Page 1

Anchor

the

Hope College . Holland. Michigan

m

U n l e a s h

t h e

l e a ^ ^ L i c k e r s

O c t

9 6

A n i n d e p e n d e n t n o n p r o f i t p u b l i c a t i o n , S e r v i n g t h e H o p e C o l l e g e C o m m u n i t y f o r I 10 y e a r s

Candidates square o f f

check out.

^ U.S. and State Representative candidates debated campaign issues with students and community members Tuesday night. CARRIE T E M M A N T campusbeat editor Haworth C e n t e r could^ add t o parking crush. InFocus, page 3. r b a 11

Image from Admissions video

C A N D I D C A M E R A : Nasser Al-Faqih ('98), a student from Palestine, confers with Russian student Olga Siminova ('96) in the new Admissions video.

you ARE MY WITNESSES Students to embark on mission to Urbana. Spotlight, page 5.

Traveling Dutchmen spend weekend on the road. Sports, page 8.

Sei\erS

fttnewa

^0L-

English t r i o pow wows with campus writers. Intermission, page 6.

B e a c h sweepers in Environmental Issues l o v e our earth. Campus, page 2.

Admissions r e c r u i t m e n t video inflates diversity the summer. The high number of minority students pictured in the video could be attributed to the fact A recently completed Admissions video tar- that many of the filmed students work in the geted for recruiting prospective students paints Admissions office. C a m p said. Such was the case in the Admissions video a more diverse picture of Hope College than for Kalamazoo College, a fellow member of the the reality. It would appear to the viewer that the level Great Lakes College Association (GLCA). "[The diversity] apof diversity in the video pears higher than it really " H o p e for the Future" is is b e c a u s e s o m e of the at about 17 percent mistudents that were workY o u w a n t t o h a v e nority students. T h i s is ing in the office that year over three limes the different ethnic groups happened to be a heavier College's actual 5 percent multicultural component r e p r e s e n t e d , b u t n o t t o of minority students. than has the student body " T h e challenge there is t h e d e g r e e t h a t it as a w h o l e , " said the y o u ' v e got to accurately college's Director of Admisrepresents their represent the institution, missions Joellen so you want to have difpresence on campus. Silberman. ferent ethnic groups rep"1 guess if you want to —Gary Camp r e s e n t e d , " said A d m i s get on something, w e ' v e A d m i s s i o n s D i r e c t o r sions Director Gary got a d i s p r o p o r t i o n a t e C a m p . " B u t not to t h e ^ degree that it misrepresents their presence on number of minority kids in our office," said Garrett Knoth, Associate Director of Admiscampus." Two out of the three student profiles in the sions at Hope. O n e challenge in Admissions literature is video are of minority students. T h e video is a making the College appealing enough to the combination of scenes from a similar video more ADMISSIONS on 2 made for Advancement and filming done over

JODI MCFARLAMD editor-in-chief

Candidates, students and community members questioned firsthand the political stances of local, state and U.S. Congressional candidates last night at a debate on campus. 90th District House Candidates Becky Arenas (D) and R e p . J e s s i e D a l m a n (R) b e g a n the evening, followed by 2nd Congressional House Candidates Rep. Peter Hoekstra (R) and Dan Krusynzski (D). Around 60 people gathered in Peale to watch the debate and ask questions. "I just changed my voter registration to Holland, and I really don't know a lot about the candidates except f r o m the newspaper," said Kelly Jansen ('97). " I ' m here to ask my questions and get a little more information, especially about the non-incumbents." Even students registered to vote in their hometowns expressed the importance of the debates. " I ' m not registered in Holland, but I think that whenever we get a chance to hear a legislator speak, we should take it," said Karen Sugden ('97). "We can educate other people, not only ourselves, on issues that are important to us." The debate was sponsored by the League of Women Voters and the Hope Democrats and Republicans.

Milestone misses discount windfall JODI M C F A R L A N D editor-in-chief Publisher screw-ups w o n ' t yield big discounts to Milestone yearbook buyers, but in the end they didn't yield big discounts to the Milestone, either. Misconceptions that the yearbook staff received a sizable refund on the 35 thousand dollar 1996 book are off, said Milestone Editor Anthony Perez ('98). T h e Walsworth publishing c o m p a n y discounted the book by $2,000 after errors were discovered in photograph placement on two pages of the freshmen section and 8 senior pictures were misplaced. T h e company provided more MILESTONE on 2

A I M and Greeks party w i t h mocktails RACHEL LAMB and CARRIE X E N M A N X staff reporter and campusbeat editor On Monday night. Alcohol Issues Matter (AIM) held its second annual "Mocktail Party" in Phelps to kick off National Collegiate Alcohol Awareness Week. "We're not really mocking mixed drinks, just saying you don't need alcohol in them to have f u n , " said Jori Kumpf ('99), a member of AIM and a "bartender" at the parly. Kumpf added that AIM strives to show students that there are people on campus that care about making people aware of alternatives to partying. "We promote responsible use of alcohol. We're not anti-drinking or anti-partying," said Kevin Burgun ('99). A I M ' s Mocktail Party wasn't the only alcohol-free event to hit campus in the past week. The Greeks also sponsored a Mocktail parly in the Klelz last Wednesday as part of their Greek Week activities. Each Greek organization entered their own drink "recipe" for the event. Independents, faculty, and staff tasted and judged the recipes and mingled with Greeks

over pizza and card games. "I thought that it was a great way for Greeks to bond and a great way for independents to interact with Greeks," said Eryn Poley ('99), member of the Alpha G a m m a Phi sorority. The purpose of the AIM Mocktail Party was to get people interested in AIM and the activities they will be sponsoring this week, including cocoa in the Pine Grove on Wednesday morning and a keynote speaker, Jeff Viening, at 9 p.m. in the Otte Room Thursday. "I think it's a great idea to promote responsibility with alcohol. 1 hadn't heard about (National Collegiate Alcohol Awareness Week] before, but now I know," said Craig Kopas ('99), party attender. The Greek Week Mocktail event provided an informal atmosphere for socializing and studybreaking in a non-alcoholic setting. "I came because I was hungry, it was free, and I wanted to hang out with the Greeks," said event attender Karl Rasche ('00). Other students at the AIM party sampling Mexican Sunsets, Bloody Marys, Pina Coladas, Shirley Temples, and Cardinal Punch seemed to miss the point of the Mocktail Party. Many still did not know it was National Collegiate Alcohol Awareness Week, or even what organization was sponsoring the parly.

.

Anchor

photo

i

by J o s h N e u c k s

B O T T O M S U P : Katie Hop COO) mixes a Mexican Sunset in Phelps.


Campus

rfcAnchor

Beat

Kemp kids rally to support G O P bid last

cited to see the K e m p s . " W e w e r e pleased with the n u m -

Wednesday m o r n i n g on a c a m p a i g n s w i n g to speak l o a r o u n d 100 H o p e

b e r of p e o p l e and the a m o u n t of e n t h u s i a s m that t h e y e x h i b i t e d , "

students and c o m m u n i t y m e m b e r s . T h e children of R e p u b l i c a n V P

said Jeff C r o u c h ( ' 9 7 ) , c o - c h a i r of

into lown a r o u n d 9 a.m.

n o m i n e e Jack K e m p s p o k e on s uch issues as e t h i c s and the moral failure of the C l i n t o n a d m i n i s t r a t i o n ,

the H o p e R e p u b l i c a n s . " T h e time of day that there w e r e a v a i l a b l e w a s tough. It w a s c h a l l e n g i n g to get e n o u g h H o p e stu-

saying that a D o l e / K e m p a d m i n i s -

d e n t s t o either skip class or get up

tration would c h a n g e these failures.

early and c o m e . "

terback. is c u r r e n t l y the head of a

A l s o present in M a a s A u d i t o r i u m were State Representative Jessie

Washington-based, non-profit, non-

D a l m a n (R) and U.S. R e p r e s e n t a -

partisan f a m i l y o r g a n i z a t i o n . ' J e n n i f e r K e m p is a s c h o o l t e a c h e r

tive Pete H o e k s t r a (R).

Jeff K e m p , a f o r m e r N F L q u a r -

Jeff and J e n n i f e r K e m p c o n t i n ued W e d n e s d a y on to B e r r i e n

and m o t h e r of three.

