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O c t o b e r 2003 perspicuous

Hope C o l l e g e •

Holland, Michigan • A student-run nonprofit publication •

Campus Briefs Book examines Jesus and the Gospels A textbook co-authored by Phillip M u n o a III, professor of religion, considers J e s u s and the Gospels both as a field of study and in the context of history. M u n o a co-wrote "Jesus and the Gospels: An Introduction to Gospel Literature and Jesus Studies" with his former d o c t o r a l m e n t o r . Dr. J a r l Fossum. "Jesus and the Gosp e l s " c o n s i d e r s the w a y in which the books of the N e w Testament look shape based on earlier sources n o w lost and the editorial decisions of those w h o c o m p i l e d t h e m . It i n cludes discussions of h o w the four Gospels are similar to and different from o n e another, and similarities to and differences f r o m non-canonical works.

Hope finds new Director of Multicultural Life at GVSU Hope has announced their selection for the new Director f o r the O f f i c e of Multicultural Life. Vanessa Greene, the new director, will begin at Hope on Monday. She worked as a Student Service Coordinator, Student Advisor, and administrator at G V S U . S h e has also w o n the Counselor of the Year Award at G V S U . On Oct. 29 at 7 p.m., s h e will attend a c o m b i n e d m e e t i n g of B S U , HAPA, and La Ru to meet the student body. Her experience includes the development of outreach preparatory programs for middle and high school students and coordination of diversity development programs for faculty and staff. Greene hopes to work with the students at Hope to promote their well-being and prepare them for positions of leadership. T h e O f f i c e of Multicultural Life is located in Student Development in DeWitt.

S e r v i n g the Hope C o l l e g e C o m m u n i t y f o r 117 y e a r s

Dutchmen dominate Adrian at home Balanced attack serves Hope well in route to 33-7 Homecoming win

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Steve Adair S P O R T S EDITOR

Hope wore d o w n Adrian all day with a not-too-familiar look - their r u n n i n g g a m e . Phil Butler c o m pleted his first g a m e without an interception in t w o y e a r s and D a n B l o e m e r s ran the ball 27 times f o r 119 yards as Hope beat up on Adrian 33-7 in the m u c h anticipated battle between t w o first place M1AA teams. H o p e got started early as rarely used kicker Nate B a m e t t w a s able, to kick a 33 yarder right d o w n the middle about half way through the first quarter. On H o p e ' s next possession, Phil Butler hit JoeVerschueren f r o m 25 yards out to make it 10-0 Hope. On the other side of the ball, it

more VICTORY on 8

A M C H O R PHOTO BY ROB ONDRA

#14 Joe VerSchueren ('04) grabs the ball for a touchdown, beating two Adrian defenders in Hope's

Professors Homecoming Weekend honored for Hope came out for a football publication victory, a Bon Voyage Ball, a Jenny Cencer

Hoedown, and a parade

S T A F F REPORTER

Several professors f r o m Hope College have recently continued the tradition of publishing books by receiving contracts honoring works of their own. Professors Carol Simon, professor of Philosophy ; Miguel de la Torre, professor of Religion; John Cox, professor of English; J a m e s Herrick, professor of C o m m u n i c a tions; Phil Munoa, professor of Religion; Neal Sobania, professor of History; and Julie Kipp, professor of English, have all received publishing deals of late. All the published professors were recently honored at a reception held in Lubbers Hall, congratulating them on their success. T o n a m e one, Carol S i m o n ' s piece w a s written throughout the course of t w o years, in collaboration with professors f r o m several other colleges. Entitled "Mentoring for Mission," this book is intended to help faculty at Christian colleges reflect on the effect of Christianity oh a college, Simon said. In contrast, Neal Sobania created a novel which described a simplified overview covering the history and culture rooted in Kenya. Sobania describes his published work, "Culture and C u s t o m s of Kenya," as being great fun to write and is proud to announce thai Kenyan newspapers have received it well through com-

A M C H O f t PHOTO BY ROB ONDRA

President James Bultman and his wife Martie ride in the Homecoming parade on Saturday. The Parade was only part of a series of events held to celebrate Hope's Homecoming that day.

plimentary reviews. All the published works of the faculty are available at this time for purchase at Amazon.com.

HOMECOMING on 3

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Inside

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Anchor@Hope.Edu (616) 395-7877

Conservatives at Hope Features, page 4

Norman Rockwell Arts, page 5

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Cleo Parker Robinson Arts, page 5

Soccer Sports, page 8


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C A M P U S BEAT

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O c t o b e r 22, 2 0 0 3

All-day events a success

Danielle Kot

26-year tradition continued on Homecoming weekend

MY TWO CENTS

A.J. Smith S T A F F REPORTER

On Saturday morning, Hope College sponsored the 26 ,h annual Run-Bike-Swim-Walk . The event is held on the Saturday of Homecoming weekend, and has been held since 1977. It is open to the public and to people of all ages. This year it was cosponsored by Shoreline Orthopedic & Sports Medicine Clinic and South Washington Family Medicine. The run portion was held at Windmill Island. The course was 5000 meters (3.1 miles) long. Two different bike events were held. One was open only to participants 17 years old or younger, and was about 5600 meters (3.5 miles) long. The second course was 8000 meters (5 miles) long. This one was open to all participants, with participants under 17 starting at 9:00, at 9:30 for participants ages 18 to 22, and at 10:15 for any participant over age 18. The swim event was divided in a similar fashion. Starting at 8:30, participants age 14 and under swam a 400 meters (1/4 mile) course. At 9:15, those who were over 15 took their turn swimming for a distance of 800 meters (1/2 mile). The final section, walk, was held at 10:00. Participants in the walk gave predictions for the 3200 meter (2 mile) walk. The ten best predictions were awarded medals. In addition to this was the Health Fair, which ran

