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For the Healing . . •


T h e B o a r d of Foreign Missions respectfully presents to the G e n ­ eral S y n o d of the R e f o r m e d C h u r c h in A m e r i c a its O n e H u n ­ d r e d a n d Eighth A n n u a l R e p o r t a n d the Eighty-third of its S e p ­ arate a n d I n d e p e n d e n t Action a n d the Sixty-fifth A n n u a l R e ­ port of the W o m a n ’s B o a r d of Foreign Missions.



TABLE OF CONTENTS F oreword C hapter I T h e H ealing of t h e N ations ............................. C hapter II

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E vangelism — T h e G od -Given T a s k of t h e C h u r c h ............ C hapter III

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E ducation — A M ajor C o n c e r n of t h e C h u r c h ............... C hapter IV

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T h e M inistry of H e a l t h — O f t h e E ssence of t h e G ospel ...... C hapter V

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T h e M issionary — T h e H eart of t h e E nterprise .............. C hapter VI

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T h e A ppeal to t h e H o m e C h u r c h .......................... C hapter VII T h e C all to W o m e n ....................... ..........

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C hapter VIII T h e M ea ni n g of t h e F igures ..............................

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F inancial S t a t e m e n t s of t h e B oard of F oreign M issions.......

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F inancial St a t e m e n t s of t h e W o m a n ’s B oard of F oreign M issions .... D irectories of t h e B oard of F oreign M issions.................... Statistical F acts of t h e M issions............................. M issionary P ersonnel ......

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D irectory of M issionaries ................................

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M issionaries a n d their S upporting C h u r c h e s a n d Societies........ 121 D irectory of t h e W o m a n ’s B oard of F oreign M issions............. 126 T ab ul a r V i ew of t h e R eceipts of t h e W o m a n ’s B oard of F oreign M issions ..................



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156 F ifth A v e n u e , N e w Y ork C ity.


FOREWORD

T h e work of the Reformed Church abroad is a single enterprise in which the Synod’s Board and the W o m a n ’s Board of Foreign Missions share responsibility. T he work on the field is adminis­ tered as a unit and at h o m e representatives of the W o m a n ’s Board participate in all regular meet­ ings of the Board of Foreign Missions and in the meetings of its field committees. It is appropriate, therefore, that our Report be presented as one. T h e W o m a n ’s Board assumes special respon­ sibility for a large share of the total budget, cov­ ering in particular the work for w o m e n and chil­ dren. While the story of the year covers the work of both Boards, the special responsibilities of the W o m a n ’s Board are clearly indicated throughout. W e feel that in presenting the Report in this w a y the picture of the wide sweep of the work of our Church abroad will appear in clearer per­ spective. F. M . P otter L. J. Shafer

Sue W

eddell


MA n d the Leaves of the Tree W e r e for the Healing of the Nations� R ev. 22:2



“ T h e C h u r c h stands undaunted, a m o n g the shattered fragments of humanity, working tirelessly for the healing of the nations.”

{Madras)

Chapter O n e

T h e war in China is in its third year. A m o y is still occupied by the Japanese and the surrounding country has been subjected to fre­ quent bombings. O n Changchow alone over two thousand bombs have been dropped since the opening of hostilities. T h e dormitory of Talmage College was hit by two bombs and partially destroyed. Five thousand refugees are still on the Island of Kulangsu and four thou­ sand up country at Tong-an. Schools and church services have had to be conducted early in the morning and late in the afternoon or evenings to avoid air raids. T he Theological Seminary and the Boys’ High School— the Talmage College— are still refugee institutions car­ rying on in the country districts. Roads have been destroyed. Rice and other essentials have been difficult to get. Fuel on the Island of Kulangsu is a serious problem. W e r e it not for the valiant efforts of the Relief Committee, there would have been no fuel with which to cook the small rations of rice available. Fortunately they were able to get w o o d d o w n from the interior and so the people on Kulangsu have not been entirely deprived of this great necessity. “This last week has been cold,” writes Miss Beekman, in January, “not cold as you have it at home, for 38° was the coldest— but that is cold enough w h e n it is the inside temperature as well as the outside. In fact, if the sun is shining, w e go outside to get warm.” T h e Mission keeps up its communication between the islands on the coast and the stations in the interior by the use of two motor boats operated under the American flag. Inflation, with the resulting rise in prices, adds its problems. “Food prices are five times what they used to be,” writes Miss Bruce from Changchow. “T h e prices of rice, flour and other foods are higher than anything ever experi­ enced here,” comes from Kulangsu. “Coal is n o w well over $100 a ton (Chinese currency), and is rising steadily. Flour jumped from $11 to $15 in the course of a day. Rice is n o w $1.50 a pound. In India serious famine conditions have obtained over the whole area of the Arcot Mission throughout the year. “Failure of the m o n ­ soon and lack of seasonal rains were followed by great suffering,”


writes Dr. Wierenga. “W a r and famine, famine and war— h o w these interact to m ak e the lot of the poor doubly hard. Parched fields neither supply food nor offer work for the peasant class. W a r en­ hances the price of what food is available. T h e result is unbelievable misery for the already impoverished, depressed classes amongst w h o m is concentrated almost all our work.” In Japan the continued strain of the war in China is also being felt in sharply advancing prices. W h a t is more serious, however, is the growing pressure for national unity, which leaves little leeway for consideration of anything but the prosecution of the war. T h e n u m ­ ber of n e w additions to the Church is below that of last year, which was the lowest in m a n y years. In Arabia there appears to be no serious aggravation of difficulties always present. Poverty, disease, superstition still run rampant, but the growing spirit of nationalism complicates the situation to a greatly increased degree. T he outbreak of the war in Europe in the early fall also brought its acute problems to the h o m e offices. A number of missionaries were about to embark by w a y of Europe to India and Arabia whe n war was declared, and the President’s declaration of neutrality was issued. Dr. John D e Boer was caught in England and had to return to the United States and proceed to India by w a y of the Pacific. T he Rev. and Mrs. J. D. Muyskens also followed this route. Dr. and Mrs. Wells Thoms, Mrs. Sharon Thoms, Dr. and Mrs. W . J. Moerdyk and Dr. Ruth Crouse, the n e w doctor for Kuwait, went ahead as planned by w a y of the Mediterranean. M u c h additional expense was involved in these necessary and sudden changes in travel plans, and there have been throughout the year periods of real anxiety and of dislocation and uncertainty. The Christian Mission is Not a Fair Weather Enterprise

Looking back over the year w e face all these facts in their stern reality, and yet w e echo those brave words that came from that c o m ­ pany of Christian m e n and w o m e n gathered from the ends of the earth at Madras, India, in the midst of the conflict in East Asia and under the dread shadow of impending war in E u r o p e : "The Church stands undaunted a m o n g the shattered fragments of humanity work­ ing tirelessly for the healing of the nations.” In these few words the heart of the true Christian speaks. For the Christian Mission has never been a fair weather enterprise. Diffi­


culties or disasters have never daunted the Christian. Indeed, de­ struction and disintegration and limitations have always beckoned him on that Christ m a y bring to bear His ministry of healing. In the face of the ravages of war and the powerful obstructive force of nationalism, the Christian groups in the countries where our mis­ sionaries work m a y seem pitifully weak, but, though numerically in­ significant, h o w spiritually powerful they are. “G o d hath chosen the weak things of the world to confound the things which are mighty— and things which are not, to bring to naught the things that are . . A violin, w e are told, weighs just under one pound, but its strings w h e n in tune bear a hundred pound pull. T he small group of mis­ sionaries of the Reformed Church in Asia and the Christians w h o are associated with them are today facing staggering difficulties, but they are facing them with a calm spirit and with undiminished faith. The strain is terrific, but the strings are still taut and in tune. “W e are grateful for having been permitted to add another year to the history of Ferris Seminary,” writes Dr. Stegeman of Japan, “as it continues to be a force for spiritual idealism in the midst of the confusion of our times.” “W e are not discouraged here in Japan,” says Mrs. Bruns, “for the very fact that w e are still able to carry on our work unhindered should be an encouragement.” It must indeed be heartening not only to our missionaries but to Christians in all countries to read that a mass meeting was held recently in Japan of ten thousand Christian laymen. T h e year 1939 in China has, in the words of Mr. Angus, been “one of continual adjustment to war conditions. Difficulties have been many, but all departments of the work of the Mission and of the Chinese Church have been carried on.” “M a n y have been the heart­ aches, the discouragements, the trials of our workers this year,” writes Miss Broekema from her isolated post at Tong-an, China, but our faithful Chinese Christians have carried on. M a n y of them show a greater depth of spiritual understanding, and a happiness of heart b o m out of distressed, unsettled conditions and a desire to spread the ‘Glad Tidings’.”


“ Evangelism is the God-given task of the Church.” {Madras)

Chapter T w o

A s one thinks of the unusual difficulties of the year, the reporta as they come from the fields are nothing short of amazing. There is evidence of n e w life a m o n g the Christians and advance movements are being planned and carried out. A country-wide evangelistic movement is under w a y in Japan. Scores of mass meetings are being held all over the country and the Gospel preached. For example, three meetings in Kurume, one of our stations in the south of Japan, were attended by a thousand people and six hundred became inquirers. T h e Sunday and week-day schools are reaching more chilj A R A N dren than ever before and the Bible Classes offered to the school girls are attended eagerly— a surprising fact when one remembers that these girls go out in groups after school to plant rice or to clear streets or m e n d the roads, because there are no m e n in Japan to do this work. O n e wonders that these girls have time even for their school work. In November, at a three-days series of evangelistic meetings at Sturges Seminary, forty-one girls testified to a desire to lead Christian lives. These, together with earlier decisions, m ak e fifty students w h o have been baptized and joined the church during this year. T h e work of newspaper evangelism, with the Christian loan library and reading room is proving to be a most effective means of preach­ ing the Gospel, particularly in a time like this. It makes it possible to reach some w h o at first do not care to identify themselves with the Christian group by attending church services. In China, 1939 has been a year with more evangelistic oppor­ tunities than ever before. Additions to the Church have numbered more than in any other year in the history of the Mission. Churches are filled and the membership has increased. Refugee Christians are bringing the Gospel to the villages. T h e W o m e n ’s Missionary Society is more active than ever before. Best of all, the Church is going for­ ward with the “1942 movement,” a plan to bring the Gospel message at least once to every h o m e in every village in our South Fukien field


before the centenary celebration in 1942. M e m b e r s of the seven churches and chapels in heavily bombed Changchow, for example, in a house-to-house visitation, distributed more than 15,000 tracts and preached to more than 24,000 people. A m o y , the most important center of church work, has been within the Japanese lines. It is estimated that the popuCHINA lation of A m o y Island is only one-third of what it formerly was. Half of the church membership is abroad, on Kulangsu, or on the mainland. Financially the churches have been able to get along because of remittances from members overseas, which have brought considerable sums w h e n exchanged into Chinese currency. T h e greatest difficulty has been in securing preachers. T h e work of the large Second Church at Tek-chhiu-kha is carried on by two Bible w o m e n assisted by members of the consistory. T he preacher at First Church w iho was imprisoned by the Japanese in 1938, was released early in 1939 and has continued his work in that church. T h e churches on Kulangsu are crowded on Sundays. Trinity Church holds two services on Sunday morning and the Kulangsu Church holds three meetings in order to accommodate all the worshipers. F r o m India comes the heartening note, “For the first time the Christian community exceeds thirty thousand; five hundred were added to the communicant membership of the Church during the year; Sunday Schools and young people’s societies, too, show a gain; additions of entire villages, m a n y n e w families, village conferences, voluntary preaching bands, are all recorded as contributing to the n e w life of the churches throughout the Arcot area.” “In spite of severe trials brought on by the failure of the monsoon and its attendant evils,” writes an Indian pastor, INDIA “w e are happy to report a steady progress in every field of our endeavor. In one of our pastorates a foothold was gained in a village which had long been a citadel of heathen superstition, and annually visited by thousands of devotees at the time of the devil dance festival. In the presence of the Deputation from h o m e two families were admitted to the Church by baptism in this place. Small as this beginning is, its strategical value lies in the fact that it has paved the w a y for n e w endeavor in this spiritually dark center.” Dr. K a g a w a ’s visit to the Arcot young people at the time of the Madras Conference brought great inspiration and gave strength and n e w spirit to the preaching bands and village conferences a m o n g all ages. Th e Church in India recognizes that the centra) thing in all mission


work is the healing of souls and the building of the Church. A s the Indian writer of the Foreword to the report of the Arcot Assembly says, “It should be our conviction that no power on earth or heaven except the love, forgiveness, and self-sacrifice of Jesus Christ, w or k­ ing in and through the redeemed lives of Christians, can ever be able to redeem this land of ours from all the evils to which she is heir.” In Arabia, the pioneer days have passed and there is strong testi­ m o n y from all fields to an awakening to the Gospel. Mrs. D e Jong writes from Bahrain, “N o longer do w e have to look for opportunities to present the Gospel of Christ— they are present on every hand. N o longer do w e have to wonder if w e will be welcome w h e n w e call— almost everywhere they are glad to see us.” A n Arabian correspondent writes of the effectiveness of ARABIA t^le scripture distribution which has ever been a large feature of the Arabian evangelistic work. H e tells of a m a n from Muscat w h o had gone to Bahrain for hospital training. While there he became interested in Christianity but felt himself unable to take an open and public stand for Christ. H e promised to continue in Bible study and prayer. W h e n he left to take up his work in the country far south of Muscat, he accepted too scripture portions for distribution a m o n g the people there. Sunday School classes and week-day clubs, visits in Arab homes, the weekly get-together in the mejlis or “gathering spot” on the missionary compound, and the daily Bible story hour in the clinics are all emphasized in the reports as indications of steadily increasing interest in the Gospel story in Arabia. Volunteer Lay Service

O n e most encouraging feature of the work of the Church is the increasing responsibility which lay Christians, m e n and women, are taking. W e have already referred to the campaign of evangelism car­ ried on by the Chinese Christians in Changchow. T h e Vellore Church takes full'responsibility for one of the districts in India. There are sixteen voluntary preaching bands, m a d e up of members of this church, w h o visit regularly in the villages and instruct the villagers in the Bible and in singing and prayer. A group of young m e n of the Arni Church are banded together for frequent visitations to nearby communities. T h e Chittoor Church is also carrying on similar activities. A t the time of the recent visit of our secretaries a n e w


village came into the fellowship of the Indian Church and 28 adults and 21 children were baptized. T h e entire work of witnessing and training had been done, not by missionaries, not even by Indian lead­ ers, but by the people in the neighboring Christian village. Even in Arabia where the Christian group is so small there are m a n y instances of true witnessing. Those w h o have become Chris­ tians love to tell the story. Mrs. D e Jong writes of one of the Chris­ tian w o m e n in Bahrain w h o came to her one day to say, “Ah, Khatoon, the lesson you gave us this morning was a fine one. I told it to the w o m e n in the hospital today, and so did the girls.” Thus is the message of the individual missionary multiplied m a n y times in this difficult land. “W h e n w e are tempted to be discouraged,” writes Miss Noordhoff, of Japan, “w e think of the m a n y young Christians w h o have gone out of our little Nagasaki Church to be Sunday School teachers, elders and earnest members of the Church in Manchukuo, China, and other places in Japan where G o d ’s word can be m a d e k n o w n through them.” The W o m a n Evangelist

“W e pray for more Bible W o m e n ” writes the missionary from India. M a n y girls are clamoring to receive instruction; hundreds of homes are open. Since the close of the mission Dispensary and of the Hindu Girls D a y School in one of our large pastorates the entire responsibility of the town rests with two Bible W o m e n w h o continue their daily task, visiting the homes, carrying the W o r d of Life. In some of these homes, there are two or three sisters studying together and these regular pupils are not the only ones w h o receive the Gospel message, for there is almost always a little crowd of w o m e n and children listening in, and by no means inattentively. “W e de not begin adequately to cover our large district,” writes Miss Bruce from China, “a district which includes families living in sixty-five river boats moored along the quays.” T he W o m e n ’s Bible School at Kulangsu carried on its significant work of training w o m e n in the Christian w a y of life. Of the sixty in attendance, all but seven were under thirty-six years of age. Denied ordinary school privileges, these w o m e n find in this school their precious opportunity to learn to read and study the Bible. Another important feature of the work in A m o y has been the religious work a m o n g the refugees. There are 1600 pupils in the


schools in the refugee c am p on Kulangsu and a daily chapel service is held for them. O n Sunday preaching services are attended by about 175, approximately half of w h o m are adults. The Organization of the Church

It is interesting to take a brief survey of the church groups with which our missions are directly associated. In A m o y the Christians in our area are members of the South Fukien Synod of the Church of Christ in China, a body uniting thirteen different denominational groups. There are twenty-seven central church groups with eightysix constituent chapels in our area. In Arcot our work is built into the South India United Church, a Church growing out of the work of five different church bodies. T he Arcot area is divided into eight districts or “circles” similar to our Classical areas, each one in the care of a missionary or an Indian pastor. Within these circles are fifteen town churches and 266 addi­ tional village congregations. T h e reorganization plan for the Arcot area, which was worked out in connection with the visit of Dr. Potter and Miss Weddell in 1939, is being put into effect this year. The Arcot assembly, begun seventeen years ago, will be replaced by a small representative body called the Arcot Coordinating Committee. This Assembly, which was composed of all the missionaries and a large group of Indians associated with them, administered most of the work of the Mission. T he organization however, was still closely related to the Mission. T h e n e w Arcot Coordinating Committee is elected from members of the South India United Church without distinction between missionary and Indian. It is, therefore, Churchcentered and thus marks a distinct advance in the process of transfer­ ring responsibilities from the Mission and the missionary to the In­ dian Church. In Japan, our churches, as soon as they become self-supporting, become constituent members of the Church of Christ in Japan, a national Church resulting from the work of four different American denominations. These churches which have become self-supporting are not included in the reports, but the Mission is n o w directly re­ sponsible for 19 congregations. There is as yet no organized Church in Arabia, but active congre­ gations n o w exist in every one of our stations. “W e are gradually building up our congregations,” writes Mrs. Pennings, of Kuwait. “W e are delighted that the friends of our hospital in-patients are los-




ing their fear of our church building and n o w consider it a real privi­ lege to attend some of our Sunday morning Arabic services. They like the hymns, and find rest and refreshment in the reverent worship. A few of them understand the message of the Bible and the sermon and hear Christ calling to them, ‘C o m e unto m e all ye that are weary and heavy laden, and I will give you rest.’” It is always a happy event in Japan w h e n one of the groups with which the Mission has been working becomes self-supporting and thus becomes a m e m b e r group in full standing in the Church of Christ in Japan. This year the Hainuzuka Church became independent. This Church is one of the comparatively few in our area which has taken root in a rural village and its growth has been a source of joy to the Mission. O n e of the first items in the n e w budget adopted by the church was Y e n 50 to be given as a thank offering to the Mission to be used in extending the Gospel in other lands. This is especially significant at a time like this in the history of Japan. Increase in Contributions

Contributions from Christians in all fields have shown a marked increase. Thus the Church of Christ in Japan, with 520 less c o m ­ municant members, gave Y e n 22,305 more this year than last. (The Y e n equals, at current rates of exchange, 2 3 cents.) The receipts from Indian village churches exceed those of 1938 by more than 2500 Rupees ($800.00)— a noteworthy increase in a year otherwise filled with economic anxiety. In A m o y there was an increase of $47,000 (Chinese national cur­ rency) including $20,000 for a n e w church building in the city of A m o y . It is difficult to give the value of the constantly fluctuating Chinese dollar, but last year it equalled, roughly, nine to ten cents. Christianity Taking Root

„ 0ne the ways in which Christianity accomplishes its work of “healing” is through the redemption of native customs and festivals. There are two or three references in the report from India this year which show that this is taking place. In the Ranipettai area the H a r ­ vest Festival (Ponnai) has become a great event in the life of the Church. Christians from one hundred villages come together for this oldest and best k n o w n of the area festivals. Here the marriage bureau vies in popularity with the sweetmeat stalls and the agricultural exhibit. Fireworks, sports, auctions and religious services each have


their part. Everyone looks forward to Ponnai for months ahead. T h e Rev. B. Rottschaefer reports that “one of the outstanding events of the year was the dedication of a large cross erected on the top of a hill in the vicinity of a group of Christian villages of the Katpadi Pastorate. T h e former Circle Chairman had long encouraged the larger group service on this hill during Easter and other festival times. It was the crowning joy of a series of services which he had con­ ducted during the years— this raising of the emblem of our Faith. This is truly an Indian expression of service and consecration to the Master without the least danger of idolatrous practices creeping in and m a y well be encouraged.” Church Buildings

Through all the reports runs the story of the building of the physi­ cal church. T h e contribution of $20,000 Chinese Currency, for the n e w building of the old First Church in A m o y , comes into this year 5 report. T h e chapel at Muscat, Arabia, has become too small and an addition is being planned. T h e foundation of a n e w stone church building was laid in Yeranthangal Village, India, last November. A church building is nearing completion in another of the Indian villages. This has been erected without help from anyone outside the village. W h e n the Deputation visited India last year, the villagers pointed with pride to the m u d walls of their half completed church, saying that they hoped to finish it in another year. Children's Homes

Closely related to our evangelistic work are the children’s homes and the work for orphans and homeless children which is carried on in all fields. Beit Sa’ed— “Hou se of Happiness”— in Bahrain, Arabia, was built and dedicated during this past year, and it is worthy of note that prac­ tically the entire cost of erecting this beautiful and adequate h o m e was met by residents of Bahrain, Arabs and friends from the Oil C o m ­ pany C a m p and by generous gifts by missionaries.


“Education is a n d always m u s t be a m a j o r concern of the Church.” {Madras)

Chapter Three

Educational evangelism has, since the early days, been one of the important aspects of the work of our Missions. Education for its o w n sake is sorely needed in most of our fields, and Christian educa­ tion is a well recognized part of any Christian program in the R e ­ formed Church. It is very instructive to compare the situation in the State of Iowa, where w e have two educational institutions of our Church, with the district of the Arcot Mission. T h e population is about the s a m e ; 2,500,000. Iowa has twenty-six universities and colleges and a large number of junior colleges giving collegiate grade education to 30,000 students. T h e entire Arcot district has no first grade college and only two small junior colleges, with 350 students. T he need is great and inadequately met, but the program of educa­ tion in which w e are engaged is an impressive one. O u r total of schools of all grades in the four fields is 221, a worthy record. W h e r e government education is well advanced, as in Japan, pri­ m ar y education is largely in the hands of the state, but in China, India and Arabia, our Missions carry on a large number of primary schools. This is particularly true in India. There are a total of 174 schools of all grades in Arcot, of which 162 are of elementary grade. T h e A m o y Mission carries on twenty-one such schools and there are two in Arabia. This makes a total of 185 schools which give Christian edu­ cation to several thousand impressionable boys and girls of elementary school age. Elementary Schools

T he Hin du Girls’ Schools continue to serve hundreds of girls w h o have no other touch with life outside their homes, providing for them day by day contact with Christian teachers both Indian and Mission­ ary. This army of children, most of them not yet in their teens, find life transformed for them as they learn skills and enter into the reg­ ular elementary school curriculum. A very particular service is offered in the A s h r a m School in Vellore which admits not only those w h o are of school-going age, but also married w o m e n and older girls w h o have not had an opportunity in earlier life. A n e w door of oppor­ tunity is offered there to m a n y a child widow.


Th e H o p e Higher Elementary School in Madanapalle serves 400 children— 325 boys and 75 girls. The staff is m a d e u d of 14 teachers, three of w h o m are women. Of the Girls’ Boarding School of Ranipettai w e read, “T he Government has issued a n e w syllabus for Elementary Schools, so the entire work had to be revised along n ew lines. A n Indian Agricultural expert from the Agricultural Institute in Katpadi spent a few days at the school and helped to set up garden and poultry projects. T h e girls worked in the garden morning and evening, and listened to his talks during the day. Each class has a part of the garden, and the hens and chickens are cared for by one class each month. Thus the girls are being prepared to carry on these profitable activities in their homes.” These are only a few of the m a n y Christian schools for boys and girls of elementary grade in the Arcot field. T h e little village school taught by the teacher-catechist and, sometimes, his wife, is often the center of life for a whole village. F r o m these hundreds of little m u d school houses come the students for our High Schools, Colleges and Training Schools. F r o m Arabia Miss Kellien writes, “Faced by the task of review­ ing the work of the past year m y first thought is that I must repeat the words that in these days come to us so often over the air from London, Paris, Rome, Berlin, ‘Nothing important to report.’ Yet h ow1 m u c h of h u m a n sacrifice and suffering is covered by that short s u m mary of movements on the battle front of Europe. Actions that capture the imagination by their daring and scope m a y not be daily occurrences, but the s u m total of day-by-day happenings, however unimportant, must contribute towards ultimate victory or defeat. So, perhaps, faith m a y see significance and hope in the routine activities of our girls’ school at Basrah; activities which have in themselves no headline news value, but m a y be used of G o d in building a n e w world order of righteousness and peace. Those w h o can see success in large and showy enterprises alone might consider this goal of Christian education an impractical dream, but it is that vision which keeps us faithful and undiscouraged in the midst of present difficulties and disappointments.


“T he Basrah Girls’ School because of decreased appro­ priations, is n o w limited to four grades. Perhaps the very ARABIA lack of large numbers constitutes our greatest opportunity in personal contacts. Thus in the classes and also w h e n the teachers visit their homes, girls receive the best of attention. O u r highest ideals and the one Perfect Example have been put before them each day in song and story. A n d the Bible stories remembered are re­ peated to their parents at home.” Miss Rachel Jackson writes of the school at Bahrain, which n o w has six grades: “M a n y more girls from the better families n o w enjoy coming to the school and remain long enough to graduate, and mothers like to come and see what the girls have accomplished. Moslems, Christians and Jews, and Indians as well as Persians and Arabs, m a k e up the monthly enrollment of 80 pupils.” “T h e School for boys in Basrah has a large enrollment this year,” writes Dr. John V a n Ess. “Educational conditions in the country have been very unsettled. During the s u m m e r it appeared that a de­ termined m o v e was contemplated to pass legislation forbidding the entrance of Iraq pupils into other than government schools. This w'ould have m a d e impossible that part of our work which is most worthwhile. W h a t a happy surprise w h e n the autumn session opened with a large influx of pupils into all departments. Athletics have been popular and the dramatic club has achieved a considerable local reputation. Bible teaching is carried out with greater pleasure than ever. T o give the Gospel message to 150 boys of impressionable age every day of the school year, is a privilege and an opportunity which to our mind cannot be surpassed.” T h e Baghdad School for Girls, a School of the United Mission in Mesopotamia, shows steady progress. Each year it reaches a higher level of influence in building solid character and in making the W o r d of G o d clearer to the pupils. T o quote from the report: “O u r aim, as always, is to present Christ in every w a y w e can. It is a satisfaction to see h o w well the girls w h o have been with us from the beginning k n o w the Bible. W e have three religions represented in our School— M o h a m m e d a n , Jewish and Christian— and there are also four Bahai girls.” T h e primary schools in the care of the A m o y Mission are crowded to capacity. Here are the training centers for the China of the future.


In times of stress and uncertainty such as these w e can give thanks that the year 1939 was one of unprecedented enrollments and con­ sequently widened opportunities. In the inland station of Leng-na, the Dorothy and Oliver Cobb Memorial School, which had been closed for a number of years, has n o w been reopened. CHINA It began in the spring term with 100 pupils, but in M a y it had to m ov e out of the city on account of frequent bombings. W h e n the school mov ed back to its buildings in the city at the opening of school in the autumn, there was an enrollment of 150. T h e primary schools in Changchow during a great part of the year were forced to meet in early morning and late afternoon sessions and attendance fluctuated because of bombing operations. T h e school authorities in that area, fearful that one of our schools might be closed because of the difficult conditions, sent a representative to the principal, begging that the school might continue because of its great value. There was no criticism m a d e of the daily chapel, Bible study, Sunday School or church attendance. The Girls’ Primary School on the Island of Kulangsu had its facil­ ities taxed to the utmost; every possible desk and bench was squeezed into the classrooms so that too m a n y pupils need not be turned away. T he spirit of giving has always been an outstanding characteristic of the children of this school and last year in spite of financial burdens they gave more generously than ever before. T h e pupils raised $304.70, Chinese currency, at Christmas time which brought joy to 153 poor people w h o needed help. They also contributed $317.50, mostly in coppers, to the Chinese H o m e Missionary Society of the South Fukien Church. T h e Livingstone Easter School at Tong-an with an enrollment of 200 has changed its curriculum and plans to register with the government as an industrial school with domestic science courses for girls and agriculture for boys. T h e large increase in the number of pupils in A m o y has brought a larger percentage of boys and girls from non-Christian homes. T h e Mission feared that this might have its effect on the Christian atmosphere of the schools, but the report indicates that this has not been the case. High Schools

All of our Missions carry on high school grade education. These schools in Japan and China are called Middle Schools. There are three such schools in Japan, two in China, four in India and one in Arabia.


In Japan, the Middle School department of the Meiji Gakuin, the m e n ’s college in Tokyo, in which w e share responsibility with the Mission of the Presbyterian Church in the U. S. A., enrolls about 1000 students. Ferris Seminary, the Girls’ High School and Junior College in Yokohama, had 150 applications for entrance in the High School, which has accommodations for 90. T h e school incorporated during the year under the Japanese Government. T he full Christian program has been freely carried on, including a s u m m e r retreat of five days’ duration and a three-day religious emphasis campaign in the autumn. T h e students m ad e a White Gift Offering of Y e n 400 at Christmas time. Plans are n o w being m a d e for celebrating the seventieth anniversary of the founding of the school by Miss M a r y Kidder, one of the early missionaries of the Reformed Church in Japan. Sturges Seminary (Baiko) is a school similar to Ferris, at Shimonoseki. This, like the Meiji Gakuin, is a cooperative JAPAN project with the Presbyterian Mission. Th e students have been active in various forms of service during the year. Comfort bags, clothes, blankets and letters have been sent to wounded soldiers in hospitals. S o m e of the Y. W . C. A. girls have conducted a. Sunday School for children of the neighborhood. At Thanksgiving time fruit and vegetables were given to the poor and flowers were sent to the sick in hospitals. At Christmas time m on ey was sent to leper hospitals. Fifty girls were baptized during the year. In China, Talmage College, the boys’ high school of the A m o y Mission, carried on its w or k during the year in a small country village. T h e school campus in Changchow was unoccupied during the year, except by gardeners and workmen, w h o continue to care for the grounds. T en bombs were dropped on the campus last August and the dormitory was severely damaged. Enrollment in the n e w and temporary site was the largest in the history of the school and included 23 girls. T he school took over the manage­ ment of the local primary school at the beginning of the year and it n o w has doubled its previous enrollment. In cooperation with the government, over 100,000 seedlings were planted. In addition to caring for the health of the students, a dispensary for the villagers was opened in cooperation with a local physician. Students conducted Sunday Schools in six villages, held services in two neighboring chapels and opened up a n e w station where a chapel is n o w being built.


T he A m o y Girls’ Middle School on the Island of K u ­ langsu is crowded with students. Miss Holkeboer writes,— CHINA “While every phase of our educational program is given due emphasis, the work of evangelism and training for Chris­ tian leadership is always our primary aim. Aside from our daily worship services and bi-weekly Bible classes for the entire school w e have a special week of services during the fall term to help students to come to a decision regarding their personal relationship to Jesus Christ. This year more than fifty girls accepted Christ for the first time, and m a n y w h o were already Christians pledged them­ selves to deeper consecration. S o m e of these n e w Christians have since then gone through severe persecution because of their faith. T he y have been remarkably brave and patient through it all. During the year 17 girls were received into the church and 22 are n o w in special classes preparing for church membership. M o r e than 70 girls are doing voluntary Christian service on Sundays, working in six different Sunday Schools, four of the six schools being entirely in their charge. There is also a great deal of personal work done by both faculty members and the older girls a m o n g the non-Christians. F r o m India w e have an encouraging note in the midst of hard­ ships. “Economic depression! Drought! W a r ! These must cer­ tainly hamper progress”, writes Mr. Selvanathan John, the head of the educational Board of the Arcot Assembly, “But”, he adds, “count your blessings n a m e them one by o n e ! Yes our blessings have been m a n y and our difficulties few in comparison.” The High School at Tindivanam has a record enrollment INDIA 391 boys and girls. Christian boys from the boarding h o m e go out in groups on Sunday for gospel team work in the villages. Miss Clara Coburn writes of the life in the Girls’ Secondary School at Madanapalle, where 221 pupils are enrolled. “A little child was taken into the Boarding H o m e whose mother is a deserted wife, she having come all the w a y from Bangalore for the purpose of admitting her children. She herself had been in this h o m e years ago and wanted her children to have a greater chance than she had had...... Another of our former students appeared one day after school had started, leading her two little sisters by the hand, and said, ‘Y o u must take these two or they will never have an oppor­ tunity. They will never amount to anything if they stay in the vil-




lage. These hostel girls do all the work of keeping the school clean, and that is no m e a n task. They also draw the water from a 75 foot well for bathing and washing plates, a task almost too hard for the growing girl. H o w w e wish for a windmill or an electric pump.” Th e story of the Christmas festivities at the Sherman Memorial Girls High School at Chittoor gives us a glimpse of the spirit of the school. Mrs. Z w e m e r writes of h o w the 201 students celebrated. “A m o n g the early events of the year were the annual Christmas festivities which began on Nov embe r 25th with ‘Supposed Christ­ m a s ’ celebrated with m u c h enthusiasm, by the hostel girls, w h o sang carols in the early morning, decorated their cottages, using rows of little earthen lamps along the front, and had fireworks and feasts. Later, just before they left for their various homes for the Christmas holidays, the girls had an interesting program based on the Nativity.” T he High School Department of the Voorhees College at Vellore, India, is another important part of the educational work of the Arcot Mission. It had an enrollment of 859 last year. It is interesting to note that girls are entering this school in increasing numbers, a fact which emphasizes the need for enlarging and improving the build­ ings. In Arabia, the Basrah Boys’ School completes the roll of high-school grade institutions under the care of our Missions. T he importance of this school for all grades is brought out in Dr. V a n Ess’ statement on page 21.

ARABIA

Colleges

W e share in the work of a number of important union institutions of college grade, where the combined strength of several Missions makes a significant work possible. These are referred to later. (See page 30). There are two junior college grade institutions for which w e are directly responsible, the Vellore College in India and the Ferris Seminary in Yokohoma. W e also share with the Mission of the Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. in the Meiji Gakuin in Tokyo. Ferris Seminary has already been referred to. (See page 23). Th e College Department of Voorhees College has an enrollment of 224, which is a marked increase over last year. Mr. Adiseshiah, w h o acted as Principal during Dr. D e Boer’s absence in America, writes: “W e are constantly reminding ourselves of the aims for which the institution stands; the members of the staff have laboured


conscientiously and in a spirit of cooperation. W e pray that through our lives w e m a y exemplify the mind and spirit of our Lord and Master, Jesus Christ.” T he Meiji Gakuin is a fully recognized college with an Arts course and a Commercial course. In the Arts College there is a special department for training social workers, and the Commercial Depart­ ment is in two sections, one meeting during the day and the other at night. T he total enrollment of the Meiji Gakuin, including its high school department, is 1816. Dr. W'. G. Hoekje has been Act­ ing President of this institution for several years, but an experienced Japanese educator was elected President this year. His sincere enthusiasm for the institution’s Christian purpose has been hearten­ ing in every way. M^e read in the report that the Christian work program of the School both in the required courses and chapel, and in voluntary activities, has been up to the standard of past years in earnestness and effectiveness. Theological Schools

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T he capstone of the educational work of the Missions is the T he o­ logical Training School. There are two such institutions, one in China and one in Ikdia. In Japan, theological education is carried on by the native church, although the Mission was recently requested to furnish a professor for the Church Seminary. Dr. H. P. D e Free is Principal of the Seminary in A m o y , which is a union institution of the three Missions working in South Fukien. T he school is nor­ mally located in Changchow, but the work has been carried on this year in one of the up-country villages. “In spite of the fact that equipment has been incomplete and books and papers harder to secure, the Seminary has had a satisfactory year, states the report. “Nine students were graduated in June and eight n e w students admitted in the fall. T h e fall enrollment was 22. Students go each week to five different places to hold services, and have charge of Sunday Schools and afternoon services. T he devotional atmosphere of the school is noteworthy; the morning quiet hour is vital in the lives of all.” In India w e have the Arcot Theological Seminary, of which Dr. C. R. Wierenga is Principal. T h e Church of Scotland Mission has again become associated with this institution this year. T h e S e m ­ inary celebrated its fiftieth anniversary in January. “Closer coopera­ tion has developed during the year with other local institutions,”


writes Dr. Wierenga. “T w o courses have been inaugurated, one for w o m e n and another for men, under the leadership of teachers attached to the staff of the Vellore Medical School. O n e joint evan­ gelistic c am p was sponsored by the staff and students of the two institutions. O n several occasions the staff of the Seminary have contributed to retreats for workers and village Christians under the auspices of various Circle Committees. B y such means and others based upon well rounded classroom training, the Seminary hopes to fulfill its purpose of becoming increasingly useful in the second half of its centennium towards the complete accomplishment of the task of Christian endeavor in these parts.” Teacher Training Schools

Another important department of the educational work of the M is­ sions comprises training schools for teachers. T h e training school for women, at Chittoor, India, is in the charge of Miss Esther D e W e e r d w h o writes, “Again another class of teachers has gone out from the school to join the vast army whose task it is to lift ignor­ ance and bring light. W e receive reassuring messages from m a n y of then! as they send wbrd about themselves along with half-yearly reports and in letters. S o m e are married and keep up a h o m e along with their teaching.” T h e teacher training school for m e n in the Arcot Mission is a union institution in charge of Mr. C. J. Lucas, L. T., w h o visited America a few years ago. Mr. Lucas writes: “Th e most outstand­ ing event of the year was the opening of the Olcott Memorial Chapel on February 27th. This is a generous gift to the institution by the Olcotts in revered m e m o r y of Mr. and Mrs. Eben Erskine Olcott. T he school is under a great debt of obligation to the Olcott family for their m a n y benefactions and the best of their gifts is the personal service of Dr. and Mrs. M a s o n Olcott, w h o have been joint wardens of the Training School hostels for over a decade.” Mr. Lucas ex­ presses deep regret that Dr. and Mrs. Olcott are not able to return to the field. Katpadi Industrial and Agricultural Schools

T w o somewhat unique institutions carried on by the Arcot Mission are the Industrial Institute, and the Agricultural Institute, both at Katpadi, India, though located some miles apart. T he Rev. B. Rottschaefer writes of the wor k of the Industrial Institute: “O u r


Institute consists of several sections in which lads of fifteen and over are taught such trades as carpentry, cabinet-making, wood-carving, rattan-weaving, blacksmithy and motor mechanics. Most of these pupils come from our Christian villages scattered throughout our Mission area. For these w e maintain a Boarding H o m e with rather a large family of over too. In the commercial section w e employ a large number of our o w n trained men. These have their families in nearby villages and their children attend a day school where they are taught the ‘3 R s ’ and relevant subjects. T h e only w a y w e can support this work is by getting sufficiently larger sales for our products so that the Boarding H o m e m a y prosper and the m e n w e employ adequately support their families. “This year w e admitted a larger number of boys than usual into the beginners’ class. Even then w e could not admit 50 per cent of those seeking admission. Each year the educational level of those seeking admission is gradually rising. Only a few years ago no one w h o had passed the 8th standard would think of an industrial train­ ing. Today seven high school students are asking for a chance.” Th e work of the Agricultural Institute is extremely varied and dif­ ficult to summarize. A few extracts from the report are all that can be given here. Through the generosity of friends in Bronxville, Mr. de Valois, head of the school, was able to take back with him to the field a trailer which he has called the “Bronxville Colt.” This is quite a curiosity in that part of India and Mr. de Valois writes of its use: “Milk, goats, chickens, bees, plants, fruits, vegetables, Bible portions and literature, and numerous other articles have trav­ elled hundreds of miles of Indian road in this ingenious manner, to the astonishment of gaping onlookers.” H e writes further, “W e have shown the ten-reel presentation on the Life of Christ, the famous ‘King of Kings’ film, 45 times to an estimated audience of 55,000 peo­ ple. T h e Tamil explanation and interpretation was always given by one of our Indian staff and, by using the amplifier, crowds of 5000 or more heard and saw this dramatic message of Jesus w h o came ‘to seek and to save that which was lost.’ If w e had the staff and the time, w e could go out every night and give this message to the hundreds and thousands w h o freely gather.” “W e lost several hundred trees because of the drought; w e had to send away the larger part of our goat herd because grazing was not available; w e did not get sufficient fodder for our cattle and had to


import hay for the first time since our Institution was well estab­ lished; income from crops was greatly reduced and m a n y of them dried up and withered away after all the investment of seed, fer­ tilizer and labor had gone into them; our wells went dry and had to be deepened. W a r conditions in Europe have alsc interfered drastically with the d em and and sale of our produce, particularly the pure bred poultry.” “T h e attendance of the school has increased slightly. A model garden for a village school has been an added attraction for the lower classes. Mr. L. Y. Dhason, the headmaster, has been on study leave since July, taking ‘W a r d h a training.’ This is a scheme of rural education that is receiving a great deal of publicity and prominence from the press and public platform under the control of the Congress ministry and the leadership of M a h a t m a Gandhi. O u r school has embodied the principles of this type of education for the past ten years, a fact which was recognized by Government in the selection of our headmaster, one of thirty m e n from the entire Madras Prov­ ince, miostly Hindu Congress leaders. It is giving our school an official standing and extending its influence. T h e spirit of our school and institution is perhaps best exemplified by the 23 boys w h o joined our Church at a beautiful service on Easter Sunday morning. Very few boys fail to m a k e this important stand for Christ before leaving the school.” Through a grant from the Davidson F u n d established by Mr. John D. Rockefeller, Jr., needed equipment has been added and the Katpadi Center developed. T h e Madras Government has given the Institute a grant of Rs. 1000 for the development of poultry raising as a cottage industry. A cooperative egg marketing society was organized during the year for the cooperative marketing of eggs for the villages. A total of 97,843 eggs was marketed during the year. A beginning has also been m a d e in concentrated extension work in various areas of the Mission. Th e work of the Institute is churchcentered and directed toward the building and strengthening of the Church in South India. Women's Industrial School

T h e W o m e n ’s Industrial School at Palmaner trains girls in agri­ culture and arts and crafts, in preparation for village life. Miss Sarella T e Winkel, w h o has been in charge of the school during Miss Jongewaard’s absence in America, describes the meetings which are


periodically held with the girls in the discussion of problems of house­ hold management and family discipline. She says: “Molding the average village girl into a model Christian home-maker is not accom­ plished, usually, without m u c h travail of soul, both on the part of the girl herself and those w h o share the responsibility of imparting such training.” This school is a model for the whole area and one that will bear watching as it adjusts itself to India’s n e w educational developments. A cottage system with “mothers” and “aunties” is employed, and these girls, along with the teachers, spend m a n y hours outside of classroom work deliberating seriously on matters pertain­ ing to household management and family discipline. Eternal vigilance has to be used in the school gardens where the girls care for the peanuts and other produce. Periodically great armies of monkeys descend upon the fields and would rob them of fruits and vegetables if they were not discovered and driven away. O n e of the regular employes of the school is the “m on key chaser.” Embroidery work is supplied regularly to h o m e workers in the villages and these girl graduates of the school, working in their o w n villages, are thus able to earn for their families. T he school is often spoken of as a “builder-up” of the village communities, and it well deserves that recognition. O n e can pick a Palmaner girl’s h o m e verv easily out of a r ow of village m u d huts. Union Institutions

S o m e of the most important w ork in education is being done by schools carried on cooperatively by a group of Missions. T h e largest number of these schools is in India. W e share in the Seminary at Bangalore and in the Union Mission Theological Seminary at Gooty, South India. Mr. J. D. Souri, the Arcot representative on the staff of this institution, has been studying in America this year and has visited a number of our churches. T w o important colleges in which w e carry responsibility are the Madras Christian College at T a m baram, in whose buildings the Madras Conference met, and the W b m e n ’s College at Madras. Another institution which has an important relation to our work is St. Christopher’s Training College at Madras, which trains w o m e n for the teaching staffs of our schools. In China w e have a share in the Fukien Christian College, a boy’s college located in normal times at Foochow, and in Japan in the W o m a n ’s Christian College of Tokyo.