County.

D e s p i t e the early hour, the a u d i e n c e in M a a s A u d i t o r i u m w a s ex-

CARRIE T E N M A N X cam pus be at editor H o p e students c a r a v a n e d t o the L a k e t o w n B e a c h last S a t u r d a y t o pluck such treasures as bottles, glass, c i g a r e t t e butts, a n d e v e n a b a b y c a r r i a g e wheel off the b e a c h . "We've d o n e the s w e e p five of the last six y e a r s ,

a lot c l e a n e r this y e a r , " said professor S t e p h e n Hemen way, a d v i s o r for the

Drug bust made at off-campus house Enforcement Team (WMDET), a

the Laketown Beach collected these and o t h e r i n t e r e s t i n g bits:

this has kept p e o p l e off part

butts • 86 s t r a w s • 2 shoes, n o t

wheel

Laketown Beach.

g a v e the

four

bags

of

trash to Saugatuck

"It went great," said John D e l c a l z o ( ' 9 7 ) , C e n t u r i a n . " W e got all kinds of great stuff, c l e a n e d up,

Dunes authori-

a n d had a g r e a t t i m e . We a r e all

ties. Students

pretty p r o u d of o u r s e l v e s . " B e a c h s w e e p e r s s a i d they e n j o y e d the c h a n c e to get o u t s i d e and

along with their

h e l p the e n v i r o n m e n t . " P e o p l e w e r e excited about it,"

load of other unexciting

and that m a k e s a big d i f f e r e n c e . "

Koskey said. " W e had great weather

dirty t o o . "

peared with students in an E n g l i s h class while it w a s filmed this s u m -

Of the 12 c o l l e g e s in the G L C A , H o p e c o m e s in with the lowest per-

mer. M a r c u s R o b i n s o n , the o f f i c e ' s

school y e a r w e w o u l d h a v e h a d the

c e n t a g e of m i n o r i t y students.

n u m b e r s in classes. You c o u l d say

P l a c i n g m i n o r i t i e s in s h o t s f o r

multicultural recruiter, sat in on Pro-

that the w h o l e t h i n g is d e c e i t f u l be-

filming is an ethical call with which

fessor Richard M e z e s k e ' s Literature for C h i l d r e n and A d o l e s c e n t s c l a s s

c a u s e w e did it during J u n e t e r m . " C a m p m a i n t a i n s that the plant is

all of the G L C A A d m i s s i o n s o f f i c e s said they would not be c o m f o r t a b l e .

d u r i n g f i l m i n g . His back is t o the

not m i s r e p r e s e n t a t i o n a l . " T o me, I think the issue is, 'Is

tos of d i f f e r e n t e t h n i c g r o u p s o n

Robinson was unavailable for

this s o m e t h i n g that c o u l d n ' t h a p -

every p a g e , b u t that w o u l d be m i s -

comment. "I w a s s o b u s y t e a c h i n g that I

p e n ? ' " he said. "If so, it's m i s r e p -

representation,"

resentation. If it's a viable possibil-

C o l l e g e ' s Director of A d m i s s i o n s

d i d n ' t pay any a t t e n t i o n to it,"

ity then it's not i n a c c u r a t e . "

E v a n Lipp. B e v e r l y M o r s e , D i r e c -

w e c o u l d c l e a n m o r e b e a c h e s , be-

PAY A VISIT T O THE FOLKS IN THE PINE I GROVE SLEEPING O U T FOR A GOOD CAUSE: |

!

HABITAT FOR HUMAN ITT

" I t w o u l d be nice if we put pho-

said

Albion

Recruiting minority students pre-

tor o f K e n y o n C o l l e g e ' s A d m i s -

sents a n u m b e r of challenges. C a m p

sions. a g r e e d . "That's cognitive dissidence,

said. O n e of these is to b e p r o - a c t i v e

"I w i s h m o r e p e o p l e w o u l d have

e x p e r i e n c e as easily," C a m p said.

senting the institution," Knoth said. "If we c o u l d h a v e shot d u r i n g the

when w h a t y o u ' r e s h o w i n g d o e s not m a t c h the reality," she said. " Y o u ' v e got to be realistic in s h o w -

w a s placed in the r o o m to " r o u n d

in r e c r u i t m e n t . D u r i n g the s u m m e r . Admissions counselors called

out the n u m b e r s " in the class, which

nearly e v e r y minority p r o s p e c t i v e

ing w h a t you are and w h o you are.

student. " A s e c o n d c h a l l e n g e is, q u i t e

T h a t ' s just part of the e t h i c s . "

w h i c h s t a f f m e m b e r s p l a c e d in

g i v e [students w h o b o u g h t the book] back 45 cents a book."

she said. " T h a t m o n e y falls b a c k into the g e n e r a l s t u d e n t a c t i v i t y

b o o k s sent o u t to seniors and in all

The discounted amount helped

fund, so it's again allocated for

the yearbook to break even, as s o m e

e q u i p m e n t u p g r a d e s and things like

" T w o t h o u s a n d dollars is a d r o p

f e a t u r e s of the b o o k , including its c o v e r a n d s o m e internal color, cost

that." Perez d e c i d e d not to return the

in the bucket w h e n y o u ' r e s p e n d -

m o r e the a m o u n t for w h i c h the the

ing $ 3 5 , 0 0 0 , " Perez said. " T h e disc o u n t w a s so i n s i g n i f i c a n t that no-

b o o k w a s c o n t r a c t e d , a c c o r d i n g to

y e a r b o o k to the p u b l i s h e r for reb i n d i n g b e c a u s e it w o u l d be t o o

A n n e B a k e r - G r a s , M i l e s t o n e advi-

lengthy a wait for the b o o k to b e

body will see it, really. If you broke

sor. "In e s s e n c e it's a b o u t a w a s h , "

returned, he said.

it d o w n per b o o k , w e ' d p r o b a b l y

and

r e c o r d the total a m o u n t r e m o v e d

m e m b e r of the A d m i s s i o n s staff ap-

b o o k s that h a v e not b e e n p i c k e d up at the Student U n i o n D e s k .

tal I s s u e s G r o u p to c l e a n u p the

c a u s e I ' m sure the other beaches are

a r e n ' t sure they'll fit into the social

stickers with correct names,

recyclables,

kept f o r the c l e a n u p effort h a v e h a d

"1 feel like w e ' r e not m i s r e p r e -

MILESTONE f r o m

P a r t i c i p a n t s included five m e m b e r s of the Centurian fraternity, w h o j o i n e d f o r c e s with the E n v i r o n m e n -

j u n k . In at least o n e case, the tallies

l o w e r n u m b e r of s t u d e n t s , h e said.

class.

e a c h y e a r , " H e m e n w a y said.

H e m e n w a y , to collect trash and

nantly C a u c a s i a n , it's less easy for m i n o r i t i e s t o look at H o p e . T h e y

had f e w e r students than the a v e r a g e

[over the water), and they did, and t h e r e h a v e b e e n f e w e r and f e w e r

b e e n t h e r e , " D e l c a l z o said. "I wish

frankly, because w e are so p r e d o m i -

A c c o r d i n g to K n o t h , w h o supervised the videotaping, Robinson

sin, o f f i c i a l s took action. " T h e y w e r e told to s t o p s h o o t i n g

recyclables from non-

trash.

A f e m a l e non-minority staff

thought of t h a t . ' "

c o v e r e d that m o s t of t h e m c a m e f r o m a s h o o t i n g r a n g e in W i s c o n -

But the beach sweep accomplishes m o r e than simply picking up

m e m b e r for the o f f i c e also sat in o n the f i l m i n g of a c l a s s r o o m with a

not sure w h a t I

p i c k e d u p h u n d r e d s of p i e c e s of s h o t g u n w a d d i n g . W h e n it w a s dis-

s w e e p lured a r o u n d 15 H o p e students, along with p r o f e s s o r Stephen

entice

thought, T m

first y e a r of the e v e n t s t u d e n t s

d r u g - s n i f f i n g d o g s lo aid in the ar-

p r o s p e c t i v e s to look f u r t h e r . C a m p

M e z e s k e said. " B u t a f t e r w a r d s , I

a p o s i t i v e e f f e c t o n b e a c h litter. A c c o r d i n g t o H e m e n w a y , on the

the b e a c h . " The annual

or implicated in the incident.

c a m e r a as it p a n s the c l a s s r o o m .

