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i

Hope College llnchor LXH—4

Official Publication of the Students of Hope College at Holland, Michigan

Alumni To Assist In Construction By Contributions

14 Hope Seniors Will Have Biographies In 'Who's Who 7 The n a m e s of f o u r t e e n Hope Seniors will a p p e a r in the 1949-1950 edition of Who's Who A m o n g Students in American I niversities and

Homecoming

responded

Peace Oratorical

enthusiastically to a suggestion by

Contest Is Planned

port

President Lubbers t h a t they sup-

Colleges, a yearly publication f o r the recognition of o u t s t a n d i n g stu-

alumni

construction

plans

of

their

Alma Mater. The response came a s Peace

Oratorical

Contests

for

men and women will be held at dents. The s t u d e n t s whose biograHope college about December 13. phies will be included in the pubThere is a f r e e choice of subject. lication a r e Hilda Lillian Baker, However it should be a persuasive Union City, New J e r s e y ; Robert discussion of some vital topic of Henry Becksfort, Holland, Michithe day related to Peace. A list of g a n ; Elton John Bruins, F a i r w a t e r , 70 suggested topics is posted on Wisconsin; Ruth Charlotte De the " S p e e c h - D r a m a t i c s " b u l l e t i n ( I r a a f , Holland, Michigan; E d w a r d board, Van Raalte 302. In length, Baker Dunning, Jackson Heights, the oration should be limited to New York; Cynthia Fikse, Chan1400 words, not more than ten per dler, Minnesota; Dorothy Kranendonk, Oostburg, Wisconsin; Mar- cent of which may be quoted f r o m garet J . Moerdyke, Holland, Mich- other sources. Prospective e n t r a n t s igan; Merrill S. Noordoff, O r a n g e in both the women's and the men's City, Iowa; Donna Belle S l u y t e r , contests should r e g i s t e r at once Holland, Michigan; W a l t e r Beekwith Dr. Schrier, director of oraman Studiford, Somerville, New J e r s e y ; Evelyn J u n e Van Dam, tory. The winners of the local conHudsonville, Michigan; Nicholas J . tests will represent Hope College Yonker, Muskegon, Michigan; and at the S t a t e Contest to be held on F r a n k L a n u s Zwemer, Lakewood, Albion College c a m p u s on J a n u a r y Ohio. 7, 1950. Nomination f o r the selection was The Adelaide ( W o m e n ' s ) Oramade by R e g i s t r a r Paul E. Hintorical Contest will be held a t an k a m p . Dean of Men Milton L. Hinga, and Dean of Women E m m a assembly, November 29. The Raven

a climax to a buffet s u p p e r held in Hope Church on October 22. Dr. Lubbers, asked to m a k e a f e w r e m a r k s at the dinner, used two stories to point up the situation

and

then

invited

all

Hope

alumni to each send ten dollars to the college this year f o r the pur-

pose of continuing and accelerating the forward-looking p r o g r a m on which the college has embarked. The suggestion was received with g r e a t e n t h u s i a s m by the approximately 200 alumni present at the dinner. Dr. Lubbers, c o m m e n t i n g on the reception of his r e m a r k s , said t h a t his words " s t r u c k a spar k that was beyond my expectations." Mr. Clyde Geerlings, Director of Alumni Relations, took c h a r g e of the dinner; there was no p r o g r a m . Dr. Wynand W i c h e r s , f o r m e r President of Hope college and now Vice-President of Western Michig a n College, told some i n t e r e s t i n g stories at the alumni meeting and concluded with a t r i b u t e to Hope M. Reeverts. The nominating com- (Men's) Oratorical Contest will be College. mittee, in m a k i n g their choices, held December 13. T h e r e is free used a s criteria the s t u d e n t ' s scholchoice of subject of any persuasive arship, his leadership and particin a t u r e f o r these contests. Also the pation in educational and e x t r a maximum length f o r the local concurricular activities, his citizentest is IGOO words; quotations f r o m ship and service, and his promise other sources are limited to ten of f u t u r e u s e f u l n e s s to business C a s t i n g was begun last night percent of this total. F i r s t prize is and society. and will continue Friday and Sat$25.00. Second prize of $20.00 is Each student accepted by t h e awarded the two winners of the urday f o r the A p p r e n t i c e Play organization is awarded a certifi- Raven Contest. " T h e E m p e r o r ' s New Clothes" a cate of recognition and may rechildren's t h e a t e r play adapted by Watch the Daily Bulletin for ceive t h e benefits of the Student C h a r l o t t e Chorpenning f r o m the f u r t h e r announcements. P l a c e m e n t Service provided by the Hans Christian Anderson f a i r y organization f o r m a k i n g employtale. All new s t u d e n t s on campus, ment contacts or s u p p l y i n g other all s t u d e n t s who have not been a f recommendations. There is no cost filiated with P & M before, and all to the s t u d e n t f o r membership or P & M m e m b e r s who have done inclusion in the publication or f o r little or no a c t i n g on c a m p u s a r e the services rendered him; he is eligible f o r the cast. only required to submit his own Pointing the exterior walls of the It is planned to make this show biographical i n f o r m a t i o n . Hope Memorial chapel will con- available to public and parochial Who's Who A m o n g S t u d e n t s in tinue f o r at least two weeks. The schools in the a r e a because of its American I ' n i v e r s i t i e s and Col- m o r t a r between the stone blocks special interest f o r children. Proleges recognizes s t u d e n t s f r o m ap- has washed and has frozen out in duction dates are J a n u a r y 18, 19, proximately (JOO colleges and uni- the process of t w e n t y - t w o y e a r s of and 20. The object of the A p p r e n versities in the United S t a t e s and the chapel's existence. Deteriorated tice Play is to give s t u d e n t s who Canada. N o m i n a t i o n s may be sub- m o r t a r must also be removed in have done little or no acting on mitted annually by f o u r - y e a r de- order that the new m o r t a r will ad- Hope's c a m p u s a chance to particig r e e - g r a n t i n g institutions. College here to the r e m a i n i n g , good mor- p a t e in t h a t branch of theatrical juniors, seniors, and s t u d e n t s en- tar. work. rolled in g r a d u a t e courses a r e eligible f o r nomination. The entire school y e a r is consumed with details of compiling and p r i n t i n g the publication, each new edition usually being released d u r i n g the following s u m m e r .

Apprentice Play Casting Underway

Workmen Repair Chapel Exterior

Far Eastern Authority Will Speak At Assembly Dr. N o - V o n g - P a r k , noted writer " N o Road Back to Y e s t e r d a y . " Mr. Paul Coleman was the forand lecturer on F a r Eastern affairs, will speak at the chapel assembly mer impartial c h a i r m a n of the Nat i o n a 1 Automobile T r a n s p o r t e r s on T u e s d a y morning, November S, Association, civilian consultant f o r at 11:10 a.m.; his topic be the Federal Conciliation Service, " A m e r i c a ' s Role in Eastern Asia." W a r Production Board, W a r Labor B o m and reared in Manchuria, Board, and o t h e r Government Dr. No-Yong-Park received his ori- Agencies d u r i n g World W a r II. He was educated a t the University of ental education in China. J a p a n Cincinnati and Butler University. and Korea, and his occidental trainNationally recognized as an a u ing in Europe and America He thority on c h a n g i n g labor t r e n d s completed his u n d e r g r a d u a t e work and techniques, Mr. Coleman has a at the University of Minnesota dynamic presentation of a new and his p o s t g r a d u a t e work at l i a r - j approach to America's most vital vard university, where he received problem. the degrees of M.A. and I'h.l). While in college, he distinguished himself by w i n n i n g many literary and oratorical prizes in competition with American s t u d e n t s in their own l a n g u a g e , lie h a s mad" Miss E m m a Reeverts was reFar Eastern Problems his life cently invited by the Edward T. study and has t a u g h t the subject at a number of leading universi- Hazen Foundation on S t u d e n t ties, including the L'niversity of Counseling to become a Hazen AsMinnesota, Western Reserve l'ni- sociate. The selection was made on versity and the L'niversity of Ken- the basis of her fine qualities and tucky. lie has likewise served f o r experiences in this field. the past ten y e a r s as a special lecThe Edward T. Hazen Foundat u r e r on F a r E a s t e r n a f f a i r s at the tion h a s h e a d q u a r t e r s in New HavI n s t i t u t e s of International Under- en, Connecticut. Its purpose is to s t a n d i n g , under auspices of Rotary foster and promote more effective International. Christian counseling on college and Dr. No-Vong-Park is t h e a u t h o r university campuses. The f o u n d a of numerous articles and books, tion is interested in the w e l f a r e of some of which have been highly the individual s t u d e n t and his oprecommended by the Book-of-the- portunities for a rich educational Month Club and literary critics experience and personal g r o w t h in throughout the country. His books the Christian life. There are apinclude: .Making a New China; An proximately 000 Hazen Associates Oriental View of America Civiliza- in the country. tion; Chinaman's Chance, Retreat A m o n g the privileges which acof the West, and The White .Man's company this honor a r e a t t e n d i n g Peace. j. Hazen Conferences and receiving

Hazen Foundation H o n o r s Reeverts

The following week on Tuesday, November 15, Hope s t u d e n t s and f a c u l t y will have the pleasure of h e a r i n g Mr. Paul Coleman of the labor relations counsel s p e a k on

Hazen books and p a m p h l e t s a s they a r e published. Last A u g u s t Miss Reeverts a t t e n d e d the Central Hazen Conference at Lake Geneva, Wisconsin.

Whoops - These Roller Skates

Mrs. Schoon Opens Reading

Clinic For Hope Students

Lubbers Return From Trip East Dr. and Mrs. Lubbers r e t u r n e d to Holland today a f t e r a trip e a s t in connection with the college and the General Synod Fund of the Re-f formed Church of America. T h e climax of the trip, which w a s s t a r t e d on October 24, was a dinner a t t h e S e c o n d R e f o r m e d Church of Hackensack, New J e r s e y . Dr. Lubbers w a s the speaker a t t h e ceremonies dedicating the new p a r lors and dining room of the church, whose p a s t o r is the Rev. Harvey B. H o f f m a n , a Hope a l u m n u s . One of the most p l e a s a n t ' e x p e r i ences of the t o u r . Dr. Lubbers reports, w a s m e e t i n g Dr. Will O r r , P r e s i d e n t of W e s t m i n s t e r college at Wilmington, Pennsylvania. Dr. O r r is r e m e m b e r e d by most Hope s t u d e n t s f o r his dynamic a d d r e s s e s last y e a r d u r i n g the annual Religious E m p h a s i s Week. While on the c a m p u s a t Wilm i n g t o n , Dr. and Mrs. Lubbers also m e t P r o f e s s o r Davis, head of the music d e p a r t m e n t t h e r e and f a t h e r of Hope's P r o f e s s o r Davis. P r e s i d e n t and Mrs. Lubbers made their j o u r n e y by car.

At a meeting held in the Dutch Mill restaurant on Monday, October 31, three men were made members of the Hope chapter of the Blue Key honor fraternity. The new members of this national organization are Gerard Gnade, Abe Moerland, and Robert Westerhoff.