“ T h e ministry of health a n d healing belongs to the essence of the Gospel.” {Madras)

Chapter F o u r

In going forth for the healing of the nations, our Missions have from the beginning sought to relieve physical suffering, not only as an expression of the spirit of Christ, but as a part of the central purpose of giving n e w life in Christ. It is interesting to face certain facts as w e think of this branch of our work. T h e latest available figures of the expectation of life are: N e w Zealand 66 years, the United States about 60, Japan 43, rural China 31.8, India 26.8. In 1937 there were 165,000 physicians in the United States, while in China, for a population three times as great as ours, the total was only 4,000. These figures only serve to illustrate the importance and urgency of this side of our work. Our Program of Medical Work

T he rapid development of medical facilities in Japan on the part of the Japanese general public has m a d e the need less urgent there, and our Mission carries on no medical work in Japan. In China there are five hospitals and dispensaries, treating 94,189 patients last year; four in India, treating 61,615, and six in Arabia, treating 150,­ 000 patients. This vast work is carried on with almost no cost to the regular contributors from our Church in America, interest on certain special endowment funds and amounts raised on the field meeting practically the entire cost. A brief review of the individual hospitals and dispen­ saries will be interesting. Muscat, in Arabia, has been without medical work for a large part of the year, due to the retirement of our missionary doctor. This leaves a hospital building standing without anyone to care for the needy sick a m o n g the w o m e n of that city. T h e Matrah Hospital, closed w h e n Dr. Harrison came home, was reopened after the arrival of Dr. Wells T h o m s on his return from furlough. “This hospital can a c c o m m o ­ date m e n and those w o m e n w h o are willing to come to a m a n doctor. T h e doctor’s right-hand helper is a m a n w h o came to Christ after several years of employment in the hospital. His family has also come out and joined the group of believers. Medical clinics have been held every week in one or more of the towns out along the sea-

ARABIA


coast. These towns will very probably become centers for estab­ lished work some day. Visits to places farther inland can at present only be possible upon invitation from the local sheikhs or rulers.” A m a r a h has also been without medical work for a part of the year due to furlough absences. During that period the people never ceased to beg that the missionaries return. T he y proved their sin­ cerity by crowding to the clinics for m e n and w o m e n as soon as the hospital was reopened on the return of Dr. and Mrs. William Moerdyk. T h e m e n ’s and w o m e n ’s hosptials in Bahrain have been open the year round, and both have been more than busy, for the numbers of sick coming from the mainland as well as from the city have been larger than before. In the m e n ’s hospital the clinics have reached a point where it is impossible for one doctor to handle them. P a ­ tients will not wait two and three hours for a doctor unless they are very sick. T h e number of in-patients and out-calls has markedly increased. For m a n y months the hospitals have been full to over­ flowing. Five promising boys have been accepted as a start for a training school for nurses. Dr. W . H. Storm writes of the oppor­ tunity in the interior: “It has fallen to the lot of the w o m e n mis­ sionaries to do the touring this year. Dr. Barny m ad e her second tour into the Nejd and spent several months in Riadh. She did an excellent piece of work and came away with an invitation to return every year. Miss Dalenberg has just added another milestone to the history of the Arabian Mission by making a tour alone to Hassa. These tours could be multiplied m a n y times if w e had sufficient staff. W e have had to refuse several calls for Miss Dalenberg; I have had to turn d o w n an invitation to Qatar twice, also one to Dhufar and one to Dubai. Entrance to the interior has always been the goal of our mission and n o w w he n the openings are coming our laborers are too few.” Th e event of the year in Kuwait was the opening of the Kate V. S. Olcott Memorial Hospital, the n e w hospital for w o m e n given by an anonymous donor in m e m o r y of that loyal friend and supporter of the work in Arabia. T he formal opening of the building by Sheikh A h m e d was a gala day celebrated by Arab, Missionaries, and the European community alike. Th e entire European community had gathered at the hospital and the staff had prepared for a tea party in



the large waiting room. His Highness, Sheikh A h m e d drew up with his entire retinue of picturesque Bedouin and their guns. They lined the entrance to the hospital, Dr. Mylrea handed the beribboned key of the front door to the ruler, w h o opened the building, with the words, “In the n a m e of God, the merciful and compassionate, I dedicate this building to the glory of G o d and the service of man.” “T h e clinic is always engrossing and often tragic,” M a r y Bruins Allison writes. “There are so m a n y interesting cases. There was the mother w h o asked for medicine for her small boy and w h e n asked what was wrong with him, she answered that he had almost drowned the day before and she thought he might need some medicine now. Another mother brought her small baby girl and said that the cat had “eaten it.” A n d sure enough, some animal had had a huge bite out of its thigh. T h e n there are the sad cases of tuberculosis in women. Usually these w o m e n are poor and cannot go to the sanitorium in Syria. T he y cannot even stay in the hospital because they have work at home, or little children, or a baby to nurse, and as long as they can they must work, until it is too late to cure them, and the rest of the family is infected with the same dreadful disease.” T he hospital for m e n at Kuwait has also had a busy year. “The year 1939 has been remarkable for the large number of patients w h o have come to us from Saudi Arabia, from Mecca, and from the Hedjaz,” Dr. Mylrea writes. H o w shall w e evaluate this work of the Arabian Mission which seems such a drop in the bucket w h e n w e realize the millions of needy, diseased, suffering souls. T h e writer of the Arabian report gives his s u m m a r y thus: “Altogether more than 150,000 m e n and w o m e n have come to the clinics in these stations. A n d let us not forget that this means that all of these have listened to the Gospel Message : some of them have been present m a n y times over. Something like 1500 have been in-patients in the hospitals and have spent days and weeks where they could see as well as hear what the N e w Life means for individuals w h o read with them and prayed with them. There were 1330 out-calls to the homes in the cities where the door was opened to receive the servants of Christ, Let no one think that invitations from Inland Arabia m e a n that the people are asking for the Gospel, but every visit there was actually an opportunity for per­ sonal witness and was another step nearer to the time w h e n there will be liberty for the open presentation of the Message of Christ.”


O u r hospitals in India are full to overflowing also. T he M a r y Lott Lyles Hospital at Madanapalle ministers to hun­ dreds of w o m e n of this northern section of our Arcot Mis­ sion area. In addition to the regular hospital service, work has been started in two n e w village areas. Dr. Alice Chorley, the Indian w o m a n physician in charge, writes of this n e w w o r k : “The first time w e went to a group of villages nine miles distant, w e visited every home, telling them our plans to come each week and hold a clinic under some of the large trees. Each time w e returned w e found a greater number waiting for us. In one village where the people were rather suspicious of our coming, w e found a young m a n suffering from tuberculosis, lying in a small closed hut. Although they did not take our medicines, they followed our instructions and kept him out in the sunshine and gave him the proper kind of diet. H e has improved and w e have w o n the friendship of that village.”

H A

Dr. Galen F. Scudder reports that the Scudder Memorial H o s ­ pital at Ranipettai shows an increase in all forms of service. T h e bed capacity has been used to the limit and frequently patients had to be accommodated on the floor, which is c o m m o n in the Indian home. T h e leper clinic treated well over one hundred patients a week. T he problems which are faced by our missionary doctors are indicated in one paragraph of Dr. Scudder’s report: “W e are still appalled with the number w h o have tried quack remedies before they come. Yesterday w e admitted a little boy whose mother complained that he did not open his eyes and that he had been that w a y for two months. W e also learned that his parents had been putting all kinds of quack medicines in his eyes for this period. O n examination w e found that ulcers were present in both eyes which had completely and permanently blinded him and were causing him great pain. T h e poor little chap pathetically held his head d o w n on his pillow all the time. H e could not bear to have his eyes touched and he could see nothing anyway. H o w our hearts go out to that little fellow w h o is n o w d oo med to a life of total blindness. H o w w e wish that his parents had had suificient intelligence to bring him to us first, and not as a last resort.” Th e hospitals in the A m o y Mission cared for 94,189 patients during the year. T h e attendance has been the largest in the history of the H o p e and Wilhelmina H o s ­ pital, on the Island of Kulangsu, except for the year 1938, w h e n

CHINA


A m o y fell. T h e branch hospital in A m o y City has been dosed since M a y 1938) yet both in-patients and out-patients have outnumbered those previously cared for in both places. In addition, the hospital has had supervision of the refugee camp hospital where a total of 32,257 calls were made. T he Changchow Union Hospital, under the n e w plan which unites all the medical work of the three Missions working in South Fukien, has come under the direction of Dr. Hofstra. Miss Jessie M . Plate has also taken over the supervision of the nursing department. T he removal of the hospital to the vacated Theological Seminary build­ ings, in 1938, resulted in a great increase in patients, because of larger accommodations and also because the buildings were on the outskirts of the city and were considered less likely to be damaged in bombing raids. In the old hospital the highest number of in-patients for one year was 1077. In 1939 in-patients were 2780 and out-patients 18,123. T h e nursing school admitted seven n e w students in Sep­ tember. A t the end of 1939 there were ten graduate nurses and twenty students. A first aid group of five students bring out emer­ gency supplies and help care for the wounded whenever there are bombs dropped during an air raid. A site for a n e w hospital building has been chosen and preparations are being m a d e so that w h e n con­ ditions become more settled, building operations can be begun at once. T h e Neerbosch Hospital in Sio-khe is n o w being managed as a branch of the Changchow hospital with Dr. E. T. S u in charge. T he Fagg Memorial Hospital at Leng-na was reopened at the beginning of the year after about ten years of unsettled conditions there. Dr. T. S. H a n is in charge, under the direction of the Changchow Union Hospital.The Elisabeth H. Blauvelt Memorial Hospital in Tong-an continued under the leadership of Dr. C. S. Chai and the supervision of Dr. T. V. Oltman. Nurses Training Schools

T h e training of nurses is an important part of the medical work of the Missions. A standardized Nurses’ Training School is carried on in connection with the H o p e and Wilhelmina Hospital in A m o y . Miss Nienhuis and Miss Veldman write of the work of the School: “This year w e inaugurated a n e w ceremony, the Capping


Service, w h e n the students w h o had successfully passed their proba­ tion course and were being kept on as regular students, received their caps. Their coming forward as the caps were placed upon their heads, the candle lighting, as a symbol of their desire to carry on the light of service, and their singing T would be true,’ m a d e it an im­ pressive service for these young w o m e n entering upon their prepara­ tion for their life work. “A s the year closes and as w e are about to graduate a class of fifteen, the largest number w e have ever graduated in one class, our hospitals in Sio-khe, Tong-an, Changchow and A m o y , are all looking to us for further reinforcements for their nursing de­ partments.” Miss Noordyk, assisted by Miss Marsilje, carries on a nurses’ training department also, in connection with the Scudder Memorial Hospital at Ranipettai, India, with thirty-three nurses in training. T h e M a r y Lott Lyles Hospital at Madanapalle graduated four nurses in 1939 and has six n o w under training. Village Health Programs

Through village clinics and roadside dispensaries our doctors carry health programs outside the walls of the hospital itself. Dr. Margaret Rottschaefer devotes her time almost exclusively to village work. It is her aim to establish self-supporting village dispensaries with an Indian doctor and nurse and a Bible w o m a n as the staff. A large part of Dr. Rottschaefer’s work is for lepers, and during the year 7,121 treatments were given at five roadside centers. B e ­ cause of m a n y hindrances, largely financial, this important work progressed slowly, but Dr. Rottschaefer writes, “In spite of all the discouragements and hindrances to our work w e refuse to be d o w n ­ hearted and w e are looking forward to a n e w year of better things.” A distinctly n e w departure is to be noted in India where the different agencies of the Mission have carried out a cooperative effort in the villages. T he Vellore Seminary, the Vellore Medical College and the district committee joined in a cam p in one of the villages in the Arni pastorate. It was felt that the effectiveness of the presentation of the Gospel was greatly enhanced w h e n accom­ panied by the medical ministry. In one of the Christian centers, also, the Agricultural Institute secured the cooperation of all the agencies in the area— boys’ and girls’ schools, school teachers, hos­ pital workers, Bible women, pastors and catechists— in an extensive


program to improve village agriculture, rural recreation and allied activities. In the past, the various departments of the work of the Mission have tended to wor k in “air-tight” compartments and this n e w development in Arcot is of great promise. Union Medical Institutions

Outstanding a m o n g the union institutions in whose work w e share is the Missionary Medical School for W o m e n at Vellore, founded by Dr. Ida S. Scudder. Miss D. M . Houghton of the nursing staff writes: “In October the L a m p Lighting Ceremony was held. Seven­ teen young w o m e n received their caps and uniforms. T h e y had passed their entrance examinations and were ready to take up the strenuous work of a nurse. I have been present and witnessed a number of these ceremonies, but I have never lost the thrill of seeing these earnest young women, starting out on their life work, giving themselves for this service of ministering to the poor, sick and needy.” T h e School faces a crisis in its history, due to the n e w requirements of the Indian government. T o go forward it will be necessary to secure a fund of two million dollars and secure the recognition of Madras University. Dr. Scudder reports that the year was passed in an atmosphere of foreboding, but she writes: “O u r forebodings are changing to rejoicings and a very definite assurance that G o d is showing us a greater way. Comparatively few k n e w about Vellore medical work before, but now, through her need, hundreds are pray­ ing for her and interest is being very widespread.” T he Union Mission Tuberculosis Sanatorium on the tableland near Madanapalle is one of the best of its kind in the East. During the year its director was requisitioned by the Government to act as director of Tuberculosis Control for the whole of India. T h e church on the grounds of the sanatorium has n o w become a m e m b e r church of the South India United Church.


“T h e heart of this enterprise of our church is the missionary.”

Chapter Five

In the family circle of our Reformed Church the missionary holds a high place of esteem and affection. W e record, therefore, with a keen sense of personal loss, the death of three missionaries, two of w h o m were cut off in the midst of careers of promising service. Th e Rev. Albert Oltmans D. D., died on June n , 1939, after forty years of fruitful missionary service in Japan. After his re­ tirement in 1926 he continued to render valuable service in connection with the American Mission to Lepers. His mastery of the Japanese language was exceptional and as evangelist, theological professor and translator of the Bible he exerted a profound influence, not only upon m a n y influential Japanese Christian leaders, but upon the whole Christian movement in Japan. H e was a profound student of the W o r d and a worthy exemplar of the things which he preached. T h e death of Mrs. Walter de Velder, on January 4, 1940, brought deep sorrow to the A m o y Mission. Mrs. de Velder, a daughter of Johannes A. Otte, M . D., was commissioned as a missionary to China in May, 1936, going out to the field in a difficult and dangerous time in the history of the Mission. While her period of service was brief, she found m a n y opportunities to witness for the Master. H e r cheerful spirit and winning personality bore daily testimony to the victory of faith in her life. She had endeared herself to the Chinese and gave great promise of future service. H e r early death is a great loss to her family and to the work of Christ in A m o y . Mr. de Velder is returning to America this s u m m e r with their baby son, Walter Philip Otte de Velder. O n April 29, 1940, a cablegram was received announcing the sudden death on the preceding day of the Rev. John J. D e Boer. Dr. D e Boer was commissioned and sailed for India in 1922. F r o m 1924 up to the time of his death he occupied the important position of Principal of Voorhees College, at Vellore, with only the usual interludes of furlough. H e was not only successful as an executive and teacher, but endeared himself to a wide circle of Indian friends to w h o m his philosophic turn of mind and rare sympathetic spirit mad e deep appeal. It will be difficult to find a successor so uniquely capable of winning the confidence and affection of his Indian col­ leagues and students.


T h e ranks of missionaries have also been reduced by the resigna足 tion and retirement of several w h o had built their very lives into the great work of the Church in foreign lands. Dr. Sarah L. H o s m o n resigned from the Arabian Mission in the course of the year to take appointment under T he Independent Board for Presbyterian Foreign Missions. H e r twenty-eight years of splendid service in South Arabia represent a great contribution to the cause of Christ in that difficult field. Dr. and Mrs. M a s o n Olcott also presented their resignation, which will take effect this year, this step being necessary because of continued ill health. Dr. Olcott m a d e a great contribution in the field of village school education, in which he was an expert widely recognized. H e and his gifted wife leave also a deep impression upon the lives and homes of Indian Christians because of their deep sympathy and understanding and vital evangelistic spirit. Miss Jennie A. Pieters and Dr. Louisa H. Hart became emeritus mis足 sionaries during this year after long periods of notable service. Dr. and Mrs. Harry P. Boot plan to accept the status of emeritus missionaries in September of this year. They have spent a lifetime of service in China and have also dedicated two daughters to that same service. Their wise counsel and unfailing devotion have left a deep m ar k upon the life of the A m o y Mission and the Chinese Church. It is fitting to include here a reference to the impending retire足 ment of the Rev. W . J. V a n Kersen as District Secretary, as he gave to the duties of his office the same zeal and consecration which mark the missionary. T he extension of the Gospel of Jesus Christ was his great passion and for thirty years he has devoted himself to the task of undergirding the work of the missionary by quiet, effective development of interest in the h o m e churches. His sound judgment, his unfailing courtesy and tact, and his w a r m interest in all their problems, have endeared him to a wide circle of missionaries and friends. The heart of this enterprise of our Church is the missionary. It is vital that recruits be sent out to fill up the gaps in the ranks. W e rejoice, therefore, to record the commissioning of a number of n e w missionaries, several of w h o m have already sailed for their respective fields. In India Miss Eunice FI. Sluyter is hard at the task of learning the language preparatory to entering upon educational service. T he Rev. and Mrs. John H. Piet have been appointed and plan to sail for


India in September. St. Nicholas Collegiate Church, which so long supported the Rev. and Mrs. Walter T. Scudder, has adopted them as its n e w representatives. T he y will be warmly welcomed by the Arcot Mission, which has lost fifteen missionaries through death and retirement in the past eight or nine years. Miss Geraldine C. Smies sailed in 1939 to join the ranks of the A m o y Mission and Arabia has been strengthened by the addition of Miss Madeline A. Tull and Dr. Ruth O. Crouse. Miss Tull has already entered upon active service as a nurse in the hospital at Kuwait, for a short term, and Dr. Crouse is studying the language at the same station in preparation for full time service. Dr. Crouse comes to us from the Assembly of the Churches of God. She left a successful practice at Duncannon, Pennsylvania, to answer the call to service in Arabia. Miss Roelphine Bakker, graduating in June from Central College, has also been appointed and assigned to the Arabian Mission. She plans to sail in late s u m m e r to enter at once upon active service as a nurse at Bahrain. It is with m u c h satisfaction and joy that w e receive back into our ranks this year Miss Alice V a n Doren, w h o has been loaned for the past several years to the National Christian Council of India. A s this report is being prepared word has been received of a special meeting of the Arcot Assembly at which Miss J. C. Scudder was the guest of honor, a graceful recognition of sixty years of service in India. T h o u g h retired from active service, Miss Dixie, as her friends love to call her, continues her keen interest in the develop足 ment of the Church in India and still participates in its counsels on special occasions, speaking the Tamil tongue with a fluency which is the envy and despair of m a n y younger colleagues. This notable event brings hom e to us again the great contribution of life which has been m a d e by our Church for these m a n y years in the hoary land of India. T h e living Church of India salutes one whose life almost spans its o w n life history.


“ Every fact of the world situation is a n appeal to the C h u r c h to advance.”

{Madras)

Chapter Six

T h e vast work of the Reformed Church abroad as it has been sketched cannot go forward without the H o m e Church. T h e rela­ tionships affecting the churches at h om e are, therefore, most im­ portant. This chapter is divided into two parts, first the report of the H o m e Department of Synod’s Board and then the report of the Department of Religious and Missionary Education. Chapter Seven will deal with the special responsibility of the w o m e n of the Church.

PART ONE It has been a busy year in the offices of Synod’s Board. T h e process of moving, which involved the disposition of records, books and pamphlets, gathered together in the course of more than one hundred years of operation, was not an easy one. M a n y valuable missionary books and publications were transferred to the N e w Brunswick Theological Seminary and to the Missionary Research Library. T he early correspondence with the field had been trans­ ferred to the N e w Brunswick Seminary Library earlier, so that only such records and documents as are necessary for the ordinary opera­ tions of the Board are n o w kept at headquarters. Missionaries and Secretaries have been active in the churches and gratitude is expressed for the wide opportunities which have been offered by the Church for service in presenting the claims of the world mission. T h e Rev. and Mrs. G. D. V a n Peursem, Dr. and Mrs. Paul W . Harrison, Miss Ruth Jackson, Miss Alice V a n Doren, Miss M a r y E. Geegh and Miss M a r y V a n Pelt have shared in this work. Dr. Potter visited the western churches in the autumn; Dr. Paul Harrison has been in great dem and and has visited prac­ tically every section of the Church. Dr. W l J. V a n Kersen has rendered service in arranging speaking schedules in the Western District. A gratifying number of churches and church organizations have m a d e application for special projects. S o m e have increased their support of missionaries assigned to them and others have taken on the support of a missionary. Several are n o w considering proposals of this character. O n e very interesting feature of the year’s work was a joint visit to


a section of the Orange Classis on the part of missionaries, secretaries and Board members. Meetings were held with consistorymen of the several churches visited, on Saturday evening. Addresses were m ad e at the Sunday morning service and on Sunday afternoon a panel discussion of the work was held in the W a l d e n Church. This was followed by a youth fellowship supper and an evening mass meeting addressed by Dr. Harrison. This plan proved so effective that it is hoped that similar projects m a y be carried out in the coming year in other areas. T h e literature prepared for Foreign Missions month included a Bulletin for use on Foreign Missions Sunday. This proved to be very popular and should be repeated again next year. A booklet of seven Sermons on Foreign Missions, by Reformed Church ministers, also was printed and sent to each minister. M a n y favor­ able comments have been received. “Christian W o r l d Facts” was sent to each minister and in response to an enclosed card, asking if this was desired again, three hundred and seventy requests were received. O n e hundred and sixty copies of the book, “For the Healing of the Nations” were ordered in advance of publication. T h e “Story of India,” a booklet of forty-seven pages, was issued in the autumn and distributed to the churches. T he problem of refugees and relief has been a concern of this Department, the Secretary having acted as chairman of Synod’s Committee on Refugees and Relief. T he work of the Church C o m ­ mittee for China Relief has been a special responsibilitv. O u r o w n Mission in A m o y is in constant touch with this need and 9,000 refugees are still being cared for by the Mission from general relief funds. T he China Emergency F u n d contributed by our Church has been drawn upon during the year for various other emergency projects in the Mission. T he scarcity of rice in some parts of the Mission and the sharp rise in the cost of living, due to the de­ preciation of Chinese currency, have m ad e necessary emergency grants to pastors and Bible w o m e n and teachers in our schools. These have been met from the China Emergency Fund, of which a small balance is still available. M o n e y sent to the Board by churches for general relief has been sent to the Church Committee for distribution in China, but some contributions m a d e specifically for relief in A m o y have been sent directly to the Mission. In the autumn a special appeal was sent out to the Church through


the columns of the Intelligencer-Leader for contributions for the support of G e r m a n missionaries left without support w h e n war broke out. T h e s u m of $1021.41 was received and forwarded through the International Missionary Council. It is a pleasure to report that the goal of $25,000 set for the Golden Milestone F u n d of the Arabian Mission has been reached. Special contributions for equipment for the Matrah Hospital have been included in the Fund, and a generous contributor underwrote and paid the balance. Expenditures are being m a d e from time to time from the F u n d for the work of the Arabian Mission in ac­ cordance with the general plan proposed. N o small part of the suc­ cess of this F u n d is due to the untiring efforts of the beloved founders of the Mission, Drs. Cantine and Zwemer. T h e attention of the General Synod is called to the O n e Hundredth Anniversary of the beginning of work in A m o y in 1942. T h e Board requests that the General Synod invite the Church to give suitable recognition to this significant anniversary, during the year 1941-42. B y action of the Board, the Secretary for China and Japan is plan­ ning to leave on July 19th to visit the Missions in those two countries, where m a n y critical questions have arisen in recent years. H e expects to participate in the services commemorating the Seventieth Anniversary of Ferris Seminary, the first Girls’ School established in Japan.

PART TW O During the past year— the first in the n e w experimentation c o m ­ bining the two departments. Religious and Missionary Education under the leadership of Mrs. Sanford P. Cobb— there has been an unusual opportunity for the integration of missionary education with the total educational program of the local church. This has been m a d e possible not only through the distribution of missionary materials but also through the discovery of n e w Sunday School lessons which include a dynamic missionary motivation thus helping the student to feel himself a part of the stream of Christian history and because of that bond to accept his responsibility in carrying the gospel of Jesus Christ “into all the world.” Perhaps the sobering thought of a world in conflict and the Church disrupted in m a n y lands, has developed a feeling of the significance of the Christian message and the need for those churches still functioning under


peaceful conditions, to assume the responsibility of carrying on. T h e fact that the contributions of Sunday Schools towards mis­ sions, both h o m e and foreign, have increased greatly during the past year, is an indication of the growing acceptance of this responsibility and understanding of the need of supporting the work of our o w n Reformed Church. In m a n y instances boys and girls are being given the opportunity to m a k e decisions as to where their missionary offerings are most needed. In each case w h e n this decision is m ad e the interest of the pupil is greatly stimulated. This increase in giving seems to be directly related to a growing conception on the part of the teachers that the K i n g d o m of G o d must be m a d e vital in the lives of pupils. There has been a continuing dem and for missionary materials, and m a n y requests have come into the office for help in the presenta­ tion of the missions of the Reformed Church, both at h o m e and abroad. T h e missionary resource packets prepared by this Department are being increasingly used, 312 having been sold during the past year, in addition to 25 Peace Packets which were prepared by this D e ­ partment for General Synod’s Committee on International Justice and G o o d Will. In addition to this there has been an increase in the sales through the Book R o o m of Missionary Education M o v e ­ ment materials, books of missionary stories for worship services and other missionary source materials. • T h e Loa n Library has been replaced to the extent of 360 books. Additional books will be added as rapidly as possible. T h e location of the book shelves in the reception hall of our n e w Headquarters makes the library accessible to all coming into the building. A number of ministers are taking advantage of this. Th e missionary programs prepared for both Domestic Missions M o n t h and Foreign Missions M o n t h have had a wider circulation, the edition in each case being practically exhausted. W e have re­ ports from churches using the material that results were satisfactory. There is a trend towards using consecutive Sundays in the study of one field rather than presenting missionary programs at intervals of a month or three months. T h e accumulative effect of several Sundays given in succession to the study of missions is m u c h more valuable, especially with the younger children. O n e church has replaced its Sunday School lessons for an entire quarter from the beginners through the adults, with the study of India using the


packet, “Bhakti,” with its graded outlines as a basis and purchasing all the books suggested for the various ages. T h e interest in this church has resulted in an essay contest which has stimulated a number of young people to write to the office for additional mate­ rial. W e hope that it m a y be possible to print the prize essay in the Intelligencer-Leader. A beautiful scrap book was prepared by a group of Juniors, depicting life in the United States, to be used in a geography class in Arabia. It is the hope of this group that some form of fellowship m a y be established between the boys and girls in that far away land and themselves. Other groups have asked for opportunities for fel­ lowship with boys and girls of their o w n age level. Wherever it is possible some such contact is made. This year marks a turning point in our organizational set-up; not only has it been found possible to coordinate various types of activities in this one department but there has been a growing opportunity for cooperation with all of the Departments and Boards. This is due in large measure to the formation of the Staff C o n ­ ference with the opportunity it provides for monthly clearing of items of program and activity. Whatever the future arrangements m a y be for the continuance of the combination of the departments of religious and missionary edu­ cation, it is clear that, to be vital, the missionary emphasis in teaching must be built into the very structure of the educational work of our church. This year with its difficulties of moving and adjustment have brought us all into closer fellowship, and this department feels deeply appreciative of this.


“ T o use their capacity to the full in every part of the C h u r c h ’s w o r k ” was the call of Mad r a s to women.

Chapter Seven

A s the last, lingering group of w o m e n left tire Marble Collegiate Church at the close of the Birthday Celebration of the W o m a n ’s Board in January, one of them remarked, “There is n e w spirit a m o n g our people; all day I have felt it!” There was unanimous agreement to this statement. Not for m a n y years had the w o m e n of the N e w York metropolitan area crowded that church to capacity, filling all corners and bulging out into the aisles. Five hundred in the afternoon; one thousand at night. It was an inspiring day and yet only one of m a n y instances of what has been a notable trend of the past year— a re-awakening and quickening of our church m e m ­ bership to the missionary task. Perhaps it is due to the stimulus of the Madras Conference and the post Madras meetings which brought into our cities so m a n y National Christian leaders of other lands; perhaps the strong emphasis on stewardship brought to us by the President of our General Synod in his program of the “Mighty Mite,” which has had its reverberations as far distant as Amarah, Iraq, where it brought glad response from a young Arab Christian; it m a y be that the grave condition of the world today is driving us to a n e w awareness of the things that are lasting. W h a t ­ ever its cause, the deepened interest is very apparent and is worthy of note in this report as w e seek to record the significant trends of the past twelve months. T h e W o m a n ’s Board has been caught up in this spirit and has sought with courage and energy to play its part in these critical days. It took courage in times such as these to send out four n e w missionaries, but in this short twelve-month period these four young w o m e n have not only been found, but equipped, commissioned and sent out, and as these words are being written a fifth n e w recruit is on her w a y to N e w Y or k from her graduation at Central College, ready to leave for Arabia. T h e calls from our fields, thus answered, have been of long, long standing, and it is a strikingly happy fact of the year that w e have been able to answer these calls not only because of generous individual gifts, but because churches and so­ cieties have come forward to indicate their willingness to take on extra responsibility that they m a y have their representative in the


field. This is a specially happy announcement, as w e remember the strong call for colleagues that was heard at Madras, when, at one of the sessions, in answer to the question, “D o you want any more missionaries? Indians, Chinese, Japanese, Fiji Islanders and m a n y others, as fast as they could get to the microphone, shouted their unanimous answer, “yes.” “T he Missionary is the life blood of our work,” writes Dr. Potter, and so long as w e keep this stream steadily flowing, w e are moving onward. O n the last day of our Church year, April 30th, w h e n w e totalled all our receipts on the Budget and found w e had received $115,641.40, w e were again conscious of this n e w spirit of advance which showed itself in an increase this year of over $7,000 of which $1,600 came from W o m e n s Societies. W h e n one looks back of the figures there stand out in bold relief the faithful individuals— m a n y hundreds of w o m e n in our churches, whose painstaking efforts and year-by-year consecration to the task of Foreign Missions, makes it possible for the work to go on. T o you w e are glad to report that w e are begin­ ning to climb back to our normal budget which will more adequately take care of our work on the field— that budget which fell with such a sudden crash in the beginning of the depression. W e find courage and n e w assurance in the record this year, for even though w e came short again of reaching our full budget of $120,000, the shortage was far less than last year— a heartening fact. There are always special gifts and legacies which m ak e possible more effective work and increase the holdings that are so necessary for a large under­ taking such as ours. W e record with gratitude the following gifts: Gifts from Legacy of Mrs. Sara W . Terry, through the W o m a n ’s Society of Old First, Brooklyn, N. Y., for Travel and Outfit of Missionary to Arabia and Memorial Membership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ; Special Gift from a M e m b e r of Central Church, Paterson, N. J., for Car for Mrs. H o n e g g e r . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Additional Gifts to China Emergency F u n d . . . . . . . . . Additional Gifts to Arabian Anniversary F u n d ...... Gifts for the Deficit of 1938-39. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E n d o w m e n t of Bed in M a r y Lott Lyles Hospital, Madanapalle, In M e m o r y of Mrs. H e n r y R. Wright, from her daughter, Alice. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

500.00 600.00 108.42

35r-i8 636.15

1,000.00


Legacies from the Estates of Lucia M . Gleason . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 25.00 Helen Gould Shepard ................ 1,000.00 Margaret C. Roosa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4,808.22 Katharine M . Talmage ............... 6,387.82 - - - - - - - 12,221.04 T he Board itself has added n e w committees for ease in working out its increasingly large task. A Board Policy and Survey C o m ­ mittee and a Budget Planning and Promotion Committee have begun to function and have already proved their worth. A very active Missionary Hospitality Committee has been at work in the joyful task of meeting incoming boats and entertaining missionaries on furlough. Theirs has been the experience, also, of “speeding” our returning missionaries on their w a y and wishing them Godspeed in the n a m e of the Board. Every Board M e m b e r w h o is in constant attendance at meetings of the Board is increasingly conscious of the rich contribution m a d e to our meetings by the Devotional C o m ­ mittee which has planned our periods of worship throughout the year. N e w life has come into our Board ranks through the addition of Mrs. Francis T. Brewster, of Manhasset, L. I., and Mrs. Chester C. Chilton, of Jersey City, N. J. T h e W o m e n ’s Assembly has been a live organization this year. Th e Spiritual Life Commission, under the able leadership of Mrs. Garret Hondelink and a strong committee, has been very active. This W o m e n ’s Assembly, an outgrowth of Ladies’ D a y at General Synod, was this year recognized by the President of General Synod by the appointment of its President, Mrs. J. J. V a n Strien, as a m e m b e r of his Advisory Council. Cooperation at headquarters has continued most effectively and a very happy fellowship exists in the n e w quarters at 156 Fifth A v e ­ nue. T h e Staff Conference makes possible a united approach to the Church and greatly strengthens every Board and Department, while the Joint Committee of the W o m e n ’s Boards is drawing us more closely together each year in our approach to w o m e n ’s groups W e have been blessed with Missionaries at h o m e this year and have been glad that their message has been heard by so m a n y groups. Miss Ruth Jackson included a trip to Brewton, Alabama, and Jack­ son County, Kentucky, in her varied itinerary and saw Domestic Missions “through Arabian eyes.” Others at h o m e during these


twelve months have been Miss Alice V a n Doren, Miss Charlotte Wyckoff, Mrs. M a s o n Olcott, Miss M a r y Geegh, Miss M i n a Jongewaard, Mrs. Harry Boot, Mrs. H en ry Voskuil, Mrs. H e n r y Poppen, Mrs. Paul W . Harrison, Mrs. Gerrit D. V a n Peursem, Miss M a r y V a n Pelt, Dr. Esther I. Barny. W e welcome h o m e for next year Miss Jessie Platz, Mrs. H. M . Veenschoten, Miss Priscilla Bekman, Miss Clara Coburn and Dr. Margaret R. Gibbons. W e have also been glad for the privilege of having as a representative of our mission schools in India, Miss Suganthy Isaiah, w h o has spoken at various functions of our Board and before missionary societies. It has been a real pleasure to k n o w Miss Isaiah and to see at first hand what mission work has accomplished. Miss Christina W o n g of our A m o y field has remained with us this year also, studying at Biblical Seminary. Both of these young w o m e n have distinguished records. T he Sewing Guild work of the year is glowingly written up by the Chairman, Mrs. R a y m o n d Brack. T he past year has seen im­ portant changes in its housing and management. In the roomier and more convenient n e w quarters in the basement at 156 Fifth Avenue, the boxes and gifts sent by churches and societies for ship­ ment to Foreign Mission stations are stored, inventoried and re­ packed. Miss M i n a Hennink, a special worker on the W o m a n ’s Board staff, n o w devotes all her time to this work except w h e n she is visiting Reformed Church missionary societies w h o have applied for help in planning their boxes. These groups are m a d e acquainted with the needs of our missionaries and the best ways of supplying them. Sample garments and hospital supplies are shown and ex­ plained, patterns offered and missionaries’ requests m a d e available. M u c h interest has been aroused and enthusiastic support has fol­ lowed Miss Hennink’s efforts. Th e boxes have improved steadily in content and are increasing in number. Shipments this spring to Arabia and India total fifty-three boxes. These included hospital supplies, garments for women, children and babies, school supplies, gifts suitable for villagers and school children and teaching helps of m a n y kinds. T h e Boards are not n o w attempt­ ing to send consignments to China because of transportation diffi­ culties. That the boxes are eagerly anticipated and heartily appreciated, is evident from the m a n y very grateful letters. S o m e of these, describing the manifold uses m a d e of everything received, and ex­


pressing the w a r m thanks of the recipients, w e wish to share with you in this report. F r o m Mrs. Gerrit J. Pennings, Kuwait, Arabia. “W e have had n e w patients, children, in the n e w year, and some asked so longingly for a ball. I did not have any, but divided a bag of marbles between two boys, giving them in a sewing bag, and the smile that trans­ formed the first boy’s face was the joy of that day to me! ‘Are those all for m e ? ’ he said. A friend came in and he gave him three, but hugged the rest. I’ll be so happy to receive another box for next Christmas if you send a shipment to Arabia. M a n y thanks and remember us again.” Mrs. Nellie V a n Vranken, Ranipettai, India.— “O u r m a n y thanks for the Sewing Guild box. It held m a n y fine, useful gifts and again m ad e m a n y a heart very happy. O u r poor Indian friends and helpers certainly appreciate these gifts. This year they were especially thank­ ful, having hardly expected m u c h since the dreadful war conditions have prevailed. I also add m y ‘thank you’ for it solved so m a n y problems as Christmas drew nearer and nearer. W h a t a comfort to go to this box and pull out and plan h o w best the contents can be used to go around the hundreds that are looking for a little cheerful package.” Mrs. B. D e Vries, Arni, South India.— “Y o u cannot realize h o w far w e stretched the contents of the Guild box. Everything was so lovely as well as useful and w e are deeply grateful to you and all w h o shared in making and packing all those things. T h a n k you all for it, and if the Board finds it possible to send out boxes in 1940, m a y Arni be remembered again, please!” Mrs. Frances D e Bruin, Tindivanam, India.— “W h e n war broke out last September w e were wondering whether our Sewing Guild boxes would come through or not, but that question was soon an­ swered! I was so thrilled with m y box and everything in it. I don’t k n o w h o w I would get through Christmas without your help. T h e past year has been one of famine and our people are desperately poor. Without m y wonderful box I would not have been able to provide the three hundred gifts which had s o m ehow to be provided. W e cannot thank you enough for that valuable help.” M a n y other tributes to the value of this work have been received. It is a big task and one where little things count greatly. W h e r e else could so small a thing as half of a “bag of marbles” bring so rich a reward ?


