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Hope College

Holland, Michigan

A student-run nonprofit publication

S e r v i n g t h e H o p e C o l l e g e C o m m u n i t y f o r 118 y e a r s

The race centinues

Campus

Holland restaurants "do it for the kids"

ANC/lOf? PHOTOS COURTESY

CNN.COM.

USA

ECONOMIST

As of the time of the Anchor's final production, the presidential election remains inconclusive, with President Bush currently in the lead with 249 electoral votes to John Kerry's 211. 270 electoral votes are needed to win.

70th Nykerk cup competition draws near Women from the classes of '07 and '08 make their final preparations for the show Andrea Vandenburgh STAFF W R I T E R

For students new to Hope College, there are many traditions here on c a m p u s they may not know about. Most students either experienced or witnessed the hard work and dedication that went into the 2004 Pull competition. On Saturday, the 70ih Annual Nykerk C u p Competition a m o n g H o p e w o m e n will take place at the Holland Civic Center. For those w h o do not know what Nykerk is, it is a competition between the freshmen and sophomore w o m e n of Hope College in song, drama, and oration. T h e events are coached by previous Nykerk participants who are now juniors and seniors. T h e Nykerk C u p competition dates back to 1936 when Dr. Bernard Nykerk, professor of English, challenged the w o m e n of the freshman and sophomore classes to a competition. T h e Nykerk c u p is handed d o w n f r o m year to year as the women compete. T h e event bec o m e s a campus-wide competition between the even and odd year classes. Nykerk molds three frenzied weeks of preparations into a night of performances.

"We are really p u m p e d about our s o n g and m o t i o n s , and together with our '07 play and oration girls we just really want to go out with a b a n g for our last year of Nykerk," said Anna Marshall ( ' 0 7 ) , a s o n g girl. 4, My favorite part is w h e n all the j i t t e r s and practice ends, t h e s p o t l i g h t is turned on. and we finally get the chance to present o u r final product to our families and friends w h o h a v e been wondering what w e ' v e been w o r k i n g on f o r so

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P H O T O BY ANDREA V A N D E N B U R G H

Even year song girls polish up the final details for their Saturday night performance.

long." "We are going to daz/.le the audience with our voice, motions and overall performance. And I ' m anxious to present the final product said Heidi Weir ( l 0 8 ) , another song girl. Leading the sophomores this year are Annie O t t o ( 05) and Emily Llewellyn ( 05), and leading the freshmen this year are S u z z y L o c k w o o d ('06) and Rachel VandeGeissen ('06).

In Nykerk. it is said that there are no winners. The c u p is awarded to a team, but there are never any losers. In ihe past sixty-nine years, the freshm e n have been awarded the c u p twenty-eight times, and the sophomores have been awarded the cup forty-one times. The Holland Civic Center is located at 150 W. 8lh St.

r anchor@hope.edu (616) 3 9 5 - 7 8 7 7

Vienna Boys visit Arts, page 3

Prop 2 conflict at Hope Features, page 4

Campus incidents Features, page 5

In c o n j u n c t i o n with Parents* Weekend at Hope College, Alpen Rose and Q u i z n o ' s r e s t a u r a n t s in d o w n t o w n Holland are contributing a portion of the proc e e d s f r o m t h e i r s a l e s to DeVos Children's Hospital of G r a n d R a p i d s t h r o u g h the c o l l e g e ' s student-organized Dance Marathon fundraiser.The o f f e r applies to l u n c h a n d d i n n e r at Quizno's on Friday, Saturday and Sunday and to dinner at Alpen R o s e on Friday and Saturday. T h o s e w h o w i s h the restaurants to make the d o n a t i o n must n o t e w h e n they o r d e r that it is D a n c e Marathon, "for the kids."

Science Day led by students a n u Mafl"" Hope College will host its annual " S c i e n c e Day" for high school students Thursday. T h e r e will be a keynote address and several one-hour presentations on a variety of science-related topics f r o m 9; 15 a.m. to 12:20 p.m. More than 500 high school students and their teachers f r o m 23 Michigan schools will attend. The students' experience will begin at 9:15 a.m. with the keynote address •'Investigating Crime and Terrorism Using Science and Technology" by Dr. Randall Murch. Presentation topics range f r o m "1 T h i n k I ' m H a v i n g a Heart Attack." " C h a n g i n g How People Use Computers." "Sun Spots and Solar Activity," "Dinosaurs—So What?," "Particle Acclerators: New Uses for tin Old T o o l " a n d " D o D o g s K n o w C a l c u l u s ? " In addition. Murch will be featured d u r i n g a w o r k s h o p for the teachers. Most of the sessions are led by m e m b e r s of the Hope faculty and students.


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C A M P U S BEAT

N o v e m b e r 3, 2004

New international program changes on the way Students will soon face new study abroad billing policies to even out expenditures

w h e r e the cost of living is m u c h less. " W e r e c o g n i z e that within the r a n g e of

c o n d u c t t o s e x u a l harassment.

r o o m and board costs, t h e r e are a p p l e s and

" W e ' r e trying to pro-

o r a n g e s , " said Neal Sobania. director of International Education. " W e w a n t s t u d e n t s t o

tect faculty and staff w h o take students o f f -

Amanda Zoratti

be c h a r g e d appropriately. , , B e c a u s e of the increased interest in o f f -

c a m p u s from being sur-

c a m p u s study, it has b e c o m e necessary for H o p e to review the policy to r e d u c e signifi-

serious behavioral problems," Sobania

cant c o s t s to the college.

said. " N o t only are they with f a c u l t y a n d staff

SENIOR STAFF REPORTER

For students with plans to study a b r o a d next year, it m a y be a bit m o r e difficult than e x p e c t e d to a f f o r d trips to s t u d y in o t h e r countries. B e g i n n i n g next fall, H o p e C o l lege will be introducing a n e w billing policy for o f f - c a m p u s study. T h e current billing policy c h a r g e s students cost of the p r o g r a m f o r their studies; h o w ever. the n e w policy requires all s t u d e n t s to pay H o p e C o l l e g e tuition, r e g a r d l e s s o f w h a t p r o g r a m they arc g o i n g on. T h e only e x c e p tion to this is if the o f f - c a m p u s p r o g r a m ^ tuition is higher, the student will b e c h a r g e d the h i g h e r tuition. O n the other h a n d , students will no l o n g e r b e c h a r g e d H o p e ' s r o o m a n d b o a r d cost, but the p r o g r a m r o o m a n d b o a r d f e e s instead.

A c c o r d i n g to Sobania, the decision w a s not taken lightly, but it w a s looked at f r o m the standpoint of the c o l l e g e a s a w h o l e . ''Students d o n ' t realize that when they study o f f - c a m p u s , w e ' r e exporting all of their tuition dollars, plus letting t h e m k e e p their f i n a n c i a l aid p a c k a g e s , " S o b a n i a s a i d . " T h a t ' s a very g e n e r o u s policy, but o f f - c a m pus study is important, s o I think it's the right t h i n g for us to d o . " Additional c h a n g e s are being m a d e as well. B e g i n n i n g with spring p r o g r a m s , s t u d e n t s w h o wish to participate in any o f f - c a m p u s

T h i s is b e i n g d o n e to prevent a student study-

event will be reviewed for behavioral and disc i p l i n a r y difficulties in a n effort to deal with

ing in S w i t z e r l a n d f r o m p a y i n g the s a m e as a student living in the D o m i n i c a n Republ i c,

prised by students with

Eligibility to Participate form for Study Abroad Students E v e r y student w h o w i s h e s to s t u d y a b r o a d will b e g i v e n a f o r m with the f o l l o w i n g o p t i o n s on it to d e t e r m i n e w h o is eligible to participate in s t u d y abroad trips a n d w h a t action will b e t a k e n to prevent possible d i s r u p t i o n s of trips. 1) I a m not, and h a v e n e v e r been, on d i s c i p l i n a r y probation 2) I a m currently not on discplinary probation

w h o arc p r o b a b l y n o t t r a i n e d to d e a l w i t h these issues, because

but h a v e been in the past. E x p l a i n . 3) I a m c u r r e n t l y on disciplinary

t h a t is w h a t S t u d e n t D e v e l o p m e n t is for. but

p r o b a t i o n Explain.