On Tuesday, November 1, opportunity was given to Hope s t u d e n t s to r e g i s t e r in the newly established Reading Clinic, a service f o r the recognition and correction of reading difficulties. S t u d e n t s who were unable to r e g i s t e r at that time and would care to do so are invited to see Mrs. Helen Schoon, director of the clinic; she may be contacted in Room 111 A of Van Raalte hall d u r i n g the first, second, third, and sixth periods, and in Room 104 of Van Raalte d u r i n g the fifth and seventh class periods. Mrs. Schoon recently p r e p a r e d the following s t a t e m e n t f o r the A N C H O R of w h a t the clinic can accomplish. " T h e r e a d i n g Clinic is not a 'cure-all' f o r e v e r y t h i n g t h a t ails you if you are not working up to the s t a n d a r d s in college t h a t you think you can reach. However, there is much t h a t it can do to help. Did you ever realize t h a t reading is a skill, j u s t like t y p i n g , s k a t i n g , or playing the p i a n o ? Well, it is; it is a more i m p o r t a n t skill t h a n almost any other. You use it every day of your life, even if only to read the signs on t h e s t r e e t corners. In college, you spend a g r e a t deal of t i m e reading; you read your t e x t b o o k s and r e f e r e n c e books, l a b o r a t o r y instructions and examination questions, the daily n e w s p a p e r and l e t t e r s f r o m home. Yet m a n y college students have not learned to read e f ficiently. T h e y w a s t e t i m e and ene r g y by plodding along a t a snail's pace. A good r e a d e r is a f a s t r e a d er. Because the slow r e a d e r s h a v e not been able to finish all t h e assigned r e a d i n g in a course, they o f t e n g e t lower g r a d e s t h a n t h e y should. Yet with a little t r a i n i n g and practice almost every s t u d e n t

can overcome these difficulties. " W h a t is good r e a d i n g ? Reading is the process of t r a n s l a t i n g certain m a r k s on paper into ideas and f a c t s and mental images. In order to do this well, the reader must use certain special skills. If you a r e a good reader, you must mast e r each of these skills.. First of all, you must know the purpose f o r which you a r e reading. Your p u r pose in reading instructions in a laboratory manual is entirely diff e r e n t f r o m your purpose in reading a novel. Because your purpose is different you will read in a different way. Second, you must be able to v a r y the speed of your reading. You must know how to read very rapidly when t h a t serves your purpose. One kind of rapid r e a d i n g is called skimming, and you can learn how and when to do this. Third, you must have a good vocabulary. You can not expect to be f a m i l i a r with every word t h a t you meet in your reading, but you can learn how to tackle an u n f a miliar word. F o u r t h , you should have the ability to use t h e dictiona r y , t h e encyclopedia or an a t l a s . These a r e the tools of good reading, and you can learn how to use them. The ot her elements in good reading are t h e ability to concent r a t e on w h a t you a r e r e a d i n g , t h e ability to r e m e m b e r it, and t h e ability to apply it. By practice, these can be improved in most students. Then you should be able to read critically. You m u s t learn to e v a l u a t e the a u t h o r ' s ideas. To do this you m u s t be able to o r g a n ize, analyze, and evaluate, or in ot her words, you m u s t be able t o T H I N K all t h e t i m e t h a t you read. These a r e the skills t h a t can be developed in a clinic to m a k e you a b e t t e r and m o r e effective r e a d e r . "

November 3, 1 9 4 9

Hope Alloted $10,000 Fund For Students Hope College was recently alloted ten thousand dollars by the H e n r y S t r o n g Educational Foundation to assist s t u d e n t s who have financial need and a r e ' able to q u a l i f y f o r the loan. T r e a s u r e r H e n r y J . StefFans announced recently. S t u d e n t s may obtain a loan by filling out an application blank obtainable f r o m the college t r e a s u r e r , h a v i n g the application approved by the t r e a s u r e r , and securing r e f e r ence letters. T h o s e eligible for the loans a r e : s t u d e n t s under twenty-five y e a r s of age at the time the loan is made; j u n i o r s and seniors in u n d e r g r a d u ate colleges; sophomores who a r e in the u p p e r third of their class; or g r a d u a t e students under 25 y e a r s of a g e and without excessive debt. I n t e r e s t r a t e on the loans is t h r e e per cent. The interest does not a c c r u e while a s t u d e n t is in school; t h a t is, it begins when the student graduates. Principal is payable 10% at the end of the first year a f t e r g r a d u a tion, 20% a t the end of the second y e a r a f t e r g r a d u a t i o n , 30% a t the end of the third year a f t e r g r a d u ation, and 40% at the end of the f o u r t h y e a r a f t e r g r a d u a t i o n . The accrued interest is payable a f t e r graduation. F o r f u r t h e r information concerning applications and qualifications, Mr. H e n r y J . Steffens, college t r e a s u r e r , may be contacted.

Survey To Begin On November 14 Mr. Marvin C. Lindeman, repres e n t a t i v e of the Holland C h a m b e r of Commerce, announced recently t h a t Donald J e n k s and Associates of Chicago will make a s u r v e y of the city of Holland concerning a proposed campaign to raise f u n d s f o r a Hope College g y m n a s i u m . The survey, scheduled to begin on November 14, will be used to d e t e r m i n e the sentiment of the Holland residents t o w a r d s the proposed campaign, since its success is largely dependent upon t h e m . The s u r v e y will be used to sound out community opinion on such topics a s the needs f o r such a g y m n a s i u m , the type of building that should be constructed, and the s u p p o r t t h a t the c o m m u n i t y is willing to give the project. Mr. J e n k s , upon the d e t e r m i n a tion of community opinion, will discuss the proposed project with t h e C h a m b e r of Commerce and college officials. F u r t h e r details of t h e p r o j e c t will then be planned in t e r m s of the results of the survey.

W A S Starts Third Year of Showings

Do

you

have

(t free

Saturday

Irma and Jim! But it's all part of the fun, and a tumble now and night? For all those who lid re seen all the movies in town, or then Just adds to your experience as a skater. He fore you know it those who are n little short on you'll be doing figure eights. allowance for the week-end or those No one would ever know that who just plain lore to skate, your Carnegie Gym was a gymnasium best het. for a Saturday n'mht full when he sees it on a Saturday of fun is the Skating Party in night. With the addition of such Carnegie Gym. Just take a look suggestive signs as "No smoking" at the wonderful time Jim Bennett and "No Fast Skating Allowed," and Irma Smith are having! along with the sharp green coke Doesn't it look like fun? bar where candy bars and gum You won't find it hard at all to are sold, the rink really takes on get into the swing of the skating a professional "New Look." There party once you hear that rhythmiare shelves lined with one hundred cal music and the whirring sound pairs of skates and the sizes range of the skates on the wooden floor. to fit every size foot — even the Once you treat yourself to this Dutchman's. The record player new form of recreation, you'll dis- with its stack of skating numbers cover a new outlet for all the pent- provides the music for rhythmical up energy that has accumulated feet. The whole evening beginning during your long week of concen- at 7:JO is yours for only 25c. Later trated study. Come alone and meet when the demand for skates has your friends there or bring your increased, they will divide the evedate. And fellows — if you bring ning into two shifts, the second a gal that has never skated before, beginning at 9.'JO. So if you want you can be sure she'll "fall" for loads of fun and can spare a quaryou before the night's over. Inci- ter, meet your friends at the Cardentally, you'll probably be "fall- negie Skating Rink every Saturday ing" for her, too. Take a look at night! See you there!

At 8:00 P.M. last S a t u r d a y night the World Adventure Series began its third y e a r of film p r e s e n t a t i o n s on c a m p u s . " F l o r i d a F i s h i n g , " a March of Time on F r a n c e , a musical film, and a f e a t u r e by General Motors entitled, " D o c t o r s of Indust r y " highlighted this first p r o g r a m . The series, f e a t u r i n g a v a r i e t y of movies a b o u t l i t e r a t u r e , science, music, a r t , and social problems, will be held bi-weekly in the chapel and the d a t e s will be posted. The p r o g r a m is u n d e r the sponsorship of the college and a t each s h o w i n g a f r e e will offering f o r C A R E will be taken. L a s t y e a r $250.00 was collected which was e n o u g h to send 25 C A R E p a c k a g e s . W A S m a y t a k e on the additional p r o j e c t of equipping a E u r o p e a n g r a d e school with books, p a p e r s , and o t h e r materials. •

Faculty Women To Have Dinner The f a c u l t y women will h a v e an i n f o r m a l dinner m e e t i n g t o m o r r o w evening a t t h e home of Miss Mildred S c h u p p e r t . T h e g r o u p m e e t s socially t h r e e t i m e s a y e a r , t h i s d i n n e r being t h e first of t h e m . To alleviate the work of t h e hostess, t h e women a r e divided into t h r e e g r o u p s and one g r o u p will h a v e c h a r g e of each m e e t i n g . 1


Page Two

HOPE

Hope College Anchor

COLLEGE

national affairs reveals the world's state of

ANCHOR

Campus Mailbox

Homecoming Event

anxiety. The Editor Successfully Ends Hope students are encouraged, therefore, The Hope College ANCHOR Under the competent chairmanEDITORIAL S T A F F to give serious thought to the m a t t e r of S i r : ship of Dona Sluyter and Edward W a l t e r B. Studdiford Editor-in-Chief peace and to participate in the Peace conSome time ago while traveling Dunning, another H o m e c o m i n g Dave Karsten ^ Nancy H. Vyverberg ( Gerald H. Boerman J a m e s A. Hoffman Robert S. Van Dyke Elton J . Bruins J o a n Wilson Gordon G. Beld Elizabeth A. Koch Mary R. Houtman Edward Kerle Michael Romano

Associate Editors

Business Manager Asst. Business Manager ."....Advertising Manager News Editor F e a t u r e Editor Sports Editor Rewrite Editor Society Editor Circulation Manager Photographer

Typists M a r g a r e t Schoonveld, Shirley Pyle, E s t h e r Kinney

Advertising Staff Betty Cross, Robert Dennison, John Du Mez, Robert Henninges, Robert Peverly, Shirley Pyle, Marilyn Veldman, Cathy Wines, Mary Zweizig, M y r n a Vander Molen, Duane Peekstok, Richard Kruizenga, Connie Schilling.

Reporters Paul Lupkes, Ruth Koeppe, Cathy Wines, Barbara Bruins, Connie Shilling, Jeannine De Boer, Jackie Medendorp, Jackie Gore, Gloria Gore, Kathy Hagstrom, Betty Watson, Harold Dean, Sue Roest, Joyce Brunsell, Helen Naden, Cathy Sharpe, Ginny Hesse, Anna Herder, Alice Gravenhorst, Marjorie Dykema, Joanne Geerds, J u n e Dunster, Mary Zweizig, Julie Bernius, Phyl Heidanus, Annette Hezinger, Connie Boersma, Chuck Wissink, Hugh Campbell, Richard Kruizenga, Nancy Smith, Dorothy Fennema, Marion Reichert, Marilyn Van Weelden, Larry Masse, Joan Ridder, Dave H a g a r , Betty Vander Werff, Leroy Lovelace, Guy Vander Jacht, Edith Teune, Patt S t a g g , Doris Adams, J a m e s Pritchard. Entered as second class m a t t e r at the post office of Holland, Michigan, a t special r a t e of postage provided for in section 1103 of Act of Congress October 3, 1917, and authorized October 19, 1918. Subscription Rate: $2.00 per year. Published by the students of Hope College every two weeks throughout the school year, except during holidays or examination periods. P R I N T E D AT OLD N E W S P R I N T E R Y

E d i t o r i a l s

A n Interpretation A natural tendency of the mind of man is to organize discrete events to f o r m meaningful patterns. Such events may be the facts presented in a class, the happenings of a dormitory, or any other body of related information. The news items in this issue of the ANCHOR form many such meaningful patterns. The relatedness of these items gives us considerable informational grist for the mill of reflection. Each year on the Hope campus there are the Peace Oratorical Contests f o r men and women. In a world rapidly dividing into two camps armed for possible atomic warfare, the subject of world peace provides a timely framework for reflection by any human being. The remarks of Ambassador van Kleff e n s during his recent visit on the Hope campus gave personal emphasis to the tension existing at the diplomatic level between the two great groups of world powers. Even the most superficial acquaintance with inter-

tests. On November 12, Hope representatives will attend the M i c h i g a n Committee for UNESCO meeting at

Evening Coffee Kletz Is H Club Project The active 'H' Club, under the leadership of Abe Moerland, h a s already succeeded in opening the Koffee Kletz in the evenings, a s one of their projects. Numerous other projects, including a gymnasium bulletin board to post Hope's outstanding athletic achievements, are under careful consideration. Leading the organization are P r e s i d e n t Moerland, Vice P r e s i d e n t Roy Zwemer, T r e a s u r e r Robert Collins and Secretary Gene Campbell. I n f u r t h e r explanation of the club, President Moerland said: "The Active ' H ' Club is open to all students with a Varsity letter in any s p o r t . " He invites all eligible stud e n t s to the Monday and T h u r s d a y meetings.