T h e Publication Committee has been rewarded this year for their many, m a n y hours of painstaking work by the amount of sales and the increase of interest in program and publicity materials. There is a definite advance in sales at Spring and Fall Conferences, prob­ ably due to the appointment of able Literature Chairmen in every Classical Missionary Union. D u e to the fact that the Program of the M o n t h has been so well received by the w o m e n and young w o m e n of the Church, the plan is being continued this year. Nearly 500 w o m e n purchased the program packets during the year. In the past year w e have received eighteen Life Memberships and eight Memorial Memberships and the Chairman of this important Committee, Mrs. D. V. B. Hegeman, expresses gratitude to those w o m e n throughout the Church w h o have assisted in broadcasting the news of this valuable, though little known, section of our work. T h e giving of twenty-five dollars, or more, at one time constitutes a Life Membership and these gifts are used in our program of evangelism. Memorial memberships— gifts of fifty dollars or more — are devoted to needed medical work. T h e list of n e w Life and Memorial M e m b e r s for the year is an impressive one. Life M e m b e r s Mrs. Miss Mrs. Mrs. Mrs. Mrs. Mrs. Mrs. Mrs.

M . Witvliet Inez Staats Lansing Kling H e r m a n Lemkuil George Hartman Jacob Blaauw Dennis D e Boer John Rowenhorst Etta G. Ernest

Mrs. Mrs. Mrs. Mrs. Mrs. Mrs. Mrs. Mrs. Mrs.

Frank F. Holmes Otto Lower David P. Johnson William Weir Fred M . Dennis Benjamin A. Tallmadge William D. Voorhees J. J. Wblbrink John Midavaine

Memorial Memberships Mrs. Sarah P. Stockwell— Gift of W o m a n ’s Missionary Society, Old First Church, Brooklyn, N. Y. Mrs. Sara W . Terry— Gift of W o m a n ’s Missionary Society, Old First Church, Brooklyn, N. Y. Mrs. G. Newell Karner— Gift of League for Service, M o u n t Vernon, N. Y. Mrs. W . R. Ackert— Gift of Missionary Society, K n o x M e ­ morial Church, N e w Y o r k City. Mrs. M a r y Poelakker— Gift of Ladies’ Adult Bible Class, Third Church, Holland, Mich.


Mrs. Evart J. Pruim— Gift of Ladies’ Aid and Mission Society, Central Church, Muskegon, Mich. Betty A n n Middlebush— Gift of Girls’ League, T w i n Lakes Church, Kalamazoo, Mich. Mrs. Jannetje V a n Strien— Gift of Mrs. David V a n Strien, through W o m a n ’s Society Communi ty Church, Woodcliff, N. J.

T he Secretary of the Baby Roll, Mrs. David Bogard, reminded us this year in her report that the first baby enrolled in 1897 was Katharina Boon Zwemer, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Samuel Zwemer, then missionaries in Arabia. Since the enrollment of this first baby, 14,450 names have been added to the roll. It is impossible for us to estimate the great good that has been accomplished, h o w 1 m a n y little ones in mission lands have been cared for and blessed by means of the enrollment gifts throughout the years. During the past year 373 babies have had a share in bringing a bit of joy and sunshine into the lives of less fortunate children in other lands. O n our roll this year are the names of two sets of twins, one Jicarilla Apache Indian baby, Janice Mentaya of Duke, N e w Mexico, eleven manse babies, and little missionary representa­ tives from each of our foreign missionary fields— Marilyn Jean Scudder and John N o r m a n D e Jong of Arabia, Robert D e Vries of India, Avis Adele D e M a a g d of Japan and Walter Philip Otte D e Velder of China. The first baby baptized in the newly organized church in El Monte, California, Katy D e Graf, is also the first baby on the roll from this church. Interest seems to have grown in the past year, for eleven n e w churches have m a d e contributions to our work. W e are again urging others to join in this great crusade of love. It is a large program which w e have been briefly reviewing; a large investment in time, energy, talents. It takes large organization and careful tending. But it takes something else— primarily— it takes consecrated individuals everywhere, w h o in sacrificial love are giving their all, however small it m a y seem, to the service of Jesus Christ. “For the world will be saved,” said Madras, “not by programs but by persons.” " ‘W h a t is in thine hand, Abel?’ ‘Nothing but one ewe lamb, O God, taken from the flock.


I purpose offering to Thee a •willing sacrifice.’ A n d so he did. A n d the sweet smell of the burning has been filling the air ever since, and constantly going up to G o d as a perpetual sacrifice of praise. ‘W h a t is it thou hast in thine hand, Moses?’ ‘Nothing but a staff, 0 God, with which I tend m y flock.’ ‘Take it and use it for me.’ A n d he did; and with it he wrought more wondrous things than Egypt and her proud kings had seen before. ‘Mary, what is that thou hast in thine hand?’ ‘Nothing but a pot of sweet-smelling ointment. O God, herewith I would anoint Thine only O n e called Jesus.’ A n d so she did; and not only did the perfume fill all the house in which they were, but the Bible-reading world has been fragrant with the m e m o r y of this blessed act of love, which has ever since been spoken of ‘for a memorial of her.’ ‘Poor woman, what is that thou hast in thine hand ?1 ‘Only two mites, Lord. It is very little, but then it is all I have, and I would put it in T h y treasury.’ A n d so she did; and the story of her generous giving has ever since wrought like a charm prompting others to give to the Lord, ‘W h a t is that in thine hand, Dorcas?’ ‘Only a needle, Lord.’ ‘Take it and use it for M e.’ A n d so she did; and not only were the suffering poor of Joppa warmly clad, but inspired by her loving life, m a n y others even n o w continue their benign mission to the poor throughout the earth.”— (Waif.) Young Women's Work

True words these, written a year ago as w e looked into the un­ k n o w n future: “W e face a n e w year that presages change and per­ haps m a n y readjustments, but which holds, too, the promise of greater avenues of service. A n d so w e bid . . . “T h e tender light of faith to shine, B y which alone the mortal heart is led U nt o the thinking of the thought Divine.”


Scarcely had the words been written w«hen fire swept through the old familiar rooms at 25 East 22nd Street, and w e found ourselves unceremoniously crowded into temporary quarters at 156 Fifth Avenue. During the spring months change followed change so swiftly that “the tender light of faith” alone m ad e it possible to keep an even keel in the confusion which always accompanies upheavals. A n e w course was tentatively chartered for the Y o u n g W o m e n ’s Committee. This was to be an experimental year in order to deter­ mine “next steps” in young w o m e n ’s work. Regular office duties were to be directed into other channels, namely, the offices of the W o m e n ’s Boards. T he Secretary was to be launched on an exten­ sive field program for the purpose of “studying particularly the character and needs of the teen age groups and observing the older groups to see h o w they might be more closely linked with the w o m e n ’s program.” T h e plans included a fall trip through the Iowa Synod, a winter trip through the Chicago Synod, and a spring trip through the Albany Synod. Both Mrs. J. H, R u m p h and Mrs. J. J. Sessler, Chairmen of the Committee for Y o u n g W o m e n ’s W or k, have been available for con­ sultation and advice during the Secretary’s absence on the field. T h e Y o u n g W o m e n ’s Commitee, with Mrs. Resch as chairman, planned the program for the Annual Rally and Northfield Reunion held in N e w Y o r k City on M a y 17th. It has been a strenuous year of travel for the Secretary including a trip abroad and almost fifteen thousand miles of driving in all kinds of weather through three Synods of the Reformed Church. Travel­ ing alone by car over treacherous highways one needed the constant assurance of the promise— “It shall not come nigh thee.” Meeting group after group, sometimes with not a single day of rest in a three weeks’ period, one needed the daily assurance— “A s thy days so shall thy strength be.” Facing the varied needs of individual groups and unexpected situations one needed to rely upon the promise “I shall put thee in remembrance what thy lips shall speak.” A n d no single promise failed when the conditions were met. A n d so the assurance “A s thy faith, so be it unto thee” is more than ever a reality. It has been both a rewarding and a stimulating experience. A s though a trumpet were sounding it, one fact repeats itself over and over— “Love” alone can be the revitalizing force that shall recapture for us the early Christians’ power which m ad e it possible for the


first disciples to turn their world upside down. O u r theme for the year, therefore, “Let us put our love into deeds and m ak e it real” was well chosen. This power alone can break the ever widening vicious circles w e saw in Europe last summer. N e w hatreds born of fear, bewildered c o m m o n folk— hopelessly caught in an inescapable net of circum­ stances, unable to refuse to go on with a destruction which means suicide or worse for themselves and their children— these things w e saw as w e watched the war clouds gather in the countries visited. T o such a Europe last s u m m e r came eighteen hundred delegates from seventy-three nations of the world seeking to demonstrate their unity in Christ Jesus at the W o r l d Conference of Christian Youth in Amsterdam. “That they m a y all be one,” prayed the Master long ago. A s w e bowed our heads in prayer at the opening service of the conference, each one praying in his o w n tongue “O u r Father, which art in heaven” that prayer of our Lord became a reality to the youth of the world. Listening to John R. Mott, Youth heard him say— “For what purpose the assembling at so great expense of such a large and representative a company,— a truly wonderful fellowship? This con­ ference never should and in all probability never would have as­ sembled if G o d had not some great design. . . . Ar e w e not agreed that the matter of supreme concern to all of us as individuals and to each of us in relation to the field and movements which w e represent is that w e go forth from Amsterd am with a vivid sense of what it means to be an ambassador of Christ at this great moment, and with an undiscourageable purpose to carry out His mandates?” “W e must concern ourselves,” said Dr. Mott, “with the basic causes of the grave ills that beset us and that has ever meant the w a y of sacrifice and loneliness.” N o easy road was pointed out to youth at Amsterdam. But in the very difficulty of the task lies the challenge to which the youth of our day will respond. It was with this challenge and the m e m o r y of that first “O u r Father” that w e returned to America and began the field work in the fall. W e found an unawareness of world conflict and too often even an apathy concerning world affairs on the part of youth which was fre­ quently disillusioning. T o o often the social element predominated and interest in acquiring a knowledge of the work going on in our


mission fields was sorely lacking. In other groups, however, w e found a responsive, eager, and enthusiastic attentiveness to sug­ gestions that was most encouraging. Here and there w e found a group using all means at hand, Board materials, current books, magazines, newspapers, speakers, and local talent and in consequence carrying on a comprehensive world wide program of service. T he request most frequently m ad e came from every section of the church visited— “Cannot the Boards give us help in training local leadership? W e do not need more or better materials. W e need help in training leaders w h o will k n o w h o w to m ak e the mate­ rial that lies between the covers of a book come alive.” T h e ap­ parent unawareness of existing available materials gave evidence that w e must recognize that there is a constantly changing m e m b e r ­ ship a m o n g the younger groups which needs continual education in the very rudiments of the missionary ideal and our denomination’s place in the entire world program. Classical Representatives, ministers’ wives and lay leadership alike pointed out the necessity of a greater emphasis upon the needs of the high school age group. Over and over w e heard such c o m ­ ments as follows: “O u r young people k n o w woefully little about the Bible, Stewardship means little to them and the meaning and extent of the missionary program of our Denomination is quite outside the pale of their thinking.” . . . “Each year it becomes harder and harder to capture the interest of the high school girl for the pull of secular activities becomes stronger and stronger.” . . . “Unless the church provides an attractive challenging program with the appeal of a national enterprise the opportunity for spiritual and Christian service will in a large measure be thwarted.” . . . “W e are not offering our young people sufficient opportunities for leader­ ship. Groups cannot advance beyond the ability of the leadership w e are able to provide.” . . . “W e need to capture in our local churches the atmosphere and spirit which calls out the best in our girls at s u m m e r conferences. For this w e need the help of ex­ perienced conference leaders to show us h o w that same atmosphere can be created in the local church, for only the privileged few can attend conferences.” . . . “W e need to convince the groups w h o began as younger girls and have grown older in the League for Service program that they are no longer a part of the youth group.” A s w e tried to help groups think through their objectives it was very significant that fellowship headed the list and spiritual de­ velopment, while occasionally mentioned, more frequently failed to


appear at all. A n d yet w h e n out of a list of ten or twelve objectives one or two were selected for further discussion, spiritual develop­ ment found its rightful place. T h e evident interest in individual and corporate worship pointed up the need for more emphasis at the point of spiritual development. W h e r e strong local Unions existed there w e found the greatest missionary interest. Four unions are contemplating a union pledge for the first time in their existence while two are ready to assume additional responsibility. T h e union offers training in denominational leadership and co­ operation which is invaluable. O n e group of union officers meet regularly once a month and are carrying on systematic visitations a m o n g their affiliated organizations. T h e size of their union pledge gives evidence of the effectiveness of their united effort. Twenty-five groups have been organized during the past year. A very gratifying number, indeed, and it is significant that nineteen of these fall in the teen age grouping and are about equally dis­ tributed between the western and the eastern churchs. N o report of the Y o u n g W o m e n ’s Department would be complete without some mention of the benefits of the Northfield Missionary Conference. Just one example will suffice for it is representative of the “Spirit of Northfield.” At a meeting in the Montgom ery Classis a former Northfield girl asked for the privilege of a private interview and w h e n this opportunity offered itself she said with face aglow— “I just wanted you to k n o w I found G o d at Northfield last summer. It’s so wonderful to k n o w H im .” W e record with gratitude also the fact that two more Northfield girls have joined our missionary family, one in India and one in Kentucky. A n d so w e close another year more than ever conscious of the abiding presence of the changeless Christ in a changing world. Grateful for the love and devotion on the part of the fellow workers, deeply conscious of the prayers that followed us during the m a n y months of travel and appreciative of all the hospitality experienced in countless homes of ministers and friends, w e enter the n e w year with a n e w sense of unity. A s a Committee w e are convinced that there can be no shortening of the ropes that bind us to the young w o m e n and girls of the Denomination. A n d as w e look toward the celebration this year of the 40th Anniversary of organized work for the young w o m e n of the denomination w e are more certain than ever that “love put into deeds” is the heart and soul of our task.


Chapter Eight

For fuller details of financial operations of the year, the reader is referred to pages 63 to 79 where a tabular statement of receipts is given, and to pages 83 to 94 containing the report of the Certified Public Accountants. T h e statement on the opposite page gives a s u m m a r y view of the receipts of Synod’s Board and a comparison with the corresponding totals of the previous year. A few c o m ­ ments upon this statement and upon some of the significant features of the financial reports should m a k e plain the general result of the operations of the year. T he important figure on the opposite page is the total under I, $266,483.01, as this represents the amount available for meeting the budget of the year. It is $13,706.56 in excess of the corresponding figure of the previous year and almost exactly the amount of our budget, in which provision was m a d e for retirement of a portion of our debt. A s a result w e are happy to report a balanced budget and a reduction of debt by $9,080.08, this making our present out­ standing debt $44,264.41. It is worthy of note that only once in the past six years has an unbalanced budget been reported. It will be noted that the grand total of receipts shows an increase also, as does the total of contributions from the living. Included in these totals are the gifts for special objects listed under II. A s the Board was not pressing any special appeal, these gifts were considerably less from the churches but the fine response of some individuals to continuing special needs resulted in a substantial in­ crease of individual gifts for such purposes. A s is noted elsewhere in these pages, the objective of the Golden Milestone F u n d has n o w been reached. W e rejoice that the Arabian Mission, just completing its fiftieth year, will be so strengthened in its program. $12,555.95 was received during the fiscal year for this purpose. S o m e comparison of the gifts from various sources toward the regular budget are of interest. T h e gifts from the churches reveal a gain of $9,774.87, or nearly 9 % ; from Sunday Schools a gain of $1,534.48, or 6 % ; from Y o u n g People’s Societies a gain of $53-34> or 4/4 % 1 from the W o m a n ’s Board a gain of $2,105.64, or 2)4% , and from individuals a gain of $3,136.19, or 25%. It is significant that in each case there is an increase over the preceding year.


Receipts for the Year E n d i n g April 3 0 , 1 9 4 0

I. F or

the

R egular W

ork of t h e

B oard :

F r o m Contributions: Churches, S.S. & Y.P.S.. .$147,873.41 Individuals .......... 15,513.81 W o m a n ’s Board ...... 86.739-79 -------- $250,127.01 Interest on Funds available for the G e n ­ eral W o r k of the B oa rd......... 16,351.18 Miscellaneous Interest .......... 4-82 -------- $266,483.01 II.

F or Special O bjects O utside B u d g e t : F r o m Contributions: Churches S.S. & Y.P.S.. .$ 8,984.43 Individuals ......... 17,646.20 W o m a n ’s Board ...... 6,189.46 -------- $ 32,820.09 Increase in Trust F u n d s : B y Gifts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,714.86 Legacies: General ...... $ 7,621.44 Trust Funds ... 150.00 -------- $ 7,771.44 Interest on Funds not available for the General W o r k of theB oa rd. . . . . . . . 14,633.10 -------- $ 56,939-49

Total Receipts ...... Deducting: Legacies ..... Interest on Funds

........ 7,771-44 30,989.10 --------

$323,422.50

$

$ 38,760.54

Total of all Contributions, 1 9 4 0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $284,661.96 Total of all Contributions, 1 9 3 9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 268,258.37 Gain in Contributions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 16,403.59 Gain in Total Receipts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17,245.72


H o m e Expenditures and Per Capita Gifts

T h e H o m e Expenditures of the W o m a n ’s Board appear elsewhere in this combined report, but are treated separately as they are an independent expenditure on the part of that Board. T he details of H o m e Expenditure of Synod’s Board appear on page 88. T h e total, $31,948.10 is 409.11 higher than in the preceding year, expenditures for literature representing the major increase, growing out of the policy of the Board to aim at more effective presentation of information to the churches. This figure represents a little under 1 0 % of total receipts, a drop of 1 % due to increase of receipts. T he per capita rate of receipts, calculated upon the basis of total receipts, is $2.01 as comjpared with $1.92 in the preceding year. Calculated upon the basis of contributions from the living, the per capita rate is $1.77 as compared with $1.68 in the preceding year. Field Expenditures

Totals expended for the regular budgets of the Missions were as follows: A m o y , $41,377.32; Arcot, $80,493.49; Japan, $40,531.83; Arabia, $52,976.63; United Mission in Mesopotamia, $5,500; a grand total of $220,879.27. T he corresponding figure of the previous year was $239,202.78. The W o m a n ’s Board

T h e figures on the opposite page give essential details of financial operations of the year. T h e budget receipts of $115,641.40 show an increase over the previous year of $7,458.04 in contributions from individuals, W o m ­ en’s Societies, Sunday Schools and churches and also an increase of $1,448.02 in interest applicable to the budget. W e have been able to pay to Synod’s Board for the regular work of the year $86,739.79, which included $3,000 for the debt of 1938-39, and also repaid $1,918.85 borrowed from funds at the close of the previous year. T h e budget for 1940-41 is stated at $123,000.00, the increase over the year just ended being due to increased cost of travel for mis­ sionaries and to cover cost of the salary and maintenance of five additional missionaries supported by the W o m a n ’s Board. Of the


above budget total $88,228.50 is to be applied to wor k on the field through Synod’s Board and the balance is used for special grants to w o m e n ’s work on the field, both denominational and interdenomina­ tional and for h o m e expenses. Financial Year of the W o m a n ’s Board

T h e receipts of the year toward the budget expense, including contributions from all church groups and individuals, as well as from sales of literature and in­ terest from investments have been . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $115,641.40 A credit balance brought forward M a y 1, 1939 amounted to . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 318.07 which makes the total available for the budget of $120,000 $115,959.47 In order to meet our necessary obligations, the Board voted to apply the following special funds: Income from investments. . . . . . . . . . . $3,605.64 Birthday Offering 1938 (Arabia).... 705.06 Anniversary Offering 1937(China).... 801.1c General Legacy F u n d ............ 900.00 ------6,011.80 This m a d e a total available for payments of the year of.. .$121,971.27 This amount is in excess of the budget of $120,000 because of addi­ tional missionaries sent during the year whose expenses were not included w h e n the budget was stated. In addition to the budget receipts of. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $115,641.40 w e received for special objects, not appearing on the annual budget . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6,245.28 13,271.79 Legacies and additions to funds ................ Interest and income not available for the general work of the budget . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9,443-98 making the total receipts for the year

$144,602.45


« -d .2 CHURCHES

II p cn

ca &

oS

”” !>0®B c ai; |§ g

s

o

CLASSIS O P P A L I S A D E S 8 75 525 00 Coytesville

1 195 40 45

.............. 6 25

H o b o k e n G e r m a n Evangel­ ical ................... N e w D u r h a m ( G r o v e ) .... North B e r g e n ............ Seacaucus ............... Trinity ( W est N e w Y o r k ) .. W e s t Hobokeni H o p e .....

175 700 209 1 24 201 G 235

00 00 00 54 33 25 51 00

2092 63

61 60 265 00

25 00

‘ 50 00 2 50 1 49 376 60

28 99

88 50 00 00

25 00

10 745 40 51

63 50 00 25

110 440 165 5 225 126 13 249

71 347 31 26 125 00 1555 26 00 374 00 6 87 33 22 249 55 377 37 12 39 19 90 00 100 00 586 50 1 49 46 49 46 49

1663 90 250 00 4412 12

CLASSIS O P P A R A M U S

H a w t h o r n e ........ ...... H o h o k u s ................

Paterson, S e c o n d ......... P e q u a n n b c k ............. Piermont ................ P o m p t o n Plains ......... P onds ................... R a m a p o ................. Ridgewood, F i r s t ........ Saddle R i v e r ............. T a p p a n .................. U pper R i d g e w o o d C o m ­ m uni t y ................ W a n a q u e ................ W a r w i c k ................ Wortendyke, T r i n i t y..... W ycko f f ................. P a r a m u s Classis ......... W . M. U n i o n ............. Total ................

750 24 413 415 253 50 65 55 87

00 17 35 00 00 87 95 00 SO

243 37 165 122

63 10 32 50

34 428 16 131 44

85 75 50 25 80

5 288 15 25 96 34

25 20 00 00 25 65

2 66 41 90 26 76

2 75

40 13 50 00 60 00

38 00 76 87

106 52

3 42

13 62

5 00

1610 32 149 226 160 33 66 240 113 107 88 32 105 130 115 26 45 299 5 86 52 17 1 275 10 84 69

85 160 84 2521 69 00 31 25 87 42 05 564 40 94 25 00 708 84 00 20 00 433 00 71 25 00 109 58 162 09 63 00 295 00 26 241 19 65 157 65 25 391 88 95 70 05 00 25 00 295 32 50 14 21 267 21 45 115 45 50 26 50 00 117 85 54 728 29 21 50 00 50 28 75 323 37 10 96 90 50 12 75 00 00 12

50 00 3804 19

453 80

13 17

35 00 77 62 20 00

52 6 751 25 109 203 34 50

50 37 51 00 00 99 65 00

4234 37 462 67 8968 20


1

6s

Total

& c

Special

ja Ul

W o m a n ’s Board

CHURCHES

jO o Young People’s Societies

60 ,o.2 cs

CLASSIS O F P ASSAIC Athenia ................. Boon t o n ................. Clifton, F i r s t ............ Clifton, First Holland..... Clifton, L a k e v i e w Heights. Fairfield ................ Garfield Lincoln Park, First. Little Falls, First.. Little Falls, Second Lodi, First Holland Lodi, S e c o n d ............. Montville ................. Mountain L a k e s ......... Passaic, First H o l l a n d.... Paterson, First Holland ... Paterson, Sixth Holland .. Paterson, Central ........ Paterson, People’s Park.. .. Paterson, Riverside ..... Paterson, U nion ......... T-*p a p Ten a q q

Wortendyke, First Holland Passaic Classis .......... W . M. U n i o n ............. Total

42 50 363 21 77 24 45 85 328 68

10 00 10 50

49 48 180 30 37 5 5 71

11 02 10 00

91 75 03 30

165 00

1070 83 800 70

00 00 00 00

150 00 25 00

100 69 41 9

00 13 18 63

125 00

3350 40

570 41

5 00

63 89

68

151 14 10 25 80 180 10 882 1405 14 10 62 85 43 43 00

5 00

101 00

12 70

45 65

109 567 61 114 30 5 117 154 695 82

37 40 30 50 03 20 11

13 62 94

10 00

25 80 300 49 1700 25 00 143 1682 1475 14 10 25 00 312 154 ’ Y o o 150 9 43

00 00 49 00 90 00

00 00

25 43 90 63 00

3512 55 410 84 7849 20

CLASSIS O F P E L L A B e t h e l ............. Central (Oskaloosa) Ebenezer (Leighton) Eddyville .......... Otley .............. Pella, First ....... Pella, Second ..... Pella, Third ....... Prairie City ........ Sully ............... Pella Classis ...... W . M. U n i o n ....... Total

25 00 113 28 207

73 16 139 07

39 148 26 100 850 50 706 140

20

67 43 38 55 615 75 21 31 47 78

10 00

2410 51 1003 05

10 00

122 226

124 1156 1240 454 45 185 187 56 3759 70

25 225 529 47 292 2045 11 00 1301 1786 10 00 216 355 226 187 34 00

00 44

20 16

37

10

11 67 44

39 82 56

55 00 7238 26

CLASSIS O F PHILADELPHIA Addisville ............. B l a w e n b u r g ........... Clover H i l l ............ Harlingen ............. Neshanic .............. North and Southampton. Philadelphia, First .... Philadelphia, Fourth ... Philadelphia, Fifth .... Philadelphia, T a l m a g e .. Stanton ............... Three Bridges ......... W . M. U n i o n ........... Total

41 30 44 36

74 00

281 60 240 28 165 00

91 31

94 100 47 87

13 20 1 00

367 53

149 92 14 55 52 50 1233 36

5 00 40 00

9 79

546 04

55 79

75 40 62 63 38 72 89 93 145 57 70 20 92 24 36 19 824 52

10 00

5 00 25 66

‘'i'so

243 162 109 178 98 558 302 603 45 242 49

81 93 36 09 00 11 76 04 00

05 87 88 75 19 44

41 50 2701 21


2925 09

346 83

38 00

9 16

7 55

5 31

5 00

Total

10 00

Special

Young People's Societies

3 88 81 07

W o m a n ’s Board

Sunday Schools

27 20 00 94 00 35 00 20 11 75 60 00 05 00 00 92 70 00 00 00 00

Churches and M e n ’s Societies

CHURCHES

CLASSIS O F P L E A S A N T PRAIRIE

Parkersburg .............

103 456 50 33 179 49 253 66 193 155 99 30 62 85 15 137 441 195 49 120 150

4 00 5 00 60 00 20 00 15 00 30 45

5 00

69 61 74

4 00

14 00 70 00

W . M. U n i o n ............. Total ................

18 52 5 00 196 55 10 00 8 85 39 00 17 50 48 62 |..... 14 18 44 80 65 88 35 00 11 00 13 75 47 50 18 50 5 00 25 00 74 78 80 00 46 00 40 00 13 50 30 00 20 00 41 63 4 05

125 748 60 42 222 71 301 80 297 241 160 43 145 103 20 242 629 235 76 240 191 4

67 82 00 79 00 85 62 38 91 63 60 75 00 50 00 39 44 00 50 00 63 05

817 61 157 00 4284 53

CLASSIS O F POUGHKEEPSIE

Uishkill H y d e P a r k ..............

Poughkeepsie, Arlington ..

88 6 16 17

48 43 92 50

291 12 179 20

00

25 15 21

15 78

64 38 23 28 126 5 164 14 21 19

96 50 83 75 25 00 20 34 52 39

694 83

14 47

10 24 14 94

30 12

12 65

17 45

15 93 76 56 25 25 80 55

17 65

35 17 46 11 17 65

524 39

28 45 1274 69

4fi 11 Total ................

11 00

170 44 40 67 417 18 360 34

CLASSIS O F R A R I T A N

21 00

14 18 50 00 35 00

Raritan, Fourth .........

Total ................

840 00 91 76 24 59

3 72 23 96 18 30 7 30 100 200 32 16

00 00 00 00 53 98

23 34 14 09

15 00

1939 10

477 61

1 00

1 00

2 39 3 4 46 13 14

20 49 78 50 50 58 50

43 458 40 8 5 10 103 815

28 00 00 91 60 00 02 03

1608 39

42 54 7 49 78 63 56 30 933 1498 164 51 5 46 3 00 132 815

56 43 50 46 98 58 50 00 24 00 29 48 60 34 11 03

3 00 4029 10




Total

21 20

Special

Young People’s Societies

35 95

W o m a n ’s Board

Sunday Schools

Churches and M e n ’s Societies

CHURCHES

CL.ASSIS O P RENSSELAER 156 105 10 11 24 106 152 32 8

06 00 Oft 60 55 12 31 56 75

19 90 40 136 51 6 40 16 3

3 00 8 52 42 50 9 71

28 09 13 00 Total ................

CLASSIS O P

648 04

99 68

144 52 78 50

21 20

00 11 00 45 98 88 24 00 00

625 68

5 00 5 00

357 183 10 33 123 188 288 94 15 40 48 16

73 50 00 60 18 62 76 25 63 24 09 00

1399 60

ROCHESTER

Total ................

044 107 8 47 194

42 95 00 01 83

44 104 24 155 66 510 100 150 37 2 85 32

96 89 46 00 26 00 38 00 87 17 14 00

2625 34

8 75 15 01 117 96 47 56 22 55 68 120

35 58 61 00 2 00

13 84 41 49 15 81

526 96

2 00

1]55 14 72 197 73 78 50 70 88 4 07 143 16 14 425 52 73 38 00 00 181 09 57 240 00 11 131 47 66 246 58 00 222 48 71 6 90 73 122 93 1147 66 194 94 16 10 40 333 38 50 00 38 124 27 56 53 02 36 149 20 25 32 00 66 96 66 96

210 89 29 81 112 38 88 135 74 36 80 394 84 131 72 9 48

1784 70

194 30

6133 30

I CHASSIS O F S A R A T O G A 33 14 85 io

Saratoga ................

75 70 00 50

44 47 10 15 30 00

27 65

5 00 20 00 28 OT

30 00

81 62

30 00

12 25

Total ................

240 82

11 3 75 2 15 64 19 51 68 32

88 15 00 115 50 25 00 52 65 15 00 00 66 5 00 62 13 4S 12 00

355 73

148 99

73 17 275 12 15 108 34 146 97 49 13 12

28 85 50 75 00 99 80 00 63 87 49 00

857 16


» '0.2 CHCKCHBS

H Ji oS

jn o £O1 m & c TO

« to®IS 5 o.£ £& to

is

■a § TfOt

3 o y

CLASSIS O F SCHENECTADY A l tamo n t ............... A m i t y .................. Glenville, F i r s t ......... Helderberg ............. Lisha's K i l l ............. N l skay u n a ............. P r i n c e t o w n ............. Rotterdam, First ....... Schenectady, First ...... . Schenectady, Second .... . Schenectady, Bellevue .. .. Schenectady, Mt. Pleasant. Schenectady, Rotterdam, Second ................ Schenectady, Trinity .... Schenectady, W o o d l a w n ., Scotia, F i r s t ............. W . M. U n ion ............. Total CLASSIS O F S C H O H A R I E B e a v e r d a m .............. Berne ................... H o w e ’s Cave, Second...... Lawyersville ............ Middleburg .............. Prattsville .............. Schoharie ............... Sharon .................. W. M. U n i o n ............. Total CLASSIS O F E A S T SI O U X A l t o n .................... Ame r i c a n (Primgrhar).... Archer .................. Big-elow ................. B o y d e n .................. Firth .................... Free Grace .............. Holland .................. Hollandale .............. Hospers ................. Ireton ................... Little R o c k .............. Matlock ................. Melvin .................. N e w k i r k ................ O range City, First........ Pella ............. ....... Prairie V i e w ............ Rotterd a m .............. Sanborn ................. Sheldon ................. Sibley, F i r s t ............. Sioux C o unty Arabian S y n d i c a t e .............. Lancester C o u n t y M. F .... Sioux County M. F. for Arabian S y n d i c a t e ..... Hollandale Mission Fest .. O ’Brien Mission F e s t ..... W . M. U n i o n ............. Total

10

15 00

14 41 207 23 105

109 28 64 131 74 96

10 00 19 17

12 20 00 161 800 1350 87

22 00 00 50

23 21 105 244

00 94| 31 13

7 64 5 00

21 88

88 20 44 35 41 235 70

2 98 10 00

166 67

28 29 51 85

3 76 11 52

35 62 46 33

12 45

101 65 309 80 315 62 166 50

75 00

3226 76

2

8 40

8 40

00 34 00 15 14

1975 43

134 00 42 00 115 92 5 00 363 01 4 00 101 67 11 00 212 65 130 30 90 00 471 02 84 25 1199 87 1590 50 197 58 7 60 18 11 129 96

23 76 42 60 5 52 80

20

10 00

9

20 12

5 00

32 02

32 73

225 93

15 18 62 28 180

25 00

66 76 14 06 13 40 12 41 240 00 64 10 85 00 118 84 86 57 186 00

8 88

10

59 163 38 378 22 15 26 14 144 1618 43 53 12 21 166 18

90 95

73 79 15 240 44 125 65 55 81 17

15 00 10 18 17 25

6 00

's'oo

21 20

42 02

5 00 83 95 30 00

' 'es'is

18

20 00

58 25 63 13 13

6 233 230 14 28

96 32 00 10 72

45 25 87 25 10 19

20

10 00 50 00 2 59

10 226 66 253

102

5 66

60

12 2 00 16 00

48 261 13

8 00 '2i'99

425 34 86 64

5507 22 55 105 7 128 92 55 91

81 97 93 43 49 50 65

561 79 106 46 149 56 758 128 286 377 186 646 72 34 67 31 614 2151 167 142 24 125 530 63

77 91 84 19 95 83 29 57 ~

11 52 95 60 03 71 09 86 98 46 87 27 56 88

425 00 34 06 86 15 18 365

15 18 365 43 3691 52

00 86 31 39 14

12 01 12 00

12

261 11

67 67 156 497 70

1427 20 134 02

2302 07

161 08

64 41 11 43

7715 89


•f

§.2

ifi

CHURCHES

$ cto® n 3® s oo

O 03

ES

CLASSIS O F W E S T

"o &

G m

02 SIOUX

Bethel ............... Carmel ............... Chandler ............. Colton .............. .. D e n v e r ............... D o o n ................. Edg-erton ............. Fairview ............. Hull, First ........... Hull, A m e r i c a n ....... I n w o o d ............... Lester ............... Maurice, F i r s t ........ H o c k B a p i d s .......... R o c k V a l l e y .......... Roseland ............. Silver C r e e k .......... Sioux Center, First .... Sioux Center, Central . Steen ................ Trinity ............... Valley S p r i n g s ........ V ol g a ................ Sioux C o unty Arabian S y n d i c a t e ........... Sioux C o unty M. F. for Arabian Syndicate .. . R o c k Rapids M. F ..... Total

127 153 21

71 80 139 80 15 00

121

95 00 22 25 103 20

8

20

175

2

438 115

130 00

21

’**9'93

2

150 7 82 424 170 1101 1076 151 249 96 2 39

75 17 88 275

00 70 49 50

20 00 25 00

22 50

5 00 12 50

257 60 93 94 150 00 24

' ‘s ’oo

48 135 43

12 27

8

60 26 280

'27*50

143 208 15 39 190 57 160

70 00

29 29 32 130 10 170 84

110 30 519 434 155 358

22 54 00 81 33

167 42

21

6

25

247 448 117 17 304 68 559 3 804 323 47 42 444 87 363 940 222 2049 1654 403 925 45 34

61 43 62 18 10 92 06 46 14 80 32 13 85 27 54 82 81 67 70 73 50 45 09

425 00

425 00

86 64 111 95

86 64 111 95

5248 78 1636 27

88 00

3072 36 734 38 10779 79

CLASSIS O F U L S T E R Bloomingdale .......... Blue M o u n t a i n ......... Clove, T h e ............. E s o p u s ................ Flatbush .............. Gardiner .............. Hurley ................ Jay Gould M e m o r i a l .... K a t s b a a n ............. Kingston, First ....... Kingston, Fair Street ... Kingston, Church of the Comforter ........... M a r b l e t o w n ........... Marbletown, North .... N e w P a l t z ............. Port E w e n ............ Rochester ............. Rosendale ............. St. R e m y .............. Saugerties ............. S h o k a n ................ . W o o d s t o c k ............ . Ulster Classis, Y o u n g People’s G r o u p ...... . W . M. U n i o n ............ Total

124 95. 17 50 12 25 31 81

120 7 25 2 61

92 76 00 62 04

17 113 16 323 88

41 08 IS 25 00

67 32 63 122 7 10 19 3 102 1 6

70 19 122 73 00 50 27 72 24 35 85 75 00 40 51

11 00

46 27 5 170 250

21 13 51 30 33

46 00

97 23 56 88

25 20

11 65

105 00 33 90 21 65 10 50 4 55 20 80

10 00 1 95 3 00

100 00 1036 50

105 80!

I

3

6 00 10 00 20 64

45 17

245 31 35 14 113 11 75 140 21 538 384 164 237 63 227 41 56 19 14

112

87 26

oo 87 49

00 27

21 69 72 33 93

00 00 50 17 72 85 25

00

7 90 27 31 3 00 100 00

1312 15 228 89 2686 34


Total

Special

Woman's Board

Young People’s Societies

Sunday Schools

Churches and M e n ’s Societies

CHURCHES

CLASSIS O F WESTCHESTER 2650 11 40 63

00 70 39 75

43 65 8 75

419 87 255 26

26 00 49 00

34 58 Yonkers, P a r k Hill First.. W . M. Union ..

176 06

20 00

Total ................

3651 61

121 40

26 00

25 00 46 35 19 33

18 35

46 17 62 40

37 12 03 00

20 00

149 100 55 112 12 45

95 00 00 93 18 00

2610 67 10 151 16 170 1670 152 30 25 885 21

00 105 00 5365 00 50 122 85 36 50 75 51 224 01 01 16 01 67 590 54 00 1951 26 83 201 83 00 64 58 00 25 00 00 20 00 1101 06 00 21 00

5809 88

125 00

9733 89

CLASSIS O F W I S C O N S I N Alto .....................

Cedar G r ove ............. Gibbsville

...............

Greenleafton

............

Rando l p h ................

Alto,

Brandon,

1357 401 106 7 685 18 204 445 4 648 281 759 105 22 165 164 121 25 2415

81 15 30 86 98 04 58 51 60 21 33 00 26 40 19 33 00 35 50

140 90 15 111 15 75

00 00 on 75 00 90

50 00 20 00 15 00 25 1 14 15

00 50 50 00

25 00 3 95 493 60

225 371 41 26 411 15 65 301 5 324 216 487 327 67 74 150 71 12 630

12 50 62 60 20 50 81 00 00 88 51 50 52 25 14 57 75 80 42

10 00 115 5i 96 61 46 25

5 00 60 80 85 50

1626 829 167 34 1279 50 332 933 9 1189 612 1301 570 103 303 390 217 42 3625

28 00 25 46 06 66 42 12 60 29 84 50 71 33 83 70 75 10 02

140 90 15 111 15 75 223

00 00 00 75 00 90 25

Friesland,

Baldwin M. F .......... .

223 25 Total ................

8387 05

1253 81

179 35

4049 94

419 67 14289 82


PARTICULAR SYNOD OF N E W Y O R K North L o n g Island..... South L o n g Island..... N e w Y o r k ............ Poughkeepsie ........ Ulster ................ Westchester .......... Total ............. PARTICULAR SYNOD OF ALBANY

Rensselaer ........... Rochester ............ Saratoga ............. Schenectady .......... Total ............. PARTICULAR SYNOD OF CHICAGO Chicago .............. Holland

..............

K a l a m a z o o ........... M u s k e g o n ............ Wisconsin ............ Total ............. PARTICULAR SYNOD OF N E W BRUNSWICK

N e w Brunswick

......

P a r a m u s ............. Passaic ............... Philadelphia .......... Raritan .............. Total ............. PARTICULAR SYNOD OF IOWA California ............ Cascades ............. Pella ................. Pleasant P r a i r i e...... East Sioux ........... W e s t S i o u x ........... Total ............. PARTICULAR SYNODS P. S. of N e w Y o r k .... P. S. of A l b a n y ....... P. S. of Chicago ..... P. S. of N e w B r u n s w i c k P. S. of I o w a ........ Total .............

1485 2898 2011 6380 1017 694 1036 3651

52 28 04 79 80 83 50 61

19176 37

2112 720 926 648 2625 240 3226 261

20 09 54 04 34 82 76 11

81 164 52 178 60 14 105 121

4 41 96 5 00 78 40 .... 76 36 50 13 .... 47 12 55 80 3 00 26 00 40

779 65

87 46

22 33 90 68 96 62 67 73

12 00 1 75

163 67 82 99 526 81 166 32

10760 90 1221 11

75 35

97 29 45 28 190 88

50881 01 16873 09

642 35

1805 1488 322 3057 2362 2092 3804 3350 1233 1939

91 33 21 61 06 63 19 40 36 10

3861 2993 5573 50 2086 1055 1253

20 00 00 40

28 20 32 00 09 39 81

9142 10291 10706 2683 4905 4764 8387

69 S3 08 58 32 46 05

21 2 30 8

135 80 48 116 12 376 453 570 546 477

37 58 56 57 35 60 80 41 04 61

21455 80 2817 89

388 558 1299 1137 2410 2925 3691 5248

69 125 50 80 81 84 23 255 64 96 34 08 51 1003 05 346 09 83 52 1427 20 78 1636 27

17659 70 4972 67 19176 10760 50881 21455 17659

37 90 01 80 70

779 1221 16873 2817 4972

65 11 09 89 67

63 05 66 50 179 36

34 28 13 5 55 1

00 99 17 00 79 00

137 95

8 11 30 10 10 38 134 88

78 75 78 78 00 00 02 00

544 3214 4224 8479 1725 524 1312 5809

44 38 68 70 23 39 15 88

76 52 23 945 57 28 228 125

Total

Special

W o m a n ’s Board.