that b e h a v i o r can also i m p a c t the e x p e r i e n c e of other s t u d e n t s . "

student b e h i n d if they have s h o w n action we

T h i s policy is already in place for the study abroad p r o g r a m s , but the n e w regulations are b e i n g put into p l a c e t o e x p a n d this p r o c e s s to all p r o g r a m s . E a c h application will h a v e an Eligibility

s h o u l d w o r r y about, or giving t h e m a b e h a v ioral contract if they d e c i d e t o take t h e m . It's a one-strike-you're-out-rule, to help k e e p the trips f r o m getting out of h a n d . "

to Participate f o r m a t t a c h e d w h e r e the stu-

T h e sheet d o e s take into account the severity of the disciplinary violation. A s e n i o r

alcohol and d r u g Issues or a lack of respect

dent will indicate their disciplinary history.

w h o has br oken parietals 3 times since his

for others, which is a n y t h i n g f r o m disorderly

T h e sheet h o l d s 3 o p t i o n s : 1) 1 am not, and n e v e r h a v e been, o n disciplinary p r o b a t i o n ;

f r e s h m a n year, f o r instance, would not b e a s

2) I a m currently not on d i s c i p l i n a r y p r o b a tion, b u t h a v e b e e n in the past. E x p l a i n ; and

b e e n cited for d r u g use. " W e ' r e not trying to prevent students f r o m

3) I a m currently on disciplinary p r o b a t i o n .

being abl e to g o , " says S o b a n i a . " W e ' r e j u s t

Explain. " S t u d e n t s are still r e p r e s e n t i n g H o p e C o l -

trying to s h o w students that it is i m p o r t a n t to c o n s i d e r the c o n s e q u e n c e s of b e h a v i n g in a

lege on these trips," S o b a n i a said. " T h i s gives

d i s r e s p e c t f u l f a s h i o n a n d m a k e o u r trips a s

the faculty and staff the option of leaving the

safe and e n j o y a b l e as p o s s i b l e . "

H o p e Colleg

Beyond Hope Interndtiondl Education PjJ G. f/«cd international CcnMi 119 12cK Suoct H c W M 40423

seriously c o n s i d e r e d as a student w h o has

Two professors bring race relations knowledge to Hope ting this m a s s i v e p r o j e c t together. The two professors have spent

S h o c k said. A l t h o u g h S c h o c k has b e e n col-

a n a t h e m a to t h e s e

c o u n t l e s s h o u r s r e s e a r c h i n g , interv i e w i n g , and putting t o g e t h e r the videos.

l e c t i n g i t e m s for this p r o j e c t f o r

b e l i e f s , so p e o p l e

Dr. S c h o c k has b e e n interested in

Lindsey Manthei

race relations in M i c h i g a n for q u i t e

ago. "Dr. J o h n s o n a n d I r e c e i v e d a

S T A F F REPORTER

s o m e time. " M y initial interest in the Klan

p o s e d t o be d o n e that s a m e s u m -

Series of KKK films examine the racist g r o u p ' s history in

Michigan

W h a t o n earth c o u l d H o p e C o l lege h a v e to d o with the Ku Klux K l a n ? Lately, q u i t e a bit. T w o H o p e p r o f e s s o r s h a v e recently

finished

c a m e f r o m s o m e very early e x p e r i e n c e s with blatant r a c i s m u p close and personal, (such a s | g a r b a g e

and s c r e e n e d t h e

d u m p e d o n o u r f r o n t porch w h e n

first in a series o f d o c u m e n t a r i e s a b o u t the history of the Ku K l u x

my parents hosted some black

Klan in M i c h i g a n . David S c h o c k , p r o f e s s o r of c o m m u n i c a t i o n s a n d Fred Johnson, prof e s s o r of history, h a v e b e e n w o r k ing f o r the last t h r e e years on put-

A m e r i c a n s w h e n I was a b o u t f o u r o r five," S c h o c k said. Later in life, S c h o c k had a startling experience with the Klan w h e n h e j o i n e d a local O d d f e l l o w s Lodge. "One

The Klan had quite a presence in Michigan in the past. In 1924, there were an estimated 5000 members in Kent county. —David Shock, professor of communications

of

the

t h i n g s the K l a n d i d w a s use o t h e r organizations for cover. Imagine my c h a g r i n w h e n

amendments were

o v e r t w e n t y years, the K l a n v i d e o

took this into their

p r o j e c t b e g a n t w o and a half years

o w n hands, w h i c h is

M c G r e g o r grant a n d it w a s s u p m e r , " S h o c k said. W h a t b e g a n as a short o n e - h o u r s h o w highlighting the K l a n ' s impact in M i c h i g a n has g r o w n into m o r e than the t w o p r o f e s s o r s e v e r d r e a m e d of. "The show was originally des i g n e d to be a n h o u r - l o n g highlight of the Klan in M i c h i g a n , but the f a r t h e r we g o t in, the m o r e it grew. It's t a k e n o v e r m y l i f e — i t o w n s m e , " S c h o c k said.

where

the

Klan

came from." Schock said.

While people generally think of the Klan as being an issue of the South, it has had a considerable following here in Michigan, as well.

While generally p e o p l e think of the Klan a s being an issue of the S o u t h , it has h a d a c o n s i d e r a b l e f o l l o w i n g h e r e in

trouble getting m e m b e r s t o speak with them. " I t ' s mostly a history b e c a u s e it's

M i c h i g a n a s well.

hard t o get p e o p l e to s p e a k with us

" T h e K l a n had quite a p r e s e n c e in M i c h i g a n in the past. In 1924,

a b o u t it. I have talked with a c o u p l e

there were a n estimated 5 0 0 0 m e m bers in Kent County. C u r r e n t l y . 1

c u r r e n t and f o r m e r Klan m e m b e r s . A f t e r the first v i d e o s h o w e d w e did

h a v e no idea h o w m a n y Klan m e m -

get a f e w calls," Schock said. " W e ' r e trying to be o b j e c t i v e .

bers there are. T h e r e c o u l d be one,

N e v e r m a k e the m i s t a k e of calling

there c o u l d be a t h o u s a n d . 1 d o n ' t k n o w , " S c h o c k said.

t h e m stupid. T h e y a r e intelligent a n d well o r g a n i z e d . "

T h e first video is a history of the

However, the Klan does have

T h e h o u r - l o n g first video in the

Ku Klux K l a n , and it sets the political c l i m a t e and gives b a c k -

u n e x p e c t e d ties to local c i t i z e n s . "I w a s t a l k i n g to a kid f r o m

series w a s s h o w n o n Oct. 15, w h i c h fell d u r i n g Fall Break, s o turnout

g r o u n d i n f o r m a t i o n f o r t h e esti-

G r a n d H a v e n not l o n g a g o a n d he told m e he h a d a f r i e n d w h o w e n t

w a s m i n i m a l . H o p e s t u d e n t s will h a v e a n o t h e r o p p o r t u n i t y to see the

I found out that

m a t e d six d o c u m e n t a r i e s that will follow.

this o r g a n i z a t i o n was once a cover

" T h i s film deals with the R e c o n struction era. From their [the

for the Klan. I

Klan's] standpoint, blacks were

thought, 'what have I done.'"

property, a n i m a l s , a w o r k f o r c e to be used. T h e 13th, I4lh, and 15th

Change the channel, or change your perspective.

to a Klan rally a n d c o u l d not be-

v i d e o on Nov. 10, with f r e e p o p -

lieve h o w m a n y k i d s f r o m his high

corn and a d m i s s i o n . "If p e o p l e are interested I h o p e

school he saw there," S c h o c k said. While Schock and Johnson have m a d e every e f f o r t to interview current Klan m e m b e r s , they h a v e h a d

they'll c o m e and tell m e w h a t they truly think. N o v i d e o project is e v e r d o n e , " S c h o c k said.

