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COLLEGE

anc or

OLLAND, MICHIGAN

79th ANNIVERSARY — 6

Hope College, Holland, Michigan

October 21, 1966

Board of Trustees: HONORARY DOCTORATE—Ekdal Buys, who resigned as chairman of the Board of Trustees, receives congratulations from President VanderWerf after being awarded an honorary Doctor of Laws. Behind them is Justice Dale Stoppeis of Grand Rapids.

Doctorate Given, Master Plan Unveiled at Dinner The f o r m e r c h a i r m a n of the B o a r d of Trustees received a n h o n o r a r y doctorate, the master plan was unveiled, and a n u m b e r of gifts a n d g r a n t s were presented to the college at the Recognition Dinner of Centennial Homecoming last S a t u r d a y night. Hope was pledged funds f r o m the Reformed Church a n d private sources to be used for the Student Cultural-Social Center and other capital improvements. EKDAL BUYS, who resigned as c h a i r m a n of the Board of Trustees last week, was a w a r d e d an h o n o r a r y Doctor of Laws degree in recognition of his contributions to the school both as a n administrator a n d a student. The presentation w a s m a d e by President Calvin VanderWerf, Dean of Academic Affairs William S. Mathis, a n d Justice Dale Stoppeis of G r a n d Rapids. Mr. Buys h a s been chairm a n of the Board for the past seven years. After the presentation of the degree, the new c h a i r m a n , H u g h De Free, unveiled the m a s t e r p l a n for the college, assisted by Student Senate President G e n e P e a r s o n and Vice President Susan Sonneveldt. Pictures of the p r o p o s e d buildings were shown and details of them a n d their construction were read b y Mr. DePree. Mr. DePree also a n n o u n c e d that a committee has b^en formed to p l a n the interior of the student center. It will be chaired by Director of Business Affairs Clarence H a n d l o g t e n a n d will include P e a r s o n , Bob T h o m p s o n a n d B a r b Timmer. A n u m b e r of d o n a t i o n s for the center were m a d e public. The class of 1925 d o n a t e d f u n d s for a faculty l o u n g e in the building, a n d a n a n o n y m o u s d o n o r contributed $ 4 0 , 0 0 0 t o w a r d its construction. Other contributions were also made. In a report on the Capital F u n d s Drive of the Reformed Churcn in America, Mr. R a y m o n d

Beckering, president of General Synod, a n n o u n c e d that the goal for the project is $6 million out of which $4 million will be used for higher education. Hope will receive $2 million of this. IN ADDITION the L a u d e Foundation contributed $ 2 5 0 0 to be used for a biology field station in Kollen Park. President V a n d e r Werf also a n n o u n c e d the creation of four new memorial scholarships. In other business, the college w a s a w a r d e d citations for distinguished service by the H o l l a n d C h a m b e r of Commerce a n d the B o a r d of Trustees of Northwestern College. Walter J. Wilson was also presented a sterling silyer Centennial medallion for the donation of a r a r e coin collection.

(Continued on page 2)

SEN. PHILIP HART

By George Arwady The Hope College Board of Trustees u n a n i m o u s l y a p p r o v e d to proceed with the construction of the Student Cultural-Social Center " a s rapidly as possible." This action was taken at the Board m e e t i n g l a s t Thursday and Friday. According to President Calvin VanderWerf, work on the structure will begin as s o o n as a combined s t u d e n t , faculty, Administration and trustee committee can decide on the interior makeup of the center a n d submit a report to the architect. He said that the g r o u n d b r e a k i n g should come "before the s u m m e r b r e a k . " PRESIDENT V A N D E R W E R F noted that in addition to the SCSC, new d o r m i t o r y Yacilities are being planned. " H o p e is to proceed with the building of two new residence halls as s o o n as f u n d s can be o b t a i n e d , " he said. Construction of these edifices, one for men stu-

Eichelberger Featured In UN Day Observance In observance of United Nations Day, Dr. Clark Eichelberger, vice president of the United Nations Association of the U.S., will speak at a n all-college assembly next M o n d a y at 11:30 a.m. Dr. Eichelberger has been active in o r g a n i z a t i o n s s u p p o r t i n g both the League of N a t i o n s and the United N a t i o n s and was a consultant to the American Delegation at the San P'rancisco Conference in 1945.

dents, the other for women, might begin "even before the student center," he added. The master p l a n unveiled last week at the Recognition Dinner does not call for a n y a d d i t i o n a l men's residences, but President VanderWerf noted that the p l a n "developed only on the p r o p e r t y we o w n " and that we are negotiating to " p u r c h a s e more l a n d " s u r r o u n d i n g the school. HE NOTED that "it would be a misconception to think that the plan included all the buildings that will be built at Hope College." The student center h a s a n estimated $2 million price tag. T h e overall m a s t e r p l a n calls for a projected $11 to $12 million. President VanderWerf said that all the construction hinges on " u n p r e cedented s u p p o r t f r o m t h e c h u r c h , alumni, friends in business a n d the c o m m u n i t y , a n d f r o m increased governmental a i d . " F i n a n c i n g for the SCSC will come f r o m the d o n a t i o n s m a d e by friends of the project, f r o m the money raised by student projects and f r o m such sources as the R e f o r m e d C h u r c h Capital F u n d s drive which was recently b e g u n , a c c o r d i n g to President VanderWerf. At the B o a r d meeting a n o t h e r a n o n y m o u s gift of $ 4 0 , 0 0 0 w a s announced, b r i n g i n g the total in the SCSC fund to over $ 1 5 0 , 0 0 0 . Additional funds will be " b o r r o w ed if needed at a r e a s o n a b l e in-

terest r a t e , " but the college hopes " t o p a y as we g o a l o n g , " the President said. PRESIDENT VanderWerf emphasized that the interest a n d concern shown by the student b o d y was " i n s t r u m e n t a l " in the B o a r d ' s decision. He c o m m e n d e d the leadership of the Student Senate and praised the e n t h u s i a s m of the renewed s t u d e n t center c a m p a i g n evidenced by the r e a p p e a r a n c e of SCSC buttons. The committee to p l a n the interior of the center will consist of 12 members. The c h a i r m a n of the committee will be Director of B u s i n e s s Affairs Clarence Handlogten. The three students appointed by the Student Senate President are Gene P e a r s o n , Bob T h o m p s o n and B a r b Timmer. In other business the B o a r d of Trustees h a s u n a n i m o u s l y voted the first m a j o r curriculum c h a n g e at Hope in over 3 0 years. This decision established three new degrees in the music department. AT T H E M E E T I N G a n e w B o a r d C h a i r m a n w a s chosen; Mr. H u g h DePree, president of the. H e r m a n Miller Co. o f Z e e l a n d w a s elected to succeed E k d a l Buys in that capacity. Mr. Buys was presented with a n h o n o r a r y Doctor of Laws at the Recognition Dinner. Dr. Fritz Y o n k m a n , vice president of the Ciba Corp. and a Hope a l u m n u s , is a new addition to the B o a r d of Trustees.

HE IS the a u t h o r of several b o o k s including " T h e United Nations Charter and What was Done at San F r a n c i s c o " a n d has chaired several c o m m i s s i o n s of United Nations Association research.

CLARK M. EICHELBERGER

Value of Academic Freedom To Be Viewed by Sen. Hart U.S. Sen. Phillip A. Hart, (Dem. -Mich.) will speak on the subject, " T h e I m p o r t a n c e of Academic Freedom in Higher E d u c a t i o n "

SCSC Will Go Up 'Before Sxunmer,' Hope to Construct New Dormitories

tonight at 8:15 p.m. in the Dimnent Chapel. Sen. H a r t was b o r n in Bryn Mawr, P e n n s y l v a n i a , on Dec. 10, 1912. He received his A.B. degree f r o m Georgetown University in 1934, a n d his law degree f r o m the University of Michigan in 1937. Sen. H a r t was admitted to the Michigan b a r in 1938. He then served with the F o u r t h I n f a n t r y Division U.S. A r m y and w a s disc h a r g e d as a lieutenant colonel ( 1 9 4 6 ) after being decorated with the Bronze Star, Purple Heart a n d Croix de Guerre ( F r a n c e ) . He practiced law in Detroit before entering public office. He h a s held offices such as U.S. attorney, E a s t e r n District of Michigan, 1952 -53; Lieutenant G o v e r n o r of Michi g a n , 1952-59 a n d legal a d v i s o r to f o r m e r g o v e r n o r of Michigan G. Mennen Williams 1953-54. In 1959 he was elected U.S. sena t o r f r o m Michigan. Senator H a r t belongs to the b a r association, A m e r i c a n Judicature Society a n d the American Society of International Law. His h o m e is in Mackinac Island.

He lectured f r o m 1922-1925 on National a n d International Affairs in the Radcliffe C h a u t a u q u a System. In 1939 Dr. Eichelberger held an a p p o i n t m e n t as consultant to the League of Nations Secretariat, was director a n d president of the Committee to Defend America by Aiding the Allies in 1941 a n d a m e m b e r of the fivem a n committee which p r e p a r e d the w o r k i n g draft of the United Nations Charter of the United States. HE HAS been decorated by the French Government, receiving the Chevalier Legion of H o n o r in 1934 a n d was g r a n t e d an h o n o r a r y Doctor of Laws f r o m K a l a m a zoo College in 1964. His most recent b o o k , published last year by H a r p e r a n d Row, is " U N : The First Twenty Y e a r s " a n d is available in French, Spanish and Arabic as well as English. DR, EICHELBERGER will be presented at the a s s e m b l y by Dr. Paul Fried, director of the Hope C o l l e g e office of International Education.

He is a g r a d u a t e of Northwestern University a n d h a s attended the University of Chicago. In addition, Dr. Eichelberger h a s for a l o n g time been a n observer in the United N a t i o n s a n d before in the L e a g u e of N a t i o n s .

i

Is

JAPANESE DRAMA—A member of the Hosho Noh Drama Troupe performs one of the ancient Japanese plays as he will in Dimnent Memorial Chapel Wednesday night. The performance is part of the Fine Arts Festival centered around Japanese culture.

Fine Arts Festival Offers Noh Drama Wednesday elaborately dressed, m a s k e d men.

N e x t Wednesday evening at 8:15 the H o s h o N o h T r o u p e , on its first tour of the United States, will p e r f o r m two N o h d r a m a s in Dimnent Memorial Chapel. The p e r f o r m a n c e is p a r t of the Fine A r t s Festival, which is built ar o u n d the theme of J a p a n e s e culture.

A mere gesture or simple movement as inconspicuous as t u r n i n g the head often symbolizes complex action or emotion. The text, in the J a p a n e s e l a n g u a g e of the 14th a n d 15th centuries, is sprinkled with poetic q u o t a t i o n s h u n d r e d s of y e a r s older.

N o h d r a m a , which is m o r e t h a n five centuries old, is a f o r m of serious d r a m a which is accompanied b y music of d r u m s , flute a n d chorus. All roles, including those of women, are p l a y e d b y

The 10-member t r o u p e is f r o m the H o s h o school, which dates f r o m the 14th century. Its leader, F u s a o H o s h o , h a s been designated a " h u m a n cultural asset" by the J a p a n e s e G o v e r n m e n t .


October 21, IMS

Hope College anchor

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Buys Receives Doctorate At Recognition Dinner a n d Dr. J o h n H o l l e n b a c h , c h a i r m a n of the E n g l i s h d e p a r t m e n t , discussed the p r e s i d e n c y of Dr. L u b b e r s . T h e t w o ex-presidents were p r e s e n t a n d were given a standing ovation. PRESIDENT VANDERWERF closed the p r o c e e d i n g s b y o b s e r v i n g t h a t H o p e w a s not " i n the b u s i n e s s of b u i l d i n g with stone, brick a n d m o r t a r , but of building lives. H o p e h a s a g r e a t s t a k e in the f u t u r e , " he said, " a n d with G o d ' s help, she will enter the seco n d c e n t u r y of her great and noble endeavor, standing o n the shoulders of giants."