Business Manager

Consequences of sex papilloma virus, which can cause cervical cancer, which if left untreated, well, has the same final result as AIDS, syphilis can cause insanity, chlymdia can cause infertility in women, and gonorrhea can cause blindness in babies and is one of the contributing causes of pelvic inflammatory disease. These diseases are nasty - uncomfortable and annoying at best and fatal, at worst. To me, none of these diseases sound like a whole lot of fun. I ' m not naive. I may be waiting to have sex, but 1 know there are college students who don't. I didn't write all this stuff to be like, "Oh don't have sex...blah, blah, blah." Rather, I wrote it to inform you. STDs are only the beginning of the consequences sex can have. The best way to protect oneself is to be informed. The best prevention of STDs is obviously not having sex, but if you are going to have sex, including oral sex, do it responsibly. Use a condom, take some form of birth control, know who you are sleeping with, and know their sexual history. If you are having unprotected sex, including again oral sex, get tested for STDs. You can be tested for STDs at the Health Clinic, and it is confidential. Don't become another person of the over one million people in the United States who live with a sexually transmitted disease or infection, and most definitely, don't make your partner become another person out of those one million.

In 2001 there were 816,149 people living with AIDS in the United States. In 2000. there were 31,575 people in the US with Syphilis. 702,093 with Chlymdia, and 358,995 with Gonorrhea. These four sexually transmitted diseases are the most c o m m o n , but there are around 20 that rank in the most-likely-to-get category, including genital herpes, which can cause birth defects in babies, human papilloma virus, which is linked to cervical cancer in women and pelvic inflammatory disease, which is caused by various other sexually transmitted infections and can lead to infertility in women. Marie Hempel ('06) was right when she wrote a letter to the editor basically telling the Anchor we left out information about sex when we did the series on sex. We did in the fact that we overlooked a lot of the consequences of sex. And there are consequences. Irresponsible sex is almost like holding a gun to your head and not knowing whether it is loaded or not. Would you really want to pull the trigger? One of the main consequences of irresponsible sex is sexually transmitted diseases and infections. In the world today, AIDS has reached a pandemic level. Not to sound like a sex-education teacher in high school, but AIDS is deadly. Yes, there are new treatments that prevent HIV from becoming full blown AIDS, but once A I D S has killed enough of your immune system, it has your life. It may take around ten years once HIV becomes AIDS, but you will be d e a d . - O n top of AIDS, there is the human

A/ZCHOff

PHOTO BY ROB ONDRA

The victors of the runportion of RunBike-Swim-Walk event keep on going. f r o m 8:30 until 10:30. At the Health Fair, people could receive diet and nutrition information, stress management techniques, and exercise tips. Also available were chances to have body fat, blood pressure, flexibility and muscle strength tested. The weather stayed favorable for the day, ensuring that no one had to run in the rain or in cold or hot weather. Everyone hopes that the 27th Run-Bike-SwimWalk has the same fortune.

Even year preparations

( Get ready for Nykerk on November 1 A M C H O f * PHOTO BY ROB ONDRA

The s o p h o m o r e ladies are preparing for the Nykerk Cup Competition which will be held in a week and a half during Parents' Weekend at the Holland Civic Center. Odd year and even year ladies will face off in the categories of oration, drama, and song after three intense weeks of practice.

All statistics can be found at www.cdc.gov.

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O c t o b e r 22, 2003

Homecoming festivities were enjoyed by all this weekend. Clockwise from above, Diana Breclaw congratulates the Homecoming King and Queen Ken Rogers ('04) and Jaclyn Timmer ('04), Aaron Garoutte ('07) and Sommer A m u n d s o n ( 07) dance at the ball, the cheerleaders perform at the football game on Saturday, Joshua Cummings ('07) bonds with a horse at the Homecoming Hoedown. Center, Jung Koral ('04) represents the Phi Sigma Kappas in the parade.

H O M E C O M I N G

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FEATURES

O c t o b e r 22x 2 0 0 3

Let's Talk About... Politics Part I .'Conservative viewpoint at Hope

INFOCUS Editor's note: This two-part treatment of politics at Hope wiii focus on iiberai viewpoints next week.

Bush is doing an excellent job of doing what he promised to the voters. -Jack Holmes, Professor of Political Science

Katie Taylor S E N I O R STAFF REPORTER

With so m a n y things going on inside the boundaries of H o p e College, it's easy f o r students to lose touch with important things going on in o u r communities and country. Last y e a r ' s war in Iraq caused m a n y m o r e s t u d e n t s to b e c o m e aware of our g o v e r n m e n t ' s current events. Americans e v e r y w h e r e (and H o p e w a s no e x c e p t i o n ) f o r m e d their own opinions on how President Bush was handling our country's situation. This is o n e of the factors that will affect, either positively o r negatively, the outc o m e of the u p c o m i n g presidential election of 2004. I n turn, the o u t c o m e of the election will affect each and every o n e of our lives as Americans. For this reason, it is important for Hope students to care about political issues (after all, college students are old enough to vote). T h e Hope Republicans and Hope Democrats are t w o groups of students on c a m p u s that are active in their interests of politics. As the presidential campaign a p p r o a c h e s , both g r o u p s will be getting busier and busier. And voters, w h o include registered H o p e students, will be preparing to help c h o o s e a president. T h e goal of this article and its follow-up next week is to familiarize s t u d e n t s with the t w o m a j o r political parties and their activities on campus. T h i s w e e k will f o c u s on the c o n s e r v a t i v e . R e p u b l i c a n side. In West Michigan, Republic a n s are in the majority, and because the Republicans are in p o w e r in the W h i t e H o u s e and in C o n gress, their party is in the driver's