L.YOU decide?

Peace Corps Redefine your world. www.pcacecorps.gov 800-424-8580

Hie worVd Is calSr^g Oon'f turn? it out. CohtsRt t h e Pcatc Corps today, j n d change your idea of "cfiangvnrg the world" is all a b o u t


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ARTS

N o v e m t > e r 3, 2004

Hope and GPS host Vienna Choir Boys World Famous a cappella choir sings at Hope College Evelyn Daniel S T A F F REPORTER

O n N o v e m b e r 4 in D i m n e n l Chapel, the stuff of musical legend comes to Hope College. The Vienna Choir Boys have been 5 0 0 years in the making. Since the group's commissioning in 1498, the Boys have p e r f o r m e d for audiences all over the world, with such f a m o u s c o m p o s e r s as Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and Antonio Salicri. The foundation f o r the Wiener Siingerknaben (Vienna Boys' C h o i r ) w a s laid w h e n E m p e r o r Maximillian I requested that his court musicians include six boys whose voices had not yet changed. Today, the choir has grown to 100 m e m b e r s and is divided into four

g r o u p s w h o travel the world. R a n g i n g in age f r o m 10-14, the b o y s attend their o w n school in Vienna and arc a large part of the cultural scene there. While their repertoire does include the works of such classical composers as Mozart, Shubert, and H a y d n , the c h o i r is k n o w n t o perform anything from Renaissance madrigals to works by contemporary twentieth-century Composers. T h e y are best known f o r their renditions of traditional Austrian folk music and lively waltzes and polkas. During their current tour, they are also f e a t u r i n g the American Jewish songs that were a p a r t of t h e i r latest r e c o r d i n g project. The choir appeals to music lovers of all age groups. "I m u s t a d m i t I t h o u g h t t h i s would have more of an appeal to the outside community," said Derek

Emerson. Hope Arts Coordinator. "You don't hear much Vienna Choir Boys c o m i n g out of Hope d o r m rooms." Despite this, the arrival of the c h o i r has g e n e r a t e d e x c i t e m e n t f r o m the student body as well. " I ' m surprised at the enthusiasm of Hope students," Emerson said. Audience m e m b e r s on Thursday w i l l b e c o m e a p a r t of a l o n g standing and w o r l d - f a m o u s tradition. " I t ' s been a r o u n d 5 0 0 years, and will be a r o u n d m u c h longer," Emerson said of the choir. ' T h i s is a c o m m o n experience with people around the world." In a d d i t i o n t o p e r f o r m i n g at t h e Musikverein and Imperial Chapel in Austria, the Vienna Choir Boys have performed throughout Europe, North America, Australia and New Z e a l a n d . A f r i c a , a n d the Middle East. T h e concert is a part of H o p e ' s Great Performance Series, which

The Internationally Acclaimed Vienna Choir Boys. has d e d i c a t e d itself to b r i n g i n g music, theater, and dance events to the college and Holland community. T h e V i e n n a C h o i r B o y s will perform on Thursday, November 4,

at 7:30 p.m. in Dimnenl Chapel. D u e to p o p l u a r d e m a n d , all the tickets for this concert have been sold out. A n y c o m m e n t s or c o n c e r n s c a n be directed to the DeWitt Box Office

Wind Symphony, Jazz Ensemble create an evening of music Concert will feature a mix of upbeat Jazz and classical chamber music Amanda Zoratti S E N I O R S T A F F REPORTER

T h i s Friday, D i m n e n l Chapel will e c h o with the m u s i c of o u r Jazz E n s e m b l e and Wind Symphony. Beginning at 7:30 p.m., this j o i n t concert is a f u n w a y to spend y o u r evening and support your fellow students. "It's a very y o u n g group this year," said P r o f e s s o r B r i a n C o y l e of t h e M u s i c Department, speaking on behalf of the Jazz portion of the p e r f o r m a n c e . " T h e y work tremendously hard and are really beginning to gel with regard to ensemble and style."

T h e group consists of 17 sludents in the J a z z E n s e m b l e a n d 5 in t h e P o s t B o p Ensemble and includes saxophones, trumpets, trombones, and a rhythm section. Coyle has been conducting f o r 11 years here at H o p e a n d w o u l d n ' t t r a d e his j o b f o r anything. "I love w o r k i n g with the students and talking about j a z z , " C o y l e said, " i t ' s the greatest j o b in the world." T h e Jazz group focuses on all j a z z styles, from swing to bop. s a m b a to cool. For this performance, the Post Bop E n s e m b l e will play " N o t h i n g P e r s o n a l , " by M i c h a e l Brecker. and the Jazz Ensemble will play four pieces: "Splanky." by Neil Heft; " G r a n a d a Smoothie," by Mark Taylor; "Sienna Green," by Kelly Bruehager; and " J e m , " arranged by Mike T a m m o r o .

T h e Wind S y m p h o n y is m a d e up of 5 6 students playing woodwinds, brass, and percussion. T h i s particular concert will also have an organ in one of the pieces. Both the W i n d S y m p h o n y a n d the J a z z E n s e m b l e rehearse twice a week, and the individuals put in considerable practice time outside of this. ' T h e r e is nothing better than the sheer j o y of m a k i n g m u s i c . " s a i d S t e v e n W a r d . Director of the bands. T h e W i n d S y m p h o n y p o r t i o n of t h e concert will consist of 4 pieces: "Resonances I," by Ron Nelson; "Folk Song Suite," by R a l p h Vaughan W i l l i a m s ; "Be T h o u My Vision," by David Gillingham; and "Blue Shades." by Frank Ticheli. E a c h of these p i e c e s w a s c h o s e n f o r a specific reason for this particular concert.

Professors of music perform in final faculty recital of the season Music faculty will play pieces by Beethoven, Handel and Duckworth Sean Daenzer PRODUCTION ASSISTANT

Being a Professor doesn't m e a n you get a f r e e and easy ride. Hope College Music faculty m e m b e r s will earn their keep at 3 p.m. on Sunday as they p e r f o r m their second Faculty recital of this semester's season. T h e c o n c e r t w i l l b e in W i c h e r s A u d i t o r i u m in t h e Nykerk Hall of Music, and is free to the public. The program opens with two selections f r o m Handel's " N i n e German Arias." T h e y will be p e r f o r m e d by Linda Dykstra, Soprano, accompanied by Mihai Craioveanu, violin, and Linda Strouf, harpsichord. "Susser

Blumen A m b r a f l o k k e n " and " M e i n e Seele hort im S e h e n " both have texts "that are somewhat sacred in nature," Dykstra said. Next on the program is a piece for Alto Saxophone and prepared tape entitled "Midnight Blue" by William Duckworth, an American composer of the late 20,h century. He is considered the founder of the post minimalist school of composition. The piece will be performed by Ryan Janus, who teaches saxophone and aural skills. L a r r y M a l f r o i d , p r o f e s s o r of guitar, will play 4 etudes in the keys of E major, C major, E major, and A major. T h e composer, Fernando Sor, is r e m e m b e r e d as a g u i t a r i s t w h o paved the way f o r others in the effort to bring classical guitar up to a h i g h e r p l a c e d u r i n g t h e I9 , h century. T h e final piece on the program

is L u d w i g von B e e t h o v e n ' s "Seranade No. 6 for flute, violin, and viola" Op. 25. "It is a charming work that has contrasting short m o v e m e n t s which are all dance related", said Mihai Craioveanu. H o p e ' s Professor of the violin. "It has u n i q u e instrumentation and provides a lot of variety to the p r o g r a m . " Faculty flutist Rebecca Vandewalker and violist Debra C r a i o v e a n u will j o i n him. It f e a t u r e s s i x m o v e m e n t s , all under 6 minutes each: Entrata Allegro, T e m p o ordinario d ' u n Minuetto, Allegro molto. Andante con Variazioni, Allegro scherzando e vivace, and A d a g i o - A l l e g r o vivace disinvolto. S u n d a y ' s concert will be the last F a c u l t y R e c i t a l of the semester, although more will be held next term.