(Continued From Page 1) T H E D I N N E R b e g a n with s h o r t p r e s e n t a t i o n s o n the history of H o p e College. Dr. Irwin J. Lubbers, p a s t p r e s i d e n t of Hope, s p o k e o n its e a r l y history, rec o u n t i n g the deeds of the presidents f r o m Dr. Phelps to Dr. Dimnent, c o m p a r i n g the a i m s of Alb e r t u s V a n R a a l t e a n d Roger Will i a m s , a n d o b s e r v i n g that H o p e w a s f o u n d e d f o r the p u r p o s e of b u i l d i n g men, not ministers. Dr. C l a r e n c e De G r a a f , professor of E n g l i s h , s p o k e o n the presidency of Dr. W y n a n d Wichers,

Correction {By the author o,

ONCE MORE UNT

The anchor would like to apologize for an error in the coverage of the Homecoming Recognition Dinner that appeared in last week's issue. The donation that made possible the purchase of a biology field station in Castle <not Kollen) P a r k was m a d e by the Holland Hitch Co. The donation of the Loutit Foundation of $25,000 was given for a capital project, foundation will be consulte d i n t h e f u t u r e t o determine the for which the S p e c i f i c project jn addition, {unds will be u s e d ^ r a r e coin collection was a j , Wilson. M a t t h e W ift o f M r s °

W a y b a c k in 1 9 5 3 I s t a r t e d c a m p u s l i f e . T o d a y , a f u l l 13 y( t h i s c o l u m n , f o r m y i n t e r e s t ir a n d lively a s e v e r . T h i s is call B u t w h e r e else can a w r i t e r f as the American campus ? W h e h o d ' e s so r o i l e d , p s y c h e s s o unf R i g h t now, f o r example, tho j u s t b e g u n , y o u ve a l r e a d y e n c asters: 1. You h a t e y o u r t e a c h e r s . 2. You h a t e y o u r c o u r s e s . ^ 3. You h a t e y o u r r o o m - m a t e f [ylhn 4. You h a v e n o t i m e to s t u d y , 5. You h a v e n o place to s t u d y r F r i e n d s , l e t us, w i t h o u t desp <*1 e , / f o n e by one. 1. Y o u h a t e y o u r t e a c h e r s looking at things their way. Take your English teacher, f o r i n s t a n c e . H e r e ' s a m a n w h o is o n e of t h e w o r l d ' s a u t h o r i t i e s on R o b e r t B r o w n i n g , y e t h e w e a r s $30 t w e e d s a n d a p r e - w a r necktie w h i l e h i s b r o t h e r S a m , a h i g h school d r o p o u t , e a r n s 70 t h o u a y e a r in a l u m i n u m s i d i n g . I s it s o h a r d t o u n d e r s t a n d w h y h e w r i t e s " F " on t o p of y o u r t h e m e s a n d " E e e y i c h ! " i n t h e m a r g i n ? I n s t e a d of h a t i n g h i m , should you not a d m i r e his dedication to s c h o l a r s h i p , h i s d i s d a i n f o r t h e b l a n d i s h m e n t s of c o m m e r c e ? Of c o u r s e y o u s h o u l d . You m a y flunk, b u t P i p p a p a s s e s . 2 . Y o u h a t e y o u r c o u r s e s . You s a y , f o r e x a m p l e , t h a t y o u d o n ' t s e e t h e u s e of s t u d y i n g M a c b e t h w h e n y o u a r e m a j o r i n g in v e t e r i n a r y m e d i c i n e . Y o u ' r e w r o n g , f r i e n d s . Believe me, some day w h e n you a r e r u n n i n g a busy kennel, y o u ' l l be m i g h t y g l a d you l e a r n e d " O u t , d a m n e d S p o t ! " 3. Y o u h a t e y o u r r o o m - m a t e s . T h i s is, u n q u e s t i o n a b l y , a b i g p r o b l e m - i n f a c t , t h e s e c o n d b i g g e s t p r o b l e m on A m e r i c a n c a m p u s e s . ( T h e first b i g g e s t , of c o u r s e , is o n w h i c h s i d e of y o u r m o r t a r b o a r d do y o u d a n g l e t h e t a s s e l a t C o m m e n c e m e n t ? ) B u t t h e r e is a n a n s w e r t o t h e r o o m m a t e problem: keep c h a n g i n g room-mates. T h e o p t i m u m i n t e r v a l , I h a v e f o u n d , is e v e r y f o u r h o u r s . 4. You have no time to study. F r i e n d s , I ' m glad to rep o r t t h e r e is a s i m p l e w a y to find e x t r a t i m e i n y o u r b u s y s c h e d u l e . All y o u h a v e t o do is b u y s o m e P e r s o n n a S u p e r Stainless Steel Blades. T h e n you w o n ' t be w a s t i n g precious hours hacking a w a y with i n f e r i o r blades, m a n g l i n g y o u r f a c e a g a i n a n d a g a i n in a t e d i o u s , f e c k l e s s e f f o r t t o w i n n o w your whiskers. P e r s o n n a shaves you quickly and slickly, easily and breezily, hacklessly, scrapelessly, t u g lessly, nicklessly, scratchlessly, matchlessly. F u r t h e r m o r e , P e r s o n n a Blades last and last. Moreover, t h e y a r e availa b l e b o t h in d o u b l e - e d g e a n d I n j e c t o r s t y l e . A n d , a s if t h i s w e r e n ' t e n o u g h , P e r s o n n a is n o w o f f e r i n g y o u a c h a n c e t o g r a b a fistful of $100 bills. T h e P e r s o n n a S u p e r S t a i n l e s s S t e e l S w e e p s t a k e s is off a n d r u n n i n g ! You c a n w i n $ 1 0 , 0 0 0 a n d even more. Get over to y o u r P e r s o n n a dealer f o r details and an entry blank. Don't j u s t s t a n d t h e r e ! 5 . Y o u h a v e n o p l a c e t o s t u d y . T h i s is a t h o r n y o n e , I'll a d m i t , w h a t w i t h t h e l i b r a r y so j a m m e d a n d t h e d o r m s s o n o i s y . B u t w i t h a l i t t l e i n g e n u i t y , y o u c a n s t i l l find a q u i e t , d e s e r t e d s p o t - l i k e t h e t i c k e t office of t h e l a c r o s s e t e a m . Or a testimonial dinner for the dean. Or the nearest recruiting station.

Senate Asks:

Why $1.25 for I.D. Cards? A $ 1 . 2 5 fee f o r a n I.D. c a r d , tacked o n to the $ 1 0 c h a r g e f o r ail c u l t u r a l events, c a m e in f o r s h a r p criticism at the weekly Student Senate meeting o n M o n d a y e v e n i n g in G r a v e s A u d i t o r i u m . S e n a t o r B o b T h o m p s o n led off the d i s c u s s i o n of this issue, s a y ing, "We p a i d $ 1 0 . 0 0 to get into all c u l t u r a l events, a n d now we h a v e to p a y $ 1 . 2 5 to get a c a r d which w e ' v e a l r e a d y p a i d $ 1 0 for." P R E S I D E N T Gene P e a r s o n enlightened the Senate a s to the financial implications. Last year the student senate received $ 4 , 5 0 0 f o r the E n t e r t a i n m e n t Series a n d w a s able to sell tickets to m a n y students. Last y e a r 9 0 0 students b o u g h t activity c a r d s , while this y e a r all 1 , 8 0 0 will h a v e them. U s i n g a d d i tion, P e a r s o n c o n c l u d e d , " W e ' r e g o i n g to get less e n t e r t a i n m e n t t h a n we got last y e a r . " T h e g e n e r a l sentiment concerning the a d d i t i o n a l $ 1 . 2 5 cost of the c a r d w a s expressed b y President P e a r s o n w h o stated, " 1 w a s never a s k e d if I w a n t e d m y picture in c o l o r on m y I.D. c a r d . " T H E PROBLEM was referred to a committee, headed b y J e r r y P o o r t i n g a , which will investigate the exact b r e a k - d o w n of the $ 1 0 which e a c h student p a y s a n d prep a r e s o m e action on the $ 1 . 2 5 charge. In other business, the Senate elected three m e m b e r s to the joint student - faculty - a d m i n i s t r a t i o n committee to p l a n the new Student Center building. The three r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s elected were Gene Pearson, Bob T h o m p s o n and B a r b a r a Timmer. S e n a t o r B o b D o n i a discussed the s e n i o r c l a s s p r o p o s a l to allow senior w o m e n to eat off c a m p u s . He a s k e d f o r help f r o m b o t h the A.W.S. a n d the S e n a t o r s in in-

vestigating further what women students felt a b o u t the p r o p o s e d change. S E V E R A L S E N A T O R S expressed s u p p o r t f o r h o u s i n g senior w o m e n In the c o t t a g e s w h e r e f r e s h m e n a r e n o w h o u s e d . When one S e n a t o r s u g g e s t e d t h a t w o m en w o u l d not be allowed to c o o k b e c a u s e of state fire r e g u l a t i o n s , s e v e r a l o t h e r s pointed out that men c a n c o o k In c o t t a g e kitchens now, this p r o v o k i n g f u r t h e r criticism of the A d m i n i s t r a t i o n ' s position. In o t h e r b u s i n e s s , the Senate received a letter f r o m Mr. Boersm a , H e a d C u s t o d i a n , w h o noted that the m i n i m u m a n n u a l cost for new g r a s s is o v e r $ 1 5 0 0 a year. Students were a d m o n i s h e d b y President P e a r s o n to r e s p o n d a p p r o p r i a t e l y a n d get off it. Pears o n a l s o reminded s t u d e n t s that this a m o u n t w a s t a k e n f r o m student tuition. D a v e Allen w a s t h a n k e d f o r his fine w o r k as h o m e c o m i n g chairm a n , a n d President P e a r s o n urged e v e r y o n e to h e a r S e n a t o r H a r t at 8 : 1 5 tonieb^ GLEN the issue es. After ties o n

PONTIER a g a i n raised of cancellation of classp o i n t i n g out the difficulF r i d a y , he c o n c l u d e d .

" T h e p u r p o s e of w h y we a r e here In the first p l a c e Is to get to c l a s s . " D a v e Allen r e s p o n d e d b y defendi n g the q u a l i t y of s p e a k e r s w h o were presented last F r i d a y . B o b D o n l a stated t h a t he d i d n ' t k n o w w h a t w a s g o i n g o n conc e r n i n g last s p r i n g ' s p r o p o s a l to set u p a c o m m u n i t y a s s i s t a n c e program. D o n Luidens, S o p h o m o r e c l a s s president, then r o s e to a t t a c k the o v e r l a p which he felt w a s g o i n g o n o r g a n i z a t i o n a l l y . He u r g e d the m e r g e r of the c o m m i t t e e s to s t u d y related p r o b l e m s . " W e need a committee to s t u d y the o v e r l a p in committees a n d then eliminate it," he o b s e r v e d . P E A R S O N and Bob T h o m p s o n then defended the s t r u c t u r e a s it n o w exists. P e a r s o n s a i d , " T h e committees were set u p to a v o i d o v e r l a p . " He stated that if everyone c o - o p e r a t e d this w o u l d w o r k out. A motion was m a d e and passed that a committee be a p p o i n t e d to meet a n d e v a l u a t e registration a n d talk with Mr. H a n d l o g t e n . President P e a r s o n s u g g e s t e d the possibility of r e s u m i n g a r t films in the P a r k T h e a t e r . T h e Senate e x p r e s s e d its g e n e r a l a p p r o v a l of this idea.

Kooiker Recital Dedicated New Concert Grand Piano Last S u n d a y , Dr. A n t h o n y K o o i k e r presented a p i a n o recital in d e d i c a t i o n of a new Steinway concert g r a n d p i a n o . T h i s p i a n o w a s o n e of the two p u r c h a s e d with the m o n e y a n o n y m o u s l y d o n a t e d to H o p e College for this p u r p o s e . T h e other one is a Y a m a h a g r a n d p i a n o which w a s dedicated at a recital in M a y . Dr. Kooi-

THE STUDENT CHURCH worships

Sunday, October 23 at 10:45 a.m. Dimnent Chapel Dr. Robert Nykamp of Western Seminary Preaching Sermon: "Powerless Christianity Chaplain W . Hillegonds Mr. Roger Davis, Organist Ushering — members of Centurian Fraternity

ker, p r o f e s s o r of Music a n d director of the p i a n o d e p a r t m e n t at Hope, expressed the g r a t i t u d e of the entire college f o r these gifts. These p i a n o s m a k e possible a m o r e extensive d e v e l o p m e n t of the creative interest a n d talent of H o p e students. There a r e a total of forty p i a n o s in the music d e p a r t m e n t , which a r e p r o v i d e d for three p u r p o s e s : p r i v a t e practice, t e a c h i n g in the c l a s s r o o m a n d s t u d i o , a n d public p e r f o r m a n c e s .

Cnr Wash Will Support Indian Town The missions committee of the student church will be holding a c a r wash tomorrow, October 22, f r o m 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. The c a r s will be washed in the music building parking lot and the cost is only $1. The money earned will be sent to Madras, India, where it will be used to roof a building at a youth c a m p known a s "Abode of P e a c e " .

Harbor Knit Shop Culver Street, Saugatuck

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You see, f r i e n d s ? When you've got a problem, don't lie down and quit. Attack I Remember: America did not become the world's greatest producer of milk solids and sorghum by running away f r o m a fight! '

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© 1966, MM Shulman

The makers of Personna Super Stainless Steel Blades (double-edge or Injector style) and Burma-Shave (regular or menthol) are pleased (or apprehensive) to bring you another year of Max Shulman9s uninhibited, uncensored column.

