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I Contest Nykerk Gup Tomorrow The annual Nykerk Cup competition will take place tomorrow night in the Civic Center at 8 p . m . The contest c l i m a x e s three weeks of r e h e a r s a l by each class of a song, play and oration. The sophomore play, "St. George and the D r a g o n , " written and directed by Jeff McGilvray, was previewed T u e s d a y night by the sopho m o r e class, as was their song. "Chim Chim C h e - r e e , " directed by senior Linda Tiezzi.

1 CUE, YOUR ON!—Sophomores review lines in preparation for the Nykerk Cup Contest on S a t u r d a y night. They a r e left to right: B a r b DeVries, Christine Nagel, Dottie Manuel, Sue Albers and Sandy Tomlinson.

The f r e s h m a n play, " T h e Proj e c t , " is directed by B a r b a r a Brunson and her f r e s h m a n assistant Lyn Poppink. Charyl Defendorf will direct the class in their song "Into the Night." T o m m i e Leenhouts is coaching the sophomore orator Karen Swets,

and Ann Slaughter is the f r e s h m a n orator, coached by Lois H i e m s t r a . The annual Nykerk b r e a k f a s t will be held tomorrow morning at 8 a . m . in Phelps. It will include e n t e r t a i n m e n t and introduction of coaches and chai r m en. T h e r e is no c h a r g e for boarding women. The non-boarding women m a y obtain tickets for $.30 from Mrs. Tollman, the housemother at Phelps. The leading roles in the sophomore play are held by Carol B u c h a n n a n . Delores Floyd, Margaret Lenel and Chris Nagel. Members of the f r e s h m a n cast a r e Bonnie Thoben, Linda Nelson, Robin Huybregtse, Sharon Zawadsky, Shirley L a u r e n c e and Maria Pizarro. The Nykerk Cup competition or-

iginally began a s a powder-puff football g a m e in the f r e s h m e n vs. sophomore tradition. The underc l a s s m e n would huddle around their junior and senior coaches learning pass patterns, offensive blocking and off-tackle r u n s . The feminine spectacle, which was devised as the w o m e n ' s answer to the Pull, c a m e to a halt when the administration decided that the endeavors of its co-eds should be emphasized in m o r e f e m inine activities. The results w e r e the t h r e e divisions in which the competition is held at the p r e s e n t : T h e play, the oration and the song. The sophomore women, who won the cup as f r e s h m e n , are anticipating winning four straight to follow up the past two victories of their m e n in the Pull.

COLLEGE

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Tonight. 8:30 p.m. — Midnight Recorded

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Hope College anchor

Student Senate Sponsors Discussion on Vietnam The Student Senate passed a proposal concerning V i e t n a m and listened to p r e p a r a t i o n s being m a d e for Hope's Vietnam Conference at its meeting on Nov. 4. Dick Shiels, National Student Assn. coordinator, told the S e n a t e that plans a r e u n d e r w a y for a conference on Vietnam to be held on Hope's c a m p u s , S a t u r d a y , Nov. 20. T h e conference will be highlighted with Slate D e p a r t m e n t s p e a k e r s as well as Dr. Wesley Fischel of Michigan State, an advisor to the Diem r e g i m e of V i e t n a m , and a G.I. who recently r e t u r n e d f r o m Vietnam. In order to help students b e c o m e a w a r e of the situation in Vietnam, general discussions a r e being held during t h e week in the S e n a t e office in G r a v e s . T h e discussions a r e open to all students r e g a r d l e s s of their previous knowledge concerning V i e t n a m . Shiels reported that the d a y and t i m e of m e e t i n g s will be announced in the daily bulletin. A proposal was then submitted and accepted that a petition be circulated on c a m p u s stating t h a t s t u d e n t s support our g o v e r n m e n t ' s

policy in Vietnam. T h e petition, however, will not be circulated una f t e r the Nov. 20 c o n f e r e n c e for as Shiels said. "We want s t u d e n t s to sign t h e petition intelligently with the realization of what they a r e signing."

N o v e m b e r 12, 1955

Fund to Serve All Departments

N e w F u n d Available at Hope T h e e s t a b l i s h m e n t of a n e w fund to e n c o u r a g e educational prog r a m s at all levels in Holland w a s a n n o u n c e d this past week by P r e s ident Calvin VanderWerf. The Louis and Helen P a d n o s C o m m u n ity E d u c a t i o n a l Fund will honor two long-time residents of Holland.

According to Dr. V a n d e r W e r f . the fund will be used "to p r o m o t e and foster creative p r o g r a m s and projects which will f u r t h e r the excellence of the entire educational system of the Holland community." P r o j e c t s which the new fund

The Kletz c o m m i t t e e r e p o r t e d that they hoped to have a decision f r o m the administration as to w h e t h e r they can proceed with plans for having the Kletz open on Monday and Wednesday evenings. A c a l e n d a r covering all the events of the coming week will be placed with the daily bulletin e a c h Monday. This m e a s u r e was passed by t h e Senate so that s t u d e n t s will be fully a w a r e of all e v e n t s and not miss t h e m b e c a u s e of lack of knowledge of thp ev^nt. Social C h a i r m a n Phil R a u w e r dink. reported that $254.50 was m a d e on the Back Porch M a j o r i t y Concert^ a f t e r all expenses w e r e taken out. Rauwerdink felt that it was a * very good concert which m a n y students should not h a v e missed, and urged s e n a t o r s to stimulate interest in f u r t h e r concerts.

i

: EDUCATIONAL FUND—The administration of the Louis and Helen P a d n o s Fund rests with this advisory c o m m i t t e e of citizens. Seated left to right, a r e Mrs. W. Robert Fitzgerald, Mrs. B e r n h a r d

P.

Donnelly, and Mrs. Stuart P a d n o s . Standing a r e Dr. Calvin VanderWerf, Dr. Robert l)e Haan, Donald I h r m a n and J u d g e Cornelius V a n d e r Meulen.

will m a k e possible include such p r o g r a m s as p a r e n t s ' s e m i n a r s on new ideas in education, pilot prog r a m s in foreign language study, e n r i c h m e n t s e m i n a r s for interested high school seniors, special work for education m a j o r s and a r e a t e a c h e r s and p r o g r a m s of adult education. Dr. VanderWerf. in making the a n n o u n c e m e n t , said, "This fund will be a fitting m e m o r i a l to two citizens who g a v e outstanding leadership to t h i s city for over half a century. Those of us who w e r e their f r i e n d s r e m e m b e r the faith in education and the love of young people which c h a r a c t e r i z e d Mr. and Mrs. Louis P a d n o s . T h e first two projects to be und e r w r i t t e n by the fund include " P r o j e c t E d u c a t i o n " and a special class in advanced placement high school chemistry. " P r o j e c t Educ a t i o n " , a forum on new curriculum i d e a s will be held in the West Ottawa High School on Nov. 12. T h r e e nationally-known e d u c a t o r s will speak to lay audiences on new ideas in m a t h e m a t i c s , English, and foreign l a n g u a g e instruction. The a d v a n c e d p l a c e m e n t class in c h e m i s t r y is for specially interested high school seniors.

Christian Action Commission Probes Christians' Duty By

George

Arwady

What should the church do about poverty? Should Red China be admitted to the United Nations? How can r a c e relations be improved? These a r e not the questions being considered by a new presidential task force or being batted around by a group of Hope students at Camp Geneva. These a r e some of the issues which were discussed Oct. 25-27 by the Christian Action Commission of t h e Reformed Church in America when this group m e t on the Hope c a m p u s . These a r e the church leaders f r o m all over A m e r i c a who, as a body, r e c o m m e n d policy for the consideration of the General Synod of the R.C.A, The views of this commission and its m e m b e r s ' concerns a r e primjarily in the field of the relationship of the Church to our mode r n society. Often we at Hope h a v e an image of the Synod of the church as an organization of m e n whose basic c o n c e r n s a r e on a plateau of theology and idealiza-

tion s o m e w h a t removed f r o m the conflicts of the 20th century which concern us. The Christian Action Commission is the too-little-known commission of Synod which explores this m y t h by actively involving the R e f o r m e d Church in those issues w h i c h are most pressing in c o n t e m p o r a r y society by recomm e n d i n g policy in those a r e a s where the a v e r a g e church m e m b e r should be concerned and would want to know his c h u r c h ' s position. Among the varied topics discussed by the commission in addition to t h e ones above were civil disobedience, the radical right, the (morality of boxing, narcotics, liquor, objective religious education in the public schools, the e n t i r e penal s y s t e m , the role of w o m e n in the m o d e r n church, poverty, and the so-called "new m o r a l i t y . " Some of the commission's r e c o m mendations h a v e not yet been determined. A great deal of r e s e a r c h and thought is applied to e v e r y question. Some of the m o r e interesting p o l i c y r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s

they a r e p r e p a r i n g to finalize for submission to the General Synod a r e as follows: Civil Rights — T h e r e is a Gene r a l Synod policy a l r e a d y of r a c i a l inclusiveness and the r e c o m m e n dation of the commission is concerned with the extension of this

policy and its application to m o r e of the R e f o r m e d Churches—especially in a r e a s w h e r e this issue is becoming a m a j o r problem. Capital P u n i s h m e n t — T h e General Synod h a s a l r e a d y gone on record as a result of a commission r e c o m m e n d a t i o n opposing t h e re-

tention of c a p i t a l p u n i s h m e n t as an instrument of justice and encouraging f o r w a r d - looking study in all a r e a s related to criminology. The commission is undertaking such a study. Liquor — A m e m b e r of the commission will p r e p a r e a study dealing with the complicated problem of the growing liquor t r a f f i c . The church's concern in this a r e a st em s from its deep concern for the health and happiness of people and society and its recollection of the biblical condemnation of excess in any form. Women in the Church — Recommendations are for increased rights of women in the church. The church is at present debating a proposal to amend its constitution. t h e r e b y permitting women to hold the offices of elder and deacon. New Morality — The commission will stu^y the moral condit'ons in the country today to d e t e m r n e to what extent they a r e a radical dep a r t u r ^ f r o m Christian m o r a l s and standards.