Lansing. The

United Nations Educational and Scientific Organization recognizes that the most effective means of resolving international difficulties is not through the use of arms, but r a t h e r through intellectual, spiritual, and technological understanding and development. It is good to learn that Hope will be represented at this committee meeting of this key international organization. One of the most effective means of exchanging ideas and effecting understanding among nations is the exchange of students and teachers. It is interesting to note in this connection, the article in this issue of the ANCHOR which describes the possibilities of American students going abroad to study. Last Saturday night the World Adventure Series again began film presentation on the campus. The proceeds of the project will this year again be sent to CARE. The WAS offerings will be used in a project to send educational materials to a European school. This project by Hope college will utilize a recently announced plan by CARE to expand its service of distributing food and clothing to Europe to include the sending of American books to schools, colleges, libraries, and professional institutions in Europe. This plan recognizes the need f o r educational materials in Europe and the importance of the mutual comprehension of ideas as a f r u i t f u l source of peace. The plan deserves enthusiastic support. The last issue of the ANCHOR contained an e x t r a c t from Sarospatak. The spirit which the extract conveyed moves our hearts to thankfulness and buoys our spirits up by the Christian enthusiasm which it displayed. The Sarospatak project cogently exemplifies the possibilities of harmonious internationa relationships. It is interesting to note the way in which events at Hope may be interpreted in terms of world affairs. And it is botli encouraging and challenging to know that Hope is contributing, and can continue to contribute to the establishment of peace. It is indeed fitting that Hope college, having a rich Christian tradition, should have the resources .to make a unique contribution toward peace. Christianity, it is true, does not promise to effect the type of peace which means escape from the hardships, the difficulties, and the trials of the world. Christianity does, however, point to life on a higher plane, where confidence in a Savior brings security and so dispels anxiety and disquietude, where trust in God replaces f e a r of men and the f u t u r e . By the manifestation of this spirit in such concrete events as sending educational materials abroad through a WAS project, Hope college can have a smal part in the great undertaking of establishing world peace.

College Officers Attend Conference "Relationships Between Junior Colleges and Senior Colleges" was the theme of the fall meeting of the Michigan College Association yesterday a t Michigan S t a t e College. Three morning sessions and one afternoon session were concerned with topics pertaining to the general theme. Mr. Albert Timmer, Dr. John Hollenbach, and Rev. Paul Hinkamp represented Hope at the conference.

East

Council During the p a s t two weeks the council inaugurated two projects of particular interest to the student body. It conducted chapel service to raise money f o r the Community Chest and it placed Council suggestion boxes to provide a channel for student opinion. We wish to t h a n k the student body f o r its generous support of the Community Chest Drive held during the chapel service last Friday. The total sum collected was $156.28 and broke all preceding records. The officers of the Council were in charge of the service with t h e Scripture being read by Secretary Bob Hill, t h e message being delivered by President Nick Yonker, and the p r a y e r being given by Vice President Evie Van Dam. The other members of t h e Council served a s ushers. Bob Kranendonk led in the singing of a few hymns while the collection was being taken. . The Student Council Suggestion Boxes t h a t you see in Van Raalte hall and Graves library have been placed there as a m e a n s by which the students may quickly and effectively make their criticisma, sug-

gestions, and gripes known to the Council and may have the Council act upon them as quickly as possible. During the first few weeks we have already received many very positive and constructive sug gestions. We have been requestec to place a light in f r o n t of Graves library to lessen the possibility of someone stumbling in t h a t dark ened a r e a , to place coat hooks on the molding board in the basement between the Kletz and the lounge, and to lessen the appearance requirements f o r students^ coming from lab to dinner a t the evening meal. These are just a sample of the type of suggestion we have been receiving, and we hope t h a t we'll receive many more. The council has invited your help by obtaining the boxes. Now it is up to you, the individual student, to let us know just what it is t h a t is griping you the most. If it sounds good in t h a t bull session, then it must be good enough to put down on paper and have some constructive action taken to remedy the situation. We cannot g u a r a n t e e immediate action on many of the suggestions, but a t least we intend to let you know what has been done and w h a t is being attempted. We would like to make two f u r t h e r suggestions t h a t you sign your name to the suggestion and t h a t you come to the Student Council meeting immediately following t h e week in which your suggestion was made. This will enable you to defend and secure the success of your suggestion.

I had a few spare hours between t r a i n s in a city in which t h e r e is a Roman Catholic institution of higher learning. As I wandered over the school's campus I saw t h a t there was a service going on in the large Church around which the school was built, so I went inside. It was a requiem mass being sung for a medical professor who had recently passed away and the sanctuary was almost filled with students. What impressed me then, and what has impressed me on other occasions when I have attended Roman Catholic worship, was the spirit of quietude and reverence in evidence. The entire atmosphere was so charged with the spirit of reverence t h a t one could not help feeling t h a t there was something highly sacred going on. A day later 1 was home and worshipped in our chapel. I was g r a t e f u l for t h a t beautiful building and more g r a t e f u l for the Protestant, Christian tradition out of which our school has come. And it was good to reflect on the significance of daily chapel at our alma mater, a practice which few of us, I believe, and none of our alumni would want to see discontinued. Hope College, and all those who belong to her in spirit, believes in the daily worship of almighty God and t h a t the cultivation of the soul is important. That conviction is fundamental to our philosophy of education. One may well wonder, however, whether we are actually being benefitted by our chapel exercises. The purpose of this brief, but important, period is, of course, worship and communion with the Triune God. We prevent the very thing t h a t we want to do, however, when we open a text book and study instead of worship, or commune with our neighbor instead of with the Holy One of Israel who in at least this brief period each day has a right to our a t t e n tion and devotion. One of our Episcopalian students of a year or two ago once remarked t h a t he was amazed a t the lack of reverence exhibited a t our daily chapel sen-ices. With his background in worship it is little wonder. Why can we not rectify this situation and make chapel what it ought to be? We can if we will. It will mean, however, t h a t faculty and students will have to come to chapel on time, t h a t they will have to.enter the sanctua r y in reverence, eliminate all whispering and remember the purpose of our coming together. I include ' f a c u l t y ' above because we members of t h e faculty can stand improvement as' well as the students. Let each of us remember each morning t h a t "the Lord is in his holy t e m p l e " and t h a t all the earth, including ourselves, should keep silence before Him. Yours sincerely, M. Eugene Osterhaven College Pastor

Chinese Music Program Heard By Musical Arts Chinese music was the theme of the monthly meeting of the Musical A r t s Club which was held Monday, October 24, a t Walsh Music Hall. Several students from China took p a r t during t h e evening. Opening the program Elin Vienschoten s a n g a Chinese hymn in Chinese style. She was accompanied by Garbo Zeng. Then Marjorie Pickens demonstrated a Chinese violin. Elin Vienschoten talked about some of the other Chinese instruments, and Myron Hermance added some interesting information about the music and instruments of t h a t country. Both Elin Vienschoten and Marjorie Pickens have lived in China where their p a r e n t s a r e missionaries, and Garbo Zeng is a Chinese student. Next month's program which is in charge of Chung Yu Sun will be centered around the music of Korea.

Camera Club Assembles, Gets New Constitution The C a m e r a Club, which held their first meeting of the year on October 19, is being reorganized this year. A t t h e second club meeting, held on October 31, t h e members of the organization ratified a new constitution and elected o f f i cers.

celebration was successfully observed on October 21-23. The t r a ditional activities s t a r t e d on riday a f t e r n o o n a t Black River when the F r e s h and Soph pull teams matched strength. In spite of bad weather and tne tenacity of the Freshmen, tne Sophs returned to the campus victorious, but only a f t e r a twonour struggle. J e r r y Mull was in cnarge. Everyone flocked to the gym in the evening, where, a f t e r a few cneers and songs, and a talk by ^oach Vanderbush, the Homecoming (^ueen was announced. Tension mounted as Master of Ceremonies Corky Utte opened the letter which made Delores Freyling Queen f o r 1941). Don Fairchild carried out election details and Bob Hill, Lorraine Drake, and E s t h e r Schmidt made a r r a n g e m e n t s f o r the peprally. The queen and her court led the S a t u r d a y morning parade of f r a ternity, sorority, and class floats. Chairman for the parade was Lamonte Dirkse. Announcement was made at the half-time of the g a m e that the Cosmopolitan f r a t e r n i t y nad taken first place with Emersonian and Sorosis receiving honorable mention. William F l a h e r t y presided as m a s t e r of ceremonies and presented the cash awards f o r dorm decorations to Columbia Hall and Columbia Court. W a l t e r Schoulten and B a r b a r a Eilander judged the decorations.

AIMCML "On effecting a c u r e " A plea f o r racial tolerance is being brought home to t h e American people with s m a s h i n g force and emphasis. A t the helm of this crusade is a series of moving pictures. The best a r e : "Gentlemen's A g r e e m e n t , " "Lost Boundaries," and "Home of the Brave." They are educating the public on a scale never achieved before. Radio and speakers, newspapers and magazines a r e also battling the ignorance f r o m which prejudices breed. But education alone can't do the job. The g r e a t e s t foe of intolerance must be the American people themselves. Racial intolerance is a crippling disease which weakens our nation. The only cure for the sickness is kindness and tolerance. No group or faction can do the job alone, each of us must decide f o r ourselves where we stand on this issue, then stand by our convictions. Racial prejudices exist on our campus. T h e r e is no better place to begin the cure. . . . "A pleasant s u r p r i s e "

It was a pleasant surprise to suddenly discover a hidden gem on campus. "The World Adventure Series," a S a t u r d a y night regular of motion pictures, has never been a g r e a t d r a w i n g card to students. What has not been publicized enough, is t h a t the pictures shown are often outstanding. " H a m l e t , " "Othello," and "House of Seven Gables," a r e a few of the excellent No Homecoming would have films to be shown this year. . . . been complete without the f r a t e r n A high school principal in New ity and sorority b r e a k f a s t s and luncheons on Saturday. Open house, Orleans recently caused quite a when one half could see how the stir in educational circles. Princiother half lives, climaxed the big pal Joseph Schwertz believed that "kids should work to learn, not to day. get A's or B's. So he did away Palette and Masque added to the with the old system of report cards. festivities with their production of Then he abolished automatic pro"The Show-Off" which played to motions. His pupils, he declared, capacity houses f o r three nights. would advance as f a s t or as slowly Musical A r t s Club provided a as they were able. In the fall, each fitting ending to Homecoming 1949 child would s t a r t off each subject with its Sunday afternoon vesper where he had ended it the year beservice. fore, regardless of what his classmates were doing."

H o p e Music Lovers Visit Grand Rapids This year, as last, a music-loving group of Hope College students h a s made a r r a n g e m e n t s to attend t h e regular subscription concerts of the Grand Rapids Symphony Orchestra at the Civic Auditorium in t h a t city. The first concert of the 1949-1950 symphony season was well received by an audience of over 3,000 persons, by appearances one of the largest in the history of the organization. Its regular conductor, Jose Echaniz, appeared in this capacity and also a s piano soloist in the Beethoven Concerto No. 4 in G. A t the conclusion of the third and final movement, Mr. Echaniz was honored with the first " B r a v o " on record by a member of the sedate western Michigan music public. This unprecedented occurrence called f o r t h an encore f r o m Mr. Echaniz, the sensational if controversial Toccata in D by Prokofiev. Controversy seemed to be the order of the night. The concert opened with Julius Rontgen's n a tionalistic Oud-Nederland Suite, which, though physically stimulating, seemed musically somewhat unbalanced. However, Rontgen's emphasis on the brass was an intended effect. T h e second half of the concert was devoted solely to Cesar F r a n c k ' s cliched D Minor Symphony, and of course any perf o r m a n c e of this work raises a dispute as to whether it is worthy of being called a symphony. The Grand Rapids Orchestra handled it extremely well, however.