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Open Daily 10-5 Except Sunday


October 21. 1966

Hope College anchor

Page 3

Week to Spotlight Student Plays 'Andorra' and 'American Dream' The Bard s a n g it this way: "All the world's a stage; the men a n d women merely actors." And again, "Life's but a walking shadow, a p o o r player that struts and frets his hour upon the stage a n d then is heard no m o r e . " At Hope the "two h o u r ' s traffic" runs across some old b o a r d s in an old building. The institution is the Hope College Little Theater and it shares the fourth floor of the Science Building with a section of the art department. Tonight the Little Theater opens its d r a m a t i c season with the presentation of F d w a r d A l b e e V ' T h e American Dream " The production will be given twice at 7 and 9 p.m. The play is one of two which are being presented this week as p a r t of the speech department's theater seminar. BOTH OF THE productions are student-directed, " T h e American D r e a m " directed by Alan Jones and J a n e Riso c o o r d i n a t i n g the presentation of " A n d o r r a " by the playwright Max Frisch. Miss Riso's play will be presented next Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. in the Little Theater. Both plays are free. Albee's " T h e American D r e a m " is one of his early plays and h a s been classified by critics as "theater of the a b s u r d . " The play satirizes the American middle class, its mores and material s t a n d a r d s . Since the initial success of this play, " W h o ' s Afraid of Virginia

ITALIAN ORCHESTRA—The Orchestra Michaelangelo di Firenze, which plays without a conductor, will perform at the Civic Center next Monday evening. Principally a string group. It is the most recently formed of the Italian Chamber Orchestras.

Italian Chamber Group Performs Monday Night Next M o n d a y evening at the Civic Center, the Cultural Affairs Committee will present one of the m a j o r attractions of the year, the Orchestra M i c h a e l a n g e l o d i Firenze. The Orchestra Michaelangelo di Firenze is the most recently formed of the Italian C h a m b e r Orchestras but has immediately earned itself the reputation of being the outstanding o r g a n i z a t i o n of its type in the world today. The g r o u p , which is principally a string orchestra, uses horns, oboes and h a r p s i c h o r d , as well as featuring a n u m b e r of instrumental solos.

Repertoire for the ensemble is varied a n d extensive including works r a n g i n g from the great Italian composers to the literature of Handel, Bach, H a y d n , Mozart, Mendelssohn, Tchaikovsky and Dvorak. M a n y of their works will be a part of the p r o g r a m presented by the Orchestra. The Orchestra Michaelangelo di Firenze exhibits a blending of individuals to create a m o n g them the kind of united performance which only a small g r o u p can achieve. Utilizing neither a conductor nor p i a n o , each is an artist of t h e highest professional skills.

Woolf" and " T h e Z o o S t o r y , " Albee has not fared as well with the critics on B i o a d w a y . Controversy s u r r o u n d e d last y e a r ' s play, " T i n y Alice," with m a n y critics complaining that the play was incomprehensible. PLAYWRIGHT Frisch in "And o r r a " takes a look at organized pressure groups, including merchants, ministers and doctors. According to Miss Riso, the characters engage in petty squabbles and jealousies which are insignificant enough individually but become d a n g e r o u s under collective pressure. Directing the Little Theater this year is George Ralph, assistant professor of speech. He has announced that three plays will be presented this year, the first of w h i c h is James Bridie's play, "What Say They?" on Nov. 16, 17, 18 and 19. This year's theater will have three technical directors, one for each of the plays. Fach of the directors has had professional ex-

perience, and last y e a r ' s director of the theater, J a m e s Malcolm, described as " o n e of the most outs t a n d i n g undergraduate p r o g r a m s in d r a m a In the c o u n t r y . " Mr. Malcolm is taking a year leave of absence to work on his doctorate. T H E FIRST technical director to visit the c a m p u s is Richard B l a n d who will assist in "What Say They?" He is a g r a d u a t e of Yaie School of D r a m a and has worked on several New York productions as well as serving as design consultant for NBC. Mr. Bianci will address Pallette and Masque, the Little Theater organization, next Monday night at 7:30 p.m. in the Little Theater. Mike Vogas, president of Pallette and Masque, said that he encourages all Hope students to work in the Little Theater, either in the plays themselves or on one of the m a n y production crews which are responsible for each play. " C o m e on u p , " said Vogas; "there's always work t o b e d o n e . "

Both in Physics Dept.

Berry, Marker Two Hope College physics professors h a v e just earned their Ph.D. degrees; Dr. Ronald Beery, for his work in m e a s u r i n g m u o n scatterings in a s p a r k c h a m b e r , and Dr. David Marker, for his

Receive

theoretical work in the interaction of elementary particles. The Physics Department is now c o m p l e t e l y staffed with faculty m e m b e r s h a v i n g their Ph.D. degrees.

DR. RONALD W. BEERY

DR. DAVID MARKER "Coca-tola" ond"Cokr art rtglttirtd Irodi-markt whkh Idinllfy tnly Hu product of Thf Cwo-Ctla (ompottf

Ph.Ds

The experimental work which was done with the s p a r k c h a m b e r at Michigan State University, is being continued at Hope College. The whole set-up was moved to Hope College and two Hope students, Randy Bos and A1 Brunsting, are continuing the experimentation. Dr. Beery, whose work is in the field of high energy and nuclear physics, is a g r a d u a t e of Western Michigan University. He received his Ph.D. degree from Michigan State University. Dr. Marker, who is a g r a d u a t e of Grinnell College, received his Ph.D. degree from Penn State University where he also earned his A.M. degree. A theoretical physicist, his doctoral thesis was on "Proton-Proton-Bremsstrahlung" cist, Dr. Marker, who is a g r a d u a t e of Grennell College, received his Ph.D. d e g r e e from Penn State University w h e r e he also earned his A.M. d e g r e e . A theoretical physicist, his doctoral thesis was on "Proton-Proton-Bremsstrahlung."

1 f

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LITTLE THEATER—Jane Bouman, Bruce Ronda and Joanne Dunnlcan rehearse a scene from "The American Dream," by Edward Albee. The performance is produced by Alan Jones as part of a seminar on theater direction and will take place this Friday and Saturday evenings.

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Page 4

October 21, ISM

Hope College aackor

cmdjor editorial

On Cniturai Affairs

C

O N T R O V E R S Y o v e r t h e C u l t u r a l Affairs

in last year's e n t e r t a i n m e n t series was largely

p r o g r a m d o m i n a t e d t h e discussion a t last

u n d e r w r i t t e n b y t h e J u n i o r C h a m b e r of C o m -

M o n d a y ' s S t u d e n t S e n a t e m e e t i n g , a n d as

merce in H o l l a n d . T h i s year s t u d e n t s will b e

m i g h t b e e x p e c t e d , a c o m m i t t e e was a p p o i n t e d

a b l e t o h e a r t h e s a m e n u m b e r of c o n c e r t s anci

to study the situation. / It s time this situation

the

w a s c l a r i f i e d , so t h a t t h e r e a l issues c a n c o m e

n o t b e o n t h e b a c k s of o n l y a p o r t i o n of t h e

to the fore.

student body.

financial

L a s t y e a r t h e B o a r d of T r u s t t e s v o t e d t o

: ^ v urn*,

responsibility for the concert will

Others

have

argued

that

the

Cultural

a d d a $ 1 0 C u l t u r a l a f f a i r s f e e t o t h e fees w h i c h

Affairs

a s t u d e n t m u s t pay w h e n h e enrolls at H o p e

t h i n g s , s u c h as t h e

College. T h u s , the C u l t u r a l Affairs c o m m i t t e e

committee

h a s a c o r e of r o u g h l y $ 1 8 , 0 0 0 , p l u s a p r o x i m a t e -

films;

ly $ 6 , 0 0 0 f r o m t h e C o l l e g e ' s t o t a l b u d g e t , a n d

c h u r e f o r t h e c o n v e n i e n c e of t h e s t u d e n t s , ac-

a n e s t i m a t e d $ 2 , 0 0 f r o m t i c k e t sales, b r i n g i n g

c o r d i n g to Dr. R i d e r .

program is,

rather,

is

in

underwriting Mortar

fact,

too

Board

not

many

films.

The

underwriting

they were i n c l u d e d

in

the

the bro-

t h e b u d g e t ' s total t o over $26,000. As D r .

Morrette

Rider, chairman

of

the

c o m m i t t e e s t a t e s b e l o w , e v e r y d o l l a r of t h i s w i l l g o t o w a r d s p r o v i d i n g c u l t u r a l a c t i v i t i e s f o r students

this

year.

Furthermore^

the

estimated

I

F T H E C O M P L A I N T is t h a t t h e r e a r e t o o m a n y c u l t u r a l e v e n t s w h i c h a r e n o t of t h e s t u d e n t e n t e r t a i n m e n t series type, the issue

is o n e of v a l u e w h i c h c o u l d b e d e b a t e d ad nau-

$10,000 to $15,000 lost on last s u m m e r ' s a b o r t -

seam.

ive e n t e r t a i n m e n t

a p p o i n t e d by t h e S t u d e n t S e n a t e , a p p r o v e d t h e

series

will

not

be

applied

against the committee's budget.

The

f a c t is t h a t

committee's budget

and

the student were

members,

involved

in all

d i s c u s s i o n of it.

S

OME

HAVE

students

OBJECTED

bought

t h a t since 900

T h e only l e g i t i m a t e g r i p e w h i c h the Sen-

entertainment

a t e h a s is t h e c h a r g e of $ 1 . 2 5 f o r t h e n e w i d e n t i -

student

s e r i e s t i c k e t s f o r five d o l l a r s l a s t y e a r a n d

Don't worry, pal. That little scratch won't affect our decigion.'

A White House Letter

t h e $4,500 w h i c h t h e c o m m i t t e e has a l l o t t e d f o r

f o r s u c h a fee o t h e r

student

r e a l i z e t h e cost of p r i n t i n g t h e c a r d s a n d ^ d o e s n ' t

entertainment

series-type

performers

than

the College d i d n ' t

h a v e e n o u g h m o n e y t o p a y f o r t h e m . I t is n o t

F i r s t of a l l , t h e b u d g e t w a s a p p r o v e d by t h e

f a i r t o ask s t u d e n t s t o p a y f o r a c a r d w h i c h w i l l

s t u d e n t m e m b e r s h i p o n t h e c o m m i t t e e last y e a r ,

a d m i t t h e m t o e v e n t s f o r w h i c h t h e y h a v e al-

a s w e l l as t h e e n t i r e f a c u l t y . S e c o n d l y , D r . R i d e r

ready paid.

states t h a t t h e c o m m i t t e e discovered t h a t $4,500

In sum, students are getting a better deal

was not e n o u g h , a n d he estimates that the total

t h a n ever b e f o r e w i t h the n e w C u l t u r a l Affairs

a m o u n t w h i c h will b e s p e n t on g r o u p s s u c h as

p r o g r a m . T h e $ 1 0 f e e is n o t e x o r b i t a n t f o r t h e

t h e N e w Society a n d

o p p o r t u n i t i e s o b t a i n e d , a n d it p r o v i d e s a t l e a s t

the Swingle Singers will

a m o u n t to m o r e t h a n $9,000.

a c o r e of w o r k i n g c a p i t a l f o r

I n a d d i t i o n , it m u s t b e b o r n e i n m i n d t h a t

THE WHITE HOUSE

c a r d s . T h i s is a n a b s u r d fee, e v e n if t h e

c a r d s a r e i n l i v i n g c o l o r . T h e r e is n o r a t i o n a l e

was not fair.

i

fication

t h i s y e a r a l l s t u d e n t s w e r e r e q u i r e d t o p a y $10,

a t least o n e of t h e c o n c e r t s w h i c h w a s i n c l u d e d

financing

activ-

ities w h i c h c a n a n d m u s t e n r i c h t h e l i f e of t h e s t u d e n t s of t h i s C o l l e g e .

WASHINGTON

Readers Speak Out

October 7, 1966 Dear President VanderWerf:

Dear Editor...

F o r one hundred y e a r s Hope College has been a nucleus of vigorous intellectual pursuit and educational fulfillment. As you celebrate this century of distinguished service to the nation's education, you h a v e my w a r m congratulations. Your fine record attests to the continuing role of the smaller college ia. the full realization of the nation's potential. It is a tribute to the wisdom of your founding fathers. And it is a promise of greater opportunity in a brighter future. The vision and vitality of your faculty, students and alumni assure the growing contribution of Hope College both to academic excellence and to national greatness. Sincerely,

Lyndon B. Johrison

i

<OUJOI

anchor

OUAND, MICNiOAN

Published ination under

weekly periods

during

the college

year except

by and for the students

the authority

of the Student

of Hope

Senate

vacation,

holiday

and exam-

College,

Holland,

Michigan,

Publication^

Board.

Entered as second class matter at the post office of Holland, Michigan. i942?, at the special rate of postage provided for in Section 1101 of Act of Subscription: $5 per year. Printed: /eeland Record, Zeeland, Michigan. Congress, Oct. 3, 1917, and authorized Ort. 19, 1917. Member: Associated Collegiate Press. Michigan Collegiate Press Assn. Office: Ground Floor of Craves Hall. Phone: 569 2122 Editor . . . . John M. Mulder Managing Editor . George Arwady News Editor . . Tom Hildebrandt Layout Editor . . Dick Angstadt Advertising Manager . Bob Schrorder Business Manager . . Jim Marcus Board Editorial

of

Assistants

Features Critiques Sports

.