In addition to these r e c o m m e n dations involving church policy, the commission suggested possible a r e a s of activity for the Men's Brotherhood such as contacting divorced people in the church, setting up anti-smoking and drinking clinics, setting up " f o s t e r h o m e s " for foreign students, and taking possible action in the civil rights movement. S u m m a r i z i n g the accomplishm e n t s of the commission, chairm a n Dr. Robert De Haan commented, " T h e Commission is exp e c t e d to keep the Church a b r e a s t of the rapidly c h a n g i n g social scene and r e c o m m e n d action for the Church to t a k e with r e s n ^ to problems arising in society. The Commission has produced a credo on r a c e relations that is an outs t a n d i n g document of its kind. It also p r e p a r e d a forward-looking s t a t e m e n t on divorce and r e m a r riage. The commission plans to continue its work of calling the attention of t h e Church to its responsibility to the w o r l d . "


Page 2

November 12, 1955

Hope College anchor

Students to Criticize Faculty Next Tuesday A

r a r e opportunity—a chance to confront the m e m b e r s of the faculty with vocal criticism, whethe r pro or con—will be offered to Hopites at the student-faculty bull session next Tuesday. Slated for 10:30 a.m. in Dimnent Chapel, the unique assembly will be "basically a time where all students can come and m a k e any comment, raise any question or voice any criticism or judgment upon the college before a representative panel of faculty, administration and campus l e a d e r s , " stated Wes Michaelson, Student Senate p r e s i d e n t . A letter will be sent to all students describing the projected powwow in g r e a t e r detail, according to Michaelson. Opportunity will be

given for students to submit written questions to the panel if they prefer or if they feel that the n a t u r e of the question requires it. Written questions should be placed in a box in Van R a a l t e on Monday, Michaelson said. Those expected on the panel a r e Dean of the College, VanderLugt, Dean of Men Carey, Dean of Women Van E e n e n a a m , Chaplin Hillegonds, William Wilson, the business m a n a g e r , Roger Rietberg of the admissions d e p a r t m e n t , and Mr. Hilmert of the religion department. Student leaders such as Bob White, chief justice of the Student Court, and G r a h a m L a m p e r t , president of IRC are also expected to participate.

meet ns a t the ambassador shop

Hopite Owns Rare Collection

Sentman Displays Small Books By P a t Canfield W^hat is reputed to be the smallest book in the world is p a r t of a collection of miniature books compiled over the last twelve years by Sue Sentman, Hope College sophomore. This book m e a s u r e s 0.138 inches square and the letters are 0.005 inches high. Miss Sentm a n commented that " t h e book is about a q u a r t e r of the size of m y small finger nail." The book itself is f r o m Tokyo, J a p a n , but contains several chapters from Genesis in English. A ten times larger version of the s a m e book is included in her collection. Other books in Sue's collection range in size upward to three by two inches, considered the maxim u m for a true m i n i a t u r e book. Also in the collection a r e slightly larger volumes, classed as "small books" r a t h e r than miniatures, from her collection on the history of printing. "A Daily Walk with God," published in 1830, is the oldest book in the collection. Religious books, especially Bibles, were the first to be miniaturized, so that t h e y could readily be carried in one's hand. Sue's collection includes books of the world's m a j o r religions as well as classics of children's literature, fables, notable speeches, essays, biographies and history-. Among the speeches and history. Among the speeches and essays are works by Somerset Maugham. George Washington,

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BOOKS OF MANY SIZES—Sophomore Sue Sentman shows a display of her collection of minature books ranging f r o m the size of a finger-nail to four inches. A b r a h a m Lincoln, John F. Kennedy, Edwin Markam, Calvin Coolidge and m a n y others. Most of the books are quite r a r e , because fine miniature books are usually printed in editions of only fifty to a few hundred. Sue has received m a n y of her books as gifts and other she finds at r u m m a g e sales, antique shows and auctions. Surprisingly enough, Sue's hobby is relatively inexpensive. as most of her books range

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in price f r o m $.25 to $20.00 apiece. Sue's interest in miniature books s t e m s f r o m a childhood experience at the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago where she w a s impressed by a small doll house containing some tiny books. Sue recalls, "At first I collected m a n y m i n i a t u r e things, and gradually my interest settled on the books." Sue, who is from Lake Forest, 111., had her collection of books and e t h e r miniatures on display at the Lake Forest Public Library in September. In November it will be exhibited in the Chicago Public Library. Sue has expressed her desire to help others take up this unusual hobby by giving them n a m e s and a d d r e s s e s of miniature-book publishers and dealers in the United States.

Hope Debate Team Swamps Opponents

Fris'

The Hope College D e b a t e Squad walked away f r o m the Maple Leaf Tourney at Goshen College last S a t u r d a y with victories in four of six d e b a t e s staged.

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Arguing the national d e b a t e question, " R e s o l v e d : T h a t law enf o r c e m e n t agencies should be given g r e a t e r f r e e d o m in the investigation and prosecution of c r i m e , " J a c k Koch and Ray Fylstra successfully upheld their a f f i r m a t i v e views a g a i n s t Kellogg College and M a n c h e s t e r College, losing only to Olivet. G r e t c h e n Steffens and A1 V e r s c h u r e d e f e n d e d the negative position against Olivet and Kellogg, but lost to Bethel.

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Page 3

Religion Series

Coed Explains Woman's Role in Moslem Culture By P a u l Verduin Thus f a r this religion series h a s dealt with m e m b e r s of various expressions of the Judeo-Christian religious tradition. M o h a m m e d a n ism, the subject of this article, Is a d e p a r t u r e f r o m this c a t e g o r y . Being the dominant religion of North Africa and the Middle E a s t , the 1300-year-old movement e s t a b lished by the Prophet has followe r s in p a r t s of Europe, black Africa, Russia, India, Indonesia and Oceania, not to mention the dubious allegiancc given it bv the Black Muslims in the U.S. Noted for its tradition of spreading the knowledge of Allah and the Prophet with the sword and with terror, today its ad h er en ts send missionaries into Central Africa as well. Two Moslems h a v e found their

way to Hope College. One of them is F e m n t e h Sharifi. A f r e s h m a n coed f r o m T e h e r a n , I r a n , Miss Sharifi c a m e to Hope a f t e r attending the L a n g u a g e T e a c h i n g C e n t e r in London last y e a r. Miss S h a r i f i ' s attitudes toward her religion represent a significant d e p a r t u r e from t h e traditional uncompromising p r e c e p t s of M o h a m m e d a n i s m . "I believe that there is a God," said Miss Sharifi quietly but emphatically while being interviewed this week, "but when it c o m e s to religions, I don't know which are true and which a r e false. "We believe in the s a m e God that you believe in," she continued and in explaining the Moslem view of Christ, she said. "We also believe that your Prophet (Christ) is a true prophet, but we see our own M o h a m m e d as the final and great-

est m e s s e n g e r of God; one should believe also in h i m . " She added that Christ is one of 124,000 prophets recognized by I s l a m . The Westerner often pictures the typical M o h a m m e d a n as one who bows facing Mecca three t i m e s a day on his p r a y e r - r u g . Denying this i m age. Miss Sharifi reported that she does not observe the three hour-long daily p r a y e r s . "Although I do p r a y to God. I h a v e never p e r f o r m e d this regulation, either here or in Teheran. It is waste of t i m e , " she c o m m e n t e d . A m a j o r fault of M o h a m m e d a n ism for Miss Sharifi is its intense discrimination against women. "A male heir inherits twice as much as a f e m a l e h e i r , " she complained. "While a man can divorce his wife at will, she has no rights for divorce. F u r t h e r m o r e , if a w o m a n

Lubbers Calls Hope 'An Ideal;' Traces College History and Spirit " H o p e isn't really a place, it's an ideal. Once you get caught up in it, you c a n ' t get out, and it will change your whole life." The n a t u r e and development of that ideal w e r e the keys of t h e t h e m e of f o r m e r H o p e College P r e s i d e n t Dr. Irwin J . L u b b e r s ' lecture last Tuesday in t h e Dimnent Memorial Chapel. It w a s t h e second speech in the Centennial Lecture Series. In delivering a talk sparkling with wit and laden with amusing yet pertinent anecdotes, he seized the attention of t h e 600 in a t t e n d a n c e and gave both students and faculty a f a s c i n a t i n g insight into the history and spirit of Hope College. In doing so, Dr. Lubbers also established a precedent of quality which h a s b e e n lacking in most of the weekly as-

IW

/

q u e r a b l e aspiration of hope whic is rekindled in each g r a d u a t i class who a r e the e m b o d i m e n t this ideal. E m p h a s i z i n g the u n i v e r s a l i t y of the concept of S p e r a . Dr. L u b b e r s c o m p a r e d the colonization of the midwest and p a r t i c u l a r l y t h e Holland a r e a to t h e s e t t l e m e n t of New E n g l a n d . He noted how the Hope and anchor symbols used in the Hope College of Brown University and as the symbols of the s t a t e of Rhode Island and r e m a r k e d t h a t the s a m e ideals and a s p i r a t i o n s were shared by peoples of both a r e a s at different times. Dr. L u b b e r s noted t h a t f r o m its founding by Van R a a l t e in the 1860's, Hope h a s been d e d i c a t e d to a broad educational purpose, unlike o t h e r church-affiliated schools which originally had the single aim of educating the clergy. He quoted from a speech m a d e at the first Hope College c o m m e n c e m e n t

by Dr. Wykhoff which defined the goals of the college as t h e education of the children and l e a d e r s of the c h u r c h in science and in language in o r d e r to m e e t the challenges of the shrinking m o d e r n world. Dr. L u b b e r s continued by emphasizing that the key to t h e success of Hope College and its graduates and essentially its basic spirit is a " c o m b i n a t i o n of tension and t o l e r a n c e " developed and nutured between the students, facuN ty and p r e s c i e n t on the c a m p u s . The tension is that spirit of individuality which c r e a t e s while the tolerance is the quality which tempers a t t i t u d e s and p e r m i t s the acc e p t a n c e of t h e i d e a s of others. It is this established liason which has scaled the wall of i n a d e q u a t e financing and allowed Hope to attain an a c a d e m i c r e p u t a t i o n which belies the s c a r c i t y of pecuniary resources.

w a n t s to go to h e a v e n , she cannot enjoy herself. To become i m m o r t al, she must be very good." She added that women a r e g r e a t l y restricted as to o c c i ^ a t i o n a l opportunities as well. In r e f e r r i n g to attitudes of Hope students, the 20-year-old P e r s i a n girl r e m a r k e d , " I see that Christians are very partial to their religion." Keeping in mind Miss S h a r i f i ' s speculative view of her own faith, it is not difficult to und e r s t a n d her lack of appreciation for, or lack of comprehension of a religion of personal c o m m i t m e n t . Reacting to the chapel services, she said, " I t ' s hard to say whether the services a r e beneficial or n o t they are p r o b a b l y a little too long." She feels that the five-minute services held at the school she attended in London were sufficient.