seat these days. O n e of the main goals of the Hope Republicans is to spread their belief that President Bush is doing a good job and should be re-elected so that he may continue this trend during the next four years. W h y do R e p u b l i c a n s s a y the president doing such a good j o b ? Jack Holmes, professor of political s c i e n c e , is d e s c r i b e d on H o p e ' s website as "the d e p a r t m e n t ' s most ardent Republican." He feels that the president has been doing his j o b effectively, and he c o m m u n i c a t e d this during a debate that took place on c a m p u s Oct. 15. " M y p e r s o n a l o p i n i o n is t h a t George W. Bush is doing an excellent j o b of doing what he promised to the voters, and I c o m m u n i c a t e d this to him personally several months ago," H o l m e s expressed. H o l m e s supports what the President has d o n e regarding terrorism a n d b e l i e v e s that Vice President Cheney, National Security A d v i so r Rice, Secretary of State Powell and S e c r e t a r y of D e f e n s e R u m s f e l d "are an excellent team of advisors for President Bush." T h e new Dep a r t m e n t of H o m e l a n d Security, created by Bush, has resulted in the largest government reorganization in d e c a d e s . H o l m e s pointed out that the third year of a first-term presidency is usually the most chall e n g i n g but f e e l s that B u s h has handled it well. 4 T h e president has restored confidence in the office of president, responded to the challenges of Sept. 11 in an effective manner, w o r k e d hard to p r o m o t e prosperity, a n d addressed the concern of citizens," H o l m e s explained further.

The Hope Republicans had dinner in a private hangar at the Gerald R. Ford International Airport in Grand Rapids at the Kent County Lincoln Day dinner the spring of 2003. Pictured with them is Secretary of State Jerri Lynn Land.

H O P E

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Amy Zwart ('04), Eric Ringnalda ('03), Josh Hauser ('04), Jeremy Brieve ('04), and Brian Manning ('03) pose with Ben Stein in the spring of 2002 when Hope Dems brought him to Hope. Jeremy Brieve, w h o is co-chair of the Hope Republicans, also is extremely satisfied with President B u s h ' s p e r f o r m a n c e these past f e w years. Brieve even had the opportunity to meet President Bush this s u m m e r in Dearborn. He is especially enthusiastic about B u s h ' s focus on family values and c o m m i t ment to those w h o demonstrate initiative and work ethic. "We (Republicans) will continue to demonstrate h o w conservative policies support the traditional family structure that is fundamental to children's well-being," Brieve said. It is o b v i o u s that R e p u b l i c a n s strongly support President Bush for the work that he has d o n e regarding issues such as education and the economy. However, his handling of the war in Iraq is a m u c h more controversial issue, and it is easy to find people w h o completely disagreed with American troops interfering there. T h o u g h Iraq is an o n g o i n g situation, H o l m e s said he is confident that what Bush is doing regarding Iraq is being done to improve national security. "It is u p to the voters to evaluate his performance, and I am confident of the o u t c o m e , " he said. Brieve added, "The public will r e m e m b e r the c o m p a s s i o n Presid e n t B u s h s h o w e d to the I r a q i people by liberating them f r o m a ruthless dictator w h o had tortured and terrorized his nation for years."

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF AMY ZWART

Together for solidarity on election night in Nov, 2000, Hope's Republicans celebrated the victory together. There are important issues other than the war that Hope Republicans h a v e been d i s c u s s i n g and taking stances on lately. T h e first is education. According to Holmes, when

The public will remember the compassion President Bush showed to the Iraqi people." —Jeremy Brieve, cochair Hope Republicans it c o m e s to state education policy. R e p u b l i c a n s support the r e f o r m s begun by former Michigan Governor John Engler. They also applaud the Republican state legislature for restoring cuts proposed by Governor J e n n i f e r G r a n h o l m (which w o u l d affect private colleges like Hope). A s Gr a n h o lm is a Democrat, it is not surprising that Republicans like H o l m e s d i s a g r e e with h e r influence, which caused the withdrawal of a $ 2 0 0 million grant to build charter schools in Detroit. Republicans also strongly support B u s h ' s

plan to "leave no child behind." His g o a l , in s h o r t , is to c l o s e t h e achievement g a p between rich and poor students. Also being discussed among rated: " O u r position on the D e m o crats running for president is that w e g e n e r a l l y do not a g r e e with th e m but believe that the D e m o cratic Party has the right and the responsibility to select their candidate." Mostly, the group of Republicans is just getting f i r e d up about the approaching election cycle, though it is still a year away. So h o w will these students try to influence others to get on the conservative track as well? "Most of the Hope Republicans I talk with are confident that the m a j o r i t y of H o p e s t u d e n t s will share their positive view of President Bush and vote for h i m , " H o l m e s stated. Hopefully, this article has given a clearer picture of the conservative viewpoint. If you are interested . in getting involved with the Hope Republicans, contact co-chairs Brieve or A m y Zwart. To learn more about President B u s h ' s p o l i c i e s , v i s i t www.georgewbush.com/agenda.


^ A n c h o r

ARTS

O c t o b e r 22, 2003

Cleo Parker Robinson Dance steps forward said.

Kirsten Winek C O P Y EDITOR

Cleo Parker Robinson Dance, a worldc l a s s d a n c e t r o u p e , w i l l p e r f o r m al t h e K n i c k e r b o c k e r T h e a t r e at 8 p.m. on T h u r s day a n d Friday as part of H o p e C o l l e g e ' s G r e a t P e r f o r m a n c e Series. C l e o Parker R o b i n s o n D a n c e has traversed the globe for o v e r 3 0 years p e r f o r m i n g d a n c e

"In addition t o great

AMCHOR

PHOTO COURTESY DEREK EMERSON

d a n c i n g and c h o r e o g r a phy, they will see some

sity Times of Los A n g e l e s said. " T h e i r ent h u s i a s m s h o w e d , clearly l e a v i n g g a s p i n g a u d i e n c e m e m b e r s a m a z e d by their twists and torso action." The New York Times also

out-

standing costuming, and hear stories f r o m cultures dif-

experiences stemming from African-Ameri-

ferent than w h a t m o s t of o u r students h a v e g r o w n up with.