.

.

Editors .

. Bob Donia, Bruce Ronda Nancy Aumann, Pat Canfield . Keith Taylor Neal Sobania

National

News

Rewrite

Dick

..

Harold

Headlines Copy

.

.

Carol Kotesski, Proof

.

.

.

.

.

Jim

Kooi Kamm Pohl

Janice Bakker, Lou Vander Naald Betty

Lou

Smith

Photography . . . Dick Angstadt, Donald Page, Chuck Lieder Darkroom Assistants . Jeff Powell, Vincent Chang Columnist . . Gordy Korstange Cartoonists . . . Muck Menning, Greg Phillips

The October 14th issue of the A n c h o r p r i n t e d a letter f r o m J i m S k i v i n g t o n which leveled s e v e r a l c h a r g e s at the college a d m i n i s t r a tion, s o m e of these at the Cult u r a l Affairs P r o g r a m . Mr. Skiv i n g t o n ' s letter c o n t a i n e d such a s t r a n g e r e l a t i o n s h i p to the t r u t h of the m a t t e r that I c a n o n l y conclude that he m a d e n o attempt to seek out the facts. The letter states t h a t the Cult u r a l Affairs fee will net the s c h o o l better t h a n $ 3 0 , 0 0 0 . T h e actual net is less t h a n $ 1 8 , 0 0 0 , since the $ 1 0 . 0 0 C u l t u r a l Affairs fee is a n a n n u a l fee a n d not collected at second semester r e g i s t r a t i o n except f r o m those students not enrolled at H o p e d u r i n g the first semester. T O T H I S $ 1 8 , 0 0 0 the college a d d s a s u m of $ 6 , 7 5 0 a l l o c a t e d to C u l t u r a l Affairs f r o m the gene r a l college b u d g e t . In a d d i t i o n to these two s o u r c e s of income, a d d i t i o n a l f u n d s a r e r a i s e d t h r o u g h the s a l e of d o o r admissions through townspeople f o r a n u m b e r of the C u l t u r a l Aff a i r s events. T h e total C u l t u r a l Affairs b u d g e t then c o m e s to a f i g u r e s l i g h t l y in excess of $ 2 6 , 0 0 0 , e v e r y d o l l a r of which is allocated to o p e r a t i o n of the Cultural Affairs p r o g r a m . One h u n d r e d percent of the students' c u l t u r a l a f f a i r s fees, not one-third a s stated in the letter, is allocated to these p r o g r a m s p l u s a n a d d i t i o n a l a m o u n t in excess of $ 8 , 0 0 0 f r o m the g e n e r a l college b u d g e t a n d d o o r s a l e of tickets. A n y p r o f i t a r i s i n g f r o m d o o r sales is r e t u r n e d to the Cult u r a l A f f a i r s b u d g e t f o r the schedu l i n g of f u t u r e p r o g r a m s . T H E P U B L I S H E D C u l t u r a l Aff a i r s p r o g r a m lists o n l y events f o r the first semester a n d a s e c o n d p r o g r a m will be p u b l i s h e d in J a n u a r y . A full f i n a n c i a l s t a t e m e n t of the C u l t u r a l Affairs p r o g r a m is a v a i l a b l e to a n y o n e w i s h i n g to

e x a m i n e it. I h o p e that the a b o v e statements a l o n g with the o b v i o u s success of the p r o g r a m s which h a v e been p r e s e n t e d to d a t e will p r o v i d e a true picture of o u r Cult u r a l Affairs series. Morrette Rider, C h a i r m a n C u l t u r a l A f f a i r s C ommittee After m u c h t a l k a b o u t the future of H o p e College, it w a s enc o u r a g i n g to see the Master P l a n that w a s p r o p o s e d in last week's a n c h o r . H o w e v e r , even in the v e r y g e n e r a l d e s c r i p t i o n of the new facilities, it s e e m s that there h a s been a n incredible lack of t h o u g h t in relating o u r f u t u r e needs to w h a t h a s been p r o p o s e d a s a p l a n . T h e administration has prop o s e d a n i n c r e a s e of a b o u t 7 0 0 students b y 1 9 7 6 (therefore a b o u t 3 5 0 m e n ) w i t h o u t c o n s i d e r i n g the construction of a new m e n ' s dorm i t o r y . P r o p o s e d new d o r m i t o r y s p a c e f o r w o m e n c o m e s to a b o u t 4 1 5 beds. However, Voorhees and v a n Vleck will be lost, a n d the 2 5 r o o m s in Phelps with three girls in them s h o u l d be reduced to 2 girls per r o o m . This is a loss of a b o u t 2 2 5 b e d s , l e a v i n g a n increase of o n l y 190 beds. T h i s does not t a k e into account wom e n ' s cottages lost b e c a u s e of new construction. We a r e left then, with faculties f o r o n l y 1 9 0 new students (all w o m e n ) , while a n estimated 7 0 0 a d d i t i o n a l s t u d e n t s will b e o n campus. L a s t , but h a r d l y least is the p l a n f o r a field h o u s e which will h o l d o n l y 2 0 0 0 p e o p l e for b a s ketball g a m e s . While I a m not p r e s u m i n g t h a t e v e r y student will attend e v e r y g a m e , the c a p a c i t y is f a r t o o s m a l l when one considers t h a t this b u i l d i n g m u s t s e r v e m a n y y e a r s p a s t 1976. In g e n e r a l , it seems t h a t this Master P l a n will be o u t d a t e d be-

f o r e it is completed, l e a v i n g H o p e in the s a m e s i t u a t i o n it is n o w , only further behind. Steve Struck The Henry Brandon Hurters t u r n e d in a fine p e r f o r m a n c e of c h e a p talent well p a s t its best. It a m u s e d m e to watch m y $ 3 fox trot f r o m m y p a i s l e y wallet a n d b o s s a n o v a a c r o s s the f l o o r to the tune of " A n c h o r s A w a y . " I kept l o o k i n g for Betty D a v i s to s h o w up in her ' 3 9 Buick but she m u s t h a v e r u n s h o r t of g a s r a t i o n s n e a r where the J o h n Powers p l a n e w a s u n f o r t u n a t e l y detained. Barclay Hayseed (or whatever his n a m e is o r w a s ) m a i n t a i n e d the consistent b a d smell of the w h o l e s h o w . His d i l a p i d a t e d , g a n g r e n e chicken s y m b o l i c a l l y capsuled the o p i n i o n s of m a n y w h o felt that the w h o l e t h i n g l a y e d a n Egg. When I p r e s e n t e d m y r i s i n g s u n ticket at the d o o r , I f o u n d myself welcomed b y the sweating, conf u s e d a n d 3 2 s k i d d o m o d s punchi n g it u p at the well water table. U n f o r t u n a t e l y due to the tense a n d i r r i t a b l e c o n d i t i o n s , I co u ld not get into p o s i t i o n to f r u g a few tomatoes atthatpseudo-frustrated G u y L o m b a r d Š . I t o o k direct a i m at his 9 inch tie a n d hit him s q u a r e o n the l a p e l of his zoot suit. I m u s t a s k myself in the true l i b e r a l a r t s t r a d i t i o n w h a t the H.B. o n the m u s i c s t a n d s really s t o o d for. Horribly b a d o r happily bombed. I a s k y o u s t u d e n t s where f o r the price of t h r e e Windmill I s l a n d P a s s p o r t s c a n a n y o n e find a g o o d m u s i c a l c o m e d y these d a y s . T i m o n of the Pine G r o v e Recently we celebrated o u r m o mentous Centennial H o m e c o m i n g , " c e n t e n n i a l " i n that it r a i n e d (Continued on P a g e 6)


October 21, 1966

Page i

Only Fear Is Ourselves

Mueller S e e s Bright F u t u r e

PANEL DISCUSSION—Col. John Powers, former public affairs officer for NASA (left), and Dr. Mortimer Adler, director of the Institute for Philosophical Research, ponder a question posed at the panel discussion featuring the Centennial Homecoming speakers.

Powers Cites Progress Of U.S. Space Program " T h e a g e of 'the s k y ' s the limit' h a s p a s s e d u s by. T h e skies s u r r o u n d i n g o u r p l a n e t h a v e been pierced like a g i a n t pin c u s h i o n by m a n . " This w a s the subject of a n add r e s s delivered b y Colonel .John " S h o r t y " Powers, a pioneer in Project M e r c u r y of the A m e r i c a n s p a c e effort. Power s a d d r e s s dealt l a r g e l y with the p r o g r e s s we h a v e m a d e in the field of s p a c e e x p l o r a t i o n a n d the benefits that A m e r i c a n s a r e receiving f r o m it now a n d m i g h t receive in the future. He cited the field of c o m m u n i c a t i o n s a s o n e sector of o u r civilization that h a s benefited g r e a t l y f r o m s p a c e science. Besides the present c o m m u n i c a t i o n s satellites such as T e l s t a r , p l a n s a r e at h a n d to set u p " a world wide, un - j a m m a b l e communications system that w o u l d i g n o r e geo-political b o u n d a r i e s . "

Powers a f f i r m e d the belief that m a n is the central figure of the entire enterprise. " T o truly unders t a n d space, we must send m a n . " He predicted that if all goes well we could be p l a c i n g a m a n o n the m o o n ' s s u r f a c e b y the fall of 1 9 6 8 In a c c o r d a n c e to m e theme of " E d u c a t i o n for Responsible Leade r s h i p , " Powers called for educators to meet this c h a l l e n g e of this decade with d r i v e a n d d e t e r m i n a tion, n o t i n g that "it is t o d a y ' s j u n i o r high s c h o o l s that a r e training the first geo-chemists, a n d g e o physicists, the first extra-terrestrial l a b o r e r s " "It is to t o d a y ' s e d u c a t o r s a n d to t o d a y ' s students that the challenge is presented, the c h a l l e n g e of a n s w e r i n g the q u e s t i o n of how far, how fast, a n d how high c a n m a n , a n infinitesimal being in relation to the forces of n a t u r e , a d v a n c e into the u n t o u c h e d exp a n s e of s p a c e . "

" N o t h i n g to F e a r but Ourselves" w a s the topic of the address b y Merrill Mueller last T h u r s d a y evening. Mr. Mueller, a r a d i o a n d television c o m m e n t a t o r for N B C , was the second s p e a k e r in the Centennial Homec o m i n g series on " E d u c a t i o n for Responsible L e a d e r s h i p . " Mr. Mueller s u r v e y e d the economic, political a n d e d u c a t i o n a l situation in the world t o d a y and m a d e predictions a s to their outcome. His p u r p o s e was to exa m i n e the r elations hip of comm u n i c a t i o n , e d u c a t i o n a n d tomorrow. He cited a n increase in collective student political action which he o b s e r v e d w a s g e n e r a l l y antiwar. Student o r g a n i z a t i o n s h a v e been o n the rise since the 1950's, which h a v e been called in some circles the " G o l d e n Age of the Fat, H a p p y C a m p u s . " This is the result of the advent of the " m u l t i v e r s i t y " which has disillusioned m a n y students, he said. Mr. Mueller a d d e d that the o b l i g a t i o n of the college t o d a y is to d i s c o v e r t h r o u g h consultation the best place for e a c h student a n d help him attain it. The g o v e r n m e n t , he noted, has been very active in a i d i n g the r a p i d l y g r o w i n g universities and colleges. Six million d o l l a r s has been g r a n t e d o u t r i g h t a n d riders h a v e b r o u g h t the total to $11 million. Because the f u t u r e lies with those " p r e p a r e d for a scientific s o c i e t y , " g o v e r n m e n t has been careful not to neglect this " s u b s i d i z e d betterment of the m i n d , " he said. T u r n i n g to world politics, Mr. Mueller s a i d that Red C h i n a is presently the greatest threat to world peace. That n a t i o n will p r o b a b l y c a u s e the next w a r , he s a i d , a n d the U.S. and the Soviet U n i o n will ally a g a i n s t her. He was not optimistic about

4

A Rich Cream'

Adler

Describes

The rich c r e a m of liberal s c h o o l i n g " w a s the w a y Dr. Mortimer Adler described the liberal a r t s e d u c a t i o n in his a d d r e s s last F r i d a y before approximately 700 people in D i m n e n t Chapel. Dr. Adler d e s c r i b e d the c h a n g ing p a t t e r n of e d u c a t i o n in the U.S. a n d p o i n t e d out the inadeq u a c i e s of the present e d u c a t i o n a l system in " s c h o o l i n g " students. He a r g u e d t h a t " w e ' r e m o v i n g in the w r o n g d i r e c t i o n " b e c a u s e u n d e r l y i n g the p h i l o s o p h y of edu c a t i o n is the J e f f e r s o n i a n n o t i o n t h a t s o m e a r e e q u i p p e d for "liberal l e a r n i n g " a n d s o m e a r e not. "If t h a t ' s the c a s e , " he s a i d , " t h e n the u n e q u i p p e d a r e n ' t prep a r e d f o r citizenship either. Dr. Adler a t t a c k e d e d u c a t o r Dr. J a m e s C o n a n t for d e f e n d i n g the Jeffers o n i a n view a n d called him " p u b lic e d u c a t i o n e n e m y n u m b e r o n e . " As Dr. Adler described it, the f o u r p u r p o s e s of liberal l e a r n i n g are: ( 1 ) Give the y o u n g a superficial a c q u a i n t a n c e with the history of l e a r n i n g ( " I t c a n ' t h o p e to be a n y t h i n g else but s u p e r f i c i a l . " ) ( 2 ) T e a c h the student the "skills of l e a r n i n g . " ( 3 ) Stretch a n d challenge the m i n d . ( 4 ) L e a v e it " a c tively d i s s a t i s f i e d . " In t o d a y ' s a g e , when m o r e free time is b e c o m i n g a v a i l a b l e to m o r e people. Dr. Adler asserted that the liberal a r t s a r e m o r e imp o r t a n t t h a n ever. D r a w i n g the

Liberal

distinction between free time a n d leisure, he said: " L e i s u r e is m u c h m o r e identified with w o r k t h a n with p l a y . Leisure is a verb. It is a n activity. It is all those activities which contribute to the d e v e l o p m e n t of man, morally and spiritually, and to the a r t s a n d sciences."