1996

police d e p a r t m e n t s . M e m b e r s of the t e a m b r o u g h t rest. N o H o p e s t u d e n t s w e r e arrested

said. F o r the p u r p o s e s of f i l m i n g , a

s e p a r a t e d

three syringes

• I baby c a r r i a g e

ADMISSIONS f r o m I to

big d i f f e r e n c e . " The group

were surprised to discover

matching

Video falsely portrays minority presence student

a lot of p e o p l e d o n ' t k n o w about, and it m a k e s a

S t u d e n t s c l e a n i n g up

dune grass on the b e a c h , and

of the sand o n

minority

s u e s G r o u p . " E s p e c i a l l y with r e c y cling, b e c a u s e that's s o m e t h i n g that

• 275 c i g a r e t t e

includes o f f i c e r s f r o m several area

Sunday b y the West M i c h i g a n D r u g

slop," said Jesse Koskey ( ' 9 8 ) . president of the E n v i r o n m e n t a l Is-

Issues Group. 'They have

r e g i o n a l p o l i c e o r g a n i z a t i o n that

hit during the early m o r n i n g h o u r s

"I t h i n k i t ' s i m p o r t a n t t h a t w e t a k e a c t i o n to s t o p w h a t w e c a n

• 3 syringes

rested for sale of m a r i j u a n a in an H o p e students. T h e r e s i d e n c e at 110 E. 15th, k n o w n as the " K n i c k H o u s e , " w a s

tal Issues G r o u p sponsors the event.

Environmental

S t a t e U n i v e r s i t y s t u d e n t w a s aro f f - c a m p u s h o u s e also o c c u p i e d by

f r o m the b e a c h . T h e E n v i r o n m e n -

BEACH SWEEP FINDS

and to m e the beach seemed

planted a lot of

Last w e e k e n d a G r a n d Valley

23,

Beach sweepers clean up

campus briefs Jeff and Jennifer K e m p rolled

O c t o b e r

I

Hope women &e+ a peek, at sisterhood at Vrt open House Sunday, Oct

cottages

c o w e s e e w h a t i t ' s an abort!!

Thafs more than a slogan, it's our mission, our mandate, our dream! Stop in a n d find out why we're all y o u n e e d to k n o w for c o o l b i k e s - n - b i k e stuff. • Maintenence classes are forming now! • All summer clothing 40% off! • Way-cool deals on way-cool wheels!

highwheeler 3 8 0 C h i c a g o D r i v e - n e x t to R u s s ' 396-6084/e-mail- Wheel@highwheeler.com Website- www.highwheeler.com

!


O c t o b e r 23,

rfa.Anchor

I 996

In F o c u s

T h e Race f o r t h e Space Haworth

Center

traffic

could further

strain the parking

situation

A p a r t m e n t s d u e to its s u b s t a n d a r d DAVE C L A U S E N infocus editor T h e addition of the Havvorlh C o n f e r e n c e C e n t e r a n d C o o k Residence Hall will i m p r o v e the f a c e of

condition compared with other Hope housing. Cook Residence Hall will c o m p e n s a t e for the h o u s ing loss, but t h e r e will be n o rep l a c e m e n t m a d e for the loss of the

c a m p u s , but visitor and student vehicles that will c o m e with the pack-

2 3 C e n t e n n i a l p a r k i n g spaces. But C o l l e g e o f f i c i a l s maintain

age m a y serve to a g g r a v a t e an al-

that the c h a n g e should not h a v e an

ready troubled p a r k i n g situation. T h e $ 15 million H a w o r t h C e n -

a d v e r s e e f f e c t o n the p a r k i n g situation, a c c o r d i n g t o Bill A n d e r s o n ,

ter, w h i c h will be utilized primarily

Vice President for B u s i n e s s and Fi-

for academic conferences, meetings, and dining services, will h a v e

nance. " T h e r e s h o u l d n ' t b e any m o r e

two p a r k i n g lots installed at e a c h end of the c o m p l e x . T h e r e will be a

students at the C o l l e g e than t h e r e were b e f o r e , " A n d e r s o n said.

total of 50 to 5 5 n e w s p a c e s cre-

" T h e r e just w o n ' t be a lot of park-

ated at the center, but these t w o lots

ing right a d j a c e n t t o the facility." There are currently 8 4 7 student

will not be o p e n for student use. "We don't consider having a

i

i

parking spaces on campus, while

vehicle as a necessity to h a v i n g an education," said William A n d e r s o n ,

a p p r o x i m a t e l y 1,110 p a r k i n g perm i t s h a v e b e e n sold to s t u d e n t s .

Vice President for B u s i n e s s a n d Fi-

A l t h o u g h this m a y s e r v e as an in-

nance. T h e s p a c e s will p r i m a r i l y b e

d i c a t o r to the c a u s e of p a r k i n g

used by visitors staying at the c e n -

Anchor

p\-\oXa b y Z a c h J o n n s o n

PROHIBITED PA R KIM G: Haworth Center parking will not be extended to student use. The trendy conference center is scheduled to open in January of1997, classes. T r a f f i c t o the c e n t e r will b e

A d d i t i o n a l visitor t r a f f i c will

R a i s i n g tuition, he said, w o u l d

o c c u r as the n e w 2 0 0 seat d i n i n g

not be fair to s t u d e n t s w i t h o u t ve-

consistent, as c o n f e r e n c e s will be

facility in H a w o r t h is o p e n e d to the

hicles. T h e cost of p e r m i t s would

ter overnight, w h i l e t h o s e w h o are

r e a s o n s for this policy. " W e ' v e c h e c k e d parking lots in

held there during the school y e a r

H o l l a n d c o m m u n i t y and w e d d i n g

r e a c h into the h u n d r e d s , to j u s t i f y

there for a f e w d a y s will h a v e their

the early m o r n i n g and f o u n d spaces

and in the s u m m e r . T h e y will u s u -

r e c e p t i o n s are held there f o r f r i e n d s

cars parked in o t h e r lots b y a valet

o p e n , " said D u a n e Terpstra, D i r e c -

ally take p l a c e o n the w e e k e n d s ,

pected to be used i n f r e q u e n t l y , will park the vehicles in the lots f a r t h e s t

tor of Public S a f e t y . A n o t h e r reason for the disparity b e t w e e n s p a c e s a v a i l a b l e and

w h e n there are f e w e r cars o n c a m pus, A n d e r s o n said. Typical c o n f e r -

of H o p e . C i t i n g the high costs i n v o l v e d

the facility. W h i l e the a d m i n i s t r a t i o n has

a w a y f r o m the main part of c a m -

p e r m i t s sold are that s o m e s t u d e n t s

T h e c e n t e r will i n c l u d e c o n f e r -

pus.

buy t w o tickets b e c a u s e they get a

service. T h e service, w h i c h is ex-

t r a u m a . Public S a f e t y cited several

ences will host 30 t o 4 0 people.

to build a n e w lot w o u l d cost f o u r

students and visitors and a 5 0 - r o o m

h u n d r e d to five h u n d r e d t h o u s a n d

ing, but it's an ongoing problem that

y e a r - r o u n d hotel. "It's intended for both the comm u n i t y o f H o l l a n d , and w e ' l l b e

d o l l a r s , " A n d e r s o n said. A n d e r s o n cited t w o w a y s that

will a l w a y s be with us b e c a u s e w e

this m o n e y c o u l d be provided: rais-

b r i n g i n g in g r o u p s f r o m o u t s i d e

ing tuition or increasing the cost of

g a r a g e s , " A n d e r s o n said. " A n d all o f a s u d d e n t h e r e is a w a l k a n d

H o l l a n d , " A n d e r s o n said.

p a r k i n g permits.

w e ' r e not used to that."

different car during the c o u r s e of the

e n c e and m e e t i n g r o o m s , a b a n q u e t hall, a f o o d service that serves both

with plans to h o u s e a p p r o x i m a t e l y

year, or that a student m a y have a

180 students, will h a v e no p l a n n e d

registered car that stays h o m e for m o s t of the year, h a v i n g a minimal

announced intentions to discontinue t h e l e a s i n g of C e n t e n n i a l P a r k

een&

impact on the parking situation. O t h e r o f f - c a m p u s students purchase p e r m i t s that are used only during

eard

Do you think parking is a problem at Hope ? What do you think should be done ?