c a n traditions a n d is well k n o w n for their e x c e l l e n t use of staging and c o s t u m e s . T h e

In other w o r d s , (this will be) an e x c i t i n g p e r f o r m a n c e

troupe is b a s e d in D e n v e r , C o l o r a d o , and has taken part in m a n y m a j o r f e s t i v a l s and tours.

w h i c h is e d u c a t i o n a l

: Tft

taught b y visiting cho-

praised the p e r f o r m a n c e , saying, "Together, they c o m m u n i c a t e d a weary, angry passion

r e o g r a p h e r s and d a n c e r s .

that o n e m i g h t h a v e thought to be i n c o m -

T h e c o m p a n y will c o n t i n u e t h i s t r a d i t i o n at

municable." T h e p e r f o r m a n c e of this w o r l d - r e n o w n e d d a n c e troupe c o n t i n u e s H o p e ' s tradition of

Hope by leading three m a s t e r classes for d a n c e students and visiting E n counter with the Arts

as

classes.

In a d d i t i o n ,

arts e d u c a t i o n . " T h e fact that H o p e c o n t i n u e s to bring in w o r l d - c l a s s p e r f o r m e r s , seen m o s t visibly t h r o u g h the G r e a t P e r f o r m a n c e Series, but really through m a n y routes, s h o w s

" T h e integrated e n s e m b l e d i s p l a y s a g e n -

well!" Cleo Parker Robinson

erous, r o b u s t version of m o d e m d a n c e in the

D a n c e is also k n o w n for its

Cleo Parker Robinson will personally s p e a k to

involvement in the c o m m u -

dance history students

said. " T h e c o m m i t m e n t is not only in bring-

Yorker. A c c o r d i n g to D e r e k E m e r s o n , H o p e arts

nity. It h o s t s an A n n u a l International Summer

a b o u t t h e h i s t o r y of d a n c e in t h e U n i t e d

ing in great p e r f o r m e r s to w a t c h and listen to, but the c o m m i t m e n t is also to allow stu-

coordinator, students and c o m m u n i t y m e m b e r s should e x p e c t a u n i q u e a n d m e m o r a b l e

D a n c e Institute that pro-

States. Cleo Parker Robinson Dance has

dents to w o r k with the p e r f o r m e r s . " T i c k e t s m a y be p u r c h a s e d at the D e w i t t

received rave reviews

theatre lobby. T h e cost is $ 1 4 for adults,

A f r i c a n - A m e r i c a n tradition," said The New

performance. " S t u d e n t s will see s o m e of the t o p d a n c e r s in the c o u n t r y d o i n g three p i e c e s , " E m e r s o n

vides instruction in a variety of d a n c e styles and traditions f o r adults a n d children. T h e institute features s o m e sessions

for its v a r i o u s p e r f o r m a n c e s . The Univer-

H o p e ' s c o m m i t m e n t t o the arts," E m e r s o n

C e n t e r box o f f i c e , which is located in the $ 12 for s e n i o r citizens, and $ 5 f o r students.

Poets, professors, and people Joe Turbessi STAFF REPORTER

H o p e s t u d e n t s will soon h a v e a c h a n c e to e x p e r i e n c e live poetry by t w o H o p e E n g l i s h P r o f e s s o r s . At 7 p . m . on T h u r s d a y , T r e e H o u s e B o o k s will host J a c k i e Bartley and H e a t h e r Sellers. Phil W a a l k e s ( ' 0 4 ) , the organizer of the C o m m u n i t y R e a d i n g Series, d e s c r i b e s it as " s o m e t h i n g to h e l p c o n n e c t faculty, students, and the c o m m u n i t y . " He feels the previous r e a d i n g w a s well a t t e n d e d and h a d a positive effect o n the c o m m u n i t y . " W e are t r y i n g to h e l p b r e a k the b u b b l e that H o p e s t u d e n t s s o m e Jackie Bartley and Heather Sellers will read at 7 p.m. on Thursday.

t i m e s e x p e r i e n c e , " W a a l k e s said. Ar/CHOFT

PHOTO BY ROB ONDRA

Sellers is the a u t h o r o f short stories, c h i l d r e n ' s books, a n d poetry.

Jazz musician Jim McNeely rehearses with the Jazz Ensemble.

S o m e of h e r w o r k s i n c l u d e Your

He performed with the group last weekend at Grand Valley

Whole Life, Georgia Underwater, a n d Drinking Girls and Their

State University.

Dresses.

selections a r e light a n d entertaining a s o p p o s e d t o dark and s e r i o u s Bartley has had p o e m s published

Sellers said m o s t of h e r

in m o r e than 120 literary m a g a z i n e s and a n t h o l o g i e s . S o m e of h e r p u b -

lications are When Prayer Is Far from Our Lips, The Terrible Boundaries of the Body, and Blood root. T h e r e will b e an o p e n m i k e a f t e r the reading.

Holland Museum features works by Norman Rockwell Jordan Wolfson S T A F F REPORTER

B e g i n n i n g with a s c e n e f o c u s i n g o n the i n n o c e n c e of y o u t h and e n d i n g w i t h a tribute to a P r e s i d e n t t a k e n f r o m us all l o o s o o n , N o r m a n R o c k w e l l ' s Saturday Evening Post c o v e r s stream a r o u n d the w a l l s of the H o l -

curator of the Holland M u s e u m , Joel Lefever,

s p a n n e d 4 7 y e a r s at the Post c r e a t i n g w o r k s of art that a d o r n e d the m a g a z i n e ' s f r o n t c o v -

studied in P h i l a d e l p h i a w h e n he h i m s e l f w a s a H o p e student. W h i l e there, he w o r k e d in

ers. A n a t i v e of N e w York, R o c k w e l l quickly b e c a m e involved in the w o r l d of art. His first

