t i n g 7 of 13 passes, and throwing H o p e ' s only touchdown. " I think the wind really was a big

GAMBLING AT HOPE COLLEGE Vegas Night Friday

factor to Phil," Kreps said. " H o w ever, he never got really frustrated or let it get to him. I d o n ' t think he was nervous; he was just off today." A l b i o n ' s d e f e n s e held H o p e to 375 total yards, c o m p a r e d to the Brits 5 6 3 y a r d s of total o f f e n s e . T h e y also forced seven Hope turnovers, which consisted of six interceptions and one f u m b l e . " W e had talked about the record (Albion's record against H o p e at home) this week, and it w a s really something to go for. W e ' v e broken so many records this year, and w e really wanted to get after this one, too, so it w a s disappointing not to get it," said Kreps. T h e game got off to a bad start f o r H o p e . A f t e r being f o r c e d to punt, Albion scored on the very first play on a 77-yard pass play. H o p e would cut the deficit late in the first quarter when Ian Fish ( ' 0 2 ) booted a 23-yard field goal. In the second quarter, the Brits began to pull away, extending it's lead when Jeff Long scored f r o m o n e yard out to put Albion up 14-3. Hope had five possessions in the second quarter, but all five w e r e halted. Four of them ended in turno v e r s , as B u t l e r w a s p i c k e d o f f three times, and Joel Solomon ( ' 0 3 ) was stripped of the ball and Albion recovered. Albion scored o n e m o r e t o u c h d o w n with less than a minute to go in the first quarter to m a k e the score 21-3 at halftime. Albion c a m e out in the second HOPE C O L L E G E ANCHOR 141 E 12TH ST PO BOX 9000 H O L L A N D MI 49422-9000

half and broke H o p e ' s spirit early in the third quarter w h e n Dreyer broke through a hole in the d e f e n s e and sprinted 84 yards for a score to extend the lead to 28-3. A s the f o u r t h q u a r t e r b e g a n , Albion finished the job. T h e Brits d r o v e 5 0 yards in ten plays when A d a m A u v e n s h i n e caught a fiveyard t o u c h d o w n pass from Rundle, m a k i n g it 35-3. H o p e would finally answer back w i t h 6 : 5 7 l e f t in t h e g a m e , as Helsen hit Solomon for a 19 yard touchdown. Helsen then found Gle for the 2-point conversion, cutting the score to 35-11. With just over t w o minutes in the g a m e , R u n d l e hit D r e w D i G i a c i n t o f r o m n i n e yards out to end the game at 42-11. Even though there w e r e n ' t m a n y positives for the D u t c h m e n in the game, there was still a record set. H o p e receiver Brian Adloff ( ' 0 2 ) c a u g h t 11 p a s s e s f o r 118 y a r d s . A d l o f f ' s collegiate career may be over, but he has left his mark in the record books. H e caught 68 passes for 896 yards this season, both of w h i c h are records. On his career mark, Adloff has caught 207 passes f o r 2,554 yards, also both records. Hope finishes the season at 7 - 2 , and 4-1 in M I A A competition. " T h i s is a disappointing way to go out because there was so much on the line, but it was a great season. T h e y ' v e had a lot of fun and I did too, even though I hate to see all the seniors g o , " Kreps said. Non-Profil Organization U.S. Postage PAID Hope College


11-14-2001