Ars Bt 1

" R e s o n a n c e s I," for instance, w a s chosen to " r e s o u n d " t h r o u g h the a t m o s p h e r e of the chapel, adding to the beauty and mystique of the piece, and the "Folk Song Suite" is a classical piece f o r a wind band. "My students rehearse well, play well, and arc terrific people to work with," said Ward. "It will be a great concert." T h e S y m p h o n y plays a w i d e variety of music, f r o m traditional band literature to c h a m b e r pieces. "I think it is so special that so m a n y students decide to make such a significant contribution to this College by participating in the Arts," says Ward. "It is so important, and 1 feel privileged to be a p a n of that." T h e c o n c e r t is f r e e a n d o p e n t o b o t h students and the community. Doors will open at 7 p.m.

Arts Brief

\rts Brief

Arts Brief

Knickerbocker Fall Film Series T h e Knickerbocker Theatre is p r e s e n t i n g its Fall F i l m S e r i e s t h r o u g h S a t u r d a y , D e c . 4. T h e series features "The Fog of War," "Falher and Son," "Since Olar L e f t " and "Valentin." " T h e F o g of W a r " c o n t i n u e d through Saturday. Oct. 16. al 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. T h i s d o c u m e n t a r y by filmmaker Errol Morris is a look at Robert M c N a m a r a , w h o served as Secretary of D e f e n s e for John F. Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson. The film is rated PG-13. "Father and S o n " ran MondaySaturday, Oct. 18-23, at 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. This Russian film is a study of the bonds between a father and his son. T h e d i r e c t o r , S u k a r o v , treats his films like paintings, often blurring the picture and inviting his audience to linger over the scene. This film is unrated but is suggested f o r mature teens. " S i n c e O t a r L e f t " is s h o w i n g Monday-Saturday, Nov. 15-20, at 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. T h i s film is a

m o v i n g s t u d y of t h r e e w o m e n l i v i n g in T b i l i s i , t h e c a p i t a l of f o r m e r Soviet G e o r g i a . Eka, the grandmother, emigrated from France, and lives in a small fiat with h e r daughter and granddaughter. T h e p e r s o n w h o d o m i n a t e s the flat's space, though, is Eka's son Olar, w h o has left to find work in P a r i s . T h e f i l m is in F r e n c h . Russian and Georgian with English sublilles. This film is unrated. T h e series will end with "Valentin." showing FridaySaturday, Nov. 26-27. and MondaySaturday, Nov. 29-Dec. 4, at 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. "Valentin" is a comingof-age story told through the eyes of a 10-year-old boy who lives with his grandmother in 1969 Argentina. He befriends a reclusive neighbor, forms an unlikely friendship with one of his f a t h e r ' s ex-girlfriends and sets out to discover the harsh realities about his parents. The film is rated P G - 1 3 and is in Spanish with English subtitles.


4%\ridhor

FEATURES

N o v e m b e r 3, 2004

Civility is not contingent upon soxual orientation: Prominent and personal chalklngs on Proposal 2 |

SPOTLIGHT

|

Nick Engel STAPF REPORTER

National C o m i n g Qui Day and (he vole for the stale constilulional a m e n d m e n t proposal II sparked s o m e grassroots activism and an e x t e n s i v e d e b a t e at H o p e d u r i n g the pasl weeks. On O c t o b e r 10, a group of students organized National C o m i n g Out Day at Hope College. T h e students chalked pro-homosexual messages along sidewalks in the Pine Grove, posted signs and handed out ribbons C o m i n g Out Day is a national celebration that was established in the early nineties to support and encourage gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender people to " c o m e out and be honest about themselves," according to participating organizations. T h i s y e a r ' s celebration marks the 11^ anniversary of National C o m i n g Oul Day. Its theme was Come Out. Speak Out. Vote. 4 'We need our families and friends to say, i t ' s not O K to use gay. lesbian, bisexual, o r transgender issues as a w e d g e , ' " said Cheryl Jacques, president of the Human Rights C a m paign Foundation, which organizes C o m i n g Oul Day. t4 We must talk to and involve our families and friends. Their voices are some of the strongest in the fight for equality," Jacques said. O n e of the actions the Hope C o m i n g Out Day organizers undertook was advertising by chalking of c a m p u s walkways throughout the Pine Grove and most of campus. Displaying messages promoting acceptance of olhOfS w i m regard 10 sexual oricniaiion. including. " G a y ? Fine By M e ! " T h e chalking took place M o n d a y night. October 10. the evening before National C o m i n g Oul Day. On October 11, the chalked messages were almost entirely washed oul. " T h e r e w a s an edict issued by President Bullman to wipe out the chalkings," said Jason Burns ( 06). co-President of G L O B E . October 12. the day after C o m i n g Oul Day. was one of H o p e ' s major visitation days. "I honestly didn't like the facl that (Hope College) wiped out the chalkings. But 1 understand why they would do it." said Erin Taylor ( ' 0 8 ) . Last week, on October 27th. several dep a r t m e n t s and student g r o u p s o p e n e d the floor for a discussion conccrning S a m e Sex Marriage: A Civil Debate and Proposal 2: How it Affects You. The chalk erasing w a s addressed during the d e b a t e as well as opinions related to Proposal 2. Lead by the Depts. Of Political Science. W o m e n ' s Studies, and Psychology, as well as G L O B E , the Sexuality Roundlable. and the W o m e n ' s Issues Organization. the discussions featured a debate between Focus on the Family sociologist Glenn Stanton and lawyer Evan Wolfson on the pros and c o n s of legalized same-sex marriage. Introducing the debate, a liason between the speakers emphasized that, "Civility is not contigent upon agreement." G l e n n Stanton began his o p e n i n g statements by presenting marriage and its' public purpose through a sociological perspective. "Marriage has always existed to serve the family and society...nature d e m a n d s it and human nature requires it," Stanton said.

