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Welcome

Alumni! GREETINGS:

Homecoming 1958 Theme: The Memory Album

Once a g a i n it is my p l e a s u r e to welcome a l u m n i and f o r m e r s t u d e n t s to the c a m p u s . T h i s y e a r we feel a special w a r m t h in g r e e t i n g you a t Academic H o m e c o m i n g . Many h o u r s w e r e invested by s t u d e n t s

F r i d a y , October 17 2:00-2:45 P .M.— Opening Session of Academic H o m e c o m i n g — H o p e Memorial Chapel.

and f a c u l t y to m a k e it a success.

We hope t h a t t h e i n v e s t m e n t h a s

b r o u g h t and will continue to b r i n g g r e a t r e t u r n s . t h a t Academic H o m e c o m i n g h a s

8:00-4:30 P.M.—Section M e e t i n g s — C o m m e r c e and I n d u s t r y — Chapel 1() Religion—Chapel 11 Music—Music Auditorium

inaugurated

It is our f o n d hope

w h a t will become a n

honored t r a d i t i o n on the Hope College campus. Now we t u r n o u r a t t e n i o n s f r o m the intellectual to the a t h l e t i c a s we extend a h e a r t y welcome to the A d r i a n football t e a m , coaches, and fans.

A s always, we a r e e x p e c t i n g a good contest.

In the p a s t t h e

Hope " D u t c h m e n " have s u f f e r e d t h e i r s h a r e of d e f e a t s a t the h a n d s of

8:15 P.M.—Address by Dr. Hessel Y n t e m a : T h e Position of the United S t a t e s in I n t e r n a t i o n a l Law in the World T o d a y — H o p e Memorial Chapel

Adrian teams.

However, we a r e

determined

that our Homecoming

s pir it will not be d a m p e n e d t h i s y e a r . Alumni presence indicates t h a t they s u p p o r t us and our t e a m and coaches in t h i s resolve. M a y I remind you t h a t a f t e r the g a m e t h e r e will be open house

8:30 P . M . — P a l e t t e and Masque Play, S C A P I N , T H E S C A M P — the Little T h e a t r e

a t all of the d o r m i t o r i e s and houses. T o m o r r o w evening at 5:30, Mrs. L u b b e r s and I hope to be g r e e t i n g you personally at the A l u m n i Buffet a t D u r f e e Hall. I also would commend to you t h e V e s p e r Service Sun-

S a t u r d a y , October 18 9:00-10:30 A.M.—Section M e e t i n g s Science—Music A u d i t o r i u m E d u c a t i o n — C h a p e l 16 Philosophy—Chapel 11

d a y a f t e r n o o n in t h e chapel a t 3 p.m. "Old Hope t h y s o n s a r e 'round thee s t a n d i n g ; Now raise t h y b a n n e r high above! To thee a s o n g t h e y s i n g . To thee t h e i r t r i b u t e b r i n g ,

10:30 A . M . — P a r a d e of F l o a t s — 8 t h Street (Cont'd on p a g e 7, col. 1)

A t r i b u t e of p r a i s e and of love." Dr.

Irwin

—Irwin J. Lubbers

J. Lubbers, President

HOPE COLLEGE ANCHOR LXXI—4

Hope College — H o l l a n d , Michigan

October

17, 1958

Queen Susan Kirkwood Reigns Over 1958 Homecoming Queen, Court Honored Last Evening Reigning over H o m e c o m i n g 1958 a r e eight of Hope's coeds. Announced a s m e m b e r s of the queen's cour t on T u e s d a y a f t e r n o o n , the e i g h t b e g a n t h e i r royal a c t i v i t y a t t h e i r first a p p e a r a n c e l a s t evening. From sixteen c a n d i d a t e s nominated on October 3, t h e field w a s n a r r o w e d in chapel T u e s d a y m o r n ing to the e i g h t s e r v i n g on the court. Two r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s f r o m each class serve on t h e court.

Dr. Trueblood to Address All-College Assembly

T h r o u g h t h e e f f o r t s of the Religious Life C o m m i t t e e and the The receipt of a $10,000 g i f t to Hope College f r o m Dr. Simon D. s u p p o r t of t h e D a n f o r t h F o u n d a Den Uyl, P r e s i d e n t of t h e Bohn tion, Dr. Trueblood will be on the Aluminum C o m p a n y of Detroit, c a m p u s October 21. Dr. Trueblood, w a s announced t o d a y by Dr. I r w i n P r o f e s s o r of Philosophy a t E a r l J . Lubbers, P r e s i d e n t of the col- ham College, Richmond, I n d i a n a , will deliver t w o a d d r e s s e s ; one a t lege. ^ T h e g i f t w a s designated by Dr. a n all-college a s s e m b l y and anDen Uyl to be set u p a s a f a c u l t y o t h e r a t a n a f t e r n o o n lecture spona w a r d . A c o m m i t t e e will select t h e sored by the YMCA and Y W C A . M e m b e r of t h e T h e t a Chi, Cosw i n n e r on t h e basis of p r a c t i c e in t h e classroom and specific plans mos Clubs, and A m e r i c a n Philosophical Association, Dr. Trueblood for self-improvement. Dr. Lubbers commented, " T h e is also t h e a u t h o r of m a n y widely(Cont'd on p a g e 2, col. 4) college is v e r y g r a t e f u l to Dr. Den Uyl f o r his g e n e r o u s contribution. W e a r e even more pleased t h a t Dr. Attention!! U y l h a s i n s t i t u t e d t h i s new conOratorical Contestents cept of recognition f o r f a c u l t y On October 21 a t 4:05 p.m., achievement. W e h o p e t h a t t h e esDr. S c h r i e r will give his a n n u a l t a b l i s h m e n t of t h i s f u n d m a y s t i m f o r t y - f i v e m i n u t e t a l k " H i n t s on u l a t e o t h e r s t o do likewise in colO r a t o r i c a l Composition." I t is leges throughout the country." intended f o r all s t u d e n t s i n t e r T h e g i f t will be invested and t h e ested in s o m e t i m e e n t e r i n g t h e y e a r l y i n t e r e s t will be used f o r t h e various oratorical contests sponaward. sored by t h e college. He will D r . Simon Den U y l is a product s p e a k in V a n R a a l t e 303. (Cont'd on p a g e 2, col. 5)

J u d g i n g of t h e houses and d o r m s decorations to t h e t h e m e of " L i f e A s We Lived I t " will t a k e place t h i s a f t e r n o o n . All the dorms, c o t t a g e s , and f r a t e r n i t y houses will be considered. Also t a k i n g place t h i s a f t e r n o o n f r o m 3:00 to 4:30 p.m. will be the first p a r t of academic Homecoming. The section m e e t i n g s will be on " C o m m e r c e and I n d u s t r y " w i t h Leon A. Bosch '29 s p e a k i n g and Max D. B o e r s m a '49 p r e s i d i n g , " R e l i g i o n " with J u s t i n V a n d e r Kolk '31 s p e a k i n g and H e n r y Voogd '41 presiding, and " M u s i c " with R o b e r t W. C a v a n a u g h as m o d e r a t o r and E v a Leenhouts P e l g r i m '17 p r e s i d i n g . The p a r t i c i p a t e s a r e M o r r e t t e Rider, A n t h o n y Kooiker, and J a n t i n a Holleman of the Music d e p a r t m e n t of Hope College. A t 6:00 p.m. t o n i g h t t h e r e will be a d i n n e r a t D u r f e e Hall with P r o f . J o h n J. VerBeek p r e s i d i n g . B e g i n n i n g a t 8:15 t o n i g h t in t h e Memorial Chapel t h e r e will be a g e n e r a l session w i t h the p r e s i d e n t of Hope College, Irwin J . L u b b e r s , presiding. Dr. Hessel Y n t e m a '12, Research P r o f e s s o r of C o m p a r a t i v e Law a t t h e University of Michigan Law School, will a d d r e s s t h e g r o u p on " T h e Position of the U. S. in Internotional Law in the World T o d a y . "

Homecoming Queen, Susan K i r k w o o d , and her Court

Hope Receives $10,000 Gift

Activities to be Resumed this Afternoon

Academic H o m e c o m i n g will continue 9:00-10:30 a.m. S a t u r d a y . T h e section m e e t i n g s will be on "Science" in the Music A u d i t o r i u m with Maurice B. Visscher '22 s p e a k i n g and G e r r i t V a n Zyl presiding, " E d u c a t i o n " in chapel 16 with Chris A. D e Y o u n g '20 presiding, and " P h i l o s o p h y " in Chapel 11 with D. I v a n D y k s t r a '35 s p e a k i n g . A t 10:30 a.m. S a t u r d a y t h e annual Hope College H o m e c o m i n g P a r a d e will t a k e place on 8th s t r e e t . It will include the Queen and h e r cour t f o r which the f r e s h m e n have c o n t r i b u t e d the float. Also each s o r o r i t y , f r a t e r n i t y , and t h e W T A S Hope College radio s t a t i o n will c o n t r i b u t e a float. In h o n o r of the A l u m n i a t 2:00 p.m. S a t u r d a y t h e a n n u a l H o m e c o m i n g g a m e will t a k e place at Riverview P a r k . A t t h e h a l f - t i m e the queen and h e r cour t will be p r e s e n t e d . A f t e r t h e g a m e open house will t a k e place a t 4:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m. f o r the dorms, c o t t a g e s and f r a t e r n i t y houses. To a g a i n welcome t h e A l u m n i the dance will t a k e place a t 8:00 S a t u r d a y n i g h t a t t h e Civic Center. The t h e m e will be " M e m o r y AlSenior r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s a r e Susie b u m . " George W o r d e n will s e r v e as MC. J i m Betke, M a r k D e W i t t , Graves and J o a n Peelen. J o a n is J i m E v e r s and K e d g e V a n W o r t will open the A l b u m w i t h s i n g i n g . A f r o m K a l a m a z o o and is m a j o r i n g p r o g r a m will also t a k e place in which t h e p a s t H o m e c o m i n g Q u e e n s in h i s t o r y a t Hope. S h e is a m e m - will be honored. T h e Q u e e n s r e t u r n i n g f o r this e v e n t a r e ( L y n n M i n e r ) b e r of A.D.D. and is p r e s i d e n t of Mrs. H o f f e m a n '51, I s l a V a n E e n e n a a n '55, (Jocelyn F r y l i n g ) Mrs. Sorosis s o r o r i t y . H e r i n t e r e s t s a r e Bussies, '56, and J o y K o r v e r , '57. The 1958 Queen will also be p r e m u s i c a n d s p o r t s , a n d she e n j o y s sented. Gordon S t e g i n k will s i n g to t h e new q u e e n and Dick Brockr e a d i n g , a l t h o u g h s h e claims she m i e r . S t u d e n t Council P r e s i d e n t , will p r e s e n t a t r i b u t e to t h e Queen. never h a s m u c h t i m e f o r it. S t u d e n t s will dance to t h e music of T o n y K o r v a t h . I n t e r m i s s i o n Susie, a blond-haired G r a n d R a p - will include s i n g i n g by t h e Coeds and t h e B r a s s Q u a r t e t will p r e s e n t idite, is w o r k i n g f o r h e r e l e m e n t - a medley of songs. Queen

Sue

Kirkwood

a r y t e a c h i n g certificate. She h a s (Cont'd on p a g e 5, col. 5)

To end H o m e c o m i n g f o r t h e y e a r 1958 V e s p e r s will be held a t 3:00 p.m. S u n d a y in t h e Memorial Chapel.


Page Two

H O P E

C O L L E G E

A N C H O R

Meditation Chapel for Hope Under Discussion A Meditation Chapel on Hope's campus is f a s t becoming a reality.

All - College Assembly To Be Held Next Week

A f u n d was set up f o r a chapel of this nature a f e w years ago by students in memory of Henry E. Schoone, professor of Greek and German, and husband of Mrs. Helen H. Schoon of our Education Dep a r t m e n t and Reading Center director.

Dr. W i l l i a m J. Vander Lugt, Dean of the College

Semester Leave of Abscence Granted Dr. Vander Lugt At a pre-school meeting of the executive committee and the Board of Trustees of Hope College, a leave of absence was granted Dr. William J . Vander Lugt, dean of the College. The leave continues f o r the entire semester. Dr. Vander L u g t came to Hope in the fall of 1954 as a professor of psychology. Arriving here f r o m Pennsylvania S t a t e University, he had previously t a u g h t a t the University of Michigan and a t Central in Pella, Iowa. In June, 1955, Dr. Lubbers named Dr. Vander L u g t acting dean of the college. He now holds t h a t position permanently. A popular figure on campus, Dr. Vander L u g t last May received a honorary membership in the campus Blue Key which is a National Honor F r a t e r n i t y . He is also an honorary member of the Knickerbocker F r a t e r n i t y . Struck by an illness in July, Dr. Vander L u g t w a s unable to work until the end of August. He returned to his office f o r a f e w days, but he was then granted a leave of absence. Now a t the University of Michigan clinic in Ann Arbor, Dr. Vanderlugt is going through an extensive series of t e s t s to diagnose his illness. To this date, no clue to the nature of the illness is known.