The question of g r a d i n g in education has long been the center of controversy, and this new wrinkle is something to think about. Schwertz contends t h a t it is better not to have t h e p a r e n t s know which g r a d e t h e i r children are in, than to promote students whether they can handle the work or not. A f t e r one year's trial, the p a r e n t s are behind Principal Schwertz one hundred per cent.

Drs. Van Saun, Dykstra Attend Ohio Conference On October 14 and 15, Dr. Walter Van Saun and Dr. D. Ivan Dyks t r a attended a Philosophy conference held a t W e s t e r n Reserve university, Cleveland, Ohio. It was the first conference of its kind to be held in the United States. Seventytwo colleges and universities participated. The subjects discussed were Introduction to Philosophy, Ethics, Logic, and History of Philosophy. The discussion was carried on to discover t h e proper content and method of teaching. Both the supernaturalistic and naturalistic views were presented. The next Philosophy Club meeting will be held Monday, November 7 a t which time Allen D y k s t r a will present a p a p e r taken f r o m the book. Pluralistic Universe by William J a m e s .

Five Hopeites Take G r a d School Tests

In p r e p a r a t i o n f o r application Beet- and admission to g r a d u a t e schools hoven's F o u r t h did much to sub- next fall, five students took Gradus t a n t i a t e the f a c t t h a t he is one of ate Record E x a m s on October 28 America's leading concert pianists. and 29. Twenty-three pre-medical students took the Medical Aptitude He chose a Baldwin piano f o r t h e test on October 22. performance, and a dispute arose These t e s t s a r e designed to give a s to t h e relative merits of t h e medical and g r a d u a t e schools a Baldwin and t h e Steinway. Suffice comparison between students f r o m it to say t h a t Echaniz was more different schools all over the counconcerned with music t h a n with try. I t g r e w f r o m a concern f o r the meaning of isolated grades brilliance. Nevertheless, his caf r o m different college transcripts. denza was long and very brilliant, The G r a d u a t e Record E x a m i n a but, in t h e opinion of some, not tions cover g e n e r a l aptitude, field Beethoven. The Prokofiev Toccata of specialization, and g e n e r a l proved t h a t any piano can be bril- knowledge. T h e Medical College liant under the fingers of Echaniz, Admission T e s t is designed to m e a s u r e general scholastic aptialthough the piece itself was retude, u n d e r s t a n d i n g of modern soceived with some reservation by ciety, and achievement in premediconservative Grand Rapids. cal science. Echaniz's

rendition

of


>

HOPE

COLLEGE

Musk Students to Offer Recital of Chopin Works Several Hope music s t u d e n t s will p r e s e n t a recital of typical Chopin w o r k s in commemoration of the h u n d r e d t h a n n i v e r s a r y of the death of Frederic Chopin on November 17, a t 8:30 p.m. in the Hope College Chapel. The s t u d e n t s a p p e a r ing are s t u d y i n g under Mr. Milton J o h n s t o n , Miss J a n t i n a Holleman, and Mrs. Harold K a r s t e n , f a c u l t y m e m b e r s in the Music D e p a r t m e n t . F r e d e r i c Chopin, the world's g r e a t e s t composer for the piano, died one hundred years ago on October 17, 1849. At the t i m e of his death when only t h i r t y - n i n e y e a r s old, Chopin, the Polish genius, was f a m o u s t h r o u g h o u t Europe. R o b e r t Schumann, a n o t h e r g r e a t composer, is said to have introduced him by saying, " H a t s off, g e n t l e m a n — a g e n i u s ! " Chopin composed n u m b e r s solely f o r t h e piano and is known f o r never t r y i n g to a t t e m p t imitation of ot her i n s t r u m e n t s a s m a n y other composers have done, such as

Beethoven. I n s t e a d , he utilized completely all the m a n y possibilities of c r e a t i n g strictly piano e f fects. Beginning a t W a r s a w where a n i n t e r n a t i o n a l piano competition has been held, celebrations have been initiated t h r o u g h o u t the world in honor of Chopin's g r e a t genius. In such commemorations, Rubenstein has played in New York City, A l e x a n d e r Brailowsky in Paris, and Robert C a s a d e s u r in London. The p r o g r a m will a p p e a r a s follows: C # Minor Polonaise, Betty Schepers; C M a j o r Prelude, Don H a z e k a m p ; G Minor Prelude, Elton B r u i n s ; B^ M a j o r Mazurka, Joyce P o s t ; E. Minor Waltz, B a r b a r a Costers; C # Minor Waltz, Carol Crist; E t u d e , Op. 10, No. 12, Herb e r t R i t s e m a ; E t u d e , Op. 25, No. 10, and Etude, Op. 25, No. 12, J e a n Ver Beek; A^ M a j o r Polonaise, George Reineke; Rondo f o r Two Pianos, Marion Slinn and M a r g a r e t De Vries.

Four Organiza+ions Ritsema, Christie Will Entertain Sponsor N e x t Monday evening a t 7:30 Conference

%

The W A L , the Student Council, the Y W C A and the YMCA are s p o n s o r i n g a two-day conference on courtship and m a r r i a g e on Tuesday and W e d n e s d a y , November 22 and 23. Leland F o s t e r Wood, Secr e t a r y of t h e Commission on Marr i a g e and t h e H o m e of the Federal Council of Churches, will be the guest speaker. Mr. Wood will s p e a k a t the Tuesday m o r n i n g S t u d e n t Assembly. On T u e s d a y evening a t 7:15 the YM and t h e YW will have a joint m e e t i n g and Mr. Wood will lead t h e panel discussion. He will, also, visit classes on T u e s d a y and Wednesday and conduct discussions in t h e m . On both d a y s he will be available f o r individual conferences. The t i m e f o r these special consultations will be announced later. The s t u d e n t committee in c h a r g e of this c o n f e r e n c e is: Hilda Baker, c h a i r m a n ; E l e a n o r Short and P e t e r K r a a k , S t u d e n t Council; N o r m a n Riech, L a v e r n e Sikkema, YMCA; Eloise H i n k a m p , Nancy Vyverberg, Y W C A ; Gladys Keizer and Ruth De G r a a f , W A L .

Debaters Plan Debate Tournament At Lansing A n u m b e r of practice debates were held a t t h e Wednesday meeting of the d e b a t e squad. This week a r r a n g e m e n t s a r e being made f o r a series of practice debates w i t h Calvin College. T h e first Debate Tourn a m e n t will be held a t E a s t Lansing on December 3. A m o n g this y e a r ' s d e b a t e r s a r e twelve m e m b e r s of the F r e s h m a n class. Floyd Goulouze, H a r v e y Moes, David Colem a n , E l t o n Bruins, E l m e r V r u g gink. Nelson S t e g e m a n , Charles Link, and William Kloote, all of whom h a v e had debating experience, a r e g i v i n g t h e newcomers a m e n t a l w o r k o u t in p r e p a r a t i o n f o r intercollegiate debating.

Math-Physics Club Has First Meeting

the Spanish Club will hold its second m e e t i n g of the year. An int e r e s t i n g p r o g r a m is planned and a n y s t u d e n t s who would like to join a t t h i s time a r e welcome to come to the meeting. A f t e r the usual business of the meeting is t a k e n c a r e of, A r l e n e Ritsema will perform a p i a n o s e l e c t i o n — " S p a n i s h Gypsy D a n c e " by Deceve. C a t h e r i n e Christie will give a serious p a p e r a b o u t " A l l - S a i n t s Day," and the g r o u p will join in a g a m e using simple Spanish words and phrases. R e f r e s h m e n t s of cider and d o u g h n u t s will be served, and the meeting will t h e n be adjourned until next month when an intere s t i n g C h r i s t m a s p r o g r a m will be held.

Homecoming Vespers Given By Musical Arts The Musical A r t s Club presented a homecoming v e s p e r service Sunday, October 23, a t 4:00 P.M. in the chapel. The service opened with " T h e Church's One F o u n d a t i o n , " by Wesley, a s the processional h y m n . Then the S c r i p t u r e was read by Dr. Eugene Osterhaven, and a choral response, " A m e n , " w a s given by the chapel choir. A c l a r i n e t trio including Mike Van A r k , Richard S t e w a r t and J o h n Du Mez then played " A n dante Religioso." Following t h i s R o b e r t K r a n e n donk s a n g " L o r d , God of Abrah a m " f r o m the " E l i j a h , " by Mendelssohn, and t w o o r g a n numbers, " T h e L a s t S u p p e r , " by Weinberger, and " L e Deum L a u d a m u s " by Buxtehude, were played by Lee Sneden. N e x t M a r g e r y A n g u s and J a c k Bolskool s a n g a vocal duet, "Love Divine, All Love Excelling," by Stainer. The chapel choir p r e s e n t e d " C h e r u b i m S o n g , " by Glenka, a f t e r which everyone s a n g " D a y Is Dying in t h e W e s t , " by Sherwin. Mrs. W. C u r t i s Snow presided a t the o r g a n while Mr. H a r v e y Davis directed t h e chapel choir. o

ANCHOR

Rent a Painting! It Costs But 25c

Reflecting on the events of Homecoming, 1 would first say a word to the F r e s h m e n .

Congratulations

f o r the fine show of determination in the " P u l l . " However, the Sophomores had it over on you, not only because

of

past

experience,

but

also because they were coached by two of

our illustrious scientists,

Among the paintings are water color, charcoal, and crayon pict u r e s by T o u l o u s e - L a u t r e c and Cezanne of the F r e n c h Impressionist S c h o o l — 19th C e n t u r y . Some o t h e r p i c t u r e s available a r e by R e m b r a n d t — 17th Century — D u t c h ; Constable — 18th Century — E n g l i s h ; Winslow H o m e r — 19th Century — A m e r i c a n ; S t u a r t — 18th C e n t u r y — A m e r i c a n ; Bottecelli — 15th C e n t u r y — I t a l i a n ; DeH o o c h — 1 7 t h C e n t u r y — Dutch; Giovanni — 1 5 t h C e n t u r y — Italia n ; Giorgione — 1 5 t h Century — Italian, and Gerard David — 15th Century — Flemish.