P a l e t t e and Masque will be presenting two one act plays, "Hippolytus" and " T h e F a r c e ' o f the Worthy M a s t e r P i e r r e P a t h e l i n , " in Snow Auditorium on Dec. 1, 2, 3 and 4 at 8:15 p.m. " H i p p o l y t u s , " by E u r i p i d e s , is a t r a g e d y of conflict b e t w e e n the lust and continence of rival goddesses and their favorites. Hippolytus is a victim of one of the favoritisms and P h e a d r a , his stepmother. is a n o t h e r victim. Hippolytus is p o r t r a y e d by A1 Wildschut; T h e s e u s by Mike Vogas; P h a e d r a by K a t h y Lenel; and the n u r s e by I r e n e M a a t m a n . Aphrodite, t h e goddess of love and beauty, is played by. Linda P a t t e r son and A r t e m i s , goddess of the moon and hunting, by Alice French. " T h e F a r c e of the Worthy Mast e r P i e r r e P a t h e l i n , " w r i t t e n annoymously in the f i f t e e n t h cen-

semblies and which, if continued in the . Centennial L e c t u r e Series, would i m m e n s e l y contribute to success for this series which h a s been lacking t h e other a s s e m b l i e s thus f a r . Dr. Lubbers quoted Woodrow Wilson, " T h e p r e s e n t is a lens through which the past is projected on the f u t u r e . " The purpose of to show t h e lens and t h e g r e a t past of Hope College to the p r e s e n t student body and faculty of Hope so that we m a y t r a n s m i t it a n a its ideals to the f u t u r e . S p e r a , The Burning Bush T h a t Is not Consumed, was t h e title of t h t lecture, r e f e r r i n g to the uncon-

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specializing in

3 2 6 RIVER AVE. IRWIN J . L U B B E R S

tury, concerns the luck and consequences of M a s t e r Pathelin in all his haggling and deceiving. It is basically a f a r c e in which the tables a r e turned. P i e r r e Pathelin is still being cast, Guillemette is b e i n g played by Susan A r m s t r o n g , and D r a p e r by J a n H u b e r t . The shepherd is Tom Cjjleman and the judge will be / K g i t h - ^ f a ^ T o r ^ ^ le plays a r e being d i r e c t e d by Dr. "Seward S a v a g e of the English departmeTTt.-^r~Savage's technical assistants a r e J a m e s Malcolm and Robert Wegter of the speech department. The s t a g e c r e w h e a d s a r e : T o m Coleman, s c e n e r y ; Mel Andringa, m a k e u p ; Susan Stoekly, c o s t u m e s ; Lee Van Dyke, lights; Rick Rietveld, business and publicity; Leslie B r u e g g e m e y e r , props; and Bob Schroeder. sound. Anne deVelder and Mike Vogas a r e technical staff assistants.

Joel's STUDIO ( S a m p l e s N o w o n D i s p l a y in V a n R a a l t e L o b b y )

DR

When asked to give her c o m p a r a tive views on Christianity and Mohammedanism, Miss Sharifi stated with objectivity, " Y o u r religion is much m o r e to the benefit of the people than is ours—the C hristian people h a v e much m o r e freedom than do Moslems." In spite of this s t a t e m e n t , s h e reflected the deep cultural and social influences that Islam h a s had on the a r e a s it d o m i n a t e s , when she said. "I was born a M o h a m m e d a n . A person is born with one religion. He must die with it a l s o . "

Coming P&M Plays Depict Conflict, Comedy

SENIOR PORTRAITS »///

Comparing Christians h e r e with those in Iran, Miss Sharifi s a w littie difference, though she g a v e this opinion; " T h e r e a r e probably more churches than mosques in Teheran. This is because Moslems pray at home, while Christians worship and p r a y in a church building."

OF HOLLAND (14-16 West Eighth Street)

USE YOUR COLLEGE CREDIT CARD

Pat Z o e t Bill M i l l s Carl Ten Pas

Dr. A r t h u r Jentz, Rev. Jack

N o v e m b e r 21st D e c e m b e r 5th D e c e m b e r 12th

YOU

ARE

Walchenbach

Dr. Lars G r a n b e r g Dean T h o m a s Carey Rev. J o h n Allan

WELCOME

TO ATTEND


Novetnber 12, 1965

anchor editorial

Where There's Smoke - Ire ECENTLY T H E S T U D E N T SENATE

R

i

passed a r e c o m m e n d a t i o n w h i c h has s i n c e b e e n s e n t t o t h e A s s n . of W o m e n

applaud

this action

of

the

Senate

t e r i z e d its r e g u l a t i o n s of w o m e n a n d m e n i n t h e p a s t . As t h e c o n c e r n e d co-ed i n t h e l e t t e r

free a n d r e s p o n s i b l e o n this c a m p u s . W e u r g e

smoke,

where

to

eat,

ad

infinitum

ad

t h e r o l e s oi

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER P r a t e r Frolics, 8 p.m.

Entered

by the

as second

class

49423, at the special Congress,

Oct.

Subscription: Member: Office:

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 20 F r a t e r Frolics, 8 p . m .

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 23 All-College Assembly, Rev. Hillegonds. Chapel, 7:30 jp.m.

rate

Associated Floor

year.

the

students

for

matter

of the at

of postage

3, 1917, and S3 per

Ground

and

authority

authorized Printed:

Collegiate of Graves

of

Student

the

post Oct.

for

of

and

College,

Holland,

Publications Holland,

in Section

exam Board

Michigan,

1103 of Art

of

19, 1917.

Zteland

Press,

Michigan

Hall.

Phone:

Editor John M. Mulder Faculty Advisor Charles S. Rock Managing Editor Paul Verduin News Editor Randy Miller Board of Editors Editorial Assistant Neal Sobania Features Joyce Pollitt Sports ....James Mace Business Jack Koch Advertising Boh Schroeder Critiques Barbara Kouw Copy Ellen Border Mary Hakken Proof Libby Conklin Harriet Heerschap Columnists Robert Donia Gordon Korstan^e Rob Wrrge Headlines Maren Kiefer

Hope

office

provided

holiday

Senate

Record,

Zeeland,

Collegiate

Michigan.

Press

Assn.

396-2122.

Critiques Social Exchange Secretary Copy readers

Letters

W

E W O U L D L I K E all s t u d e n t s , f a c u l t y a d m i n i s t r a t o r s t o m a k e u s e oi t h e l e t t e r s t o t h e e d i t o r c o l u m n in t h e anchor. H o w e v e r , to prevent m i s u n d e r s t a n d ings, w e list b e l o w t h e r e q u i r e m e n t s f o r a letter to the editor. L e t t e r s m u s t be signed b u t n a m e s will be w i t h h e l d o n r e q u e s t . P s e u d o n y m s w i l l b e D r i n t e d o n l y if t h e l e t t e r w r i t e r ' s i d e n t i t y is k n o w n t o t h e e d i t o r . All l e t t e r s r e s p o n s i bly w r i t t e n a n d w i t h i n t h e r a t h e r b r o a d l i m i t s A g o o d t;<ste w i l l b e c o n s i d e r e d f o r p u b l i c a tion. O p i n i o n s e x p r e s s e d by l e t t e r w r i t e r s a r e n o t n e c e s s a r i l y t h o s e of t h e e d i t o r i a l s t a f f . All letters m u s t be s u b m i t t e d n o later than 6 p.m. on the Wednesday before the F r i d a y of p u b l i c a t i o n . L e n g t h s h o u l d p r e f e r a b l y b e r e s t r i c t e d t o 200-S00 w o r d s , a n d t h e e d i t o r i a l staff r e s e r v e s t h e r i r h t t o e d i t f o r s p a c e . M e a n i n g a n d c o n t e n t will b e p r e s e r v e d .

Dear Editor . . .

19

I GUANO, MKNMAN

periods

t h a t it b e p a s s e d a n d r e m i n d t h o s e i n a u t h o r ity t h a t t h e s m o k e is o n l y t h e sign of t h e i r e which reigns within the female hearts.

Readers Speak Out

anchor

under

r e g u l a t i o n s c a n b e j u s t i f i e d by s u c h a r a t i o n -

to

r e a l i s t i c is t o a d o p t a s m o k i n g r u l e f o r w o m e n w h i c h a l l o w s t h e m t o s m o k e in t h e c l e a n l i n e s s of t h e i r d o r m i t o r y , r a t h e r t h a n i n t h e sty in

COiiiM

ination

w o m e n w h a t t i m e they s h o u l d be in t h e dor-

first in a c o n s t r u c t i v e e f f o r t to m a k e w o m e n

e n t r e g u l a t i o n s a n d l a w s of t h i s c a m p u s m o r e

Coming Events

Mich.,

parents

t h e m w h a t t i m e t o be in t h e d o r m i t o r y , w h e r e

o n l y a r e t h e r u l e s d i f f e r e n t t o r m e n t h a n loi w o m e n , b u t t h e c o l l e g e by its r e s t r i c t i o n s a n d r e g u l a t i o n s m a k e s it d i f f i c u l t , ii n o t i m p o s s i b l e , f o r it t o c a r r y o u t a n i d e a l of m a k i n g

vacation,

w h i c h c l a i m s t o a c t i n t h e p l a c e of

food

alization. T h e r e c o m m e n d a t i o n of t h e S e n a t e is t h e

t h e d o u b l e s t a n d a r d is itself d o u b l e , f o r n o t

except

campus

below points out, the college claims a n d hopes t o i n s t i l l r e s p o n s i b i l i t y w i t h i n w o m e n yet tells

ity w h i c h t h e y d e s e r v e . I n a v e r y r e a l sense

year

our

a r e n e c e s s a r y f o r t h e o r d e r of t h e c o l l e g e c o m m u n i t y , b u t w e ask w h e t h e r all of t h e p r e s e n t

t h e d o u b l e s t a n d a r d , it is o n l y t h e b e g i n n i n g of a series of a t t e m p t s t o g i v e H o p e C o l l e g e w o m e n s o m e of t h e f r e e d o m a n d r e s p o n s i b i l -

college

endure

the schizophrenic a t t i t u d e which has charac-

W e wish t o p o i n t o u t however, that w h a t e v e r t h e o u t c o m e of t h i s e f f o r t t o a l t e r

the

and

mitory? W e d o recognize that some restrictions

t h e b a s e m e n t of G r a v e s .