French Club Plans Season The first r e g u l a r meeting of the Hope College French Club, Le Cercle Francais, was held Monday evening a t the home of Miss Nella Meyer. The f e a t u r e d speaker f o r the evening w a s Mrs. Wendell Miles, a native of France, who with her d a u g h t e r spent the past summer at their home in Alsace. The p r o g r a m s f o r the remainder of the meetings were also set up. The November meeting will be arranged around the works of Moliere, and December will f e a t u r e a Christmas Vespers. The J a n u a r y meeting will be informal with French conversation, games, and singing, and in Febr u a r y the club members will participate in French skits. March will f e a t u r e impressionist Art, and the April meeting will be centered around the products of France. The y e a r will conclude with the annual picnic in May. Membership in Le Cercle F r a n cais is open to all Intermediate and Advanced French students, and the meetings a r e conducted completely in French. Meetings are held the first Monday of each month, altern a t i n g a t the homes of Miss Meyer and Mrs. Prins. The officers a r e : President, Adina Yonan f r o m Brooklyn, N.Y.; vice president, B a r b a r a Monroe f r o m Pittsford, Michigan; secretary, N a n c y Plewes f r o m Holland; and t r e a s u r e r , Leona Jansen f r o m P a t erson. New Jersey.

Sem Discusses Unification of Europe at IRC Conference The first annual conference of Western Michigan International Relation Clubs was held on our campus last weekend. It began with an informal coffee hour at 2:30 in the Kletz. Approximately students f r o m other schools were registered. Those colleges which were represented were Olivet, Calvin and Albion. At 4:15 Mr. R a g n a r Sem gave a speech on " E u r o p e a n Unification— The Role of Youth." Following his speech there was a planned panel discussion with one member f r o m each represented school. John Angus, Hope's representative, acted as chairman. Mr. Sem acted on the panel also and questions were directed to him. The evening meeting was preceded by a reception in Durfee lounge and a banquet in the Juliana Room with approximately eighty present. Dr. Lubbers gave t h e invocation and Dr. Fried introduced the visiting schools and their faculty advisors and the guest speaker. Mr. Sem commented on " P r o g ress in N o r t h Atlantic Cooperation and the F u t u r e of the E u r o p ean Movement." His talk was a progress report on European Unification. He told of t h e background of unification and the hope of the f u t u r e . He elaborated on such things as the E u r o p e a n Coal and Steel Co. which is a supernational organization f o r common policy and common market. It enables them to build up coal and steel industries. He spoke about the European Common Market which the French call the Free Trade Addict. Through this they hope to establish t h i s type of p r o g r a m and f r o m it t h e y hope to establish a more vital and competitive economy, a common social policy, a common labor m a r k e t and, most important of all, a common policy f o r helping the underdeveloped areas.

The money placed in this fund when it was established was supplemented by churches and interested persons in recent years. Last year twenty-five students participated in a project to raise money for this in their home churches. This s u m m e r approximately fifty students participated in this project to raise the balance of the money needed to complete the Meditation Chapel.

Ford to Speak Here Next Friday The Honorable Gerald R. Ford, representing the 5th congressional district of Michigan in the United States House of Representatives, will speak to an all college assembly third hour next Friday, October 24, on the theme of the Theodore Roosevelt centennial observance, "Responsible Citizenship."

Dr. Elton Trueblood

Next week m a r k s the ending of the year-long centennial observance (Cont'd f r o m page 1) of the birth of Theodore Roosevelt. read books including Philosophy of The twenty-sixth President was Religion, Declaration of Freedom, born in New York City on Oct. 27, T h e Life We Prize, The Logic of 1858. The limelight caught him in Belief, The Knowledge of God, and his eearly twenties when, as a The Essence of Spiritual Religion. member of t h e New York S t a t e Dr. Trueblood is the son of Assembly, he attracted national atA tentative site f o r the chapel Quaker p a r e n t s and h a s active tention, and it stayed with him unwas Kollen dormitory but since membership in Friends World Comtil his death a t the age of 60. seems to be an impossibility. A mittee f o r Consultation, where he During the intervening years he committee consisting of Ron Lok- is also chairman; Yokefellow Assodid just about everything that any horst, Wally Van Buren, Virginia ciation, president; Church Peace Westra, Gerry Giordano, and Lor- Union, and William Penn College. aspiring American youth might, in his most fanciful moments, yearn e t t a Plassche has been organized to do. He rode the Western cattle to view and consider possible sites. ranges as a cowboy. He pursued bad men as a deputy sheriff in the Badlands, and law violators of Dr. Fried Attends The S.N.E.A. held its second every description as top cop of his New York Workshop meeting of the year Wednesday, home city. Dr. Paul Fried, associate pro- October 8 a t 7:15 P.M. in the Kletz He led a picturesque regiment fessor of history a t Hope, h a s been Lounge. The special speaker of the named a member of the Committee evening was Miss Shackson, an up a Cuban hillside amid all the on Academic Policy Towards Edu- English teacher at Holland Junior trappings of romantic fiction. He cational Travel of the Council on High, who spoke to us about her hunted bears in Wyoming and lions Student Travel. In this capacity. t r i p to Puerto Rico this p a s t sum- in Africa, explored a hitherto unknown river in Brazil, went down Dr. Fried will be chairman of a mer. in one of the first submarines and workshop session a t the 9th Annual Miss Shackson went to Puerto Conference on Educational Travel Rico as a representative f r o m the up in one of the first airplanes. He wrote some two dozen books, at New York City, Oct. 22-24, 1958. M.E.A. to the Convention of the and won authoritative recognition This conference will tackle such Association of Student Teachers problems as E a s t - W e s t student ex- held there. W i t h her slides Miss as a n a t u r a l i s t and a historian. In politics, he beat the bosses at change, sending high school stu- Shackson took members on a t r i p their own game, becoming first dents abroad, g e t t i n g good pub- to the West Indies. Post cards, licity f o r educational travel pro- pictures, purses, dolls, and other Governor of his s t a t e and later the g r a m s , raising f u n d s f o r p r o g r a m s souvenirs were passed around to kind of President of the United States the American people idolize and scholarships and the f u t u r e of be viewed by the members. and historians never tire of a r g u educational travel exchanges beS.N.E.A. will hold its next meeting about. tween the E a s t and West. Dr. ing November 12. Hope College will join colleges Fried will lead his g r o u p in disBanquet all over the United S t a t e s in obcussing how to i n a u g u r a t e foreign Interfrat study p r o g r a m s within the colleges. Held in Durfee Hall serving the Theodore Roosevelt Dr. Fried is well-qualified to be On Tuesday, October 14, the In- Centennial. F e a t u r i n g the displays a m e m b e r of the council. Two t e r - F r a t e r n i t y Banquet w a s held in on the College campus will be such years ago he instituted the Hope the J u l i a n a Room. The purpose of topics as Roosevelt's interest in College Vienna Summer School. this meeting w a s to acquaint all nature; Roosevelt as a h u n t e r and Dr. Fried stated, "I feel t h a t new men with the f r a t e r n i t i e s . One explorer; Roosevelt as a writer and this conference will be very worth- representative f r o m each F r a t e r n i - sportsman and also his m a j o r role while and I am looking f o r w a r d to ty on campus spoke. These speak- in establishing an effective Civil it with much anticipation. I expect ers were: Harold Van't Hof—Cos- Service Commission. to learn much about improving our mopolitan, Paul Buit—Emersonian, summer school set up, and I hope Dick Hall—Arcadian, John Van t h a t others will be able to profit D a h m — F r a t e r n a l , and Dick Brown f r o m my past experiences." —Knickerbocker. (Cont'd f r o m page 1) The contractor's estimate f o r completing the chapel was $4,250. There is a possibility t h a t the price has gone up somewhat since t h a t time. Of course, certain f u r n ishings were not included in his estimate. A t this time, the fund stands a t approximately $3,000.

Dr. Trueblood . . .

S.N.E.A. "Visits" Puerto Rico

Hope Receives . . .

Qualification f ir Fulbrights Announced )y Mr. Wolters Fulbright Scholarship f o r m s a r e still available in Mr. Wolters' office according to a recent announcement. These g r a n t s a r e used f o r g r a d u a t e study. Competitions f o r 900 F u l b r i g h t and Latin-American scholarships f o r g r a d u a t e study abroad will close November 1, it w a s announced by the Institute of International Education. The scholarships offer Americans international travel expenses in most cases and partial or complete tuition and maintenance f o r s t u d y in 39 foreign countries during 195960. The Institute of International Education is administering t h e a w a r d s f o r the Department of S t a t e under the F u l b r i g h t Act and the Inter-American Cultural Convention. The Fulbright a w a r d s f o r study

In speaking to us, Mr. Ford will follow the commission's purpose in recalling Theodore Roosevelt's dynamic Americanism and to make his spirit again a vital factor in American life.

and research in Europe, L a t i n America, and the Asia-Pacific area cover international travel, tuition, books, and maintenance f o r one academic year. The Inter-American Cultural Convention g r a n t s provide f o r t r a n s p o r t a t i o n f r o m the U.S. Gove r n m e n t and tuition and maintenance f r o m the government of the host country. General eligibility requirements f o r the a w a r d s are U.S. citizenship, a Bachelor's degree or its equivalent before departure, language ability sufficient to c a r r y on the proposed study, and good health. A good academic record and dem o n s t r a t e d capacity f o r independent study are also necessary. P r e f erence is given to applicants under under 85 years of age. Countries where

U.S. students

m a y study u n d e r the F u l b r i g h t P r o g r a m s are Argentina, A u s t r a lia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Burma, Chile, the Republic of China, Denmark, Ecuador, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Iceland, India, Israel, Italy, J a p a n , Luxembourg, the Netherlands, N e w Zealand, Norway, Peru, t h e Philippines, Turkey, and the United Kingdom. Persons interested in these a w a r d s m a y w r i t e to the I n s t i t u t e of International Education or to a n y of the I n s t i t u t e ' s regional offices f o r 'U.S. Government G r a n t s / a brochure explaining t h e Fulb r i g h t and IACC P r o g r a m s . Students now enrolled in colleges or universities should consult with t h e i r campus F u l b r i g h t advisor, Mr. Wolters, f o r f u r t h e r i n f o r m a tion and application f o r m s .

of Holland and Hope College. While a t Hope he was active in the Y.M. C.A., class athletics, member of the Knickerbocker Society and president of his class in the sophomore year. , A f t e r being discharged f r o m the A r m y in April 1919, Den Uyl spent the summer in Holland and in the f a l l journeyed to Detroit. In December he took a job as a clerk in the Accounting D e p a r t m e n t of t h e company he w a s destined to head some 30 years later — the Bohn Aluminum Company. During t h e s e years he has held various positions such as Cashier, Auditor, Assistant Secretary, Secretary and Treasurer. The company h a s plants in Detroit, Adrian, Holland, and South Haven, Michigan. On J u n e 4, 1956, Dr. Den Uyl received an Honorary Doctor of L a w s degree f r o m Hope College. H e h a s served as Chairman of t h e Board of the Michigan Colleges Foundation.


H O P E

C O L L E G E

A N C H O R

The History of Homecoming

Choir to Tour Western States

by Sally Houtman Homecoming as we know it today was first held on November 9, 1928. Previous to that time, the activity which corresponds most to Homecoming was the Armistice Day Celebration. The FreshmanSophomore Pull, however, has been an annual event a t Hope College since 1905. But then, instead of pulling over the treacherous, swirling ( ?) w a t e r s of Black River the teams held their t u g - o f - w a r over a ten foot wide creek j u s t a few blocks f r o m campus.

Dr. Robert Cavanaugh, Head of the Music Department of Hope College, has announced t h a t the chapel choir is organized and ready f o r its first performance Sunday. Dr. Cavanaugh revealed t h a t this spring the choir will be touring the western states including Illinois, Iowa, Colorado, Arizona, and California. The choir will leave Holland March 28 and r e t u r n on April 11, 1959. The Chapel Choir was organized in 1929 by the late W. Curtis Snow who formerly headed the college's music department. In 1952, the choir inaugurated its nation-wide tours when it traveled to New York and, a m o n g other places, performed at Radio City Music Hall a t the E a s t e r Sunrise services. Since t h a t time, the choir has traveled f r o m coast to coast and has given over 75 concerts. In order f o r a Hope student to be selected f o r the Chapel Choir, he must meet the following requirements: 1. He must be able to read music., 2. His voice quality must be good. 3. He must be in good physical condition. (On a trip to Calif o r n i a overnight bus rides and strenuous schedules are commonplace.) 4. His scholastic average must be C or better. The choir has made two longplaying record albums on an RCA label. Over two hundred students auditioned f o r this years choir. From these a seventy voice choir was selected. The first sopranos include: Jeanie Baldwin, Hildred DeWitt, Geraldine Giordano, Susan Graves, Mary Ann Klaaren, Joy Korver, Lynne Thomas, Virginia Top, Mary Lou Van Dyke, and Mary Van Loevering. The second sopranos a r e : Shelby Braaksma, Mary DeJong, Anne De Pree, Sally DeWolf, Elaine Dykhuizen, Carol Nelson, Carol Nieuwsma, J u d i t h Van Dyke and Marjorie Vermeer. Members of the first alto section are: Evalyn Carter, J o h a n n a De Groot, Margot Fisher, Gail Friesema, E d n a Hollander, Emily Hradec, Una Hunt, J a n e Klaasen, J e a n Schregardus and J a n e Wezeman. Singing second alto are: Sandra DeKoning, Mary Fryling, Evelyn Hollander, Sally Houtman, Marilyn Kortenhoven, Carol Luth, J a n e t Owen, Loretta Plaasche, Carol Rylance and Marilyn Scudder. Ron Beyer, Gregory Bryson, Donald Jansen, Walter Johnson, Dean Nederveld, Merwyn Scholten and Stanly Winn are members of the first tenor section. Second tenors include: Albert Fassler, John Kleinhekel, Calvin Rynbrandt, Sheryl Schalfer, David Smits, David Wilkin and John Zwyghuizen. Singing first bass in the choir are: J a m e s Betke, Harley Brown, Mark DeWitt, E v e r t Fikse, Ray Ritsema, Carl VerBeek, Leander W a n g and George Worden. Concluding the list as second basses a r e : John Angus, William Brookstra, Clark Matthews, George Peelen, Gordon Stegink, and Robert Van E t t e n .