Shown in custody above, is the Freshman who first experienced the Ask f o r t h e m a t t h e Circulation bath in Black River. On the day of the Pull, he was found up a tree ber, next year get yourself a cou- Desk. Both s t u d e n t s and f a c u l t y on the Sophomore side of the river. This situation was promptly corple of chem or physics m a j o r s to m a y t a k e a d v a n t a g e of this opporrected, and the Freshman found himself in a rather damp condition. coach you on to success. (No hard t u n i t y . The Freshman pull team followed him through the river in the opposite feelings, Reineke.) direction a little later. Pickens and R y s k a m p . So r e m e m -

I notice t h a t all those who att e m p t e d the A.M.A. test are signing up f o r education courses next s e m e s t e r ; t h a t is, all except Failing. He claims he had two r i g h t guesses f o r sure. However, Gnade has no worries; he's already been accepted a t A l bany . Congratulations, J e r r y ! ( W h e n are we going to get our coffee?) A f e w of our alumni send their g r e e t i n g s to all t h o s e they didn't get a chance to see Homecoming. " C u d d l e s " Van Hall said he would have liked to have talked to more people, but he had o t h e r very imp o r t a n t non-scientific business to take c a r e of. Rod Decker came up all t h e way f r o m Albany, s p o r t i n g a crew-cut. Well, enough a b o u t Homecoming. Mr. Dunning, C h a i r m a n of the Committee on Window Procurement f o r the N e w Dorm, i n f o r m s me t h a t plans a r e almost complete and t h a t f u n d s a r e pouring in r a p idly. One of the Senior chem boys told me t h a t C a s p e r has decided to stop and clean all his equipment before he proceeds any f a r t h e r . The ot her day I w e n t into Zwemer Hall and found Fairchild accusing S m a l l e g a n of b e i n g able to t a k e a bath in a t e s t tube. T h a t ' s nothing, J o h n . A f t e r Dick t a k e s a shower he crawls into a dessicator to d r y off. J u s t a word in closing — Man was f e a r f u l l y and wonderfully made, but a woman a l w a y s needs a r e p a i n t job. o

Delegates To Attend U N E S C O Meeting

Foreign Scholarships To Be Offered To Seniors A n n o u n c e m e n t has recently been made by the D e p a r t m e n t of S t a t e and the P r e s i d e n t ' s Board of Foreign Scholarships of t h e opening of competitions f o r U. S. Government a w a r d s f o r g r a d u a t e s t u d y in the United Kingdom, Belgium, B u r m a , N e t h e r l a n d s , Philippines, Greece, New Zealand, F r a n c e , Italy, I r a n , and N o r w a y f o r the academic y e a r 1950-51. The scholarships offered to A m e r ican g r a d u a t e s t u d e n t s a r e made available a s a result of Public Law 584, 79th C o n g r e s s ( t h e F u l b r i g h t A c t ) . T h i s is the second y e a r in which A m e r i c a n g r a d u a t e s t u d e n t s will have the o p p o r t u n i t y of competing f o r these a w a r d s which provide t r a v e l , tuition, and maintenance f o r study a b r o a d f o r one academic y e a r . The n u m b e r of o p p o r t u n i t i e s in t h e various p a r t i c i p a t i n g countries are listed a s f o l l o w s : United Kingdom, 156; Belgium and Luxembourg, 22; B u r m a , 3; N e t h e r l a n d s , 25; Philippines, 6; Greece, 12; New Zealand, 10; F r a n c e , 220. In t h e cases of I t a l y , N o r w a y , and Iran the exact n u m b e r of t h e scholarships to be offered is not available a t this t i m e , but applications a r e being received in these competitions nonetheless. The basic eligibility requirem e n t s a r e : 1. A m e r i c a n citizenship; 2. a college degree or its equivalent by t h e t i m e the candid a t e t a k e s up his a w a r d ; 3. knowledge of t h e l a n g u a g e of the count r y sufficient to c a r r y on his studies abroad. I n t e r e s t e d a p p l i c a n t s who a r e p r e s e n t l y enrolled a t a college or university should g e t i n f o r m a t i o n and application f o r m s f r o m the F u l b r i g h t P r o g r a m C o m m i t t e e on their own c a m p u s . The S e c r e t a r y of the F u l b r i g h t P r o g r a m Committee on t h i s c a m p u s is Mr. E d w a r d Welters, Van R a a l t e 312. Applications m u s t be completed by December 1, 1949.

GROCERY Across from West Hall

about.

9S8S&S&SSSSSSSSS8SSSSSSS

Committeemen To Be Selected Members of the S t u d e n t Council working

on

the

plan

of

having

s t u d e n t s on f a c u l t y committees are Roy

Lumsden,

Nick

Yonker,

Charles and

Mulder,

Jeanne

Ver

Beek. One r e p r e s e n t a t i v e f r o m the Council and two f r o m t h e college a t l a r g e will be chosen f o r each committee. At t h e f a c u l t y dinner on October 24,

three

representatives

were

chosen to attend the S t u d e n t Council meetings. T h e y

were

Dr.

D.

Nykerk Cup Contest To Be Held Nov. 18 The F r e s h m e n girls will have one more chance to beat the Sophomores! On N o v e m b e r 18 both classes will meet in the Holland High School A u d i t o r i u m to compete in t h e fields of Music, Dramatics, and L i t e r a t u r e f o r the Nykerk Cup. J o a n Wilson is the general chairman f o r the contest and has chosen a committee of f o u r to help her. They

are.

Sophomore

Chairman,

Muriel D r o p p e r s with Mickey V a n Ivan D y k s t r a of the Greek d e p a r t E g m o n d a s her Senior advisor and ment, P r o f e s s o r L a r s G r a n b e r g of the Psychology d e p a r t m e n t , and F r e s h m a n C h a i r m a n , Nella P y l e Dr. Ella Hawkinson of t h e History and J u n i o r advisor, N a n c y Smith. department. Little can be revealed yet because this is a very hush-hush a f -

Miss Elsie Stryker To Address Y W C A

f a i r but t h e c o m m i t t e e asks f o r the

support

of

their

classes

to

m a k e this a good contest.

On n e x t T u e s d a y evening, No- &SSSSSSS@SS&28S3SSSSSSS& cember 8, the m e m b e r s of the Compliments of YWCA will have Miss Elsie Stryker, who comes f r o m N e w J e r s e y , as their g u e s t speaker. Miss S t r y k e r has recently been appointed Director of Religious Education a t Hope Church. 3SSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS This p a s t T u e s d a y m e m b e r s of the YW heard an e n j o y a b l e and inspiring "chalk t a l k " by E s t h e r Everse. Miss E v e r s e is a new and talented F r e s h m a n on the Hope campus.

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Rev. T. Jansma Speaks At Alpha Chi Meeting

F o r t h e ^ e x t m e e t i n g which will be held N o v e m b e r 9, t h e second W e d n e s d a y of t h e month, a n intere s t i n g p r o g r a m is being planned that includes a movie. So, come on all math a n d physics s t u d e n t s and see what you a r e s t u d y i n g is all

This Freshman Got Wet

Rent a f a m o u s p a i n t i n g and add to the b e a u t y of y o u r r o o m ! The library now h a s a collection of p a i n t i n g s by f a m o u s a r t i s t s which you can r e n t a t $.25 a s e m e s t e r .

R e p r e s e n t a t i v e s f r o m Hope College will attend the Michigan Committee f o r U N E S C O meeting a t E a s t L a n s i n g on N o v e m b e r 12. Discussion of the by-laws of the organization and r e p o r t s of United N a t i o n s Day celebration will highlight t h e meeting. Hope College r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s a t tended the p r e l i m i n a r y o r g a n i z a tion meeting of Michigan U N E S C O a t A n n A r b o r in J u n e . The a i m s of t h i s s t a t e o r g a n i z a t i o n a r e to disseminate i n f o r m a t i o n and g e n erally f u r t h e r t h e purpose of t h e U. N. Hope College, a s a m e m b e r institution, will benefit by these services and c o n t r i b u t e to t h i s organization t h a t looks upon education, service, and u n d e r s t a n d i n g a s avenues to world peace. • F u r t h e r i n f o r m a t i o n on U N E S Rev. Theodore J a n s m a , p a s t o r of CO m a y be f o u n d on the bulletin the E i g h t h R e f o r m e d Church of board on the n o r t h wall of t h e 21 W . G r a n d Rapids, w a s the f e a t u r e d m a g a z i n e room of Graves L i b r a r y . s p e a k e r a t the A l p h a Chi meeting Monday night. P r e s i d e n t Leon 9&8SS8SS8SSSSS8S@SS@8S@88888SS88S38@S888SSS&8SS6 D y k s t r a introduced t h e speaker. Abe De Vries led t h e men in singHAVE YOUR DORM AGEN ing and devotions were in charge of Levi Akker. All college men int e r e s t e d in C h r i s t i a n Service a r e invited to a t t e n d t h e meetings. o

On October 19, t h e M a t h - P h y s i c s club held i t s first meeting of the y e a r in room 108 of t h e Science Building 1 . T h e members p r e s e n t h e a r d a v e r y i n t e r e s t i n g t a l k given by Mr. Millard W e s t r a t e , who is a n e n g i n e e r f o r Holland's Board of Public W o r k s a n d also electrical engineer f o r t h e local radio station, W H T C . H e spoke on t h e applica- Avison Takes Child To t i o n s of M a t h e m a t i c s and Physics in his field of work. Also of m a n y St. Louis For Operation of his experiences in t h e field of L a s t week-end M r . E d w a r d Avielectrical engineering. son w a s in St. Louis where he took A f t e r M r . W e s t r a t e had speken, his d a u g h t e r M a r y Louise f o r a n a s h o r t b u s i n e s s meeting w a s held. operation. He will r e t u r n f o r h e r Officers f o r t h i s coming y e a r were in t w o weeks. elected which a r e a s follows: presiH e h a s also decided n o t to direct dent, J i m W o l t e r b e e k ; vice-presi- a p l a y f o r t h e J a c k s o n T h e a t e r dent, J a c k R y s k a m p ; s e c r e t a r y , Guild because of t h e heavy schedDon H a z e k a m p ; and t r e a s u r e r . Bob ule of w o r k in P a l e t t e and Masque. Erickson. -

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Page Four

HOPE

COLLEGE

Milestone Staff Collects Photos

P & M Monthly Meeting

French Club Will M e e t on Nov. 14

To Feature One Act Play

P r e s i d e n t N o r m a H u n g e r i n k announces t h a t t h e n e x t meeting of the F r e n c h club will be held on November 14 a t t h e home of Mrs. M. P r i n s . A s s i s t i n g Miss H u n g e r ink in the p r e p a r a t i o n s f o r the p r o g r a m is Nancy Lee Corpe. A f e w s k i t s in F r e n c h will be presented. The m e m b e r s will also practice music f o r the coming C h r i s t m a s p r o g r a m . P l a n s will be discussed f o r t h e f u t u r e F r e n c h club p a r t y . Those s t u d e n t s who corresponded to F r a n c e t h i s summer will read some of their letters. To conclude the evening, r e f r e s h ments will be served.

' A studio production, open to t h e s t u d e n t body, of t h e one-act play " Y o u r s and M i n e " by Ella Mae Daniels will be given t h i s evening in the L i t t l e T h e a t e r u n d e r t h e direction of R a y m o n d M a r t i n and Richard L e o n a r d . This will be t h e first r e g u l a r monthly m e e t i n g of P a l e t t e and Masque, and all those i n t e r e s t e d in a n y aspect of dramatics a r e s t r o n g l y u r g e d to be present f o r t h e p r o g r a m and the business m e e t i n g a f t e r w a r d s . R e a d i n g s f r o m S h a k e s p e a r e by Marvin M e p y a n s and a g r o u p of A m e r i c a n ballads by Richard Leona r d will complete the p r o g r a m . The cast f o r " Y o u r s and Mine" is a s follows: Dr. J a m e s F l o w e r s — Roy Adelberg; Katherine Flowers — J u n e D u n s t e r ; Dad Flowers—Robe r t Stopples; Mrs. Hopper — Helen Naden. T h i s p r o g r a m will be presented f o r t h e Women's L i t e r a r y

Clubs of Holland and S a u g a t u c k on November 9 and 18. Crews f o r t h e production a r e : P r o p e r t i e s — Phyllis Leach, Berdean Young, Don L u b b e r s ; Cost u m e s — A m y Silcox; Make-up — Marvin M e p y a n s ; S t a g e — Mr. Edw a r d Avison, Doug Gunther, Dale DeWitt, Bob B u r r o u g h s ; L i g h t s — A1 Arwe. ^ Any s t u d e n t s on campus who a r e interested in joining the o r g a n i z a tion are very welcome to t h i s meeting. Crews will be organized t h i s evening and new m e m b e r s who wish to be included should be present. T h e new constitution, which was discussed by the executive committee of P a l e t t e and Masque last week a t t h e i r meeting, will be read to the g r o u p . The s t u d e n t body in general is invited to come up to the Little T h e a t e r t h i s evening to enjoy the p r o g r a m and f u n .