Young People’s Societies

Sunday Schools

Churches and Men's Societies

CHURCHES

15 2192 48 50 6334 89 00 6311 12 10 16020 8b 75 2860 91 45 1274 69 89 2686 34 00 9733 89

25834 85 1536 84 47415 17

2288 1037 1558 625 1784 355 1975 225

36 56 50 68 70 73 43 93

385 5 143 5 194 148 129 42

84 00 18 00 30 99 96 02

4961 1831 2711 1399 5133 857 5507 561

62 73 12 60 30 16 22 79

9851 89 1054 29 22963 54

5014 7839 9424 884 3070 2426 4049

90 348 52 18464 68 33 235 78 21405 42 82 1205 02 27100 12 46 328 34 3946 38 63 599 99 10725 08 21 45 97 8358 53 94 419 67 14289 82

32710 29 3183 29 104290 03

1731 1399 622 1995 2191 1663 4234 3512 824 1608

01 79 46 13 34 90 37 55 52 39

96 31 45 556 250 462 410 41 3

00 20 00 67 84 50 00

3768 2968 993 5214 5155 4412 8968 7849 2701 4029

60 70 23 31

95 12 20 20 21 10

19783 46 1865 52 46060 62

434 207 988 461 3759 817 2302 3072

55 55 21 61 70 61 07 36

30 106 33 66 55 157 161 734

00 987 99 966 96 2607 08 1771 00 7238 00 4284 08 7715 38 10779

52 93 82 89 26 53 89 79

332 11

12043 66 1344 49 36352 63

87 75 642 137 332

25834 9851 32710 19783 12043

46 35 35 95 11

85 S9 29 46 66

1536 1054 3183 1865 1344

84 29 29 52 49

47415 22963 104290 46060 36352

17 54 03 62 63

119933 78 26664 41 1275 22 100224 15 8984 43 257081 99


Gifts f r o m Individuals “A Friend” ........... $ 1,000.00 “A Friend” ........... 100.00 “A Friend of the Arabian Mission” ............ 3,660.00 Anonymous gifts from “Friends” ........... 330.26 Addison, Mr. J. T ....... 5.00 Alpha Dutch Clerical Club 18.00 Brooklyn ........... American Christian Litera­ ture Society.......... SSO.oo American Mission to Lepers 300.00 Amos, Rev. W m . D ...... 10.00 Anderson, Miss Cornelia .. 5.00 Anonymous ........... 5.00 Bahrain Church ....... iSS-^o Bahrain Petroleum Co., Ltd. 100.00 Bayles, Rev. and Mrs. Theo­ dore ............... 10.00 Beardslee, Mr. J.W., III ... 7.00 Boldt, Mrs. Miner ...... 10.00 Boyd, Rev. James 0 ..... 5.00 Braak, Mrs. N .......... 5.00 Braaksma, Mr. George __ 4.00 Bruce, Miss Agnes B ..... 92.65 Buchanan, W. E., Esq.... 46.20 Cantine, Rev. James, D. D . . 105.00 Case, Mr. Clifford P ..... 20.00 Central Bank, Grand Rapids, Michigan ............ 11.59 Chamberlain, Rev. L. B., D. D ................ 20.00 Chambers, Mr. F. R ..... 100.00 Chicago Missionary C o m ­ mittee .............. 375-00 Clarke, Miss Margaret __ 10.00 Clarke, Mr. PL B ........ 200.00 Cobb, Rev. Henry E., S. T. D ........... 300.00 Colton, Mrs. I. J. Ismail... 4.00 Conant, Mr. and Mrs. R. G. 25.00 Cornell, Mr. W. H ...... 10.00 Couch, Miss Sarah ...... i5-00 “The Davison Fund” .... 500.00 De Gray, Miss Harriet .... 10.00 Dimnent, Rev. E. L ...... 28.50 Dodd, Dr. E. M ......... 3.00 Downs, Rev. F. S., D. D. .. 3.00 Drury, Miss Charlotte .... 50.00 Duryee, Miss Lily N ..... 300.00 Ellis, Mr. W. T ......... 10.00 Eppink, Mr. John W ..... 500.00 Fagg, Mrs. John G ...... 10.00 Flipse, Mrs. Agnes ...... 25.00 Frantz, Mrs. A. J....... 5.00 Fugua, Mr. Ward ...... 10.00 Gates, Mr. C. G ......... 25.00

Gaylord, Mr. H. F ....... Gebhard, Rev. J. G., D. D .. Geres, Rev. G. D ........ Gwinn, Mr. Ralph W ..... Hahn, Rev. A. F ........ Hammonton Presbyterian Church ............. Harper, Mr. Richard H. ... Harrison, Dr. and Mrs. P. W ............... Herder, Mr. and Mrs. O. J. Hindes, Mrs. S. W ...... Hodge, Mrs. H. L ....... Hope College .......... “In Memory of M y Mother,” from Miss Anna F. Bacon Ingham, Dr. John A ..... Jackson, Miss Ruth ..... Jackson, Miss Rachel.... Jameson, Mr. E. C ....... Jansen, Mr. F. W ........ Japanese Christian Ass’n .. Jewett, Mr. James R ..... Johnson, Mr. Alfred .... Johnson, Mrs. Charles .... Johnson, Mr. F ......... Karaghensian, Mr. Charley. Kiel, Dr. and Mrs. Lee H.. Kieth, Miss Laura C ..... Krans, Mr. Harry ...... Kuyper, Mrs. C ......... Lepaltak, Rev. and Mrs. C.. Luidens, Rev. Anthony .... Maddaus, Mr. Oscar .... Marsellus, Rev. J........ McDougall, Mr. W ...... Meyer, Mr. Harris ...... Millen, Miss Mabel ..... Milliken, Rev. Peter ..... Missionary Committee of the Society of Inquiry .... Missionary Monthly ..... Moerdyk, Rev. J. E ...... Montalvo, Mr. Edward .... Moody Bible Institute ... Morrison, Miss Margaret .. Mulder, Mrs. C. D ...... Mulder, The Misses ..... Muyskens, Rev. John D. .. Noyes, Mr. Bradford .... Olcott, Miss Anna W .... Olcott, Dr. and Mrs. Charles T ..... ...... Olthoff, Miss Jean ...... Pennings, Rev. Marion .... Peters, Miss Nanna Heath.. Pierson, Mr. DeLavan --

2.00 30.00 5.00 25.00 1.00 13-50 10.00 121.00 25.00 10.00 5.00 500.00 26.84 50.00 100.00 100.00 10.00 100.00 4.00 25.00 10.00 5.00 6.75 100.00 35.00 25.00 110.00 5.00 23.00 5.00 5 00 35-00 20.00 20.00 10.00 JS-OO 10.00 125.00 3.60 10.00 100.00 50.00 10.00 10.00 35-00 25.00 5 00 50.00 1.00 2.00 225.00 25.00


Pickens, Mrs. E. Z...... Punt, Mr. Arie ........ Radcliff, Mr. J. R., Jr.... Reints, Mr. Heye ...... Richards, Mr. and Mrs. Theo................ Romaine, Demarest and Theodore ........... Rozeboom, Mr. B ........ Sailer, Mr. T. H. ...... Sansom, Miss Olive ..... Samuelsen, Mrs. Inga ... Sanford, Dr. Francis B ... Schermer, Mr. and Mrs. Peter ............... Schomp, Mrs. W. W ..... Schmitz, Mr. William ... Schrier, Dr. Paul G ...... Seelye, Miss Henrietta H.. Scoville, Mr. F. C ....... Scudder, Dr. Frank S.... Scudder, Rev. and Mrs. W. T ............... Skillman, Miss M. C ..... Sluijer, Mr. Henry ...... Smith, Miss Lizzie W .... Smith, Miss Rose ...... Smith, Mr. and Mrs..... Starke, Mr. Emory P .... Stryker, Miss Florence .... Speck, Mrs. E. G ....... Taylor, Miss Minnie .... Terhune, Mr. and Mrs.... Thurston, Rev. John A. ... “Tither from South Dakota”

10.00 250.00 2.00 500.00 50.00 35-00 25.00 25.00 20.00 10.00 50.00 25.00 10.00 450.00 25.00 500 25.00 60.00 130.00 100.00 65.00 7 00 S.oo 2.00 65.00 5-00 10.00 125.00 25.00 8.75 7.00

25.00 Towl, Mrs. F. M ........ “T w o Friends” ........ 75-00 1,000.00 “Two Friends” ........ “T w o Friends” ........ 16,000.00 “T w o Friends” ........ 500.00 “Friends” ............. So.oo Van Brunt, Mr. J. R ..... 100.00 Vander Linden, Mr. H. W . 25.00 Vander Wal, Mr. A. G. ... 5-00 Van Dyck, Rev. and MVs. J. 5-00 Vander Ploeg Family ... 40.00 Vander Velde, Miss Jean­ nette ............... S.oo Van Ess, Rev. Jacob .... 5-00 Van Houten, Miss J. F. ... 35-00 Van Keuren, Mr. W . Lloyd 50.00 Van Nuis, Mrs. C. R .... 50.00 Van Rheenan, Mr. H .... 100.00 Veenschoten, Mr. Girard ... 3.00 Volunteer Band, Central College ........ 3-00 Voorhis, Rev. J. W ...... i,oo Waldron, Miss Florence ... 300.00 Waldron, Miss Mary A. ... 5-00 Warnshuis, Dr. and Mrs. A. L ................ So.oo Weemhoff, Mr. Jay ..... 100.00 Williams. Mrs. S. H ..... 100.00 White, Mr. Benj. J...... 3-00 Zondervan. Messrs..... -r 10.00 Through Dr. P. W. H a m 1,020.17 son ................ Total ........... $33,160.01

Legacies From the Estate of John H. Garretson ...... . P. C. J. Goeree .......... Johanna Haisma ......... . Peter S. Hamstra........ Le Grand Ketchum .... . .. Hiley Merselis .......... Mr. and Mrs. Derk Niessink Mary Lane Opie ........ Gerritt Ormel ........... Joseph H. Skillman ...... George Van Peursem ..... Cornelius Van Rooyen .... John N. Voorhis ........ Aalt and Lubbertje Witteveen

$

25.00 150.00 25.00

3618 255.8i

569.39 300.00 1.000. 00 270.00 2,115.06 250.00

32500 1.000.00 1,450.00 $ 7,771.44


R E C E I P T S O F T H E B O A R D S I N C E 1857, I N P E R I O D S O F FIVE YEARS, W I T H TOTA L S A N D A V E R A G E S Receipt* Total, 1858-1862

Totals for Five Years $134,055 49

1 A verage for 1 Five Years $26,811 10

Increase

1865 1866 1867 278,501 40

55,700 28

$28,899 18

328,525 01

65,705 00

10,004 72

316,046 95

63,209 37

341,884 10

68,376 82

5,167 45

403.544 42

80,708 88

12,332 06

548,607 53

109,721 50

29,012 62

619,798 89

123,959 77

14,238 27

739.469 17

147,893 89

23,934 12

805,307 01

161,061 40

13,167 51

1868 1869 1870 1871 1872 1873 1874 1875 1876 1877

12,495 63

1878 1879 1880 1881 1882 1883 1884 1885 1886 1887

1896 1897

.............. ..............

154,139 42 111,111 89

1898 1899 1900 1901 1902

.............. .............. .............. .............. ..............

124,301 126,838 147,213 173,204 167,911

18 36 78 12 73

1903 1904 1905 1906 1907

..............

158,894 142,474 150,239 174,464 179,232

94 79 94 74 60

197,468 205,372 207,404 282,231 284,269

26 64 59 86 36

255,838 321,942 300,752 309,419 302,453

47 58 52 86 02

1908 1909 1910 1911 1912 1913 1914 1915 1916 1917

.............. .............. .............. .............. .............. .............. .............. ..............

1918 1919 1920 1921 1922

.............. .............. ..............

325,292 345,462 478,614 593,942 445,182

08 82 66 88 90

1923 1924 1925 1926 1927

.............. .............. ..............

562,450 544,808 532,146 553,364 510,977

49 39 69 00 32

1928 1929 1930 1931 1932

..............

507,584 606,572 518,626 575,735 475,118

64 00 45 90 51

..............

.............. .............. ..............

1933 .............. 1934 .............. 1935 .............. 1936 .............. 1937 ..............

309,835 41 296,064 90 316.832 72 277,148 83 319.670.87

1938 1939 1940

338,485.51 306,176.78 323.422.50

1,176,746 71

J

235,349 34

74,287 94

1,490,406 45

1 1

298.081 29

62,731 95

437,699 07

139,617 78

540.749 38

103,050 31

2,188,495 34

2,703.746 89 1

2.683.637 50

I

536,727 50

1,519,552 73

1 I

303,910 54

1

4.021 88

232,816 96

I

♌v. Inx>additi0n S56,500 were given by Mr. W a r r e n A c k e r m a n to remove the debt restin* on the Board $ F r o m 1895, receipts of the Arabian Mission are included. . A f*0-330-06 were given for the E n d o w m e n t of the Theological Seminary in the Arcot Mission, through the efforts of Rev. Jacob Chamberlain, D.D.


Auditors’ Statement M a y 18, 1940. The Board of Foreign Missions, R. C. A., 156 Fifth Avenue, N e w York City. Gentlemen : W e have completed our examination of the books of account of The Board of Foreign Missions, R. C. A., for the year ended April 30, 1940, and submit herewith statements, prepared from these records, marked Exhibits “A,” "B" and “C ” and Schedules No. 1, No. 1-a, No. 2 and No. 3. Based on such examination, the statements mentioned above, w h e n con­ sidered in connection with the following brief comments, in our opinion set forth fairly the Board’s financial condition at April 30, 1940, and its revenue and expenditures for the year then ended. The balance of cash on deposit at April 30, 1940, as shown by the cash book, w a s the balance remaining after giving effect to entries dated M a y 1, 1940, to M a y 3, 1940, inclusive, for receipts amounting to $22,037.19 and for disburse­ ments totaling $2,539.02. This balance w a s reconciled with the balance as at M a y 3, 1940, confirmed to us by the B a n k of the Manhattan C o m p a n y We understand that the purposes of including the aforementioned items are to approach the effect of accrual of amounts to be received and paid, and to have the accounts consistent with those of prior years. The monthly totals of receipts shown by the cash book were compared and reconciled with the totals of deposits for corresponding months credited on bank statements on file in the Board’s office. Paid checks returned by the bank were examined and compared, as to amounts and n a m e s of payees, with disbursement entries in the cash book The petty cash on hand w a s counted on M a y 15, 1940. In connection with investments at April 30, 1940, consisting of cash in savings bank, bonds, stocks, mortgages and real estate, on M a y 14, 1940, w e examined the pass book for the savings account with The B a n k for Savings in the City of N e w York and bonds and stock certificates held in the Board’s safe deposit box. W e also examined mortgage documents held in the office safe of tlie Board ; letters received directly by us from others and letters addressed to the Board confirming investments held by the writers of such letters as agents or trustees for the Board. Detail records relating to changes in the m o n e y balance of the investment account were examined and compared with the related entries in the books of account. These changes representing additions through investments received as legacies, securities purchased and interest added to savings bank account and reductions due to investments sold or redeemed and receipts of principal of mortgages held by the Board, resulted in a net decrease in the investment account during the period of $46,426.60. Through the redemption and sale of bonds, the sale of stock and the sale of real estate, a net loss of $4,774.39 (excess of book values over proceeds) w as sustained. The Board has allocated this net loss as follows: a profit of $311 50 w a s realized and credited to the Scudder Memorial Hospital E n d o w m e n t F u n d and the remaining net loss of $5,085.89 w a s charged to the Unallocated Loss on sales of Trust F u n d Investments account. The latter account has thereby been increased during the period and the resulting balance at April 30, 1940, w a s T ^ .t p 57’d the a m o u n t s h o w n Oh Exhibit “B ” as deducted from the total of A legacy w a s received in the current year from the Estate of William L D e Fouw. W e understand that it w a s not found possible to place a satisfactory valuation upon that portion of this legacy received in the form of a participation in certain notes and mortgages and, therefore, it w a s decided to take these items into the accounts at no amount, with the intention of deferring entry of an amount in the accounts until after liquidation of the Board’s interest in these items. „ . , ; Vv-- A . — cvv ii d d , cue iiaLtfu in lxiib report on Schedule No. 2 showing for all items the ledger balances and for items of bonds (other than real estate mortgage bonds) and corporate stocks, current values based on published prices at or near April 30, 1940. W h e r e such prices were not tound no amount is shown in the column “Value based on published prices at or near April 30, 1940. ’ However, this is not intended to indicate that there is no value for such items.

. J ™ ® * P u n 2? wer? increased during the period by a bequest of $1,714.86 in 6 resulting from the sale of a trust fund investment amounting to $311.50 and reduced by an amount of $200.00 representing that part of a trust fund transferred to The W o m a n ’s Board of Foreign Missions, R. C. A.


Transactions in funds handled solely as accommodations are shown only on Exhibit "C” and are not represented in Revenue or Expenditures on Exhibit “A.” Certain features of total revenues and total expenditures have been verified as indicated in previous paragraphs. W e have not, however, m a d e a complete examination to ascertain whether or not all credits for revenue and charges for expenditures have been m a d e to the proper accounts, nor have w e attempted to determine, by detailed examination of the records, whether there has been c o m ­ pliance with all conditions and restrictions under which funds have been received. Classifications of balances in the statements herewith are based on the classifi­ cations in your accounts. Respectfully yours, LOOMIS, S U F F E R N

&

FERNALD,

Certified Public Accountants. LOOMIS, S U F F E R N & F E R N A L D


T H E B O A R D O F F O R E I G N M I S S I O N S , R. C. A. Statement of R evenue and Expenditures M a y 1, 1939, to April 30, 1940 E X H I B I T “A ” REVENUE Collections....................................................... Legacies: F o r general w o r k ................................. f 7,621.44 F o r specific w o r k ................................. 160.00

$250,127 01

7,771.44 Inconae f r o m Invested funds (general): Security F u n d ..................................... % 2,244.25 E n d o w m e n t a n d General F u n d s .................... 13,798.84 I n c o m e f r o m Trust F u n d s held b y B o a r d of Direction... I n c o m e f r o m Invested funds available for specific work: Available for use in C hina .................. .....3 Available for use in India ........................ Available for use in Arabia ....................... Ministerial Education in India..................... Conditional Gifts ..................................

16,043.09 308.09 425.36 3,641.22 4,261.92 674.97 5,316.99 14,320.46

I n c o m e f r o m investments held in trust for T h e W o m e n ’s B o a r d of Foreign Missions, R. C. A ............ Miscellaneous interest received ................ ....... Miscellaneous receipt— refund of pension p a y m e n t .... Designated Gifts— Exhibit “C,” .........................

312.64 4.82

66.02 34,509.79 $323,463.36

Total of above revenue Mission w o r k : EXPENDITURES A m o y Mission ............................. Arcot Mission ............................. J a p a n Mission ............................ Arabian Mission ... ....................... United Mission in M e s o p o t a m i a ............ Interest on b a n k loans a n d fund balances.............. H o m e Expenditures— Schedule No. 1 ................... Foreign Mission Conference............................ Contributions to missionary associations.............. A n g l o - A m e r i c a n C o m m i t t e e ............................ Remittances to missions of income f r o m invested funds not within appropriations..................... Remittances of trust fund income to the W o m a n ’s Board of Foreign Missions, R. C. A .................. Annuities on Conditional Gifts: M e t fr o m General F u n d ................ $ 2,147.01 M e t f r o m income on Conditional Gifts.... 5,316.99

$ 41,377.32 80,493.49 40,531.83 52,976.63 5,500.00 $220,879.27 812.85 31,948.10 850.00 690.70 75.00 9,325.40 290.06

7,464.00 Legacies remitted for missionary w o r k ...? 2,166.60 Legacies remitted for purchase of mission p r o p e r t y ............................ 800.00 Legacies remitted for repairs to mission property ............ ^ .............. 3,327.51 ---------- $ 6,294.11 Expenditures of Designated Gifts— Exhibit " C ” ....... 24,010.29 302,639.78

Total of above expenditures Excess of revenue over expenditures f rom foregoing sources— for year ended April 30, 1940 ...............................

$ 20,823.58

Represented by: Following fund increases: Legacies ............................. .....$ 1,477.33 Pension F u n d ............................. 66.02 Excess of receipts over disbursements of Designated Gifts— Exhibit “C ” ....... 10,499.50 Decreased deficit of General F u n d s — excess of revenue over expenditures......... 9,080.08 $ 21,122.93 Following fund decrease: Trust F u n d s — accumulated income.........

299.35 $ 20,823.58


T H E

BOARD

O F F O R E I G N M I S S I O N S , R. C. A. Balance Sheet April 30, 1940 E X H I B I T "B"

ASSETS Cash: In b a n k (includes net increase *19,498.17 M a y 1 to 1940) ....................... ................ O n h a n d .........................................

84,646.51 199.00

Investments: B o n d s (other than real estate m o r t g a g e bonds) and corporate stocks— at b o o k values (value based on published prices, at or near April 30, 1940— *257,360.40)— Schedule No. 2 .................. *370,130.98 Mortgages, real estate, etc.— at bo o k values— Sched­ ule No. 2 ...................................... 279,677.14 Deposit in T h e B a n k for Savings in the City of N e w Y o r k .......................................... 7,629.59

$ 84,845.51

*657,437.71 500.00 500.00 6.119.71 22.27 537.77 1,351.23 1.890.72 1,404.88 502.32

A d v a n c e to A m o y Mission for w o r k i n g f u n d ..... A d v a n c e to Arabian Mission .................... P a y m e n t s for account of missionaries— collectible Account receivable f r o m Refugee C o m m i t t e e .... Shipping a n d sundry charges advanced for others Advanc e s to e m p l o y e .......... ........... ....... Prepaid expenses ................................ Cost of office alterations, deferred............... Other deferred charges .........................

*754,112.12 LIABILITIES A N D F U N D B A L A N C E S Accounts payable for missionary w o r k ................. * Balance of funds for transmission-— Exhibit "C” ........

2,734.28 3,439.31 *

Designated Gifts not yet remitted— Exhibit “C ” ................. A m o u n t due Japan Mission on contributions f r o m legacies to J a m e s Ballagh F u n d ............................................ Funds: Trust funds: Principal ......................................*540,085.36 Accumulated income .......................... 19,864.50

6,173.59 46,916.39 4,283.20

*559,949.86 Special trust funds: Conditional Gifts (annuity funds)............ 128,284.05 Security F u n d ................................ 71,622.69 Total funds— Schedule No. 3 ............... *759,856.60 Deduct— Unallocated loss on sales of trust fund investments ................................... 29,067.67 Legacies— unexpended balance ..................... Insurance F u n d — reserve for insurance contingencies Pension F u n d — reserve for future pensions......... I ncome on investments— deferred...................

730,789.03 8,240.10 1,624 68

66.02 284.62 *798,376.53

General F u n d deficit: Balance— M a y 1, 1939...............................* 53,344.49 Deduct— Excess of revenue over expenditures applicable to General F u n d for the period.. 9,080.08 Balance, April

30. 1940

44,264.41 *754,112.12


T H E

BOARD

O F F O R E I G N M I S S I O N S , R. C. A.

Statement of Receipts and Disbursements of Designated Gifts and F u n d s Han d l e d as Acco m m o d a t i o n s M a y 1, 1939, to April 30, 1940 E X H I B I T “C ” Receipts: D E S I G N A T E D GIFTS Gifts ex-appropriation— for A m o y Mission .................... $ 2,582.20 “ “ — Chur c h C o m m i t t e e for China Relief..... 7,169.32 “ “ — for Arcot Mission....................... 6,198.05 “ “ — for J a pan Mission ..................... 717.64 “ “ — for Arabian Mission ................... 2,472.98 “ “ — for “Golden Milestone”— Arabia ....... 12,682.78 “ “ — for N e w s p a p e r Evan g e l ism inJapan... 231.00 “ “ — General ............................... 2,415.82 Centenary F u n d i n c o m e ........................................ 40.00 Receipts of Designated Gifts— Exhibit “A ” ................ $ 34,509.79 Disbursements i Gifts ex-appropriatlon— for A m o y Mission .......... ? 1,313.93 “ “ — C h u r c h Comm i t t e e for China Relief .................... 7,169.32 “ — for Arcot Mission ........... 5,689.31 “ “ — for J apan Mission .......... 428.28 “ “ — for Arabian Mission ........ 1,880.26 “ “ — for “Golden Milestone”— Arabia 3,812.43 “ “ — for N e w s p a p e r E v a ngelism in J a p a n .................. 221.00 “ " — for Arabian Hospital Building F u n d ..................... 1,087.94 “ “ — General ................ 2,407.82 Disbursements of Designated Gifts— Exhibit “A ” ..........

24,010.29

Excess of receipts over disbursements, Designated Gifts— Exhibit “A ” ......................................... Designated Gifts unremitted— M a y 1, 1939..........................

10,499.60 36,415.89

Designated Gifts unremitted, April 30, 1940— E x ­ hibit “B ” : Gifts ex-appropriation: 2,609.87 F o r A m o y M i s s i o n ............................ ? 1,124.54 F o r Arcot M i s s i o n ............................ 54.20 F o r J a p a n M i s s i o n ............................ 1,009.82 F o r Arabian Mission .......................... 16,493.77 F o r "Golden Milestone”— Arabia............... 20.00 F o r N e w s p a p e r Eva n g e l i s m in J a p a n .......... 33.00 General ....................... ................ 24,672.32 Centenary Fund, principal ...................... 190.00 Centenary Fund, accumulated i n c o m e ........... 657.87 Arabian Hospital Building F u n d ................. 50.00 H i g h School in India............................. -------- $ 46,915.39 F U N D S H A N D L E D AS A C C O M M O D A T I O N S Balance of funds for transmission less accounts receivable for funds transmitted a n d advances for shipping charges— -May 1, 1939...$ Received for transmission...........................$ Shipping charges collected........................... Received for other boards............................

2,815.14

7,121.27 405.68 270.93 7,797.88 $ 10,613.02

Disbursements: A m o u n t s transmitted .... Shipping charges advanced Paid to other boards.....

$

6,790.63 649.92 270.93 ----------

Balances, April 30, 1940— Exhibit “B": F u n d s for transmission....................... $ 3,439.31 Less: Accounts receivable for funds transmitted .................. $ 281.02 Advan c e s for shipping charges... 256.75 ---------537.77 ---------- $

7,711.48

2,901.54


T H E BOARD

O F F O R E I G N M I S S I O N S , R. C. A.

Statement of H o m e Expenditures M a y 1, 1939, to April 30, 1940 E X H I B I T “A " Schedule No. 1 Account books, stationery a n d supplies............. Alterations expense on 156 5th Avenue, N. T. City.... A n n u a l r e p o r t ....................................... Audit of B oard accounts............................ B o o k s purchased .................................... Circulars a n d miscellaneous printing................ E x c h a n g e ........................................... E xpens e — ^District Secretary ........................ Illustrating literature ............................... Miscellaneous expenses .............................. Missionary educational expenses ................... Missionary offering envelopes an d b o x e s............. Neglected Arabia (publication)...................... Office furniture a n d repairs......................... Office rent a n d upkeep at Holland, M i c h i g a n ........ Pamphlets a n d leaflets............................... Postage, telegrams and cables....................... Progress Council— Stated Clerk of General S y n o d ..... Retirement F u n d for Office W o r k e r s — e x p e n s e ....... R e n t a n d care of office............................... Salaries of officers— Schedule No. l a ................. Office salaries— Schedule No. l a ..................... Special office assistance............................. Telephone expense .................................. Travel expense a m o n g churches a n d conferences.... Travel of B o ard m e m b e r s a n d annual meeting expense Total— Exhibit " A ”

$

429.12 552.41 315.00 525.00 254.54 170.26 10.03

200.00 203.13 331.97 1.650.00 15.00 164.78 265.45 959.45 1.467.00 1,085.14 1,159.56 72.00 2.162.01 11,700.00 6,450.00 61.20 320.23 1,180.52 244.30 $

31,948.10

Statement of H o m e Office Salaries— Officers and Office Assistants F o r the Y e a r E n d e d April 30, 1940 E X H I B I T “A ” Schedule No. la Paid to officers: F. M. Potter— Treasurer a n d Corresponding Secretary......... ? Li. J. Shafer— ^Associate Secretary ............................. W . J. V a n K e r s e n — District Secretary .......................

5,000.00 4,500.04 2,199.96

Total salaries paid to officers— Schedule No. 1 ......... ? 11,700.00 Paid to office assistants: H. E. B r o k a w ...................... .......................... J R. Smith ...................................................... G. H. Speer ................................................... V. E. U n d e r ............... F. J. B a r n y ................................................... Olive M. Sansom: Retirement allowance ...............

1,820.00 1,560.00 1,560.00 1,040.00 50.00

Total salaries paid to office assistants— Schedule No. 1. .$

6,450.00

420.00


T H E B O A R D O F F O R E I G N M I S S I O N S , R. C. A. Statement of Investment Securities and Real Estate ^Exhibit “B ” Schedule No. 2 April 30, 1940 Value based on published prices at or near Ledger April 30, 1940 balances B o n d s (Other T h a n Real Estate M o r t g a g e Bonds) 5 M A l a b a m a Pwr. Co., 1st ref. mort., 5%, due 1968 ..................................... 2 M A mer. Tel. & Tel. Co., deb., 3 & % , due 1961. .. 2M do., 3Yi%, due 1966................... 2 M A n a c o n d a Copper Mining Co., S. F. deb., i%%, due 1950 .......................... 5 M A r m o u r & Co., 1st mort. S. F., series B, 4%, due 1955 ................................ 1M B. a n d O. R. R. Co., ret. a n d gen. mort., series A, 5%, due 1995.......................... 3 M B. a n d O. R. R. Co., P., L. E. & W. V., ret. mort., 4%, due 1951........... ........ . 5M Bellows Falls Hydro-Elec. Corp., 1st mort., 5%, due 1958 ............................ 8 M Boston a n d M a i n e R. R. Co., 1st mort., series JJ, unstamped, 4 % % , due 1961........... 1 0 M B-M. T. Corp., coll, trust, 4 % % , due 1966.... 5 M Can. Pac. Ry. C., equip, trust cert., 5%, due 1944 .................................... 5 M Cent. 111. Pub. Service Co., 1st mort., series A, 3 % % , due 1968.................. .....••• H M Central R. R. of N. J., gen. mort., 5%, due 1987 .................................. •• 5 M Chi., Mil., St. P. a n d Pac. R. R. Co., mort., series A, 5%, due 1975 ................. . . $200 Chi., Mil., St. P. a n d Pac. R. R. Co., conv. adj. mort., series A, 5%, due 2000............. 7 M Cities Service Corp., conv. deb., 5%, due 1950 5 M Clevel. U nion Term. Co., 1st sinking fund, series A, 5 % % , due 1972............. •• ■• 5M Cons. Edison Co. of N. Y., Inc., 10-year deb., 3 % % , due 1948 ............... . . 2 M D e n v e r a n d Rio Grande, W e s t e r n R. R. Co., ref. a n d imp. mort., series B, 5%, due 1978. 1 0 M Eastern G a s & Fuel Assoc., 1st mort. col. trust, series A, 4%, due 1956............ 5 M Firestone Tire & R u b b e r Co., deb., 3 % % , due 1948 .................................... 4 M Glen Alden Coal Co., 1st mort., 4%, due 1966. 1 0 M Great Nor. Ry. Co., gen. mort., series I, 3 % % , due 1967 ................................ 3 M Great Nor. Ry. Co., 1st ref., series A, 4 % % , due 1961 .............................. •• 5M Gulf States Steel Co., 1st mort. S. F., 4 % % , due 1961 ................................ 5 M H o u s t o n Lting. a n d Pwr. Co., 1st mort., 3 % % , due 1966 ............ ............... . 1 0 M 111. Cent. R. R. Co., 1st mort., 3 % % , due 1951 5M Jones & Laughlin Steel Corp., 1st mort., series A, 4)4%, Hue 1961................. 5 M K a n s a s G a s & Elec. Co., 1st mort., 4>4%, due 1980 ..................................... 3 M Man. Ry. Co., cons., 4%, due 1990.......... trust, series A, 4%, due 1956............. 1 0 M Minn., St. P. & Saulte Ste. Marie Ry. Co., stamped, 4%, due 1938 .................. 5 M Missouri, K a n s a s & Texas Ry. Co., 1st mort., 4%, due 1990 ............................ 3 M Morris & Essex R. R. Co., const, mort., 5%, due 1955 .... ........................... **$2,500 Nat. Hotel of C u b a Corp., inc. deb., 6%, due 1959 ..................................... 5 M N. Y. C. R. R. Co., con. mort., series A, 4%, due 1998 ................................

5,225.00 2.182.50 2.187.50

$

5,032.50 2,020.00 2,040.00

2,060.00

1,970.00

5,187.50

4,900.00

267.50

R000.00

1,665.00

2,640.00

5,225.00

4,948.50

4,380.00 10,262.50

7,920.00 10,000.00

5,150.00

4,962.50

5,300.00

5,025.00

1,870.00

11,325.00

325.00

4,710.00

3.25 5,232.50

14.50 5,334.58

4,275.00

5,100.00

5,350.00

5,087.50

130.00

1,925.00

8,250.00

9,456.25

5,231.25 2,980.00

5,075.00 4,080.73

7,850.00

9,750.00

3,258.75

3,000.00

5,125.00

4,950.00

5,575.00 8,662.50

5,200.00 10,000.00

4,768.75

4,925.00

5.100.00 2,497.50 8.250.00

5,158.75 3,000.00 9,456.25

550.00

8,825.00

1,362.50

4,837.50

1,140.00

1,323.75

181.25

1,000.00

2,925.00

4,898.75


1M 4M 6M 15M 5M 2M 10M

N. Y. U a s & Elec. Lt., H e a t & Pwr. Co., pur­ chase m o n e y mort., 4%, due 1949......... N. Y. W a t e r Serv. Corp., 1st, series A, 5%, due 1951 .......................... . No. Pac. Ry. Co., ref. a n d imp., series A, 4 % %, due 2047 ................................ No. Pac. Ry. Co., ref. a n d imp., series D, 5%, due 2047 ................................ Ohio Edison Co., 1st mort., 3 % %, due 1972. .. Penn. R. R. Co., gen. mort., series A, 4 % % , due 1965 ..................... p ^nri& e n - mort-. series D, 414%,

Phila. & Reading Coal & Iron Co., ref. mort., S. F „ 5%, due 1973..................... . 7 M T h e Port of N e w Y o r k Authority, gen, ref., 4%, due 1975.................. .......... $10,300 T h e R e a d i n g Co., gen. a n d ref. mort., series A, 4 % % , due 1997....................... 1 M St. Louis, San Fran. Ry. Co., 1st mort., prior lien, series A, 4%, due 1950.............. 3 M So. Cal. Edison Co., Ltd., 1st ref. mort., 3 % % , due 1960 .................. 1 5 M So. Pac. Co., 4 % % , due 1981............... 1 M So. Pac. R. R. Co., 1st ref. mort., 4%, due 1955 3 M _Standard Oil Co. of N. J., debt., 2% %, due 1953 5 M Texas Elec. Serv. Co., 1st mort., 5%, due 1960 U. S. Savings Bonds, series D ($10,000 m a t u r ­ ity value), issued March, 1940, due March, 1950 .................... 1 3 M W e s t Shore R. R. Co., 1st mort., 4%, due 2361 $500 W i c k w i r e Spencer Steel Co., 1st mort., series A, 7%, due 1935.........................

1.170.00

850.00

3.810.00

3.970.00

2.940.00

5.272.50

7.893.75 5.475.00

14,212.50 6.037.50

2.080.00

1.865.50

9.850.00

9.625.00

609.50

4,572.22

$4,600

C ORPORATE STOCKS Shares 55 Amer. Sugar Ref. Co., pref., 7 % ........... 2 A mer. Tel. & Tel. Co., c o m m o n ............. 20 Atchison, Top. & Santa F e Ry. Co., pref., 5 % . 101 Bank e r s Trust Co. ( N e w Y o r k ) ............ 380 Canadian Pacific R a i l w a y Co., c o m m o n . .... 50 C o m m o n w e a l t h & Southern Corp., pref., 6 % . 20 Cons. Edison Co. of N e w York, Inc., pref., 5 % 10 do., c o m m o n ............................. 140 Delaware, L a c k a w a n n a & W e s t e r n R. R. Co. 30 Glen Alden Coal C o ........................ 3 Great Northern Ry. Co., pref............... 13 Illinois Central R. R. Co., c o m m o n ......... 1,500 Majestic Mines C o .......................... 5 National B a n k of N. J...................... 20 National Biscuit Co m p a n y , pref., 7 % ....... **25 National Hotel of C u b a Corp., c o m m o n . .... 20 National P o w e r & Light Co., c o m m o n ...... 7 Nitrate Corporation of Chile, series A and B. 7 Northern States P o w e r Co., pref., 7 % ....... 25 Ohio Edison Co m p a n y , pref., $6............ 5 T h e P e n n ro a d Corporation, c o m m o n ....... 130 Pennsylvania Railroad C o ................. 25 Public Service Corp. of N e w Jersey, c o m m o n 25 Sharon Steel Co m p a n y , $5 convertible pref.. 10 Southern Pacific C o m p a n y , c o m m o n ....... 25 Standard Brands, Inc., $4.50 cumulative pref. 65 United States Steel Corp., pref., 7 % ........ 3 Utica Knitting Co., pref., 7 % ..............

Total bonds (other than real estate m o r t ­ g a g e bonds) and corporate stocks— Exhibit “B ” ......................

7.472.50

7.402.50

7.132.75

9,997.21

130.00

155.00

3,266.25 6.562.50 596.25 3.142.50 5.287.50

2.955.00 14,475.00 630.00 3,086.25 5.012.50

7.500.00 6.175.00

7,500.00 12,818.75

57.50

319.33

$212,886.75

$281,192.57

$

$

* *

4,833.13 345.00 1.130.00 5,832.75 2.090.00 3.400.00 2.165.00 318.75 665.00 262.50 82.13 141.38 3,330.00

5,888.13

200.00 2, 020.00 11,463.50 13,467.52 5,162.50

2,010.00 238.75 18,725.00 2,648.10 43.63 936.00 725.00 2,480.00

201.00

160.00 62.50 647.50 2,578.13 10.63 5,424.02 1.150.00 2.500.00 185.00 2.375.00 7,597.50 240.00

$ 44,473.65

$ 88,938.41

$257,360.40

$370,130.98

165.00 595.88 2.700.00

10.00 2.860.00 1,050.00 1,465.63 121.25 2,681.25 8,027.50

•Published prices at or near April 30, 1940, not available. ••The ledger balance has not been allocated as between stock and bonds on these items in the B o a r d ’s records.


M O R T G A G E S A N D CERTIFICATES Ledger Maturity Balances Guaranteed Mortgages: ,,Dates^ J 4,000.00 Filbert St,. G a r d e n City, L. I............. Matured 4.975.00 Franconia Ave., Flushing, I*. I............ Feb. 1, 1943 5.500.00 Hilbert St., Brooklyn, N. T ................ Matu r e d 5.850.00 4036 67th St., Woodside, L. I............... Oct. 1, 1942 9.900.00 Mansfield Place, Brooklyn, N. T ........... Matu r e d 4.750.00 P a r k V i e w Place, Baldwin, E. I............. Matu r e d P e m b r o k e Ave. a n d 260th St., Little Neck, 4.000. L. I...................................... Sept. 1. 1942 6.850.00 27 Stoner Ave., Great Neck, L. I............ Mar, 1, 1943 4.500.00 69th Lane, Q u e e n s County, N. Y ............ Matured 2.750.00 119th Ave., Woodside, L. I................. Matured 6.000. 160th St., Jamaica, L. I.................... Matured 4.700.00 192nd St., Jamaica, L. I................... M a t ured 4.075.00 197th St., Hollis, L. I...................... Feb. 1, 1942 3.500.00 K a t h r y n St., Hempstead, L. I.............. Apr. 1, 1941 6.850.00 Kilburn Road, G a r d e n City, L. I........... July 1, 1942 18,500.00 71st St. a n d 3rd Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y ....... Dec. 1, 1942 Mortgages N o t Guaranteed: Central Ave., Hempstead, L. I............. Matured 3332 Fish Ave., Bronx, N. Y ................ Matured R o s s m o r e Ave., Bronxville, N. Y ........... Matured 633 T enth St., Brooklyn, N. Y .............. Matured 1620 East 13th St., Brooklyn, N. Y ..... Matured 1058 East 14th St., Brooklyn, N. Y ..... Matured 938 East 26th St., Brooklyn, N. Y ........... M a t ured 1527 76th St., Brooklyn, N. Y .............. Matured 343 5th Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y ............... Oct. 31, 1942 448 N e w Jersey Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y ....... M a t ured Ave. R, Brooklyn, N. Y .................... Matured 289 Barclay St., Flushing, L. I............. Matured C r o s s w a y H i g h w a y , Glen Cove, L. I........ Apr. 1, 1941 189 Duffield St., Brooklyn, N. Y ............ June 1, 1943 Pulaski St., Brooklyn, N. Y ................ M a t u r e d 184th PI., Jamaica, L. I..................... Matured 218th St., Bayside, L. I............ Matured Undivided 3 0 % interest in the following: T e m p l e Emanuel, Passaic, N. J. ($50,000).