Hope Alumni f r o m all over the United S t a t e s g a t h e r in Holland to celebrate Homecoming. Down through t h e years many changes and additions have been made to the program but the general significance of the weekend remains the same for every r e t u r n i n g Alumnus. It provides an excellent opportunity to meet old friends, and wander around t h e college campus where they may have spent some of the best years of their lives. In 1928, the first Homecoming was highlighted by the big parade on Friday, followed by a pep rally a t Riverview P a r k . The^football g a m e on S a t u r d a y was preceded by another parade to the park. At this time the literary societies present on campus also entertained their visiting Alumni. In 1933, the Frosh-Soph athletic fight and pull, were included in the Homecoming celebration on Thursday afternoon, but the following y e a r were again held as a separate preciding event and not until 1945 did t h e y become a regular p a r t of the p r o g r a m . Since then the athletic fight between the two classes has been dropped, but the pull remains, although it has now been moved to a date preceding Homecoming. Various themes have been used throughout Homecoming festivities, including; An Application of Commercial Products to Homecoming, Magazine Titles, and one year it was based on comic characters. The year 1937 stands out f o r the f a c t t h a t Miss M a r j o r y Moody was named Hope's first Homecoming Queen, although actual coronation ceremonies seem not to have appeared until a l a t e r date. World W a r II attempted to int e r r u p t t h e scheme of things, but the Hope women wouldn't let it happen. In 1944, there was a drastic shortage of men on Hope's campus, but tradition prevailed as r e t u r n i n g alumni were greeted by a festive celebration, this year featuring two touch-football squads of Hope's coeds competing against each other. In 1946 Homecoming was resumed in true pre-war style with the regular football g a m e and f r a ternity parties held on Saturday, and the pep rally, and pull on Friday afternoon and evening. In 1948, it became traditional > f o r Palette and Masque to present a Homecoming production. Also in 1948 the singles tennis t o u r n a m e n t f o r the Duffield Wade Trophy was started. Homecoming activities during the week-end have m e a n t much to all who have participated, as it does to u s now. Each year in the past has been a bigger and better Homecoming. T h i s year will be no exception.

Peter Dalrymple

From London to Holland by Philip De Velder Many of us, especially those who eat in one of the college dining halls, have probably noticed a welldressed, r a t h e r youthful-looking person who seems to spend most of his time in or around the college kitchens. We may say to ourselves—" Surely, he can't be a waiter, as he does not wear the dark trousers and white vest t h a t we associate with the waiters. Can he be a s t u d e n t ? That is hardly likely as none of us can remember ever sitting next to him in the classroom. If he is a new professor, why isn't he being discussed as all the new profs a r e ? J u s t who is he t h e n ? " It is hoped t h a t by the time you finish this, it will no longer be necessary to ask the question—who ? The gentleman in question bears the impressive title of Associate M a n a g e r of the Slater Food Service. His name, in case you are wondering, is Mr. P e t e r Dalrymple, though it is understood t h a t he has a nickname, which the author cannot a t this time remember. It is said t h a t a true Londoner is born within the sound of the bells of St. Mary-Le-Bow Church. While I did not discover if this w a s t r u e in Mr. Dalrymple's case, I did, in the course of our interview, establish t h a t he w a s born and raised in t h a t g r e a t city. L a t e r on, he began to think of what he would like to do f o r a living, and he finally decided t h a t he would like to become a hotel executive. To study f o r this purpose, he entered the University of London, and took hotel m a n a g e m e n t , g r a d u a t i n g in 1953. While he was a t the university, he was employed p a r t time by the Savoy Hotel Company, working at London's "Waldorf-Astoria," the Savoy. This hotel is rated as the International De Luxe Type in most of the travel guides to the British Isles. Upon finishing his course at t h e university, the company accepted him as a full-time employee. A f t e r working a t the Savoy f o r a time, the company sent him to various countries in continental Europe. He worked in hotels in Switzerland, Germany and France. On r e t u r n ing to London, he decided to come to the United S t a t e s to look into the possibilities here. He arrived j u s t a little under a y e a r ago, and has been employed by the Slater Food Service f o r three weeks. He has a very charming wife, and a baby son who was born in this country.

HAD'S SANDWICH SHOP

BULFORD STUDIO

399 River Avenue

PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPHY

THE HOME OF HOLLAND'S

52 East Eighth Street

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Telephone EX 2 - 9 6 0 8

BEST HAMBURGER

Page Three

/ Homecoming Play to Open Tonight Junior Class Begins Year with Two Picnics The Class of "60" enjoyed an afternoon of fellowship a t the annual autumn beach party, held a t Ottawa Beach September 18, 1958. A picnic supper, consisting of wieners, baked beans and lemonade was served under the direction of Scotty Wallace. Many joined in volley ball and Softball. Frisbee played an important p a r t in the recreational activities also. Dave White and J a n e Tomlinson acted as co-chairmen. The Junior Class acted as host to the Class of '62 a t a picnic held September 25, 1958 a t Kollen Park. The f r e s h m a n pull coaches, Gary Bylsma and Stan Bosker introduced the members of the team and t h e i r morale girls. A word of encouragement was given by Roland Van Es, Junior Class President; a f t e r which there were the traditional songs and cheers. Mel Ver Steeg served as chairman.

Palette and Masque, the Hope College dramatic organization, presents its annual Homecoming play, Scapin, a French comedy by Moliere tonight, October 17, and also October 18, 20, and 21, s t a r t i n g at 8 p.m. in the Little Theatre of the Science Building. The cast f o r Scapin is Robert Fisher as Scapin, Ronald Beyer as Octave, George Steggerda as Silvestre, Mary Onken as Hyacinte, Joe Woods as A r g a n t e , John Lubbers as Geronte, Charles Lemmen as Leandre, John Wiers as Carle, Carol Luth as Zerbinette, and Nancy Malstrom as Nerine. Heading the backstage crews f o r the play are Greta Weeks, s t a g e crew, John Wiers, light crew, Carol Rylance, costume crew, Betty Vicha, property crew, Mary Van Dyk, make-up crew. In addition to their p a r t s in the play, Carol Luth is serving as the assistant to the director, Dale S. DeWitt, and George Steggerda is publicity manager. All seats f o r the performances are reserved. They m a y be obtained by calling EX 6-4611, Extension 15. The price of the tickets is 65c.

Language Laboratory Holds Open House

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Dr. E z r a Gearhart, Head of the German Department a t Hope College, has announced t h a t d u r i n g Homecoming weekend there will be an open house at t h e L a n g u a g e Laboratory located in the Graves Library Building. Hours f o r the open house will be Thursday, Oct. 16, 11:00 to 12:00 a.m., 2:00 to 3:00, and 4:00 to 5:00 p.m., Friday, 10:00 to 11:00 a.m., 4:00 to 5:00 and 6:54 to 9:45 p.m., and Saturday, 9:00 to 12:00 a.m. The Hope College L a n g u a g e Laboratory consists of twenty-five sound absorbing booths, twenty of which a r e equipped with a specially designed t a p e recorder. All of these booths are inter-connected with a m a s t e r console operated by the instructor.

RYPMA & TOPP SHELL SERVICE "Service Is Our Business" Phone EX 4 - 8 7 6 0 Corner 15th and River Ave.


Page Four

H O P E

C O L L E G E

A N C H O R

Pleasant Postlude EDITORS NOTE: Carolyn Zhe also studied in Edinburgh

Heavenly Sounds from Arthur, Louis, Steinway, and Steinway

during her Junior

year. This story is a sequel to Lois Thorn's article about life in Edinburg

by Jim Michmerhuizen

which appeared in last week's Anchor. by Carolyn Zhe I t w a s a clear s u m m e r n i g h t t h a t I stood on a hillside overlooking a small T u r k i s h t o w n and t h e r u i n s of t h e once m a g n i f i c i e n t t e m p l e to D i a n a of t h e E p h e s i a n s . T h e land w a s so quiet and p e a c e f u l , possess i n g a n e n c h a n t i n g q u a l i t y . My f r i e n d s and I w a t c h e d t h e moon r i s i n g over the n e a r b y m o u n t a i n s and t h o u g h t how like o u r e x p e r ience m u s t be to m a n y s h a r e d by J e s u s and his disciples, or by t h e A p o s t l e P a u l a s he e n c o u r a g e d t h e early Ephesian Christians, perhaps on t h a t v e r y s pot! We had some f o l l o w e r s , small b o y s who w e r e s h o w i n g t h e typical E a s t e r n curiousity t o w a r d s a n y t h i n g u n u s u a l , and t r y i n g to sell old coins which t h e y had found a m o n g t h e r u i n s . T h e y all looked r a t h e r blank, and I w o n d e r e d how m e n like t h e A p o s t l e Paul could h a v e come f r o m t h i s s o r t of m a t e r i a l ( f o r T a r s u s is in T u r k e y ) , w h e n one b r i g h t kid held out a coin, w r o t e a price on t h e g r o u n d , and won o u r h e a r t s w i t h his e n t h u s i a s m . T h i s revived m y f a i t h in T u r k i s h intelligence.

did a special d a n c e f o r us. I t could h a v e been a n y wild or b a c k w a r d people on a n y c o n t i n e n t s i n g i n g a n d d a n c i n g t h e r e by t h e flickering l a n t e r n light. The people in t h e back villages w e r e n ' t m u c h concerned a s to o u r n a t i o n a l i t y , and w e r e still less concerned a b o u t t h e revolt t h e n g o i n g on in I r a q , and o t h e r world a f f a i r s . Istanbul was more Westernized, but the tiny, d i r t y , back s t r e e t s and t h e city b a z a a r , c o n s i s t i n g of boothlike shops, could not be f o u n d a n y w h e r e in o u r W e s t e r n world. One of t h e m o s t i m p r e s s i v e t h i n g s a b o u t I s t a n b u l was its m a n y Mosques. W e all e n j o y e d t h e u n i q u e n e s s of t a k i n g off o u r shoes, t h e n g o i n g into t h e i n t e r i o r w h e r e men were squatting before the K o r a n and u t t e r i n g c h a n t s to Allah.

Dr. Crook spends many hours w o r k i n g on cancer research. Much of the valuable equipment was made a v a i l a b l e to him t h r o u g h grants.