Gov't Careers Are Chemistry Club Holds First Meeting of Year O f f e r e d To Seniors The Hope C o l l e j e Chemistry Club The Social Security A d m i n i s t r a tion offers college seniors a career in G o v e r n m e n t t h r o u g h the J u n i o r Professional A s s i s t a n t and J u n i o r Management Assistant Examinations announced by the U. S. Civil Service Commission on October 11, 1949. A r c h i t e c t , bacteriologist, biologist, e c o n o m i s t , m a t h e m a t i c i a n , and psychologist positions a r e a f e w of t h e m a n y open to the J u n i o r Professional A s s i s t a n t . Social science g r a d u a t e s may compete f o r a p p o i n t m e n t t o responsible positions in Social Security Administration Field Offices by t a k i n g t h e J u n i o r P r o f e s s i o n a l Assistant-Social Science A n a l y s t E x a m i n a t i o n . Application f o r m s a r e available in Mr. T i m m e r ' s office. Van

Raalte

112, and the applications a r e to be filed not l a t e r than November 8, 1949.

held its f i r s t m e e t i n g of the y e a r on October 19, in the Science Building. P r e s i d e n t Paul Cook welcomed all the old and new m e m b e r s and then t u r n e d the meeting over to Dr. Van Zyl. Doctor Van Zyl's talk covered the history of t h e A m e r i c a n Chemical Society and a r e p o r t of t h e Societies Convention v h i c h was held a t Atlantic City, H e w J e r s e y , t h i s September. Dr. Van Zyl spoke briefly of t h e p r o g r e s s of the Chemistry d e p a r t m e n t and of the f o r m a t i o n of the C h e m i s t r y Club. The h i g h l i g h t of t h e meeting was when Dr. Van Zyl turned over to President Cook t h e c h a r t e r of membership in t h e American Chemical Society, which is the l a r g e s t scientific society in tha world. With t h i s impressive beginning the Chemist r y Club is looking f o r w a r d to a profitable and int3resting year.

Stop at BOTER'S When

in

Need

ANCHOR

Alumni H Club Has Second Meeting The first m e e t i n g of the Alumni H Club was held October 30, 1948. Mr. Clyde Geerlings was appointed Business M a n a g e r , and Dean Milton Hinga, Athletic Director, a t a lunchoen held a t Temple. I t w a s unanimously decided, due to the int e r e s t and a t t e n d a n c e , t h a t the club organize. A n o m i n a t i n g committee, consisting of Russell VanderPoel, A1 Cook and Clarence Becker, w a s appointed. A t t h e second meeting, October 22 of t h i s y e a r , a nomination slate was introduced to more t h a n a hundred f o r m e r Hope lettermen, and it w a s u n a n i m o u s l y accepted. J i m VerMuellen of Grand Rapids was elected to the Presidency and Earl Klaasen of Holland was elected S e c r e t a r y - T r e a s u r e r . The president p r o m p t l y appointed n u m e r o u s committees f o r t h e purpose of g e t t i n g f u t u r e a t h l e t e s interested in Hope College. One of the f o u n d e r s of the organization, Dean Hinga, said: " T h i s group will g r o w into one of the most active o r g a n i z a t i o n s in support of Hope College and Hope College f u n c t i o n s . Men came f r o m all sections of the c o u n t r y to a t tend, and went a w a y enthusiastic about h a v i n g a b i g g e r and better organization next y e a r . "

These h a v e been busy weeks f o r the

photographers

of

the

Mile-

The Hope College O r c h e s t r a , unstone. The c a m p u s buildings w e r e der t h e direction of M o r r e t t e Rider, t h e objects of their i n t e r e s t last will p r e s e n t its first concert on week, and now the f a c u l t y is be-, T h u r s d a y , N o v e m b e r 10, a t 8:15 P.M. f o r e the c a m e r a . A n i n t e r e s t i n g and varied proU n d e r c l a s s m e n who have had g r a m h a s been planned by Mr. t h e i r Milestone pictures t a k e n have Rider. A m o n g the selections a r e expressed t h e i r satisfaction with " T o c c a t a " by Girolamo Frescobaldi, the methods and work of Under- "On the S t e p p e s of C e n t r a l A s i a " bill studios. Today and tomorrow by A. Borodin, J a r o m i c W e e n b e r g those who h a v e not yet made ap- er's " P o l k a f r o m S h u a n d a , " " T r u m p o i n t m e n t s f o r their pictures may pet P r e l u d e " of H e n r y Purcell, and " S h o r t O v e r t u r e " by Don Gillis, do so in Van Raalte hall. Seniors m a y have t h e i r pictures and W a g n e r ' s " S i e g f r i e d Idyll." W a g n e r ' s Idyll was w r i t t e n a s a taken a t the studio of their own C h r i s t m a s p r e s e n t f o r his wife and choosing, but these m u s t be in the h a n d s of the staff by t h e week fol- its first p e r f o r m a n c e was given f o r lowing T h a n k s g i v i n g v a c a t i o n . her p r i v a t e l y on C h r i s t m a s mornSeniors have been given certain ing. Don Gillis, who is p r o g r a m dispecifications f o r t h e i r pictures, rector of N a t i o n a l Br o a d c a s t i n g and in this w a y the staff hopes to Company, published his " S h o r t O v e r t u r e " j u s t lately and it has m a k e a more u n i f o r m book. only been p e r f o r m e d in public a In order to obtain new ideas f o r few times. a b e t t e r Milestone t h i s year. Bill V a n ' t Hof and Bob V a n Dyke represented Hope at the Associated Collegiate P r e s s Conference in Detroit. The U n i v e r s i t y of Michigan, Michigan S t a t e , W a y n e University, The following schedule of chapel and the University of Detroit were leaders w a s released last week f r o m hosts a t the conference which w a s Rev. E u g e n e O s t e r h a v e n ' s office: held October 13-15. One-hundred Nov. 4 — P r o f . Clarence Kleis. and t h i r t y - s e v e n colleges were repNov. 7 — Dr. Clarence De G r a a f . resented f r o m t h i r t y - s i x s t a t e s inNov. 8 — Y M - Y W C A . cluding Florida, A l a b a m a , Texas, Nov. 9 — P r o f . Harold Hoverand C a l i f o r n i a . G e n e r a l Motors kamp. showed their interest in the work Nov. 10 — P r o f . L a u r a Boyd. by providing a banquet f o r the enNov. 11 — Dr. D. Ivan D y k s t r a . t i r e five hundred and fifty deleNov. 14 — Mr. J . J . R i e m e r s m a , g a t e s . Both s t u d e n t s reported t h a t the entire conference was very Principal of Holland High School.

Schedule of Chapel Leaders Is Released

beneficial in f a c i l i t a t i n g the building of the yearbook. Ideas w e r e derived f o r sectional production in the wisest utilization of spaces and b e t t e r financing of t h e yearbook. The Milestone is to have pictorial a d v e r t i s i n g and run half and f u l l p a g e snaps of college life in the a d v e r t i s i n g sections which is hoped to raise the a d v e r t i s i n g value of the section. Such new ideas will help make t h e Milestone a b e t t e r yearbook.

Welcome Hopeites DEFOUW'S ELECTRIC SHOP

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Evening Concert To Be Presented By H o p e Orchestra

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The usual confusion w a s on hand a t Zwemer Hall, and t h e same bicycles w e r e s t r u n g on t h e s a m e flagpoles, and t h e m o n s t e r s h a v e gone back to t h e i r hiding places for another year. The All-Girl M a s q u e r a d e P a r t y produced, a m o n g o t h e r t h i n g s , the Kitchen Cabinet Band. Anyone is eligible to join if he h a s the following qualifications: If he is a Dean of Women, if he is a House Director, if he h a s an " I N " with the kitchen, a n d lastly, if he can play t h r e e n u m b e r s ( a n y t h r e e will do) w i t h proficiency. C o n g r a t u l a tions f o r a w o n d e r f u l showing! o — "All Girl," did I s a y ? A m o n g the o t h e r lovely sights, were two pulchritudinous specimens, n a m e l y J a c k and Abe. J u s t couldn't stay a w a y f r o m the f e m a l e s f o r one night, could y o u ? o Slaves a r e being sold to the highest bidder a t sorority m e e t i n g s these days, but R u t h Ann Johnson firmly r e f u s e d to loan N a n Thompson money to buy her. o The K a n g a r o o K o u r t w a s a h u g e success and lots of f u n . We shall long r e m e m b e r our most noble k n i g h t of the c a m p u s who c a m e to t h e d e f e n s e of Princess Connie Boersma. W H O w a s t h e girl Nick Yonker imported f r o m Chicago f o r Homec o m i n g ? Is the g r a s s really g r e e n er t h e r e , N i c k ? o W h a t ' s going on between Beach C o t t a g e and t h e " T " B a r r a c k s ? We t h i n k it's a r o m a n c e with a Mysterious Mr. Chucker and a certain Miss L.A. a s the culprits. o The man of the week is Corky Otte . . . how do you do it. Corky ? o Dot Milne s e e m s to have a secret a d m i r e r . H a v e you noticed t h e posies she w e a r s ? o C o n g r a t u l a t i o n s t o Lamont Dirkse and R u t h i e De G r a a f ! And, incidentally, h a v e you noticed t h e lovely f r a t pin t h a t A n n Cousins is d i s p l a y i n g ?

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4 i

HOPE

SIBYLLINE

" W h a t a m I bid f o r t h i s h e a l t h y , h a r d - w o r k i n g young lady you see b e f o r e y o u ? Who will s t a r t t h e bidding?" Sounds such a s these echoed f r o m t h e Dorian room on F r i d a y , October 28, a s t h e e i g h t new pledges became eight new slaves sold u n d e r t h e .auctioneer's hamm e r . " F . S. Boone" S m i t h presided over the hilarities a s t h e aiittioneer. A f t e r the sale, t h e Dorians recalled t h e w o n d e r f u l Homecoming b r e a k f a s t which was enjoyed by t h e p r e s e n t m e m b e r s , p l e d g e s , and a l u m n a e . T h e y also a r e looking f o r w a r d to a d a t e n i g h t which will be held in t h e n e a r f u t u r e , and which p r o m i s e s to be loads of f u n f o r the Dorians and t h e i r guests.

This y e a r t h e Sib float in the a n n u a l Homecoming p a r a d e had a s its song title t h e m e " S t a r of t h e W e s t . " A l a r g e white s t a r b e a r i n g the n a m e " H o p e " was the principal a t t r a c t i o n . On t h i s s t a r w e r e mounted smaller blue s t a r s r e p r e senting the ot her colleges in t h e MIAA. The a l u m n a e luncheon w a s held a t the Dutch Mill and many old m e m b e r s r e t u r n e d to renew t h e i r friendships. A t each place w a s a lovely white mum with the silver and blue ribbon of t h e Sibs. Devotions were led by Edith K r e u n , and Edna Pierce was the m i s t r e s s of ceremonies f o r the r e m a i n d e r of the p r o g r a m . P r e s i d e n t M a r g e A a r d e m a g a v e the welcome and introduced t h e president of t h e A l u m n a e Association. This was followed b y a s l i g h t l y shortened SOROSIS piano rendition of " S t a r of the M e m b e r s and new pledges of E a s t " by Anital R y n b r a n d t . Dot S i g m a S i g m a "blended p e r f e c t l y " B u r g e r s s a n g an old f a v o r i t e — by t a k i n g t i m e out f r o m the h u s t l e " S t a r d u s t , " and Lizz Schmidt g a v e of c a m p u s activities to g a t h e r f o r her inimitable version of life in a Homecoming Kletz. The prog r a m s w e r e o r a n g e and blue Brooklyn — t h e " E a r t h b o r n S t a r . "

%

*

" p e r c s " and the p r o g r a m w a s entitled, " A P e r f e c t Blend," all ground together for a brewing good time. Eve Schuiling led in devotions and M a r g a r e t Wolffensp e r g e r s a n g h y m n s in Dutch. The " h i s t o r i e s " of Hope's Homecoming w e r e p r e s e n t e d by Lois E n g l a n d , and Ginnie Hesse g a v e with the " h y s t e r i c s " of the s a m e . T h e t r a d i t i o n a l Homecoming A l u m n a e luncheon took place at t h e W a r m ' F r i e n d T a v e r n . President Joyce B a k e r p u t out the welcome m a t and Sorosite Wolffensp e r g e r said grace. A f t e r renewing a c q u a i n t a n c e s , t h e new pledges w e r e introduced and the chain of f r i e n d s h i p w a s once a g a i n linked w i t h t h e Sorosis songs. C h a i r m a n of t h e e v e n t was N a n c y V y v e r b e r g . Gold m u m s with w h i t e ribbons s p a r k l e d on t h e lapels of Sorosite g i r l s a t t h e game. T r e m e n d o u s joy w a s r e g i s t e r e d a t h a l f t i m e when Sorosites w e r e given honorable mention f o r their float with Hillsdale " U n d e r n e a t h t h e A r c h e s . " T h a t m a d e the back aches and f a l l e n a r c h e s w o r t h the trouble. W o r k i n g t o g e t h e r on this float a s co-chairmen were Marion Reichert and Shirley Gess.