that gay couples are not a threat to straight pulling it in the hands of the stale. He expressed concerns that although samerelationships. "They want to make a com"You are going lo lake healthcare coversex partners can and do have loving relationmitment and have their marriage honored the age away from kids...it's about discriminatships children would not be able to g r o w in a w a y you expect to h a v e y o u r s h o n o r e d , " ing against people because you are not marnatural way. " N o culture has raised a genWolfson said. "Since the race relation cases ried," B u m s said. eration of children in a same sex family," of 1948, the essence of the freedom of marJohnson added that b e c o m i n g aware of all Stanton said. riage is to marry w h o you love." perspectives is imperative. " K e e p becoming ComparStanton countered Wolfson's more knowledgable about personal responses ing a single arguement by emphasizing the imajxnil this (Proposal 2]," Johnson said. parent f a m portance of heterosexual relationN e l s o n c o n t i n u e d , interpreting homoily to homoships in society and their impact on sexual marriage from a legal perspective. "In sexual relachildren. According to him, mothProposal 2, the issue is not whether or not tionships, ers and fathers, h u s b a n d s and homosexual marriage is allowed. Same sex Stanton also wives, and the m a l e and female marriage is already illegal...the proposal will staled that a roles influence a child's gender poprohibit places from providing domestic parth e a l t h y sition and should be present in all ner benefits...or civil union for any purpose." f a m i l y healthy families. "Masculinity and Nelson said. maintains femininity are far too prescious to Although the majority of rights are perthe normademinish," Stanton said. manent o n c e attained through the full faith tive roles of Glenn Stanton, a professional Referring to spiritual dimensions and credit clause, h o m o s e x u a l civil union a father and sociologist and advocate of marriage. Wolfson reminded the liscences are not. "If the contract is recogm o t h e r for Focus on the Family audience that there are t w o f o r m s n i z e d , it s h o u l d be in o t h e r s l a t e s figure. expresses his opinion conof marriage, religious and legal, too...Proposal 2 wouldn't affect that," Nelson "Falhercerning homosexual couples h o w e v e r , o n l y a legal m a r r i a g e said. less-ness and their impact on the family liscense is recognized by the govNelson offered statistics, that according to has hurt structure and the sanctity of e r n m e n t and community. W h e n a Charles Patterson of the University of Virchildren marriage during a videotaped h o m o s e x u a l c o u p l e d e c i d e s they ginia, three in ten h o m o s e x u a l couples h a v e deeply," debate show on the 27th. want to spend the rest of their life children and most adopt f r o m abusive situaStanton together. " S o m e are married in h o u s e s of tions. Sexual identities of these children have said. worship and discriminated by the governbeen proven unaffected by a parent's orienHe concluded with a summarization of his ment." Wolfson said. tation. views of parenting roles. In his experience, Stanton followed the discussion with fur"Social science tells us that fathers mailer ther slalemenLs renouncing homosexual marand our hearts lei 1 us thai mothers matter." riage. ' T h e r e ' s a large majority [of homoEvan Wolfson was then permitted to apsexuals] w h o d o n ' t want marriage, contrary proach his p o d i u m to debate his perspective to gay ideal." Slanlon said. on homosexuality from the oposite spectrum. In response to religious implications of In addition-lo legal and civil protections, marriage, the socialologist staled that the respect, and social security, " h o m o s e x u a l s government supports a church, labcrnaclc. or warn 10 have a legal c o m m i i m c n i lo match s h r i n e ' s d e c l a r a t i o n of u n i o n b e t w e e n a their personal c o m m i t m e n t , " Wolfson said. couple. In addition, same sex marriages are He referred 10 cases concerning marriage encouraged in the teachings of Jesus Christ. that were presented lo the S u p r e m e Court in "The government ordains and blesses Evan Wolfson, a civil rights 1987. W h e n marriage w a s defined in constimarriages...they reflect His [Christ's] very attorney, presents his tutional law. ihe j u d g e declared thai marriage image," said Stanton. perspective on same sex is an opportunity to mark a slatement of comHe continued, mentioning ancient historimarriage and the right to mitment and receive support for it. Under cal a c c o u n t s d e s c r i b i n g the n o r m a l i t y in equal benefits for all, law. marriage also brings an important spiridespite orientation. p o l i g a m o u s r e l a t i o n s h i p s . M o r e o v e r , ihe tual d e m e n s i o n . It was also declared a gatee x i s t a n c e of h e t e r s e x u a l r e l a t i o n s h i p s Although sociely is beginning lo accept howay to an array of legal e c o n o m i c , public, throughout all of k n o w n history, whereas in mosexual couples. B u m s expressed sentiand private protections. " T h e s e statements his opinion homosexual marriages have only ments due to the reactionary actions taken were made in the defense of felons," Wolfson recently existed. "If w e allow homosexual on c a m p u s during Nalional Coming Out Day. said. marriage...against tradition, unnatural and Posters and chalk messages in support of Past confronlations on the battleground of against G o d ' s will...we will develop a race h o m o s e x u a l s w e r e taken d o w n , w h e r e a s , defining marriage are ihe ending of race reof children, sickly and e f f e m i n a t e , " said "Vole for Bush, gays are going lo hell...the strictions, abusive relationships, legalizing Slanlon. president did not lake them down, they were divorce, a After this debate, there w a s a panel disu p all day," Burns said. husband's cussion talking about proposal II. There were He also spoke of the discrimination he and right to five speakers: Karima Jeffrey, Hope professeveral h o m o s e x u a l students e x p e r i e n c e d "take what sor of English; Jason Burns ('06), co-presievery day on campus. H e was lold, "You are belongs to dent of G L O B E ; David Myers. Hope proa gay, you live a filthy and immoral lifestyle." h i m " in refessor of Psychology; Jessica Johnson, coArt professor John Hanson sympathized spect to a president of the sexuality roundlable; and with several homosexual students w h o comw i f e , and Mike Nelson, a G r a n d Rapids attorney and mented according to their experiences, "We governm e m b e r of the A m e r i c a n Civil Liberties faculty members are still affected by the same ment reUnion. silence and same fears," Hansen said. strictions R e p r e s e n t i n g the E v a n g e l i c a l Christian Hope springs eternal, however, according on h o w to perspective on c a m p u s , Jeffrey opened the to Meyers. "Attitudes are changing with drasexually behave. In light of the history leadpanel discussion by quoting several passages m a t i c speed...twenty y e a r s f r o m n o w the ing towards the present definition of marf r o m the Bible w h i c h e m p h a s i z e d loving, w h o l e c u l t u r e will h a v e c h a n g e d u n l e s s riage, both parties in the debate agreed that committed relationships and G o d ' s ultimate something turns it around. The slate must not the r e l a t i o n s h i p should be, " c o m m i l e d to j u d g e m e n t . "Each and every o n e of us has to discriminate against its citizens, it gives creequality under the law, pursuit of happiness, be and will be accountable f o r every choice, dence for others lo do the s a m e . " Meyers and separation of church and stale." every aclion on this earth," Jeffrey said. said. W o l f s o n added that this ideal, u n f o r t u Meyers proceeded, slating several issues Jeffrey concluded the open discussion by nately d o e s not exist. Legalized civil unions, c o n f r o n t i n g both m a r r i e d a n d u n m a r r i e d commenting on her perspective regarding hoseparate from marriage, will only have parcouples. "I am concerned about the corromosexuality and same sex marriage. allel protections within participating stales sion of marriage...toxic forces are taking its "I do think every individual should have and not nationally. Gay couples, " H a v e to loll on it today," Meyers said. provisions to have their loved ones protected. accept something lesser and uncertain when B u m s addressed the controversy surroundW h e n y o u f o r g e that r e l a t i o n s h i p w i t h they can't participate in it. Separate is seling Proposal 2, on the Michigan ballot yesGod...he will let you know what you should d o m , if ever, equal," Wolfson said. terday. He declared that the proposal w a s c h a n g e in y o u r life...there will be m a n y Queslions were then presented to both repconstitutionally discriminating against those people in heaven that people in the world resentatives from m e m b e r s of the audience. w h o are not married, taking insurance and would not expect to be there," J e f f r e y said. In defense of one comment, Wolfson repealed

Marriage has always existed to serve the family and society...nature demands it and human nature requests it. -Glenn Stanton, Focus on the Fam

At •ft-


N o v e m b e r 3, 2004

5

!Anchor

FEATURES

Investigating incidents on campus I N F O C U S Erin L Hotta INFOCUS EDITOR

H o w many people laugh al the Hope College ineidenl r e p o r t s ? H o w m a n y people snicker every lime a fire alarm is activated d u e to burnt toast? How many people sigh in frustration when they read that another door w a s "checked and secured" after being propped open by a pencil? "There has to be more than this happening on c a m p u s ! " they may say. With these points in mind, d o n ' t people e v e r w o n d e r w h a t e t h i c a l l y should a n d shouldn't be made public to the Hope c o m munity? This is the fine line that H o p e ' s Student Development and C a m p u s Safely are trying to define. " S t u d e n t D e v e l o p m e n t tries to create a balance in which the c o m m u n i t y is informed of situations that do occur that could possibly affect the safety of the entire c a m p u s . " said Richard Frost, dean of students. "Al ihe s a m e time w e don't want to inform them of loo little, so that ihey believe a concern for safety is never an issue on campus. But w e

Students should be alert and be cautious of closing the doors of their dorm and locking their room.