Dr. Crook's Cancer Study Brings Added Prestige to Hope by Richard Jaardsma

One of t h e h a l l m a r k s of a l a r g e college or u n i v e r s i t y a r e t h e reUpon l e a v i n g I s t a n b u l we took s e a r c h e s t h a t a r e c a r r i e d on by a boat across t h e Sea of M a r m a r a , v a r i o u s m e m b e r s of t h e t e a c h i n g t h e n a bus. I shall never f o r g e t s t a f f . A l t h o u g h Hope m a y not fall t h a t a m a z i n g bus ride. It w a s v e r y into t h e c a t e g o r y of a u n i v e r s i t y , E n r o l l m e n t figures f o r t h e first crowded, and so collapsible s e a t s its p r o f e s s o r s and i n s t r u c t o r s also s e m e s t e r w e r e released f r o m t h e w e r e p u t down t h e aisle. T h e n e x t c a r r y on t h e scholarly t r a d i t i o n of R e g i s t r a r ' s Office. t h i n g I k n e w t h e conductor, in r e s e a r c h in one w a y or a n o t h e r . F u l l - t i m e s t u d e n t s n u m b e r one b a r e , dust-covered f e e t , w a s clam- One such p r o f e s s o r is Dr. Crook of t h o u s a n d one h u n d r e d t w e n t y - f i v e . L a t e r t h a t n i g h t we walked back o r i n g over t h e a r m s of t h e s e a t s the biology d e p a r t m e n t , who is doOf these, six h u n d r e d n i n e t y - e i g h t p a s t t h e low cement-covered stone to collect f a r e s . I t w a s hilly coun- ing vital r e s e a r c h on c a n c e r u n d e r a r e men and f o u r h u n d r e d t w e n houses, p a s t the open melon s t a n d s t r y , and the vehicle had no b r a k e s , the d e s i g n a t i o n , " T h e E f f e c t of ty-seven a r e women. and on to o u r hotel.- In t h i s p a r t so when the bus stopped t h e con- M a m m a l i a n H o r m o n e s on MicroThe senior class h a s an enrollof t h e world the people seemed to d u c t o r had to j u m p out of t h e o r g a n i s m s . " m e n t of t w o h u n d r e d seven. T h e r e s t a y a w a k e and lively until a b o u t back door and p u t a block of wood E v e r since last s p r i n g i n t r i g u i n g a r e two h u n d r e d fifty-three j u n i o r s , 12 a t n i g h t . A g a i n a t 6 in t h e u n d e r t h e back t i r e . B e f o r e s t a r t - c r a t e s and o t h e r o d d m e n t s could be m o r n i n g we would a w a k e to t h e i n g he would g r a b the block and seen c a r r i e d into t h e cor r idor s of two h u n d r e d n i n e t y - e i g h t sophomores, and t h r e e h u n d r e d s i x t y sound of hoofs on t h e cobblestone we w e r e off a g a i n ! the science building, u n d e r t h e seven freshmen. s t r e e t below. No, t h e y w e r e n ' t This w a s all p a r t of a nine week w a t c h f u l e y e s of Dr. Crook and S t u d e n t d i s t r i b u t i o n is: really t h a t a m b i t i o u s , t h e y loafed t o u r f r o m London t h r o u g h Bel- o t h e r m e m b e r s of t h e Biology DeGeographical Distribution all a f t e r n o o n ! g i u m , F r a n c e , S w i t z e r l a n d , A u s t r i a , p a r t m e n t . T h e s e c r a t e s w e r e t h e Michigan 902 A g a i n n e a r E p h e s u s , we took Y u g o s l a v i a , a n d Greece to I s t a n - a d v a n c e s h i p m e n t of t h e e q u i p m e n t N e w York 147 a b o u t a f i f t e e n mile hike u p a hill bul. W e w e r e i m p r e s s e d by t h e n e c e s s a r y f o r the c a r r y i n g out of New Jersey 103 to see t h e place considered by t h e h a r d - w o r k i n g , p o o r Y u g o s l a v s . Dr. Crook's r e s e a r c h . More a r e a r - Illinois 89 R o m a n Church to be t h e d e a t h We'll n e v e r f o r g e t t h e f a s t t a l k - r i v i n g all t h e t i m e and w e should Wisconsin 40 place of t h e V i r g i n M a r y . T h e r e i n g we did to s a v e o u r film f r o m not be s u r p r i s e d if t h e whole third Iowa 36 is a little stone chapel over t h e t w o d e t e r m i n e d Y u g o s l a v police. floor of t h e science building w e r e Ohio 16 s p o t now, and a s p r i n g of "holy We c a m e back by w a y of A t h e n s , soon covered with r a d i o a c t i v e t r a c - C a l i f o r n i a 14 w a t e r " r u n s n e a r b y . On t h e w a y s e e i n g t h e Acropolis and t h e r u i n s ing m a c h i n e s and c u l t u r e s of ParaIndiana 11 u p we passed a m a n coming down a t Delphi, t h e n w e n t on by s e a to mecium and euglena. Minnesota 9 r i d i n g a donkey. His w i f e w a s S o u t h e r n I t a l y . F r o m t h e r e we W o r k i n g u n d e r t h r e e g r a n t s . Dr. P e n n s y l v a n i a 8 t r o t t i n g a l o n g behind, on foot. T h i s t r a v e l l e d u p t h r o u g h N a p l e s and Crook, w i t h t h e help of biology Massachusetts 6 is typical of t h e back villages in Rome to G e r m a n y and back to m a j o r A u s t i n A a r d e m a , is doing Colorado 4 Greece and T u r k e y . London. e x a c t l y w h a t t h e title of his re- F l o r i d a 3 W e f o u n d the T u r k s quite Much m o r e could be w r i t t e n on s e a r c h e s s u g g e s t s : T r y i n g to dis- W a s h i n g t o n 2 f r i e n d l y . In one T u r k i s h t o w n a o u r experiences, a n d on t h e bene- cover w h e t h e r h o r m o n e s , such as Connecticut 2 s t u d e n t who knew E n g l i s h invited fits of such a t r i p . The f r i e n d l i - insulin, h a v e a n y effect on uniVirginia 2 u s to his home, insisted on g i v i n g ness and aid given us h a s t r a n s - cellular o r g a n i s m s and, if so, w h a t South D a k o t a 2 u s lunch, and showed us a r o u n d f o r m e d t h e o r i e s and b e l i e f s of t h i s effect is. Delaware t h e town. We m e t like f r i e n d l i - e q u a l i t y and b r o t h e r h o o d into livT h e t h e o r y or a s s u m p t i o n t h a t N e w H a m p s h i r e n e s s e v e r y w h e r e . One of t h e o t h e r i n g f e e l i n g s and u n d e r s t a n d i n g . Dr. Crook is w o r k i n g u n d e r is t h a t Arizona h i g h l i g h t s was being t a k e n to t h e T h i s is a p a r t f r o m a n u n f o r g e t t a b l e an individual, s e l f s u p p o r t i n g cell Louisiana n i g h t c a m p of g y p s y l a b o r e r s on g e o g r a p h y lesson, more i n t e r e s t will show t h e s a m e c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s Maryland a tobacco field. T h e y w e r e s i n g i n g and u n d e r s t a n d i n g of news, and of and behave in the s a m e m a n n e r a s Kentucky to t h e a c c o m p a n i m e n t of a c l a r i n e t - course t h e r e w a s t h e e x c i t e m e n t of those cells which a r e m o r e h i g h l y F o r e i g n Countries like i n s t r u m e n t a n d a d r u m , and t h e d i f f e r e n t and u n u s u a l . specialized and m u s t be d e p e n d e n t China 14 on o t h e r cells. T h a t t h i s a s s u m p - C a n a d a 5 tion is p r o b a b l y a valid one h a s N e t h e r l a n d s 3 been born out in countless experi- A r a b i a 3 ments. Cuba 2 Dr. Crook believes t h a t by intro- Indonesia 2 COMW ducing c e r t a i n h o r m o n e s directly J o r d a n 2 into t h e m e t a b o l i s m of a unicellu- I r a n 2 l a r o r g a n i s m , t h e n a t u r e of t h e cell I r a q 2 will be changed. W h e t h e r t h i s Philippines l c h a n g e will be a beneficial one or Mexico 1 not is difficult to s a y , and f o r t h a t H u n g a r y 1 r e a s o n he is doing r e s e a r c h into S o u t h India 1 t h a t b r a n c h of micro-biology. Formosa 1 To t h o s e of you who probably P e r s i a n Gulf 1 will d i s m i s s this e x p e r i m e n t as British Columbia 1 p u r e r e s e a r c h and of no practical A u s t r i a 1 value, it m i g h t be well to s a y t h a t one of his g r a n t s is g i v e n by t h e A m e r i c a n C a n c e r Society, which be- t h a t I will spend m y whole l i f e lieves t h a t t h i s line of question- doing t h i s " . W e h e a r t i l y e n d o r s e ing m a y e v e n t u a l l y lead to some t h e s e s e n t i m e n t s a n d invite t h e i n s i g h t into t h e b e h a v i o r a n d p e r - s t u d e n t s to d r o p in and h a v e D r . h a p s t h e e v e n t u a l cure of cancer- Crook tell t h e m m o r e t h a n w e ous cells. If t h e r e s e a r c h of D r . have been a b l e to a b o u t his w o r k . Crook shows definite a n d positive proof t h a t cells a r e influenced beneficially by h o r m o n e s , m u c h can be done in f u r t h e r c a n c e r r e s e a r c h . BUNTE'S D r . Crook h a s h i g h h o p e s f o r t h e success of his e x p e r i m e n t s and PHARMACY s a y s , " T h e possibilities in t h i s t y p e "ARf YOO SURE THIS li MORE HEALTHrOU THAN of r e s e a r c h a r e endless a n d f a s c i n - 5 4 E. 8th Ph. EX 6 - 6 5 1 1 CI&ARBJTES f" a t i n g and I s h o u l d n ' t be s u r p r i s e d

Full - Time Students at Hope Number 1,125

F o r g i v e me, d e a r r e a d e r , f o r I am compiling t h i s column f r o m t h e j a c k e t on a r e c o r d called " H e a v e n l y S o u n d s in H i - F i " , on which d u o - p i a n i s t s F e r r a n t e and T e i c h e r d i s p o r t t h e m s e l v e s in quite jolly f a s h i o n o v e r such n u m b e r s a s T h e Moon W a s Yellow, S t a r d u s t , I've Told E v e r y L i t t l e S t a r , etc., none of which will be h e a r d a t t h e i r concert h e r e on t h e t w e n t y first of t h i s m o n t h . I g l e a n f r o m this jacket the information that A r t h u r F e r r a n t e and Louis T e i c h e r have been p l a y i n g t o g e t h e r since t h e y m e t a t J u i l l i a r d when t h e y w e r e six y e a r s old, b o t h b e i n g prodigies of a h i g h o r d e r . Completing t h e i r s t u d i e s , t h e y two w e r e i m m e d i a t e l y hired by t h e i r f o r m e r t e a c h e r s to begin t e a c h i n g o t h e r prodigies. "At this point," the jacket says, " t h e y discovered a n e w d e l i g h t b y p l a y i n g w i t h d a n c e b a n d s on weekends, s u p p l e m e n t i n g t h e i r incomes and — m o r e i m p o r t a n t — g a i n i n g a t h o r o u g h u n d e r s t a n d i n g and a p preciation of w h a t t h e y consider to be a ' d i s t i n c t p a r t of t h e A m e r i c a n way of l i f e ' . " The g i s t of t h a t is t h a t we can expect s o m e t h i n g alse besides o r thodox t w o - p i a n o l i t e r a t u r e w h e n we h e a r t h e m on t h e t w e n t y - f i r s t . About their "prepared piano" techniques not m u c h can be said to those who h a v e not y e t h e a r d t h e m . Some of it is f a m i l i a r e n o u g h — t a c k s in t h e h a m m e r s of a p i a n o will m a k e it sound like a h a r p s i chord; Calvin's p e r f o r m a n c e l a s t March of t h e S a i n t M a t t h e w P a s sion utilized t h a t device—and s o m e of it is unbelievable. We m a y be s u r e of one t h i n g , h o w e v e r ; t h e m o s t e n j o y a b l e concert of t h e whole '58- , 59 s e a s o n m a y well be t h e first one of t h e series. F e r r a n t e and T e i c h e r ' s experimentation with prepared piano sounds is in no sense a c o v e r - u p f o r poor t e c h n i q u e or m u s i c i a n s h i p . One m i g h t a l m o s t be led to e x p e c t t h i s of a t e a m w h i c h is not a s h a m e d to p l a y a n occasional n i g h t w i t h a dance b a n d or to m a k e a r e c o r d i n g such a s t h e one I h a v e in f r o n t of m e now.

K

ouncil olumn by S h e r i C r a w f o r d

A t t h e S t u d e n t Council m e e t i n g , S e p t e m b e r 23, 1958, P r e s i d e n t Dick Brockmeier e x p l a i n e d t h e c o m m i t tee s y s t e m to t h e council. T h e council h a s both s t a n d i n g c o m m i t t e e s and special c o m m i t t e e s . One of t h e special c o m m i t t e e s is Leadership Orientation P r o g r a m under t h e C h a i r m a n s h i p of Dick Brown. The p u r p o s e of t h i s p r o g r a m is not to t r a i n l e a d e r s , b u t r a t h e r to outline some of t h e r u l e s of t h e school and to help g r o u p c h a i r m e n , class officers, and o t h e r l e a d e r s in c a r r y ing out t h e i r p l a n s . T h e h an d b o o k d r a w n u p by t h e c o m m i t t e e e x p l a i n s t h e c h a n n e l s used to e s t a b lish w a n t e d d a t e s , to o b t a i n w a n t e d i n f o r m a t i o n and o t h e r n e c e s s a r y m e t h o d s of f u l f i l l i n g duties. T h e m o s t i m p o r t a n t p a r t of t h e S t u d e n t Council m e e t i n g , O c t o b e r 7, 1958, w a s t h e election of t h e S t u d e n t Council m e m b e r s a t l a r g e . T h e s e two m e m b e r s w e r e elected by t h e council a f t e r h e a r i n g t h e qualifications of each a p p l i c a n t f r o m his civil service s h e e t a n d a f t e r a s h o r t speech b y each c a n d i date. Shari Crawford, junior, and J o h n A n g u s , senior, w e r e elected. P r e s i d e n t Dick B r o c k m e i e r a n d t h e council w i s h to r e m i n d all s t u d e n t s a n d f a c u l t y t h a t e v e r y o n e is welcome to visit a council m e e t i n g . T h e n e x t one will be T u e s d a y , October 2 1 , 1 9 5 8 a t 8:30 p.m. in t h e Kletz.