ANCHOR

Page Five

Acceptances of Bids Are

#ororitip0 DORIAN

COLLEGE

Jfratprnitfea COSMOPOLITAN

Received By Fraternities F r a t e r n i t y bids a r e out, and 119 of them w e r e acceptances. The A r cadians received 25 of t h e m ; Ron Kolkman, Roy Adelberg, Ed Viening, J i m Rendel, H a n s Veening, J e r r y W e a v e r , S t u a r t Noordyk, Robert Simonsen, Kenn K a m m e r aad, Roger Knopf, Richard Reinem a n n , Douglas Monroe, J o h n Giebink. Bob Moolenaar, T h o m a s Ritter, Richard Weisiger, Carl Van Farowe, Don S i k k e n g a , Paul Mitsos, Hendrik P a r s o n s , G o r d e n Schipper, J a c k H a s c u p , Bill Wiersm a j Donald Kooiman, J a m e s H a r vey. The Knickerbockers received 18; Ken Glupker, William Aldrich, George H a m p s , Marvin Mepyans, H a r d y E n s s i n g , Robert Eyerly, Kenneth Brinza, A n t h o n y Zalinka, Bernard Ozinga, Albert J o h n s o n , Alvin V a n d e r Kolk, Charles Gifford, A r t h u r Brockner, Gorden Jones, J o s e p h Gross, Howie Van Dahm, C h a r l e s D y k s t r a , K e n n e t h Pollard.

The Cosmopolitan F r a t e r n i t y reThe luncheon ended with the sing- ceived 15; J o h n Boeve, Bob Buring of the Sib song, blending rows, F r e d M a r t i n , P e t e r Roon, a l u m n a e voices with those of the W a r r e n Sinke, J a c k Mellema, Dan De G r a a f , Raymond Brokaw, Norpresent m e m b e r s — a p e r f e c t endman Thompson, Dan Veldman, ing. Owen Christensen, W a r r e n W e s t e r hoff, Richard Ruch, J a m e s S t r y k e r , W a r r e n Exo. THESAURIAN The E m m e r s o n i a n s received 30 A f t e r the Homecoming p a r a d e acceptances, they w e r e : Don Brockon the 22, the T h e t a s and t h e i r way, Don Prentice, Dick V a n d e r Heidt, Guy V a n d e r J a g t , Charles alumnae r e n e w e d acquaintances

w e r e innoculated with the A r c a -

KNICKERBOCKER • On T h u r s d a y evening, October 13, a special l i t e r a r y m e e t i n g w a s held a t Miller's Barn to g e t acquainted with prospective m e m b e r s and also to acquaint them with some of the activities on Hope's campus. Vice-president J a c k R y s k a m p welcomed the g u e s t s and then turned the meeting over to J i m Wolterbeek, who is in c h a r g e of r u s h i n g e v e n t s . President Paul Cook g a v e a very i n t e r e s t i n g talk on the ideals of the Knickerbocker f r a t e r n i t y and f r a t e r n i t y functions. The h i g h l i g h t of the evening w a s the s h o w i n g of color slides of Hope's c a m p u s and Holland by Charles Kelly. Then Ken Smouse gave his audience an "inside pict u r e " of the Men's Glee Club. The various aspects of P a l e t t e and Masque w e r e described by Martin Mepyans, and Verne Sikkema concluded the p r o g r a m by outlining the activities of the YMCA. A s m o k e r followed, so m e m b e r s would get b e t t e r acquainted with their guests. Cider and d o u g h n u t s were served. A l i t e r a r y meeting opened to guests was hold Monday, October 17. Ken Smouse led the g r o u p in singing, and devotions were read by M a r t Mepyans. Charlie Link's serious paper, " T h e History of Hope College," g a v e everyone a more vivid idea about early c a m p u s life, especially in sports. Wade " R e d " Moore combined medicine and baseball in his h u m o r paper, in such a m a n n e r t h a t m a n y h e a r t y chuckles were hoard. A word of t h a n k s goes to J i m Brown and his committee who did a fine job in m a k i n g the a f t e r ^ a m e lunch d u r i n g Homecoming such a success, and to Don F a i r child and his helpers whose h a r d work on the float made a g r a n d showing in the p a r a d e . C o n g r a t u l a t i o n s are extended to the Cosmopolitan F r a t e r n i t y f o r their winning float e n t r y .

dian spirit when all joined in to

o

P h i K a p p a A l p h a w a s honored in a recent meeting by t h e p r e s ence of one of its f o r m e r members, Wendell Miles, District A t t o r n e y of t h i s county who p a r t i c i p a t e d in t h e prosecution a t t h e N u r n b e r g t r i a l s in G e r m a n y . Mr. Miles g a v e a talk about his m a n y i n t e r e s t i n g experiences. Cosmo Bill MacKay m a d e the l a u g h s f o r t h e evening, assisted periodically by his buddy, Cosmo Chuck Mulder.

Votaw, Russel Korver, Bob H a r p e r , Harold Van Zoeren, George Muyskens, Russel A. V a n Dyke, Bob B r a n d t , Dick Teppink, K a s p e r Ultee, Dick T h o m p s o n , Ray Zwemer, N o r m a n T a y l o r , Gayle • T h o m a s , Kenneth Erickson, Ronald Rosenberg, H e r b e r t W a g e m a k e r , Ray Lee, H a r v a r d Vanden Berge, Dan B r a n d t , Floyd Dry, Kenneth Otto, J a c k De W a a r d , William Finlow, Two new m e m b e r s were added Faried Banna, William Smith, Donto the Cosmo s i n g i n g group, " T h e ald Inglis. S o u r S e v e n ; " the g r o u p now calls The F r a t e r n a l Society received itself " T h e N a u s e a t i n g N i n e . " 31 acceptances; Don Hillebrands, T h e y sang. Bill N e a t h a m m e r w a s Dick Hagni, Paul Robbert, Robert m a s t e r critic. The m e e t i n g w a s Bos, Don P i e r s m a , Ron Appledorn, held in t h e Tulip Room of the Don Miller, Bob Inqam, E u g e n e W a r m Friend T a v e r n . Hospers, Don Lubbers, Charles Chicken d i n n e r s w e r e served Fleishmann, Don W i e r e n g a , Paul ^Van Eck, David Kloote, K e n n e t h Cosmos and their g u e s t s a t a reBauman, J a m e s Meeusen, J a m e s cent banquet a t the Marquee. CosDe Vries, R a y De Witte, J o h n mo Zeb H e r m a n c e s t a r t e d the proNewton, J o h n Johnson, R a n d y g r a m with a vocal n u m b e r . Cosmo Bosch, Rodger N o r t h u i s , J i m Abel, Lloyd Ter Borg p r e s e n t e d a cornet Dick Huff, E r w i n Koop, William solo, accompanied by Cosmo Phil Kloote, R o g e r V a n d e r Meulen, Carl F r e d r i c k s o n . Movies of the MonJ o r d a n , Bob H a r t l e y , John E. Win- m o u t h game, t a k e n by Mr. Clyde Geerlings, were shown. ter, William Messier. Cosmopolitans welcomed m a n y of Rebidding will t a k e place on Not h e i r alumni a f t e r t h e homecoming vember 4, and the bids will be g a m e . R e f r e s h m e n t s were served cleared on November 7, by the I n t e r f r a t e r n i t y Council. A t this a m i d yells such as, " J o e ! You old r a s c a l ! W h a t have you been doing time pledging will be closed f o r these t w e n t y y e a r s ? " the semester. Hell week will be The float trophy h a s been placed f r o m November 27 until December in the Cosmo t r o p h y case. I t s 3, instead of f r o m October 27 to background is a b e a u t i f u l Cosmo November 3 a s s t a t e d in the last c r e s t . Right now, the t r o p h y case is a beauty spot in t h e room. issue of t h e A N C H O R .

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F r a t e r P r e s i d e n t Hendrickson called the meeting to order. He then welcomed the new pledges. F r a t e r Gene Campbell opened the m e e t i n g with p r a y e r and F r a t er V a n d e r Velde led t h e g r o u p t h r o u g h a few, but well-sung songs. F r a t e r H e n r y Visser t h e n g a v e his serious p a p e r about t h e a t o m bomb and what effects it seems to have on Americans. F r a t e r De Voogd r e a l l y took c a r e of t h e humor w i t h a p a p e r entitled " D e a r D i a r y , " in which he recalled m a n y experiences here and a b r o a d . F r a t e r Vande W a t e r moved t h e m e e t i n g be adjourned.

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HOPE

Page Six

COLLEGE

ANCHOR

SECOND PLACE NOW HOPE GOAL Cross Country Team and Huyser Remain Unbeaten The Hope College cross country grabbed five of the first six places, squad meets the strong Albion team, which was the conference team and star individual performer, losing only fifth place to Hein of champion last year. This season the Ivan Huyser, continued undefeated the Dales. Placing in the Hillsdale Albion team is also strong, and meet was as follows: Huyser, as they won their third meet of this meet may decide the conferHope; Ottipoby, Hope; T r i p p , the season in a Homecoming race, ence champion for 1949. Both Hope Hope; Randall, Hope; Hein, Hillsdefeating Hillsdale, 1G to 47. and Albion go into this meet undedale; Knopp, Hope; VanHeest, The individual winner of the feated. Following this test, Hope Hope; Campbell, Hope; Auguin, Bearcat race was Ivan Huyser, who meets Kalamazoo in a home meet Hillsdale; Beck, Hillsdale; Halcovered the four-mile course in 22 on Saturday, November 12. stead, Hillsdale; Kasiski, Hillsdale. minutes and 11 seconds for a new This year's M^AA meet will be MIAA Meet at Hope course record. The week before, held at Hope on November 15. All Coach Lars Granberg is prepar- the MIAA teams will travel to Huyser also broke the Adrian course record as he ran it in 21 ing the Hope harriers for the next Holland f o r the run which will take minutes and 47 seconds. In this three meets which remain on the place on Tuesday afternoon. The meet, Hope knocked off both To- schedule, one of them the MIAA meet will be a big factor in figurmeet, which this year will take ing how the teams will stand in ledo" University and Adrian. In the Hillsdale race, Hope place at Hope. Next week the Hope the season's final records.

Homecoming Spoiled W i t h 13-9 Dale W i n Hope's dreams of an MIAA football championship ran into a brick wall on three occasions at Riverview Park when potential Dutch touchdown drives were halted by a rugged Hillsdale defense deep in Bearcat territory. As a result, Hillsdale escaped with a four-point, 13-9 victory and a probable conference title. The Bearcats roared into an early lead with Spud Huston, 2()0-pound fullback, slamming across for the game's first tally. Young's attempted kick was wide. Later in the first quarter, all-MIAA halfback Bill Young ripped off 38 yards for Hillsdale's second and final score. This time Young's kick was good, giving the Bearcats a 13-0 first quarter lead. .

time reaching the Hillsdale tenyard marker before they were halted. In the third quarter the Dales slammed to the Hope eight where they were stopped by a fumble. Hope's other threat came in the fourth quarter when a first down on the Bearcats' four-yard line provided a golden opportunity. The Hillsdale defense again held, enabling the to maintain their fourpoint lead. o

Voorhees Girls Top Volleyball Leagues The women's volleyball league is in full swing with exciting games being played every Thursday night. Voorhees " A " and Voorhees " C " remain the only undefeated teams in the leagues. STANDINGS

. " A " League W Voorhees " A " 3 Town Girls " A " . . 3 Beach • 2 Van Vleck " A " .... 1 West Hall 1 Fairbanks 0 "B" League W Voorhees " C " 3 Town Girls " B " .. 3 Van Vleck "B" .... 2 Voorhees " B " 2 A f t e r taking the kickoff, the Hope-Ives 0 Dutch launched another drive, this Columbia 0

In the second frame, Hope retaliated with a Yonker-to-Holwerda pass good f o r five yards and six points. Holwerda's kick for the extra point made it 13 to 7. A few moments later the Hollanders were again knocking at the Hillsdale goal, but were stalled on the sixinch line. A f t e r the Bearcats had taken over, Clair DeMull slammed Bill Young into the turf behind the end zone for a safety, setting the score at 13-9.