A n d e r s o n said that there are no

tional p a r k i n g , A n d e r s o n said that this is a p r o b l e m c o m m o n on college c a m p u s e s . " T h e r e h a s n ' t b e e n a year g o n e by that h a s n ' t called for n e w park-

And Cook Residence Hall,

parking facility t o serve students. In a d d i t i o n , the C o l l e g e h a s

in creating a n e w p a r k i n g facility,

r e c e i v e d f e e d b a c k calling for addi-

plans in the w o r k s t o do so. " P a r k i n g is very e x p e n s i v e and

are all used to p a r k i n g in o u r o w n

Quotes of the W e e k "A 6 y e a r old kissing a n o t h e r 6 y e a r old is i n a p p r o p r i a t e behavior. U n w e l c o m e is u n w e l c o m e at any a g e . " -Lexington, NC, school district spokeswoman Jane Martin, on the first-grade boy suspended on grounds of sexual harassment after smooching a female classmember

on the

cheek. " R o g e r Stone, with his wife, placed a d s in s w i n g e r m a g a z i n e s . T h a t ' s how s q u a r e R e p u b l i c a n s are. Even w h e n they hav e a sex s c a n d a l , it's with t h e i r wives." -"Politically Incorrect" host Bill Maher The unpaid Dole advisor has vehemently denied reports that he and his wife, Nydia, solicited sexual partners on the Internet and in magazines.

"1 think t h e r e ' s a p r o b l e m .

"I think cars should b e out-

A parking structure needs to be built with easy accessibility t o

l a w e d for the e n t i r e country. I think e v e r y o n e should b e forced

all s t u d e n t s . " —Ryan Spangler ('98)

t o w a l k around. W e ' r e too lazy." —Jared Buono ('97)

" I t ' s p o p u l a r with y o u n g f e m a l e c u s t o m e r s , m a n y of w h o m say they d o n ' t w a n t to t o u c h things h a n d l e d by middle aged m e n . " -Kazutaka Umegaki, a spokesman for Tokyo Mitsubishi Bank, which has opened a new 'Total Anti-Germ Branch "featuring ATM's that are clad in special antibacterial plastic and dispense disinfected cash. source: Newsweek

The Japan Exchange and Teaching Program 1997 Teach English in junior and senior high schools in Japan Learn about J a p a n e s e culture and people Gain international e x p e r i e n c e

Requirements H a v e an excellent c o m m a n d of the English language Obtain a bachelor's degree by June 30, 1997 "I definitely think t h e r e ' s a problem with p a r k i n g but the only way to fix it w 6 u l d be to create p a r k i n g f a r t h e r a w a y , and I d o n ' t think p e o p l e w o u l d like that." — K r i s t i Steketee ( ' 9 8 )

"Yes, a parking structure w o u l d alleviate the lack of park-

Be a U.S. Citizen Be willing to relocate to Japan for one year

ing. You w o u l d n ' t h a v e to worry about s n o w r e m o v a l and security w o u l d be less pf a problem." —Chris Garbrecht ('98)

C o n t a c t t h e C o n s u l a t e G e n e r a l of J a p a n at 2 0 0 R e n a i s s a n c e C e n t e r , S u i t e 3 4 5 0 , D e t r o i t , Ml 4 8 2 4 3 Call ( 3 1 3 ) 5 6 7 - 0 1 2 0 , ( 3 1 3 ) 5 6 7 - 0 1 7 9 , or l - S O O - I N F O - J E T .


d wAnchor

Opinion

your voice.

our voice.

False Hope Attracting minority students to a p r e d o m i n a n t l y white s c h o o l is a t o u g h j o b . A d m i s s i o n s c o u n s e l o r s d o n ' t w a n t to b r i n g in a n y o n e f o r w h o m H o p e i s n o t a g o o d m a t c h . A n d b a l a n c i n g o n t h e fine l i n e b e t w e e n a p p e a l i n g t o m i n o r i t y p r o s p e c t i v e s s o t h e y l o o k at t h e C o l l e g e m o r e seriously and m i s r e p r e s e n t i n g reality isn't easy. B u t w h e n t h e A d m i s s i o n s filming c r e w a d d e d a b l a c k m a l e to a class for

filming,

O c t o b e r 23, I 996

they crossed that line. N o t

only did they d o c t o r the c l a s s r o o m to u p diversity, but the p l a n t e d i n d i v i d u a l is n o t e v e n a H o p e C o l l e g e s t u d e n t . T h e shot stepped a w a y f r o m reality not once, by

No fault divorce a reason to support Arenas Dear Editor, Jessie Dalman, Holland's Stale Representative who is running for re-election this November, is sponsoring a bill that would end no fault divorce. This means that any time a c o u p l e wants to get a divorce blame has to be attributed to one side. I ' m sure the rationale is that by m a k i n g d i v o r c e h a r d e r that couples won't get a divorce. Do you really believe that? I believe that if a couple is going

to get a divorce a law that makes them assign blame is not going to stop them. It's just going to make it a harder process. Isn't divorce already hard enough? Already kids are torn between two parents who don't get along after a divorce. Assigning blame in a divorce will just make it harder for kids involved. If domestic violence is involved the victim would know that they have to face their aggressor in court. It's already hard enough for women in that situation to get up the cour-

p l a n t i n g a s t u d e n t in a c l a s s w h e r e h e w a s n o t e n r o l l e d ,

Congress can't speak for disinterested

b u t t w i c e , b y p l a n t i n g a p e r s o n w h o is n o t , a n d h a s n e v e r

Dear Editor,

been, a Hope student. It c r o s s e d t h e l i n e b y s h o w i n g t h e C o l l e g e in a d e s i r a b l e l i g h t , b u t w i t h d i s h o n e s t y l u r k i n g in t h e s h a d o w s . Is t h a t t h e w a y w e a s a C h r i s t i a n i n s t i t u t i o n w a n t t o operate? A n d t h e A d m i s s i o n s v i d e o d o e s n o t s t o p at a d d i n g a s t u d e n t t o a h o m o g e n o u s c l a s s . T h e m a j o r i t y of its c a n d i d shots make Hope College appear significantly more d i v e r s e o n c e l l u l o i d t h a n it d o e s in r e a l i t y — c o m p a r e 17 percent m i n o r i t y p r e s e n c e on the tape to the actual 5 p e r c e n t of m i n o r i t y s t u d e n t s at H o p e . T h e f a c t t h a t t h o s e w h o f i l m e d t h e v i d e o in A d m i s s i o n s w a n t e d s o m u c h to a p p e a l t o m i n o r i t y p r o s p e c t i v e s o n l y u n d e r s c o r e s w h a t n o o n e will d e n y : a d i v e r s e s t u d e n t b o d y is i m p o r t a n t t o a w e l l - r o u n d e d , c o m p l e t e c o l l e g e experience. But this time A d m i s s i o n s h a s c h o s e n to g o a b o u t this the w r o n g way. A d m i s s i o n s d o e s a g r e a t j o b of p r o - a c t i v e l y r e c r u i t i n g m i n o r i t y s t u d e n t s . T h e n u m b e r s h a v e i n c r e a s e d f r o m 108 minority students d u r i n g the 1990-91 a c a d e m i c year to 149 d u r i n g 1 9 9 4 - 9 5 . T h e a d d i t i o n o f a m u l t i - c u l t u r a l r e c r u i t e r to t h e s t a f f a n d t h e e f f o r t s at p h o n i n g all m i n o r i t y prospectives personally s h o w s their c o m m i t m e n t to s e l l i n g t h e C o l l e g e t o s t u d e n t s t h a t will b e a g o o d fit. Most students d o not accept or reject a college after w a t c h i n g a v i d e o . A n d s i n c e it w o n ' t b e t h e d e c i d i n g f a c t o r f o r p r o s p e c t i v e s , w h e r e i s t h e h a r m in it? W e l l , it lies. T h e s k e w e d p e r c e n t a g e m a k e s H o p e o u t t o b e s o m e t h i n g t h a t it is n o t , a n d f o r s t u d e n t s u n f a m i l i a r w i t h t h e c o l l e g e , t h i s is a n i n s u l t . T h e v i d e o t o c o m e o u t of t h e o f f i c e d o e s a p o o r j o b of