H O P E

C O L L E G E

A N C H O R

Page Five

Dr. H. Yntema to Keynote Academic Homecoming Tonight

i

Beginning this a f t e r n o o n is t h e i n a u g u r a t i o n of academic homecoming. Centered* around t h e t h e m e of " T h e Position of t h e United S t a t e s in the World T o d a y " , the p r o g r a m opens a t 2:00 this a f t e r n o o n . Continuing t o d a y and t o m o r r o w . Academic Homecoming is t h e product of six m o n t h s work. S t u d e n t s as well a s alumni a r e invited to sessions. To g a i n a d m i t t a n c e into a session it is necessary to r e g i s t e r at the a l u m n i office. Mrs. S t r y k e r will give each applicant a ticket of admission to t h e session. The opening general session is t h i s a f t e r n o o n f r o m 2:00 to 2:45 at the chapel. P r e s i d i n g is Clyde H. Geerling who is g e n e r a l chairman of the e n t i r e academic homecoming. Dr. Lubbers will welcome the alumni, and t h e music d e p a r t m e n t will provide a p p r o p r i a t e music f o r the occasion. Dr. Hollandbach will introduce the t h e m e . Section m e e t i n g begins a t 8:00 and go until 4:30. T h e a f t e r n o o n sections include commerce and i n d u s t r y , religion, and music. A f t e r a 6:00 d i n n e r a t Durfee, Dr. Hessel Y n t e m a will deliver the keynote a d d r e s s . The conclusion of academic h o m e c o m i n g will be S a t u r d a y m o r n i n g when the final t h r e e section m e e t i n g s a r e held f r o m 9:00-10:30. T h e section m e e t i n g s a r e science, education, and philosophy. C o m m i t t e e s w o r k i n g f o r academic h o m e c o m i n g have been u n d e r the c h a i r m a n s h i p of Mr. Geerlings and the h o n o r a r y c h a i r m a n s h i p of Max Boersma. Dr. Hollenbach w a s t h e m e - p r o g r a m c h a i r m a n and Mr. Kleis of t h e P h y s i c s D e p a r t m e n t served a s a r r a n g e m e n t s c h a i r m a n . Last y e a r s public r e l a t i o n s d i r e c t o r Dr. B a k e r is Publicity and P r i n t i n g C h a i r m a n . Hope's t r e a s u r e r Mr. S t e f f e n s is F i n a n c e Chairman. Rowland Van E s is s t u d e n t homecoming c h a i r m a n . F a c u l t y m e m b e r s s e r v i n g on the c o m m i t t e e a r e Dr. Fried, Dr. D y k s t r a , Mr. Ver Beek, Miss Re e v e r t s , Dr. Rider, Mr. Hilmert, Mr. Ten Hoor, and Dr. Brand. S t u d e n t c o m m i t t e e m e m b e r s a r e J u d y Mulder and F r e d Brown, who were homecoming c h a i r m e n last y e a r , and B a r b a r a E m m i c k . Rounding out t h e c o m m i t t e e a r e Mr. Robert Van Dyke, Mrs. Pilg r i m , Mrs. S t r y k e r , Mrs. Virginia Van Dyke, and Mr. Visscher.

lacht niet ten s t a a r t e worde.) Their goal was a C h r i s t i a n school. The

school

headed

by

Walter

T a y l o r was called Holland A c a d e m y and was housed in a building called Van Vleck which had been built in 1854.

In 1866 Hope College was

officially

incorporated

and

that

y e a r eight men comprised t h e first g r a d u a t i o n class. Rev.

Philip

Phelps

D.D.

was

elected the first p r e s i d e n t and Hope College, still closely connected to the A c a d e m y , b e g a n its long y e a r s of g r o w i n g pains. By 1867 the s t u d e n t s n u m b e r e d sixty-eight

and

the

c a m p u s con-

tained several o t h e r s m a l l e r buildings, one of which was a log cabin chapel

which the

s t u d e n t s them-

selves constructed. Keynote

Speaker — Dr.

Hessel

P i o n e e r s in every way, t h e found-

Yntema

e r s of Hope College were e d u c a t o r s T o n i g h t ' s Keynote a d d r e s s is be-

of t h a t t i m e who recognized the

ing- delivered by Dr. Hessel Yntema.

Our Hope Through the Years

He g r a d u a t e d f r o m Hope in

by Betty Vicha

1912. At 8:15 t o n i g h t , a g e n e r a l ses-

In 1957 t h e Chicago Tribune con-

sion of all d e l e g a t e s to academic

ducted a s u r v e y which named Hope

homecoming

will

meeet

chapel f o r the address.

in

the

Dr. Lub-

College a s one of the top ten coeducational liberal a r t s colleges in the c o u n t r y .

bers will preside.

The same year the

Michigan l e g i s l a t u r e passed a resoDr. Y n t e m a ' s a d d r e s s will c e n t e r a r o u n d the topic "The Position of t h e U n i t e d S t a t e s in I n t e r n a t i o n a l Law in t h e World T o d a y . " Michigan, Dr. Y n t e m a is r e s e a r c h comparative

law

at

the law school there. P r e c e d i n g t h i s g e n e r a l session, a banquet Hall.

will

be

held

in

Durfee

P r o f e s o r John J . Ver Beek

will preside o v e r the 6:00 dinner.

ATTEND OPEN HOUSE!

commending

Hope College

on her a c h i e v e m e n t . As any growing t h i n g , a college does not at once e n t e r into a respected posi-

C o m i n g f r o m the U n i v e r s i t y of p r o f e s s o r of

lution

tion. It too has g r o w i n g y e a r s and

of a people are d e p e n d e n t upon its education." And so plans w e r e made to establish a school. T h e General Synod of the R e f o r m e d Church, with which t h e s e t t l e r s had affiliated, appoin ted W a l t e r C. T a y l o r , an elder in t h e R e f o r m e d Church of Geneva, N e w York, to be in c h a r g e . W o r k on t h e P i o n e e r School b e g a n in 1851. T h e first r e p o r t of t h e new school contained t h i s s t a t e m e n t by Dr. Van Raalte, " T h i s is m y Anchor of Hope f o r this people in the f u t u r e . " He backed up his belief by g i v i n g live a c r e s of land f o r use by the new school.

i m p o r t a n c e and need of h i g h e r education f o r women. In c o n t r a s t to c o n t e m p o r a r y schools which were a g a i n s t co-education, Hope in its first y e a r "Higher

of

existence

education

for

declared: women

seems to provide the p r o p e r medium between the spirit of oriental b a r b a r i s m which r e g a r d s women a s fitted only to be p a r e n t and housekeeper, and the infidelity of women's r i g h t s f a l s e l y so-called." In 1878, the n i n e t y - e i g h t s t u d e n t s in-

cluded two women, Hope's first. g r o w i n g pains. W h a t are the D u r i n g t h a t t i m e the s t r u g g l i n g events t h a t lead to a college's sucschool, a l t h o u g h s u p p o r t e d by its c e s s ? Whose a r e the a s p i r a t i o n s Christian people, incurred m a n y and ideals which fashion a college into w h a t men consider successful ? The people, too, had a g r e a t f a i t h debts, and the Synod decided to W h a t a r e t h e s e a s p i r a t i o n s and in the school they were establish- d r a w up a new constitution in o r d e r ideals? ing. F r o m miles a r o u n d men came to keep it f r o m f u r t h e r debt. Hope College was founded be- to clear t h e land, goods w e r e doUnlike m a n y o t h e r c h u r c h - r e l a t e d cause of the ideals and a s p i r a t i o n s nated, everyone sacrificed somecolleges, Hope did not sacrifice t h e of a band of i m i g r a n t s f r o m Rot- t h i n g to help Dr. Van R a a l t e ' s m a t t e r s of the s pir it a s it delved terdam who sailed f o r America on Anchor of Hope to g e t s t a r t e d . For f u r t h e r into the m a t t e r s of t h e October 2, 1846. Headed by Rev. t h e y had come to m a k e a place in A. C. V a n R a a l t e , these brave t h e New World f o r t h e i r children mind. R a t h e r it e x p a n d e d in o r d e r people m a d e t h e i r way to Michigan and they were willing to sacrifice to contain equal s h a r e s of both. P e r h a p s Hope's success can be to find a place w h e r e t h e y could if need be in o r d e r to p r e p a r e live and raise t h e i r children in ac- t h e m f o r high g r a d e A m e r i c a n a t t r i b u t e d to t h e completeness of cordance with t h e i r C h r i s t i a n f a i t h . citizenship and t h e intelligent de- t h e education which it offers. " T o By 1848 t h e y had settled in a v e l o p m e n t of C h r i s t i a n C h a r a c t e r . educate t h e whole of m a n f o r t h e choice location on t h e e a s t e r n shore In the w o r d s of t h e i r c o u r a g e o u s whole of l i f e " is H o p e ' s p u r p o s e of Lake Michigan n e a r Black Lake. f o u n d e r , " L e s t t h i s people sink into and as it recognizes t h e f u l l n e s s of Even a t t h a t e a r l y date, t h e y were insignificance," " L e s t o u r children the s p i r i t u a l life and necessity of concerned w i t h t h e education of become t h e t a g - e n d of society." the physical, and seeks to p r e p a r e t h e i r people and f e l t t h a t " t h e ( O p d a t dit volk niet in onbeduid- its s t u d e n t s f o r a g r e a t e r e x p e r i c h a r a c t e r , outlook and p r o s p e r i t y endheid vervalle, Opdat o n s n a g e s - ence in both.

Queen Honored Last Evening (Cont'd f r o m p a g e 1) a composite m a j o r of French and English. M e m b e r of chapel choir and the D u r f e e House council, she also belongs to the French Club and Delta Phi s o r o r i t y . From the j u n i o r class comes Sue Kirkwood f r o m Metuchen, N e w J e r s e y , and J u d y Van Dyke who hails f r o m Zeeland, Michigan. Sue, an avid k n i t t e r and sewer, is a n e l e m e n t a r y education m a j o r with a composite m a j o r in h i s t o r y and sociology. She is seen behind the desk in the l i b r a r y several h o u r s a week. Also, she is on t h e YWCA Service commission, and a m e m b e r of Delphi s o r o r i t y . An English m a j o r p l a n n i n g to go into secondary education, J u d y w a s this y e a r ' s co-chairman of Homecoming. H e r activities a r e n u m e r ous. She serves on Pan-Hell a s vice-president, is a House Board member, on the " Y " cabinet, on W A A board, and s i n g s in chapel choir. H e r hobbies a r e music and horseback-riding. S o p h o m o r e s on the queen's c o u r t are Carol Joelson and J u d y E a s t man. Coming f r o m Venice, F l o r i d a Carol is a n a r t and G e r m a n m a j o r . She is on W A A Board, a m e m b e r of t h e Y Cabinet, a W A L m e m b e r , and a Delphi pledge. Besides h e r t a l e n t in a r t , she finds time f o r s p o r t s , w a t e r skiing, and music. H a v i n g high hopes of becoming an occupational t h e r a p i s t , J u d y is at p r e s e n t a n E n g l i s h m a j o r . She is a cheerleader, a House Council and A House Board member, a receptionist, and a S t u d e n t Council c o m m i t t e e woman. She is a Delphi pledge. T h e class of 1962 is r e p r e s e n t e d by Diane Claussen f r o m Closter, N e w J e r s e y and by B a r b a r a Ver Meer f r o m F o r e s t Grove, Michigan. A speech m a j o r , eighteen y e a r old Diane h a s entered m a n y c a m p u s activities in the six weeks she h a s been here. She is a YWCA m e m ber, belongs to the French Club, to W A A , and to P a l e t t e and Masque. Also, she is a cheerleader. She dances, twirls, and acts. An e l e m e n t a r y education m a j o r , B a r b a r a is also off to a f a s t s t a r t a t Hope. She is a " Y " m e m b e r and also belongs to A S A . She p l a y s piano and sings.


Page Six

H O P E

C O L L E G E

A N C H O R

THE POSITION OF THE UNITED Religion

Music

Elton

M.

Eenigenburg

T a k i n g a religious view of the topic, " T h e

Place of

the

United

S t a t e s in t h e C o n t e m p o r a r y W o r l d " of Academic H o m e c o m i n g will be Dr. J u s t i n V a n d e r Kolk. Dr. V a n d e r Kolk g r a d u a t e d f r o m Hope College in 1931, w e n t on f o r graduate

study

at

the

Oberlin

G r a d u a t e School of Theology and the

Divinity

versity

of

School

Chicago,

of

the

and

Uni-

got

his

Ph.D. d e g r e e f r o m t h e U n i v e r s i t y Justin Vander

Kolk

of Chicago.

He is now t h e ProRobert W. Cavanaugh

fessor of S y s t a m a t i c Theology of

Commerce and Industry

N e w Brunswick Theological Seminary in N e w J e r s e y . He h a s written

many

articles

periodicals,

is

for

religious

President

of

the

Board of Domestic Missions of the R e f o r m e d Church in A m e r i c a , is a lecturer

at

the

Silver

Bay

Con-

ference on W o r l d Mission, and has been a l e a d e r a t M i n i s t e r R e t r e a t s . He also belongs to the Theological Commission, and the World Alliance of the R e f o r m e d Church of

1/

r

A m e r i c a in t h e United S t a t e s a r e a . He h a s

two

daughters attending

Hope a t the p r e s e n t time, Joyce, a junior, and N a n c y a f r e s h m a n . The section m e e t i n g will b2 in Chapel

11

at

3

o'clock,

Friday

a f t e r n o o n a l o n g with t h e o t h e r section m e e t i n g s . Dr. Elton M. E e n i n g e n b u r , c u r r e n t l y a P r o f e s s o r of Historical

Theology

at

Western

S e m i n a r y and t h e a u t h o r of m a n y articles,

will

give

a

10-minute

critique of Dr. V a n d e r Kolk's talk.

Leon A. Bosch

The section m e e t i n g s f o r Academic H o m e c o m i n g will begin a t 3:00 on F r i d a y , October 17, in t h e chapel. The g e n e r a l t h e m e will be " T h e Position of t h e United S t a t e s in the World T o d a y " . Section A, Commerce and Ind u s t r y , will be presided over by Mr. Max D. B o e r s m a and t h e s p e a k e r will be Dr. Leon A. Bosch. D r . Bosch h a s d e g r e e s f r o m Hope College, U n i v e r s i t y of Illinois, and N o r t h w e s t e r n U n i v e r s i t y . He h a s been a m e m b e r of t h e f a c u l t y of t h e School of Business a t N o r t h w e s t e r n U n i v e r s i t y since 1931, and in 1953 b e g a n his p r e s e n t d u t i e s a s Associate D e a n of t h e School of Business A d m i n i s t r a t i o n .