of

campus

f o r it is t i m e f o r t h e c o l l e g e to r i d itself oi

t h e t w o sexes, b u t w e c a n n o t d e n y its e x i s t e n c e . O n e i m p o r t a n t s t e p i n m a k i n g t h e pres-

weekly

O R E X A M P L E is t h ? r e a n y r e a s o n w h y w o m e n s h o u l d be r e q u i r e d to eat on

s h o u l d tell 21, 22 o r p e r h a p s e v e n 2 3 y e a r - o l d

t i o n of t h e d i s t i n c t i o n b e t w e e n

Published

very real m o r a l s t a n d a r d s .

t o e a t ? Is t h e r e a n y r e a s o n w h y a n i n s t i t u t i o n

d e p l o r e t h t i r e q u a l i t y , see it as a n o b l i t e r a -

PRCSS

som*

service while m e n can choose w h e r e they wish

W

THURSDAY,, NOVEMBER 18 Orchestra Concert, Chapel, 8:15 p.m.

and

a b o l i s h e d , a n d t h a t s m o k i n g by w o m e n b e p e r m i t t e d a n y w h e r e f i r e r e g u l a t i o n s d o no.*

H I L E W E A R E N O T suffragettes, we firmly believe t h a t n o i n t e l l i g e n t person c a n d e n y t h e i m p o r t a n t r o l e of w o m e n in t w e n t i e t h c e n t u r y l i f e . W e m a y

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 16 All-College Assembly, Anthony Kooiker, 10:30 a.m.

themselves

f o r so l o n g in r e g a r d t o w o m e n s m o k i n g b e

nauseam.

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 13 Nykerk Contest, Civic Center, 8 p.m.

to

F

We

Q

responsible

S t u d e n t s . T h i s p r o p o s a l r e c o m m e n d s in p a r t that thp d o u b l e s t a n d a r d which has existed

p r o h i b i t it.

(m

women

Barbara Kouw Nancy Aumann Dick Shiels Lynn Archambeau Margo Hakktn Dona Davidsmeyer Zelda Skagfang Cartoonists Cary Carson Muck Menning Photographers Dirk Angstndt Wendell Hyink Bob Sammonds Reporters George Arwady, Darlene Bentz, Paul Bleau, Pat Canfield, Kiit\ Davis, Linda Den Besten, Rich Koster, Donna Leech, Glen Loomizn, Marty Luther, John R'nwirk. MikeO'Riordan, Mary Schakel, Bob Sonneveldt, Florence Sova, Betie Verwey, Bill Wichers.

You may very well not print this letter, but I hope you do. I m e a n no disrespect in what I have to say. Many Hope women a r e annoyed by the strict ten o'clock curfew imposed on them, but a r e helpless against this rigid control and m u s t conform or suffer the conseqences. Most of us feel a deep loyalty to this college, its ideals and its administration, but we c a n ' t help questioning our f r e e d o m on thih campus. We are fairly capable, morally educated women with a ibasic belief in God and higher ideals. It is almost an insult that we are trained to be responsible and then not allowed to do so. Why should we have to be in at ten and ten-thirty every week night? Is it f r o m tradition, lack of trust or resistance to change? Do we practice rigid-curfewing because it makes our p a r e n t s happy? Don't women have the right to, at least, a degree of f r e e d o m , as compared to that of the m e n of this camjpus? We're not ''little igirls" but administration, community and society in general seem to think so. We a r e expected to be feminine, but m o d e r n ; aggressive, but restrained; and responsible, but . . . "in by t e n ! " A sincere co-ed

I r e a d with i n t e r e s t e a c h week the Hope College anchor. I feel that this y e a r ' s p a p e r is, in general, well written. H o w e v e r , f would like to question the a c c u r a c y of a s t a t e m e n t on t h e f r o n t page of the Nov. 5, 1965, issue. In t h e article entitled " D r . Lubbers to L e c t u r e on Ever-Rekindling H o p e " , the r e p o r t e r m a k e s the s t a t e m e n t , " I n 1945 when D r . Lub-

bers b e c a m e Hope's P r e s i d e n t , t h e college was known for little else than a 'pre-seminary mill.' " With all due respect to Dr. Lubbers and his m a n y contributions to Hope during his y e a r s as Presid e n t , the work of his predecessors should not be forgotten. In particul a r , I r e m e m b e r the fine work which Dr. Wynand W i t h e r s did as P r e s i d e n t of t h e college f r o m about 1931 to 1945. These -were the d a y s which included the G r e a t Depression and World War II when it w a s not possible to do much, if any, building; just to keep the college going was a t r e m e n d o u s challenge. As a chemistry g r a d u a t e I can c o m m e n t only on the c h e m i s t r y d e p a r t m e n t with any degree of acc u r a c y . During these s a m e y e a r s Dr. Gerrit Van Zyl and others 'built the chemistry d e p a r t m e n t to a point where it was and is recognized as an outstanding departm e n t , nationwide. Hope's President, Dr. Calvin V a n d e r W e r f , class of 1937, is a g r a d u a t e of these s a m e days. Finally, what is so bad ab^ut being known as a college which begins the training of students for t h e ministry of t h e gospel of J e s u s Christ? Sincerelv yours, Elmor Harteenrk Chemistrv M a j o r Class of 1939 All to often, I am stopped by friends who ask, " W h a t ' s eating y o u ? " To them I reoly, "I suppose" it has to do with lack of comm i t m e n t , a spiritual leukemia. The punctured heart vales of conf o r m i t y will s a p us of o u r moral strength, our courage of conviction in these sterile sycophantic sixties.

\

I don't know how it began, but 1 suspect it started on the floor of the Senate when a short, stubby man called McCarthy spat out his first graceless obscenities. I don't know how it was allowed to happen, but I suspect it foliated in the h e a r t s of men not proud enough or strong enough to withstand it. Anyway, it's u^on us, this spiritual sickness, and it will bury us long b e f o r e that large country across the sea, once headed by a beefy, bald man in Moscow, will m a k e good its shoeleather threats. The canker sore of lost c o m m i t m e n t is s p r e a d i n g and we will rise above it only when we h a v e the monumental courage to say n a y to the heard of horses who desire to beat us down in the pioneer spirit that m a d e us great. I have recently r e t u r n e d f r o m Venezula, and our sickness is spreading, though it has not taken hold with the c o n s u m m a t e artistry displayed in America. There, too, the young grow old without grace. There, too, there is sterility, but the beer cans have not cluttered up all their natural wonders. There, too, the children lack innocence and only the dogs, h a n g ' n g hungrily f r o m the windows, are, in a peculiar way, quite wondrous. F o r God's sake, A m e r i c a , WAKE up! Commit yourself! Commit yourself to anything! To Central P a r k at dusk, to the Guggenheim M u s e u m , to the individual, to Hope College, but commit yourself, and Get m a d ! Get m a d frequently! Oh, how it shrinks the m u c a s m e m branes of the spirit. B o c o m e furious at the calmunies of can't, at society -which cannot l a u g h at itself. Torture you r self with h a r d (Continued to P a g e 5)


November 12. 1965

Page 5

Hepe College a n c h o r

'Seduction and Abandonment

I

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Werge Isn't Hot for 'Candy' By Rob Werge (Due to the gracious benevolence of our esteemed, yet earthly, editor, I h a v e f o r s a k e n m y column to write a review. Owing to the tenor of the book discussed it is hoped t h a t no under-aged students will r e a d f u r t h e r . ) "A lovely book and an essential one; it ought to be in every American h o m e , " wrote W a r r e n Miller, critic. " I t is awful and if m y Auntie Maud e v e r r e a d it, I would d i e . " enjoins Rob Werge, hack reviewer. ( E n d of Socratic dialogue.) I will say three things about " C a n d y : " It is funny, it is bad and it is demoralizing. F i r s t , it is the s t a n d a r d of d a r i n g hum o r t h a t the d e f e n d e r s of the book usually rally. Reading " C a n d y " is like reading 8909 elephant jokes in succession. The laughter becomes choked in your t h r o a t unless you find something intrinsically funny about elephants. It is fortunate that there is something intrinsically funny in the f i g u r e of Candy. F o r she is the personification of SEX as a way of life. She is the logical result of a flood of literawmmm

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F i n a l l y " C a n d y " is demoralizing (dare I call it a "wicked book" . . . s h a d e s of P u r i t a n i s m and all). It is not Candy's virginity which here becomes so debauched a s it is the concept of l a n g u a g e . The author uses his words, gushing s t r e a m s of four-lettered ones, as i n s t r u m e n t s of a b u s e and moment a r y sensation. He uses t h e m as Candy uses sex. On a deep level, there is a sense in which words a r e holy things. Sounds imbued with m e a n i n g , they establish the f u n d a m e n t a l bond of mankind and define the limits of our humanity. By t r e a t i n g words as "only words," Southern debases the e s s e n t i a l phenomenon of speech. As f a r as its author refuses to elucidate instead of shock and to truly satirize instead of cheaply a m u s e , " C a n d y " is a sick book. By communicating only his d i s r e g a r d for literary and h u m a n sensibility, Southern t e a r s the word f r o m its h u m a n depths and sells it to the sensation-seekers in the m a r k e t place. There they jostle e a c h other to h e a r , and sensitivity is lost amidst loud and sophisticated applause.

Our Man in Europe

251 opponents and are attempting to consolidate their position. This occurred in central J a v a where the Communists a r e strongest. Sukarno is " r u n n i n g s c a r e d " and is said to be considering dissolving Indonesia's Communist P a r t y .