the Philadelphia M u s e u m of Art. Years later, a f r i e n d of L e f e v e r ' s f r o m g r a d u a t e school b e c a m e the c u r a t o r of the A t w a t e r K e n t M u s e u m , and s u b s e q u e n t l y L e f e v e r w a s able to

paintings w e r e c o m m i s s i o n e d e v e n b e f o r e he w a s 16. Still in his teens, he w a s hired b y Boys'Life, the official publication of the B o y S c o u t s of A m e r i c a t o illustrate their m a g a -

secure the Rockwell collection f r o m his g o o d friend so that it c o u l d be s h o w n h e r e in H o l -

zine. S o o n R o c k w e l l w a s w o r k i n g f r e e l a n c e f o r m a n y d i f f e r e n t p u b l i c a t i o n s . A f t e r his

land. " W e thought R o c k w e l l c o v e r s would m a k e

f a m i l y m o v e d t o N e w R o c h e l l e , he set up a

a g o o d e x h i b i t here b e c a u s e w h e n looked at them over time, they chronicle A m e r i c a n his-

Norman Rockwell himself, when asked

s t u d i o with cartoonist C l y d e F o r s y t h e and soon w a s producing w o r k for such m a g a z i n e s

about his works, was quoted as saying, " W i t h o u t thinking a b o u t it too m u c h in spe-

as Life, Literary Digest, and Country Gentleman. W h e n he w a s 22, he painted his first

c i f i c t e r m s , I w a s s h o w i n g the A m e r i c a I k n e w a n d o b s e r v e d to o t h e r s w h o m i g h t n o t

c o v e r f o r t h e Saturday

l a n d M u s e u m . T h i s c o l l e c t i o n of p i c t u r e s c r a f t e d by a m a n with his f i n g e r s o n the p u l s e of A m e r i c a c a p t u r e s the spirit of the times in w h i c h he lived. E a c h c o v e r tells a d i f f e r e n t story, e a c h o n e a tribute t o the c h a r a c t e r of A m e r i c a in s o m e f a s h i o n or another.

have noticed." His c o v e r s portray basic A m e r i c a n life a s v i e w e d t h r o u g h his e y e s , yet they invite the o b s e r v e r to inspect the w o r k s m o r e closely

Evening

tory and A m e r i c a n l i f e . . . t h e y s p e a k to the average person w h o can understand them and i d e n t i f y " said G e r l i n d e Knoll, Director of Public R e l a t i o n s at the H o l l a n d M u s e u m . " . . . W e think H o p e students w o u l d benefit

Post.

Rockwell thought very highly of that particular m a g a z i n e , calling it the "greatest s h o w w i n d o w in A m e r i c a " . T h e m a g a z i n e w e l c o m e d R o c k w e l l , and c o n s e q u e n t i a l l y e v e r y Post that w a s a d o r n e d with a R o c k w e l l c o v e r

f r o m seeing the exhibit if for no other reason

PHOTO COURTESY

then R o c k w e l l b e i n g an ' A m e r i c a n Icon.' But also b e c a u s e the illustrations c o v e r and

WWW.HOLLANDMUSEUM.ORG

c h r o n i c l e such r a n g e - f r o m w a r and peace,

A/S/CHOft

Norman Rockwell's work is currently on

to inequality and justice, and g r o w i n g up and g r o w i n g old. A s an o b s e r v e r and illustrator,

so that one g a t h e r s his or her o w n distinct m e a n i n g s f r o m the details R o c k w e l l m e t i c u -

usually sold a q u a r t e r of a million m o r e c o p ies then a n o n - R o c k w e l l cover.

lously painted o n t o e a c h cover. T h e s e artif a c t s are flawlessly p r e s e r v e d , a p p e a r i n g in

R o c k w e l l used real p e o p l e in his artwork, s o m e t i m e s taking pictures of t h e m a n d then

their original c o l o r s e v e n t h o u g h s o m e of t h e m d a t e as far b a c k as 1916 w h e n his first

c o n v e r t i n g w h a t he saw to c a n v a s . F o r his c o v e r entitled ' U n i o n Station, C h i c a g o , ' h e

cover, ' S a l u t a t i o n , ' m a d e its d e b u t o n t o the f r o n t p a g e of the Saturday Evening Post. T h e

w a s given p e r m i s s i o n t o p h o t o g r a p h the vario u s p e o p l e p a s s i n g t o and f r o inside the sta-

C h a r l e s L i n d b e r g landed. T h e H o l l a n d M u s e u m w a s f o r t u n a t e to get

tion and use their i m a g e s to c r e a t e the painting o f the station. He w o u l d usually paint

permission to display these w o r k s of art a w a y f r o m their p e r m a n e n t h o m e at the A t w a t e r

a d m i s s i o n p r i c e of $ 3 to v i e w the exhibit

h i m s e l f in his c o v e r s a s an extra. R o c k w e l l

K e n t M u s e u m in Philadelphia. T h e current

a l o n g with the rest of the m u s e u m .

c o v e r displays t w o y o u n g b o y s greeting e a c h o t h e r w h i l e a y o u n g girl p u s h e s a stroller a l o n g s i d e . F r o m this b e g i n n i n g , his c a r e e r

display in the Holland Museum. painted for 27 hours straight during the L i n d b u r g flight e v e n t so that his cover, entitled ' P i o n e e r , ' c o u l d be ready right a f t e r

Rockwell was a master!" T h e s e c o v e r s portray the m a j e s t i c spirit of A m e r i c a n life, painted by a m a n w h o had e x p e r i e n c e d the m a n y j o y s and sorrows of this country, and w a s able t o c a p t u r e t h e m in their entirety. T h e exhibit o p e n e d on O c t . 4 and will continue through Jan. 4 . T h e r e is an