Dr. Bosch acts as a c o n s u l t a n t to business firms and t r a d e association p a r t i c u l a r l y in t h e a r e a s of executive development and h u m a n relations. He h a s also served a s c o n s u l t a n t to the F r e n c h and Venezuelan g o v e r n m e n t s in t h e e s t a b lishment of graduate business s t u d y courses in t h e i r universities. Dr. Bosch is a m e m b e r of t h e A m e r i c a n M a n a g e m e n t Association, Dwight B. Yntema t h e A c a d e m y of M a n a g e m e n t , t h e since 1946. H e is t h e h e a d of t h e A m e r i c a n Association of U n i v e r s i t y Michigan S e n a t e T a x S t u d y Comof Michigan. H e also h a s a t t e n d e d m i t t e e . Dr. Y n t e m a is also a m e m t h e U n i v e r s i t y of Chicago and Y a l e ber of t h e A m e r i c a n Economic A s U n i v e r s i t y . H e h a s been t h e P r o - sociation and t h e A m e r i c a n S t a t i s f e s s o r of Economics and head of tical Association. H e h a s w r i t t e n t h e D e p a r t m e n t of Economics a n d several published a r t i c l e s on n a Business A d m i n i s t r a t i o n a t H o p e tional income.

Morrette

Rider

Jantina

Holleman

The Music D e p a r t m e n t will present f o r its academic H o m e c o m i n g p r o g r a m a g r o u p of s p e a k e r s f r o m Hope College. T h i s g r o u p , composed of Mr. A n t h o n y Kooiker, Dr. M o r r e t t e Rider and Miss J a n t i n a Holleman, will be m o d e r a t e d by Dr. R o b e r t C a v a n a u g h , head of the Music D e p a r t m e n t . Mr. A n t h o n y Kooiker, associate p r o f e s s o r of music t h e o r y and piano since 1950 will be s p e a k i n g on " T h e Position of T e a c h i n g P i a n o in t h e World T o d a y . " A n a t i v e of Hull, Iowa, Mr. Kooiker is a n alumnus of N o r t h w e s t e r n U n i v e r s i t y and T h e E a s t m a n School of Music. His N e w York d e b u t w a s m a d e a t Town Hall in N o v e m b e r of 1954. B e f o r e coming to Hope, Kooiker w a s f o r t h r e e y e a r s the accomp a n i s t of A l b e r t S p a l d i n g . A n t h o n y Kooiker

S p e a k i n g on the position of Orc h e s t r a l Music in t h e world t o d a y will be Dr. M o r r e t t e Rider, d i r e c t o r of H o p e ' s O r c h e s t r a and S y m p h o n e t t e and a s s o c i a t e p r o f e s s o r of music t h e o r y . Rider is a n a t i v e of R e a d i n g , P e n n s y l v a n i a and a g r a d u a t e of t h e U n i v e r s i t y of Michigan and Columbia U n i v e r s i t y . H e h a s been on the Hope College staff since 1947. T h e position of Music E d u c a t i o n t o d a y will be discussed by Miss

J a n t i n a Holleman, assistant profe s s o r of m u s i c and

i n s t r u c t o r of

m u s i c education courses.

Coming

f r o m the m i d w e s t and a g r a d u a t e of C e n t r a l College a n d

Columbia

U n i v e r s i t y , Miss H o l l e m a n h a s also s t u d i e d in t h e U n i v e r s i t y of A m can

boast

of

piano

study

s t e r d a m in t h e N e t h e r l a n d s .

under She

H u r a l d M o r r i s , Louis C r a w d e s and Paul Frenkel.


H O P E

C O L L E G E

Page Seven

A N C H O R

STATES IN THE WORLD TODAY SCIENCE

PHILOSOPHY

Wesley

i-

Maurice

Marvin

Homecoming 1858 . . . ( C o n t ' d f r o m page 1) 12 N o o n — " H " Club D i n n e r — D u r fee Hall 12 N o o n — M r s . L u b b e r s ' Luncheon f o r o u t - o f - t o w n wives of H Club Men 2:00 P.M.—Hope vs. A d r i a n — Riverview P a r k A f t e r G a m e Alcor A l u m n a e T e a — Gil more C o t t a g e Open House all d o r m i t o r i e s 5:30-7:00 P . M . — A l u m n i Buffet S u p p e r — D u r f e e Hall 8:00 P . M . — H o m e c o m i n g Ball— Civic C e n t e r 8:30 P . M . — P a l e t t e and Masque P l a y , S C A P I N , T H E S C A M P by Moliere—Little T h e a t r e S u n d a y , October 19 3:00 P . M . — V e s p e r Service— Memorial Chapel

ADRIAN!

D. Ivan Dykstra

Hope d u r i n g the y e a r s 1947-1950. a r y ('47) and worked t o w a r d his The critique of Dr. D y k s t r a ' s Ph.D. d e g r e e a t Columbia Universpeech will be given by Mr. Wes- sity. T h e s u b j e c t of his t h e s i s ley C. D y k s t r a , P r o f e s s o r of Phil- which will be s u b m i t t e d t h i s y e a r o s p h y at A l m a College. He also is " S o r e n K i e r k e g a a r d : Critic of received his education a t N o r t h - Hegel." Philosophy Section F, will be w e s t e r n A c a d e m y and N o r t h w e s t e r n J u n i o r College, Hope College held in Chapel 11 t o m o r r o w morn('46), W e s t e r n Theological Semin- ing a t 9 a.m.

EDUCATION

Dr. Visscher received his A.B. d e g r e e f r o m Hope College in 1922, his Ph.D. d e g r e e f r o m the Univ e r s i t y of Minnesota in 1925, and his M.D. d e g r e e f r o m the Univ e r s i t y of Minnesota in 1931. He has been p r o f e s s o r and c h a i r m a n of t h e d e p a r t m e n t of physiology a t t h e U n i v e r s i t y of M i n n e s o t a since 1936. In 1955, Dr. Visscher received the A m e r i c a n Cancer Society Medal f o r Minnesota. Dr. Visscher has w r i t t e n n u m erous articles f o r professional j o u r n a l s and h a s been a m e m b e r and officer of m a n y medical societies. He is now the p r e s i d e n t of the A m e r i c a n Physiological Society. T h e critique will be given by Marvin H. K u i z e n g a of the Class of 1930, Hope College. Mr. Kuize n g a is a s s i s t a n t director of biological r e s e a r c h a t the U p j o h n C o m p a n y in K a l a m a z o o and is t h e a u t h o r of several articles on endocrinology which a p p e a r e d in professional j o u r n a l s .

Education " T h e Role of A m e r i c a n E d u c a tion in t h e W o r l d T o d a y " will be Dr. C h r i s A. De Y o u n g ' s t h e m e f o r the section on education a t H o p e College's 1958 Academic Homecoming. Dr. D e Y o u n g , recently r e s i g n ed h e a d of t h e d e p a r t m e n t of education and psychology a t Illinois S t a t e N o r m a l U n i v e r s i t y h a s accepted a position to head t h e A m e r i c a n delegation of p r o f e s s o r s and a s s i s t a n t s who a r e developing a n e w t e a c h e r s college in C a m bodia, S o u t h e a s t Asia. H e e x p e c t s to f l y to C a m b o d i a in N o v e m b e r f o r t h e two y e a r t e r m . T h i s p r o j e c t is a p a r t of t h e A m e r i c a n aid p r o g r a m in S o u t h e a s t

(

Dykstra

Dr. Ivan D y k s t r a , head of t h e philosophy d e p a r t m e n t at Hope College will s p e a k on Philosophy as r e l a t e d to t h e c o n f e r e n c e t h e m e , " T h e Position of t h e United S t a t e s In The World T o d a y " a s p a r t of Academic H o m e c o m i n g . Dr. D y k s t r a w a s born in P l a t t e , South D a k o t a . He a t t e n d e d N o r t h w e s t e r n Classical A c a d e m y and N o r t h w e s t e r n J r . College and t h e n g r a d u a t e d f r o m Hope in 1935 and W e s t e r n Theological S e m i n a r y in 1938. He received his Ph.D. D e g r e e B. Visscher f r o m Yale U n i v e r s i t y in 1945. T h e s u b j e c t of his t h e s i s f o r this w a s " T h e Position of t h e U n i t e d S t a t e s in the World of T o d a y " a s " T h e Lordship of God in the Theoit a p p l i e s to t h e field of science logy of Karl E a r t h . " He h a s w r i t will be Dr. Maurice B. V i s s c h e r ' s ten articles f o r C h r i s t i a n C e n t u r y s u b j e c t when he speaks to Section and o t h e r publications. In the y e a r s 1940-1947 he held D, Science, a t 9:00 on S a t u r d a y p a s t o r a t e s in Stone Ridge, N e w m o r n i n g , October 18. The m e e t i n g will be held in the Music Audi- York and H a w t h o r n e , N. J . He w a s t o r i u m with Dr. G e r r i t Van Zyl head of t h e Greek d e p a r t m e n t a t presiding.

H, Kuizenga

AGGRIEVE

C.

Otto Yntema

Asia, and is channelled t h r o u g h t h e p r i v a t e agency of t h e U n i t a r i a n Service Committee. T h e Cambodian a s s i g n m e n t is the sixth overseas p r o j e c t f o r Mr. De Young. F r o m 1920-24 he served in India as principal of a n e l e m e n t a r y school and h i g h school, and is an e x a m i n e r in E n g l i s h f o r the Univ e r s i t y of M a d r a s . In 1947 he w a s s e n t by the U. S. A r m y to B r e m e m and Berlin, G e r m a n y , as a educative c o n s u l t a n t . A g a i n in 1950 he w a s appointed Chris A. to a n education mission by t h e U. S. D e p a r t m e n t of S t a t e with his education s u r v e y f o r t h e P r e s b y h e a d q u a r t e r s in Heidelberg, Ger- t e r i a n c h u r c h in P a k i s t a n . many. A g r a d u a t e of Hope, Mr. De H e served in t h e first g r o u p of Y o u n g will e x a m i n e t h e educational F u l b r i g h t p r o f e s s o r s to India, lec- school in R u s s i a and will give t h e t u r i n g on educational a d m i n i s t r a - salient c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s in o u r own t i o n a t t h e C e n t r a l I n s t i t u t e of A m e r i c a n schools. I n his speech E d u c a t i o n a t t h e U n i v e r s i t y of he will give the s t r o n g p o i n t s of Delhi f r o m 1950-1951. I n 1955 he our p r e s e n t d a y educational s y s t e m and the late Mrs. D e Y o u n g led an and will t a k e a r e a l i s t i c look a t

i

De Young

it w i t h r e s p e c t to t h e p r e s e n t world situation. In t h i s p o s t - s p u t n i k era, a r e w e placing e n o u g h e m p h a s i s on m a t h and science? Can w e place e n o u g h e m p h a s i s on t h e m and still do justice to t h e o t h e r s u b j e c t s which a r e i m p o r t a n t also ? T h e s e a r e t h e m a j o r points t h a t D r . Y o u n g hopes to b r i n g out in his speech t o d a y .


Page Eight

m

PE

C O L L E G E

A N C H

Your

HOPE COLLEGE ANCHOR Member Associate Collegiate Press

PRESS

Published weekly by and for the students of Hope College except during holiday and examination periods, under the authority of the Student Council Publications Board. Entered as second class matter at the post office of Holland, Michigan, at a special rate of postage provided for in section 1103 of Act of Congress, October 3, 1917, and authorized October 19, 1918. Subscription Kate: $2.00 per school year to non-student subcribers. Editor-in-Chief John Fragale, Jr. Managing Editor Nancy Boyd Editorial Board Carol Rylance, Carl Poit, W. Gardner Kissack Nancy Ramar, Alberta Litts News Editor Norma De Boer Feature Editor Richard Jaarsma Society Editors Norma Wallace, J. Gregory Bryson Sports Editors Ronald Bekius, Robert Balfoort, Lloyd Tinholt, Carolyn Scholten Make-Up Editor Carol Vander Meer Copy Editor Lynne Feltham Photographers David Vande Vusse, Frederick Vande Vussee Typist Barbara Phillippsen Business Manager Ronald Lokhorst Circulation Manager Dale Heeres Advertising Manager Duane Werkman, Richard Stadt Bookkeeper. Fred Diekman

A New Meditation Chapel In recent years there h a s been an increasing desire, and many of us feel there h a s been an increasing need, f o r a meditation chapel somewhere on the campus of Hope College. And only during this last year have definite plans and possibilities begun to materialize. Because of the spaciousness of the interior of our college chapel and t h e necessity to lock it each day a f t e r classes, the main auditorium proves very unsatisfactory f o r any personal p r a y e r and meditation. Dormitories and f r a t e r n i t y houses with all their general activity and noise give little opportunity f o r a student to be alone either physically or mentally. Where then, can the s t u d e n t go, in search of this solitude on c a m p u s ? This summer some students were asked to solicite f u n d s f o r a new meditation chapel and an interested number of students responded with their ideas and help. With the help of these students money was obtained f r o m various single donors and church organizations. The college itself donated a lump sum f o r the chapel and t e n t a t i v e architectural plans have been drawn up. Suggestions have been made concerning the location of a meditation chapel and interested students who are pushing this idea are seriously considering the ideas. The chapel m u s t be a room located in another building, however, f o r it is impossible to find a suitable place f o r a new building on campus. Also there must be an accessible outside entrance to the room for one of the l a r g e buildings on campus could not be left entirely open day and night. Because of this stipulation the two most feasible possibilities are a basement room in the back of the chapel, which h a s an outside entrance, or one of the basement rooms in Van Vleck Hall. Not only is t h e r e sentimental value in this oldest s t r u c t u r e of Hope College but Van Vleck Hall is centrally located on campus. Other possibilities are a basement room in Kollen Hall or possibly one in the new women's dormitory which will be built in the f u t u r e . U n f o r t u n a t e l y , because one of these dormitories is a men's hall and the other a women's hall a meditation chapel in one of these halls would be likely to end as a chapel f o r just men or j u s t women because of t h e nature of t h e building in which t h e chapel would be situated. However, because of the proximity of t h e room in Kollen Hall under consideration to t h e college radio station it really must be disregarded as a choice. This brings u s to the present, today,—and you. We need your help and interest. Won't you a t least consider the possibility and advantage of a personal meditation chapel on Hope College's campus?