L 0 1 2 2 2 3

Dutchmen Dump Hurons, 16 to 6 Hope's Dutch remained among the top of the heap of Michigan collegiate football squads when they racked up their fifth victory of the season, downing Michigan Normal, 16 to 6. The Hurons threw a scare into the Hollanders when they took a 6-0 lead in the second period with Jim Martin taking a handoff from Tom Toncali and going across from the two. In the third q u a r t e r , . halfback Jim Pfingstel covered 12 yards f o r Hope's first tally, and Tom VanWingen raced 28 yards for another a few moments later. Bill Holwerda's field goal added three points in the last quarter to cap the scoring.

Pet. 1.000 .750 .500 .333 A big event in women's athletics .333 on Hope's campus was the Wo.000 men's MIAA Play Day last Saturday, at which time the Hope board L Pet. of the WAA was hostess to stu0 1.000 dents f r o m Hillsdale, Kalamazoo, 1 .750 and Albion. This is an affair which 1 .G67 comes to Hope's campus only once 1 .6G7 in six years. 3 .000 Taking part were about eighty4 .000 five girls who were divided into various t e a m s . E a c h team contained girls from all of the schools. The day began with registration in the Carnegie gymnasium a f t e r which there were mixers from 9:30 to 10:00 a.m. relays f r o m 10:00 to 10:30, and volley ball from point f o r first, two for second, 10:45 to 11:45. Then all of the girls had lunchthree f o r third, and so on. The eon at the Voorhees dining hall. sixth and seventh men across for This was followed by an entereach school do not figure in the tainment at Voorhees which conscoring, but hold their places pre- sisted of a skit and some musical venting members of the other numbers. From 1:30 to 2:00 p.m., there squad from moving into a scoring was a meeting of the Women's position. MIAA at which a secretary was Lest this be more confusing, let elected and plans f o r coming events us take an example. Suppose that were discussed. This was followed in a dual meet Hope gained the by badminton doubles, archer, ping following places: 1st, 4th, 5th, 6th, pong, and tumbling until 2:45 7th, 9th, and 11th; the opponents when basketball was played. The day ended at Voorhees hall took 2nd, 3rd, 8th, 10th, 12th, 13th, with a tea at which the Hope WAA and 14th. Hope's first five men board presented each guest with a have placed Ist, 4th, 5th, 6th, and letter opener on which the letters 7th f o r a total of 23. The oppo- WMIAA were engraved. nents first five men have placed o 2nd, 3rd, 8th, 10th, and 12th for a total of 40. Hope's 9th and 11th Dorm Sports Chairmen place winners do not figure in the scoring, but they hold their posi- Selected By Women tion, thereby keeping the oppoTo facilitate the operation of the nents 10th, 12th, 13th, and 14th from moving up into a greater women's intermural physical education program, the following dormiscoring position.

MIAA Play Day Is Held at Hope

Math 99 - Fundamentals Of Cross Country Scoring With Hope currently pacing the MIAA in cross country competition and the league harrier meet scheduled to take place at Holland this year. Coach Lars

Granberg has

suggested t h a t an explanation of the seemingly complex method of scoring this sport be given f o r those who may be a bit hazy concerning the matter. It is with this purpose in mind, and also t h a t of the possibility of stimulating a greater interest in cross country by means of an increased understanding of the game, t h a t the following explanation is offered. To begin with, as in golf, the team with the lowest total is the winner. For example, if Hope had a final score of 23, and its opponent had 40, Hope would be the winner of the meet. In a dual meet, seven contesta n t s participate f o r each school. The first five men across 'figure in the scoring on a basis of one

tory sports chairmen have been

M I A A Harrier M e e t A t Hope This Year

the Hope-Hillsdale quarterback

Nick

Hillsdale HOPE Alma Adrian Albion Kalamazoo

9 ..2

Scores Hillsdale 13, Hope 9. Albion 12, Olivet 6. Alma 45, Grand Rapids JC 0. Valparaiso 38, Kalamazoo 0. Adrian 27, Kalamazoo 13. Hillsdale 8, Central Mich. 0. Hope 16, Mich. Normal 6. Alma 14, Albion 6.

253 yards. On the receiving end of the aerials, Hope also paces the

One of the first women's sports activities to be scheduled on a dor-

mitory basis is bowling which will Huyser, Ottipoby, Tripp, Rendell, conference with DeMull having be held each Friday afternoon. All Campbell, VanHeest, Knopf, and snared seven for 101 yards, and those interested are urged to come Holwerda six for 127 yards. Parsons. out.

As an example of the raiding, or whatever you'd like to call it. Kern pointed to the situation at Benton Harbor junior college; he said that nearly all of last season's championship basketball team showed up this year as sophomores at Hillsdale College. He then expressed confidence that the problem could be ironed out in conferences with the MIAA. Athletic Director Hinga says that Hope certainly cannot be accused of burglarizing the junior college ranks. Says Hinga, "We haven't had a t r a n s f e r student from a junior college since before the war." The junior colleges undoubtedly have a problem — but who doesn't? Asking the MIAA schools not to accept a former junior college student until his junior year seems like a pretty tall order. Our comment: We feel for you, jc, but it's rough all over. Somewhat closely allied to the jaysee complaint is the suggestion that the rule prohibiting freshmen from playing on varsity athletic squads be put back into force. It seems that officials at Monmouth, a school with this ruling, were none too happy when they discovered t h a t Hope had eleven frosh on its roster. The primary purpose of this rule is to prevent the institutions from using various athletes who flunk out a f t e r the first semester, thereby eliminating the renegades from the ranks and limiting them to those of solid scholastic standing. Whether this is a problem at Hope, and other small colleges for that matter, is debatable.

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A f t e r expressing concern over the loss of its athletes to the MIAA, JC Conference President Palmer Kern said that the MIAA isn't being accused of raiding the junior ranks. What then is the MIAA being accused of, we'd like to ask.

At last comes a favorable comment on our suggestion for a new Games type of basketball scorer. Alumnus Ted Flaherty writes from Japan, L T Pet. P F PA "That new type of score board sounds like quite the thing; and I don't 0 0 1 . 0 0 0 141 15 see why it wouldn't work just as well for basketball as for bowling. 1 0 .833 113 33 Says Hugh Fullerton, Jr. in his "Sports Roundup", "Personal nomi2 0 .667 105 77 nation for the season's most nauseating nickname: 'Troybabes' for the 2 0 .600 101 87 4 1 .333 88 110 University of California freshmen." He undoubtedly hasn't heard of 4 0 .333 67 133 Hope's "Cabinetmakers".

lena Gill, Fairbanks; Beth Thomp-

greater part of his total 298 yards, all dorm recreation and sports acin front of Columbia hall and will the largest offensive mark in the tivities throughout the year. end on the college track, covering Elected to represent the freshMIAA. a distance of four miles. men girls on the WAA Board were The feature of the battle is exYonker has completed 18 of 34 Jackie Blaauw, Pat Stagg,. and pected to be the stiff competition attempted passes for the mark of Connie Boersma.

Hope's seven contestants will be

All W 6 5 4 3

In Passes, Offense Dutch

Also in a doleful mood is the Michigan junior college conference, which seems to believe t h a t the MIAA is "robbing the cradle". The Jaysees claims that the MIAA members are stealing their best athletes before their two years of study are completed, and they intend to ask the larger schools not to use these lads until a f t e r graduation from the junior colleges.

Hats off department: to the athletic committee f o r drawing up a top-notch 1949-50 basketball schedule. It's encouraging to be able to look over the list and find that such pushovers as Percy Jones and Grand Rapids JC are not contained therein. Contests against squads of t h a t calibre undoubtedly have done more harm than good to Hope teams of the past. Our only f u r t h e r suggestion would be to schedule a couple of genuine games to replace the bi-annual religious wars which take place when the Dutch meet Calvin.

Pet. P F PA 1.000 67 9 .667 56 27 .667 67" 47 .333 34 62 .333 14 50 .000 20 61

Plus Sundaes

Following

Seems as though there's nothing Very cheery to write about anym o r e — Hope loses a heart-breaker to Hillsdale; f a n s at the homecoming game say the cheerleaders might as well have stayed home; the Varsity club says there's not enough business at its evening Kletz sessions; the patrons of the Kletz say the food's all right but the joke's are stale; and the Freshmen are sore because Black River wasn't equipped with a water heater.

League W L 3 0 2 1 2 1 1 2 1 2 0 3

Hillsdale HOPE Adrian Kalamazoo Alma Albion

F

points

MIAA STANDINGS

Ruth VerMeuIen, West Hall; He-

game,

v9<.

Kalamazoo College is having its troubles too. The Hornets are bemoaning the fact that twelve seniors on their 1949 grid squad will give them their first big loss through graduation since the war. Hope is little better off, losing nine via the graduation route, ajl of them regular performers. The Hope seniors are Bob Koop, Gord Timmerman, Clair DeMull, Abe Moerland, Nick Yonker, Bill Holwerda, Gord Van Hoeven, Jim Pfingstel, and Rip Collins.

Yonker Leads M I A A

November 15. The race will begin

an's Ganes, and Albion's Hagadon.

With a 1949 MIAA football championship still possible only by the most improbable mathematical calculations a f t e r a 13-9 loss to Hillsdale, Hope's Dutchmen will be shooting for the loop's runner-up slot in their last two contests of the season. This Saturday the Hollanders travel to Albion to meet the Britons' last-place MIAA eleven. The following Saturday Hope will take on Kalamazoo at Riverview Park in the season's finale. Albion, definitely one of the "have-nots" in league circles this year, should give the Dutch little trouble in the game scheduled for two o'clock, Saturday at Alumni Field. Kalamazoo, on the other hand, is one of the stronger squads in the MIAA this year, and is usually " u p " for the Hope game, regardless of its performance during the remainder of the year. Consequently, the final game of the year on November 12 may be expected to be anything but a pushover for the Orange and Blue. Hillsdale, following its four-point victory over Hope, remained not only the single undefeated team in the MIAA, but also the only allwinning team in the state. Hope and Northern Michigan previously shared the distinction with the Bearcats. Northern Michigan was toppled from the undefeated ranks by Michigan Tech, 27 to 7. The Dales, to insure the conference crown, must yet defeat Adrian, the league dark horse, and Albion. Hillsdale is a top-heavy favorite for both these contests, and if the results prove to be as expected. Jack Petoskey will hold the honor of having copped the MIAA title in his first year as Bearcat coach. Hope's mathematical chances of figuring in the title lie in the possibility of Adrian or Albion upsetting Hillsdale, while Hope gains victories in its final pair of tilts. o

GOOD COFFEE

son, VanVleck; Barb Wierenga, Co-

dxtxre

Title Highly Improbable A f t e r Hillsdale Loss

chosen for the 1949-'50 school year:

Forty-two men, seven from each Yonker was recognized as the leadMarijane Borr, and Vivian Voorschool, will take part in the MIAA ing offensive threat in the MIAA. horst, town girls; and Pearl Flacross country meet to be held at Yonker's 253 yards in passing herty, Hope-Ives. The duties of Hope at four o'clock on Tuesday, top the circuit, and make up the these chairmen will be to care for

furnished by Hope's Huyser, Adrir

'49 Grid Pennant Dreams Shattered

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a

11-03-1949  
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