Are there certain situations in which the Hope community should and shouldn't know? don't want lo inform them of too much, so that sludenls are constantly concerned for their safety, li really is a very fine balance lo achieve." On Ocl. 21 Student Developmeni was informed of a situation in which a group of female students were approached by a n o n Hope affilia t e d w o m a n who made the girls feel uncomfortable, but left them wmmmmmmm—mmmmmmmwmm unharmed. T h e girls were sitting on the enclosed porch of their cottage on 15,h St. around 10:30 P.M. when a middle-aged woman pressed her face upon the glass window of the porch. She then opened iheir porch door and walked in. She c a m e u p lo the girls and told ihem thai her c a r b r o k e d o w n and she d i d n ' t h a v e any money. T h e girls willingly gave her $5. The w o m a n then left ihe house, only to hand the money lo t w o men w h o stood on the opposite side of the street. T h e girls watched them walk d o w n the street, into S a m ' s Groceries, and walk out with beer. This situation was reported that night lo Student Developmeni. W h e n Sludenl Development received this incident report, they had the choice to send a public announcement through KnowHope. if they fell that situation was a threat lo the community. T h e y also had the choice lo forward it to C a m p u s Safety if they fell thai the incident affected the safety of the entire cam-

pus. In ihis situation, the incident wasn't publicly announced, but forwarded to C a m p u s Safely. An incident report was not posted. Dean Frost said that this situation wasn't publicly announced because it was an ineidenl that didn't include a threat, but solely a level of discomfort. " I s there a difference between feeling uncomfortable and feeling threatened? Should Student Develo p m e n l publicly announce every time a person feels uncomfortable by a homeless person or by a man thai pinches the rear of a sludenl? If these girls were harmed in any way. then, yes, a public n o t i c e w o u l d h a v e been m a d e , but they w e r e n ' t , " Frost said. In early October. Student D e v e l o p m e n i was informed of a g r o u p of girls living in Dykslra Hall w h o reported a non H o p e affiliated male w h o enlered their d o r m and w o u l d n ' t leave. H e said that he wanted lo "hang out with hot girls" and insisted on taking pictures of them all. T h i s situation was reported lo Sludenl Developmeni, which decided that a public a n n o u n c e m e n t was not necessary. C a m p u s Safety w a s informed of the matter t w o weeks later in which ihey said it was too late' to post the situation on Hope's incident reportsDean Frost said lhal this situation w a s n ' t publicly announced on K n o w H o p e because

Is there a difference between feeling uncomfortable and feeling threatened? Should Student Development publicly announce everytime a person feels uncomfortable? -Richard Frost, dean of students

the man wasn't a ihreal. and a person can't assume that anolher's intentions are harmful. He explained that ihe man could have been a friend of s o m e o n e living in Dykslra and had fell welcomed in the dorm. When a homeless man approached a female sludenl in late September. Frost used the same assumption. He said that this man could have thought il was socially acceptable behavior to sit and talk wilh a female student, because he w a s a k n o w n wanderer in the community w h o was befriended by college sludenls in the past. Since he w a s n ' t a ihreal, a posting on K n o w H o p e wasn't needed. But does this situation deserve lo be posted in the incident reports? To this question, Frost was unsure. Srgl. C h a d Woliers said lhal these situations weren't considered threats to the c o m munity, but he thought that they should have been posted in ihe incident reports. "I don't k n o w w h y these situations aren't in the incident report. T h e y should be. Typically w e only post incidents in which C a m pus Safety is directly contacted. In those situalions. Student Development w a s contacted first. Student Developmeni had the choice lo inform C a m p u s Safely of these incidents if they thought il affected the security of the entire sludenl body." So what constitutes a situation lhal affects the security of the entire student body ? Sixty two percent of H o p e ' s sludenl body is made u p of females. Can an assumption be made lhal these situations could have affected the sense of security for the majority, if nol the enlire, sludenl b o d y ? If so, do these situations deserve to be posted on K n o w H o p e and/or on the ineidenl reports? O r is Hope content with hearing about die abundance of burnt toast in Kollen Hall?

When an incident occurs, telephone C a m p u s Safety immediately. D o n ' t delay in reporting an incident by sending it through email. Helpful Hints

With the help of CIT, a new anonymous telephone line will be installed at C a m p u s Safety next year, so you will be able to call without worrying about "ratting people out." If something seems suspicious, report it. It's getting darker. Walk with a buddy at night. Be sure to close doors behind you. D o not prop them open!

COMING SOON TO WICHERS AUDITORIUM T H E H O P E COLLEGE MUSIC FACULTY'S LAST PERFORMANCE OF THE SEMESTER WILL BE THIS SUNDAV AT 3 P.M. D o NOT MISS THIS PERFORMANCE AT NYKERK TTALL.

HARRY POTTER IS COMIMQ TO H O P E C O U E Q E I W H E R E ? TO GRAVES H A L U STARRING IN: HARRY POTTER AND THE PRISONER OF AZKABAN


TI

AncKor

O P I N I O N

11

Editor's voice

N o v e m b e r 3, 2004

Your voice

Your voict 11/7

Appreciating the little things W h e n I w a s younger, I really liked dirt. O n e of m y f a v o r i t e places l o play w a s the s a n d b o x , b u i l d i n g castles, d i g g i n g t u n n e l s and searching for clay buried b e n e a t h the sand. T h e s e d a y s , p e o p l e still m a k e fun o f m e for liking dirt s o m u c h , but n o w that I study it, it's easy lo f o r g e t w h y 1 liked it so m u c h in the first place, w h a t m a d e it so m u c h f u n . I ' v e forgotten w h a t it's like t o g e l m y h a n d s dirty just for the heck o f it. I ' v e f o r g o t t e n w h a t it's like to play. In my c r e a t i v e writing c l a s s last semester, I learned a n e w w a y of

It's time for the....

Second Annual Mr. Dutch Pageant! C O M E SEE EIGHT H O P E MEN COMPETE FOR T H E AFFECTIONS OF T H E CAMPUS

writing, a f f e c t i o n a t e l y k n o w n as " t h e m e t h o d . " For those w h o d o n ' t k n o w w h a t this is. the m e l h o d is based on not thinking, just writing, a m u c h m o r e d i f f i c u l t skill lo m a s t e r than one m a y e x p e c t (have you e v e r sal d o w n and tried not to think?). But w h e n you d o a c h i e v e t h e slate of m i n d that c o m e s with being a b l e to write without y o u r t h o u g h t s interfering with w h a t is written, it's o n e of the besl feelings ever. M y p r o f e s s o r liked to c o m p a r e the m e t h o d to play. In the world o f m a k e believe, there a r e n ' t rules t o p l a y i n g with B a r b i e d o l l s o r T o n k a trucks o r dirt. But if you interrupt a child playing, ihis entire

recycle the anchor!

TUESDAY, N O V . 9 , 9 - 1 1 P.M. M A A S AUDITORIUM

recycle the anchor!

A L L PROCEEDS GO TO D A N C E M A R A T H O N T I C K E T S WILL BE SOLD A R O U N D CAMPUS THROUGH N o v . 9 .

ASKING PRICE: $ 5

recycle the anchor!

w o r l d can be shattered in a n instant a n d the child is brought c r a s h i n g back to reality. With so m a n y things g o i n g o n in o u r lives and in the world right now. it's easy to get distracted. It's so easy t o g o into s o m e t h i n g

SPONSORED BY THE SIGMA IOTA BETA SORORITY

u n f a m i l i a r or difficult, g e l a f r a i d that w e ' l l d o s o m e t h i n g w r o n g , a n d c o m p l e t e l y m i s s the entire point o f w h a t we w e r e trying to d o in the first place. I h a v e heard that m a n y p e o p l e say that chi l dren are a lot s m a r t e r than m o s t a d u l t s b e c a u s e they a r e a b l e to look at the w o r l d t h r o u g h n e w e y e s , i n n o c e n t a n d u n i n f l u e n c e d by society. Kids are c u r i o u s

The Union of Catholic Students is sponsoring an on-campus Mass

a b o u t e v e r y t h i n g . T h e y ask w h y s o m e t h i n g h a p p e n s , not b e c a u s e they h a v e lo, but b e c a u s e they w a n t to k n o w .