LITTLE MAN ON. CAMPUS

Inquiring Reporter As the above title suggests, this column will be concerned with s t a t e m e n t s and f a c t s gathered by one of those snooping bloodhounds who so make a f a r c e out of privacy. It is my job in this column, and I hope, others to uncover f a c t s and to stimulate discussion about topics which concern the welfare and life of the students. So much for the preamble! The rest of this article tends to be r a t h e r factual and to the point. It is not generally known t h a t people in the Reformed Church have been raising money f o r a "meditation chapel" on the Hope College campus. The purpose of this chapel is to provide a plac3 for personal meditation and communion with God. There is, however, one t h i n g t h a t was neglected. Students were never asked f o r their opinions about the need f o r such a chapel. The Anchor, the official organ of the students of Hope College, attempted to correct this oversight by conducting a poll. These are the results of our survey: Out of twenty people interviewed a t random in the Kletz: FOR: 3 A G A I N S T : 16 TOO S L E E P Y TO A N S W E R : 1 We will not a t t e m p t to draw any positive conclusion f r o m these f a c t s f o r we think the f a c t s speak f o r themselves. Aside f r o m comments about the students being too busy to meditate, these answer were received from the people interviewed: "I do not think we need a meditation chapel because if we w a n t to pray or j u s t meditate we can go to the chapel or any of the countless churches in the Holland a r e a . " "Instead of spending a lot of money foolishly f o r something we don't need anyway, why don't the people whose idea this is donate t h a t money for financially needy students ? " "I believe t h a t a meditation chapel is the very t h i n g t h a t this college is lacking and I believe it would add much to the religious life of the students." " W h e r e would we put i t ? " "I think t h a t the whole idea is silly, Once the t h i n g is put up it will just fall into disuse." These a r e just some of the comments received and are, I think, a representative sampling of the opinion of t h e student body. However, we cannot be sure and since you, the students, play such a large role in the eventual success of this project, we would like to have more of your opinions in letters to the Anchor. —Richard J. J a a r s m a

fl>6T

Beat Adrian

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7 HEARTHSIDE — "" — HANDCRAFTS

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EDITOR

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Dr. John Hollenbach, Vice-President

Alumni Homecoming — 1958 Version When the fall season approaches, the call to Alumni to r e t u r n to college usually means a week-end of football, food and fellowship, all wrapped up in the atmosphere of reminiscence. This y e a r the Hope Homecoming call t a k e s on a new note. In addition to all the appeals just mentioned there is a new one, so simple, so obvious t h a t it is almost e m b a r r a s s i n g to talk about it as an innovation. This y e a r the Homecoming Committee has invited its alumni to r e t u r n to their Alma Mater also to learn — to sit once more in the classroom and lecture hall and to participate in discussion on topics of significance and importance f o r the American adult in today's world. In other words the 1958 Hope Homecoming includes a day of mental stimulation at a series of sessions which we might call the first edition of an "Alumni College." The idea of an academic conclave as p a r t of Homecoming grew out of a discussion among members of the executive committtee of the Alumni Association and staff members here at the college. It seemed to them ironic, the more they reflected, t h a t here in the place where supposedly the mind's adventure is the central occupation, where, above all, the excitement of mind rubbing a g a i n s t mind, of new ideas launched and attacked should be significant, we provide a t our m a j o r alumni g a t h e r i n g s little or no intellectual fireworks. Out of this discussion came the idea, approved enthusiastically by students, faculty and key alumni, f o r a "Homecoming With a Difference" this fall. T h a t is why, in addition to the traditional society luncheons, the parade, the football g a m e and the Sunday Vesper, we are holding today and tomorrow morning a series of lectures, panels and discussions around the central topic, "The Position of the United S t a t e s in the World Today." This topic is of peculiar importance f o r every thinking American today. Not too long ago our Vice President met with a stony reception in South America. Recently the libraries of the United S t a t e s I n f o r m a tion Service in Lebanon were attacked, heralding the beginning of serious civil conflict in the Middle E a s t e r n state supposedly most proAmerican. Even more recently, Quemoy h a s brought us to a f u r t h e r agonizing reappraisal of our world position. For the past eight months, too, the American system of education, especially public elementary and secondary education, has been under serious question, and comparisons with E u r o p e a n and Russian education are many and o f t e n unflattering. W h a t is the position of the United S t a t e s of America at this point of world history ? This is a pertinent question then not only in t e r m s of our economic, military and political power, but in t e r m s also of the cultural and scientific aspects of our own society. Around such issues the Alumni College sessions will center. Elsewhere you have seen the names of those who a r e leading the discussions of the conference. They f o r m quite a gallery of distinguished American scholars — a n d importantly, too, of distinguished Hope Alumni. Their presence here on this occasion is an indication t h a t Hope s t u d e n t s of the past have not pulled down a sheepskin curtain on learning a t the time of graduation, but have continued to study and grow a f t e r they l e f t these halls. Students and faculty are hosts to the alumni f o r the events of this weekend. As hosts, let us plan to meet our guests — not only a t the game but at some of the sessions of the academic conference. — J o h n Hollenbach

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H O P E

C O L L E G E

A N C H O R

Page Nine

Societies View Past Along With Present r>

ALPHA GAMMA PHI Alpha Gamma Phi, the youngest sorority on campus, has been in existence f o r only a year. In May, 1957, the need f o r a new sorority was recognized by t h e Pan-Hellenic Board. T w e n t y - f o u r f r e s h m e n accepted bids and pitched right in on a job t h a t they knew would require much but hoped would give m a n y rewards. That same s p r i n g a tea w a s given by Mrs. Lubbers to honor the new sorority. At t h a t time Diane Sluyter w a s elected as the first president, Marcia Baldwin, vice-president, Dorene Tornga, secretary, and Carol Rylance, treasurer. During the summer, round robins were circulated as all the girls worked on ideas f o r the crest, name, creed, prayer, pledge, song, and constitution for the new sorority. At a house p a r t y in the fall the ideas were all brought together. T h e pine tree was chosen as the central figure f o r the crest. Working from there, t h e colors green and gold were chosen, the pin designed, the Greek symbols f o r Alpha Gamma Phi accepted. The yellow carnation was chosen as the sorority flower and the constitution was approved. On November 8, Alpha-phi officially became a sorority. At the formal induction ceremony in the J u l i a n a Room, Jocelyn Fryling, president of the Pan-Hellenic Board initiated each member and presented t h e c h a r t e r to be signed. Alpha-phi's first activity was a successful date night of bowling g a m e s in t h e Kletz, and " F a n t a s y in F r o s t " a t the Morton House was the theme of her formal. Her first informal, "Samoset," was held a t Castle P a r k . In the spring Alpha-phi entertained the f r e s h m e n with "The Greatest Show on E a r t h . " Although alumni are f e w . Alpha-phi will hold a Homecoming luncheon a t the E t e n House Saturday. Carol Rylance is in charge of the get-together. Ruth Van Der Meulen and Judy Neinhuis are cochairmen of the float. The theme is " H i s bark was worse than his bite." Alpha-phi is now a y e a r old. The first pledge class has been initiated. Members, new and old, are looking forward to another exciting and profitable year.

Arcadian The Arcadian F r a t e r n i t y was officially organized on October 11, 1946. The first active clan consisted of 24 men with Dr. E. E. Brand as f r a t e r n i t y advisor. The Greek name Chi Phi Sigma w a s chosen denoting service, love and wisdom. The f r a t e r n i t y house, located next to the men's dormitory was acquired in 1951, the same year Mrs. J e a n n e t t e Boskoel began her still continuing service to the f r a t e r n i t y as house-mother. In its short but dynamic history the f r a t has made g r e a t strides in its social, athletic and intellectual achievements. The Arcadian Homecoming Float this year will be a replica of the f a m o u s RCA Victor trade mark. It will display the phonograph, and the dog listening to his m a s t e r ' s voice. The dog will be done in black and yellow depicting Adrian. He will be listening to his m a s t e r ' s voice coming f r o m the phonograph. The RCA Victor title will present the t h o u g h t : Rover Concedes Another Victory. Cosmopolitan

The Cosmopolitan F r a t e r n i t y was founded in 1890 by a g r o u p of freshmen. The Greek letters given to the f r a t e r n i t y were Phi Kappa Alpha. Phi stands f o r the Greek word, Philia which means friend? The nine charter members of the Delta Phi Sorority met in October ship. K a p p a f o r the word, Kinema of 1911 to organize a society which would be f o r "The literary and cultural meaning progress and Alpha f o r development of its members". Delphi r e f e r s to the oracle of Apollo, the word Alethea meaning t r u t h . the Roman god of music and poetry. Through the years, the Delphi Phi The object of the f r a t e r n i t y is society has diligently strived to uphold these ideals. The Delphi beto develop its members socially, lieves in friendship, scholarship, laughter, honor, courtesy, character, intellectually and morally. The and God as the g r e a t source of life and light. The society g r e w in membership, and in 1916 there were thirty- Friday night literary meetings one members. Today Delphi h a s fifty-two members. They are sisters offer intellectual stimulation in the of the Phi Kappa Alpha f r a t e r n i t y and each year, a joint meeting with form of the serious paper and ent e r t a i n m e n t in the humor paper. their brothers is f u l l y enjoyed. In recent years the Delph Phi society h a s presented a fashion The f r a t e r n i t y pin was adopted show in t h e spring of the year for the F r e s h m a n girls. There has also in 1922. The pin is a small shield been a joint tea with the Sigma Sigma sorority. Throughout the year, superimposed over a large shield, the house parties, the initiation of t h e pledges, date night, the f o r m a l and has a globe on it symbolizing and the informal p a r t y brings a g r e a t e r unity which binds all the the cosmopolitan out-look and the Greek letters. Phi Kappa Alpha. members into one g r e a t sisterhood. Last year, Delphi had the honor of winning the trophy f o r their The l a r g e r shield is topped by a homecoming float f o r the third consecutive year. Delphi also s a n g knights helmet, the symbol of the their h e a r t s and souls away to "Cindy" and became the victors of the f r a t e r n i t y . women's division of the All College Sing. The f r a t e r n i t y house is located The Delphi society holds high the ideal of the c h a r t e r members, at 47 E a s t Thirteenth Street. In music and poetry, the literary and cultural development of each member. the house the literary meetings are

DELPHI

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held and it also serves as a recreational center of the active members. Here the men can watch The Dorian Ladies say "Welcome" to all the visiting Hope alumni, television, play cards and pingpong. and remind f o r m e r Dorians to come and visit the sorority room. The p a s t two weeks have been busy ones. On Friday evening, The inspiration f o r this year's October 3, Formal Initiation was held in Durfee Terrace Room. Each Cosmo entry in the Homecoming new member was presented with a yellow rose and a copy of the creed parade is the circus. Everyone has in the very impressive candlelight ceremony. Punch and cookies were in his mind's memory album the served. vision of all the f u n he had a t the At the previous meeting elections were held, and Nancy Raymer circus. The float committee, Marty was elected sophomore representative to Pan-Hellenic Board, and Mari- Elzinga, c h a i r m a n ; Jim Combs, and lyn Ferris, sophomore representative f o r Student Council. Jim Stringer, incorporated all the Blythefield Country Club, in Grand Rapids will be the scene of nice things of t h e circus and built the formal on November 7. The f o r m a l is under the chairmanship their float around them. The body of Ann Tell. of the float is a three r i n g circus Last Friday evening in the Music Building Auditorium a joint under the big top. Under the canmeeting w a s held with the Emersonians. The theme of the meeting vas peaks of t h e tent a r e three was "Moon Men and Maidens." The p r o g r a m opened with devotions acts. In the center is an "Adrian by Diane Oldenburg and J e r r y Wondra. Carroll " T e x " Bennink was bull dog" j u m p i n g through a hoop, the Master of Ceremonies, w i t h Gordon Stegink acting as song leader. f o r a Hope College "Dutch". The The serious paper, entitled "Man on the Moon," was given by Carol whole float is being pulled by an Fischer, and the h u m o r paper, "Little Red Riding Hood" was given by elephant. Louise H u n t e r , Doris Schmidt, Marilyn Campbell, Paul Buit, and Ron A t the literary meeting of OctoLokhorst. Cider and donuts were served a t the close of the meeting. ber 10, the speaker was Wallace The Dorians expressed pride t h a t t h e i r brothers had won the Gumner, the Superintendent of scholastic trophy. Schools in Lowell, Michigan. Mr. The pledge class treated the juniors and seniors to b r e a k f a s t in the sorority room Saturday morning a t 8:00 a.m. The menu consisted Gumner, w a s t h e second speaker in a series of meetings in which of juice, coffee and assorted sweet rolls. The traditional Homecoming B r e a k f a s t will be held a t Cumerfords f o r m e r Cosmos are giving p a p e r s tomorrow morning. J a n e A n k e r is acting as chairman. The Dorians on their various professions. T^iese are looking f o r w a r d to visiting with the f o r m e r Dorians. men are invited to come in and Shirley Doyle and Scotty Wallace are in charge of the float. j u s t "talk shop". Mr. Gumner told A s h o r t business meeting will be held this evening a t 7:00 p.m. of the various problems of his office. The meeting was opened by singing the Cosmopolitan Hymn SYBESMA'S SERVICE W e Need Your Head led by chorister, George Worden. Dealer in Sinclair Products in Our Business Bill Jones the chaplain f o r the WASHING A N D GREASING POST'S BARBER SHOP f r a t e r n i t y offered the opening TIRES A N D BATTERIES 3—Barbers 331 College prayer. The h u m o r paper w a s given Corner 9th and College by Tom Aardema.