OPINION

Anchor

i u u r

Editor's voice

voice

O c t o b e r 22, 2 0 0 3

ct'/tt

Your vqicp

Your voice

Your voice

,-IU

There is nothing to fear but fear itself This Monday, I attended a student teaching conference. The presenter at the first seminar I attended began the session by reading a list of "great truths learned by children," followed by a list of the same from adults. One of the items in the latter list really caught my attention. "If you can remain calm, you don't have all the facts." I was taken aback at this statement. I know that my resultant extrapolation of the sentence wasn't intended, but my mind couldn't help but wander. Is this what our culture tells us? Is panic the norm ? mtmammmmmmmmmmmatmmmmmmamm Is it not sensible to be calm? This one statement brought a plethora of questions to my mind. Everywhere I look in the world. I see evidence of the disappearance of calmness and the panic and fear that now has a stranglehold on many. We are constantly bombarded by the scarier side of the world. Growing up, most parents that I know were constantly paranoid that strange things would happen to their child, and were constantly on guard. Now that we are grown up, we get the incessant warnings from the news media. The possibility of nuclear weapons in Iraq! North Korea is attacking! You are too fat! You don't look good enough! More on the news at 11! Our culture is one of extreme fear. We are encouraged to live with a dread of both the known and the unknown. There are cautions everywhere to be distrustful and cautious around everyone. While the old adage, "better safe than sorry" can apply to some situations, this attitude is detrimental in the long run. When we constantly have our guard up against others and unfamiliar situations, we are unwilling to take risks. Without taking risks, humans are unable to learn, especially from one another. This type of risk taking is critical to forming a c o m m u nity where its members are comfortable enough with each other to

"Better safe than sorry" may work sometimes, but is it healthy?

learn. Obviously, it would be too much to expect the entire world to make this shift in any short amount of time, but I think Hope is a whole other matter. To fulfill the goal of a liberal arts college, we must risk, and not live in fear. Instead of running away f r o m things or ideas that scare you, confront them. Sit down and have meaningful, active discussions with those people you disagree with. That's the only way to make our time at Hope meaningful.

Anchor Staff

Anchor Staff

Anchor Staff Staff

•

Anchor Staff

editor-in-chief managing editor arts editor sports editors copy editors

photo editor business manager distribution manager advisor

Nick Denis Anjey Dykhuis Maureen Yonovitz Brad Vanderberg Steve Adair Nicole Lanlz Mackenzie Smith Kirsten Winek Rob Ondra Danielle Koski Keirslen E. Schwanbeck Mark A. Lewison

Staff Reporters: Jennifer Cencer, Erin L Hotta, Erin Sanborn, Allison Schneider, A.J. Smith, Jordan Wolf son, Joe Turbessi, Katrina Baker, Andy Borozan Senior Staff Reporter: Katie Taylor Photo Assistant: Anneke Meeter Columnist: Meridith De A vi la

Students comment on pornography at Hope To the Editor: Upon opening the Oct. 8 issue of the Anchor, my r o o m m a t e and I f o u n d o u r s e l v e s s h o c k e d at the number of negative Letters to the Editor. In that i s s u e ' s E d i t o r ' s Voice, Nick Denis pointed out that "only negative letters are being sent in," and he encouraged readers "to voice agreements and praises." We couldn't agree more. Several letters attacked the recent article on pornography, an article that we believe was simply an attempt to address a very serious issue on this campus. Thus, we would like to express our praise for the Oct. 1 issue of the Anchor, in particular its " L e t ' s Talk About Sex" article on pornog-

raphy. Ever since my roommate's computer died, we have had a difficult time finding good pornography. T h e Hope-Geneva Bookstore refuses to special order any magazines for us, and a 3 a.m. trip to the computer lab reveals that all the c o m p u t e r s are already in use by other students w h o are downloading their own pornography. Imagine our excitement at opening our f a v o r i t e c o l l e g e n e w s p a p e r and finding a large collage of half-naked women in full color, stretching out over two pages! Several of our friends, who normally take no interest in the news at Hope, informed us that they very well may now become weekly subscribers to your fine publication. That is not to say that there is no

THE ANCHOR WANTS YOU! !! DID YOU EVER WANT TO SEE YOUR NAME ON THE FRONT PAGE OF THE P A P E R ?

room for improvement. We noticed that the women you included were only half-naked. Feel free to expand upon this. We also found several pictures of half-naked men, and we urge you not to include such illustrations in the future. Overall, however, we applaud the Anchor for its attempts to solve the problems involving lack of pornography on campus. We were dismayed to find the Oct. 8 issue was void of such educational pictures, and we hope that future issues will bring back the Anchor centerfold.

—Joshua Morse COS) -David Jorgenson ('05)

I T ' S N O T T O O LATE TO GO A B R O A D NEXT FALL!!!

HERE IS YOUR CHANCE!

APPLICATIONS ARE

COME TO THE MEETING TONIGHT AT 8 P . M . IN THE ANCHOR OFFICE... IT'S IN DEWTIT, BEHIND THE RADIO STATION AND STUDENT UNION DESK. COME FIND OUT WHAT FT TAKES TO BE PART OF A NEWSPAPER STAFF!

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2004.

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S T A T I O N IN D E W I T T .

Watch this space! In 2001, Student Congress used $500 of the student activity f e e to buy this scrolling marquee sign in the lobby of the DeWitt Center. Although active in 2001, the sign has yet to display anything since. As a service to you, the Anchor will keep track of h o w m a n y weeks it has been blank since installed.