How many people actually know what happened with the smoking ban in the Kletz last year? I was asking myself this question on Sunday night while being interviewed about the ban [for a media class project.) I find it difficult to understand how someone can pay close to $ 19,000 a year to come to Hope, and then not care what happens on campus while they are here. Maybe it's that students know that Hope has a good reputation. Maybe it's that the students feel things are okay. Maybe it's that the students don't care that there's a hair in their f o o d at Phelps. M a y b e students d o n ' t c a r e if the a d m i n i s t r a t i o n

eliminates the Greeks. Maybe students w o n ' t care if their opinions will not be permitted in the Anchor uncensored. Maybe students don't care if the administration doesn't always pass things through committees following procedures they dictate to student organizations (The Kletz). Maybe. Maybe I'm an optimist, but I honestly b e l i e v e that s t u d e n t s c a r e about stuff like this. The problem is that the students' voice. Student Congress, isn't being told what to say. If you. as a student at Hope College, have a concern, then voice it. Each student enrolled at this college has a Student Congress representative. If you don't know who your rep is but want to voice your

a g e to leave a b u s i v e h u s b a n d s . They don't need another obstacle b e f o r e they can leave an abusive relationship. D i v o r c e is a l r e a d y ugly, hard things for families to go through. We don't need to make it any harder than it already is. That's why I will vote for B e c k y Arenas for State Representative. Susan McAndrew ('00)

students c o n c e r n s , p l e a s e e - m a i l us at STUDCONG. H o w e v e r , e - m a i l i n g us is not enough to get something done. If you don't like the j o b we're doing let us know. We are, after all, accountable to our constituents. Pay attention to the goings on in Student Congress because eventually they will e f f e c t your life. If you don't let us know, then there is the chance that the representative casting a vote on the issue important to you would vole with iheirown bias. You don't want that. Matt Fretz ('99) Scott Hall Representative

Do you love +o dravJ the/Krtl< sports? Political cartoons? pandow doodles? Would you like to cartoon for -fhe Anchor7. i f so, please contact -^e Ank office at xirn.

N e w cartoonist rocks!

a c c u r a t e l y r e f l e c t i n g t h e d i v e r s i t y at H o p e C o l l e g e . E n t i c i n g w o u l d - b e s t u d e n t s t o e n r o l l is a c h a l l e n g e t h a t A d m i s s i o n s m e e t s w e l l , b u t d o i n g it b y s h o w i n g a p r o d u c t t h a t d o e s n ' t e x i s t j u s t i s n ' t in k e e p i n g w i t h o u r m i s s i o n .

m e e t the press

A n d t h i s lie i n s u l t s t h e s t u d e n t s t h a t a l r e a d y a t t e n d H o p e a s w e l l . It s a y s t h a t t h e r e a l i t y o f t h i s i n s t i t u t i o n is n o t g o o d e n o u g h t o a t t r a c t b u y e r s , s o it n e e d s a l i t t l e doctoring. C u t t i n g a n d splicing together a v i d e o that h e i g h t e n s t h e a p p e a r a n c e o f d i v e r s i t y is h a r d t o s w a l l o w . A n d to a d d a b l a c k m a l e t o a c l a s s r o o m f o r t h e p u r p o s e s of filming

is n o t s t o m a c h a b l e .

If A d m i s s i o n s n e e d e d a c l a s s r o o m s h o t , t h e y c o u l d h a v e f i l m e d d u r i n g t h e s c h o o l y e a r , w h e n t h e s t u d e n t b o d y is belter represented. A d m i s s i o n s n e e d s t o s a y y e s to d i v e r s i t y , b u t n o t by f a l s e l y a d v e r t i s i n g it. M i n o r i t y s t u d e n t s s h o u l d h a v e a s i g n i f i c a n t r o l e in r e c r u i t i n g o t h e r m i n o r i t y s t u d e n t s by sharing their perspectives and e x p e r i e n c e s . But splicing t o g e t h e r a tape with o v e r three t i m e s the real d i v e r s i t y , a s if t o s a y " L o o k at u s ; w e a r e d i v e r s e , " is

editor-in-chief Jodi Mc Far land o p e r a t i o n m a n a g e r Arin Neucks c a m p u s b e a t e d i t o r Carrie Tennant spotlight e d i t o r infocus e d i t o r intermission e d i t o r sports e d i t o r production e d i t o r p h o t o editors copy editors business mgr./ad r e p page designers ad designer faculty advisor

L y i n g a b o u t t h e p r o d u c t is a g o o d w a y t o s e e s a l e s sharply decline.

Tim Boudreau

staff r e p o r t e r s Jessie Bicknell • Stacy Bogarcl • Dan Cwik • Heidi Huebner • David Gabrielse • Rachel Lamb • Jessica Nelson • Melissa Oorns • Keely Reynolds • Amy Sirassburger • Noelle Wood • Mike Zuidema

wrong. T h i s time a r o u n d . A d m i s s i o n s has m i s s e d their m a r k .

Kim Powell Dave Clausen Matt Morgan Glyn Williams Amy-Lynn Halverson Josh Neucks, Zach Johnson Matt Sterenherg, J e f f Crouch Michelle Piel Dave Schrier Rebecca Hollenbeck

The Am hor is a pntducl of student effort and is funded through the Hope College Student Congress Appropriations Committee. Letters to the editor are encouraged, though due to .space limitations the Anchor reserves the right to edit The opinions addressed m the editorial are solely those of the editor-in-chief. Stories from the Hope College News Service are a product of the Public Relations Office One year subscriptions to the Anchor are available for $11. We resene die right to accept or reject any advertising

Anchor

the


O c t o b e r 23, I 9 9 6

d*Anchor

Spotl ight

Parenting profs do the balancing act by toting tots to the office full-time in the Sociology department while her husband Professor Tom S w a n s o n in M a t h e m a t i c s Every Monday and Thursday. works part-time. Dad brings Emma C h e m i s t r y P r o f e s s o r J o A n n e in on T u e s d a y and M o m on Stewart grabs her briefcase and a Wednesdays day's supply of baby bottles and "Typically, a play pen is set up in here and she spends time with me," diapers. Making her way to Peale Sci-, Deb Swanson said. It's not unusual ence Center, Stewart and her three- for students to pass by the door and month old daughter Katie prepare see the sign "Shhhhh, Emma is for another day of ups and downs. sleeping." Since classes started in August, G o o d days a n d b a d days Stewart has been bringing Katie Katie is a "good baby," accordinto her office. Although Stewart ing to Stewart. She sits in her is taking the semester off from stroller or on mom's lap, cooing and teaching, she smiling the day still comes into a w a y — on a her o f f i c e to good day that is. keep up with reThose bad search. Y o u r life is a series of days inevitably N o t alone come when a things half d o n e — pile of work is Thanks t o the half d o n e laundry, sitting on the scheduling flexhalf d o n e e - m a i l . desk waiting to ibility Hope provides for be d o n e , the —JoAnne Stewart parents. Stewart baby is crying, C h e m i s t r y Professor and her h u s and a student is wailing for a band. Chemistry Professor William Polik are two conference, she said. of several faculty members that Bouma-Prediger remembers the balance family and work by toting days when he'd have to leave faca child into work along with ulty meetings with a screaming graded term papers and exams. child in his arms. Professor Steven Bouma"If she's squealing and screamPrediger in the Religion Depart- ing, you have to leave," he said. ment. father of three, generally Working parents try to take each doesn't plan to bring his children days challenges in stride. into work with him. "Every day a half a dozen things But, just two weeks ago Bouma- happen and you take a deep breath," Prediger's seven-year-old daugh- Stewart said. "Your life is a series ter Anna went to class with him, of things half done: half done launbecause of a scheduling conflict dry, half done e-mail." with the child care provider. It's all about juggling life, accord"Some people do probably won- ing to Bouma-Prediger. der" when they see you working T h e balancing act with a child beside you, but someNancy Nicodemus remembers times you have to Bouma-Prediger doing the balancing act, and how said. difficult it was to teach a full load Professor Deb Swanson works of classes in a half day in order to

KIM POWELL spotlight editor

spend time with her children. Swanson said, balancing is tough in spite of a supportive husband and co-workers. "A student comes in for a conference and they expect to see only you. The student is trying to talk and you're bouncing and she's crying and you hope they understand," she said. Bouma-Prediger praised the support he gets from fellow faculty members and even students. When you're toting a crying child "generally you get knowing glances from faculty who have been there in the past." he said. Things are changing When Nicodemus started teaching over 30 years ago, she was the only woman with young children on the faculty. "Women who had decided to go into academics didn't have a family was the assumption." she said. Now. more than ever before parents with young children make up the C o l l e g e ' s faculty and staff. Resulting in the reestablishment of Hope's policy concerning maternity leave. Currently, new Moms get two weeks off for child birth and an additional four weeks for family time. While that gives six weeks of paid time off. many moms and dads take an unpaid sabbatical or partial leave for the first several months to spend lime with ihe newest family member. Some colleges have a policy that you cannot bring your child to work with you. Bui, Hope isn't an ivory tower that bans kids from campus. Instead, ihe College tries to help parents by pulling them in touch with child care agencies and allowing them flexibility to make the arrangements that work best with their own schedule and family.