With m o r e free time a n d a great; er o p p o r t u n i t y " t o leisure," modern m a n m u s t become a w a r e of e d u c a t i o n a s a life-long process, he said. " N o one can become educated while he is y o u n g , and t h a t ' s the simple u n v a r n i s h e d t r u t h . " Youth is an i n s u p e r a b l e obstacle to b e c o m i n g e d u c a t e d . "

Trimble: Modern Society Losing Aesthetic Quality " I t ' s not so m u c h w h a t we a r e not g e t t i n g . " This Was the mess a g e of c o m p o s e r Lester Trimble as he s p o k e last S a t u r d a y on how o u r society is i m p o v e r ishing itself by g i v i n g the work of the artist to technicians. Citing the great material c h a n g e s in o u r c o u n t r y d u r i n g the p a s t two decades, Mr. Trimble pointed out that there h a v e been c o r r e s p o n d i n g " aesthetic changes." Cities a r e " d y i n g at the c o r e . " Slums a r e t o r n d o w n a n d replaced with new high-rise a p a r t m e n t b u i l d i n g s that are p o o r l y constructed a n d aesthetically u g l y . " S u b u r b i a is a tasteless a c c u m u l a tion of " b o x e s " - the w o r k of the architect h a s been u s u r p e d by the engineer a n d builder. S u b u r b i a ' s s h o p p i n g centers likewise reflect a neglect of aesthetic c o n s i d e r a -

tions, he said. Mr. T r i m b l e then described the insidious effect of o u r m o d e r n society on the h u m a n s e n s e s - n o i s e s , smells, a n d tastes that result in a loss of sensation. Mr. T r i m b l e also described the aesthetic experience. " A r t is a h e i g h t e n i n g of finite m a t e r i a l such that we c a n experience it in a non-finite w a y . " yVe perceive art t h r o u g h o u r senses; that is why we s h o u l d keep o u r senses working well, he said. What t r o u b l e d Mr. T r i m b l e is not so m u c h that all of this is b a d , but that o u r society accepts all of this. He concluded by disc u s s i n g the state of c o n t e m p o r a r y music, c o n d e m n i n g most of it as " f a l s e " a n d referring to " h o n e s t , logically c o n s i s t e n t " music as the s t a n d a r d of aesthetic respectability.

The Best of Peanuts PEANUTS

Arts

2* •< c

LOOk, THE FIRST OFFICIAL LEAF OF AUTUMN I

the M a n i l a Conference on Vietn a m , s a y i n g that it w o u l d be " b u t the first of a series," that would merely set the guidelines for other s i m i l a r conferences. On the domestic political scene, Mr. Mueller feels that white b a c k l a s h will not be a significant issue in the c o m i n g election in which he does not see a n y h u g e Republican c o m e b a c k . He expressed agreement with Dr. M a r t i n Luther K i n g

in s a y i n g that black power is n o better t h a n white power. Citizen p o w e r is what counts. S N I C K a n d C O R E were mentioned a s the m o s t t r o u b l e s o m e of the civil rights groups. S u m m i n g up, Mr. Mueller observed that " w e face g r i m times a n d to meet them we must h a v e g r e a t e r d a r i n g . " The future is bright, however, because " w e h a v e n o t h i n g to fear but ourselves."

CENTENNIAL SEMINARS—Lester Trimble, composer-in-residence at the University of Maryland, answers a question at a discussion last Friday afternoon. Dr. Yale Brozen, professor of business economics at the University of Chicago, listens intently.

Poverty Program Promotes Ill-Fare, Contends Brozen Bearded a n d b a l d . Dr. Yale Brozen a d d r e s s e d the a u d i e n c e who attended F r i d a y ' s centennial s e m i n a r on e c o n o m i c s a n d basiness. Dr. Brozen is a p r o f e s s o r of business e c o n o m i c s at the University of C h i c a g o ' s Business G r a d u a t e School a n d serves as a m e m b e r of the Committee on E c o n o m i c Policy for the United States C h a m b e r of C o m m e r c e . S p e a k i n g like a voice in the wilderness a n d yet with evidence a n d documentattcm. Dr. Brozen offered two insights into the current e c o n o m i c fluctuations. First, he m a i n t a i n e d that the e a s y answers which seem to a p p e a r as o b v i o u s e c o n o m i c truths a r e often far f r o m the truth. F o r instance, one n o r m a l l y supposes that i n c r e a s i n g the minim u m w a g e helps eliminate poverty. Not so, s a y s Dr. Brozen. In actuality, w h a t it does d o is eliminate j o b s , intensifying poverty a n d u n e m p l o y m e n t r a t h e r t h a n d e s t r o y i n g them. Second, Dr. Brozen contended that in practice, the welfare state p r o g r a m s contributed m o r e to the general ill-fare t h a n welfare. What h a p p e n s is that such p r o g r a m s d o not achieve their w o r t h y hu-

Reprinted

LEAVER HAVE BEEN FALLING FOR U)££K$... WHAT MAKES THAT ONE 5 0 OFFICIAL?

m a n i t a r i a n ends. People believe a s a l w a y s , t h a t they can get or p r o v i d e s o m e t h i n g for nothing. But that is a wishful d r e a m . Society a l w a y s p a y s , a n d it is that p a y m e n t that p r o m o t e s the illfare of all, especially those who are meant to be the recipients of the welfare p r o g r a m s . So the War on Poverty, viewed in that light, would be h a r d e r to win t h a n the one in Viet-Nam. Dr. Brozen did not p r o p o s e a detailed c o u n t e r p r o p o s a l because he feels that too m u c h is being d o n e - less, a n d not just different, g o v e r n m e n t action is p a r t of the solution to the p r o b l e m , he said. He did, however, suggest s o m e positive steps, including the revision of tax l a w s a l o n g a m o r e equalitarian standard. In the c o u r s e of questioning, Dr. Brozen w a s asked why the g o v e r n m e n t h a s proceeded on its present e c o n o m i c c o u r s e if all that he had s a i d w a s valid. His a n s w e r was that F e d e r a l prog r a m s are s p o n s o r e d by politic i a n s who m u s t get votes a n d therefore aid certain powerful interest g r o u p s . Consequently, prog r a m s which in actuality defeat their stated p u r p o s e s are continued.

by permission

of the

Chicago

Tribune

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October 21,

Hope College

Dear Editor:

The Fifth Column

More Letters

The A.M.S. Handbook

(Continued From Page 4)

By Gordy Koratange

A little booklet called "A.W.S. 1 9 6 6 - 6 7 " c a m e o u t s o m e few weeks a g o which p u r p o r t s to tell b u d d i n g Hope m a i d e n s how m u c h they're g o i n g to e n j o y being a coed, a n d h o w ' " w e can work together to m a k e this y e a r a rewarding a n d worthwhile venture." Perusing the p a m p h l e t we f o u n d it full of such Interesting details as b i g sister-little sister p r o g r a m s , enthusiasm, fashions, winter, spirit, w o m e n ' s developmental prog r a m s a n d m e m b e r s at large. As far a s it goes the i n f o r m a t i o n is adequate, but it leaves out one very i m p o r t a n t item - M E N . T H E R E F O R E we h a v e questioned the Association of Men Students as to what their p l a n s are for the c o m i n g year. I now present their p r o g r a m in the hopes that it will give a complete picture of the activities of the typical Hope College w o m a n student.

yfiowti

Sad/

VEURINK'S

"Greetings, Girls: The Activities B o a r d of the A.W.S. h a s a l r e a d y been at work m a k i n g p l a n s for m a n y exciting events to be held d u r i n g the next nine m o n t h s . We h o p e everyone will participate, for without y o u r active s u p p o r t these events will not be successful. " T H E AVERAGE Hope C o ed: We h a v e asked o u r m e m b e r s for their opinions o n the typical female student so that y o u y o u n g freshmen girls will be able to see the mold into which y o u must fit if you a r e to be a n active p a r ticipant. Here are three of their answers: ( 1 ) ' H o p e girls? Well, sort of a synthesis of H a y l e y Mills, Little O r p h a n Annie, Elizabeth T a y l o r a n d Albert Schweitzer. Most a r e l o o k i n g for a D a d d y W a r b u c k s with J o h n L e n n o n ' s h a i r . ' ( 2 ) ' T h e y come here l o o k i n g for ultimate reality a n d find it in a sorority or eventually in a suburb.' ( 3 ) ' I ' d s a y they're sort of like cocker spaniels. Their version of a wild, good time is to put on a p a i r of white levis.' " B i g Brother-Little Sister Prog r a m : Each new w o m a n student can be assigned a b i g b r o t h e r in o r d e r to help them feel that H o p e is really a family replacement. He will be on h a n d to give you a sound t h r a s h i n g if you s h o u l d ask a question o r to help you when y o u r m o t o r scooter b r e a k s down. The A.M.S. hopes next y e a r to h a v e Big Father-

HOPE CHURCH

SHOW:"

Want to

Will Again Have Donut Sale Due to n u m e r o u s requests a n d a desire to f u r t h e r the SCSC drive, the A.W.S. Activities B o a r d will a g a i n sell d o n u t s in the d o r m s this S u n d a y , a c c o r d i n g to S a n d y Schapper, president of the b o a r d . The donuts can be p u r c h a s e d on each floor of the w o m e n ' s d o r m s , in Kollen Hall L o u n g e , and at a central location in the fraternity h o u s e complex.

It seems characteristic that ethical debates on Hope's c a m p u s result in m u c h more heat than light, which is illustrated very w e l l b y t h e recent " V i r g i n i a W o o l f hassle. All too often we fail to distinguish between cause a n d effect in h u m a n actions a n d so m a k e unfair s n a p judgments. We should learn to view the soul as a doctor views the b o d y , m a k i n g clear the line between s y m t o m a n d disease. What self-respecting physician would be satisfied g i v i n g paink i l l e r s f o r acute appendicitis, k n o w i n g that death would await

6:45 P.M. School of Christian Living (Adult Discussion Groups)

James Tallis Organist and Choir Dir.

Church Located on 11 th Between River and Pine Across from Centennial Park

"Tnmif WuodA.

Sounds of c l a p p i n g , g r o a n i n g and c h a n t i n g in m o n o t o n e of " s u m m e r flowers a r e going, fall winds are b l o w i n g , " echoed in Dimnent Chapel last T u e s d a y a s students participated in a demonstration of J a p a n e s e singing. The event w a s a n all-college assembly lectureon J a p a n e s e N o h d r a m a f e a t u r i n g D r . William Malm, professor of music literature at the University of Michigan. Dr. Malm b e g a n b y briefly explaining the physical aspect of Noh d r a m a . Modeled after outd o o r stages of earlier times, the indoor stage of t o d a y h a s a cypress roof a n d is edged by pine trees. Assisted b y tape recordings, musical instruments, slides a n d audience participation. Dr. Malm described in depth the musical aspect of the N o h d r a m a . / T h i s element of the d r a m a consists of a

chorus, a flute player a n d two or three d r u m m e r s . Professor Malm discussed the N o h tunal system a n d r h y t h m or nori with taped e x a m p l e s demonstrating the i m p o r t a n c e to J a p a nese of the interval between pitches and the a r r a n g e m e n t of beats with syllables. Playing J a p a n e s e d r u m s . Dr. Malm showed the variety of s o u n d s a v a i l a b l e b y different m e t h o d s of p l a y i n g them. Using d r u m s a n d the audience he d e m o n s t r a t e d a few typical J a p a n e s e n a m e d stereotype d r u m patterns. Dr. Malm concluded by stating that N o h music is " o n e of the most interesting a n d abstract of m u s i c s . " This lecture w a s an introduction to J a p a n e s e N o h D r a m a , in prep a r a t i o n for one of the highlights of this y e a r ' s Fine Arts Festival, Tokyo's Hosho Noh Drama T r o u p e next Wednesday.