This week's count: 107

Letters to the Editor Guidelines Open to anyone within the college and related communities The Anchor reserves the right to edit due to space constraints No personal attacks, poor taste or anything potentially libelous Letters chosen on a first come first serve basis, or a representative sample is taken No a n o n y m o u s letters, unless discussed with Editor-in-Chief Editor-in-Chief may verify identity of writer

The Anchor is a product of slutitnl effort and is funded through the students of Hope College, funding which comes through the Hope College Student Congress Appropriations Committee. Letters to the editor are encouraged, though due to space limitations the Anchor reserves the right to edit. The opinions addressed in the editorial are solely those of the editor-in-chief. Stories from the Hope College News Service are a product of the Public Relations Office. Oneyear subscriptions to the Anchor are available for $20. We reserve the right to accept or reject any advertising.

the

Anchor

2003 fall semester, Issue #8 of 26

T h e Anchor reserves the right to refuse publication of any letter submitted Letters over 500 words in length will not be considered for publication

M a i l letters to t h e A n c h o r c / o H o p e C o l l e g e , d r o p t h e m off at t h e A n c h o r o f f i c e ( l o c a t e d in t h e c e n t e r of D e w i t t , behind

WTHS),

or

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^Anchor

CLASSIFIEDS & MORE

O c t o b e r 22, 2 0 0 3

Classified T H E ANCHOR WANTS

You! Have you ever wanted to see your name on the front page of the paper? Here is your chance! Come to our meeting tonight at 8:00 p.m. in the Anchor office...It's in Dewitt behind the radio station and Student Union Desk. Come find out what it takes to be part of a newspaper staff!

Llvia-1 really mean it when I say www.blarneywoolenmills.com that these next nine months are going to be a ba-last. We're going P- Tell me when Hanson comes to go crazy!! -Aurea Pisca back, then we will talk. -A Keep an eye out! For Bultmanisman, Minervans. and a monkey! The Ranchor is coming soon... M- sorry about the photo spread, I did the best I could without a fire... -N

M&M- If I were a Mormon, and a boy, we would be married. -A Check out Michael Moore on Halloween in Ypsilanti.

www.onetermpresident.org

Reils- Buy me'a pipe and we'll hang out and look artsy. -A

Liv- Sometimes I wonder if the whole world is going mad. Keep your chin up, move on back home, and we'll find a place for this winter and spring. -Aurea Pisca

Station wagons of Hope College UNITE!

A- Well, normalcy is good, if you're looking for it. -A

Air is not good. Patrick. Air is not good.

Free Mumia!

For l a d i e s i n t e r e s t e d in...

Trees make paper.

GREEK LIFE

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m m i B i w i i Y

Paper makes trees. Paper makes The Anchor.

General Rush Info 8:oo Tonight Graves Auditorium CTD C = 3 CTD C 3

T

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C=3

October Events at the Kletz

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Come and hear unique fol ksy aoousti c or! gi nal s from Annekds neA/ CD! (And some fun covers too...)


Sports

Sports Sports s o

ts

t>ports

Issue

published

0

f

f

Sporty

Pm

c;

Spot

6 ^ C ) ^ < g 0 0 3

Soccer teams keep ball rolling in MIAA race Flying Dutch shutout Saint Mary's, Dutchmen rally to tie

to play h a r d , " said captain D a w n G i l l i a m ( ' 0 5 ) after the w i n . T h e s h u t o u t victory o v e r St. M a r y ' s keeps the D u t c h on top of the

a f t e r d o m i n a t i n g most of the game," comments Kevney Dugan

leader b o a r d in the M I A A with a 9-

( ' 0 4 ) , a captain on the s q u a d . " W e

1-0 overall record. "It w a s a h u g e win f o r u s a n d se-

w a n t e d t o win it f o r t h e A l u m n i t h e r e as m u c h as f o r o u r s e l v e s , and

Andrew Borozan STAFF REPORTER

T h e ball s e e m s to k e e p b o u n c i n g the D u t c h ' s way. A f t e r a d o m i n a t -

c u r e d o u r p l a c e in the M I A A e v e n

I personally feel like w e let t h e m

more," added Gillam. T h e D u t c h n o w h o l d the k e y to

down." T h e tie p u t s H o p e in s e c o n d

their o w n destiny standing five points a b o v e rival C a l v i n . T h e D u t c h will

p l a c e , j u s t one p o i n t b e h i n d top-

ing e f f o r t o v e r A drian last W e d n e s day (5-0) the D u t c h traveled to

d e f e n d their first p l a c e c r o w n as Tri-

ranked K a l a m a z o o . T h e r ace for the c o n f e r e n c e c r o w n m a y be h i n d e r e d

b y the M I A A ' s p l a y e r of the w e e k ,

State, I n d i a n a c o m e s to t o w n o n Sat-

b y t w o injuries sustained Saturday,

R a c h e l S a u e r m a n ( ' 0 7 ) , p r o v e d to withstand any and every attack

urday. O n the other side o f the coin, the

one b y a n o t h e r captain E d H u e b n e r ('04), and another by mid-fielder

t h r o w n at t h e m b y t h e B e l l e s .

m e n kept their l e a g u e c h a m p i o n s h i p

Dave Gonthier ('06).

N e g e e n M a s g h a t i ' s ( ' 0 6 ) goal, with

g o a l s a l i v e with a 1-1 tie a g a i n s t A l m a o n Saturday. A l m a deflated the

Both p l a y e r s w e r e t a k e n o u t of the g a m e o n S a t u r d a y with M C L

was e n o u g h to win S a t u r d a y

high spirits of H o p e ' s H o m e c o m i n g

injuries. T h e D u t c h m e n will m i s s

m o r n i n g ' s c o n t e s t 1-0. "St. M a r y ' s is a g o o d t e a m , so w e

early with a goal at t h e t h i r t y - m i n u t e

H u e b n e r ' s league leading six assists

mark. The Dutchmen fought on h o w -

as they take o n A l b i o n at h o m e on

had t o c o m e out intense a n d r e a d y

e v e r and tied the g a m e with j u s t 10

Wednesday.

Saint M a r y ' s t o take on the everd a n g e r o u s Belles. T h e d e f e n s e , led

12 m i n u t e s t o play in r e g u l a t i o n ,

# 1 5 Devin McNeil ('06) drives past an Alma defender in Saturday's 1-1 tie.

m i n u t e s to go. "It w a s frustrating to tie t o a team

it b e c a m e c l e a r t h a t H o p e h a d

c r o w d , d a z z l e d f o r the s e c o n d time

H o p e ' s o f f e n s e , the second half w a s

Volloyball falls to CaMn

s c o r e d all the p o i n t s they n e e d e d to

this season, a g a i n c a m e to their f e e t

all a b o u t the r u n n i n g g a m e d u e t o

Stave Ad&lr

get. A d r i a n n e v e r s e e m e d t o get it g o i n g , o n l y getting 16 y a r d s in the

for another successful proposal

H o p e ' s big lead.