5 P.M. SUNDAY, N O V E M B E R 7 IN M A A S A U D I T O R I U M

recycle the anchor! recycle the anchor!

I find that w h e n I a d o p t this childlike m i n d s e t and b e c o m e interested e n o u g h in finding s o m e t h i n g out just f o r the s a k e o f finding it out. s o m e interesting t h i n g s b e g i n t o h a p p e n . F o r

FREE PIZZA!

e x a m p l e , I o n c e saw a n s t r a n g e l o o k i n g o b j e c t in ihe d r i v e w a y of a c a m p s i t e I w a s slaying at and w e n t t o see w h a t it w a s . It e n d e d u p j u s t b e i n g s o m e tree bark, but in g o i n g l o find it out, I met a really

C O M E FOR FAITH, FOOD A N D FELLOWSHIP

recycle the anchor!

cool old m a n n a m e d L a n n y w h o s h o w e d m e a tree w h e r e a great h o m e d owl lived. He told m e that there w a s a n o t h e r owl a bit f u r t h e r away, a n d at night, they w o u l d talk to e a c h other. S o later that n i g h t , I w e n t back a n d listened to the o w l s ' c o n v e r s a t i o n for a

The Anchor wants you!

while. It w a s really p e a c e f u l , s i m p l e , w o n d e r f u l , and I w a s glad t o h a v e g o t t e n the c h a n c e t o e x p e r i e n c e it. an o p p o r t u n i t y I w o u l d h a v e missed had 1 not been c u r i o u s a b o u t s o m e tree bark in the m i d d l e of ihe road. I l o v e it when t h o s e sorts of things h a p p e n b e c a u s e it r e m i n d s m e that e v e n a m i d s t all the hard stuff. I a m still a b l e to feel like a kid a g a i n . P l a y i n g in the dirt. M a k i n g m i s t a k e s a n d getting messy. It's great. W h e n w a s the last l i m e you acted like a k i d ?

\nchor Staff Anchor Staf ff Anchor Stuff editor-in-chief Maureen Yonovilz campus beat editor Mackenzie Smith arts editor Jordan Wo If son infocus editor • Erin L'Hotla spotlight editor Jenny Cencer business manager Christy Hug distribution manager Garrison Dyer production assistant Sean Daenzer advisor Mark A. Lewison

Senior Staff Reporter: Amanda Zoratti

Staff Reporters: Shannon Mee, Lindsey Manthei, Andrea Vandenburgh, Caroline Coleman, Evelyn Daniel, Juiie Lancaster. Jen Gould, Eiissa Van Nest, Nick Engel, Holly Beckerman

to write for the Ranchor have a funny Idea that you always wanted to see in our semeslerly-published fake paper? well, here's your chance! send stories to anchor@hope.edu or if you want to work for the real paper... we are currently in the market for staff writers, sports editor, photographers, ad manager

Have an opinion? Want to see your name in the paper? Send letters to the editor to anchor@hope.edu Letters to the Editor Guideiines O p e n t o a n y o n e w i t h i n the college a n d related c o m m u n i t i e s T h e A n c h o r r e s e r v e s the right to edit d u e l o s p a c e c o n s t r a i n t s N o personal attack s, p o o r t a s t e o r a n y t h i n g potentially libelous Letters c h o s e n o n a first c o m e first s e r v e basis, o r a r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s a m p l e is t a k e n N o a n o n y m o u s letters, u n l e s s d i s c u s s e d w i t h E d i t o r - i n - C h i e f E d i t o r - i n - C h i e f m a y verify i d e n t i t y of w r i t e r

Vie Anchor i\ u prnducl of sludrni effort and is funJed ihrough ihe stiu/enls of Hope College, funding whit h comes through the Hope College Shtdeni Congress Appropriations Commit lee. lull en lo ihe editor are encouraged, though due lo \piire linii/alions the Anchor resents the right to edit. Ihe opinions addre\scd in the editorial ore solely those of the editor-in-chief. Stories from the Hope College News Sen-ice ore a prtxluct of the I'uMic Relations Office. Oneyear subscriptions to the Anchor are available for S20. We rrsene the right to accept or reject any advertising.

Anchor

2004 fall semester, Issue #9 of 26

T h e A n c h o r r e s e r v e s the r i g h t t o refuse p u b l i c a t i o n of a n y letter s u b m i t t e d L e t t e r s o v e r 5 0 0 w o r d s in l e n g t h will not b e c o n s i d e r e d for p u b l i c a t i o n

Mail letters to the Anchor c/o Hope College, drop them off at the Anchor office (located in the center of Dewitt, behind WTHS), or e-mail Anchor@hope.edu


Classified

Students* Right to know: Real Events happening on Y O U R campus

Li22ie Eton's Wool Co

Vegas Night

T H E A N C H O R W A N T S YOU! H a v e you ever w a n t e d to see your name on the front page of the paper? Here is your chance! C o m e to our meeting tonight at 8 : 3 0 p . m . in t h e A n c h o r office...It's in DeWitt behind the radio station a n d Student Union Desk. C o m e find out w h a t it takes to be part of a newspaper staff! I love the fishes 'cause they're so delicious. Arrfish! Avast ye! A n d yo ho ho a n d a bottle of rum while you're at it.

^Anchor

CLASSIFIEDS & MORE

N o v e m b e r 3, 2004

Evening at the

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616392.203?

Friday, Nov. 19 a y a r n f o r all r e a s o n s

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Monday, November 1

Rduertise in the Rnchori

Suspicious Situaiion - Campus Safety was callcd lo Kraker Annex for a loud music complaint, ihc-siudcni were advised lo turn the music down. Physical Plant staff was paged lo clcan off the w i n d o w s ai Phelps Hall. A sink was found lo be overflowing in the basement ot Lichty Hall. Thursday, October 28

October Events

Suspicious Situaiion - The custodian at Maas reported a male acting suspiciously in ihe Maas Center. he appeared to be checking the place out ralher than just taking his medication like he said. The subject was located and advised that Hope College was private property and that he should noi be in the buildings.

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Thursday, October 14 Customer Appreciation Day Join us for cider and donuts

The fire alarm was activated at Depree due lo heat in the kiln room, a heat detector was activated and needed to be replaced before the system would reset. Tuesday, October 2 6

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BBfnre last weekwid. the only t t e l he'd ever bomeil wis a CO.

Comer of 8th & College

A window was broken ai Lubbers Hall due to a Frisbee, the name of the student is unknown.

393.6340

Cead Mile Failte Hope Students.

Tuesday, October 26 Pumpkin Carving and Apple Bobbing 6:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m.

Thursday, October 28 Kietz Specialty Buffet . 11:00a.m.-1:30 p.m.