00

00

6,000.00 7.900.00 6.500.00 9.800.00 3.200.00 5.500.00

6,000.00 4.250.00 6.825.00 3.800.00 5.500.00 3.500.00 15,500.00 925.00 2.500.00 3.500.00 3.500.00 14,397.03

Certificate: Participation Certificate, Reservoir Ave., Bronx, N. Y., 5 % % ................... Matured

9,372.22 ---------- $215,169.25

M O R T G A G E BONDS G r a m e r c y P a r k Building Corp., 20year debenture u n i t s ............. Manchester Terminal Corp, 2nd m o r t ­ gage income b o n d (with stock w a r ­ rants and voting trust certificates Master Printers Building, K y m s o n Building Corp., 1st mortgage, S. F . . H oly o k e Buildings, Chicago, 111., 1st mortgage, certificate of deposit.... St. M a r k s Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y ...... Taylor Ave., Bronx, N. Y ............ 222-6 W e s t 29th St., N e w Y o r k City, 1st mo r t g a g e .................... 103 East 57th St., N e w Y o r k City, 1st mor t g a g e ........................ 8120 Jefferson Ave., East, 1st refund­ ing S. F. mortgage, certificate of deposit .......................... N e w Y o r k Title & M o r t g a g e Co., ctf. No. 3516, series Q ................ 1 P a r k Ave. Building, N. Y., 2nd m o r t ­ gage ($300 face value)...........

6%

June 1, 1949

$1,000.00

1,000.00

4

Oct. 1, 1963

6%

July 1, 1946

6% 5% 5%

Matured Matured Matured

1,000.00 7,469.09 1,950.00

474.10

3+

Apr. 15, 1941

3,100.00

6

Nov. 10, 1941

2,000.00

4

Oct.

15, 1942

4

Matured

6

Nov. —

6, 1951

19.00 1,760.00 210.00 19,982.19


MORTGAGE NOTE O r an g e County, California.... ......

5% -- —

M a t ured

*7,000.00 ----------

7,000.00

REAL, E S T A T E Ledger , Balances Florida property ........................................ $ 12.50 Kollen property— Holland, Michigan ...... 3,750.00 917 South W e s t n e d g e Avenue, Kalamazoo, M i c h i g a n ..... 4.500.00 80 P a r k Drive, East Chester, N. Y ........................ 8,830.24 81 Stanwix Street, Brooklyn, N. Y ....................... 4,326.82 Laketown, Michigan, property............................ 700.00 N e w Utrecht Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y ................ ..... 8,703.80 212th Street, Bellaire, L o n g Island........................ 4,152.09 North D a k o t a property................................... 2,550.25 ---------- * 37,525.79 MISCELLANEOUS ( B o o k Value N o t Yet Determined) Half interest in $3,000 mort a g e participation certificate No. 5723 of the Westchester Trust Co., Yonkers, N. Y., on property located at Ashburton and P a r k Avenues, Yonkers, N. Y.— received as part of legacy........... ? Trustee’s certificates of the 1st State Bank, Holland, Michigan, for $2.96 a n d receiver’s certificate of P e o ­ ple’s State Bank, Holland, Michigan, for $42.60— received as part of legacy............................$ Request f r o m the Estate of A n n a Caroline Voute consist­ ing of the following interests: 3/18ths of % interest in property at 605 North 16th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 4/18ths interest in $10,000 face value m o r tage bond on Bellevue-Stratford Hotel, Philadelphia, Pa.$ Half interest in the following: $2,000 note a n d m o r t g a g e on property located in O t ­ t a w a County, Michigan $1,400 note and m o r t g a g e on property located in O t ­ t a w a County, Michigan Various promissory notes for a total unpaid face a m o u n t of $4,200................................. $ Total mortgages, real estate, etc. (at book values)— Exhibit “B ” ...................

LOOMIS, S U F F E R N & F E R N A L D

$279,677.14


T H E B O A R D O F F O R E I G N M I S S I O N S , R. C. A. Statement of F u n d Balances April 30, 1940 E X H I B I T “B-’— S C H E D U L E No. 3 Accumulated Income Trust funds: E n d o w m e n t funds: Designated for use in China: A m o y Hospital F u n d .............. $ Elisabeth H. Blauvelt Memorial Hospital F u n d .................. C. H. V. B e d E n d o w m e n t F u n d — Blauvelt Hospital ............... G. J. Kooiker B e d E n d o w m e n t F u n d — - A m o y Hospital ............... M a r t h a Schadelee F u n d — Sio K h e H o s p i t a l ........................ Jasper Westervelt F u n d — Neerbasch H o s p i t a l ........................ John H. Oerter Memorial F u n d .... Designated for use in India: Arcot Industrial School F u n d ..... Scudder Memorial Hospital, Ranipettai: General Purpose F u n d .......... Isaac B r o d h e a d F u n d ........... Eliza M. Garrigues Memorial F u n d Alida V e n n e m a H e e v e n Fund.... E u p h e m i a M a s o n Olcott F u n d ___ Dr. Geor g e A. S a n d h a m F u n d .... Elizabeth R. Voorhees College F u n d C. L. Wells Memo r i a l F u n d ........ Designated for use in Arabia: F u n d for Medical Missionary W o r k in A r a b i a ..................... Bahrain Hospital F u n d s — Arabia: General Purpose F u n d .......... Alfred D e W . Mason, Jr., Fund.!. F a n n y W . M a s o n Memorial Fund. L e w i s D. M a s o n F u n d ......... L ewis D. M & s o n F u n d — surgical supplies ...................... V a n Rensselaer Burr, Jr., Fund.. Basrah Hospital F u n d — A r a b i a .... A n n a M. T. Santvoord— A m a r a H o s ­ pital .........................

27.88

*

6,000.00

3.82

500.00

6.29

700.00

5.87

785.00

7.63 14.68

1,000.00 1,950.00

321.14

20,000.00

9,394.91 298.34 423.88 885.74 676.10 1,095.60 6,139.88 116.21

36,335.58 1,000,00 1,000.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 5,000.00 10,000.00 15,316.54

25.14*

111,353.07

116.67 80.13 48.45 30.05*

7,259.00 5.000. 3.000.00 9,643.89

32.30 19.26 41.98

2,000.00 1,200.00 2,000.00

16.15

1,000.00 *246,686.34

*

00

*266,440.9*

6.99 * 2,000.00 43.68 12,555.36 6.99 2,000.00 17.46 5,000.00 75.12

Held in trust for W o m a n ’s Board: Susan Y. Lansing F u n d ............... * 17.40 Josephine Penfold F u n d ............... 17.40 Adrian T r i m p e F u n d ............................ *

Total

3,643.26

37.86

$ 19,754.58 Ministerial education in India: William R. Gord o n F u n d .............. * Christian Jansen Fund................ Joseph Scudder F u n d .................. G. B. W albridge F u n d ....................

•Debit balance— deduct.

Principal

34.80

* 21,555.36 *

21,630.48

5,000.00 5,000.00 700.00

* 10,700.00

10,784.80


Principal General trust funds: William C. B a r k a l o w F u n d ................. Abbie J. Bell F u n d ........................... Josiah E. a n d Ida Crane Memorial F u n d ..... Elizabeth Diehl Memorial F u n d ............. William L. D e F o u w F u n d .................. John H e e m s t r a and Fa mily Mission F u n d .... Mr. and Mrs. Cornelius Hollestelle F u n d . --- Garrett N. H o p p e r F u n d ..................... Abel H. Huizinga F u n d ...................... In M e m o r i a m F u n d .......................... Mr. and Mrs. H e n r y J. Kollen Memo r i a l F u n d Susan T. Lansing F u n d ..................... J o h n S. Lyles F u n d ........................... M a d ison A v e n u e R e f o r m e d C h u r c h F u n d ..... Clarine V. B. a n d L u c y A. M a t s o n F u n d ..... H e y e M e n n e n g a F u n d ....................... Charles E. M o o r e F u n d ...................... John Neefus F u n d ........................... P. I. a n d M. V. K. Neefus F u n d .............. M a r y Neefus F u n d ........................... North R e f o r m e d Church, Passaic, N. J., Fund. Charles W,. Osborne F u n d ................... P e r m a n e n t F u n d ............................ A. J. Schaefer F u n d ......................... Semelink Family Mission F u n d ............. Rev. Dr. C. D. F. Steinfuhrer Memorial Fund. John Martin V a n B u r e n F u n d ............... A. C. V a n Raalte Mission F u n d .............. Alida V a n Sehaick F u n d ..................... L e n a M a y Visser F u n d ...................... A. V. S. Wallace F u n d ....................... Cornelia M. Wallace F u n d . ................... Mr. a n d Mrs. William W a l v o o r d F u n d ....... A b b e y L. Wells F u n d .......................

Total

f 10,784.60 200.00 600.00 6.500.00 1.714.86 9.000. 4.500.00 1.500.00

1.000.

00

00

500.00 3.750.00 2.500.00 50.000. 00 15.000. 00 1 ,0 0 0.00

600.00 475.00 9.379.86 14.000. 00 4,045.09 25.000. 00 5.000. 00 14,550.00 194.25 14.000. 00 5.500.00

20.000.

00

3.000. 00 29,000.00 600.00 625.00 625.00

1.000.00 5,000.00 $261,143.66

Total trust funds: Principal ............................. $540,085.36 Acc u m u l a t e d income ................. 19,864.50 $559,949.86 Principal Conditional Gifts: Mr. a n d Mrs. John P. B o o n ........................ $ J a m e s Cantine .......... Katherine H. Cantine.............................. Rev. A B. C h u r c h m a n .............................. Virginia T. B. C o b b ................................ D. J. D e B e y ....................................... Mr. and Mrs. Roel D e Y o u n g ....... Rev. a n d Mrs. R. D. D o u w s t r a ..................... Mrs. G. H. D u b b i n k ................................ A n n a H a g e n s ...................................... Lizzie H a g e n s ..................................... Joseph A. and William B.Hill...................... J o h n Gerardus F a g g — inm e m o r y of................ Rev. and Mrs. S. J. M e n n i n g ....................... Alice Oldis ........................................ N a n n a H e a t h Peters .............................. Arie P u n t ......................................... William Schmitz ..."................................ M. C. S. F u n d ...................................... M a r y S. S w i c k ..................................... Minnie T a y l o r ........ M a r y C. V a n B r u n t................................ Mrs. John P. V a n G o r p ............................. Cornelius V a n Z e e ................................. Mr. a n d Mrs. J. Visser............................. M a r y Voorhees .................................... E d w a r d Whiteside .......................... John W o l f ........................................ Nellie Z w e m e r .................................... Total Conditional Gifts.... Security F u n d ..................... Total F u n d s — Exhibit

“B ”

Total

500.00 5,000.00 2,000.00 2,500.00 4,000.00 1,000.00 1,700.00 1,000.00 250.00 100.00 100.00 18,461.56 10,000.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 5,000.00 4,672.50 10,000.00 5,000.00 40,000.00 7,000.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 500.00 1,000.00 2,000.00 500.00 1,000.00 $128,284.05 71,622.69 $759,856.60


FINANCIAL

STATEMENTS

OF THE

W O M A N ’S B O A R D

OF

FOREIGN

MISSIONS


CLARKE, OAKES & G R E E N W O O D Accountants an d Auditors SO B r o a d Street N e w York M a y 21, 1940. W O M A N ’S B O A R D O F F O R E I G N MISS I O N S , R. C. A., 156 Fifth Avenue, N e w York, N. Y. M e s d a m e s : — W e have audited the books an d accounts of the Treasurer of your B o a r d for the year ended April 30, 1940, and submit herewith the following statements, which, in our opinion, set forth the transactions of the B o a r d for the year a n d its financial condition as at April 30, 1940. E X H I B I T A — Statement of assets a n d liabilities as at April 30, 1940. E X H I B I T B: Schedule I— Statement of receipts for the year ended April 30, 1940. Schedule II— Statement of disbursements for the year ended April, 30, 1940. In conformity with the Board's practice in the past, no provision has been m a d e for depreciation of buildings owned. C a s h balances w e r e reconciled with statements submitted by the de­ positaries and confirmed b y correspondence. T h e securities w e r e examined M a y 6, 1940. V e r y truly yours, (Signed) C L A R K E , O A K E S & G R E E N W O O D . W O M A N ’S B O A R D REFORMED

O F F O R E I G N MISSIONS

C H U R C H IN A M E R I C A

S T A T E M E N T O F ASSETS A N D

LIABILITIES A S

AT

A P R I L 30, 1040

ASSETS EXHIBIT A C A S H I N B A N K S (appropriated $18,802.59) ........ I N V E S T M E N T S : (At b o o k values) Deposit Accounts: B a n k for Savings, N e w York, N. Y .......... ..$ E m i g r a n t s Industrial Savings Bank, N. Y. ., B o w e r y Savings Bank, N e w York, N. Y ..... Bonds: $3000 A m e r i c a n Telephone & Telegraph Co. 5 % %, 1943 5000 A m e r i c a n Telephone & Telegraph Co. 3%, 1966 ........................... 1000 Atlantic Coast Line R. R. Co. 4%, 1952.. 2000 Australia, C o m m o n w e a l t h 4%, 1956 .... 2000 Canadian Pacific R a i l w a y Co. 4 % % , 1960 1000 Elgin, Joliet & Eastern Railway, 3>4%, 1970 ............................... 5000 Gulf States Utilities Co. 3 % % , 1969..... 6000 Illinois Central Railroad Co. 4%, 1953... 3000 Illinois Central Railroad Co. 4%, 1955... 6000 K a n s a s P o w e r & Light Co. 3%, 1969.... 3000 Midland Valley Railroad Co. 5%, 1943... 5000 Morris & Essex Railroad Co. 4 % % , 1955. 4000 National Steel Corp. 3%, 1965 ......... 3000 N e w Y o r k Central Railroad Co. 4(4%, .;!!!!! 2000 N e w Y o r k Edison Co.'3(4 %,' 1966’!’ 3000 Pacific G a s & Electric 2000 Pacific G a s & Electric 3000 Penn. P o w e r & Light 1500 Prudence Corporation

Co. 3(6%, 1966. ... Co. 4%, 1964..... Co. 3(6%, 1969.... 6(6%, 1933 (in de-

4000 Southwestern G a s & Electric Co. 4%, 1960 5000 Standard Oil Co. of N. J. 2 % % , 1953 .... 2000 Texas Corp. 3(6%, 1 9 6 1 .... ............ 2000 Texas Corp. 3%, 1959 .................. 5000 United Light & R a i l w a y Co. 5(6%, 1952.. 5000 United States Steel Corp. 3(4%, 1948.... Accrued Interest

$ 19,000.90 750.82 45.73

3.393.75 5.126.50 996.00

2,010.00 2.017.50 1.016.50 5.357.75 5.350.00 2,752.60 5.486.75 2.917.50 4.668.75 4.070.25 2.857.50 2.049.00 3.241.50 2.164.00 3.194.25 1.500.00 4.276.50 5.020.25 2.101.50 2.086.50 3.537.50 5.182.75 $ 82,375.00 30.92 82,405.92


Real Estate B o n d s a n d Mortgages: 40 W e s t 77th Street, N e w York, N. Y. (partici­ pating ctf.) 4 % ................... $ 72 Gree n w i c h Street, N e w York, N. Y „ 6 % .... 128 W e s t 130th Street, N e w York, N. Y „ 5 % % . . 136th Street, Northside, East of B r o o k Avenue, 4 % ................................ 143 Westervelt Avenue, N e w Brighton, Staten Island, N. Y., 5 % ................. 160 W e s t 120th Street, N e w York, N. Y „ 4Mi. •% 166 Benziger Ave., N e w Brighton, Staten Island, N. Y „ 5 % % ........................ 302 W e s t 146th Street (2737 Eighth Avenue), N e w York, N. Y., 5 % .............. 357 W e s t 117th Street, N e w York, N. Y., 4%.... 680 Williams Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y., 5 % .... 891 Irvine Street, Bronx, N. Y „ 4 % % ........ 1413 78th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y., 5 % % ...... 2066 M a p e s Avenue, Bronx, N. Y. 5 % % ..... L y o n s Street, Eastchester, N. Y „ 5 % % ....... 6118 Tyndall Avenue, Eastside, No. of 201st Street, 5 % % ....................... 106 W e s t 43rd Street, N e w York, N. Y., 5 % (Participating Ctf.) ............... 291/3 Seventh Ave, N e w York, N. Y „ 2 % (Participating Ctf.) ............... 316 W e s t 93 rd Street, N. Y., 4 % (Partici­ pating^ Ctf. 350/2 W e s t 38th Street, N e w York, N. Y. 3 % % (Participating Ctf.) ........... ... 2050/6 Eighth Avenue, N e w York, N. Y., 3 % (Participating Ctf.) ............... Certificate S h o w i n g $356.60 Interest in M o r t ­ g a g e Participating Certificate for Original F a c e A m o u n t of $1,000, on Property at Valentine A v e n u e and East 201st Street, 5 % % .......... M ortgages O w n e d Jointly with the W o m e n ’s B o ard of Domestic Missions: $8,000 Pease Street a n d North 3rd Street, Mt. Vernon, N. Y „ 5 % — One-third Interest .................... ...... $1,600 4080 Hill Avenue, Bronx, N. Y., 6 % — One-third Interest ...........

3,470.24 14.000. 00

6,000.00 14.000. 3.300.00 9.000. 4.000.

20.000. 5.500.00 4.000. 4.000. 4.500.00 3.500.00 5.000.

00 00 00

00 00 00 00

16,000.00 1,516.65 492.96 1,518.42 496.25 228.57

281.60

2,666.67 533.33 $124,004.69

Real Estate: 27 W e s t

93rd Street Property, N e w York, N. Y ................................ $18,335.06 77-85 W a l w o r t h Street Property, Brooklyn, 20,043.10 270 W e s t 84th Street Property, N e w York, N. Y. (Undivided Fractional I n t e r e s t— 5,191.98 5016.67/27050.00) .................. 5,992.42 347 H a n c o c k Street Property Brooklyn N. Y . .. 4,983.25 438 W a t e r Street Property. N e w York, N. Y... 473-477 William Street Property, East Orange, N. J. (Undivided One-half Interest). 5,500.00 8,133.95 1457-84th Street Property, Brooklyn. N. Y .... 1895 P a r k A v e n u e Property, N e w York, N. Y. 13,441.31 $81,621.07

Stocks: 20 Shares Amer i c a n W a t e r W o r k s & Electric Co. $6 Preferred .................. 20 Shares A n c h o r H o c k i n g Glass Corp. $6 Preferred ......................... 20 Shares Atchison, T o p e k a & Santa F e Ry. 5 % Preferred ...................... 30 Shares C o l u m b i a G a s & Electric Corp. 6 % Preferred .......... 200 Shares F i r e m e n ’s Ins. Co. ofN e w a r k , N. J. 4-158/1000 Shares Mt. V e r n o n Trust C o ....... 95 Shares North A m e r i c a n Co. 6 % C u m . P r e ­ ferred .......... 55 Shares United Corporation $3 C u m . P re­ ferred .......................

$2,009.30 2,724.38 2,029.30 3,066.45 1,000.00 4.63 5,332.21 2611.95 18,778,22

Certificate for $155.95— Beneficial Interest in Mt. V e r n o n Trust C o m p a n y ...........

1.00 $326,642.75


LIABILITIES A N D F U N D S XTNREMITTED

J

BALANCES

R E N T DEPOSITS O N L E A S E D PROPER T I E S D U E R E A L E S T A T E A G E N T ..............

$

7,695.43

455.00 22.38

477.38 T E M P O R A R Y F U N D S A W A I T I N G DISTRIBUTION: D i a m o n d Jubilee F u n d ....... ......... .......... $ 10,000.00 30,000.00 Estate of M a r y Bussing .......... ............... 2,127.91 L e g a c y Account .......... .•••••................ 2,180.12 BOth Anniversary F u n d for Arabia .............. Golden Jubilee Funds: „ , „„ Children’s H o m e . Vellore, India.... $ 4,425.00 Undesignated ..................... 575.00 5,000.00 3,614.96 A d a Louise Morris F u n d .... 530.31 Pension F u n d ............. . 1,293.79 General a n d Contingent F u n d s ■$ 54,747.09 P E R M A N E N T F U N D S — W h o s e I n c o m e Applies on Budget: Jane A n n Gopsill F u n d ..... .................... $32,500.00 A n n a T o w n s e n d V a n Santvoord F u n d ........... 30,000.00 M aria H o e s V a n B u r e n Memorial F u n d ......... 20,000.00 M a r y E. T a l m a g e F u n d .......................... 5.362.19 Catherine J. Gebhardt F u n d .................... 9,656.03 Ida B a l d w i n F u n d ............................... 5,500.00 Charlotte W . D u r y e e F u n d ...................... 5,000.00 Eliza A. Zabriskie F u n d ....... ................ 5,000.00 Clara D e Forrest Burrell Evangelistic F u n d ..... 5,000.00 M a r t h a T. Douglas F u n d ------.. .■ ■■ •••••••••.... 3,000.00 North R e f o r m e d Church, Passaic, N. J. F u n d --A n n Eliza Disborough F u n d .................... 2,000.00 Helen A. Rollins F u n d ..... ..................... 1,733.98 Catherine Jane Pryer Evangelistic F u n d ........ 1.000.00 M a r y Storrs Coe F u n d ........................... LOoO.OO Mrs. E d w a r d H. Peters F u n d .................... J’nnS'AS Jane T. B. M o o r e Memorial F u n d ............... 1’22x M a r y Louise Leonard Memorial F u n d ........... 750.00 Abbie J. Bell F u n d .............................. 500.00 E m i l y H e r m a n c e F u n d .... ...................... Olive Gates Wallace Evangelistic F u n d ......... 500.00 M a r y H o bart F u n d .............................. 475.00 A n n a and Marg a r e t Rosenraad Evangelistic F und. 300.00 J o h n H o f f m a n Memo r i a l F u n d ................... 100.00 Margaret R o o s a F u n d ........................... 4.308.22 Katharine M. T a l m a g e F u n d ................... 6,387.82^ ^

^

P E R M A N E N T F U N D S — W h o s e Inco m e Does Not A pply on Budget: M a r y Taber Schell Hospital E n d o w m e n t F u n d .... 50,000.00 M a r y Lott Lyles Hospital E n d o w m e n t F u n d ..... 13,000.00 Children’s H o m e , Vellore, E n d o w m e n t F u n d ..... 3,000.00 M a r y B. Doolittle F u n d ... ...................... 2,000.00 Netherlands Comm i t t e e F u n d .................... 1,105.01 H a n n a h M o r e Bishop Memorial F u n d ............ 1,000.00 Margaret L o g a n T u n n a r d F u n d .................. 1,000.00 Marion Wells T h o m s Hospital F u n d ............. 1,000.00 Annuity F u n d s ................................... 3“,500.00 M atured Annuity F u n d s ......................... 9’022 nX A n n a F. B a c o n Memorial F u n d .................. 95-00 m

7fl0 01

S URPLUS ARISING F R O M R E A L E S T A T E O P E R A ­ T I O N S .......................................

^

6,449.10 $326,642.75


W O M A N ’S B O A M D O P F O R E I G N M I S S I O N S — R E F O R M E D AMERICA— S T A T E M E N T OF RECEIPTS F O R T H E E N D E D A P R I L 30, 1940

CHURCH YEAR

IN

Exhibit B Schedule 1 R E C E I P T S P R O M C H U R C H E S , SOCIETIES A N D INDIVIDUALS F O R G E N E R A L W O R K O P BOARD: General Contributions ............................? 43,515,12 Designated Contributions for Missionaries’ Salaries 38,559.99 14,654.07 Miscellaneous Designated Gifts ................. Memorial Memb e r s h i p s ........................... 400.00 Life Mem b e r s h i p s ................................ 450.00 Special Offerings: Foreign Missions S u n d a y ............ ? 514.76 Anniversary ......................... 505.62 W o m e n ' s A s s e m b l y ................. 83.00 Birthday ............................. 913.19 Northfield ............................ 12.00 -------2,028.57 Y o u n g W o m e n ’s Societies: Receipts on account of Y o u n g W o m e n ’s Budget.? .......................... 15,191.31 Miscellaneous Gifts applied to Y o u n g W o m e n ’s B u d g e t ........ 790.49 -------5,981.80 S e w i n g Guild ................................... 336.90 United Mission Meso p o t a m i a — Salary............... 1,320.00 B a b y Roll M e m b e r s h i p s .................. 431.98 Children’s H o m e , A m o y , China ..............$18.32 Children’s H o m e , Vellore, India............. 10.00 ______ 28 32 Missionary Travel a n d Outfit .................... 153.57 W o m e n ’s Christian College, T o k y o ............... 125.00 124.19 St. Christopher’s Training College, M a d r a s ....... Gift for PriorY e a r ’s Deficit ...................... 636.15 „ , „ T „ ---------- $108,745.66 Sales of Literature ............................................. 350 86 I n c o m e f r o m Trust F u n d held by North R e f o r m e d Church Passaic 46.55 Insurance Recovery o n Fire D a m a g e .......................... 481.00 I n c o m e f r o m Invested F u n d s Applicable to B u d g e t ............. 6,017 33 I n c o m e from Invested F u n d s not Applicable to Budget.? T R U S T S F U N D S I N C O M E — H E L D B Y B. F. M., R. C. A.: Susan Y. Lansing F u n d ................. ’..$145.03 Josephine Penfold F u n d .................. 145.03 R E A L ESTATE: I n c o m e Collected in Year ................ $8,789.62 Less: Expenses .......................... 6,375.77 F O R SPECIFIC W O R K : China E m e r g e n c y F u n d ..........................$ Special Gifts, China .............................. Special Gifts, India ............................... Gift for Salary of Eunice Sluyter................ Gift for Salary of Lois Marsiije ................. Missionary Medical College for W o m e n , Vellore.... Support of Beds in M a r y Taber Schell Hospital,... Gift for Dr. Rottschalfer ........................ Car for Mrs. H o n e g g e r ........................... Gift for Mrs. H o n e g g e r ................... ....... F o r Gridley Girls’ School ........................ Special Gifts, Arabia ............................ Special F u n d for Arabia— Fiftieth Anniversary!.. ! Special Gift to cover shipping cost of bed to Arabia Special Gifts, J a pan .............................. Special Gifts for Missionary Travel & Outfit Special Gifts, General ........................... W o r l d D a y of Praying Offerings ................. Designated Gifts for B o a r d of Foreign Missions___

$115,641.40 5,479.51

290.06

2,413.85 -------

8,183.42

108.42 202.35 616.21 800.00 675.00 288.42 115.00

100.00 600.00

100.00 150.00 336.99 351.18 91.19 44.21 45.00 14.00 21.07 1,181.24 6,245.28


LEGACIES A N D ADDITIONS TO FUNDS: Estate of Katharine T a l m a g e ................... $ Estate of Margaret R o o s a ....................... Estate of Helen Gould Shepard .................. Estate of Ducla Gleason ..... ............. • • ■■• •• E n d o w m e n t of bed in M a r y Lott Lyles Hospital in M e m o r y of Mrs. H e n r y R. W r i g h t ........ North R e f o r m e d C h u r c h F u n d .................. Share

6,387.82 4,808.22

1,000.00 25.00

1, 000.00 50.75 -------

of Income M a r t h a Antoinette Quick Memorial F u n d Held by General S ynod ................

13,271.79 1,260.56 $144,602.45

Received for the Account of W o m e n ’s B o a r d of Domestic Missions and Other Allied Groups... Net Proceeds on Invesments Sold or R e d e e m e d ...... R en t Security Received on Rented Property ........

5,283.65 9,849.61 75.00 $159,810.71

B A L A N C E S I N B A N K , M A T 1, 1939: Corn E x c h a n g e B a n k Trust C o m p a n y ........... $ 12,086.43 6.130.41 Central H a n o v e r B a n k and Trust C o m p a n y ...... 285.81 Central H a n o v e r B a n k and Trust Co., agent account

18,502.65 $178,313.36

W O M A N ’S B O A R D O F F O R E I G N M I S S I O N S — R E F O R M E D C H U R C H IN A M E R I C A — S T A T E M E N T O F D I S B U R S E M E N T S F O R T H E Y E A R A P R I L 30, 1940 Exhibit B Schedule II F O R W O R K OF BOARD U N D E R G E N E R A L BUDGET: T o B oard of Foreign Missions: For General Appropriations ................. ? 79,750.00 844.53 F o r salary, travel and outfit of Geraldine Smies 907.42 F o r salary, travel and outfit of Eunice Sluyter 225.00 F o r extra teacher at Chittoor, India ......... 3,000.00 F o r Deficit in year 1938-39 .................. -$ 84,726.95 Interdenominational W o r k : 500.00 W o m e n ’s Christian College, Madras, I n d i a --500.00 St. Christopher’s Training College, M a d r a s .... 1,500.00 W o m e n ’s Christian College, Tokyo, Japan --200.00 Christian Literature for W o m e n a n d Children 2,700.00 Children’s H o m e , A m o y , China ................... 500.00 Children's H o m e , Vellore, I n d i a .................. 500.00 Orphanage, Bahrain, Arabia ....................... 50.00 1,050.00 654.17 Grants to Missionaries .......................... 100.00 Special Grant to Miss Charlotte Kellien ......... 453.56 S e w i n g Guild ................................... Grants to Cooperating Bodies, Etc.: Missionary Education Department: Appropriation .................. $ 1,325.00 Publications ................... 100.00 ? 1,425.00 Assessment— Stated Clerk, General Synod, R. 749.70 C. A ....................................... Y o u n g W o m e n ’s Depa r t m e n t (Salary of Secre­ tary $1,100.00, Assistant a n d Expenses 2,156.40 $1,056.40) ................................ 15.00 International Union Missionary Societies..... 109.00 Missionary Education M o v e m e n t ............ 325.00 Staff Conference ............................. 4,780.10 Publicity and Promotion: A n n u a l Reports, a n d Miscellaneous Supplies..$ 932.73 Publications, Literature ............... 1,750.01 Travel of Speakers and Delegates ...... 767.37 Conference Expenses ........................ 279.54 Special Anniversaries ....................... 373.03 4,102.68


Honi'e Administration:

Rent, Service, Etc..... ....................... ? Office Expense, Audit, Etc.................... Office Salaries: (Stenographer 12080., Publications Secre­ tary $1603., Assistant (part time) $780., A s ­ sistant to Treasurer $1800., Miscellaneous extra office assistance $205.65) Salaries of Officers: m (General Secretary $3400., Assistant Treas­ urer $2,100.) Retirement Allowances: „ (Honorary Secretary $1000., Retired Cor­ responding Secretary $600., Contribution to Retirement F u n d for H a y W o r k e r s $227.50) Stationery, Printing and Postage ........... Legal Fees ........... ...................... Telephone a n d Telegraph .................. Servicing Mort g a g e s ........ ................ Renovation of N e w Offices a n d Furnishings.. M o v i n g E x p ense ....... ..................... FOR

SPECIFIC W O R K : In China: „ , i China E m e r g e n c y F u n d ..................... ? Special Gifts ................................

117091

^ 6,468.65

5,500.00 . .. i .s j i .ou

® 4&x.t>u „ ,^l ”° 2,123.50 353 °6

19,646.03

ssin °6.io 365.60 $

In India: . , „ , ^ ^ M a r y Taber Schell Hospital E n d o w m e n t F u n d . I n c o m e ...................................... 1,908.01 M a r y Lott Lyles Hospital E n d o w m e n t F u n d I n c o m e ............................. . • •• • 330.00 W o m e n ’s Missionary Medical College, Vellore — Special Designated Gifts .............. 333.42 Special Gifts ................................ 1-437-73 In Japan: Special Gifts ................................ In -A_raT^ia * Car for Dr. B a r n y — Arabian Anniversary F u n d . $ Special to B o a r d of Foreign Missions for Sal­ ary, Travel and Outfit of Dr. R u t h Crouse $779.49 and Salary Miss A n n Snyder $625.00 Special Gifts ................................

451.70

4,059.16 214.21

750.00 1,404.49 463-18

Special Gifts— General ......................... • •t 14.00 Special Designated Gifts, B oard of Foreign M i s ­ sions ................... 1,148.224 Special for Account Lois Mars i l j e ................ W o r l d D a y of Prayer Offerings .................. 21-v7 A m e r i c a n Mission to Lepers .................... ....... P a y m e n t s to Annuitants ..........................

2,622.67

2,213.45 1,756.20 $129,530.88

MONIES RECEIVED F O R T H E ACCOUNT OF ALLIED B O A R D S , T R A N S M I T T E D ........................ I N V l o ™ E N T S : ....................................... t 23.456.00 Accrued Interest— B o n d s ......................... fS'.o Additions to Deposit Accounts .................... l6.2» Real Estate— Foreclosure Expenses ............ 983.26

5,295.12

24,486.46 $159,312.46

B A L A N C E S I N B A N K S , A P R I L 30, 1940: . , Corn E x c h a n g e B a n k Trust Co. (Appropriated $14,869.42) ................................... S 15.067.73 Central H a n o v e r B a n k a n d Trust Co. ( Appropnated) ........................................ 3,933.17

19,000.90 $178,313.36


LEGACIES Estate Estate Estate Estate

Lueia M. Gleason ....................................... ? Helen Gould Shepard .................................... Margaret C. Roosa, balance of l e g a c y ................... Katharine M. Talmage, legacy in full ...................

25.00 1,000.00 1,808.22 6,387.82 $12,221.04

ADDITIONS TO F U N D S E n d o w m e n t of B e d in M a r y Lott Lyles Hospital, Madanapalle, India— In M e m o r y of Mrs. H e n r y R. Wright, by her daughter Alice ....................................................... $ North R e f o r m e d Church, Passaic, N. J., Trust Fund, P a y m e n t of Principal ...............................................

1,000.00 50.75 $1,050.75

INCOME F R O M

INVESTMENTS

Trust F u n d s held b y B o a r d of Foreign Missions, i n c o m e ......... $ 290.06 M a r t h a Antoinette Quick Memorial Fund, held by General Synod, income distribution ........................................ 1,260.56 North R e f o r m e d Church, Passaic, N. J., F u n d I n c o m e ........... 46.55 Invested F u n d s I n c o m e (less $37.50 credited to W o m e n ’s Societies) 11,459.34 Real Estate I n c o m e (net) ...................................... 2,413.85 $15,470.36 MISCELLANEOUS A n n u a l Offerings: Anniversary, M a y (plate collection) ............. $ T o u n g W o m e n ’s Rally and Northfield Reunion.... W o m e n ’s Assembly, June ....................... Denominational Rally at Northfield ............. Birthday, January (plate collection) .............

256.12 15.08 80.50 12.00 628.00

_________ 5 B a b y Roll M e m b erships ........................................ S e w i n g Guild, for transportation ............................... Sales, Literature ............................................... Insurance P a y m e n t ............................................

991 70 431.98 336.90 350.86 481.00 $2,592.44

SUMMARY W o m e n ’s a n d Y o u n g W o m e n ’s Societies a n d Church Groups. Individuals ................................................. Legacies ..................................... .............. Additions to F u n d s ........................................ I nco m e f r o m Investments (Less $37.50 credited to W o m e n ’s cieties) ................................................. Miscellaneous ................ ............................. Total FUNDS

$100,224.15 13,043.71 12,221.04 1,050.75 15,470.36 2,592.44 $144,602.45

AND

ACCOUNTS

COMPRISING B A N K BALANCES April 30, 1940 M a r y E. T a l m a g e F u n d ......................................... $ Golden Jubilee F u n d .......................................... Annuity F u n d ................................................ General L e g a c y F u n d ..................................... ..... Catharine Jane Gebhardt F u n d ................................ A n n a F. B a c o n Memorial F u n d ................................. Olive Gates Wallace F u n d ..................................... North R e f o r m e d Church, Passaic, Principal .................... M a r y E. Bussing F u n d ......................................... Abbie J. Bell F u n d ............................................. Eleanor Kendall F u n d ........................................ . M a r y Lott Lyles Hospital F u n d ................................ Netherlands Comm i t t e e I n come ................................ M a r y B. Doolittle Fund, Inco m e ............................... Golden Jubilee Fund, I n come ............... ........... ......... R o o s a Fund, I n c o m e ..................................... .... ] D i a m o n d Jubilee Fund, I n c o m e ...................... ......... Katharine T a l m a g e Fund, I n c o m e ..............................

1,000.00 280.84 2.50 339.73 211.20

95.00 150.00 100.50 945.85 29.76 6.58

1,000.00 30.25

110.00 1,313.37 1.16 8.35 .71


Maria H o e s V a n B u r e n Memorial Fund, Inco m e ...... M a r y E. T a l m a g e Fund, I n c o m e ..................... M a r y E. Bussing Fund, I n come ...................... Arabian Anniversary F u n d .......................... Special Gift Account ................................. Special Account, Lois Marsil>e ...................... M a r y Lott Lyl-es Hospital E n d o w m e n t Fund, Income . M a r y Taber Schell Hospital E n d o w m e n t Fund, Income Children’s H o m e , Vellore ............................ Orphanage, Bahrain ................................. Gifts forWomFen’s Missionary Medical College, Vellore China E m e r g e n c y F u n d .............................. Designated Gifts, B o ard of Foreign Missions ......... C o s t u m e F u n d Assount ............................... R e n t Desposit Security .............................. Real Estate I n c o m e ................................. General W o r k ....................................... Transfers ................................ ............ Missionaries’ Salaries, 1940-41 ........................ Designated Appropriations, 1940-41 .................. Total

2.37 2.33 48.42 2,180.12 1,482.13 144.88 535.85 435.45 120.55 26.52 60.00 27.32 35.00 69.96 455.00 6,471.48 198.31 52.50 1,001.91 25.00 $19,000.90



DIRECTORIES O F T H E B O A R D OF F O R E I G N MISSIONS

STATISTICAL FACTS O F T H E MISSIONS

MISSIONARY PERSONNEL

D I R E C T O R Y O F T H E MISSIONARIES

MISSIONARIES

AN D

CHURCHES

THEIR AND

SUPPORTING

SOCIETIES


B o a r d of Foreign Missions MEMBERS OF T H E BOARD Rev. Rev. Rev. Rev.

1938-1941 J. W. Beardslee, Ph. D. Rev. Milton T. Stauffer,D. D. Harry J. Hager, Ph. D. Rev. J. H. Warnshuis, D. D. Harold W. Schenck Mr. W. T. Hakken T. H. Mackenzie, D. D. Mr. F. W. Jansen Mr. Herman Vanderwart 1939-1942

Rev. Rev. Rev. Rev.

Paul H. Achtermann James E. Hoffman Bernard J. Mulder, D. D. Harry W. Noble, D. D. Dr. Leland Rex , „

.

Rev. Joseph R. Sizoo, D. D. Mr. Herbert N. Armstrong Mr. Clifford P. Case Mr. W. Edward Foster Robinson

^

r

Rev. Rev. Rev. Rev.

L. A. Brunsting Rev. David Van Strien Edward Dawson, D. D. Rev. Anthony Van Westenburg Garret Hondelink Rev. G. J. Wullschleger E. F. Romig, D. D. Mr. F. E. Smith Mr. W. Lloyd Van Keuren

1940-1943

Hono r a r y M e m b e r —

Rev. W m . Bancroft Hill, Litt. D.

OFFICERS O F T H E B O A R D President— Rev. Edward Dawson, D. D. Vice-President— Rev. J. W . Beardslee, Ph. D. Recording Secretary— Rev. Milton T. Stauffer, D. D. Corresponding Secretaries— Mr. F. M. Potter, L. H. D.

-— Rev. L. J. Shafer, Litt. D. Treasurer— Mr. F. M. Potter, L. H. D. District Secretary-— Rev. W . J. Van Kersen,

D. D., Holland, Mich.

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Rev. Rev. Rev. Rev.

Rev. T. H. Mackenzie, Chairman Milton T. Stauffer Mr. Herbert N. Armstrong David Van Strien Mr. Clifford P. Case Anthony Van Westenburg Mr. W. Edward Foster J. H. Warnshuis Mr. Herman Vanderwart Ex-Officiis:

The President and Vice-President

MEDICAL ADVISERS Edward M. Dodd, M. D., 156 Fifth Ave., N e w York. Dr. Lilian C. Warnshuis, 89 St. Mark’s Place, N e w Brighton, N. Y. R. H. Nichols, M. D., Holland, Mich. Harold E. Veldman, M. D., 1418 Plainfield Ave., N. E., Grand Rapids, Mich.


Classical Missionary Agents Albany ..... .....Rev. Bergen .......... “ South Bergen .... “ “ California ....... Cascades ........ “ Chicago ......... “ Dakota .......... “ Germania ........ “ Grand Rapids ..... “ Greene .......... “ Holland ......... “ Hudson ......... “ Illinois .......... “ Kalamazoo ....... “ North Long Island... “ South Long Island... “ Monmouth ....... “ Montgomery ...... “ Muskegon ....... “ Newark ......... “ N e w Brunswick __ N e w York ...... Orange .......... Palisades ........ Paramus ........ Passaic .......... Pella ........... Philadelphia ...... Pleasant Prairie .... Poughkeepsie ..... Raritan .......... Rensselaer ....... Rochester ....... Saratoga ........ Schenectady ...... Schoharie ....... East Sioux ...... West Sioux ...... Ulster ........... Westchester ...... Wisconsin .......

“ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “ “

M. Stephen James, 9 Monroe St., Albany, N. Y. J. C. Spring, Dumont, N. J. H. W . Noble, 278 Pacific Ave., Jersey City, N. J. H. G. Korver, 436 W. 76th St, Los Angeles, Calif. A. Van Bronkhorst, Conrad, Mont. B. R. Van Zyl, 2536 S. Ridgeway St., Chicago, 111. H. Hesselink, Harrison, S. Dak. F. Snuttjer, Lennox, S. Dak. Jacob Prins, 813 Thomas St., Grand Rapids, Mich. Jacob Van Ess, Catskill, N. Y. Marion DeVelder, Holland, Mich. G. M. Flikkema, Philmont, N. Y. J. P. Scorza, 11594 S. State St, Chicago, 111. A. DeYoung, 321 W. Cedar St, Kalamazoo, Mich. S. J. Verhey, 41-06 50th St, Woodside, N. Y. T. W . Luidens, 319 E. 23rd St, Brooklyn, N. Y. William L. Sahler, Freehold, N. J. Putnam Cady, Fonda, N. Y. C. B. Wissink, 1127 Jefferson Ave., Muskegon, Mich. H. W. Schenck, 71 Mt. Hebron Rd., Upper Mont­ clair, N. J. Milton T. Stauffer, N e w Brunswick, N. J. Edgar F. Romig, 245 W. 77th St., N e w York City. John W. Tysse, Wallkill, N. Y. D. Van Strien, 975 Palisade Ave., N. Bergen, N. J. Edward Dawson, 127 Passaic Ave., Passaic, N. J. A. C. V. Dangremond, Clifton, N. J. Edward Huibregtse, Prairie City, la. William H. Farrar, Hammonton, N. J. P. H. Achtermann, German Valley, 111. Lyman A. Talman, Hyde Park, N. Y. David R. Evans, Somerville, N. J. H. C. Morehouse, R. D. 1, Rensselaer, N. Y. Cornelius Lepeltak, Marion, N. Y. A. H. Voerman, Greenwich, N. Y. M. A. Stegeman, Firth, Neb. A. Van Westenburg, Scotia, N. Y. W. R. Buitendorp, Middleburg, N. Y. John A. Roggen, Maurice, la. E. C. Duryee, R. D. 1, Saugerties, N. Y. G. I. Robertson, 137 S. 6th Ave., Mt. Vernon, N. Y. James Wayer, Racine, Wis.


Statistical Facts of the Missions T H E

A M O Y

MISSION, C H I N A

F ounded 1842 Area occupied, 8,000 square miles. Population, 4,000,000 MISSIONARIES A m o y : Miss K. R. Green, Miss L. Vander Linden, Miss E. K. Beekman, Rev. H. A. Poppen, Dr. C. H. Holletnan, Miss T. Holkeboer, Miss J. Nienhuis, Dr. T. V. Oltman, Miss J. Veldman, Miss H. E. Boot,* Miss G. C. Smies. C h o ngchow: Rev. H. P. DePree, D. D., Rev. H. M. Veenschoten, Mr. W. Vander Meer, Miss E. G. Bruce, Dr. R. Hofstra, Miss J. M. Platz. Sio-khe:

Rev. W . R. Angus.

Tong-an:

Rev. F. Eckerson, D. D., Rev. E. W . Koeppe, Miss R. Broekema.

Leng-na:

Rev. W . de Velder.

Chuanchow:

Rev. H. J. Voskuil. ASSOCIATE MISSIONARIES

Mrs. H. P. De Free, Mrs. H. M. Veenschoten, Mrs. C. H. Holleman, Mrs. E. W. Koeppe, Mrs. R. Hofstra, Mrs. W . Vander Meer, Mrs. W . R. Angus, Mrs. T. V. Oltman, Mrs. W. de Velder.f ON FURLOUGH Rev. and Mrs. H. P. Boot. O N L E A V E IN A M E R I C A Mrs. H. J. Voskuil, Mrs. H. A. Poppen. E M E R I T U S IN A M E R I C A Miss N. Zwemer, Miss M. C. Morrison, Miss L. N. Duryee. Chinese Staff— Ordained ministers, 18. Schools— Boarding: Boys’, 6; students,

Other helpers, 268. 1967. Girls’ and women’s, 5; stu­ dents, 1148. Theological, 1; students, 24. Nursing, 2; students, 50. Day schools, 11; students, 672. Hospitals and Dispensaries— FiveJ; patients treated, 143,449. * Moved to Changchow in February, 1940. fDied January 4, 1940. t Includes Changchow Union Hospital.


T H E A R G O T MISSION, I N D I A

F ounded 1853 Area Occupied: In the Chittoor District “ “ North Arcot District “ “ South Arcot District “ “ Mysore State

5 Taluqs (Counties) a n d parts of 2 others 7 " " " pan " 1 other 2 " " ‘ part •• 1 other 1 •• •• ’* part •• 1 other

Total............... 15 Taluqs (Counties!

Languages —

PopuSq. Miles lation 805,991 4,104 2,816 1,289,935 529,669 1,017 75,788 340

8.277

2.701,383

Tamil, 1,600,700; Telugu, 950,000; Hindustani, 150,600; Kana-

rese, etc. MISSIONARIES A m i : Mr. B. De Vries. Chittoor: Mrs. T. F. Zwemer,

Miss E. J. De Weerd, Miss Martha Vanderberg. Miss E. H. Sluyter. Katpadi: Rev. B. Rottschaefer, D. D., Mr. J. J. De Valois. Madanapalle: Miss C. M. Coburn, Miss H. Brumler, Rev. R. G. Korteling, Miss M. R. Gibbons, M. D., Miss J. G. De Vries. Paltnaner: Miss S. Te Winkel. . Punganur: Rev. J; D. Muyskens. Ranipettai: Rev. H. E. Van Vranken, Miss W . Noordyk, Dr. G. F. Scudder, Miss D. A. Wells, Miss L. M. Marsilje.J Tindivanam: Rev. C. A. De Bruin. Vellore: Miss I. S. Scudder, M. D., Miss D. M. Houghton, Mrs. H. Honeg­ ger, Miss G. Dodd, Rev. C. R. Wierenga, D. D., Rev. J. J. De Boer, Ph. D.* IVandiwash: Miss M. Rottschaefer, M. D. Coonoor: Miss J. C. Scudder (Emeritus). AS S O C I A T E MISSIONARIES Mrs. B. Rottschaefer, Mrs. H. E. Van Vranken, Mrs. J. D. Muyskens, Mrs. C. R. Wierenga, Mrs. G. F. Scudder, Mrs. J. J. De Valois, Mrs. J. J. De Boer, Mrs. R. G. Korteling, Mrs. C. A. De Bruin, Mrs. B. De Vries. ON FURLOUGH Miss A. B. Van Doren, Miss C. C. Wyckoff, Dr. and Mrs. Mason 01cott,t Miss M. E. Geegh, Miss C. W . Jongewaard. E M E R I T U S IN A M E R I C A Rev. and Mrs. H. J. Scudder, Miss Louisa H. Hart, M. D., Rev. and Mrs. W. H. Farrar, Rev. W . T. Scudder. Indian Staff—

Ordained ministers, 16. Other helpers: Men, 337; women, 179. 5‘H ioo/j— B oarding: Boys’, 9; students, 726. Girls’, 7; students, 509. Theo­ logical, 1; students, 37. Day schools, 174; students, 12,381. Hospitals and Dispensaries— 7; patients treated, 50,013. * Died April 28, 1940. t Resigned December 14, 1939. $ Short term.


T H E JAPAN MISSION F ounded 1859 Organized into North and South, 1889; reunited, 1917 Area occupied in the Island of Kyushu, 15,552 square miles Conservative estimated responsibility of the R. C. A., 2,000,000 MISSIONARIES Rev. J. C. de Maagd. Nagasaki: Miss Sara M. Couch (Emeritus), Miss Jeane Noordhoff. Oita: Rev. H. Kuyper. Saga: Rev. B. Bruns. Shimonoseki: Miss C. J. Oilmans. Tokyo: *Rev. A. Oilmans, D. D. (Emeritus), Rev. W. G. Hoekje, D. D., Rev. J. Ter Borg, Rev. B. M. Luben, Miss Flora Darrow. Y o k o h a m a : Rev. H. V. E. Stegeman, D. D., Miss H. R. Zander, Miss P. M. Bekman, Miss F. B. Bogard, Miss F. C. Walvoord, Miss M. E. Liggett.f Kururne:

ASSOCIATE MISSIONARIES Mrs. W. G. Hoekje, Mrs. H. Kuyper, Mrs. H. V. E. Stegeman, Mrs. J. Ter Borg, Mrs. J. C. de Maagd, Mrs. B. M. Luben, Mrs. B. Bruns. H O N O R A R Y ASSOCIATE MISSIONARY (Until September, 1939) Mrs. A. Oilmans. ON FURLOUGH Rev. and Mrs. B. C. Moore. E M E R I T U S IN A M E R I C A Mrs. H. V. S. Peeke, Miss Minnie Taylor, Miss Jennie A. Pieters. Japanese

Workers—

Ordained ministers, 10.

Other helpers: Men, 72;

women, 31. Schools — Boys (J4), Meiji Gakuin; students (Yz), 908. Girls (iY), Ferris Seminary; students, 497. Sturges Seminary; students (Y), 267.

* Died June n, 1939. f Short term.


T H E A R A B I A N MISSION Founded, 1889; Incorporated, 1894; Adopted by R. C. A., 1894 Amalgamated with the Board of Foreign Missions, 1925 Area occupied, 1,000,000 square miles

P opulation O m a n : Sultanate ............... 500,000 Nejd .......................... Trucial ................ 80,000 H a d r a m a u t .................... Bahrain Islands ................ 100.000 Yemen ........................ Kuw a i t ...................... 50.000 Asir ........................... Basrah Vilayet ................. 250,000 Hejaz ......................... K assa .......................... 150,000 T h e Bedouin (Central Arabia).. Total Population, 5,530,000

250,000 150,000 1,000,000 1,500,000 1,000,000 500,000

The Arabian Mission at present has reached Oman, Bahrain Islands, Kuwait, Basrah Vilayet, Hassa, The Nejd. MISSIONARIES Rev. J. E. Moerdyk, Dr. W. J. Moerdyk. Miss Rachel Jackson, Miss C. Dalenberg, Rev. G. E. De Jong, Dr. W. H. Storm, Miss Esther I. Barny, M. D.f Basrah: Rev. J. Van Ess, D. D., Miss C. B. Kellien, Rev. G. Gosselink, Mr. J. Van Ess, Jr.* Kuwait: Dr. C. S. G. Mylrea, Rev. G. J. Pennings, Mrs. Mary Bruins Allison, M. D„ Dr. L. R. Scudder, *Miss M. A. Tull, Miss R. O. Crouse, M. D. Matrah-Muscat: Rev. D. Dykstra, D. D., Dr. W . W. Thoms. Amarah:

Bahrain:

ASSOC I A T E MISSIONARIES Mrs. J. Van Ess, Mrs. D. Dykstra, Mrs. C. S. G. Mylrea, Mrs. G. J. Pen­ nings, Mrs. G. Gosselink, Mrs. W . J. Moerdyk, Mrs. G. E. De Jong, Mrs. W. H. Storm, Mrs. W. W. Thoms, Mrs. L. R. Scudder. ON FURLOUGH Dr. and Mrs. P. W. Harrison, Rev. and Mrs. G. D. Van Peursem, Miss M. C. Van Pelt, Miss Ruth Jackson. E M E R I T U S IN A M E R I C A Rev. J. Cantine, D. D., Rev. and Mrs. F. J. Barny, Miss J. A. Scardefield, Miss F. Button. Native Staff—

Ordained ministers, o. Other helpers: Men, IS; women, 13. Schools: Boys’, 1; Girls’, 2. Total students, 436. Hospitals and Dispensaries— 9; patients treated, 93,751.

Schools— D a y

* Short term. t O n leave in America.


T h e United Mission in M e s opotamia O rganized 1924 Area occupied, Mesopotamia or Iraq, 180,000 square miles Population, 2,238,000; Arabs and Kurds, 1,830,000 Cooperating Boards — Board of Foreign Missions, Presbyterian Church, United States of America; Board of Foreign Missions, Evangelical and Re­ formed Church; Board of Foreign Missions, Reformed Church in America.

MISSIONARIES Baghdad-. Rev. and Mrs. B. D. Hakken (R. C. A.), Mrs. Sharon J. Thoms (R. C. A.), Miss Elisabeth R. Calverley (E. and R. C). Dohuk:

None.

Hillah:

None.

Kirkuk:

Rev. and Mrs. J. C. Glessner (E. and R. G).

Mosul:

Rev. and Mrs. J. W . Willoughby (P. U. S-. A.).

Rev. and Mrs. A. G. Edwards resigned December 20, 1939.


General S u m m a r y , 1 9 3 9 China | India |Japan 2

♦Meso­ potamia 5

Total 30

_

4

258

5

1

28

8

1

39

6

1

47

3

47

8 3 1 72 — —

563 363 62 12381 883 15 2693 13 1670 2 61 297 13035 191 15291

Arabia Station occupied ..... 5 7 ii Out-stations and i preaching- places .... 861 149 19 Missionaries, m e n 9 8 ordained ........... 5 Missionaries, men, unordained ........ 4 3 Associate Missionaries, married w o m e n .... 12 9 9 Missionaries, u n m a r ­ IS 11 ried w o m e n ....... 11 Native ordained 18 Ministers .......... 16 10 Other native helpers, 72 men ............... 131 337 179 Native helpers, w o m e n . 137 31 Churches ............. 27 15 18 3707 8251 307 C o m m u n i c a n t s ....... 184 626 70 Received on confession. — Boarding Schools, B o y s ’ 6 9 — Scholars ............. 1967 726 — 5 Boarding Schools, Girls’ 7 — 1148 509 Scholars ............. __ Theological Schools ... i i Students ............. 24 37 — S unda y Schools ...... 20 238 30 466 Scholars ............. 2000 10096 B a y Schools ......... 2 11 174 Scholars ............. 672 12381 1672 Hospitals and — Dispensaries ....... 5 7 143449 Patients treated ..... 50013 —

5

12

15 13 1 44 3 — —

1 13 — — 3 150 1 130

— — 6 323 3 436

_

9 93751

21 287213

* Figures for the United Mission in Mesopotamia, except for m i s ­ sionaries, represent the whole w o r k of the Mission. Figures indicated are for 1938. Fractions indicate union institutions.

Comparative S u m m a r y , 1 8 5 8 - 1 9 3 9 18581! 1868 |1878 1 Stations ............ Out-stations and preaching places .. Missionaries, m e n . .. Missionaries, married w o m e n ........... Missionaries, u n m a r -

1908

1918

1928

1938

1939

10

11

11

23

29

27

29

31

30

2■ 8f

18

14

49 16

123 28

241 36

268 41

366 50

372 64

249 44

258 40

12

14

21

31

33

42

57

42

..

22 7 297'i ...

6 87 .. .

Patients treated ....

1898

6

1 Native ordained ministers ......... Other native helpers, m e n ......... Native helpers, women ........... Churches ........... C o m m u n i c a n t s ...... Boarding Schools, B oys ............. Scholars ............ Boarding Schools, Girls ............. Scholars ............ Theological students.. D a y schools ........ Scholars ............ Hospitals and

1888

39'

7

9

20

33

46

58

49

47'

4

6

26

30

37

45

44

49

47

76

86

173

211

367

520

813

701

56S

2 13 816

10 31 1563

47 47 4559

41 47 5564

146 311 42 64 5282 7114

422 59 10577

324 62 12445

363 62 12381

2 55

1 40

1

46

3 97

7

19

17 413

44 1341

1

1

15537] 9673

7 3081

13 517

5 10 300 456 61 32 106 201 2612 6059

9 1004

16% 1724

17% 2753

15% 3136

15 2693

11 11% 766 1323 80 83 195 236 8245 11858

19% 1994 80 279 13215

14% 2050 65 192 13569

13 1670 61 191 15291

4 8 25 18046 107571 128660

20 81014

18 280088

21 287213


'■

■’iik

'

Missionary Personnel

At the end of the calendar year 1939 there were 141 missionaries in the active service of the Board, of who m 32 were ordained and 15 unordained men and 45 married women and 49 unmarried women. In addition, there were 19 emeritus missionaries on the roll of the Board.

R eturned

to t he

F ield:

The following missionaries have returned to their respective fields this year after furlough: T o China —

Rev. and Mrs. Rev. and Mrs. Miss Harriet Brumler. T o Japan — Miss C. Janet T o Arabia — Dr. and Mrs. T o India—

H. P. De Free, Miss Ruth Broekema. J. D. Muyskens, Rev. and Mrs. J. J. De Boer,

Oltmans, ♦Rev. and Mrs. B. C. Moore. W. J. Moerdyk, Dr. and Mrs. W. Wells Thoms. T o the United Mission in Mesopotamia — Mrs. Sharon J. Thoms.

R eturned H o m e

on

Furlough:

The following missionaries have returned home this year on furlough: F r o m China —

Rev. and Mrs. H. P. Boot. Alice B. Van Doren, Dr. and Mrs. Mason Olcott, Miss

F r o m India— Miss

Mary E. Geegh. F r o m Arabia — Dr. and Mrs. Paul W. Harrison, Rev. and Mrs. G. D. Van Peursem, Miss Mary C. Van Pelt, Miss Ruth Jackson.

N

ew

M

issionaries :

The following new missionaries entered upon service in the course of the year: In China — Miss Geraldine C. Smies. In India— Miss Lois M. Marsilje (short In Arabia —

term), Miss Eunice H. Sluyter. Miss Madeline A. Tull (short term), Miss Ruth O. Crouse,

M. D.

N e w A ppointments : The following new appointments have been made: T o India—

Rev. and Mrs. John H. Piet Miss Roelphine Bakker.*

T o Arabia —

* Sailed early in 1940.


Directory

of Missionaries

The following list contains the names of missionaries now connected with the various Missions, whether in the field or at home expecting to return, with their addresses. Emeritus missionaries and those under ap­ pointment are also included. Letter postage to all foreign countries here named, five cents for the first ounce, three cents for each additional ounce or fraction thereof. Postage on printed matter I c e n t s for two ounces or fraction thereof. A M O Y MISSION Letters to all stations should include “Amoy” in the address. W E N T OUT

**Miss Nellie Zwemer, Holland, Michigan...................... **Miss Margaret C. Morrison, 601 Mayflower Road, Claremont, Calif.. **Miss Lily N. Duryee, 156 Fifth Ave., N e w York ................ Rev. Frank Eckerson, D.D., Tong-an......................... Rev. Harry P. Boot, D.D., 408 College Ave., Holland, Mich....... Mrs. Anna H. Boot, 408 College Ave., Holland, Mich............ Rev. Henry J. Voskuil, Kulangsu ........................... Mrs. Mary S. Voskuil, Kulangsu .... Rev. Henry P. De Pree, D.D., Yungfu, Hochi, Fukien, via A m o y -Mrs. Kate E. De Pree, Yungfu, Hochi, Fukien, via Amoy ........ Miss Katharine R. Green, Kulangsu ......................... Miss Leona Vander Linden, Kulangsu....................... Miss Edna K. Beekman, Kulangsu ................... Rev. H. Michael Veenschoten, 156 Fifth Ave., N e w Y o r k ......... Mrs. Stella C. Veenschoten, 156 Fifth Ave., N e w York ........... Rev. Henry A. Poppen, 18 East 16th St., Holland, Mich.......... Mrs. Dorothy T. Poppen, 18 East 16th St, Holland, Mich......... Rev. Edwin W . Koeppe, Tong-an............................ Mrs. Elizabeth R. Koeppe, Tong-an ......................... Clarence H. Holleman, M.D., Kulangsu ............... ....... Mrs. Ruth E. V. Holleman, Kulangsu ........................ Miss Tena Holkeboer, Kulangsu ...... -............... :.... Miss Jean Nienhuis, Kulangsu .............................. Mr. William Vander Meer, Changchow (1923-1926)*............ Mrs. Alma M. Vander Meer, Changchow ..................... Miss Elizabeth G. Bruce, Changchow......................... Richard Hofstra, M.D., Changchow.......................... Mrs. Johanna J. Hofstra, Changchow ........................ Miss Ruth Broekema, Tong-an .............................. Rev. William R. Angus, Sio-khe ............................ Mrs. Joyce B. Angus, Sio-khe .............................. Theodore V. Oltman, M.D., Kulangsu ....................... Mrs. Helen M. Oltman, Kulangsu ...........................

1891 1892 1894 1903 1903 1908 1907 1908 1907 1907 1907 1909 1914 1917 1917 1918 1918 1919 1919 1919 1919 1920 1920 1920 1923 1921 1922 1922 1924 1925 I92S 193° 1930


Miss Miss Rev. fMrs. Miss Miss

Jeannette Veldman, Kulangsu .......................... Jessie M. Platz, Changchow ........................... Walter de Velder, 156 Fifth Ave., N e w York .............. Margaret O. de Velder ............................... Harriet E. Boot, Changchow .......................... Geraldine C. Smies, Kulangsu .........................

1930 1930 1936 1936 1938 1939

* Service intermitted. ** Emeritus, t Died January 4, 1940.

A R C O T MISSION General Address— Madras Presidency, India WENT

OUT

**Miss Julia C. Scudder, Coonoor ............................. 1879 **Rev. Henry J. Scudder, 47 Huntington St., N e w Brunswick, N. J. (1894-1897, 1914-19x9)* ................................. 1890 **Mrs. Margaret B. Scudder, 47 Huntington St., N e w Brunswick, N. J. (1914-1923)* ......................................... 1897 **Miss Louisa H. Hart, M.D., Sackville, N. B., Canada ........... 1895 **Rev. William H. Farrar, 325 Vine St., Hammonton, N. J.......... 1897 **Mrs. Elizabeth W. Farrar, 325 Vine St., Hammonton, N. J......... 1897 **Rev. Walter T. Scudder, 547 Riverside Drive, N e w York......... 1899 Miss Ida S. Scudder, M.D., Vellore......................... 1899 Miss Alice B. Van Doren, Chittoor .......................... I9°3 Miss Delia M. Houghton, Vellore........................... i9°8 Rev. Bernard Rottschaefer, D.D., Katpadi .... I9°9 Mrs. Bernice M. Rottschaefer, Katpadi....................... I9°9 Miss Margaret Rottschaefer, M.D., Wandiwash (1918-1924)* ...... 1909 Miss Sarella Te Winkel, Madanapalle O936-1938)*............. 1909 Mrs. Henry Honegger, Vellore ............................. iQto Miss Charlotte C. Wyckoff, Tindivanam .............. 1915 Rev. John D. Muyskens, Punganur (1919-1923)* ............... 1915 Mrs. Dora J. Muyskens, Punganur .......................... 1923 fMr. Mason Olcott, Ph.D., 156 Fifth Ave., N e w York (I9I7-I923)’,' ••• I9IS ftMrs. Eleanor G. Olcott, 156 Fifth Ave., N e w York .............. 1920 Miss Gertrude Dodd, Vellore .............................. I9I6 Rev. Herbert E. Van Vranken, Ranipettai........ •............. 1917 Mrs. Nellie S. Van Vranken, Ranipettai...................... 1917 Miss Wilhelmina Noordyk, Ranipettai........................ 1917 Rev. Cornelius R. Wierenga, D.D., Vellore (1920-1923)*......... 1917 Mrs. Ella K. Wierenga, Vellore............................. I923 Miss Clara M. Coburn, 156 Fifth Ave., N e w Y o r k ............... 1918 Galen F. Scudder, M.D., Ranipettai......................... I9I9 Mrs. Maude S. Scudder, Ranipettai ......................... 1919 Mr. John J. De Valois, Katpadi........................... 1920 Mrs. Henriette H. De Valois, Katpadi........................ I920 tfRev. John J. De Boer, Ph.D................................ I922


Mrs. Erma E De Boer, Vellore ............................ Miss Harriet Brumler, Madanapalle ......................... Mrs. Theodore F. Zwemer, Chittoor......................... Miss Mary E. Geegh, Madanapalle .......................... Miss C. Willamina Jongewaard, Palmaner ..................... Rev. Ralph G. Korteling, Madanapalle ....................... Mrs. Anna Ruth W. Korteling, M.D., Madanapalle .............. Rev. Cornie A. De Bruin, Tindivanam ........................ Mrs. Frances L. DeBruin, Tindivanam........................ Miss Margaret R. Gibbons, M.D., 156 Fifth Ave., N e w Y o r k ...... Miss Esther J. De Weerd, Chittoor......................... Mr. Benjamin De Vries, Arni .............................. Mrs. Mildred V. De Vries, Arni ............................ Miss Doris A. Wells, Ranipettai........ .................... ***Miss Martha Vanderberg, Chittoor .......................... Miss Johanna G. De Vries, Madanapalle ...................... Miss Lois M. Marsilje (short term), Ranipettai ................ Miss Eunice H. Sluyter, Chittoor ........................... Rev. John H. Piet (under appointment) __ Mrs. C. Wilma V. Piet (under appointment)

1922 1923 1923 1924 1925 1925 1925 1926 1926 1926 1928 1929 1929 1930 1934 1937 1939 1939

* Service intermitted. ** Emeritus. *** Transferred to Arcot Mission, 1937. t Transferred to Areot Mission, 1924. tt Died April 28, 1940. t Resigned D e c e m b e r 14, 1939.

J A P A N MISSION WENT

**$Mrs. H. V. S. Peeke, 156 Fifth Ave., N e w Y o r k ................ **Miss Sara M. Couch, 96 Kami Nishi Yama Machi, Nagasaki ...... **Miss Jennie A. Pieters, 44 East 15th St., Holland, Mich........... Rev. Willis G. Hoekje, D.D., Shirokane, Shiba, Tokyo .......... ftfMrs. Annie H. Hoekje, Shirokane, Shiba, T o k y o ................ **Miss Minnie Taylor, 104 North Fifth St., Alhambra, Calif......... Rev. Hubert Kuyper, Oita.................................. Mrs. May D. Kuyper, Oita (1915-1917)*...................... Miss Jeane Noordhoff, 16 Higashi Yamate, Nagasaki............ Miss C. Janet Oltmans, Shimonoseki ......................... Rev. Henry V. E. Stegeman, D.D., 37 Bluff, Yokohama......... Mrs. Gertrude H. Stegeman, 37 Bluff, Yokohama............... Rev. John Ter Borg, Shirokane, Shiba, Tokyo ................. Mrs. Amelia S. Ter Borg, Shirokane, Shiba, T o kyo.............. Miss Florence C. Walvoord, 37 Bluff, Yokohama ............... Miss Flora Darrow, Shirokane, Shiba, Tokyo ................. Rev. Boude C. Moore, 88 Itchome, Iriarai machi, Tokyo .......... Mrs. Anna McA. Moore, 88 Itchome, Iriarai machi, Tokyo ....... Rev. John C. de Maagd, Kururne (1935-1937)* .................

OUT

1887 1892 1904 1907 1908 1910 1911 1912 1911 1914 1917 1917 1922 1922 1922 1922 1924 1924 1028


Mrs. Marion M. de Maagd, Kururne (1935-1937)* ........... . Miss Helen R. Zander, 37 Bluff, Yokohama................... Rev. Bamerd M. Luben, Shirokane, Shiba, Tokyo ............. IfMrs. Edith E. Luben, Shirokane, Shiba, Tokyo ................ Rev. Bruno Bruns, Saga .................................. Mrs. Regina B. Bruns, Saga................. .............. Miss Priscilla M. Bekman, 156 Fifth Ave., N e w York ........... Miss F. Belle Bogard, 37 Bluff, Yokohama .................... Miss Mary E. Liggett (short term), 37 Bluff, Yokohama .........

1928 1928 1929 1930 1930 1930 1936 1936 1938

* Service intermitted. ** Emeritus. j: Transferred to Japan Mission, 1893. ftt Transferred to J apan Mission, 1912. t Transferred to Japan Mission, 1932.

A R A B I A N MISSION W E N T OUT

**Rev. James Cantine, D.D., Stone Ridge, N. Y .................. 1889 **Rev. Fred J. Barny, 89-01 212th St., Queens Village, N. Y ......... 1897 **Mrs. Margaret R. Barny, 89-01 212th St., Queens Village, N. Y .... 1898 Rev. James E. Moerdyk, Amarah, Iraq........................ 1900 Rev. John Van Ess, D.D., Basrah, Iraq...................... 1902 Mrs. Dorothy F. Van Ess, Basrah, Iraq...................... 1909 **Miss Jane A. Scardefield, care Mrs. Barnett, P. O. Box 8$, Fern Park, Fla........ .......................................... 1903 **Miss Fanny Lutton, care Miss E. Luther, 302 State St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 1904 Rev. Dirk Dykstra, D.D., Muscat, Arabia.................... 1906 Mrs. Minnie W . Dykstra, Muscat, Arabia..................... 1907 C. Stanley G. Mylrea, M.D., Kuwait, Arabia (via Iraq)......... 1906 Mrs. Bessie L. Mylrea, Kuwait, Arabia (via Iraq) .............. 1906 Rev. Gerrit J. Pennings, Kuwait, Arabia (via Iraq)............. 1908 Mrs. Gertrud S. Pennings, Kuwait, Arabia (via Iraq)........... 1912 Paul W. Harrison, M.D., 156 Fifth Ave., N e w Y o r k ............. 1909 Mrs. Anna M. Harrison, 156 Fifth Ave., N e w Y o r k ............. 1917 Rev. Gerrit D. Van Peursem, Bahrain, Persian Gulf ............ 1910 Mrs. Josephine S. Van Peursem, Bahrain, Persian Gulf.......... 1910 Miss Charlotte B. Kellien, Basrah, Iraq...................... 1915 Miss Mary C. Van Pelt, Kuwait, Arabia (via Iraq) ............. 1917 Miss Ruth Jackson, Bahrain. Persian Gulf ..................... 1921 Miss Rachel Jackson, Basrah, Iraq .......................... 1921 Miss Cornelia Dalenberg, Bahrain, Persian Gulf ................ 1921 Rev. George Gosselink, Basrah, Iraq (1925-1929)*.............. 1922 Mrs. Christina S. Gosselink, Basrah, Iraq.................... 1929 William J. Moerdyk, M.D., Amarah, Iraq..................... 1923 Mrs. Cornelia L. Moerdyk, Amarah, Iraq ..................... 1923 Rev. G. E. De Jong, Bahrain, Persian Gulf (1933-1937)* ......... 1926 Mrs. Everdene K. De Jong, Bahrain, Persian Gulf (1933-1937)*.... 1926 W. Harold Storm, M.D., Bahrain, Persian Gulf................. 1927


Mrs. Ida P. Storm, Bahrain, Persian Gulf.................... 1936 Miss Esther I. Barny, M.D., Bahrain, Persian Gulf .............. I927 W. Wells Thoms, M.D., Muscat, Arabia ...................... I931 Mrs. Ethel S. Thoms, Muscat, Arabia ....................... 1931 Mrs. Mary Bruins Allison, M.D., Kuwait, Arabia (via Iraq)....... 1934 Lewis R. Scudder, M.D., Kuwait, Arabia (via Iraq) ............. 1937 Mrs. Dorothy B. Scudder, Kuwait, Arabia (via Iraq) ........... 1937 Mr. John Van Ess, Jr. (short term), Basrah, Iraq............... 1938 Miss Madeline A. Tull (short term), Kuwait, Arabia (via Iraq) ... 1939 Miss Ruth O. Crouse, M.D., Kuwait, Arabia (via Iraq) .......... 1939 Miss Roelphine Bakker (under appointment, short term) ......... .... U N I T E D M I S S I O N IN M E S O P O T A M I A W E N T OUT

Mrs. Sharon J. Thoms, American Mission. Baghdad, Iraq (1913-1918)* 1906 Rev. Bernard D. Hakken, American Mission, Baghdad, Iraq ...... 1922 Mrs. Elda V. Hakken, American Mission, Baghdad, Iraq ......... 1922

•Service intermitted. ••Emeritus.



MISSIONARIES

THEIR

AND

SUPPORTING

CHURCHES

AND

SOCIETIES


Missionaries Specially Supported b y Churches, Societies, C h u r c h Schools, Missionary Unions a nd Other Organizations CHINA

Rev. William R. Angus ....... Fort Washington Colleg.ate Church, N e w York City. ♦Mrs. William R. Angus ....... Eighth Church, Grand Rapids, Mich. ♦Miss Edna K. Beekman ....... W o m a n ’s Society, Bronxville, N. Y. ♦Miss Harriet Boot ........... First Church and Organizations, Holland, Mich. Rev. Henry P. Boot.......... Third Church, Grand Rapids, Mich. ♦Miss Ruth Broekema ..........Sunday School, Hope Church, Chicago, 111. ♦Miss Elizabeth G. Bruce....... Park Hill First Church, Yonkers, N. Y. Rev. Henry P. De Pree ....... Second Church, Kalamazoo, Mich. Mrs. Henry P. De Pree....... Second Church, Zeeland, Mich. fRev. and Mrs. Walter De Velder..One UnitFirst Church, N e w Brunswick, N. J. One Unit— Sunday School Church, Lansing, 111. Rev. Frank Eckerson ..........First Church, Newark, N. J. ♦Miss Katharine R. Green...... W. G., St. Nicholas Collegiate Church, N e w York City. Dr. Richard Hofstra ..........Bethany Church, Chicago, 111. ♦Mrs. Richard Hofstra ......... South Classis Long Island, Missionary Union. ♦Miss Tena Holkeboer ......... Classis Westchester, Missionary Union Dr. C. Holleman ............. Calvary Church, Qeveland, Ohio. Mrs. C. Holleman ............ Church Sunday School, Overisel, Mich. Rev. E. W. Koeppe .......... Central Church, Sioux enter, Iowa. Mrs. E. W . Koeppe .......... Grace Church, Grand Rapids, Mich. ♦Miss Jean Nienhuis .......... Sunday School, Fourth Church, Holland, Mich. Dr. Theodore Oltman ......... First Church, Milwaukee, Wis. Mrs. Theodore Oltman ........ Ebenezer Church, Morrison, 111. ♦Miss Jessie Platz ........... W. F. M. S., Marble Collegiate Church, N e w York City. Rev. Henry A. Poppen ........ First Church, Sioux Center, Iowa. Mrs. Henry A. Poppen ........ Fifth Sunday School, Grand Rapids, Mich. ♦Miss Geraldine Smies ..........Classis Holland, Missionary Union. ♦Miss Leona Vander Linden .....Second Church and Societies, Pella, la. Mr. William Vandermeer...... Second Church, Fulton, 111. ♦Mrs. William Vandermeer ......First Church, Passaic, N. J. ♦Missionaries supported through the W o m a n ’s Board. fMrs. De Velder died January 4, 1940.


Mrs. ♦Miss Rev. ♦Mrs.

H. M. Veenschoten ...... Abbe Church, North Clyraer, N. Y. Jeannette Veldman ....... Church and Societies, Grandville, Mich. Henry J. Voskuil ........ Bethany Church, Chicago, 111. Henry J. Voskuil ........ North Classis Long Island, Missionary Union. INDIA

♦Miss Harriet Brumler ......... Sunday School, Fifth Church, Grand Rapids, Mich. ♦Miss Clara M. Coburn ........ Classis Rochester, Missionary Union. fRev. and Mrs. J. J. De Boer.... Bellevue Church, Schenectady, N. Y. Rev. C. A. De Bruin .......... Third Church, Pella, Iowa. Mr. J. J. De Valois ...........Reformed Church, Bronxville, N. Y. Mrs. Benjamin De Vries ...... Forest Grove Church and S. S., Jamestown, Mich. ♦Miss Johanna De Vries ....... S. S., First Church, Hamilton, Mich. ♦Miss Esther De Weerd ........ Trinity Church, Holland, Mich. ♦Miss Mary Geegh ............ Trinity Church, Holland, Mich. ♦Dr. Margaret Gibbons ......... Group of Friends, Jamaica, N. Y. ♦Mrs. Henry Honegger......... Central Church, Paterson, N. J. ♦Miss C. W . Jongewaard ....... Member, Frst Church, Tarrytown, N. Y. Rev. Ralph G. Korteling....... First Church, Chicago, 111. Mrs. Ralph G. Korteling....... Seventh Church and Sunday School, Grand Rapids, Mich. ♦Miss Lois Marsilje ........... Miss Minnie Goodnow. Rev. John D. Muyskens ....... Church, Mount Vernon, N. Y. ♦Mrs. John D. Muyskens ....... W. M. S„ St. Nicholas Collegiate Church, N e w York City. ♦Miss Wilhelmina Noordyk ______Sixth Holland Church, Paterson, N. J. ♦♦Dr. Mason Olcott ............ Bethany Church, Chicago, 111. Rev. and Mrs. John Piet....... St. Nicholas Collegiate Church, N e w York City. Rev. Bernard Rottschaefer ......Sixth Holland Church, Paterson, N. J. ♦Dr. Margaret Rottschaefer......Classes Chicago and Illinois, Missionary Union. Dr. Galen F. Scudder ...... i..Grove Church, N e w Durham, N. J. ♦Mrs. Galen Scudder .......... S. S„ First Church, Passaic, N. J. ♦Mrs. Henry J. Scudder ........ Classis N e w Brunswick, Missionary Union. ♦Miss Eunice H. Sluyter ....... Member, through'W. M. S., Marble Collegiate Church, N e w York City. ♦Miss Sarella Te Winkel ....... Self-supporting. Rev. H. E. Van Vranken.......Second Church, Schenectady, N. Y. Mrs. H. E. Van Vranken...... Smallegan-DeKleine Syndicate. ♦Miss Doris Wells ............ W . M. S., North Church, Newark, N. J.* ♦Missionaries supported through the W o m a n ’s Board, t Dr. De Boer died April 28, 1940, ** Dr. Olcott retired December 14 .^39-


Rev. C. R. Wierenga ..........First Englewood Church, Chicago, 111. *Mrs. C. R. Wierenga ..........W. M. S., American Church, Newburgh, N. Y. *Miss Charlotte C. Wyckoff .....W. L. C. S., West End Collegiate Church, N e w York City. JAPAN

♦Miss F. Belle Bogard..........Sunday School, First Church, Pella, la. Rev. and Mrs. Bruno Bruns .... Classes of Germania and Pleasant Prairie ♦Miss Sara M. Couch ..........Womens League, Flatbush Church, Brooklyn, N. Y. ♦Miss Flora Darrow .......... Classis Montgomery, Missionary Union. Rev. and Mrs. J. C. de Maagd ....All Organizations, First Church, Grand Haven, Mich. ♦Mrs. Willis G. Hoekje ........ (In part) Classis Poughkeepsie, Missionary Union. Rev. Hubert Kuyper .......... American Church, Orange City, Iowa. ♦Mrs. Hubert Kuyper .......... Classis Ulster, Missionary Union. ♦Miss Mary Elizabeth Liggett.... W. F., M. S., Marble Collegiate Church, N e w York City. Rev. Bernard M. Luben .... . First Holland Church, Passaic, N. J. ♦Mrs. B. C. Moore ............ Classes Greene and Raritan, Missionary Union. ♦Miss Jeane Noordhoff ......... Classes East and West Sioux, Missionary Union. ♦Miss C. Janet Oltmans ........ S. S., Bethany Church, Grand Rapids, Mich. ♦Miss Jennie A. Pieters ........ Classes Grand Rapids and Muskegon, Missionary Unions. Rev. H. V. E. Stegeman ...... Reformed Church, Hospers, Iowa. Mrs. H. V. E. Stegeman ...... Third Church and S. S., Holland, Mich. Rev. John Ter Bo r g ..........Immanuel Church, Grand Rapids, Mich. Mrs. John Ter Borg ......... Third Church and Sunday School, Holland, Mich. ♦Miss Florence Walvoord....... Classis Wisconsin, Missionary Union. ♦Miss Helen Ruth Zander ...... Classis Schenectady, Missionary Union. ARABIA

♦Dr. Mary Bruins Allison ...... Classes Holland, Grand Rapids, Kalama­ zoo and Muskegon, Missionary Unions. ♦Dr. Esther I. Barny .......... Community Church and Societies, Woodcliff, N. J. ♦Miss Cornelia Dalenberg ...... Church, South Holland, 111. Rev. and Mrs. Garret E. De Jong. .Wisconsin Classis. Rev. Dirk Dykstra ........... Alto Church, Waupun, Wis. Mrs. Dirk Dykstra ........... First Church, Holland, Mich. ♦Missionaries supported through the W o m a n ’s Board.