The U.S. and Cuba h a v e finally completed their r e f u g e e a g r e e m e n t via the Swiss e m bassy and up to 100,000 r e f u g e e s U.S. jets destroyed several a r e expected to be airlifted to Soviet-built missle sites in four the U.S. in the next period. This days of bombing. Seven U.S. will call for extensive contact a i r m e n were lost as w e r e seven with C a s t r o ' s government in the U.S. planes. Hewever, their misf u t u r e . Most political analysts sions w e r e accomplished. think t h a t this is an a t t e m p t U.S. p a r a t r o o p e r s killed 110 by C a s t r o to reopen some kind VC in the jungles 25 miles north of r a p p o r t between Cuba and of Saigon. They t e a m e d with the U-S. The United States firmAustralian i n f a n t r y m e n and ar- ly denies that any such thing tillary to m a k e it an e x t r e m e l y is being contemplated and that unpleasant weekend for the all our actions h a v e been for communists. h u m a n i t a r i a n r e a s o n s alone. T h e success of our forces and Ian Smith of Rhodesia rejectthe h e a r t e n i n g flood of o f f e r s ed Wilson's proposal for addiand donations of food, tools, tional t a l k s stating that the two clothes, medicines and blood g o v e r n m e n t ' s ideas on Rhodesf r o m the nation's good s a m a r i ian independence were irrecontans w e r e e x t r e m e l y encouragcilable. ing to the Administration. It Clashes between Chilean and suggests that our policies in Vietnam and the support for Argentine police in the territory them a r e far stronger than pre- claimed by both and new clashes between Greek and Turkish viously believed. Cypriots in F a m a g u s t a , Cyprus In other international news, the C a n a d i a n s r e t u r n e d Liberal, put an additional strain on world Prime Minister Pearson to tensions. In the U.S. a m a s s i v e power power but left him with only 129 seats of the 265-seat House failure blacked out a large secof Commons. T h e chief opposi- tion of the northeast f r o m New tion, John D i e f e n b a c k e r ' s Con- York to Toronto. As the lights servatives, gained four seats to went out and power failed at 5:30 p . m . (EST), over 150,000 raise their total to 99. In Indonesia, both fighting people w e r e stranded on suband d e m o n s t r a t i n g continued. ways in New York City. The A crowd of aibout 150,000 people origin of the power failure is d e m o n s t r a t e d in J a k a r t a against still unknown. c o m m u n i s t s in Sukarno's cabFormer President Eisenhower inet. Fighting broke out in was taken to the hospital a f t e r S u m a t r a , led by a r m e d Com- a possible mild h e a r t attack. m u n i s t youths. The c o m m u n - His condition is now " s a t i s f a c ists h a v e reportedly* m u r d e r e d t o r y . "

Communism and Religion By Bob Donia L U J B L J A N A , Yugoslavia — The first of N o v e m b e r is one of t h e most i m p o r t a n t days in the y e a r h e r e in Slovenia. All - S a i n t s ' Day, h e r e known as " V s i S v e t i , " is a national holiday, but only in the almost 100 per cent Catholic Republic of Slovenia and not, I a m told, in any of the o t h e r Republics. The Alpine c h u r c h to be found in every village is t h e c e n t e r for all religious activity, which m e a n s that t h e c e m e t e r y for the village is usually located in t h e churcii c o u r t y a r d . On the afternoon of All Saints t h e r e is a m a s s , with the c h u r c h generally filled to overflowing, followed by the placing of c a n d l e s on the tombs of r e l a t i v e s and a f u r t h e r c o m m e m o r a t i v e service in t h e c e m e t e r y itself. It a p p e a r s as though the e n t i r e village p a r t i c i p a t e s , with often a dozen or m o r e c a n d l e s being placed on one grave. The candles burn late into the night, lighting up the c e m e t e r y and adjoining church. T r a v e l i n g through the countryside, one can see each c e m e t e r y f r o m a conside r a b l e distance. T h e soft glow of candlelight, illuminating m o d e s t but very n e a t and clean g r a v e s and an i m m a c u l a t e c h u r c h , s e r v e s as a reverent m e m o r i a l to the dead and their faith. In most c e m e t e r i e s is also to be found a g r a v e or g r a v e s for the p a r t i s a n s who died fighting in World W a r II. On t h e last school d a y before All Saints, classes Si school children visit t h e s e g r a v e s with flowers, and they can be seen singing songs in m e m o r y of those now heroized men who f o u g h t f h e Nazis during that bitter conflict. At monuments to partisans throughout the republic, hiph gove r n m e n t officials lay w r e a t h s on the t o m b s of m e n who w e r e in

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The Best of Peanuts PEANUTS

g r a p h y with obvious pornography. It is an obvious failure. S a t i r e is a literary blend of h u m o r , criticism and wit to the end that h u m a n institutions or h u m a n ity m a y be improved. Therein lies the philosophic impetus for works as " Letters F r o m Obscure M e n " and "A Modest P r o p o s a l . " The book in whose tradition " C a n d y " a t e m p t s to follow s e r v e s as an e x a m p l e . For it is at the end of " C a n d i d e " that the title c h a r a c t er realizes the simplistic dictum, "We m u s t all cultivate our own g a r d e n s . " Candide and his reade r s ultimately transcend the blindness and stupidity of their world. This is not possible in " C a n d y " for never once does Southern step outside his work to view his folk in antagonism to the reality of life and sex. We w a n d e r out of the tale by the s a m e door we c a m e in, neither enlightened nor cond e m n e d . "Good grief, it's D a d d y , " Candy yells in her final line. It is a r e f r a i n heard elsewhere in the story. And 1 get the feeling that on s o m e d a r k New York street, the s a m e lost cry will again be h e a r d wafting out of some open thirdstory window.

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Review of the News Vietnam successes could be the title for the past w e e k ' s actions there. In one of the most s a v a g e fights of the w a r , a c o m m u n i s t force which outn u m b e r e d two c o m p a n i e s of US air c a v a l r y m e n 2-1 w a s b e a t e n off by the latter. VC casualties n u m b e r e d 56 known dead. US losses were heavy, p r i m a r i l y b e c a u s e they w e r e 'so d a m n e u aggressive.'

ture obsessed with seduction and adultery which hid its m u c k y flow in the guise of c h a r a c t e r analysis. In Candy there is no need for such a guise. She is a two-dimensional n y m p h o m a n i a c and nothing else. When put into contact with the other c a r d b o a r d f i g u r e s of the story, she acquires a m a d absurdity which is m o m e n t a r i l y comic. She r a c e s through kalidescope adventures in search of a mystic path of enlightenment. And she finds it. Usually in bed. The basic motif is that of seduction and abandonment, seduction and a b a n d o n m e n t . . . ad infinitum. Only the c h a r a c t e r s c h a n g e places as they revolve wildly around the voluptuous figure of Candy. In the lists is P r o f e s s o r Mephesto ( " a regular guy, not just a simply a r m c h a i r c r a c k p o t " ) a m y s t i c called Grindle, Irving Krankeit (his n a m e was Irving Semite but he changed it for professional reasons) and Aunt Livy (author Terry Southern's counterpart to the wife of Bath). There a r e those who claim t h a t " C a n d y " is a profound s a t i r e . It is not. It is basically a dirty book a t t e m p t i n g to fight subtle porno-

m a n y cases their f o r m e r comr a d e s . Television news reels of t h e s e events clearly e m p h a s i z e the m e m o r y of the Communist-led p a r t i s a n s , and the official celeb r a t i o n is concentrated solely on this aspect of r e m e m b e r i n g the dead. P e r h a p s m o r e than anything else, to an outsider the widespread participation in t h e holiday is a tribute to the stubborn religious faith of these people, holding d e a r to t h e i r Catholic faith in large n u m b e r s despite previous persecutions and, at p r e s e n t , a r e g i m e willing to only co-evist with religion.

But political implications aside, the Slovenian c o m m e m o r a t i o n of All Saints is a truly beautiful and moving r e m i n d e r of those who have gone before. It is a quiet, r e v e r e n t act of p r a i s e and worship of God.

'Lack of Commitment' (Continued F r o m P a g e 4) looks, the teased hair, of the meretricious young who should be d a r i n g the elements, swinging upside down and saying anything they d a r n well please, so long as it's controversial and fosters malcontent. I suppose the key word is anger. Anger so visceral it gives you h e a r t b u r n . C o m m i t m e n t , guts, life of the mind, spiritual leukemia . . . these a r e a few of the f a v o r i t e things ibeing bandied about these days. Resist the urge to gird. Strengthen those pectoral muscles. Open your windows—let the sun in, and you too, can b e a social critic. LET AMERICA S P E A K . L E T F R E E D O M RING. L E T M E ALONE. PUT ME DOWN . . . Calvin Vander F r i s b e e

student un-opportunities. By this I m e a n things related to J e r r y Dyk s t r a ' s letter concerning the frequently closed Student Union. At twenty m i n u t e s a f t e r ten on Tuesday, Nov. 9, twenty - two students and myself w e r e , without our consent, evicted f r o m Van Zoeren L i br ar y. The doors reopened at eleven thirty. We w e r e told this was b e c a u s e of the assembly in the chapel. G r a n t e d the a s s e m b l y p r o g r a m s this s e m e s t e r h a v e been exceptionally fine. There a r e s o m e students who would r a t h e r study, a m a z i n g l y enough. If we a r e to accomplish something correctly, a few actions m u s t be t a k e n . T h e r e f o r e , between t h e hours of ten t h i r t y and eleven thirty on T u e s d a y s , we must not only close the l i b r a r y , but the Kletz and the offices and lock everyone f r o m the\r d o r m i t o r i e s .

H e r e t o f o r e you m a v add another situation to your growing list of

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Yet it is alsq a t r i b u t e to t h e toleration of the g o v e r n m e n t in the Communist country. T r u e , t h e r e is a real political overtone in the glorification of the p a r t i s a n s , but one not r e s e n t e d a n d even generally supported by the population in this republic. It is a p r a g m a t i c way of honoring a religious tradition without at the s a m e time overtly suporting religion.

The Phantom Champion of the Underdog

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November 12, 1965

Hope College anchor

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Vennema's Intellectuality Strengthened Hope Image

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Excellence and Relevance

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By Joyce Pollitt

acquire m e a n i n g only by finding their place in s y s t e m s of ideas. But s y s t e m s of i d e a s can b e c o m e r e l e v a n t only as they a r e set in relation to intelligible purposes. But these, in t u r n , can find their relevance only as purposes that a r e of interest to and significant fior not merely specialists, but for all persons. This suggests t h a t t h e e x t r a comm i t m e n t is concerned with h u m a n izing education ( a s c o m p a r e d to " m e c h a n i z i n g " it, or " m e r e - i n tellectualizing" it. or m a k i n g merely skillful routine of it. Hopefully, education b e c o m e s h u m a n i z e d not so much because w e m e r e l y know or know how, but b e c a u s e we know w h a t kind of e l e m e n t a l h u m a n purpose our knowing and doing serves. F o r long, we t r u s t e d quite implicitly—and in r e t r o s p e c t , p e r h a p s quite naively—that this c o m m e n d able goal of liberal education could be achieved by t h e simple device of exposing s t u d e n t s to a reasonably b r o a d r a n g e of disciplines. But we a r e not at all s u r e that this is enough to fulfill w h a t we a r e aiming for in our second commitment. This a p p e a l to r a n g e alone overlooks t h e possibility that liberal education involves not only w h a t we t e a c h , but how we t e a c h it, with the real " h u m a n i z i n g " occurring chiefly in t h e l a t t e r .