Anchor photo by Zach Johnson

W H A T " A

B A B E : Chemistry Professor JoAnne

Stewart and three-month-old Katie talk research with Chemistry major Mike Struck (*97 ). D o i n g it all Swanson says you can do it all. but something has to give. "Instead of working 70 to 80 hours a week you work 40 to 50." Polik said. You have to coordinate with your spouse as to who is picking the baby up and you have to set priorities, he said. Swanson looks to her daughter as the reason for working as a full-

Urbana to open a world of opportunity NOELLE W O O D staff reporter As Chaplain Dolores Nasrallah walked the University of Illinois campus at ihe 1987 Urbana, she contemplated God's call on her life. She t u r n e d to a c o m p l e t e stranger walking beside her and asked him if he thought the longing she felt to serve God was a divine appointment to enter the ministry. According to Nasrallah, Urbana is a once in a lifetime opportunity to see what God is doing in the world. " D o n ' t be a f r a i d to g o . " Nasrallah said. "Don'l be afraid to open yourself up and allow God to speak to you. Go to get the big picture of G o d ' s heart for the world." As more than 17,000 students gather at the University of Illinois from Dec. 27-31, Student Outreach Director, Lori Fair, hopes students will be receptive to God

working in their life, regardless of career goals. Urbana is nol only for those who are planning to devote their lives to missions. It is for a n y o n e w h o would like the experience of being surrounded by others who share ihe same faith. Julie Grahmann ( ' 9 7 ) who attended Urbana in 1993 remembers the camaraderie among students. "It was so cool to bump into people and know that they're Christians." Grahmann said. Hope's goal is to send 100 students to the event. The goal may be reached since about 75 have already

signed up. Thanks to a sizeable corporate donation the cost to attend has been lowered from the original price of $340 to $150. Transportation will be provided from Hope, and food and lodging at the University are all included in the fee. The convention tries to facilitate mingling among students from different schools by dividing students into prayer groups. Also, seminars will be given by speakers from around the world, on missions work. And for students interested in furthering their educalion in ministry there is an opportunity to investigate over 250 ministry agencies. Although Hope has never sent a group of students to the convention the College's connection to Urbana goes back to its beginnings 50 year ago. when Hope's famous missionary Samuel Zwemer spoke to students at the first Urbana. Students interested in Urbana should contact the Keppel House at *7829 before Nov. 1.

time p r o f e s s o r and a full-time mom. "I do it partly for my daughter. I want her to see that you can be both a professor and a mom," Swanson said. The struggle is a daily one but the rewards of spending time with your child and continuing the career you love make it worth it. Stewart said, as she turned to look at Katie.

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theAnchor

Intermission

O c t o b e r 23.

I 996

W r i t i n g students gather in L u b b e r s l o f t f o r a d v i c e J O D I M C FAR L A N D editor in cheif S o m e 30 s t u d e n t s c o n g r e g a t e d in L u b b e r s L o f t Friday a f t e r n o o n to

writers c o m i n g out with their w o r k

laughing students. "That baby whis-

is n o t a c o n s e q u e n c e o f m o r e

p e r e d s o m e t h i n g s in the e a r of

classes. T h e classes are in a n s w e r to the students' d e m a n d . Sellers

Pinkney B e n e d i c t . " Ridl w a r n e d students that his

said.

a p p r o a c h shifts f r o m the entry level

f e e d t h e i r c r a v i n g s for p i z z a and

" T h e r e ' s the s a m e n u m b e r of

writing a d v i c e . T h e English D e p a r t m e n t ' s Big

p e o p l e w r i t i n g . T h e r e ' s just m o r e c l a s s e s for t h e m to g o t o , " she said.

Pinckney

The hosting professors dis-

Benedict and Heather Sellers,

c u s s e d the n e w four-credit s y s t e m

Three.

Jack

Ridl,

poetry class to the i n t e r m e d i a t e . "I b e c o m e this beast that rele g a t e s the d e a t h o f y o u r g r a n d m o t h e r t o s o m e p l a c e o v e r h e r e and pay more attention to your r h y t h m , "

the

he said. " A n d then

g a t h e r i n g of the C o l l e g e ' s

t h e r e ' s this g r e a t m o m e n t of ' A h a !

hosted

T h e t h r e e of us a r e

w o r d s m i t h s to

r e a l d i f f e r e n t , w h i c h is

L o v i n g my g r a n d m o t h e r m e a n s at-

give t h e m the

o n e of the best things

tending

amateur

inside track on

y o u V e got going for

/ Seueo

^

new class of-

you here at H o p e .

ferings and department

— H e a t h e r Sellers fte.<\e.o\cT

curriculum.

English Professor

Ridl a n d Sellers told attenders that writing at H o p e has seen a shift to a s t r o n g e r p r o g r a m a n d stronger student writ-

to

rhythm.*" B e n e d i c t told a t t e n d e r s that his c l a s s e s f o c u s on workshopping.

PR photo

TRIBUTE TO C O L E : J. Hamilton ('99), D. Fleming ('00), and P. Leete ('00) kneel in front of R. DeVries (00), K. Sitz ('99), M. Hicks ('99) and M. Arwady('OO) to conclude a song.

Musical 'Cole' details life of Broadway composor "It w a s neat h o w o n o p e n i n g MATT MORGAN intermision e d i t o r

" I ' v e had stuin w r i t i n g c l a s s e s , a n d

urged

a t t e n d e r s t o try o u t e a c h of t h e g e n r e s to get a solid b a s e . " T h e three of us a r e real dif-

night n o trains w e n t by. T h e poles s e a m e d to be the biggest p r o b l e m ,

dents w h o ' v e really discovered t h e m s e l v e s in p r o f o u n d w a y s in my

partment c o l o r f u l l y o p e n e d the ' 9 6 -

but the light t e c h n i c i a n s did a g o o d j o b of cutting d o w n o n the s h a d o w , "

w o r k s h o p s , " he said. T h e p r o f e s s o r s urged trying the

' 9 7 season with the narrative m u s i -

said Seth G a r d n e r ( ' 0 0 ) .

cal " C o l e , " based o n the life of c o m -

T h e H o p e C o l l e g e T h e a t r e de-

U n f o r t e n e n t l y trains did g o by

ers c o m i n g out of it. "We h a v e a r e m a r k a b l e history

f e r e n t , w h i c h is o n e of the b e s t

writing c l a s s e s on for size, and en-

of students at H o p e w h o h a v e g o n e

things y o u ' v e got g o i n g for you

couraged taking writing classes dur-

U s i n g oration, s o n g s and c o n -

m a n c e , but they did not detract from

o n , " Ridl s a i d . ' T h e r e are 25 stu-

ing a M a y term or o t h e r s u m m e r

d e n t s o v e r the last eight y e a r s that

h e r e at H o p e , " H e a t h e r Sellers said. T h e f l o o r w a s o p e n e d to stu-

stantly c h a n g i n g slides as a b a c k g r o u n d , the play d e p i c t e d P o r t e r s '

the p e r f o r m a n c e a s the actors kept g o i n g o v e r the noise outside. T h e

are publishing. We w a n t p e o p l e to

dent q u e s t i o n s . O n e student a s k e d

undistracted. " W e live in a society that has

life f r o m his c o l l e g e y e a r s at Yale

p o l e s w e r e m a d e use of by the ac-

t h r o u g h his s u c c e s s f u l B r o a d w a y

tors as they leaned on them and

Arnold

you d o y o u r writing last," Ridl said.