Rev. George Gosselink ....... First Church, Waupun, Wis. ♦Mrs. George Gosselink ....... Classis Pella, Missionary Union. Dr. Paul W. Harrison ........ Trinity Church, Plainfield, N. J. ♦Mrs. Paul W . Harrison ....... Classis Passaic, Mssionary Union. ♦Miss Rachel Jackson ..........Classes South Bergen and Palisades, Missionary Unions. ♦Miss Ruth Jackson ...........Classis Bergen, Missionary Union. ♦Miss Fanny Button ...........Arabian Circle, First Church, Brooklyn, N. Y. Rev. James E. Moerdyk ....... Arabian Syndicate, Sioux County Churches. Dr. and Mrs. William J. Moerdyk. Second Church, Zeeland, Mich. Dr. C. S. G. Mylrea...........First Roseland Church, Chicago, 111. Rev. Gerrit J. Pennings ....... First Church, Orange City, Iowa. Dr. Lewis R. Scudder......... Gravesend Church, Brooklyn, N. Y. Dr. and Mrs. W . Harold Storm__ Reformed Church, Overisel, Mich. Dr. W. Wells Thoms ..........First Church, Zeeland, Mich. Mrs. W. Wells Thoms ........ Fourth Sunday School, Philadelphia, Pa. Rev. John Van Ess .......... First Roseland Church and Sunday School, Chicago, 111. Mrs. John Van Ess .......... Reformed Church, Hudson, N. Y. (by an individual member). Mr. John Van Ess ........... Bethany Church, Chicago, 111. Rev. G. D. Van Peursem ...... Second Church, Somerville, N. J. ♦Mrs. G. D. Van Peursem ...... (In part) W. Assoc., Second Church, Somerville, N. J. ♦ Missionaries supported through the W o m a n ’s Board of Foreign Missions. UNITED

M I S S I O N IN M E S O P O T A M I A

Rev. Bernard Hakken ......... Third Church, Grand Rapids, Mich. ♦Mrs. Sharon J. T h o m s ......... W o m a n ’s Society, Bronxville, N. Y. ♦Missionaries supported through the W o m a n ’s Board.



DIRECTORY

OF THE

W O M A N ’S B O A R D O F F O R E I G N M I S S I O N S


T h e W o m a n ’s B o a r d of Foreign Missions OFFICERS O F T H E B O A R D 1 9 4 0-1941 PRESIDENT

M

rs. E dgar F.

R omig , 390 West End Ave., N e w York, N. Y. VICE-PRESIDENT

M

rs. J. J.

V a n Strien, h i West Fifth St., Bayonne, N. J. S Y N O D I C A L VICE-PRESIDENTS

P. S. Albany, M rs. G arret H ondelink P. S. N e w York, Miss A nnie S. W yckoff P. Y. N e w Brunswick, M rs.A. L. Stillwell P. .S'. Chicago, M rs.Ja me s W ayer

P. Y.

Iowa,

M

rs. H enry

W. P ietenpol

RECORDING SECRETARY M rs. T heodore B rinckerhoff , 255 Suydarn St., N e w Brunswick, N. J. GENERAL SECRETARY

M

iss

Su e W

eddell, 156 Fifth Ave., N e w York, N. Y.

TREASURER Miss H elen Card, 156 Fifth Ave., N e w York, N. Y. ASSISTANT T R E A S U R E R Miss E d w i na P aige FOREIGN C O R R E S P O N D I N G SECRETARIES rs.M ilton T. Stauffer Japan, M rs. E rnest R. P alen India, Miss A n n e B. L ittell Arabia, M rs.C harles T. O lcott China,

M

CANDIDATE SECRETARY

M

rs.Jo h n

W. B eardslee, Jr ., Seminary PI., N e w Brunswick, N. J. H O N O R A R Y SECRETARY

Miss O. H. L awrence ,30 East 22nd St, N e w York, N. Y. S E C R E T A R Y F O R Y O U N G W O M E N ’S W O R K Miss Julia H eines, 156 Fifth Ave., N e w York, N. Y. SECRETARY FOR D E P A R T M E N T OF MISSIONARY A N D RELIGIOUS E D U C A T I O N M rs, Sanford E. Cobb, 156 Fifth Ave., N e w York, N. Y. C O M M I T T E E O N N O M I N A T I O N S F O R 1941

M M M

rs. F agg iss B ussing

iss

V a n B r un t , Chairman M rs. E vans M rs. H a w k i n s


MEMBERS OF THE BOARD Miss O. H. L awrence , 30 East 22nd St., N e w York, N. Y. M rs. D e W itt K n o x , 325 East 41st St., N e w York, N. Y. M rs . Jo h n G. F agg,45 Prospect PI., N e w York, N. Y. M iss G ertrude D odd, Vellore, Madras Pres., India. Miss M. Louise E dwards , 86 Sixth Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. Miss A. S. W yckoff , 88-26 164th St., Jamaica, N. Y. Miss Louise G. Z abriskie, 1185 Park Ave., N e w York, N. Y. Miss M atilda M. N a s h , 157 South Lake Ave., Albany, N. Y. M rs. J. M. M ontgomery , i West 72nd St., N e w York, N. Y. M rs . F. M. T o w l , 45 Montgomery PI., Brooklyn, N. Y. M rs. Jo h n H. R aven , N e w Brunswick, N. J. M rs . C. S. V a n N uis,864 President St., Brooklyn, N. Y. M rs . A. L ongstreet Stillwell, 30 North Bridge St., Somerville, N. J. M rs. J. P reston Searle, 131 Riverside Dr., N e w York, N. Y. M rs. Jeremiah R. V a n B r un t , 21 Montgomery PI., Brooklyn, N. Y. Miss Sa r a h A. B ussing , 65 West 95th St., N e w York, N. Y. Miss A n n e B. L ittell, P. O. Box 26, Boonton, N. J. Miss M ary L. P owles , Temperance Hall, North Broadway, Yonkers, N. Y. M rs. Ja m e s W ayer , 1227 Arthur Ave., Racine, Wis. M rs. E dgar F. R omig , 390 West End Ave., N e w York, N. Y. M rs. G arret H ondelink ,417 Alexander St., Rochester, N. Y. M rs . D aniel V. B. H e g e m a n ,Rocky Glen, Redding Ridge P. O., Conn. M rs. H enry W . P ietenpol, 709 Peace St., Pella, Iowa. M rs . T heodore F. B ayles, Seminary PI., N e w Brunswick, N. J. M rs . G eorge E. B ergen, 100-15 Springfield Blvd., Queens Village, N. Y. Miss E lizabeth R. V a n B b u n t ,21 Montgomery PI., Brooklyn, N. Y. M rs . A n t h o n y V a n W estenburg , 220 Ballston Ave., Scotia, N. Y. Miss Jeanette W estveer, 205 College Ave., Holland, Mich. M rs.John W. B eardslee,Jr.,Seminary PI., N e w Brunswick, N. J. M rs. A. D e Y o un g , 321 West Cedar St., Kalamazoo, Mich. M rs. Ira A. H a w k i n s ,Warwick, N. Y. M rs . A. W. H opper.Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. M rs . Ja me s W . H owie , 115 East 53rd St., N e w York, N. Y. M rs. T heo . B rinckerhoff , 255 Suydam St., N e w Brunswick, N. J. M rs. C laude J. F ingar ,98 Kingston Ave., Yonkers, N. Y. M rs. C harles T. O lcott, 325 East 41st St., N e w York, N. Y. M rs. J. J. V a n Strien, h i West Fifth St., Bayonne, N. J. M rs. S. C. N ettinga, 133 West nth St, Holland, Mich. MRs. M ilton T. Stauffer , 102 College Ave., N e w Brunswick, N. J. M rs. W alter H. V eenendaal ,4918 West Washington Blvd., Milwaukee, Wis. M rs. D avid R. E vans ,22 North Bridge St., Somerville, N. J. M rs. E rnest R. P alen ,325 East 41st St., N e w York, N. Y. M rs . P aul E. H i n k a m p , 64 West 14th St., Holland, Mich. M rs. G eorge Somerville,370 Crestwood Ave., Crestwood, TuckahoeP.O. N. Y. M rs . M. Stephen Ja m e s , 184 South Main St., Albany, N. Y. M rs. G. K. T e l l m a n , 1137 Peck St., Muskegon, Mich. M rs. C harles E. T uxill ,Wurtsboro Hills, N. Y. M rs . M artin de W olfe, 320 Henry St., Herkimer, N. Y.


Members of the Board— Continued M rs. B. B. H a g e m a n , Millstone, N. J. M rs. D avid B ogard, Little Falls, N. J. M rs. J. H omer Flatten , 390 West End Ave., N e w York, N. Y. ! M rs. J. A ddison Jones , 104 Hooker Ave., Poughkeepsie, N. Y. M iss F lorence G ordon , 40 King Ave., Weehawken, N. J. M rs. R a y m o n d H. B rack , 306 Stanley Ave., Staten Island, N. Y. M rs. Ira J. H esselink, Leighton, Iowa. M rs. T aeke B osch , Midland Park, N. J. M rs. J. J. Sessler, 118-01 14th Ave., College Point, N. Y. M rs . H enry B e l t m a n , 1316 Miles Ave., Kalamazoo, Mich. M rs. F ranklin J. H i n k a m p , R. F. D. i, Schenectady, N. Y. Mis. D avid V a n Strien, 975 Palisade Ave., North Bergen, N. J. M rs. Ir wi n J. L ubbers, Pella, Iowa. M rs. H arold W. Sc h e n c k , 81 Mt. Hebron Rd., Upper Montclair, N. J. M iss H elen C ard, 390 West End Ave., N e w York, N. Y. M rs . F. E arle F airchild, 225 Beverly Rd., Douglaston, N. Y. M rs . W illiam A lbrecht ,25 North Bridge St., Somerville, N. J. M rs. R ichard Co n a nt , Upper Ridgewood, N. J. M rs. F rancis T. B rewster , 164 Nassau Ave., Manhasset, Long Island, N. Y. M rs. C hester C. C hilton , 24 Highland Ave., Jersey City, N. J.

H O N O R A R Y VICE-PRESIDENTS M rs. H enry E. Cobb, 52 Vanderbilt Ave., N e w York, N. Y. Miss M ary Joslin M iss A n n a W. O lcott, h i West 13th St., N e w York, N. Y. M iss C lara L ouise L awrence ,41i Delaney St., Orlando, Fla. M rs . J. J. H ollebrands,4119 Helen Ave., Detroit, Mich. M rs. H enry H armeling , 7941 South Princeton Ave., Chicago, 111 . M rs. C ornelius K uyper, Cedar Grove, Wis. M rs . A n t h o n y W alvoord, 43 West 17th St., Holland, Mich. M rs. J. N. T rompen ,437 Lafayette Ave., S. E., Grand Rapids, Mich. M iss N a n n a H eath P eters,610 The Wyoming, Washington, D. C. M rs. B e n j am i n K astein, 201 South Grove St., Waupun, Wis. M rs. F itzhugh C. Speer, Madison, N. J. M rs . M alcolm J. M ac L eod, 132 Pondfield Rd., Bronxville, N. Y. M iss Sa ra h L. Jackson , 157 East 72nd St., N e w York, N. Y. M iss M aud C lark , 190 Riverside Dr., N e w York, N. Y. M rs. W illiam B ancroft H ill, Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. M rs. H enry J. Scudder,47 Huntington St., N e w Brunswick, N. J. M rs. Irving H. B erg, 78 Trenor Dr., N e w Rochelle, N. Y. Miss A n n a E. G aston , 180 Lexington Ave., Passaic, N. J. Miss A n n E lizabeth Leonard ,710 Lodi St., Syracuse, N. Y. Miss E liza P. C obb,520 West 114th St., N e w York, N. Y. M rs. J. H. W arnshuis , M. D., 89 St. Mark’s PI., N e w Brighton, S. L, N. Y.


DIRECTORS M rs. E dgar F. R omig M rs. J. J. V a n Strien M rs . D e W itt K nox M iss A nnie S. W yckoff M rs. A. L. Stillwell M rs. G arret H ondelink M rs. Ja me s W ayer M rs. H. W. P ietenpol M rs. T. B rinckerhoff M iss H elen C ard M rs. R ichard Ex-officio,

M

M rs. M ilton T. Stauffer M iss A n n e B. L ittell M rs. E rnest R. P alen M rs. C harles T. O lcott M rs . Jo h n W. B eardslee, Jr. M rs. C hester C. C hilton M rs. J. J. Sessler M rs. F. J. H i n k a m p M rs. D avid V a n Strien M rs. W illiam A lbrecht Conant

rs. B ogard, M rs . H e g e m a n , M rs. B rack , M iss

STANDING

L awrence

COMMITTEES

Board Membership M Miss W yckoff M rs. H ondelink M rs. P ietenpol

rs.E vans ,Chairman M rs.W ayer M rs.Stillwell M rs.J. J. V a n

Strien

Finance M M M M

rs. H owie iss B ussing iss W yckoff

iss

C ard, Chairman M rs. D avid V a n Strien M rs. K n o x , co-opted

Publication M M M M M M

rs. E vans rs. B ogard rs. F airchild iss G ordon rs. C o n a nt

rs. Sessler, Chairman

M rs. B eardslee M rs. James M rs. D e Y oung M rs. H esselink M rs. Sc h e n c k

Missionary Candidate M

rs. B eardslee, Chairman

M rs. Stauffer M iss L ittell M rs. P alen M rs. O lcott M iss V a n B r un t

M M M M

rs. B rewster (Advisory) rs. V a n W estenburg rs. P aul H i n k am p rs. L ubbers

Sewing Guild M Miss C ard

rs. B rack , Chairman

M

rs. E vans


Missionary Hospitality M Miss V a n B r un t

M rs. V a n N uis M rs. B ayles

rs. F agg , Chairman M rs.Searle M iss C obb M rs.F ingar

Board Policy and Survey M rs. J. J. V a n Strien, Chairman M rs. T o wl M iss B ussing M rs. H owie M rs. Stillwell M rs. V a n B runt M rs. B eardslee M rs. R aven M rs. B ogard M rs. H a w k i n s M rs. O lcott

Devotional M M rs . M ontgomery M rs. M ac L eod

rs. H opper, Chairman M rs. H egeman

Entertainment Committee M rs. T uxill, Chairman M rs. D avid V a n Strien M rs.C o n a nt M rs. F latten M rs.B ergen M rs. H a g e m a n M iss V a n B r unt M rs. A lbrecht

Life and Memorial Membership Committee M rs. H M rs.A. D e Y o un g M rs . P ietenpol M rs. V a n W estenburg

e g e m a n , Chairman M rs .N ettinga M rs.V eenendaal M rs.T ellman

Baby Roll M

M M M

rs. B ogard, Chairman rs. P aul H i n k a m p M rs.V a n N uis rs. H esselink M rs.F. H i n k a m p rs. Ja me s M rs.B elt ma n

Magazines for Missionaries M Miss W estveer

M rs . L ubbers

rs. Searle, Chairman M rs.H a g e m a n M iss P owles

China M

rs . Stauffer , Chairman M rs. J. J. V a n Strien M iss E dwards M rs. H opper M rs.B rewster M rs. F agg M rs .V a n W estenburg M rs. B osch

India M rs. D avid V a n M rs. B rack M rs. Searle M rs. K n ox

M iss L ittell, Chairman Strien M rs.H a w k i n s M rs.de W olfe M rs .M ac L eod M rs.L ubbers


Japan M

rs. P alen , Chairman M rs. Jones M rs. P aul H i n k a m p M iss B ussing M rs. B rinckerhoff

M

rs. O lcott, Chairman M rs. F ranklin H i n k a m p M iss E. V a n B runt M rs. E vans

M rs. Sc h e n c k M rs. T o w l M rs. H e g e ma n M rs. H ill

Arabia M M M M

rs. F airchild rs . B ayles rs. V a n N uis rs. M ontgomery

Budget Planning and Promotion M

rs. D avid

V a n Strien, Chairman M rs. O lcott M iss L ittell M rs. C hilton M rs. Sessler M iss C ard

M rs. H egeman M rs.Jones M rs. B eardslee M rs. Stauffer M rs. P alen

MEMB E R S OF INTERBOARD COMMITTEES Representatives to the Board of Foreign Missions M

rs. R omig

M

rs. B eardslee

M

iss

W

eddell

Representatives to Field Committees of Board of Foreign Missions China— M rs. Stauffer , M rs. J. J. V a n Strien India— Miss L ittell, M rs. D avid V a n Strien Japan— M rs. P alen , M rs. Sc h e n c k Arabia— M rs.O lcott,M rs .F airchild

Representatives to Inter-Board Project Committee M

rs. D avid

V a n Strien

M

iss

W

eddell

Representatives to Joint Committee of Women’s Boards M

rs. R omig

M

iss

C ard

M

rs. C hilton

M

rs. Sessler

M

iss

W

eddell

Representatives to Joint Committee for Young Women’s Work M

M rs. C hilton , Chairman rs. Somerville, M rs. F ranklin H i n k a m p , M rs. P alen , M rs. B e l t m a n , M rs. H esselink, M rs. A lbrecht , M rs. B rewster , M rs. B ogard

Representatives to Missionary Education Committee M

rs. Sessler

M

rs. C o n a n t

M

iss

W

eddell

President’s Advisory Council (General Synod) G eneral Secretary

Youth Fellowship Committee G eneral Secretary


\

Representatives o n Interdenominational Committees

Foreign Missions Conference Reference and Counsel— Miss Weddell Women’s Work— Mrs. Evans Home Base Cultivation— Miss Weddell Committee on Far East— Mrs. Stauffer Church Committee on China Relief— Mrs. Fagg India Committee— Mrs. Knox, Miss Cobb North American Committee on Christian Education in Japan_ Mrs. Brinckerhoff Christian Literature for Women and Children in Mission Lands— Miss Bussing, Mrs. David Van Strien

Women’s Christian Colleges in India: Vellore Medical College— Mrs. Knox, Dr. Lilian Warnshuis Women’s Christian College of Madras— Mrs. MacLeod, Mrs. Mont­ gomery, Mrs. de Wolfe, alternate St. Christopher’s Training College— Mrs. Scudder, Mrs. Evans, Mrs. Hawkins, Alternate. (Three year term ending 1 9 4 2 ) Women’s Christian College of Japan— Mrs. Brinckerhoff Women’s Medical School, Shanghai— Mrs. Hopper Northfield Missionary Conference— Mrs, Somerville, Mrs. Bosch. Miss Heines Lake Geneva— Mrs. D. J. De Gelleke, Mrs. C. V. Kastelyn Winona— Mrs. S. Vender Ploeg, Mrs. John Kuite, Mrs. Carl Baake, Mrs. G. Vender Linden


Classical Committees Particular S y n o d of Albany

Albany ...............Mrs. Theodore H. Whitbeck, 44 Eagle St., Albany, N. Y. Greene ...............Mrs. Edwin Emerson Davis, Athens, N. Y. Montgomery ...........Mrs. Howard D. Smith, Fort Plain, N. Y. Miss A. Elizabeth Leonard, 710 Lodi St., Syracuse, N. Y. Rensselaer ............ Miss Adaline Beekman, Kinderhook, N. Y. Rochester ............ Mrs. W . L. Vande Walle, 102 Laurelton Rd., Rochester, N. Y. Saratoga ............. Mrs. Charles E. Van Der Werken, 101 Saratoga Ave., Cohoes, N. Y. Schenectady ...........Mrs. Agnes M. Sebast, 1212 Altamont Ave., Schenectady, N. Y. Schoharie ............ Mrs. O. F. Durfee, Schoharie, N. Y. Mrs. Jared Van Wagenen, Jr., Lawyersville, N. Y. Particular S y n o d of Chicago

Chicago .............. Mrs. Henry Harmeling, 7941 So. Princeton Ave., Chicago, 111. Mrs. G. Vander Linden, 848 West 62d St., Chicago, 111. (For Whiteside County'* Mrs. Henry Mollema, 518 13th Ave., Fulton, 111. Grand Rapids .......... Mrs. H. E. Veldman, 2447 Oakwood, N.E., Grand Rapids, Mich. Mrs. George Muyskens, Byron Center, Mich. Holland .............. Miss Henrietta Zwemer, 353 Central Ave., Holland, Mich. Mrs. P. E. Hinkamp, 64 West 14th St., Holland, Mich. Illinois ............... Mrs. I. Van Westenburg, 7811 S. Wolcott Ave., Chicago, 111. (For Central Illinois) Mrs. Elmer Simonson, Raritan, 111. Kalamazoo .............Mrs. Jacob Juist, 908 Gayle Ave., Kalamazoo, Mich. Muskegon ............ Mrs. John Mulder, Spring Lake, Mich. Mrs. J. C. Van Wyk, 432 Amity Ave., Muskegon, Mich. Wisconsin ............ Mrs. E. H. Tanis, 117 So. Brummond St., Waupun, Wis. Mrs. Franklin Herbst, I 2550 North Grant Blvd., Milwaukee, Wis. Particular S y n o d of Iowa

California .............Mrs. C. I. Jones, 9313 San Pedro St., Los Angeles, Calif. Cascades ............. Mrs. Alexander Van Bronkhorst, Box 261, Conrad, Montana.


Particular S y n o d of Iowa— Continued

Da*cota ...............Mrs. James Holleman, R. R. i, Springfield, S. D. Mrs. W m . Wolbrink, Box 27, Monroe, S. D. Germania ............. Mrs. Theodore A. Mansen, Davis, S. D. Mrs. Frank Snuttjer, Lennox, S. D. P e^a ................ Mrs. Ira J. Hesselink, Leighton, Iowa. Mrs. A. B. Van Houweling, Pella, Iowa. Pleasant Prairie ....... Mrs. C. H. Bode, Aplington, Iowa. Mrs. Neelo Boomgaarten, Alexander, Iowa. Mrs. Calvin Schnucker, Titonka, Iowa. Mrs. Paul Achtermann, German Valley, 111. East Sioux ........... Mrs. James Hyink, Hospers, Iowa. Mrs. E. Van Engelenhoven, Alton, Iowa. West Sioux .......... Mrs. A. Te Paske, Sioux Center, Iowa. Particular S y n o d of N e w Brunswick

Bergen .... .......... Mrs. G. Joseph Mayer, 748 Midland Road, Oradell, N. J. South Bergen ......... Mrs. Chester Chilton, 24 Highland Ave., Jersey City, N. J. Monmouth ... ........ Mrs. William L. Sahler, Freehold, N. J. Newark .............. Mrs. Geo. H. Donovan, 483 Ferry St, Newark, N. J. N e w Brunswick ....... Mrs. Adolph Zimmerli, 221 Grant Avenue, N e w Brunswick, N. J. Palisades ............. Mrs. Leonard A. Sibley, 924 Summit Ave., Jersey City, N. J. Paramus ............. Mrs. Ira A. Hawkins, Warwick, N. Y. Mrs. Thomas Hughes, 34 Temple Place, Passaic, N. J. Passaic ...............Mrs. Peter Keyser, 38 Arlington Ave., Hawthorne, N. J. Philadelphia ...........Mrs. James Craven, Richboro, Pa. R antan .............. Mrs. James J. Staats, R. D. 3, Somerville, N. J. Partciular S y n o d of N e w York

Hudson .............. Mrs. William E. Prouty, Mellenville, N. Y. North Long Island ......Mrs. Jacob J. Sessler, 118-01 14th Ave., College Point, N. Y. South Long Island ......(Emeritus) Miss M. Louise Edwards, 86 Sixth Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. N e w York ........... Mrs. Paul R. Dickie, 400 E. 67th St., N e w York, N. Y. Orange ...............Mrs. M. Seymour Purdy, 80 Third St., Newburgh, N. Y. Poughkeepsie .......... Mrs. E. B. Stringham, R. F. D., Wappingers Falls, N. Y. Ulster .......... .....MTs. Edgar Ellsworth, St. Remy, N. Y. Westchester ...........Mrs. H. B. Nichols, 33 Elm Place, Hastings, N. Y.


Classical Representatives for Y o u n g W o m e n ’s W o r k Particular S y n o d of Albany

Albany ...............Appointment pending Greene ............... Mrs. Henry Layman, 73 Railroad Ave., Catskill, N. Y. Montgomery .......... Miss Marion Van Horne, 222 S. Washington St., Herkimer, N. Y. Rensselaer ............ Mrs. Reinhardt Van Dyke, Nassau, N. Y. Rochester ............ Mrs. Harold Schut, Marion, N. Y. Saratoga ............. To be appointed. Schenectady ...........To be appointed. Schoharie ............ Mrs. Leonard M. Braam, Lawyersville, N. Y. Particular S y n o d of Chicago

Chicago .............. Mrs. C. Medema, 1219 S. Kildare, Chicago, 111. Grand Rapids ......... Miss Joan Spoelstra, 1321 Grandville Ave., S. E. Grand Rapids, Mich. Holland .............. Miss Adrianna Steketee, 24 West 18th St., Holland, Mich. Illinois ...............Mrs. C. Medema, 1219 S. Kildare, Chicago, 111. Kalamazoo ........... Mrs. William Herder, 1143 Douglas Ave., Kalamazoo, Mich. Muskegon ............ Mrs. J. C. Van Wyk, 432 Amity Ave., Muskegon, Mich. Wisconsin ............ Mrs. Harold Day, 1516 N. 53rd St., Milwaukee, Wis. Particular S y n o d of I o w a

California ............ Mrs. Peter Koopman, 301 Eureka St., Redlands, Calif. Cascades ............. Mrs. Alexander Van Bronkhorst, Box 261, Conrad, Mont. Dakota ...............Mrs. Henry D. Holleman, Springfield, S. Dak. Germania ............. Mrs. Theodore A. Mansen, Davis, S. Dak. Pella ................ Mrs. Nick Rozeboom, Box 43, Otley, Iowa. Pleasant Prairie ....... Miss Mae De Beer, Stout, Iowa. East Sioux ........... Miss Katie Van’t Hof, Hull, Iowa West Sioux ...........Miss Katie Van’t Hof, Hull, Iowa Particular S y n o d of N e w Brunswick

Bergen ...............Miss Madeline Van Wart, Closter, N. J. South Bergen ......... Miss Agnes Ersldne, 35 Winfield Ave., Jersey City, N. J. Monmouth ............ Mrs. W . B. Rankin, 539 River Rd., Red Bank, N. J. Newark .............. To be appointed. N e w Brunswick ....... To be appointed.


Particular S y n o d of N e w Brunswick— Continued

Palisades ............. Miss Florence Gordon, 40 King Ave., Weehawken, N. J. Paramus ............. Mrs. F. L. Baechtold, 329 Stillwell Place, Ridgewood, N. J. (New Jersey Section) Appointment pending. (New York Section) Passaic ...............Mrs. David Bogard, Little Falls, N. J. Philadelphia ...........To be appointed. Raritan ...............Mrs. Frank E. Barnes, 41 Ross St, Somerville, N. J. Particular Synod of N e w York

Hudson .............. To be appointed. North Long Island ..... Miss Charlotte Weihe, 118-08 14th Ave., College Point, N. Y. South Long Island ......Mrs. Stephen R. Voris, 2526 East 26th St., Brooklyn, N. Y. N e w York ........... Mrs. Ernest E. Shay, 44 E. 92nd St, N e w York, N. Y. Orange ...............Mrs. Herbert C. Schmalzriedt, 202 W. Main St, Port Jervis, N. Y. Poughkeepsie ..........Mrs. B. Charles Ross, 4 Fairmont St, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. Ulster ............... To be appointed. Westchester .......... To be appointed.


Calendar of Birthdays

Missionaries and Associate Missionaries Name

Date

January

9

it

10 10 II

“ (1 “ a a a

22 25 25 27

28

February 15 it

“ March li it II it

19 21 2 6 12 13 14

18

it it li

It it it April ff

ti il a a n “ a May

il it It li It II June

II II

19 25

28 29 29 31 3 II 12 13 19 20 21 22 30 9

16 17 23

28 29 30 6 10 23

W e n t to the Field

*Dr. Gibbons, India ................... $Miss Couch, Japan ................... Dr. Rottschaefer, India (India, 1909; Arabia, 1927)... .. 1931 ttMiss Pieters, Japan .................. .. 1904 Mrs. V a n Peursem, Arabia ........... $Miss Julia Scudder, India ............ .. 1879 fJMiss Morrison, China ................ Miss Holkeboer, China ............... Miss F. Walvoord, Japan ............. Miss Noordyk, India ................. .. 1917 .. 1897 tJMrs. Farrar, India ................... Mrs. Korteling, India ................. •• 1925 Miss Bogard, Japan .................. Miss Broekema, China ................ .. 1924 .. 1929 Mrs. Gosselink, Arabia ............... Miss V a n Doren, India ............... .. 1903 ♦Mrs. Veenschoten, China .... ......... ... 1917 ... 1932 ♦Mrs. Harrison, Arabia (1917) ........ Dr. M a r y Bruins Allison, A r a b i a ...... 1934 Dr. Barny, Arabia (1927) ............ ... 1936 Miss Kellien, Arabia ................. ... 1915 Miss D e Vries, India ................. ... 1937 Miss Marsilje ....................... ... 1893 tJMrs. Peeke, Japan (1887) ............ Mrs. Luben, Japan ................... ... 1932 Miss Smies, China ................... ... 1939 Mrs. Ter Borg, Japan ................ Mrs. Voskuil, China ................. Mrs. Moerdyk, Arabia ................ Mrs. Piet, India ...................... .Under appointment ♦Mrs. Poppen, China ................... Mrs. Vander Meer, China ............. Miss Wyckoff, India ................... JMiss Taylor, Japan .................... Miss Nienhuis, China .................. Mrs. Wells Thoms, Arabia (India, 1927) Mrs. D e Valois, India ................. Mrs. D e Maagd, Japan ................ Miss Janet Oilmans, Japan ............ Mrs. Rottschaefer, India ............... fDr. Hart, India ....................... Mrs. Galen Scudder, India ............. M 3rs. D e Vries, India .................

... 1923 ... 1915

... 1931 1937 ... 1914 ... 1895 • •• 1919

... 1929


1

July *1

3

M 9 <f (t it it

18 26

29 30

August

1

2

a 4 «

6 8

u

a u u it

9 9 10 11

li

14 II

IS

ti

17 it tt

22 28

September 6 it 8 tt 10 it 10 li It it it

IS 20 21 21

ti

29 It

October

30 1

It

4 it

II tt

II tt

14 It it il it

21 22 22 26

tt

31 November ’ 2 It

4 it

S It it

14 18

a 19 tt li

19 19

Mrs. Wierenga, India ......... Mrs. De Free, China ......... Mrs. De Jong, Arabia (1926-1933) ♦Miss Van Pelt, Arabia ....... Miss Brumler, India ........ .. Miss De Weerd, India........ Mrs. Van Ess, Arabia ........ Mrs. Honegger, India ........ Mrs. De Boer, India......... . Miss Darrow, Japan.......... Mrs. Hofstra, China .......... ttMiss Scardefield, Arabia ...... Mts. Mylrea, Arabia ......... Miss Tull, Arabia ........... Miss Zander, Japan .......... Mrs. T. F. Zwemer, India...... Miss Vanderberg, India ...... . §Miss Dodd, India ............ ♦Miss Bekman, Japan .......... ♦Miss Coburn, India ........... Mrs. Dykstra, Arabia ......... ttMiss Button, Arabia .......... ftMrs. Bamy, Arabia .......... Mrs. Holleman, China ......... Miss Bruce, China............ Mrs. De Bruin, India .......... Mrs. Hakken, Mesopotamia ..... Mrs. Oltman, China .......... Dr. Crouse, Arabia ........... Miss Vander Linden, China ..... ttMiss Duryee, China ........... Mrs. Angus, China ........... Miss Dalenberg, Arabia ....... Mrs. Van Vranken, India ...... Mrs. Hoekje, Japan (1908) ..... Miss Beekman, China ...... ... Miss H. Boot, China .......... §Miss Houghton, India ......... ♦♦Mrs. Olcott, India ............ Miss Liggett ................ Mrs. Moore, Japan ........... Miss S. Te Winkel (1909-1937) ... Mrs. L. Scudder, Arabia ....... Miss Noordhoff, Japan ........ Miss Green, China ........... Mrs. Muyskens, India ......... Mrs. Koeppe, China ........... Miss Ruth Jackson, Arabia ..... Mass Jongewaard, India .......

1923

1907 1938 1917 1923

1928 1909 1910 1922 1922 1922

1903 1906 1939 1928 1923 1934 1916 1936 1918 1907 1904 1898 1919 1921 1926 1922 1930 1939 1909 1894

1925 1921 1917 1912

1914 1938 1908 1924

1938 1924

1938 1937 1911 1907 1922 1919 1921 1925


&

22 23

December 1 2 S 9 13 14 16 16 21 24 26 29 31

Mrs. Pennings, Arabia ............. 1912 Miss Veldman, China ........................... 1930 Mrs. Stegeman, Japan .......................... 1917 Mrs. Storm, Arabia ............................ 1936 tJMrs. H. J. Scudder, India (1897) ................ 1923 Miss Wells, India ............................. 1930 *Mrs. Boot, China .............................. 1908 ยงDr. Ida Scudder, India ......................... 1899 Miss Sluyter, India ............................. 1939 Miss Rachel Jackson, Arabia ..................... 1921 fJMiss Zwemer, China .......................... 1891 Mrs. S. J. Thoms, Mesopotamia (1906) ............. 1918 Miss Geegh, India ............................. 1924 Mrs. Kuyper, Japan (1912) ...... 1918 Mrs. Bruns, Japan ............................. 1930 Miss Bakker, Arabia ............... Under appointment Miss Platz, China ............................. 1930

* On furlough. ** Resigned, t In America.

1 Emeritus.

ยง Vellore Medical School.



TABULAR VIEW

OF THE

RECEIPTS

OF

THE

W O M A N ’S B O A R D O F F O R E I G N M I S S I O N S


OF

Total

Sunday Schools and Classes

Young Women's Societies

RECEIPTS Y. P. Societies C. E. Societies Mission Bands

OF

W o m e n ’s Societies

CHURCHES

CLASSIS

VIEW Churches and M e mbers

TABULAR

ALBANY 120 00

26 18 Albany, F i f t h ............ 25 05 75 12 60

992 35 137 40 60

50 00 50 00

25 00

60 00 54 52 25 00

65 00 50 00

43 96

00

1 12

151 50

19 14 6 00

4 76 75 3 01

218 24 CLASSIS O F B E R G E N Bergenfield (Clinton Ave.) .

35 103 15 18

00 12 50

5 00

2 46

00

C o mmu n i t y , _ H u d s o n

Ave-

2 75 3 01

12 50 32 14

12 50 32 14

1634 76

140 00

127 00

1 00

5 00

8 18 15 54 75 00 1 85

18 70 49 66 12 87 Ridgefield P a r k (Neighbor-

290 36

2288 36

5 00

128 00 52 00 85 90

52 00 9 38

30 00

39 38

32 00 100 00

15 00 6 50

5 00

190 00

130 00 37 50 283 00

11 25

41 00

18 75

105 00 25 00

15 00

2 6b

ibb 66

1 00

CHASSIS O F SOUTH BERGEN Bayonne, Fifth Street ....

''232'65

Jersey City, Faith V a n Jersey City, Hud. City 2nd Jersey City, Lafayette ___ Jersey City, St. J o h n ’s

27 50

120 00 100 00

64 85

10 00

330 00 75 40 60 50

66

37 00

128 18 25 00

130 93

1731 01

4 53

124 53

iie 00 40 00 60 00 70 00

00

00

602 65 135 00 110 00

12 76

60 00 127 61

303 29

1399 79

00

00

789 00

70

6 50

3 00

14 00

14 00 297 50

18 296 50 284

15 00 6 50

273 18 1296 40

18 04 00 85

52 25 4 43

15 00 L e a g u e for Service Union Nationwide Night Off’g..

55 127 265 1

100 00

100 00

Teaneck, C o m m u n i t y .....

50 70 50 00 01 87 10 14 30 12 50 22

2 00

80 90 English Neighborhood

3 30 100 00

1197 115 227 90 129 1 164 19 49 203 15 25

10 00


Total

Sunday Schools and Classes

Y. P. Societies C. E. Societies Mission Bands

Young: Wo m e n ' s Societies

W o m e n ’s Societies

Churches and M e mb ers

CHUR C H E S

CLASSIS O F CALIFORNIA Bethany, R e d l a n d s .......

Trinity

(El Monte)

12 78 70 1 51 5 69 2 56 40 71

125 4 15 5 50 1*5

00 69 00 00 00 00

75 00 1 06

38

2 25

20 00

19 26 7 00

1 51

78 08 51 69 82 22

San 1 50

Totals ...............

1 50 27 95

27 95

W . M. U n i o n ..............

CLASSIS O F

212 9 16 30 71 64

65 45

242 64

122 32

1 89

2 25

38

4 71

434 55

CASCADES 43 18 14 1 16 11

Totals ...............

80 12

15 00 15 00

00 41 37 84

35 75 10 00

15 00

105 54

75 75

15 00

3 96 2 21

38

43 33 34 1 56 39

80 12 09 41 08 05

10 88

207 55

3 42

9 42 6 39

CLASSIS O F C H I C A G O 6 00 6 39

135 97

45 00 30 00

25 75

20 00

83 55

47 50 40 00 64 50

Chicago, Archer A v e n u e ..

4 3 12 53

87 00 72 79 86 25 30 96 4 28 100 00 7 66

92 14 35 00 11 31

30 60 50 126 80 83 30 26 37

00 00 00 00 00 00

54 02 ioo 66

3 00

00

1 18

00

00 64 00

52 10 25 14

10 00 60 00

10 42 1112 29 225 22 3 90 51 1353

50 5 40 5 71 30

50 00 00 50 50 22

8 80 25 00 26 17 12 50

13 29

12 50

10 00

2 00

5 74

7 50

99 00 75 50 55 50 87 18 72 79 98 70 97 10 91 78

10 00 110 00 21 81

15 00 90 00 2 55

284 135 85 52 194 94 4 37 72 103 234 141 113 155 45 136

42 1427 26 75 1353

1 20

20 00

00 29 25 40 22

W . M. Union, Whiteside 38 83 Totals ...............

1803 44

2596 59

38 83 411 02

131 99

71 86

5014 90


CLASSIS O F

Total

Sunday Schools and Classes

Y. P. Societies C. E. Societies Mission Bands

Y oung W o m e n ’s Societies

W o m e n ’s Societies

Churches and M e mbers

CHURCHES

DAKOTA 30 00

38 00 52 1 36

8 00

52 1 36

10 00

10 00

15 5 15 15 25

8 51

94 20 70 75

00 00 00 00 00

10 00 11 00

3 62

22 50 5 00

,

20 00

20 00 6 70

15 00

8 96

40 00 35 00

19 82

55 00 16 00

60 00 36 91

3 55

284 79 26 00

26 85

71 87

592 79

214 08

47 66

5 00 90 00 28 00

15 27

2 31

6 84

65 70 10 75 32 70 8 96 40 00 79 24 1 12

1 12

Springfield, E m m a n u e l ....

49 63 5 94 15 00

io i9

90 00

205 00 63 10 315 19 26 00

2 31

107 16

988 21

CLASSIS O F G E R M A N I A

10 50 5 82 7 50

10 00

25 00 7 50

2 00

10 09 5 85 15 32

00 66 00

50 82 50 50 75

15 00

26 39

10 00

12 00

42 50 10 00

9 77

20 00

1 08

42 29 5 38

11 39 I m m a n u e l (Willow Lake)..

17

10 00

11 58

5 137 28 10 15 32 7 21

1 88

50 86

85 28

35 00

35 00 13 00 127 71

267 88 1

56 00

11 02

461 61


CQ 02

CD <D « 02 CDC GO « o offl

SB'O W

03

<U Ih

CHURCHES

O c +0J)

3E ■Cw oS

lifl5+3

§!•§

1= pco

Ph H'5 w

hdS

3r> ®03 ■go S3 W 3C CO d

5

CLASSIS O F G R A N D RAPIDS

10 00

10

A d a ................ . B y r o n C e n t e r ........ Corinth .............. G r a n d Rapids, Third .. G r a n d Rapids, Fourth G r a n d Rapids, Fifth ..

49 65 404 89

60 7 145 76 140

58 135 773 9

43 24 59 58

25 120 ISO 30

''igs'eo

219 134 35 63 288 30

6 46

2 27

63 34 70 11

130 14 230 206 1115

21 99 20 85 00

83 255 1075 64

43

67 26 4 88

5 60 43 485

25 00 37 50 85 00

22 00

kdale Park) ......... . G r a n d Rapids, Seventh . G r a n d Rapids, Eighth .. G r a n d Rapids, Ninth . .. G r a n d Rapids, Aberdeen Street ............. G r a n d Rapids, B e t h a n y . G r a n d Rapids, Bethel ... G r a n d Rapids, Beverly . G r a n d Rapids, Calvary . G r a n d Rapids, Central .. G r a n d Rapids, Fairview G r a n d Rapids, Garfield P a r k .............. G r a n d Rapids, Grace.... G r a n d Rapids, H o m e Acres G r a n d Rapids, I m m a n u e l . G r a n d Rapids, K n a p p Ave. G r a n d Rapids, R i c h m o n d Street ................. G r a n d Rapids, Trinity .... Grandville ................ Grant ................... W l M. Union, G r a n d Rapids a n d M u s k e g o n ......... L e a g u e for Service Union..

1 88 5 00 18 92 81 20 7 7 304 11

50 50 00 73

55 00

20 00

10

207 89 51 180 5 37 141 138 15

3 36 40 00

4 07

10 00

•Too

1 20

'"66

13 36

"3*89

144 45 97 464 54

00 33

22 40 83

221 88

00 00 00

13 00 25 00

2 00

2 00

00

19 00

10 45

00

10 00

00 50 00 50

20 00

85 00 172 00 7 82

119 00 158 92 462 65 22 82

13 42 325 00 5 00

44 162 787 32

50 42 00 23

359 55 6 25

6 25

2798 32 446 09

88

85 46

1 00 1000 00 1456 10

10 00

359 55 2293 88

Totals CLASSIS O F

6 26 22 50 176 40 15 28

00 64 00 00

15 31

2285 73

7839 33

GREENE

Athens .......... Catskill ......... Coxsackie, First .. Coxsackie, Second K i s k a t o m ....... Leeds ............. W . M. U n i o n ...... Totals •Includes gift of m e m b e r , $400.00.