Editor's note: Now serving his sixteenth year as chairman of the philosophy department, Dr. D. Ivan Dykstra is a noted figure on the Hope scene. Graduating from Hope in 1935, he received his Ph. D. from Yale in 1945. His articles on Karl Barth and Barthianism have appeared in several religious periodicals. Dr. Dykstra joined the Hope faculty In 1947 as professor of Greek. In 1964 his "An Introduction to Liberal Education" was Incorporated into the freshman philosophy course. By Dr. D. Ivan Dykstra Liberal a r t s college t e a c h i n g is a particularly d e m a n d i n g profession for m a n y reasons, among these b e c a u s e it m a k e s two uncompromising c o m m i t m e n t s . The first of t h e s e is to professional excellence. T h e r e m a y h a v e been a t i m e when in t h e liberal a r t s college we were willing to accept something less t h a n such excellence b e c a u s e we were, a f t e r all, justifying our e x i s t e n c e not so m u c h by our professional a c a d e m ic c o m p e t e n c e as by our being g u a r d i a n s of something besides this. If there ever was such a day for the liberal a r t s college, that day is past. This commitment has come about only in p a r t b e c a u s e of the p r e s s u r e s of the a c a d e m i c competition. More i m p o r t a n t l y , it has come about b e c a u s e we h a v e had the courage to c o m m i t ourselves to the tough intuition t h a t nothing can e v e r justify our a i m i n g for less t h a n we do know or can know. But on top of this is a n o m e r comm i t m e n t , h a r d even to d e f i n e and h a r d e r to m a k e operational. We can locate it first by way of a negative: At t h e s a m e t i m e that we a r e c o m m i t t e d to professional excellence, we must find s o m e way of keeping the disciplines f r o m becoming p u r e esoteric e x e r c i s e s ; t h a t is. such that they a r e of int e r e s t exclusively for specialists whose p r o c e d u r e s are intelligible only to other specialists in the s a m e field. A f f i r m a t i v e l y , t h e second comm i t m e n t has something to do with relevance. The bits and pieces of what we learn or l e a r n to do can

F u r t h e r m o r e , we seem to have a s s u m e d that t h e h u m a n i t i e s must somehow " h u m a n i z e " t h e sciences. But h u m a n i t i e s s u b j e c t s can as readily b e c o m e esoteric specialties as do the sciences. The h u m a n i z i n g t h a t liberal a r t s education prides itself on must therefore c o m e about in s o m e other way. This " w a y " is the t a r g e t of the s e a r c h in the philosophy p a r t of t h e f r e s h m a n c o u r s e . Introduction to Liberal Studies. This course is an effort to m a k e the m a j o r f a c e t s of the h u m a n e n t e r p r i s e (via their exemplification in the m a j o r a c a d e m i c disciplines) articulate by identifying those explicit or implicit m a j o r purposes t h a t m e n seek to serve a s they try to become c o m p l e t e h u m a n beings. In proposing to do this, the lib-

SENIORS GRADUATION PORTRAITS by

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HOPE

eral studies course does not promise any kind of c h e a p substitute for the knowledge and competences that constitute t h e disciplines; nor does it try to give even a small s m a t t e r i n g of t h e kind of thing t h a t happens in the typical first courses of the disciplines themselves. It a t t e m p t s only to p r o v i d e a clear and c o m p r e h e n s i v e context in which what happens in t h e disciplines m a k e s sense. And beyond this, m a y b e it can provide a clear m a p in the contexts in which the h u m a n enterprise itself m a k e s sense, not only to the specialist but to e v e r y o n e .

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Campus GOPs Analyze Politics

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On Tuesday night a m e e t i n g of the Hope College Republican Club was held in the Kletz. Attended by some 40 students, the chief ac tivity of the evening was an address by State Senator Zollar of Berrien County. The S e n a t o r analyzed t h e r e c e n t meeting of t h e state legislature in Lansing f r o m the m i n o r i t y viewpoint, which a m o u n t e d to a story of e x t r e m e l y liberal legislation passed by the D e m o c r a t i c m a j o r ity and then vetoed by Republican Governor Romney on t h e grounds of being financially unsound. Finally. t h e m e e t i n g was thrown open to a general discussion which r a n g e d f r o m such topics as the Lindsay victory in New York City to the 18-year-old voting controversy.

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DR. AME VENNEMA A n a t i v e of Holland, Mich., he was a g r a d u a t e of Hope and of New Brunswick S e m i n a r y . He was called to s e r v e Hope through t h e suggestion of his old friend Dr. Kollen. When Dr. V e n n e m a c a m e , he w a s " s o m e w h a t broken in health but not in s p i r i t . " said his boyhood friend. Professor Henry E. Dosker, 76. "We w e r e boys together and, even in the early y e a r s

P l e a s e ! Take only one anchor. This is the basis on which the anchor is published, due to a limited budget. Some students a r e deprived of anchors if ext r a s a r e taken.

Campus

U.S. interest in Vietnam goes back to our policy of supporting the F r e n c h in their fight with the Viet Minh in the late forties. We increased our support steadily until by the time the fighting stopped in 1954, the U.S. was paying 80 per cent of the F r e n c h e x p e n s e s . That was the y e a r of the Geneva conference, where an a g r e e m e n t was r e a c h e d that Vietnam should be split. Elections would be held as soon as possible, the natives would be free to live in whichever sector they chose and all fighting would stop p e r m a n e n t l y . Any acquisition of additional war m a t e r ials or military alliances was forbidden in both sectors. The U.S. refused to sign the Geneva a g r e e m e n t . Ngo Din Diehm, the new premier of South V i e t n a m , w a s given A m e r i c a n support quickly. E v e n in 1956 when he failed to hold the elections agreed up at Geneva, the U.S. stood up for Diehm by saying that the North had broken the a g r e e m e n t as well. We could

not deny, however, that t h e elections would h a v e com e out unfavorably for the West, as a m a j o r i t y of the v o t e r s would have elected the c o m m u n i s t Ho Chi Minh. Diehm proceeded to establish an oppressive totalitarian r e g i m e . The U.S. knew that he was consistently removing d e m o c r a t i c a l l y - elected •village chiefs and imprisoning anyone else who disagreed with h i m ; the U.S. continued its support. As a m a t t e r of fact in 1957 when Diehm was fighting for his authority with rebels desirous of throwing off his oppression, t h e U.S. m a r k e d l y increased its aid to him. Communist North Vietnam inc r e a s e d her aid to the reoeis, soon to be known as the Viet Cong, about the s a m e time.. Since t h e n , Diehm has b e e n removed, along with a goou m a n y of his successors. The w a r and the involvement of the U.S. continues regardless, as the communist forces of the Viet Cong h a v e not given up on taking over. A m e r i c a n involvement can no longer be inter-

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preted as a defense of any particular r e g i m e but r a t h e r as a preventative m e a s u r e . It is not that we want to keep a r e g i m e in power but merely that we cannot allow the Viet Cong to r e p l a c e it. Both Eisenhower and Kennedy succeeded in involving the U.S. only by supplying advisors and military and financial aid—for the most p a r t . However, when the c o m m u n i s t s of the north b e c a m e actively involved in fighting for the Viet Cong, the forces of the U.S. responded. Air retaliation r a i d s against North Vietnam h a v e b e c o m e a m a j o r thrust in the w a r . The purpose of t h e s e raids is to " t e a c h North Vietnam a lesson," to prove to China that the U.S. is not a " p a p e r t i g e r " and to h a r a s s military m o v e m e n t s and supply lines. The gains of the Viet Cong have virtually stopped. It can be objectively said that the Viet Cong cannot achieve a m i l i t a r y victory. The question continues to be raised as to who is to be b l a m e d for the w a r . All that h a s been said officially by the I n t e r n a l Control Commission authorized by the Geneva a g r e e m e n t in 1959, is t h a t the U.S. h a s violated the a g r e e m e n t and, in 1962, that North V i e t n a m h a s as well.

of Hope College

Rev. Walchenbach, Preaching

The w a r with G e r m a n v began during his a d m i n i s t r a t i o n , yet Hope continued to meet new and even higher collegiate s t a n d a r d s . The progress of the college its p lf durthis timp reflects t h e quality of his leadership.

By Dick Shiels

CHAPEL

Service at 11:00 A.M.

A m a n of forethought and precision. he was often asked to speak; and his eloquence, be it on t h e p l a t f o r m or r u l n i t , w a s soon reknown. This a b i l i t v to convey his ideas clearly aided him as president.

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CHURCH

MEMORIAL

At the fiftieth a n n i v e r s a r y of t h e founding of Hope College in 1916, Dr. V e n n e m a was able to speak of g r a d u a t e s f r o m Hope now attending m a n y universities of the United States and in Oxford. England. and of s c h o ' a r s h i n s they had won. He said, "Of all the young men of t h e state of Michigan f r o m all the institutions of learning, denominational and s t a t e , who have successfully passed the q u a l i M n g e x a m i n a t i o n s for t h e Rhodes Scholarship. fiftv p e r c e n t a r e Hope College g r a d u a t e s . "

The U.S. in Vietnam

invites you to worship

DIMNENT

Hope College envisioned new heights Intellectually under t h e able l e a d e r s h i p of the R e v e r e n d Ame V e n n e m a f r o m the y e a r 1911 to 1918. " H i s m a i n interest w a s to establish at Hope College a scolars h i p , " said one authority, " w h i c h was to guide the spiritual and moral w e l f a r e of the d e n o m i n a t i o n and beyond denomination into society and civic and international l i f e . "

of boyhood, Dr. V e n n e m a w a s a l e a d e r a m o n g the ' b o y s ' . " His own intellectual p r o w e s s was reflected in the a i m s and accomp l i s h m e n t s for which he w a s responsible. Hope w a s a c c r e d i t e d in 1914 by the North C e n t r a l Association of Colleges a n d S e c o n d a r y Schools.

T h e U.S., obviously not lilywhite in the m a t t e r , can t a k e credit for having taken r e p e a t e d step* toward negotiation. Vice P r e s i d e n t H u m p h r e y has said that 15 official o f f e r s h a v e 'been m a d e . The m o s t convincing step we h a v e taken in t h a t direction h a s been to offer a billion dollar economic development p r o g r a m to enc o m p a s s t h e whole of V i e t n a m in the event of a s e t t l e m e n t . We stand r e a d y to p a y for p e a c e with m e n , advisors, b o m b s or dollars.