S c h w a r z e n e g g e r w a s related by

B u t t h e s t u d e n t s in a t t e n d a n c e s h o w e d that f o r s o m e , w r i t i n g is

career. T h e cast for " C o l e " w a s e x ceptionally y o u n g , with six f r e s h -

s w u n g off t h e m d u r i n g the d a n c i n g . T h e f r o n t r o w of the a u d i e n c e

c r e e p i n g up o n the scale of priori-

m e n and three s o p h o m o r e s in a cast

ties.

of ten, but the y o u n g cast w a s full

tables, a d d i n g to the early 1900's feel of the w h o l e s h o w . T h e audi-

of personality and h a n d l e d t h e m -

e n c e w a s so c l o s e to the stage that

s e l v e s with p o i s e and c o n f i d e n c e . " W e d i d n ' t k n o w w h a t to ex-

it w a s possible to brush the actors

a b o u t B e n e d i c t ' s o w n writing style.

know about Hope College."

"He

"That's why Pinckney and I have c o m e here," Sellers said. " T h e r e ' s this great t h i n g h a p p e n ing." But the i n c r e a s e d n u m b e r of

writes

like

m a r r i a g e only to William Faulkner, and W i l l i a m F a u l k n e r h a d a b a b y with M a d o n n a , " Sellers said t o the

term so students could

write

Russian pianist textures intense moods ful m o v e m e n t s of her a r m s a n d finKEELY R E Y N O L D S staff r e p o r t e r When Natalya Antonova ap-

g e r s c a p t u r e d the e y e s of the audie n c e as well. From the

pect b e c a u s e it w a s o u r first time,

sat on folding chairs at cabaret-style

as they w e n t by. The intimate surroundings

L e n i n g r a d C o n s e r v a t o r y w h e r e she

but it w a s really f u n . " said Meredith

m a d e it p o s s i b l e for a small b a n d

then received musical training giv-

Arwady ('00).

ing her o p p o r t u n i t i e s she o n l y

T h e p e r f o r m a n c e w a s held in

c o n s i s t i n g of w o o d w i n d s , bass, d r u m s , and piano to effectively con-

the Physical Plant, located o n 11th

vey the d i f f e r e n t m o o d s of the

A n t o n o v a varied the t e m p o s

w i s h e d for. " M u s i c w a s my w h o l e life. I

Street b e t w e e n C o l u m b i a a n d Lin-

and intensities of e a c h piece. S h e

had n o c h i l d h o o d , only m u s i c . If I

c o l n A v e n u e s , b e c a u s e the m a i n

songs. . W h e t h e r they w e r e e n e r g e t i c

c a p t u r e d the attention of the audi-

w o u l d n ' t h a v e done this I would not

stage in the DeWitt C e n t e r is u n d e r renovation. T h e Physical Plant is n e a r the

Sonata

first

p r o a c h e d the p i a n o O c t . 16 for a

Beethoven's

concert in D i m n e n t C h a p e l , the au-

the e n d i n g piece Hungarian

d i e n c e fell silent with a n t i c i p a t i o n .

sody

S h e sat d o w n and g r a c e f u l l y placed h e r fingers upon the k e y s .

an a m a z i n g c a r e e r b e g a n . Shortly after, she entered the very elite

p o s e r and m u s i c i a n C o l e Porter.

during Saturday night's perfor-

piece

in D Major

to

Rhap-

and c o l o r f u l o r placid a n d sexy, the b a n d s w u n g effortlessly through the

audience

e n c e t h r o u g h o u t the entire perfor-

h a v e b e e n a b l e to a c h i e v e s o m a n y

watched h e r every m o v e , she raised her chin and b e g a n softly, introduc-

mance. W h e n Antonova was just a

things." A l t h o u g h A n t o n o v a has a full

ing the c r o w d to the s o u n d s of the

child she would listen with her

t i m e teaching c a r e e r at the E a s t m a n

train tracks, s o the noise of the train w a s e x p e c t e d to be a p r o b l e m . T h e

instrument which she masters. As the m u s i c g r e w m o r e in-

m o t h e r as h e r older sister took pi-

S c h o o l of M u s i c in Russia, she c o n -

b u i l d i n g is also only a f r a c t i o n of

a n o lessons. T h e d r e a m i n g little girl

certizes and gives recitals t h r o u g h -

the size of the D e W i t t T h e a t e r a n d

tense h e r back s w a y e d f a s t e r a n d

c o n v i n c e d her m o t h e r to a l l o w her to take lessons at the age of f o u r and

out the United States and n u m e r o u s

has to w d r k a r o u n d o b s t a c l e s s uch

talented singers and actors, you

as poles.

c a n ' t g o w r o n g with " C o l e . "

Aware

that

the

ler neck g r e w longer. T h e g r a c e -

Meet the

Greeks

lake a break from studying, meet Qreeks, get to know Hope's 13 orginizations, ask questions about * Qreek Cife and just hang out

i

PUlpA 9.15 fum. Coma

you

aW

© a d s7"®® ; tew© Take a break to worship with us Sunday morning at 11:00 a.m. Hope Church 77 West 11th Street 392-7947

other c o u n t r i e s .

m u s i c a l l y d o m i n a t e d show. " C o l e " c o n t i n u e s O c t . 23 to 26 b e g i n n i n g at 8 p.m. in the Physical Plant. For a night of e n t e r t a i n i n g by

Readers Kasische, B e n e d i c t leave c r o w d s t i m u l a t e d A. STRASSBURGER staff r e p o r t e r

Kasische, the first reader, is a

ally be sure w h i c h y o u ' r e d o i n g , "

slender, d a r k - h a i r e d w o m a n w h o

f o r the b a c k b o n e o f his w r i t i n g .

read in a sincere, f r e s h tone, h e r

W i t h h i s m e l l o w S o u t h e r n drawl a n d his e a s y , f a m i l i a r w a y of

" B o m o n M o n d a y to m u c u s

a p p e a r a n c e contrasting sharply with

and b l o o d / and the a r m s of a teenage mother slippery with dread,

h e r poetry. K a s i s c h e ' s writing style, illus-

u n d e r a m o o n that crept/ with mush-

trated a b o v e in the excerpt f r o m h e r

r o o m s in the dark/ w h i l e the b l o o d -

r e m a k e of the n u r s e r y r h y m e

K a s i s c h e did. B e n e d i c t ' s e s s a y s included the

s u c k e r s s u c k e d a n d c l u n g to t h e

" S o l o m o n G r u n d y , " h a s b e e n de-

re-telling of the story of a murder-

dead." A n d with that, L a u r a K a s i s c h e

scribed as sweet and s a v a g e , tragic

ous beauty q u e e n ( " T r a c e y ' s Trial")

and j o y f u l . T h i s b l e n d of e m o t i o n s

a n d " D e r e k ' s Hair." a tribute to the

g r a b b e d the a u d i e n c e last W e d n e s -

resulted in an o f f - b a l a n c e , s u r p r i s ing r e a d i n g with a dark u n d e r c u r -

" m e n ' s c l u b " existing in his h o m e -

day and held them effortlessly, mesm e r i z e d . f o r the d u r a t i o n o f h e r reading. T h e newly-renovated Knicker-

rent of d i s c o m f o r t . K a s i s c h e ' s poetry r a n g e d f r o m n e w s stories that had caught her eye

storytelling, he captivated the audience just

as completely

as

t o w n b a r b e r s h o p . B e n e d i c t used this o p p o r t u n i t y to p o k e fun at his o w n g l e a m i n g head and lament his w i f e ' s m y s t e r i o u s o b s e s s i o n with h e r hairstyle, a p p e a l i n g to the au-

entitled " H y m n f r o m the H o u s e of

a n d b e g g e d to b e e x p a n d e d ( " W o m a n Kills S w e e t h e a r t with B o w l i n g Ball") to her recent e x p e r i e n c e s as a n e w m o t h e r ( " O d e to^

T r o u b l e , " s h o w c a s i n g readings by Laura Kasische and English

Exhaustion.") Hope College's own Pinckney

in-progrcss. Blood Rules. Painstak-

P r o f f e s o r P i n c k n e y Benedict.