6 98

3 72 18 57

62 •760 65 49 31

968 10

Tis

38

2 53

1037 56

1 41

5 78 35 05

38

69 48 791 50 68 72 68 98 31 60 7 28

31 50

31 50


Total

Sunday Schools and Classes

Y. P. Societies C. E. Societies Mission Bands

Young W o m e n ’s Societies

W o m e n ’s Societies

Churches and Me m b e r s

CHUR C H E S

CLASSIS O F H O L L A N D 17 15

1 00 112 90 13 59 841 43 377 11 25 15

Holland, Trinity .... North B l e n d o n ........... North Holland .

21 19 11 1504 14

67 16 25 27 11

80 60 05 61 76 42 00 30 00 47 20

L e a g u e for Service Union.. Totals ...............

....

40 68 11 25 242 100 22 5 274 338 114 47 7 40 61 210 238 57 118 14 102

00 5 00 00 00 00 01 35 66 00 169 41 95 00 5 00 50 58 10 00 30 5 00 00 5 00 25 00 29 01 99 50 00 60 00 50 50 25 00 00 10 50 19 65 00

478 137 152 356 169 169

63 00 16 36 00 25

2 00

1 00

7 50

99 67 20 00

62 68 11 25 280 794 00 1176 22 4 94 28 1116 50 00 775 600 00 719 85 8 25 7 120 30 00 81 261 40 11 60 36 1862 71 143 39 7 00 227 75 00

2 00

160 00 160 00 14 80

12 50

2004 46

23 00 20 00 20 00

3200 60 3600 67

606 59

715 157 356 569 251 169 20

15 00 00 00 01 31 95 53 93 69 30 40 25 68 15 86 63 61 50 80 24 06 00 16 36 00 25 00

9424 82

CLASSIS O F H U D S O N 46 42 1 88 80 19 3 8 19 15

66 18 68 62 77 69

127 10 110 9

50 00 00 13

70 00

2 70 94

5 00

2 ei 1 05 2 61

7 66 Totals ...............

148 82

315 71

70 00

94

8 97

46 1 200 10 190 31 3 14 22 15 7

42 88 20 00 00 86 68 67 38 69 66

544 44

CLASSIS O F ILLINOIS

Totals .............. .

3 00 12 01 10 00

70 20 102 50 55 16

00 00 32 00 40 64

26 01

314 36

5 75 29 34

500 00

70 25 634 62 75 16

500 00

884 46

10 00 35 09

10 00

00 75 66 01 40 64


Total

Sunday Schools and Classes

Y. P. Societies C. E. Societies Mission Bands

Young W omen's Societies

W o m e n ’s Societies

Churches and Members

CHURC H E S

CLASSIS O F KALAMAZOO 1 12

1 12

134 65 6 83 137 50 33 53 35 28

Kalamazoo, North P a r k

..

225 00

1 12

51 00 20 16 644 75

3 15 33 74

82 26

101 00 182 00

37 61

78 60 87 165 44 4 57

94 7 10 16

58 73 44 63 75 8 30

W . M. U n i o n .............. 607 21

25 00

11 00 118 20

33 00 35 00

50 00

25 25 49 50 00

18 50 5 00 33 50

1 35 3 00

2 00

2 53 24 79

10 00

2 25 25 50 188 55

17 50 60 00

2076 40

252 50

4 24 8 73

65 95 70 68

18 75 26 00

81 32 25 83

88 10

2 38

10 00

15 00

17 35 38 82

384 18 255 87 89 677 218 182 134 120 92 259

125 79

27 115 10 28 89 188

52 42 75 05 74 55

3070 63

CLASSIS O F N O R T H L O N G ISLAND 15 00 29 25

15 00 29 25 65 16

275 00 Flushing', C h u r c h on Hill.. •675 00 22 32 Long- Island City, First. ...

8 35 19 11 5 62

9 3 5 42

12 98 00 00 2 62

6 00

W

M

U n i o n ............. 1139 28

• F r o m G r o u p of Friends.

128 16

63 00 270 30 206 35

66

00 00

00

400 00 65 17 62 15 135

105 00 2 00

2 00

1125 00 87 17 62 15 135

00 50 20

65 00

101 00

22 00

3 75

10 00

00 75 50 50 00

1867 35

00 00 00 00

50 00

160 00 26 50 72 50 37 38 17 25 35

270 30 586 35

5 00 20 00

22 50 20

65 00

123 00 8 35 179 11 32 12 76 25 19 12 3 98 47 00 100 75 20 12

31 50 35 00 207 75

3214 38


Total

Sunday Schools and Classes

Y. P. Societies C. E. Societies Mission Bands

Young W o m e n ’s Societies

W o m e n ’s Societies

Churches and Me m b e r s

CHURCHES

CLASSIS O F S O U T H L O N G ISLAND •1707 91

1707 91 5 25 9 82

980 00

980 00

143 50 35 00

143 48 26 264 37

5 25 9 82

13 20 26 11

230 00

34 27

37 00 12 00

35 00

11 57

102 95

27 00

12 00

206 66

W . M. U n i o n .............

50 20 11

241 00 11 57

5 66 683 05

50 00

55 00 683 05

4002 46

119 27

4224 68

•Special Gift f r o m Le gacy $500.00. CLASSIS O F MONMOUTH 4 7 7 1 19

90 36 50 39 50 6 29 1 88

R e d Bank, First .........

5 59 9 37 62 78

27 50 12 00

117 50 33 24 23 7 41 17

00 00 00 50 00 89

303 39

45 52 19 6 00

4 58

266 66

4 58

251 71

32 19 170 1 52 35 24 13 254 17

40 36 52 58 50 29 88

09 95 89

622 46


Total

Sunday Schools and Classes

Y. P. Societies C. E. Societies Mission Bands

Young W o m e n ’s Societies

W o m e n ’s Societies

Churches and Membe rs

CHURCHES

CLASSIS O F MONTGOMERY 1 54 19 46

79 50 65 00 2 50 31 00 4 96

6 00

7 87 4 75 30 90 7 50

96 40 24 30 95 37

50 00 00 00 00 00

3 45

30 00

1 50

26 00 10 00

11 01

53 1 80 ia i a 10 92 a 75

8 00

127 00 120 00

82 17 10 93

34 00

5 00 5 00 10 00

io 66

40 50 75 00

120 00

5 25 1 00

32 00 Nation-wide L e a g u e Night

90 00 37 00 75 00 90 50

26 11 93 18 12 106 130 9 55 7 32

00

50 41 03 55 13 92 00 47 00 00

1 75 143 47

CLASSIS O F

167 159 104 45 28 30 135 44

9 00

55 47 6 00

04 46 50 00

40 00

36 91 6 00

32 90

81 84 2 31

1266 03

37 00

37 50 109 42

60 00

136 86 38 00

50 00

112 00

1558 50

MUSKEGON

Coopersville ............. Covenant (Muskeg-on Hts.)

44 2 4 61 13 4 5 146 103

08 35 10 13 12

2 21

18 20

24 66

93 13

258 20

41 142 195 5 125 103 95

50 30 00 00 00 75 00

15 00 7 50

31 35

10 00 20 00

30 00 10 00

26 50 Muskegon, Fellowship

....

5 59 37 50 5 51 6 30 8 64

1 63 10 41

20 00

50 00 70 00 32 50

12 61

8 06 175 30

io 00

731 51

1379 19

245 00

1 71

141 111 4 268 bi

58 77 10 40

4 62 328 308 5 403 133 105 38 27 102 75 38 18 197

24 16 08 13 00 20 75 00 92 22 91 51 80 41 91

12

W . M. Union (see Grand Rapids) Totals ...............

7 21

63 30

2426 21


Total

Sunday Schools and Classes

Y. P. Societies C. E. Societies Mission Bands

Young Women's Societies

W o m e n ’s Societies

Churches and Members

CHURCHES

CLASSIS O F N E W A R K Belleville ................

13 44

East O rang’e, First.......

2G 25 3 75 10 00

Mafconnier (Oak T r e e ) ....

19 46 28 13 8 06 3 75 55 95

42 3 56 42 26 50

52 00 00 00

40 00

00

1 88

9 60

00 8 79 75 00

20 00

37 2 61 425 37

00 50 50 00 50

25 00

65 3 82 82 31 60 48 140 10 65 505 37

56 00 25 00

63 00

25 13 56 25 95 50

Newar k , Mt. Olivet, Italian •78i 60 15 00

5 50

12 20

1 00

Plainfield, N e t h e r w o o d ....

i 00 25 00 22 75

25 00 22 75 168 79

1648 37

799 30 15 00

5 50

172 47

1995 13

50 00

112 88

• F r o m a Friend $50.00. CLASSIS O F N E W BRUNSWICK 6 38 2 16

33 37 1 50

56 23 41 118 •84

10 55 37 50 80 00

136 40 250 378

Magyar, South R iver..... M e tuc h e n ............... N e w Brunswick, Second .. . N e w Brunswick, S u y d a m

112 07 R o c k y Hill ..............

5 86

Spotswood

..............

2 2i 3 98

Totals ...............

295 58

•Income f r o m Legacy: A n n E. Disborough, |30.00.

50 00 20

58 48 4 00 5 00

00

35 35 00 00 50

5 00 30 53 37 50

83 00 9 00 24 15

20 00

200 26

32 50 139 68 1616 49

93 03

25 99 175 90

37 85

13 34

141 83 325 471

35 73 00 84

15 00

215 07 9 00 45 01

20 00

2 65

16 68

2 00

15 77

220 24 36 48 139 68

69 48

116 76

2191 34


CLASSIS O P N E W Y O R K Collegiate Corporation .... St. N i c h o l a s ............

*3061 155 2303 1125 17 50 51 75

00 00 14 32 50 00

125 00

38 00

27 50 150 00

200 00

21 14

25 00 3 00 13 00

4 33

20 00 120 00

8 23

50 00 35 00

25 00 87 00

5 75 86 20

5 44

io oo 33 70 7 50 12 27 Sixty-eighth St. G e r m a n . . .

40 00

33 7 22 40

76 50 27 00

10 00

67 215 5 3

45 35 215 00 2 50

10 00 00 62

11 00

1 00

1 74 10 00

10 00

.................. 346 10

25 20 23 58 00 33

40 00

1 74

Totals ...............

42 436 33 29 13 24

00

14 32 50 75

120 00 12 00

10 00

10 00

McKee

51 00

30 00

5 00 1 12

147 3236 190 2328 1212 17 101

12 00

10 00

21 75

Total

Sunday Schools and Classes

....

147 51

20 00

Chur c h of the Comforter. . .

T. P. Societies C. E. Societies Mission Bands

Young W o m e n ’s Societies

W omen's Societies

Churches and Members

CHURCHES

7423 81

337 50

1 00

19 90

19 90

371 29

8479 70

•Gift of M e m b e r , $800.00. Furnald L e g a c y Income, $500.00. CLASSIS O F O R A N G E 5 00

5 00

7 99 84 32

7 50 17 7 K

7 48

25 00

48 22

42 50 750 00 7 50 57 50 7 « nn 55 00 76 25 07 as 16 00

M a m a k a t i n g ............. M o n t g o m e r y .............

11 7i| 20 021 ................ i sal W .......... alpack L o w e r

W . M. U n i o n ............. Totals ...............

5 00 28 13

5 00 50 00 7 00

7 57 5 00

136 00

157 76

72 00

50 50 52 71 87 70

21 00

30 00 28 13 59 39

25 00

1369 64

95 800 14 57 86 66

61 00

59 39 195 02

50 00 21 48

3 00

3 00

New b u r g h , Ch. of O u r Sav.. N e w Hurley .............

■Wallklll

R1

7 00

17 57 1725 23


CLASSIS O P P E L L A 3i 88 5 62 50 00 780 00 26 25

25 103 150 15 117 403 395 413 30 115 112

00 28 50 30 36 04 11 10 00 62 56

10 00

25 00 7 58 683 26 65 00

20 00

41 00 15 00 33 00

10 24

75 00 893 75

25 113 207 20 124 1156 1240 454 45 185 112 75

00 28 38 92 94 30 11 10 00 11 56 00

766 08

3769 70

73 00

10 00

195 50

40 00 45 00 60 00

13 21

1880 87

219 00

Total

Sunday Schools and Classes

Y. P. Societies C. E. Societies Mission Bands

Young W o m e n ’s Societies

W o m e n ’s Societies

Churches and M e m bers

CHURCHES

CLASSIS O F P A L I S A D E S 1 88

1 88

112 50

37 50 1 39 33 5 22 43 12

12 00

435 165 5 160 78 165 45

26 00 00

5 00

00

60 00

00 00 00

34 00

94 00

5 00 50 00 1 49

Y outh Fellowship Meeting. Totals ...............

201 94

1283 26

CLASSIS O P P A R A M U S A c q u a c k a n o n k ...........

600 00

569 85

10 90

32 00 22 81 130 00 120 45

67 50 25 00 14 13

11 25 7 95 26 25

91 88 9 60

10 00

52 205 95 107 77 25 105 84 79 26 45 189 5

50 00 00 65 00 00 00 25 00 50 00 41 00 86 50 42 50 17 50

12

00 00 49

78 21

1663 90

1 00

440 00

1610 85

2 00

17 05 8 99

30 00 25 00

100 00

35 00 18 26

20 00

36 45 18 25

32 33 149 226 160

00 71 05 94 00

66 63 24 0 00 113 26 107 65 88 25 32 95 105 00 130 50 115 45 26 50 45 00 299 54 5 00 86 50 52 10 17 50 1 12

164 62

5 d6 |

14 05

10 00

Totals ...............

00 00 71 39 26 00 33 22

6 49

1 12

92 08

40 45 110 13 440 165 5 225 126 249 45 1

275 75 10 00

70 00 48 50 50 00

14 00

20 62

978 28

2471 04

89 00

84 00 69 12 50 00 8 00

688 05

4234 37


CLASSIS O F PASSAIC 9 00 10 12

i fi so 5 29

40 35 125 30

00 00 00 00

3 00 55 00

21 00

5 20 18 38 33 94 14 64

40 00 50 00

10 00

88 00

25 00

21 20

5 66

25 00 80 00 60 00

ioo 66

82 90 55 00 14 00

35 00

Totals ...............

62 32 35 43

25 00 00 00

2266 52

938 15

4 53 8 62 1 8 73

35 00

00

00

37 5 5 71

50 29 20 20 68 38 151 94 14 64 25 00 80 00 180 00 882 90 1405 00 14 00 10 00

10 00

14 82 8 83

00 12

10 00

10 00

•1315 66

49 48 180 30

10 00

10 00 20 00

Total

Sunday Schools and Classes

Y. P. Societies C. E. Societies Mission Bands

Young W o m e n ’s Societies

W o m e n ’s Societies

Churches and Members

CHURCHES

38 48

.... 100 00

5 00

202 88

62 85 43 43

25 30 83 00

3512 55

•Special Gift f r o m Member, $600.00. CLASSIS O F PHILADELPHIA 5 00 Blawenburg Plovpr Trill

.............

North a n d S o u t h a m p t o n ___

60 35

23 i6 10 10

20 00

70 00 83 00 54 00

1 00 10 00

5 85

25 00

6 00

70 51

ns on 2 n on

20 00 20 00

4 03

26 66

95 on 19 44

W , M, U n i o n ............. Totals ...............

228 75

491 69

30 00

45 35

5 00 34 00

21 00

1 2 52 ■Rpfhpl

48 98

18 52 196 55

10 00

10 00

3 50

25 no 7 50

10 00

25 00 12 37

14 80 23 38 15 00 8 48 15 00

22 io 32 3

Elim

4 00

10 00

23 62

1 81 10 OO

20 00

50 66

10 00 6 52

50 50 5 00

74 78 60 00

20 66

3 00

10 50 10 00 10 00

Totals ...............

260 37

13 03 25 44

824 52

13 75 5 35

92 24 36 19

53 08

CLASSIS O F P L E A S A N T PRAIRIE 68 22

62 63 89 73 93 00 145 20

13 75 8 85 00 50 62 18 80

39 17 48 14 44 65 35 47 18 5 74 80

88

00 50 50 00 78 00

13 50 20 00

10 00

25 00 4 05

6 63

378 80

85 63

41 63 4 05 9 00

83 81

817 61


Total

Sunday Schools and Classes

Y. P. Societies C. E. Societies Mission Bands

Y oung W o m e n ’s Societies

Women's Societies

Churches and M e mbers

CHUR C H E S

CLASSIS O F POUGHKEEPSIE 18 96 ................. Fishkill 3 63 3 75 78 00 Poughkeepsie, Arlington ..

46 00 ...... 38 50 20 20

24 37 5 164

00 50 00 20

4 34

10 00

3 39

21 52 16 00 17 65

112 07

400 57

W.*M. Union .............

64 96 38 50

1 00

10 75

10 75

1 00

23 28 126 5 164 14 21 19 17

83 75 25 00 20 34 52 39 65

524 39

CLASSIS O F R A R I T A N 2 20

3 21 H i g h B r i d g e .............

2 20

io 66 3 78

26 28

4 50 46 50 13 58 7 50 3 28

40 66 430 00 40 00

10 00

5 27 3 02

40 00 60 00 815 03

28 98

1511 39

39 3 4 46

49 78 50 50

....... 7 nn

13 58 14 5n

....... 18 00 3 64 5 60

43 28 458 00 40 00 8 91 5 60

10 00

10 00

43 02 60 00 815 03 10 001

58 02| 1608 39

CLASSIS O F RENSSELAER 116 13 22 50

26 20 6 98 1 88

•56 19 90 40 110 35 5 35

00 00 11 00 25 00 00 24

20 00

8 39

78 19 90 40 136 51

10 00

75 56

50 00 11 00 45 98

6 88

5 00

....... |

15 00 3 00

•Interest from Legacy: Abbie J. Bell, $7.50.

144 52

40 24 15 00 3 00

506 73

35 00 ...... l‘

8 39|

625 68


Total

40 00 35 00 15 00

Sunday Schools and Classes

90 00 25 00

Y. P. Societies C. E. Societies Mission Bands

Y oun g Women's Societies

Abbe

W o m e n ’s Societies

CLASSIS O F

Churches and M embers

CHURCHES

ROCHESTER

....................

53 72 29 78 3 00 10 08 31 82 9 64 18 08 2 41 6 00

14 21 40 00 8 66

Rochester, Brighton .....

50 00 8 10

47 18 25

10 00

56 30 38 53 92 64 25 51

05 62 00 00 03 25 00 79 88 06 30 00 51 88 61 50

5 00

1 88

15 01 25 29

25 00 15 75 25 00

22 00

....

10 IS

8 00

5 00 39 00 31 00 27 50

14 71 227 67 14 50 2 66

....

2*96 8 89

30 00 55 23 11 73

Totals ...............

304 22

852 41

1 88

10 00

277 98

7 00

210 89 29 81 112 38

72 78 88

14 73 00 88 57 135 11 74 66 36 00 80 71 394 73 84 16 131 38 72 56 9 36 48 25 55 23 11 73

343 09 1784 70

CLASSIS O F S A R A T O G A 11 88

3 75 2 15 64 19 51

3 15 75 00 2 25 19 52 20 00 2 62

15 45 16 31 27 30

00 00 15 00 45 00

3 50 41 21

49 42

68 66

32 62 12 00

12 00

W . M. U n i o n .............

15 00 25 00 52 65 00

261 60

3 50

94 00 25 00 56 00 86 60 70 00 72 00 89 25 65 00 309 80 315 62 165 50 74 13 44 on 30 00 41 00 235 15 70 14

15 00

1843 19

15 00

41 21

355 73

CLASSIS O F SCHENECTADY 3 00 S 81 4 4 BO T.iQbn’c? TCill

22 50 5 47

9 38 4 70

Totals ...............

98 36

3 65

4 42 2 15 3 33

4 69 64

3 65

15 23

109 28 64 131 74 96 101 65 309 315 165

00 00

81 10 42 65 70 00 80 62 50

88 20

44 35 41 235 70

00 34 00 15 14

1975 43


Total

Sunday Schools and Classes

IY. P. Societies C. E. Societies Mission Bands

Young W o m e n ’s Societies

W o m e n ’s Societies

Churches and Me m b e r s

CHURCHES

CLASSIS O F S C H O H A R I E 3 12

20 00

64

11 11

29 00 5 00 72 63

2 49

52 7 65 9 00 7 26

5 52 80 28

20 00

20 00

13 50

9 00 20 76

12 01

W . M. U n i o n .............

23 7fi

7 25

4 75

38 66

179 39

4 75

10 26 13 40 4 41

56 50

1 2 01 12 00

3 13

225 93

CHASSIS O F E A S T S I O U X

Firth ................. . 34 84 3 32 1 20

Little R o c k

.............

3 37 5 66 3 03 6 66

Pella .................... 13 16 4 06 2 62 2 49 10 00

Sibley, F i r s t ............. W . M. Union, East and

66 76

8 00

190 29 70 45 63 91

00 00 00 00 25 00

50 12 15 25

66

50 00 00

2 60

20 00

14 00

20 00

95 00

13 12 240 64 85 118

40 41 00 10 00 84 86 57 186 00

10 00

10 00

21 20

50 00 50

15 00

18 87

00

60 00 115 00

15 7 160 138 80 32

07 00

50

20 66

20 00 10 00

2 59

5 00

2 00 6 00

4 50

10 00 10 00

38 90 225 18

10 226 253 102 60 14 12

20 00

11 38

2 19 161 56

48 261 13

53 66

07 59 16 06 62 39 18 57

161 56

Y o u n g W o m e n ’s Union, 200 00

200 00

3 87 Totals ...............

133 73

3 87 1441 96

672 50

IS 19

40 69

2302 07


Total

Sunday Schools and Classes

Y. P. Societies C. E. Societies Mission Bands

Y oun g W o m e n ’s Societies

Wo m e n ' s Societies

Churches and Members

CHURCHES

CLASSIS O P W E S T S I O U X 3 51 1 19 1 35 24 3 3 20

88 03 53 00 61 67 75 28 27

3 38 5 00 44 12 Steen ....................

W.

M. Union

23 21 10 71 5 20

20 85 25 6 41 25 204

00 00 00 55 50 00 05

25 00 50 00 18 48

118 138 10 26 120 57 132 110

40 00 00 00 00 50 00 00

25 00 46 00

26 39

15 00

2 12 10 00 50 00 25 00

25 210 25 265 75 359 00 15 81 50 30 288 20 16 25 25 00

00 00 00 00 00

3 00

32 81 29 21

48 135 43 8 60 26 280 143 208 15 39 190 57 160 110 30 519 434 155 358 21 25

51 00 48 43 53 53 44 61 40 67 87 28 27 50 38 00 00 37 00 52 12 45 00

(see Bast

Totals ...............

205 15

2099 20

674 48

3 00

90 53

29 56 3 76

57 00 4 00 25 00

5 00

5 00

24 36

3072 36

CLASSIS O F U L S T E R Blooming-dale ............

2 62 8 00

53 04 9 9i 1 18 40 25 Kingston’ Ch. of the Comf.

22 70 12 19 22 50

5 113 15 283 71 40

2 50

66 08 00 00 00 00

5 00

20 00 63 00 50 00

50 00

120 7 25 2 61

92 76 00 62 04

17 113 16 323 88 67

41 08 18 25 00 70

32 19 63 00 122 50

Pin tfpkill 19 85

7 27 10 72 . 19 85

1 50 102 00

3 75 102 00

7 27 6 22 2 25

4 50

98 4 46

42

1 40

2 05

6 51 100 00

41 83

1312 15

ioo 00 Totals ...............

182 85 1022 47

60 00

5 00


Total

Sunday Schools and Classes

Y. P. Societies C. E. Societies Mission Bands

Y oung Women's Societies

W o m e n ’s Societies

Churches and Me m b e r s

CHURCHES

CLASSIS O F WESTCHESTER

Lincoln

Park

Com.,

2 50

2395 00 65 00

3 76

142 75 10 00

5 00 5 00

215 00

2610 00 67 50

10 36

10 36 151 51 16 01

1 01

Yon25 67 *1200 00

145 370 140 20

00 00 75 00

100 00 12 08 10 00

720 00

25 00 160 00 21 00

5 66

1951 93

3494 50

15 00

170 1670 152 30

67 00 83 00

25 00 885 00 21 00 348 45

5809 88

♦Gift of M e m b e r CHASSIS O F

WISCONSIN

A Itn 9 00 3 93 Emmanuel

(Clinton) .....

85 88 3 22 2 25 14 64 10 00 1 96 222 43

180 332 23 296 20 15 65 261 5 96 42 437 304 65 50 105 56 10 357 198

12 45 00 50 30 00 10 00 56 60 00 43 00 50 81 40 00 00 00 00 143 00 44 174 07 50 00 50 30 20 00 00 00 7 50 00 15 00 75 5 00 00 50 00 99 69

4 13 54 77 6 60

2 00 30 57 84

225 371 41 411 26 15 65 301 5 324 216 487 327 67 74 150 71 12 630 198

12 50 62 20 60 50 81 00 00 88 51 50 52 25 14 57 75 80 42 69

Young: W o m e n ’s L e a g u e 24 56

24 56 Totals ...............

353 31

2923 59

674 13

2 00

96 91

4049 94


P. S. O P A L B A N Y Albany .................. Greene .................. Rochester

...............

Schenectady

.............

Total ................ P. S. O F C H I C A G O Chicago ................. G r a n d R a p i d s ............ Holland ................. Illinois ................... K a l a m a z o o .............. M u s k e g o n ............... Wisconsin ............... Total ................ P. S. O F I O W A California ............... Cascades ................ D a k o t a .................. Pella .................... Pleasant Prairie ......... East Sioux .............. Wlest S i o u x .............. Total ................ P. S. O F N E W BRUNSWICK ..................

Berg e n

N e w B r u n s w i c k .......... Palisades ................ P a r a m u s ................ Passaic .................. Philadelphia ............. Total ................ P. S. O F N E W Y O R K H u d s o n .................. North L o n g Island....... N e w Y o r k ............... O ra n g e .................. Ulster

.. ................

Total ................

218 35 143 75 304 49 98 38

24 1634 76 140 00 05 968 10 31 50 47 1266 93 37 00 56 506 73 35 00 22 852 41 277 98 3 50 42 261 60 36 1843 19 15 00 4 75 66 179 39

7 00

962 98 7512 21 544 73

16 03

1803 2293 3200 25 607 731 353

44 88 60 01 21 51 31

2596 2798 3600 314 2076 1379 2923

59 32 67 36 40 19 59

411 446 606 35 252 245 674

02 09 59 09 so

00 13

9014 96 15689 12 2670 42

65 105 71 127 893 260 133 205

45 242 64 122 32 54 15 00 75 75 87 592 79 214 08 55 00 71 267 88 75 1880 87 219 00 378 80 85 63 37 73 1441 96 672 50 15 2099 20 674 48

1863 57 6979 89 2058 01

273 297 62 168 295 201 978 2266 228 28

18 50 78 79 58 94 28 52 75 98

1296 789 303 1648 1616 1283 2471 938 491 1511

40 27 50 10 00 00 4 58 39 37 5 50 93 03 49 94 00 26 04 89 00 15 100 00 30 00 69 39

4802 30 12349 18 453 61

148 1139 102 346 195 112 182 1951

82 28 95 10 02 07 85 93

315 1867 4002 7423 1369 400 1022 3494

71 70 00 35 46 81 337 50 64 136 00 1 00 57 60 00 47 50 15 00

4179 02 19896 51 619 50

5 00 38

3 65

131 15 12 10 8 7 2

290 2 112 g 343 41 15 3

Total

ill

Sunday Schools and Classes

03

Y. P. Societies C. E. Societies Mission Bands

W o m e n ’s Societies

OF

CLASSB8

Churches and Members

SUM H A R T

36 53 00 39 09 21 23 13

2288 1037 1558 625 1784 355 1975 225

36 56 50 68 70 73 43 93

815 94 9851 89

99 71 86 5014 90 31 2285 73 7839 33 50 2004 46 9424 82 00 884 46 500 00 125 79 3070 63 73 63 30 2426 21 21 00 96 91 4049 94

187 74 5148 05 32710 29

1 89 38 2 31 9 00 13 19 3 00

2 25 434 55 207 55 10 88 107 16 988 21 11 02 461 61 766 08 3759 70 83 81 817 61 40 69 2302 07 90 53 3072 36

29 77 1112 42 12043 66

3 00

69 6 8 5 21

48 49 00 00 00

130 303 251 172 116 78 688 202 53 58

93 29 71 47 76 21 05 88 08 02

1731 1399 622 1995 2191 1663 4234 3512 824 1608

01 79 46 13 34 90 37 55 52 39

122 97 2055 40 19783 46

94 1 00 7 00 5 00

8 207 119 371 17 10 41 348

544 3214 4224 8479 1725 524 1312 45 5809

97 75 27 29 57 75 S3

44 3,8 RS

70 23 39 16

88

13 94 1125 88 25834 85


962 9014 1863 4802 4179

Albany .................. Chicago ................. I o w a .................... N e w B r u n s w i c k ......... N e w Y o r k ............... G r a n d Total .........

98 96 57 30 02

7512 15689 6979 12349 19896

16 187 29 122 13

21 544 73 12 2670 42 89 2058 01 18 453 61 51 619 50

815 5148 1112 2055 1125

Total 94 05 42 40 88

9851 32710 12043 19783 25834

89 29 66 46 85

370 45 10257 69 100224 15

20822 83 62426 91 6346 27

Receipt!

03 74 77 97 94

Sunday Schools and Classes

Y. P. Societies C. E. Societies Mission Bands

Young W o m e n ’s Societies

OP SYNODS

W o m e n ’s Societies

Churches and Members

SUMMARY

from Individuals

“A Tither” from S. Dakota.? Albrecht, Mrs. William .... " A Friend” for B u d g e t ... Angell, Jessie B ...... 75.00 “Annuitant" .............

5.02 2.00 25.00

Individual, Nagasaki, Japan Inter-Board Vesper Service at Three Oaks, Michigan. .

25.00

Jackson, Miss Rachel .... Jones, Mrs. J. Addison ....

100.00 30.00

Balkins, Helen ........... Barney, Mrs. Alfred In M e m o r y of her Mother, Mrs. Peter Leeyster .... Beiboer, Mrs. F ........... Boughton, Mrs. James E . ... Bouma, Miss Winnie ..... Bruins, Mrs. H. M ......... Bussing, Miss Sarah A .....

15.00 Keith, Mrs. J ames D ....... Klei, Miss Annie .........

50.00 15.00

Calverly, Dr. Eleanor T. ... Castle, Miss Caroline ..... Clark, Miss M a u d S ........ Clark, Miss M a u d S.— In M e m o r y of Mrs. W . N. Clark ................. Clark, Miss M a u d S.— In M e m o r y of Mrs. Charles Harriman ............. Chamberlain, Mrs. L. B. ... Cobb, Mrs. H e n r y E ....... Cobb, Mrs. H e n r y E.— In M e m o r y of her daughter, Dorothy Penrose Allen— her son, Oliver Ellsworth Cobb, and her grandchild, Elizabeth Penrose Allen.. Cobb, Dr. H e n r y E.— In M e m o r y of his mother, Cornelia Polhemus ..... Cobb, Eliza P ............. Chambers, Mrs. Frank R . .. .

25.00 10.00 250.00

Deyo, W a r r e n V .......... Dodd, Miss Gertrude .....

5.00 5.00 2.00 5.00 10.00 40.00

45.00 25.00 5.00 225.00

50.00 100.00 5.00 100.00 100.00 2,500.00

Edwards, Miss M. Louise . .

2.00

Farrar, Mrs. W . H ......... Field, Miss Harriet V. R . . .

10.00 15.00

Gaston, Miss A. E ......... Goodnow, Miss Minnie .... Greenwood, Miss M a r y M . ..

200.00 675.00 10.00

Hagens, Misses L. and A. .. Halsey, Mrs. C. W ......... Harmellng, Mrs. H ........ Hegeman, Mrs. D. V. B .... Hill, Miss A n n a M ......... Hill, Mrs. William B ....... Hondelink, Margaret E. ... Howie, Mrs. James W ......

70.00 10.00 2.00 35.00 25.00 6,000.00 30.00 100.00

In M e m o r y of Mrs. Sarah J. Jackson ............... In M e m o r y of Mrs. B. M. Flikkema ..............

10.00 25.00

.12 8.07

Leonard, Miss A n n a E .....

5.00

MacLeod, Mrs. Malcolm J... Marsellus, Rev. John ..... Maxwell, Mrs. John A ...... Mitchell, Miss Agnes .....

25.00 7.50 10.00 15.00

Nash, Miss Matilda M ..... Nettinga, Mrs. S. C ........ Northfield Seminary Church, East Northfield, M a s s ....

10.00 5.00 90.00

Peters, Miss N a n n a Heath

200.00

Raven, Mrs. John ........ Robinson, Miss Annette .... Ryley, Miss E d n a ........

100.00 10.00 10.00

Schanck, Miss Sarah A .... Scheidenhelm, Mrs. F. W . . . Scoville, F. C ............. Southard, Mrs. Jane W . and Miss Lydia ............ Stillwell, Mrs. A. L ........

20.00 20.00

Terhune, Mr. and Mrs. H e r ­ m a n R ................. TeWinkel, Miss Sarella . Through Mrs. F. S. Pronk . Tiffany, Miss Marguerita .. Towl, Mrs. Forrest M ......

25.00 840.00 5.00 1.00 300.00

V a n Brunt, Mrs. J. ....... V a n Buren, Mrs. M a y .... Vander Molen, Mr. and Mrs.

5.00 10.00 5.00

5.00

2.00 5.00

Vandermyde, M r and M rs Harold ............... V a n Nuis, Mrs. Charles . .. V a n Syckle, Miss Florence Ver Planck, Mrs. W . G. . .. Veenendaal, Mrs. W . H. . Voorhees, Miss Jennie T. .. Voskuil, Mrs. H. J ........ Walvoord, Mrs. E d i t h .... Walvoord, Gerardus ..... Walvoord, Miss H a n n a .. . Winn, Miss M. Leila ..... Wyckoff, Miss Annie S. .. . Zoller, Mrs. H enry ....... Zwemer, Miss Henrietta . . Total

..............

5.00 10.00 20.00 55.00 5.00 5.00 10.00

1.00 15.00 32.50

6.00 45.00 2.50 25.00 213,043.71


ENDOWED

BEDS

M a r y T a b e r SoUell Hospital, Vellore, India ( N o w associated with the Missionary College for W o m e n , Vellore.) “We s t e r n Bed.” Mrs. W , Bancroft Hill Bed. Mrs. William H. Story Bed. “Fisher Bed.” “Thanksgiving Bed.” T h e W e s t E n d Collegiate Bed. "The Michigan Bed.” T h e Delia R o spas Bed. Miss Constance E. Browne. In M e m o r i a m Miss Eleanor B e rgen Mrs. William L a m b e r t Mrs. John M. D o d d Mrs. J o h n W . Castree Mrs. A. L. Cushing Miss Helen M. D o d d Harriet B o o r a e m Scudder Mrs. Catherine Lott Mrs. H e n r y Taylor G r a y Mrs. A n n a D e Witt Scudder Dr. John Lloyd Zabriskie Miss Edith R a v e n Mrs. S a m u e l Sloan Mrs. Louisa H o p k i n s C o o k e Mrs. Annie D. Scoville Mr. S a m u e l Sloan Miss M a r y Isabel Allen Rev. Charles Cuthbert Hall, D.D. Mrs. Eliza A n n Harris

Miss M a r y Catherine Miller Rev. Cornelius L o w Wells, D.D. Mrs. Elizabeth Louderback Quackenbush Miss Susan L u d l o w Ferris Mrs. A n t o n A. R a v e n M a r y D e Witt Sanborn Ella S. Goldsmith Miss A n n a T. V a n Santvoord Mr. A n t o n A. R a v e n Mrs. A m a n d a Valentine Bussing Miss Eliza V a n der Poel M o o r e Mrs. Harriet F a n s h a w M o o r e Rev. B e n j a m in and M. A. Easier In M e m o r y of “Elsie” Mrs. Esther Taber Miss Harriette Taber Rev. John Scudder, M.D. “In M e m o r y of Minnie P u t n a m ”

M a r y Lott Lyles Hospital, Madanapalle, India Mrs. Abigail Lott Zabriskie Mrs. M a r y A. Reeves L a w r e n c e Miss Cordelia V a n D e n B e r g h Miss Clara Louise L a w r e n c e Mr. William A. L a w r e n c e Mrs. Ida V a n der Veer D o w n i n g Mrs. A n n Maria Westervelt Mrs. Elizabeth Lansing T o w n s e n d Mr. N o r m a n M a c L e o d Burrell Mrs. E m m a Elwell G o w e n Mrs. Charles H a r r i m a n Mr. N a t h a n V a n W a g e n e n Mrs. H e n r y R. W r i g h t Wilhelmlna Hospital, A m o y , China Rev. B e n j a m i n a n d M. A. Easier “Peace a n d Memor i a l ” Marlon Wells T h o m s Memorial Hospital, Bahrain, Arabia “Margie Bishop B e d ” in m e m o r y of H a n n a h M o r e Bishop "In M e m o r y of Mrs. A n t h o n y E l z e r m a n ” K u w a i t Hospital, Arabia "The Margaret L o g a n T u n n a r d Bed."


PROJECTS

OF

W O M E N ’S M I S S I O N A R Y

UNIONS

Classis of A l bany— Half Salary, Dr. Sarah L. H o s m o n , Arabia (resigned 1940) ( N e w project to be assigned) Classis of B e rgen— Salary Miss R u t h Jackson, Arabia Classis of South B e r g e n — Half Salary a n d share in W o r k , Miss Rachel Jackson ^Vi*atiia Classis of Chicago— Salary and share in W o r k of Dr. Margaret Rottschaefer, India Grcncral "Work Share in Girls’ School, Bahrain (Y. W . Conference) Classis of G r a n d Rapids— Share in Salary Miss Jennie A. Pieters, Japan Share in Salary Dr. M a r y Bruins Allison, Arabia Share in W o r k in Arabia Share in General W o r k Classis of Greene— Half Salary Mrs. B. C. Moore, Japan Classis of Holland— Share in Salary Miss Geraldine Smies, China Share in Salary Dr. M a r y Bruins, Allison, Arabia Share in W o r k in Arabia Classis of K a l a m a z o o — Share in Salary Dr. M a r y Bruins Allison, Arabia Share In W o r k in Arabia Classis of North L o n g Island— Salary Mrs. H. J. Voskuil, China Share in Girls’ School, Madanapalle, India Share in W o r k in Arabia Scholarships in Ferris Seminary, Japan Bible W o m a n in India Classis of South L o n g Island— Salary Mrs. Richard Hofstra, China Classis of M o n m o u t h — Share in Vellore Parish W o r k Classis of M o n t g o m e r y — Salary Miss Flora D a r r o w Japan Share in Evangelistic W o r k , India Classis of M u s k e g o n — Share In Salary Miss Jennie Pieters, Japan Share in Salary Dr. M a r y Bruins Allison, Arabia Classis of N e w a r k — Half Salary Dr. Sarah L. H o s m o n , Arabia (resigned 1940) ( N e w project W o r k in Arabia) Share in W o r k Mrs. H e n r y Honegger, Vellore, India Classis of N e w B r u n s w i c k — Salary Mrs. H. J. Scudder W o r k in India Classis of Orange— Beattie Memorial School, Chittoor, Indian Classis of Palisades— Half Salary and share in W o r k , Miss Rachel J a c k ­ son, Arabia Classis of P a r a m u s — Girls’ School, Ranipettai, India Evangelistic W o r k in India Classis of Passaic— Salary and share in W o r k , Mrs. Paul W . Harrison, A r q.hia

Classis of Pella— Salary Mrs. George Gosselink, Arabia Scholarships, Ferris Seminary, Japan (Y. W . Conference) Classis of Philadelphia— Bible W o m e n in India Share in W o r k in Arabia Classis of Poughkeepsie— -Share in Salary Mrs. Willis Hoekje, Japan Classis of Raritan— Half Salary Mrs. B. C. Moore, Japan Evangelistic W o r k in India Beds in M a r y Lott Lyles Hospital, India W o r k in Arabia General W o r k Classis of Rensselaer— Chittoor N o r m a l School, India Classis of Rochester— Salary Miss Clara Coburn, India Share in W o r k , Madanapalle, India Classis of Saratoga— W o r k in China, specifically in Sio-khe Classis of Schenectady— Salary and share in W o r k , Miss Helen R. Zander, Japan Classes East and W e s t Sioux— Salary Miss Jeane Noordhoff, Japan Share in W o r k of Miss C. W . Jongewaard, India Classis of Ulster— Share in Salary Mrs. Hubert Kuyper, Japan General W o r k Classis of Westchester— Salary Miss T e n a Holkeboer. China Bible W o m e n in Japan Evangelistic W o r k in India Beds in M a r y Lott Lyles Hospital, Indian B u srah Girls’ School and W o r k in Arabia Classis of Wisconsin— Salary and share in W o r k , Miss Florence W a l v o o r d Japan N O T E — Classes w h i c h are not listed have not as yet as s u m e d a definite project, but practically all of the Classes contribute their annual offering for General W o r k , m a n y of t h e m in addition to the pledges listed above