November 12, 1965

Thursday

Hope College anchor

Page 7

in Chapel

First Concert Features Celloist Leopold Teraspulsky, Professor of Violincello at Indiana University will be guest soloist with the Hope College Orchestra under the direction of Dr. Morrette Rider for that organization's first concert, Nov. 18, in Dimnent Memorial Chapel. The concert, which will begin at 8:15 p.m., opens with the Concerto Grosso Opus 6, -Number 12 by the Italian Baroque composer, Arcangelo Corelli. The string section of the orchestra will highlight solo passages played by Leslie Clark and David Tubergen, violinist; Mary P a t Russel, cellist; and Rosemary Hekman, harpsichordist. Following the Corelli, Mr. Teraspulsky will play the concerto for cello and orchestra by Haydn. The Haydn concerto is accepted as one of the m a s t e r solo works for this instrument and provides an opportunity for both a beautiful melodic performance and the exhibiting of a virtuoso technique. Mr. Teraspulsky is a native of New York and a graduate of the Manhattan College of Music. He has served as first cellist with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra and with the Grant Park Orchestra. In 1958, "59 and '60 he appeared as soloist at the Casals Festival both in Prades. F r a n c e and in San J u a n , Puerto Rico. He has been soloist with a great variety of orchestras in the United States and abroad

including the Geneva, Zurich, Grant P a r k and Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestras. Following intermission the or-

in Knoxville, Tennessee, where he was a m e m b e r of the Brass section of the orchestra. In honor of the 100th anniversary of the birth of J e a n Sibelius the orchestra will p e r f o r m one of the first orchestral compositions composed by this great Finnish musician, his Karelia suite based on Finnish folk songs f r o m the Karelia section of Finland. The final portion of the p r o g r a m will be devoted to the last movement of the "Symphony on a French Mountain Air," iby D'Indy. This unusual work is a symphony foi piano and orchestra and will f e a t u r e Charles Aschbrenner f r o m the Hope music faculty as piano soloist with the o r c h e s t r a .

LEOPOLD TERASPULSKY chestra will perform "A D r a m a t i c Overture," a new composition by Robert J a g e r . Mr. J a g e r is a member of the faculty of the United States Navy School of Music in Washington D.C. and was the winner of two composition contests during 1964, the Ostwald Band Masters Association award and the Roth composition contest for Orchestral pieces. He is a native of Muskegon, Mich., attended the I n i v e r s i t y of Michigan and taught

The public is invited to attend the concert without admission charge. The orchestra will join the college choirs in the presentation of Handel's " M e s s i a h " on Dec. 14.

Heine Announces Geography Grant Werner Heine, assistant professor of G e r m a n , has announced a g r a d u a t e fellowship offered by Michigan State University for a student interested in geography. The fellowship includes a stipend of $4000 and applicants need not have majored in geography. All interested students who will be g r a d u a t e d during spring or s u m m e r of 1966 with a g r a d e of 3.6 or better for their last two years of u n d e r g r a d u a t e study are eligible to apply for the fellowship. Mr. Heine m a y be contacted for f u r t h e r information.

FRATER FROLICS—OKE men are seen here transformed into feminine roles ior the annual farce. Pictured in siow motion are go-go girls De-nny Farmer, Rick Fair, Gary Holvcik, Bob Kullgren, Terry Sheffield and Dave Baas.

Praters Set TV as Theme For 20tli Annual Frolics The F r a t e r n a l Society will open the first of a two-night presentation of their 20th annual Frolics on Nov. 19 and 20 in the Women's L i t e r a r y Club. Curtain time both nights will be 8 p.m. Under the direction of Rueben Archilla and D a v e Baas, and assisted by Chris Buys and BUI Hill, the F r a t e r s will give an inside look at some favorite TV p r o g r a m s . P r o g r a m s scheduled for Frolic performance are ' T h e Hurler," directed by P a t E a m a n ; "A Day in Court," directed by Bill Hill; "Shindig," directed by Dave Baas

and Rueben Archilla; "Yogi B e a r , " directed by Chris Buys; " F r i d a y Night at the Movies," directed by Gene P e a r s o n ; and "The News," directed by Ken Walz and Phil Rauwerdink. Tickets for the Frolics are $.75 and a r e available f r o m any member of the f r a t e r n i t y or at the door. Proceeds will go to a charity organization. Stage director is Ade Slikkers; business m a n a g e r , Dennis F a r m er; tickets, Bill Mills; p r o g r a m s , Frank Lundell; and publicity, Dennis Oehm.

Georgeoff Featured at IRC Banquet; Education in East Europe Discussed HONORED PARENTS—Bob Dahl introduced Mr. and Mrs. Everett Leibundguth, 'Mom and Dad' of the weekend, at halftime of Saturday's football game. Ruth Meyer waits to present Mrs. Leibundguth with a corsage. Bob and Ruth were co-chairmen of this year's weekend for parents.

Hope Art Dept. Displays Work Across the Nation Works by art d e p a r t m e n t faculty m e m b e r s are appearing in outof - state exhibitions during the month of November while Hope's campus during the s a m e time offers the watercolor exhibition of University of Wyoming art professor Joseph Deaderick in the library mezzanine. The work of Philip Homes, chairman of the Hope art d e p a r t m e n t , is included in the Seventh Miami National Ceramic Exhibition in the University of Miami art gallery at Coral Gables, Florida. The exhibition will run f r o m Nov. 9 through Nov. 30, and is one of the m a j o r exhibitions of c e r a m i c art at the national level. Mr. Homes' work was selected by j u r y from several thousand entries. Delbert Michel, Hope art instructor, has received notification that hi^ oil painting entitled "Landscape with Blue Moon" is being shown in the 55th National Oil Painting Exhibition. The exhibition, sponsored by the Mississippi Art Assn., will be on display at the Municipal Art Gallery in Jackson, Miss, during the month of November. Artists throughout the nation submitted paintings by invitation. At the close of the show, prize winning entries will receive p u r c h a s e awards, and become the property of the Mississippi Art Assn.'s per-

manent collection. A one-man show of watercolors by University of Wyoming art professor, Joseph Deaderick, is on display during the month of November in the Mezzanine Gallery of Van Zoeren Library. M r . Deaderick's works portray in/vrvid color landscape subjects painted in the vicinity of Guanajuato, Mexico, where he spent a s u m m e r teaching art for the G r e a t Lakes College Assn.'s s u m m e r session. Gallery hours are from 8:30 to 10 p.m. Monday through Saturday

Dr. John Georgeoff of P u r d u e University addressed the International Relations G u b at their banquet last Thursday with a talk entitled, "Education Under Communism." In his discourse he described specifically the education systems of Yugoslavia and Bulgaria. Dr. Georgeoff g r a d u a t e d from Harris Teachers College in 1949, received his Master of Arts Degree in Education from Washington University in 1952 and in 1962 received his Ph.D. degree from George Peabody College for Teachers with a dissertation on the "Teaching of Social Studies in the E l e m e n t a r y Schools of Yugoslavia." He has m a d e three trips to Europe, the last two, in 1960 and in 1964-1965, for the purpose of studying education in Yugslavia and Bulgaria. Dr. Georgeoff was awarded a Ford Fellowship in 1959 and an Inter-University Travel Grant in 1964 in order to conduct his research. Since 1961 Dr. Georgeoff has been on the faculty of Purdue University, in the department of education, where he holds the rank of Assistant Professor. Dr. Georgeoff s t a t e d that "schools are no longer a preparation for life but a p a r t of life."

Almost every child in Yugoslavia and in Bulgaria has an opportunity for some kind of education but in the backward a r e a s it is often not taken a d v a n t a g e of. There are three broad a r e a s in the elementary school c u r r i c u l u m : academic, general technical education and free activities, with the curriculem similar to that of the United Slates. After e l e m e n t a r y school the student may go to a four year secondary school—either the gvmnasium which is college preparatory or to a technical school. Then he may enter a university of other higher technical schools. Teaching is by three basic methods: observation. discussions and text books, with discussions being the principal m e t h o d . "

The basic philosophy behind the schools as related by Dr. Georgeoff is that "not only must facts be taught but the students must get philosophy, specifically that

of Marx and Lenin f r o m their work. Morality is that which aids the Socialistic Communist State: everything else is immoral. There are two basic aims of education in Bulgaria and Yugoslavia: .education for citizenship and education for vocational ends. These two aims, if accomplished, m a k e up the New Socialist Communist Man." Slides pertaining to Yugoslavia and Bulgaria m a d e up the second part of the p r o g r a m . Dr. Georgeoff took them while visiting Eastern Europe in 1%5. The Twentieth Anniversary of the Yugoslavian Revolution Parade and several pictures of schools and youth s u m m e r c a m p s were shown. Dr. Georgeoff concluded his prog r a m with a question and answer period, in which he described difficulties he encountered in traveling through a Communist country.

TRINITY REFORMED CHURCH Welcomes You M o r n i n g Service at 9 : 3 0 A.M.

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Don't w a i t until the last d a y . M a k e y o u r a p p o i n t m e n t now f o r y o u r senior p o r t r a i t . STOP!

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Rev. Gordon V a n Oostenburg, Pastor

396-3674

2 0 t h a n d Central


Page 8

November 12, 1965

Hope College anchor

Hope Favored to Recapture MI A A Hoop Derby By Graydon Blank Now that the pigskins have left the air, and the smell of the hot dog has left the football stands of Hope for the last time this year, minds turn to the roar of the crowds, and the thrills and chills of basketball. Coach Russ DeVette has also changed his way of thinking, and is already planning s t r a t e g y for the upcoming basketball season, but his object remains the same as during the football season—victory. Coach DeVette has good reason to think of victory for the upcoming season, for last year the Dutchmen captured the league championship with an MIAA record of 10 wins and two losses, and an overall record of 16-6. In these 22 g a m e s , the Dutch ran over tha century mark six times, and finished the season with seven straight victories. Six of these were in the MIAA. P e r h a p s the greatest victory in last y e a r ' s season was that victory over Calvin to capture the championship in overtime. But that is all in the past, and Coach DeVette and his squad have another big season ahead of them. They will have to work hard if they expect to retain their crown. The Dutch a r e the favorites in

the MIAA this year, because most of last y e a r ' s t e a m is on the squad again. In pre-season practice. Coach DeVette has eight returning lettermen along with eight newcomers, five of whom played reserve ball under Coach Daryl Siedentop last season. This return m manpower gives the Dutch a big advantage over the other t e a m s i.i the league but that doesn't count the rest of the loop out. The Big Dutch will have to fight off threats f r o m foes like Calvin, Olivet and Albion, if they intend to keep the MIAA Crown at Hope for another year. The Dutch squad will be m a d e up of approximately 13 men of the present 16 out. There are 10 underclassmen out for the team, and only 6 seniors. The team lost only one senior last year, which should give the team good experience for the next several y e a r s . A synopsis of the players follows: Clare Van Wieren—a senior f r o m Holland. Clare lead the team in scoring last y e a r with a 20.6 points per game average. Clare also m a d e first t e a m All-MIAA in '64. He has a very good shot and drives excellently. His rebounding ability m a k e s him an all-around threat.