Friday, October 29 Trick or Treat Night! i ,

LISTEN TO 8 9 . 9 F M

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Way of Civilization

Join us as we discuss the "civilization" of Christian Culture, seeking lo discover how we can remove Jesus from the box of culture and live a bolder, more faith-filled life. Thursday, Nov. 4. 8 p.m. at Pillar (lOlh and College)

get soma

1 em o n^e11o's T H E VOICE OF HOPE COLLEGE

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Intervarsity C h r i s t i a n Fellowship Presents: The Barbarian

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11-8

616-546-8858


Issue 9 of 26, published weekly

i s J o v e m b e r 3, 2004

Hope drops MIA A lead after Albion loss Opponent tallies 14 fourth quarter points to bury Dutchmen in a come-frombehind victory Nick E v e r s e STAFF R E P O R T E R

The Hope M e n ' s loolball learn was dealt a s e r i o u s b l o w to iheir M l A A - c o n f e r e n c e championship hopes, bowing out lo Albion Saturday 17-13 at Holland Municipal Sladium. T h e loss drops Hope lo 5-3 overall and 4 1 in the conference. Albion now moves into a second place lie with ihe Flying Dulchmen. Both t e a m s are c h a s i n g A l m a , w h i c h remained undefeated in conference play with a 44-21 thrashing of Wisconsin Lutheran. S a t u r d a y ' s g a m e was filled with sloppy p l a y by b o t h t e a m s . W i n d y c o n d i t i o n s throughout the afternoon hampered the passing game. G u s t s of 4 0 miles per hour severely hindered the special teams, especially the punting game. In the 4 ,h quarter, with Hope traveling into the wind, the Flying Dutchmen twice punted d e e p in their own territory. The results w e r e punts of 5 and 15 yards. Albion used the good field position to put together their only two touchdown drives of the g a m e , completing a 1 7 - 1 3 - c o m e b a c k v i c t o r y o v e r t h e Dulchmen. "Field position is always a big factor in

every g a m e , even more when the conditions a r e n ' t ideal." r e m a r k e d H o p e head coach Dean Kreps. "We continue to put our defense in tough spots. We c a n ' t expect to stop our opponents every time when w e do that. It takes offense, d e f e n s e and special teams play to be successful. Hope appeared to be well on it's w a y lo remaining u n d e f e a t e d in c o n f e r e n c e play, leading 13-3 heading into the final quarter. After a Nate Barnelt 30-yard field goal tied the game 3 - 3 early in the second quarter. Jake Schrock made an amazing catch in double coverage for a 47-yard touchdown. Q u a r t e r b a c k Joe S c h w a n d e r s e e m e d to throw the ball u p for grabs in the left corner of the end /.one. Albion d e f e n d e r s had the play g u a r d e d p e r f e c t l y , but S c h r o c k s o m e h o w wrestled the ball away f r o m defensiveback Anthony R u s s o f o r the t o u c h d o w n and a 10-3 advantage. Unfortunately, that would be the last time the Flying Dutchmen f o u n d the e n d - z o n e on

half of play, but the third-quarter was rather slow developing. Nate Bamett hit a 26-yard field goal early in the third quarter to give Hope a 13-3 advantage, but neither team would score the rest of the period. T h e fourth quarter saw the Britons capitalize on the Flying D u t c h m e n ' s special team errors, scoring first on a 3-yard touchdown pass lo tighi-end Troy Rundle f r o m quarterback Steve Wasil to make it 13-10. Then with 4:13 remaining, Wasil scrambled out of the pocket and hooked u p wilh wide- Hope had a chance lo make a rally of their own. Q u a r t e r b a c k Joe S c h w a n d e r m o v e d the team d o w n f i e l d , mostly with his legs.

If I know our team like I think I do, we will be just fine [vs. 777State]. Our guys are not as 'sad' as they are 'mad.' We are disappointed in ourselves. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Dean Kreps, football coach

Saturday. Both teams exchanged heated remarks as they headed to the locker r o o m for halftime. Albion players screamed. "It's going to be just like last year." referring to last seasons thrilling 28-27 win by the Britons. T h e players all seemed fired up for the second

S c h w a n d e r scrambled for a 30-yard gain to put the Flying D u t c h m e n in position to score the go-ahead touchdown. Albion ended any chance for a c o m e b a c k when defensive back

Chase Chandler made his fourth interception of the game. C h a n d l e r ' s i n t e r c e p t i o n g a v e h i m the record for most picks in a single game. Hope Senior defensive back Joe Diekevers intercepted his seventh pass on Saturday, tying the all-time conference record f o r thefts in a season. y Schwander finished 10-31 for 173 yards with a touchdown and 4 interceptions. His counterpart at quarterback. Steve Wasil, finished 9 - 2 3 with 2 touchdowns and 2 interceptions. Hope now focuses its attention on their next opponent, Tri Slate. Coach Kreps believes his players will be ready to roll and will experience no hangover from this weeks defeat. "If I know our team like I think I do. w e will be jusl fine," said Kreps. " O u r g u y s are not as "sad" as they are " m a d " . We are disappointed in ourselves; each and every o n e of us. After this weeks battle with Tri-State. Hope will finish the regular-season at division leading Alma. Kreps has warned his kids about the importance of not looking past Tri-State in anticipation for the match up with Alma "We still control our destiny as far as winning the M I A A c h a m p i o n s h i p goes. We have to take care of business. We can't worry about Alma or Albion. We have to lake care of TriState. The rest of it w o n ' t matter if w e d o n ' t stick to the task at hand."

Men's soccer pulls out overtime victory vs. Alma Dutchmen move towards perfect conference play Nick E v e r s e STAFF REPORTER

The Hope M e n ' s soccer team needed overtime to dispatch of a pesky Alma team Saturday afternoon. The Flying Dutchmen notched their 12,h straight victory in the 102nd minute of play, scoring on a Bryan Johnson goal off an assist from Devin McNeil. Johnson's

goal g a v e h i m 6 for the season, while M c N e i l ' s assist g a v e him a team-leading 10 for the year. T h e g a m e was played in blustery conditions, with wind gusts blowing a b o v e 4 0 miles per h o u r for mosl of the game. Dust and debris blew onto the field f r o m the construction of the Devos Fieldhouse a c r o s s the street, w o r s e n i n g the winds already brutal effect. T h e g a m e w a s lightly contested throughout, wilh both teams trading scoring chances. It was a costly turnover by A l m a thai e n d e d u p

being the difference. Devin McNeil look a pass at midfield and brought the ball up the right side, finding J o h n s o n w h o knocked it past the keeper f r o m 18 yards out. G o a l k e e p e r Kevin B u l t e r f i e l d notched his 1 Olh shutout of the season. T h e Flying Dulchmen outshot A l m a 19-8 on the game. T h e win kept H o p e ' s conference record a perfect 12-0 and moved their overall record lo 15-3. More important it kept the Flying Dulchmen a g a m e ahead of rival Calvin. Calvin blanked Olivet 4 - 0 on Sat-

urday, moving to 11-1 in ihe conference. If both Hope and Calvin win their respective games on Tuesday, the stage will be sel for a season-ending s h o w d o w n between these t w o bilter rivals wilh the M I A A - conference championship on the line. T h e Flying Dutchmen finish their season wilh two lough road games. H o p e s o c c e r coach S t e v e S m i t h knows it will be tough finishing the season on the road, but believes his team can handle the added pressure. "A coach always feels good

about his t e a m ' s c h a n c e of w i n n i n g , " r e m a r k e d S m i t h . " I t is tougher to play on the road bul w e h a v e played well on the road this year, perhaps even better than at home. We know it's going to be lough bul w e are training hard and hoping for a good outcome. If Hope can win-out it will mark the first lime the Flying Dutchmen have finished conference play undefeated. It would also be the third consecutive conference championship for the Dulchmen. matching the streak set by the 1994-96 teams.

Sports Wrap-up for Nov. 1 and 2 Women's soccer - Hope 8, Kalamazoo 1 Men's and ibv 13, N C A A 2 0 N C A A Natic Football Saturday TRI-STAI Nov. 13 al Alma. Nov. 20-Dec. 18 N C A A M e n ' s Soccer Today at Kalamazoo. Saturday at C a l v i n J Nov. 1 0 - 2 7 N C A A C h a Women s soccer Saturday at Alma, nooi Nov. 10-27 N C A A Chartl Volleyball | day M I A A Tournameni

Volleyball (MIAA tourney) - Hope defeats Adrian 3024, 30-11, 32-34, 30-16; advance to MIAA semifinals Flying Dutch Cross Country catches the MIAA championship

HOPE COLLEGE ANCHOR 141 E 12TH ST PO BOX 9 0 0 0 H O L L A N D MI 49422-9000

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11-03-2004