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Gene P e a r s o n Student s e n a t e President

Man wanted for parking

Skiing" How

In the excitement of c a m p u s events, i n d i v i d u a l s w h o are responsible for their successful completion a r e often forgotten a n d remain u n t h a n k e d . F o r this r e a s o n the Student Senate w o u l d like to publicly t h a n k c o - c h a i r m a n R a n d y Miller and Carl Walters for the m a n y h o u r s they spent m a k i n g a r r a n g e m e n t s for the Pull, a n d Dave Allen for the fine j o b of c o - o r d i n a t i n g he did with his 16 h o m e c o m i n g committees. Hopefully all the y e a r ' s activities will r u n as s m o o t h l y .

Malm E x p l a i n s Noh D r a m a

11 A.M. Morning Worship Service

Charlotte Heinen — Dir. of Chr. Ed.

"STYLE

know what's in this y e a r ? This s e m i n a r will show you the latest in P l a y b o y pin-ups, mixed drinks, dirty jokes a n d erotic dances. See the newest " m o d " a p p a r e l - - t r a n s parent sweatshirts a n d h e a r a special lecture o n , 'Are you r e a d y for Weejuns?' " P e n n y Night: Guys p a y their dates a p e n n y for each minute they c a n s n e a k out of the dormitory after closing h o u r s . " M a y Day: Festivities begin with a nightime picnic at a secluded Holland beach. F o l l o w i n g this is the inter-sorority fertility competition, the winner being the one who places the most girls in the May pole dance. " W o m e n ' s Developmental Prog r a m : Undeveloped as of the present, but hopefully a m o v i e about Sophia Loren entitled ' T h e Virtues of Spaghetti.' "WE OF T H E A.M.S. trust that this y e a r will be fun, h a p p y , joyous, enchanting, contenting, blissful a n d estatic for all of y o u wenches."

Lecture - Demonstration

INVITES YOU TO WORSHIP

Glen O . Peterman — Pastor

Little Daughter a n d Big MotherLittle Daughter P r o g r a m s to give girls a d d i t i o n a l security.

a g a i n for the h u n d r e d t h time in a hundred homecomings. The judges however, were not particularly h a m p e r e d b y the natural h u m o r s of r a i n ; wind; seas; tulips. They t u r n e d in their u s u a l , speedy, incompetent a n d prejudiced p e r f o r m a n c e . Another of life's big questions was a d d e d to those yet u n a n s w e r ed; e.g., w h o really does choose the judges for all-college ceremonial events? ( T h e Sing, the float contest). Who a n d how selected is the committee of faculty a n d students who in turn select the cheerleaders? How are m e m b e r s of the student court a p p o i n t e d ? Who voted, a u t h o r i z i n g a ten dollar Cultural Activities fee? Who or what mystic spirit creates the liaison between students, professors, the Administration a n d well known c a m p u s d e m a g o g u e s ? I admit that everyone is entitled to freedom of choice, freedom of responsibility, f r e e d o m o f freedom. I also admit that s o m e of the losing floats were not the best ever created. There were however, those nice, righteously i n d i g n a n t few w h o received no recognition for floats which were a b o v e the caliber of the winners. Peter Schaible GDI

his patient? T h e d o c t o r t r e a t s s y m p t o m s , b u t strictly as a m i n o r s k i r m i s h in the m a i n battle a g a i n s t the disease itself. S y m p t o m s a r e necessary guides to p i n p o i n t illness. To c a r r y the a n a l o g y s o m e w h a t further, severity of s y m p t o m h a s no exact relationship to severity of the disease. M a n y cancer victims, for instance, never know they a r e seriously ill until they are b e y o n d aid; n o o b v i o u s symptoms w a r n them. The " s y m p t o m s " of spiritual m a l a i s e are often attacked with little r e g a r d for the u n d e r l y i n g cause, with the s a m e t r a g i c result that the " p a t i e n t " receives n o useful help. 1 l o u n d " V i r g i n i a W o o l f dist u r b i n g a n d , in s o m e ways, sickening. In the s a m e way, I find the trial a n d crucifixion of Christ disturbing a n d sickening, but I would not r e m o v e those events f r o m the Bible if I could. N o r do I get up and g o home h a l f w a y t h r o u g h . Christianity is b a s e d on learning f r o m e x a m p l e , both the best and the worst. " V i r g i n i a W o o l f is the best " C h r i s t i a n " film yet produced in America, a refreshing and d i s t u r b i n g s t a n d o u t in the usual diet of p a p . Frederick Oettle

Serving Food at Its Finest in a Pleasant Atmosphere O

28 W. 8th St.

Tel.: 392-2726

For Students With Experience In • Paste Up * Cold Type * Headliner • Varityper Call 396-6573


Page 7

Hope College anchor

October 21, 1966

Hoopla and a Happy Birthday:

/

'

ope College Is 100 Years Old

ROYAL COURT—Queen Cindy Clark, who reigned over Homecoming last weekend, sua with her court after the coronation last Friday evening. They are, left to right, Barbara Ryzenga, Candy Chapman, Susan Sonneveldt, Mary Rynbrandt, Queen Cindy, Sue Albers, Sandy TomMnson and Rosie Hudnut.

M

MUSIC, MAESTRO—Miss Joyce Morrison as Sally Fourth (upper left), Chaplain William Hillegonds as Paul Pitts (above) and Mrs. Isla Van Eenenaam as Professor Ichabod Isotope, the Tenth and AlmOst the Last (upper right) display thei^ musical Ulents as they compete in the conducting contest at the Kleti concert last Friday night. The fair

FLOATING ALONG—The Sorosite float, titled 44Tuming into a New Century," glides down Eighth Street en route to Riverview Park and first place in the sorority float competition in the Homecoming Parade last Saturday morning. The Fraternal Society took first In the fraternity division with their float, "Hope's Key, Passing Into a New Century."

The View From Here

Review of the News

American Brainwashing By J a n Huber We are accustomed to s h u d d e r at the thought of living in a country behind the Iron Curtain, where we u u u i d have to face loudspeakers on every street corner, billb o a r d s a n d mass d e m o n s t r a t i o n s on television. We would hate to be a w a k e n e d by h a r s h voices d e n o u n c i n g U.S. imperialism, and to be lulled into sleep by the militant t o n e s o f ' T h e Kast Is Ked. , , We wouldn't be able to live, we believe, under a system that leaves no r o o m for privacy, for free thought or speech. Y E T O N E of the first impressions that a visitor to the United States receives is one of the ubiquity of p r o p a g a n d a . Even a Eur o p e a n visitor like me, w h o knows advertising from his own c o u n t r y ,

Stuart Wil DoesPhotos For Tribute Book A portrait book, " A Recognition of Austin W a r r e n , " h a s just come off the press. Austin Warren is internationally known as a critic and scholar. The p h o t o g r a p h y for the b o o k was done by Stuart Wilson, 'instructor in English at H o p e College. The 4 5 pictures attempt to capture Professor W a r r e n ' s various m o o d s . Professor Warren, w h o retires at the end of this year, teaches literature a t t h e University of Michigan. A m o n g his w o r k s are " T h e o r y of Literature," " R a g e for O r d e r , " " R i c h a r d C r a s h a w , " and "New England Saints."

m a r v e l s at the e n o r m o u s billb o a r d s , the signs, a n d the nevertiring voices on the r a d i o and television. I p e r s o n a l l y have become so allergic to advertising, after spending one year in the United States, that 1 wince at the s o u n d of r a d i o commercials, and turn off the television sometimes just because 1 can't stand the commercials anymore. American advertising, if not as all-pervading as communist state p r o p a g a n d a , is more insidious because it uses more t a l e n t and more sophisticated techniques. Some of us live in the filth, noise, and stench in the middle of our great cities (which can be in Chicago with its N e g r o ghettos or Paris with its Algerian ghettoes or L o n d o n with its We^t ghettos or L o n d o n with its WestIndian ghettos). Even the fortunate a m o n g us h a v e to breathe the polluted air, drive t h r o u g h the countryside that is defaced by old iron wastelands, and sleep t h r o u g h the noise. And that is only what we a r e doing to our own countries, to ourselves. WE ALLOW ourselves to be lured by advertising into forgetting all this. We are b r a i n w a s h e d into b u y i n g cars a n d refusing school taxes, into hiding in our s u b u r b s , not c a r i n g for our cities. Or, as Russell Baker put it in T h e N e w V o r k Times recently, why d o Americans spend millions on b o d y d e o d o r a n t s a n d billions on p o l l u t i n g t h e i r Eastern seaboard? The forces that operate behind the gigantic c o m m u n i c a t i o n systems of our time m a y be radi-

cally different in different countries. In communist countries one can easily point out the controlling genius: The Party. In the Western world advertising is not under direct political control. It is not concerned with every facet of o u r lives, but only with what we buy. It h a s no genius, good or evil, behind it; n o b o d y k n o w s where it is going. It is a free system. T H E S I M I L A R I T I E S in results are more striking than the differences in origin. And the results are as much deplorable in the United States as in Russia or in China or in a n y m o d e r n state: Pollution, e c o n o m i c discrimination, and hysterical anti-Americanism are only e x a m p l e s of the excesses reinforced by the pervasiveness of our m o d e r n communication systems.

High Percentage Of Negroes Flunk Army Mental Test The Defense Department records that 67.5 per cent of the 18 yearold Negroes who took the a r m e d services mental test between June 1, 1964, and Dec. 1, 1965, failed to meet minimum s t a n d a r d s , while a c o m p a r a t i v e l y low 18.5 per cent of white youths of the s a m e age did not obtain p a s s i n g g r a d e s , a c c o r d i n g to the Associated Press. T h e nationwide a v e r a g e f o r failures of this test is 2 5 . 3 per cent. The October issue of American Education, an official publication of the Office of Education, received the figures by special permission of Secretary of Defense Robert S. M c N a m a r a .

Lansing, Michigan Colonel A. Holmes, Michigan's Selective Service director stated that draft calls for October and November will be down 14 per cent. Vietnam Secretary' of Defense Robert McNamara stated, after returning from Vietnam, that there will be no need to increase the rate of troop transfers to Vietnam. President Johnson is now in New Zealand. He will travel to Australia on Oct. 21-22, Manila on Oct. 23-27, Thailand on Oct. 27-30, Malaysia on Oct. 30-31, Korea on Oct. 31-Nov. 2. Alaska on Nov. 2 for refuling, and then back to Washington. Chances are good that he may stop off at Vietnam. North Vietnamese are training in the Soviet Union to fly newer model Migs than are now used by Hanoi. Seven members of Premier Ky's cabinet have plunged South Vietnam into turmoil. resigning their posts just prior to the Manila conference. Charges of favoritism and use of police state tactics were used to justify the resignations. The New York Times reported that North Vietnam moved closer to an "admission that it is the sponsor of the Vietcong." While the North once insisted that the Vietcong constituted an "indigenous, autonomous rebel movement," a recent editorial described the activities of the National Liberation Front as one : of several "cleverly applied" ; communist tactics to gain the : South.

Tokyo, Japan Premier E. Sato is coping with : a growing crisis brought about ; by government scandals and un- : rest in his conservative, liberal, : democratic party. While this ; government has generally sup- • ported U.S. foreign policy, a united front of three parties quite critical of U.S. policy has been formed to force this government out of power. They are; the Moderate Social Democrats, the Komei (clean government) part of the Soka Gakkai Buddhist movement and the Communist Party. Netherlands The present Dutch coalition government was censured by the nation's largest party and chose to resign. Negotiations for a new government are under way, and elections are not far off. Mexico Northern Mexico, ravaged by killer hurricane Inez, is the scene of hunger-riots. .V Washington, D.C. Barring unforeseen problems, the U.S. may attempt a lunar landing late in 1968. V. Colorado Two hundred thousand housewives have succeeded somewhat in a shopping-cart spree strike to force chain stores to lower prices. Similar strikes have started or are planned in seven other cities. Lima, Peru As many as 150 may have died as earth quakes hit Peru and Chile. Washington, D.C. Since the first patent was granted 325 years ago, there have been nearly 3.25 million U.S. patents.