S P O R T S EDTTOR

f r o m the 5 0 - y a r d line.

VICTORY from 1

Dan Bloemers

first q u a r t e r and n e v e r m a k i n g it

T h e s e c o n d half l o o k e d m u c h

( ' 0 4 ) c a p p e d off o n e of his better l o o k i n g g a m e s this season with a

past the H o p e 4 0 - y a r d line in the

like the first h a l f , with H o p e a g a i n

T h e F l y i n g D u t c h fell t o C a l v i n last T h u r s d a y in three g a m e s

late t o u c h d o w n run. B u t l e r had a

32-30, 30-28 and 30-23. D e s p i t e the final s c o r e s , the m a t c h w a s closer than it l o o k e d o n

Mean-

g o o d d a y as well, despite

paper. H o p e f o u g h t b a c k e v e r y t i m e C a l v i n tried to put the g a m e

while, H o p e took t h e

b e i n g called o n to p a s s

ball with just u n d e r

m u c h less often than in previous games. He finished

away, c o n s i s t e n t l y f e e d i n g C a l v i n a steady diet of spikes f r o m Katie Hall ( ' 0 4 ) a n d t i p - o v e r s f r o m M c K e n n a T r o y a n ("04). Julie

entire half.

t w o m i n u t e s left in the

the day 13-25 for 2 3 7 yards

half and d r o v e 80 yards in just f o u r plays

and 3 T D ' s . Despite looking shaky

t h a n k s t o a spectacular strike f r o m Butler to

early this year, H o p e has n o w i m p r o v e d to an M I A A

sure-handed Jake Schrock ('05). Al-

e n c e a n d 4 - 2 overall. T h e y

t h o u g h t h e extra point

will play Tri-State next

f a i l e d , H o p e still w e n t into the l o c k e r r o o m at

w e e k o n the road in India n a . F o r H o p e , it will b e

h a l f t i m e w i t h a 16-0

their c h a n c e t o scope o u t

lead. D u r i n g halftime, in a

next y e a r ' s addition to the

move

44-yard touchdown

doubt

l e a d i n g 3 - 0 in the c o n f e r -

was

no

Athletic A s s o c i a t i o n . Tri-

by

State U n i v e r s i t y is a prov i s i o n a l m e m b e r of t h e

Brian F i e l h a u e r ' s ( ' 0 5 ) p r o p o s a l a m o n t h earlier, n e w l y e l e c t e d H o m e c o m i n g King

A//CHOH

PHOTOS BY ROB ONDRA

A Dutchman intercepts an Adrian pass.

K e n n y R o g e r s ( ' 0 7 ) p r o p o s e d to his girlfriend, a student from Ferris State University. Of course, the e x p e c t e d a n s w e r w a s g i v e n and the

v

t h r o u g h o u t the m a t c h , o v e r p o w e r i n g C a l v i n ' s d e f e n s e at times. W h i l e the c o m e b a c k s w e r e valiant, they w e r e loo f r e q u e n t , w h i c h w a s p a n of the p r o b l e m . H o p e n e v e r got in a r h y t h m b e c a u s e they w e r e c o n s t a n t l y b e i n g f o r c e d to r e s p o n d to 3 - 0 , 5 - 0 , or even 8-1 runs by the Knights. T h e loss o n T h u r s d a y , c o u p l e d with their loss the w e e k b e f o r e t o A l m a , d r o p s the o n c e M I A A leading Dutch back into third p l a c e t w o g a m e s behind C a l v i n and A l m a . W i t h only three c o n f e r e n c e g a m e s left, it a p p e a r s H o p e will b e p l a y i n g f o r s e c o n d or third place.

Michigan Intercollegiate

inspired

that

V a n d e r S l i c e ( ' 0 6 ) c o n t i n u e d t o i m p r o v e a n d hit the ball well

s e a s o n but will h a v e full

d o m i n a t i n g all a s p e c t s of the g a m e . A d r i a n ' s lone score w a s t h a n k s t o

0 5 season, w h e n they will e v e n t u -

one big p a s s play o n a d r i v e that

T r i - S t a t e is c o m i n g off a 4 5 - 8

For

Ice H o c k e y E a r l y B i r d T o u r n a m e n t i n M i d l a n d Hope 5, Northwood I (Friday)

N C A A for the 2003-04 m e m b e r s h i p in the 2 0 0 4 -

was otherwise sputtering.

Sports Wrapup

Calvin 6, Hope 5 (Saturday) T h e D u t c h m e n will travel to I n d i a n a p o l i s this w e e k e n d t o participate in the D 3 S h o w c a s e T o u r n a m e n t this w e e k e n d , taking o n F l o r i d a

ally j o i n the M I A A .

Atlantic o n Friday e v e n i n g .

loss to W i s c o n s i n L u t h e r a n .

Tight-end Jeff Eldersveld ('04) #88 takes a handoff from quarterback Phil Butler and attempts to run through Adrian's defensive line to pick up some yardage. The Dutchmen lead the MIAA with a 3-0 record with three more league games remaining in the season.

Women's Soccer Aquinas

I, Hope 0 (Monday) Volleyball

It took only six g a m e s t o d e f e a t both Olivet a n d Saint M a r y ' s o n T u e s d a y night at the D o w Center.

HOPE C O L L E G E ANCHOR

14! E I2TH ST P C BOX 9000 H O L L A N D Ml 49422-9000

Non-Profu Organizalion U.S. Posiage PAID Hope College


10-22-2003