Chris Buys—a senior f r o m Caledonia. Mich. Chris is a tremendous hustler and can score accurately from the outside. His spirit and enthusiasm picks up the team when they are low and helps them to win many a ball game. Don Kronemeyer—a sophomore from Holland. Mich. Don proved himself last year when he c a m e oft the f r e s h m a n squad to start at guard on the varsity and go on to help win the championship. Don. as many will recall, sank the winning free throws in the Calvin g a m e last year. Kronemeyer averaged 11.3 points per g a m e last year. Car! Walters—a junior from Holland. Mich. Carl averaged 12.9 points per g a m e last year, but was more of an aid to the team in his leadership ability and his playm a k e r role. Walters is noted for his dribbling, pass-making, and accurate jump shot. J i m Klein—a junior from Berwyn. 111. Klein should be a real big help on the boards this year, has a real good shot, and great rebounding and tipping ability. Bill Potter—a senior from Grand Rapids. Mich. Bill is next to impossible to stop from the corner, and is a real s c r a p p e r under the

i

boards. Bill poured in 180 points last year for a 9.5 average. Roy Anker—a senior f r o m South Holland. 111. Roy was voted the most improved player of the team last year and is sure to have a lot to do with the Dutch success this year. Roy. at 6'7", plays an important part under the boards for the Dutch. Floyd Brady—a sophomore from Chicago. III. Floyd c a m e to Hope last year with an All-Chicago labei. He proved his worth by coming in second in the scoring race, after Clare Van Wieren. with an 13.9 average. Brady was chosen to the 2nd All-MIAA team in his first year of play. Tom Pelon—a sophomore from Holland. Mich. Pelon led the junior varsity squad in scoring, and is expected to m a k e a good showing on the varsity squad. Paul Wassenaar—a sophomore from Holland. Mich. Wassenaar played steady ball on the junior varsity squad last year at a forward position and is expected to give the squad depth. Rich Zondag—a sophomore from Randolph. Wisconsin. Zondag led the junior varsity squad in rebounding last year and should give

Captain J a i m e Zeas scored three times to feature the Dutch attack while Allan Griswold had three assists to finish with the t e a m lead in assists. Zeas tailed the first Hope goal on a pass from Griswold early in the first quarter and Walt Bruinsma upped the count to 2-0 a few minutes later with a cor-

ON THE MOVE!—Halfback Tom DeKuiper (dark jersey) p r e p a r e s to tackle Bluffaon's Bob Hewitt (26) in Hope defeat last Saturday, 23-6.

Bluff ton's Bluff Is Good

Dutch Chewed by Beavers 23-6 for the score on second down. The Flying Dutch got on the scoreboard in the third q u a r t e r afier Paul W a s s a n a a r recovered a Beaver fumble on the Bluffton four yard line. Hyink hit Bill Hultgren with a four-yard pitch for the tally but the senior signalcaller was grabbed from behind and downed

POINT KING—Senior halfback Bill Keur carries for another gain in the Bluffton game of last Saturday. Keur won the MIAA individual scoring title with eight touchdowns for 48 points.

J i m Thomas—a sophomore f r o m Holland. .Jim was the main playm a k e r for the JV squad last year, but was also very effective on long jump shots. Gary Rypma—a sophomore from Grand Rapids, Mich. G a r y will give Coach DeVette some much needed bench strength, as well as lots of pep. He will not be eligible until next semester. Paul Terpstra—a senior from Kalamazoo, Mich. Terpstra is trying for his first year on the Hope t e a m , and has shown great potential in pre-season practice. Taibi Kahler—a junior f r o m Highland, Ind. Taibi is also trying out for the first time, and would add much height to the squad. Taibi is quite a c c u r a t e from around the basket and will help the team with added board strength. The Dutch will begin their season against Concordia on Dec. 4.

Hope Kickers Close Season With Win Over Oakland Making it four in row over a two year period the Hope soccer squad topped the booters from Oakland University at Van Raalte Field, 5-1, last Saturday to finish its season with a 4-5 record for its first year of varsity competition.

By J a m e s Mace T h r e e touchdowns in the final five minutes of the first half by a powerful Bluflton College squad gave the visitors a big halftime lead and made it easy for the Beavers to record a 23-6 win over Hope in the final g a m e of the year for the Flying Dutch last Saturday at Riverview P a r k . Hope stymied the strong Bluffton running attack for the first period and a half so Beaver q u a r t e r b a c k Art Tuel went to the air and found the weakness in the Hope defense. Tuel connected with end J i m Sommer for the first touchdown with a 24-yard-pass with five minutes to go in the second period. The play capped a 43-yard-drive that was featured by a 14-yard-pa.ss from Teul to Ed Herring. Hope took the kickoff but the Dutch were stopped on downs on their own 44 and t h e Beavers took over. Five plays later Tuel found Eldon Gerber in t h e end zone with a five-yard-pass to give the visitors a two-touchdown a d v a n t a g e . A 13yard-pass from Tuel to S o m m e r and a 21-yard burst around end by Herring highlighted the scoring march. Attempting to get on the scoreboard before the half ran out Harlan Hyink had his second down pass intercepted by Doug Court and r e t u r n e d to the Hope 20. Tuel then fired a pass to S o m m e r good for 12 y a r d s and Gerber cracked off tackle down to the one-yard line. Mike Goings then went over

the varsity squad the s a m e advantage. Mike Paliatsos—a sophomore f r o m Muskegon, Mich. Mike was also a big boy under the boards for Coach Siedentop last year. Mike drives well and should give the team a lot of strength in rebounding and scoring.

while attempting the two point conversion. The losers blew three chances to score in the fourth q u a r t e r , failing twice inside t h e Bluffton 10yard line. Once the defense downed Tuel on Bluffton four but Hyink fumbled on Hope's first play and the Beavers r e c o v e r e d . The Dutch later drove to the Bluffton seven but a fumble once again stalled the drive. Late in t h e g a m e Tom DeKuiper returned a punt to the Bluffton 19 but four plays netted the Dutch only one y a r d and the visitors took over on downs. Bluffton completed a 41-yard pass play from Tuel to S o m m e r a f t e r the Hope drive was halted and moved to the Hope six yard line but the Dutch recovered a fumble to kill the t h r e a t . Gary F r e n s went in for his first play of the g a m e and was downed in the end zone by the hard charging defense for a safety. The loss gave the Dutch a 4-4 record for the season while finishing second in the MIAA with a 3-2 ledger. Bluffton upped their season's m a r k to 7-2. E a r l i e r this week rt was announced that Hope halfback Bill Keur had captured the league scoring title with 48 points. Keur took second in rushing behind Pete Boroday of Albion. Boroday edged the fleet senior bv six yards, 326-320. H a r l a n Hyink took second in league passing behind Dave Neilson of Albion. Hyink totaled 417 y a r d s with 25 completions in 70 a t t e m p t s .

ner kick that found the Oakland goal. Zeas m a d e it 3-0 with a solo dash in the second quarter but Oakland scored its lone goal shortly before the end of the second period. Griswold set up the last two Hope scores, both in the third period. First he fed Zeas who beat the Oakland goalkeeper and then set up Kwala Simanza who scored his first goal of the year. The Hope defense was as good as it has ever been and it limited the Oakland forwards to only three shots on goal, while the Dutch put 27 shots on the visitor's goalie.

Osterhaven's Second Puts Runners 4th in MIAA Cal Osterhaven capped off a brilliant sophomore season with the Hope cross country t e a m , finishing second in the annual MIAA meet and leading the Flying Dutch to a fourth place finish in the league. Osterhaven took second behind Jim Dow of Albion who set a course record of 21:21 in winning the event for the third consecutive year. Dow's effort also gave the

Music Dept. Offers Two Day Voice Workshop Mrs. Theodore Harrison of the American Conservatory of Music, Chicago, wil be on Hope's c a m p u s to present a two-day Vocal Workshop Nov. 17 and 18. She will be working with a group of voice students from the studios of Joyce Morrison. Robert Cavanaugh. and Joan Tallis in open lesson sessions, and will present a lecture on " A r t Song Poetry and History" at 2:00 p.m., Nov. 17, in Snow Auditorium. The Workshop will begin at 9:30 a.m. Wednesday with assigned M as ter s ' open sessions, and will continue throughout the two days. All voice students will be required to attend the Wednesdav morning session ^rom 9:30 - 11:20 in Snow Auditorium, and are strongly urged to attend the Poetry lecture t h a t afternoon, as well as any ana all other times their schedules permit, said Mr. Cavanaugh.

Britons first place in the meet with 27 points. Adrian was second with 49 points while Calvin and Hope were third and fourth with 90 and 108 points respectively. Osterhaven was named to the All-MIAA cross country for his outstanding p e r f o r m a n c e s all year long. He was voted to the team along with Dow, Craig Van Voorhees. Rex Curry and Tom Swihart. The other Hope runners in the meet, held this year at the Knollcrest course in Grand Rapids, were Wayne M eer man. who finished 22nd. Rich Bisson, 25th, Dan Berry 28th and Danny Howe. 31st. The finishers by team a f t e r Hope were Olivet, Alma and Kalamazoo.

Senior Portraits Because of the earlier deadline, it is i m p e r a t i v e t h a t all seniors have their pictures taken by Nov. 24 so that the proofs may be returned to the photographers by Dec. 9, announced Milestone Editor Jon Wiegand. The five photographers who a r e participating have set up displays in the lobby of Van Raalte. Each senior must m a k e his or her own appointment and their own - financial a r r a n g e m e n t s with the nhotogranher of his or her choice. Proofs must be returned by Dec. 9. It is probable that late pict u r e s will not be included in this y e a r ' s Milestone.

Profile for Hope College Library

11-12-1965  

11-12-1965  

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