October 21, 1966

Hope College

Page •

Cross Country Team Defeated; FormsmaWins F o r m s m a a n d Osterhaven, as they h a v e continually been the b a c k b o n e behind the successes of the team. ALSO MAKING a n impressive s h o w i n g are W a y n e Meerman a n d c a p t a i n Paul H a r t m a n , who w a s out most of last season with a leg injury. H a r t m a n h a s completely recovered f r o m last s e a s o n ' s m i s h a p , a n d is c o m i n g on s t r o n g as the s e a s o n progresses. Dick Bisson c a n a l w a y s be counted on for a g o o d p e r f o r m a n c e , a n d is a l w a y s in there trying. Doing a n o u t s t a n d i n g job for Coach V a n Wieren in his f r o s h year at H o p e is Art Pedersen. Pedersen is a constant challenge to other m e m b e r s of the team a n d is d e v e l o p i n g with each meet. Pedersen will be a definite help in the meets to come this y e a r , as well as a future prospect in the sport. T H E D U T C H will be l o o k i n g f o r w a r d to the MIAA Field D a y at the end of the season. They will be seeking revenge for their loss to the Britons, as well as picking up s o m e points on the other teams to w h o m they h a v e gone d o w n in defeat.

Last F r i d a y the cross c o u n t r y team, under the direction of Coach Glenn Van Wieren, w a s defeated by a s t r o n g Briton s q u a d f r o m Albion. The F l y i n g Dutch were a mere f o u r points f r o m victory a n d a tie for second place, but the final score read, Albion 2 6 , Hope 30. In individual competition, Doug F o r m s m a a g a i n went unchallenged in league competition, with a winning time of 2 9 : 5 2 . Albion's best m a n , Jim Dow, finished in second place, a n d Gal Osterhaven finished in third for Hope. THIS WAS NOT e n o u g h to win the meet, as the Britons placed the next three men a c r o s s the finish line before W a y n e M e e r m a n b r o k e the tape. Meerman cut off 24 seconds f r o m his p r e v i o u s best time, but r e m a i n e d 10 seconds behind the Albion r u n n e r in front of him. F r e s h m a n Art Pedersen and captain Paul H a r t m a n finished eighth and eleventh respectively. The Dutch will a g a i n take to the course t o m o r r o w a f t e r n o o n at Alm a a n d will try to continue on their winning ways. Hope fans have been especially impressed with the Dutch's first two men,

Abel Named All-MIAA Back of the Week H o p e ' s j u n i o r h a l f b a c k Keith Abel w a s n a m e d this week as back of the week b y the Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association coaches. A b e l , a 5-foot-8, 160-pound h a l f b a c k carried for 80 y a r d s in 24 attempts a g a i n s t Albion last week when Hope upset Albion 12-9 in a ball control victory. Also cited this week was Olivet tackle Bob Parrella as l i n e m a n of the week. Parrella, six-foot 235p o u n d s , p l a y e d b o t h w a y s last S a t u r d a y when Olivet defeated Alm a 9-0. He h a d a dozen tackles to his credit a n d helped hold Alma to only three y a r d s rushing.

Coaches involved in each g a m e submit n a m e s of top tacks a n d lineman in each MIAA game. Selection is then m a d e by league commissioner, J o h n Hoekje, f r o m statistics a n d coach reports. In last week's MIAA action the s t a n d i n g s received a tossing ar o u n d . Olivet crushed Alma, 9-0, and K a l a m a z o o defeated A d r i a n 12-2. The F l y i n g Dutchmen c a n still tie for this y e a r ' s c h a m p i o n ship, but the other teams will h a v e to lend a little help.

mm

*

Hope's Physical Education Major Offers Challenge " T h e r e is such a need for physical education teachers that we felt we h a d to do something. Before, even P.E. m i n o r s were getting great teaching p o s t s . " So s p o k e Dr. Lawrence Green,' c h a i r m a n of the physical education department. The new P. E. major, w a s first offered to f r e s h m a n only last year. " I t ' s a lot m o r e academic than the regular P.E. m a j o r . Before setting up the requirements, I read an article challenging schools to m a k e P.E. a mental, as well as a physical, m a j o r . " A s f a r a s I know, Hope is fhe only college to take the d a r e of that article." A m o n g the courses required for the P.E. m a j o r are Z o o l o g y 14, Statistics 35, Introduction to Psychology 15, Philosophic History of Physical Education, and Ginesiology. The total h o u r s required for a P.E. m a j o r , beside the regular required courses, a m o u n t to 4 8 semester h o u r s . He also added that he thought it w a s a s h a m e that Hope h a d not offered a P.E. m a j o r sooner. Since the p r o g r a m h a s been m a d e available, six students h a v e m a d e p l a n s to m a j o r in P.E.*, said Dr. Green.

Intramural Standings W L T

Praters

5 0 0

Cosmos Emmies

2 1 2 2 1 1

Arkies Knicks Centurians Indies

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FATAL MISTAKE—Hope and Albion players scramble for a fumble during the Homecoming game last Saturday afternoon. A1 Kinney recovered It in the end zone for Hope, paving the way for a 12-9 upset victory over the defending MIAA champs in the Centennial football game at Riverview Park.

Homecoming Victory

Dutchmen Upset Albion, 12 - 6 T h e Centennial H o m e c o m i n g weekend c a m e to a climax last S a t u r d a y when the Plying Dutchmen upset the MIAA c h a m p i o n Albion, 12-9. The Dutch o u t p l a y ed Albion a n d h a n d e d the Britons their first MIAA loss since 1963. Hope led the g a m e 12-3 at the half but were forced to put d o w n two Albion scoring threats in the last five minutes to w r a p up the victory for Hope College a n d the 4 , 5 0 0 students, faculty a n d Alumni who b r a v e d the weather. A L B I O N took a n early lead in the first q u a r t e r with a field goal, however the Dutch defense limited Albion to o n l y six y a r d s d u r i n g the period. With 10:09 left in the first half, H o p e culminated a 63 y a r d a d v a n c e for its first touchdown. The score came on a 4 1 - y a r d p a s s f r o m substitute q u a r t e r b a c k Clint Schilstra to senior end G a r y Holvick. Injured q u a r t e r b a c k G a r y Frens w a s forced to r u n with the ball when the extra point conversion ended in a b a d center. Hope a g a i n controlled the ball on the Albion 33 when the wind limited D o u g F'alan's punt to three y a r d s p a s s e d the line of scrimm a g e . H o p e moved the ball on the g r o u n d to the three-yard line where Keith Abel went over the g o a l line a n d fumbled. L I N E M A N A1 Kinney recovered the ball in the end zone for the second TD. Hope led at the half 12-3 after Steve Wessling failed to score on the conversion. The third period was d o m i n a t e d by a n e x c h a n g e of ball between the two clubs with neither team entering the other's half of the field.

pleted a n 11 y a r d p a s s to Lloyd H a r p e r , m o v i n g the ball to the 20. Three incomplete passes a n d a seven-yard p a s s g a v e H o p e the ball on their own 13. Hope moved the ball to the 17 on three q u a r t e r b a c k s n e a k s by Schilstra. The Dutchmen were then penalized five y a r d s for t a k i n g too l o n g in the h u d d l e a n d were forced into a p u n t i n g situation with 12 seconds r e m a i n i n g . T H E BRITONS then j u m p e d offside twice while F r e n s attempted to fall d o w n in the end zone for a safety and then attempted to punt. Writh only two seconds on the clock Schilstra ended the g a m e with another q u a r t e r b a c k sneak. T o m o r r o w t h e Flying Dutchmen meet the Alma Scots, tied with Hope for the b o t t o m of the s t a n d i n g s , at A l m a . Next week the Dutchmen will return for a Mom a n d Dad's Day g a m e with Kalamazoo.

In the fourth q u a r t e r Albion scored when Chuck Scarletta carried f r o m the f o u r - y a r d line. Before the score, the Hope defense h a d been successful at s t o p p i n g a n all MIAA back of the week f r e s h m a n fullback Jim Bell. The c o n v e r s i o n attempt failed with the score 12-9 a n d 6:54 r e m a i n i n g in the g a m e . A F T E R T H E kickoff Hope didn't m o v e the ball, a n d then Schilstra fumbled on the Hope 22. After g i v i n g up some y a r d a g e to A l b i o n ' s Scarletta, H o p e ' s defense, led all a f t e r n o o n by Charlie L a n g l a n d , Lee Berens a n d Bill Beebe, forced Albion to give up the ball on Hope's fourteen. After three unsuccessful p l a y s , Frens punted 14 y a r d s into the wind a n d the Britons were a g a i n on the move. Albion's q u a r t e r b a c k Dick Vander Linde, who h a s missed the last two g a m e s because of injury, com-

NCAA FOOTBALL

Knights Boot Dutchmen To Third Straight Loss In last F r i d a y ' s soccer g a m e the F l y i n g Dutchmen suffered their third straight conference defeat at the h a n d s of the Calvin Knights, 3-1. F o r a while the Knights led by a score of 3-0, scoring twice in the first half a n d their final goal on the o p e n i n g kick-off of the second half. In the third q u a r t e r Hope received its only success of the a f t e r n o o n when D o u g Nichols used his knees

on a c o r n e r kick to put the ball in the net. In this rematch with the Knights the Dutchmen outplayed Calvin t h r o u g h o u t the first q u a r t e r a n d most of the second. In the second half Hope, l a c k i n g spirit, fell into a defensive g a m e a n d w a s u n a b l e to m o u n t a s t r o n g offense. T o m o r r o w a f t e r n o o n at 2 p.m. the kickers will match toes on the V a n Raalte field with the semin a r i a n s of M a r y k n o l l Seminary.

PURDUE v.s.

MICH. STATE IN COLOR

1:00 P.M. SAT.

WZZAA ^

MDS. MICHIQAN

AMBASSADOR Styles In Accordance With The Tastes of Discriminating Young Men

Shop


October 21. 1966

Hope College anchor

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Hoopla and a Happy Birthday: ope College Is 100 Years Old

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ROYAL COURT—Queen Cindy Clark, who reigned over Homecoming last weekend, sits with her court after the coronation last Friday evening. They are, left to right, Barbara Ryzenga, Candy Chapman, Susan Sonneveldt, Mary Rynbrandt, Queen Cindy, Sue Albers, Sandy Tomlinson and Rosie Hudnut.

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MUSIC, MAESTRO—Miss Joyce Morrison as Sally Fourth (upper left). Chaplain William Hillegonds as Paul Pitts (above) and Mrs. Isla Van Eenenaam as Professor Ichabod Isotope, the Tenth and Almost the Last (upper right) display thei^ musical talents as they compete in the conducting contest at the Kleti concert last Friday night. The fair

FLOATING ALONG—-The Sorosite float, titled "Turning into a New Century," glides down Eighth Street en route to Riverview Park and first place in the sorority float competition in the Homecoming Parade last Saturday morning. The Fraternal Society took first In the fraternity division with their float, "Hope's Key, Passing Into a New Century-"

The View From Here

Review of the News

American Brainwashing By Jan Huber We are accustomed to s h u d d e r at the thought of living in a country behind the Iron Curtain, where we u u u i d have to face loudspeakers on every street corner, billb o a r d s and m a s s d e m o n s t r a t i o n s on television. We would hate to be awakened by h a r s h voices d e n o u n c i n g U.S. imperialism, and to be lulled into sleep by the militant tones o f ' T h e Kast Is Red." We wouldn't be able to live, we believe, under a system that leaves no r o o m for privacy, for free thought or speech. Y E T O N E of the first impressions that a visitor to the United States receives is one of the ubiquity of p r o p a g a n d a . Kven a Eur o p e a n visitor like me, who knows advertising f r o m his own country,

Stuart WiWi Does Pliotos For Tribute Book A portrait b o o k , "A Recognition of Austin W a r r e n , " h a s just come off the press. Austin Warren is internationally k n o w n as a critic and scholar. The p h o t o g r a p h y for the book was done by Stuart Wilson, instructor in English at Hope College. The 4 5 pictures attempt to c a p t u r e Professor W^arren's various moods. Professor Warren, who retires at the end of this year, teaches literature a t t h e University of Michigan. A m o n g his w o r k s are " T h e o r y of Literature," " R a g e for O r d e r , " " R i c h a r d C r a s h a w , " and "New England Saints."

m a r v e l s at the e n o r m o u s billb o a r d s , the signs, and the nevertiring voices on the r a d i o a n d television. I personally have become so allergic to advertising, after spending one year in the United States, that I wince at the s o u n d of r a d i o commercials, and turn off the television sometimes just because I can't stand the commercials anymore. American advertising, if not as all-pervading as communist state p r o p a g a n d a , is more insidious because it uses more t a l e n t and more sophisticated techniques. Some of us live in the filth, noise, and stench in the middle of our great cities (which can be in Chicago with its N e g r o ghettos or Paris with its Algerian ghettoes or L o n d o n with its We*l ghettos or L o n d o n with its WestIndian ghettos). Kven the fortunate a m o n g us have to breathe the polluted air, drive t h r o u g h the countryside that is defaced by old iron wastelands, a n d sleep t h r o u g h the noise. And that is only what we are d o i n g to o u r own countries, to ourselves. WE ALLOW ourselves to be lured by advertising into forgetting all this. We are b r a i n w a s h e d into b u y i n g cars a n d refusing school taxes, into hiding in o u r s u b u r b s , not c a r i n g for our cities. Or, as Russell Baker put it in The N e w V o r k Times recently, why d o Americans spend millions on b o d y d e o d o r a n t s a n d billions on p o l l u t i n g t h e i r E a s t e r n seaboard? The forces that operate behind the gigantic c o m m u n i c a t i o n systems of our time m a y be radi-

Lansing, Michigan

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cally different in different countries. In communist countries one can easily point out the controlling genius: The Party. In the Western world advertising is not under direct political control. It is not concerned with every facet of our lives, but only with what we buy. It h a s no genius, g o o d or evil, behind it; n o b o d y k n o w s where it is going. It is a free system. T H E SIMILARITIES in results are more striking t h a n the differences in origin. And the results are as much deplorable in the United States as in Russia or in China or in any m o d e r n state: Pollution, e c o n o m i c discrimination, a n d hysterical anti-Americanism a r e only e x a m p l e s of the excesses reinforced by the pervasiveness of o u r m o d e r n communication systems.