Benedict f o l l o w e d with w o r k s c o n -

erful imagery in this mix of fact and

trasting in style to K a s i s c h e ' s . T h e y w e r e n o less e n j o y a b l e . B e n e d i c t

a West Virginia dairy f a r m in the

bocker Theater o p e n e d its doors last w e e k to host the second installment of the O p u s Visiting Writers Series

T h e evening began at 6:30 p.m. with the s o u n d s of the H o p e College Jazz E n s e m b l e . T h e m u s i c ushered in an almost full house of H o p e

d r a w s on the e x p e r i e n c e of b e i n g

students, professors, and adults

r a i s e d in a s m a l l W e s t V i r g i n i a t o w n , w h e r e "at any given m o m e n t

f r o m the c o m m u n i t y .

you m a y live or die and n e v e r re-

d i e n c e with his d o w n h o m e humor. Benedict finished his reading with a f e w c h a p t e r s f r o m his noveling attention to details created powfiction a b o u t a boy g r o w i n g up on 1 % 0 ' s . T h e e x c e r p t s read w e r e intriguing. l e a v i n g m a n y , no doubt, a n t i c i p a t i n g t h e p u b l i c a t i o n of B e n e d i c t ' s s e c o n d novel.


October

23,

Anchor

I 996

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^Anchor

S p o r t s

O c t o b e r

23,

I 996

D u t c h m e n amidst ten game winning streak GLYN W I L L I A M S sports e d i t o r

Smith. "We slruggled lo put the ball in the net and we won 4-0. Thai's okay, we can have that." H o p e c o u l d h a v e very e a s i l y scored twice as often as ihey did, considering their 30 shots on goal. "Part of the problem is lhal we were trying for eight goals all al once," Smith said. "We decided at halflime, "Hey, let's try to gel ihe s e c o n d goal before we gel the eighth, and they did."

T h i s y e a r ' s Flying D u t c h m e n soccer learn has been referred lo as the besl this school has seen in a long lime as ihey have rolled over everyone lhal has gollen in their way. The squad is on a record setting p a c e lo b e c o m e p o s s i b l y the best team in Hope College history. T h e y W e struggled to get Sheldon have already brot h e ball in t h e n e t scored his fifth ken ihe record for goal of the seamost goals in a seaa n d still w o n 4 - 0 . son wilh 34:29 son with 63, and T h a t ' s okay, w e can left in the first they a r e on i h e i r have t h a t . half as the ball way lo win the —Steve Smith sailed into ihe most g a m e s in a Men's soccer coach top right hand season. comer just outSean Toohey side the reach ( ' 0 0 ) is j u s t f o u r goals and nine points shy of break- of the Bulldog goalkeeper. The asing ihe single season record in bolh sist came off the foot of midfielder of ihose categories, as he now has Chris Riker ('98), his second of the year. 19 g o a l s a n d 4 4 p o i n t s . J o s h Hope's next goal came 21 minSheldon ('97) is currently lied for utes into the second half, as a clusthe record for most assists in an ter of Flying Dutchmen and BullMIAA season wilh eight. Last Saturday's soccer game was dogs alike gathered in front of the no d i f f e r e n t than their p r e v i o u s goal, trying their best to gel a hold games, as the Dutchmen (14-0-1) of it. Josh Meersma ('97) managed to rolled over the visiting Adrian Bulldogs, 4-0. Despite many chances dribble the ball through the goal lo and even more shots on goal, Hope score his first of the season, and only the third of his Hope career. was ahead only 1-0 at halflime. Mall Vander Naald ('00) was cred"I was f r u s t r a t e d b e c a u s e the guys were playing absolutely great, ited wilh the fourth assist of his but just nol gelling ihe ball into the young career. L e s s than three m i n u t e s back of the net." said Coach Steve

Anchor pUoXo b y Z a c h J o h n s o n GREASED LIGMTMIIsT: Steve Coy ('98), races past a hapless Bulldog as John Conlon ('97) looks to see if help is needed. The Dutchmen (14-0-1) are ranked third in the nation. Sheldon delivered Clayton Bergsma ('00) a pass lhal he used perfectly to slam into the back of the net. Thai goal was his third in ihe last four games. "(Sheldon) has been playing real well lately," said f o r w a r d Blair Richards ('98). "He has been up and down the field playing offense and defense. He is a solid player." Hope is currently ranked third in

the naiion and first in the Great Lakes Region. The toughest teams Hope might be faced wilh at some point in the p l a y o f f s is 12lh ranked K e n y o n C o l l e g e ( 9 - 2 - 1 ) and n u m b e r 18 Ohio Wesley an (9-1-2). Smilh and his players are nol as concerned wilh those iwo teams as ihey are wilh Olivet, whom they face next Saturday.

"We're nol even thinking about K e n y o n right now," Smith said. "The only game we are really worried about right now is Olivet and that's the way we have to be as a team," he said. "I mean, first of all, we haven't even qualified for the national tournament yet, and second of all, if we start looking ahead right now we'll probably drop lo Olivet," Smilh said.

Esteves takes new starting role in stride DAVE GABRIELSE staff reporter Dean Esteves ('99) came lo Hope in the fall of last year in the hopes that he would soon be the starting quarterback. He fell that he had the ability lo be at the helm of the team, and coming to Hope would provide him with the atmosphere lo do so. Wilh Esteves taking the starting role since the Homecoming game on Oct. 12, it h a s c a u s e d m a n y people to think that he and Justin Wormmeester ('99) don't gel along. This statement is totally wrong. The two are actually good friends. " W o r m m e e s t e r and I are always rooting for each other, so I don't see how there can be any problems between us," Esteves said. Esteves has been playing wilh two other members of Hope's team

-

D e a n Esteves for practically his entire football career. Tim Dykstra ('98) and Brandon G r a h a m ( ' 9 8 ) grew up with Esteves and played football wilh h i m t h r o u g h p e e w e e ' s a n d al H u d s o n v i l l e High S c h o o l . Wilh them playing logelher for so long, it is almost a u l o m a l i c lhal they

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W o m e n ' s S o c c e r - The Flying Dutch shul out Adrian College 9-0 last Saturday afternoon lo improve their record to 7-2 in the M I A A and 8-6-1 overall, a remarkable turnaround from 0-4-1 earlier this season. Tracy Phelps ('97) and Lauren O ' D o w d ('97) scored iwo goals apiece, while five others scored one goal apiece. V o l l e y b a l l - Hope (21-5 overall) lost to rival Calvin College over the weekend 13-15, 15-10. 15-8, 15-12. The Flying Dutch and the [vllAA wilh 9-1 records Knights are currently lied atop the night al 6:30 p.m. in each. Hope hosts Alma loMIAA match. their last r e g u la r season / D u t c h m e n lost to tough F o o t b a l l - The F l y i n g ^ 3. Hope's only iwo Albion on Saturday. 4 9 - ^ feet of Brandon Graham (*98) touchdowns c a m e via t h e ^ and Dean Esteves (*99). C r o s s C o u n t r y - Both teams competed logelher in the WisconsinParkside Invitational on Saturday. The men's team finished I llh in a field of 30, while the women finished ninth amongst a field of 29. Marie Matchelt ('97) finished first among Hope runners in 23rd place out of 147 and Dan Bannink ('97) crossed the line 34th in the field of 344 runners.

know what the other person is going to do. "It is fun to play with these guys. I have played with them for what seems like forever," Esteves said. Esteves just takes things in stride, and whatever happens is okay. "I am never nervous when I play," he said. "I just play because I love the game." The football team is beginning to get things together. Esteves feels the season is progressing from week to week. Although he doesn't like the aspects of being 2-4, the league play gives them a chance to start over. "We have to feel confident lhal we can win, and go from there," Esteves said. Esteves' plans for after school are uncertain as of right now. He is thinking of a business major, but like m a n y c o l l e g e s t u d e n t s , he changes his mind every day. •- -O rv r. 2"gZ

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10-23-1996  
10-23-1996