High Percentage Of Negroes Flunk Army Mental Test The Defense Department records that 67.5 per cent of the 18 yearold Negroes who took the a r m e d services mental test between June 1, 1964, a n d Dec. 1, 1965, failed to meet m i n i m u m s t a n d a r d s , while a c o m p a r a t i v e l y low 18.5 per cent of white y o u t h s of the s a m e age did not obtain p a s s i n g grades, according to the Associated Press. T h e nationwide a v e r a g e f o r failures of this test is 25.3 per cent. The October issue of American Education, a n official publication of the Office of Kducation, received the figures by special permission of Secretary of Defense Robert S. M c N a m a r a .

Colonel A. Holmes, Michigan's Selective Service director stated that draft calls for October and November will be down 14 per cent. Vietnam Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara stated, after returning from Vietnam, that there will be no need to increase the rate of troop transfers to Vietnam. President Johnson is now in New Zealand. He will travel to Australia on Oct. 21-22, Manila on Oct. 23-27, Tnailand on Oct. 27-30, Malaysia on Oct. 30-31, Korea on Oct. 31-Nov. 2. Alaska on Nov. 2 for refuling, and then back to Washington. Chances are good that he may stop off at Vietnam. North Vietnamese are training in the Soviet Union to fly newer model Migs than are now used by Hanoi. Seven members of Premier Ky's cabinet have plunged South Vietnam into turmoil, resigning their posts just prior to the Manila conference. Charges of favoritism and use of police state tactics were used to justify the resignations. The New York Times reported that North Vietnam moved closer to an "admission that it is the sponsor of the Vietcong." While the North once insisted that the Vietcong constituted an "indigenous, autonomous rebel movement," a recent editorial described the activities of the National Liberation Front as one of several "cleverly applied" communist tactics to gain the South.

Tokyo, Japan Premier E. Sato is coping with a growing crisis brought about by government scandals and unrest in his conservative, liberal, democratic party. While this government has generally supported U.S. foreign policy, a united front of three parties quite critical of U.S. policy has been formed to force this government out of power. They are: the Moderate Social Democrats, the Komei (clean government) part of the Soka Gakkai Buddhist movement and the Communist Party. Netherlands The present Dutch coalition government was censured by the nation's largest party and chose to resign. Negotiations for a new government are under way, and elections are not far off. Mexico Northern Mexico, ravaged by killer hurricane Inez, is the scene of hunger-riots. Washington, D.C. Barring unforeseen problems, the U.S. may attempt a lunar landing late in 1968. Colorado Two hundred thousand housewives have succeeded somewhat in a shopping-cart spree strike to force chain stores to lower prices. Similar strikes have started or are planned in seven other cities. Lima, Peru As many as 150 may have died as earth quakes hit Peru and Chile. Washington, D.C. Since the first patent was granted 325 years ago, there have been nearly 3.25 million U.S. patents.

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Page 8

October 21, 1966

Hope College anchor

Cross Country Team Defeated; FormsmaWins Last F r i d a y the cross country team, under the direction of Coach Glenn Van Wieren, was defeated by a s t r o n g Briton s q u a d from Albion. The Flying Dutch were a mere four points f r o m victory and a tie for second place, but the final score read, Albion 26, Hope 30. In individual competition, Doug F o r m s m a a g a i n went unchallenged in league competition, with a winning time of 29:52. Albion's best m a n , Jim Dow, finished in second place, and Cal Osterhaven finished in third for Hope. THIS WAS NOT e n o u g h to win the meet, as the Britons placed the next three men a c r o s s the finish line before Wayne Meerman b r o k e the tape. Meerman cut off 24 seconds f r o m his previous best time, but remained 10 seconds behind the Albion r u n n e r in front of him. P'reshman Art Pedersen a n d captain Paul H a r t m a n finished eighth a n d eleventh respectively. The Dutch will a g a i n take to the course t o m o r r o w a f t e r n o o n at Alm a and will try to continue on their winning ways. Hope fans have been especially impressed with the Dutch's first two men,

F o r m s m a a n d Osterhaven, as they h a v e continually been the b a c k b o n e behind the successes of the team. ALSO MAKING an impressive showing are Wayne Meerman a n d captain Paul H a r t m a n , who wtas out most of last s e a s o n with a leg injury. H a r t m a n h a s completely recovered f r o m last season's mishap, and is coming on strong as the s e a s o n progresses. Dick Bisson c a n a l w a y s be counted on for a good p e r f o r m a n c e , and is always in there trying. Doing an o u t s t a n d i n g job for Coach Van Wieren in his frosh year at Hope is Art Pedersen. Pedersen is a constant challenge to other m e m b e r s of the team a n d is d e v e l o p i n g with each meet. Pedersen will be a definite help in the meets to come this year, as well as a future prospect in the sport. T H E D U T C H will be looking f o r w a r d to the MIAA Field Day at the end of the season. They will be seeking revenge for their loss to the Britons, as well as picking up s o m e points on the other teams to w h o m they h a v e gone down in defeat.

Abel Named All-MIAA Back of the Week Hope's j u n i o r halfback Keith Abel was n a m e d this week as back of the week by the Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association coaches. A b e l , a 5-foot-8, 160-pound halfback carried for 80 y a r d s in 24 attempts against Albion last week when Hope upset Albion 12-9 in a ball control victory. Also cited this week w a s Olivet tackle Bob Parrella as lineman of the week. Parrella, six-foot 235p o u n d s , p l a y e d both w a y s last S a t u r d a y when Olivet defeated Alm a 9-0. He h a d a dozen tackles to his credit a n d helped hold Alm a to only three y a r d s rushing.

Coaches involved in each g a m e submit n a m e s of top tacks a n d lineman in each MIAA game. Selection is then m a d e by league commissioner, J o h n Hoekje, f r o m statistics a n d coach reports. In last week's MIAA action the s t a n d i n g s received a tossing around. Olivet crushed Alma, 9-0, and K a l a m a z o o defeated Adrian 12-2. The F l y i n g Dutchmen can still tie for this y e a r ' s c h a m p i o n ship, but the other teams will h a v e to lend a little help.

Hope's Physical Education Major Offers Challenge " T h e r e is such a need for physical education teachers that we felt we had to d o something. Before, even P.E. m i n o r s were getting great teaching p o s t s . " So spoke Dr. Lawrence Green, c h a i r m a n of the physical education department. The new P. E. major, was first offered to f r e s h m a n only last year. " I t ' s a lot m o r e academic than the regular P.E. m a j o r . Before setting up the requirements, I read a n article challenging schools to m a k e P.E. a mental, as well as a physical, m a j o r . "As f a r as I know, Hope is fhe only college to take the d a r e of that article. " A m o n g the courses required for the P.E. m a j o r are Z o o l o g y 14, Statistics 35, Introduction to Psychology 15, Philosophic History of Physical Education, and Cinesiology. The total h o u r s required for a P.E. m a j o r , beside the regular required courses, a m o u n t to 4 8 semester h o u r s . He also added that he thought it was a s h a m e that Hope h a d not offered a P.E. m a j o r sooner. Since the p r o g r a m h a s been m a d e available, six students h a v e m a d e plans to m a j o r in P.E.*, said Dr. Green.

Intramural Standings W L T

Praters Cosmos Emmies Arkies Knicks Centurians Indies

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0 1 1 1 i 3 5

0 2 1 1 2 0 0

KEITH ABEL

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FATAL MISTAKEâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Hope and Albion players scramble for a fumble during the Homecoming game last Saturday afternoon. A1 Kinney recovered it in the end zone for Hope, paving the way for a 12-9 upset victory over the defending MIAA champs in the Centennial football game at Riverview Park.

Homecoming Victory

Dutchmen Upset Albion, 1 2 - 6 T h e Centennial H o m e c o m i n g weekend came to a climax last S a t u r d a y when the Flying Dutchmen upset the MIAA c h a m p i o n Albion, 12-9. The Dutch outplayed Albion and h a n d e d the Britons their first MIAA loss since 1963. Hope led the g a m e 12-3 at the half but were forced to put down two Albion s c o r i n g threats in the last five minutes to w r a p up the victory for Hope College a n d the 4 , 5 0 0 students, faculty a n d Alumni who b r a v e d the weather. ALBION took a n early lead in the first q u a r t e r with a field goal, however the Dutch defense limited Albion to only six y a r d s d u r i n g the period. With 10:09 left in the first half, Hope culminated a 63 y a r d a d v a n c e for its first touchdown. The score c a m e on a 4 1 - y a r d p a s s f r o m substitute q u a r t e r b a c k Clint Schilstra to senior end Gary Holvick. Injured q u a r t e r b a c k G a r y Frens was forced to run with the ball when the extra point conversion ended in a bad center. Hope a g a i n controlled the ball on the Albion 3 3 when the wind limited Doug F a l a n ' s punt to three y a r d s p a s s e d the line of scrimmage. Hope m o v e d the ball on the g r o u n d to the three-yard line where Keith Abel went over the goal line and f u m b l e d . L I N E M A N /VI Kinney recovered the ball in the end zone for the second TD. Hope led at the half 12-3 after Steve Wessling failed to score on the conversion. The third period was dominated by an e x c h a n g e of ball between the two clubs with neither team entering the other's half of the field.

In the fourth q u a r t e r Albion scored when Chuck Scarletta carried from the f o u r - y a r d line. Before the score, the Hope defense h a d been successful at stopping a n all MIAA back of the week -f r e s h m a n fullback Jim Bell. The c o n v e r s i o n attempt failed with the score 12-9 a n d 6:54 r e m a i n i n g in the g a m e . A F T E R T H E kickoff H o p e d i d n't m o v e the ball, and then Schilstra fumbled on the Hope 22. After giving up some y a r d a g e to A l b i o n ' s Scarletta, Hope's defense, led all a f t e r n o o n by Charlie L a n g l a n d , Lee Berens and Bill Beebe, forced Albion to give up the ball on Hope's fourteen. After three unsuccessful plays, Frens punted 14 y a r d s into the wind a n d the Britons were a g a i n on the move. Albion's q u a r t e r b a c k Dick Vander Linde, w h o h a s missed the last two g a m e s because of injury, com-

pleted an 1 1 y a r d p a s s to Lloyd H a r p e r , m o v i n g the ball to the 20. Three incomplete passes a n d a seven-yard pass gave Hope the ball on their own 13. Hope m o v e d the ball to the 17 on three q u a r t e r b a c k s n e a k s by Schilstra. The Dutchmen were then penalized five y a r d s for t a k i n g too long in the huddle and were forced into a punting situation with 12 seconds remaining. T H E BRITONS then jumped offside twice while Frens attempted to fall d o w n in the end zone for a safety a n d then attempted to punt. With only two seconds on the clock Schilstra ended the g a m e with another q u a r t e r b a c k sneak. T o m o r r o w t h e Flying Dutchmen meet the Alma Scots, tied with Hope for the bottom of the standings, at Alma. Next week the Dutchmen will return for a Mom and Dad's Day g a m e with Kalamazoo.

NCAA FOOTBALL

Knights Boot Dutchmen To Third Straight Loss In last F r i d a y ' s soccer g a m e the Flying Dutchmen suffered their third straight conference defeat at the h a n d s of the Calvin Knights, 3-1. For a while the Knights led by a score of 3-0, scoring twice in the first half a n d their final goal on the opening kick-off of the second half. In the third q u a r t e r Hope received its only success of the a f t e r n o o n when Doug Nichols used his knees

on a corner kick to put the ball in the net. In this rematch with the Knights the Dutchmen o u t p l a y e d Calvin t h r o u g h o u t the first q u a r t e r and most of the second. In the second half Hope, l a c k i n g spirit, fell into a defensive g a m e a n d was u n a b l e to mount a s t r o n g offense. T o m o r r o w a f t e r n o o n at 2 p.m. the kickers will m a t c h toes on the Van Raalte field with the semin a r i a n s of M a r y k n o l l Seminary,

PURDUE V.S.

MICH. STATE IN COLOR

1:00 P.M. SAT.

WZZM ÂŽ GRAND RAPIDS, MICHIQAN

AMBASSADOR Styles In Accordance With The Tastes of Discriminating Young Men

10-21-1966  
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