DORIAN

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SIBYLLINE "Dog Daze" is the theme of the Sybilline Sorority homecoming float which is under the capable direction of Carol Vander Meer and Ruth Mokma. The Sorority is looking forward to our homecoming luncheon to be held in the "Tulip Room" at the W a r m Friend Tavern, and anticipate this time of fellowship with their alumnae. J a n Burgwald is the homecoming luncheon chairman. The 1958 pledge slave sale was held at the old Van Raalte's Mansion on October 3. Informal initiation started Monday, October 6, and ended on Thursday when Formal Initiation was held a t 9:00 in the Music Building.

SOROSIS The Sorosis Society has the distinction of being the oldest sorority on campus. It began in the year 1905 as an outgrowth of the Minerva Literary Society of what was then called Hope Academy. The officers which lead the group through t h a t first memorable year were — President, Elizabeth Grotemaat; Vice President, Estelle Kollen; Secretary, Mina Coggeshall; and Treasurer, Anna Huizinga. The following year, 1906, the Society went through some reorganization and the May issue of the 1906 Anchor had this to say about the society — "Although the Sorosis is but a newly organized society, it is already s t r o n g and in a flourishing condition". Through competent leadership and enthusiastic members the society continued to flourish. Their motto was, and is today — " S t r e n g t h and Honor" and the desire to make these ideals guiding s t a r t s in the development of character in her members. The F r a t e r n a l Society being the oldest f r a t e r n i t y on campus and desiring to befriend the new Society, adopted the Sororities as their sisters, and this friendly status has been maintained ever since. Through her long history Sorosis has acquired many wonderful traditions which are still upheld today. The yellow rose as a symbol of beauty to her members, the Sigma Sigma songs which tell of her fellowship and strivings, the friendship circle, the two Greek S's rising out of the gold Cresent, the Annual Spaghetti dinner, the F r a t e r Sorosis meeting, the meeting with the Alumnae, and the tea honoring the housemothers. The Sorosis Alumnae have always maintained a place in t h e i r h e a r t s f o r their Society. They have kept up interest in the active chapter and have carried on activities in their own group. The active society is very f o r t u n a t e in having such a strong and helpful Alumnae group. This summer the Alumnae sponsored Benefit Desert P a r t i e s in various p a r t s of the United States in order to raise f u n d s to complete the f u r n i s h i n g of the room in Voorhees in an E a r l y American motif. Sorosites a f t e r leaving Hope have gone out in various walks of life — and yet they remain ever near to "the cresent banner" and "the s t a r of Hope". About 60 Alumnae will be present a t the Homecoming Luncheon to be held tomorrow noon at Cumerford's. Plans f o r the luncheon have been headed by Helen Wade. President Joan Peelen will preside a t the meeting and will introduce the other officers. Vice President, Shirley Meiste; Secretary, Ann De Pree; and Treasurer, Marcia Wiersma. Joan will also introduce to the group the new sophomore members t h a t have joined the society, and in addition the new t r a n s f e r members Karen Abell, Florida; Lenora Kettwick, Iowa; and Carol Thompson, New York. The Alumnae President, Mrs. Harvey Koop will also speak and introduce the other Alumnae officers — Vice President, Mrs. Irv Vrieling; Secretary, Mrs. Daniel Paul; and Treasurer, Miss Natile Bosman who is presently teaching in Saudi, Arabia. The Sorosites have been ably lead in construction their homecoming float by co-chairman Ardith Brower and Sue Walcott. The Society will be preseting a replica of an antique steam engine and hope t h a t everyone will be able to stay following the game — "Remember when Hope Railroaded Adrian — 1 9 5 8 ! " Working as chairman of the various float committees have been J u d y Tysse, Evy Hollander, Phyll Welch, Barbara Bootsman, Joy Phillip, and Marcia Wiersma..

Fraternal In J a n u a r y 1834, the F r a t e r n a l Society was established a t Union College in Schenectady, New York, with a membership of nine. The F r a t e r n a l Society grew and prospered in its years a t Union College. On J a n u a r y 4, 1864, the F r a t e r nity moved f r o m Union College to Holland Academy through the eff o r t s of one of its alumni. It was then t h a t the motto, " F e w and Chosen", t h e constitution, and the watchwords of friendship, love and t r u t h were originated. From those days F r a t e r n a l h a s prospered and grown. I t did not grow without the expected grow-

ing pains and at times its mere existence was challanged, but the men of F r a t e r n a l have held together and developed into a closely knit organization and have matured on the watchwords, "Friendship, Love and Truth. The F r a t e r n a l Society was the first f r a t e r n i t y on Hope College's campus. F r a t e r n a l ' s alumni number in the thousands and have always been close to the f r a t e r n i t y , never losing the F r a t e r n a l Spirit. This year the theme of the parade being "Our F i g h t i n g Dutchmen" the F r a t e r s have decided to have f o r their float a boxing r i n g (Continued on page 10)

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Library Increases Service to Students

Durfee's new housemother Mrs. Market entertains House Board president Marge Ten Haken at afternoon tea.

Amsterdams Loss Is Durfee's Gain The transition f r o m being a private secretary in an insurance firm in Amsterdam, New York, to being head resident at Durfee Hall, Hope College, has brought many interesting changes to the life of Mrs. Laura Markert.

Societies . . . (Cont'd f r o m page 9) with a bulldog in one corner and a football player in the other with the slogan "We Won Then — We Will Win Again!" Knickerbocker In the early days of Hope College, the high school or prep school here in Holland was of g r e a t importance to Hope, for two-thirds of each f r e s h m a n class came f r o m the prep school and was therefore already acquainted. The Senior Class of 1909 was especially closeknit. Some of the fellows often met f o r the so-called bull sessions in the northwest corner on the first floor of Van Vleck; this of course was when Van Vleck was the men's dorm. Some of these men had been asked to join one or the other of the two f r a t e r n i t i e s then on Hope's Campus, the F r a t e r n a l or the Cosmopolitan. However, it was impossible f o r these two f r a t e r n i t i e s to offer membership to all the men. As a result of this situation and because of the strong friendship existing among non-fraternity men at Van Vleck, they decided to work together, and f o r each other, to find a new f r a t e r n i t y . This was the beginning of Knickerbocker. From the 12 original members Knickerbocker grew and prospered rapidly and had become significant to life a t Hope when the first World W a r took its toll and the membership was reduced to seven. But Knickerbocker survived by the same determination t h a t its members were to show a q u a r t e r century later during another world turmoil. We can be proud of the spirit in which Knickerbocker was begun, We can be proud of the high esteem which it h a s earned. Knickerbocker h a s always held t r u e to its Greek letters K a p p a E t a Nu—High standing socially, morally and intellectually. The 1958 K.H.N. Homecoming float committee is headed by Paul Fell and aided by Bruce Crawford, Peter Beitner, Gary Bylsma, Gene B a r n h a r t and Ken Brown. The Knickerbocker theme will be "Add Another Jewel to Our Crown". The float will consist of a high crown studded with 13 jewels, each jewel representing a previous victory over Adrian. In the center of the crown t h e r e will be an e x t r a large j e w e l . representing a victory f o r

One such experience was t h a t of traveling to the Midwest. This was entirely new f o r Mrs. Markert, as she reports t h a t previously she had never been west of Buffalo, New York. Also, this is the first time t h a t Mrs. Markert has ever made her home outside of Amsterdam. In conversing with Mrs. Markert, one discovers t h a t she has a very warm and pleasing personality. Her friendliness is instantly noticeable. And, it is exactly this attitude of friendliness which prevails on Hope's campus that thrills Mrs. Markert. "I had heard so much about it," Mrs. Markert said, "but to really experience it is just so wonderful." Most of Mrs. Markert's day is spent in carrying out her new duties as house-mother. She also finds time each day to walk around campus, becoming acquainted with the buildings on campus, the various personalities engaged in campus activities, and the city of Holland. In Amsterdam, Mrs. M a r k e r t was very active in church work. She is a member of Trinity Reformed Church where she was active in the various organizations and also t a u g h t Sunday School. She is a member of the Dept. of Women's Work in the Reformed Church of America and an officer of the Missionary Union, Classis of Montgomery. She also served as president of t h e United Church Women of Amsterdam, the Women's League f o r Service and gave volunteer work to several charitable organizations.

paper entitled, "Fountain of Our Foreign Policy". The humor paper was given by George Bitner. The music p a p e r by Gene Barnhort, featured g u i t a r music by Chet Atkins.

Emersonian Emersonian has a history and tradition of which it can well be proud. It began in 1919 as a litera r y society which was changed officially into a f r a t e r n i t y in 1929. The new and vital group was watched with interest by college officials a s we grew and expanded in size and character. Our meetings were held in rented rooms the first f e w years. As our activities increased we found t h a t by leasing houses f r a t e r n i t y life better fulfilled the needs of our members and was made more meaningful to them. 1937 is indeed a g r e a t landmark in our history when we acquired a lease on the beautiful Beach Residence on 12th Street and Columbia Avenue. The 29 room house w a s situated on a two and onehalf acre lot, covered with evergreens, rose and g r a p e arbors, and a spacious green lawn. T h e Emersonian Alumni Association bought this house in the beginning of World W a r II, it was A t the L i t e r a r y meeting Oct. 10 leased to the a r m y during the w a r —Bruce Brumels gave the serious years, and finally sold to the col-

by Sally Evans This year there have been several changes in the Hope College library. F i r s t and foremost is the new schedule of hours. The library is now open regularly every week day f r o m 8:15 a.m. to 5:15 p.m. and f r o m 6:45 p.m. to 9:45 p.m. On S a t u r d a y s the schedule is f r o m 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon and f r o m 1:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. It is closed f o r all holidays, special programs, and college assemblies. In relation to access to the open stacks, the library m u s t enforce the rule of leaving all personal books outside and not allowing any brief cases or zipper note books inside. All available space in the steel stacks, which were purchased in 1950 and hold 55,000 books, is now being f u l l y used. Desks and chairs a r e provided in the stack room f o r those wishing to use the books there. For outside use, books may be borrowed f o r two weeks, with one renewal. Renewals may be made in person or by telephone, without bringing in a book. Notices of overdue books will be sent out f o u r days a f t e r a book is due. Books on closed reserve may be obtained a t the desk. These are the books placed on reserve by the faculty f o r required reading. The reference collection is located in the reading room and is not circulated. The periodical collection consists of some 5,000 bound volumes and is located in the main library. Indexes to the contents of periodicals in the reading room are located on tables in lege — thus establishing the Emersonian Memorial Fund. Emersonian remained in this location until 1954 when the house w a s razed to make way f o r Kollen Hall. Emersonians new reside at 50 E a s t 10th Street. Immediately preceding the war Emersonian was by f a r the most powerful and influential campus organization with its 82 members. The whole f r a t e r n i t y was inactive during most of the w a r years, but in 1946 as Emersonians returned to campus our active membership grew. The successes and failures of Emersonian would make a long list, f o r our life has indeed been eventful. But w h a t held t r u e over the years still holds t r u e today — t h a t Emersonian men l e f t Hope College a more firmly established school, and left Hope College as men t h a t will always cherish the ideals of Phi Tau Nu, Love, Honor, Freedom and Success. The Emmie's float theme is "Anchor the Bulldogs". This will be accomplished by two bulldogs impaled upon an anchor swinging f r o m a goalpost, symbolizing Hope pinning down the Adrian football team. The chairman of the float committee is John Jefferies and he is assisted by Ron Bekius, Cal Bosman, Wayne Joosse and Dale Heeres. A t a joint literary meeting held Friday, October 10, in t h e music building auditorium, the Emersonians and their sisters, t h e Dorians enjoyed t h e p r o g r a m , "Moon, Men and Maidens". Co-chairman were the two vice-presidents of the societies, A n n Tell and Greg Bryson, aided by Sharon Smith and Dale Heeres. Carroll " T e x " Bennink acted as m a s t e r of Ceremonies. The p r o g r a m was as follows, Devotions — J e r r y Wondra and Diane Oldenburg. Roll Call—Wayne Josse and Carol Paton. Serious paper—Carol Fischer, "Men and the Moon" H u m o r P a p e r — " L i t t l e Red Riding Hood", D u e t — J e r r y and J i m Hesselink, Emersonian Hymn, and Dorian Song. Cider and donuts were served following the meeting.

WTAS Hope College Radio Kollen Hall HOLLAND, MICHIGAN W T A S is the campus radio station. Since its beginning as a t a p e recorder and a weak t r a n s mitter, W T A S has developed into a station with equipment similar to t h a t used in commercial stations. WTAS, the Anchor station, offers a wide v a r i e t y of p r o g r a m s f o r your listening pleasure. With the aid of a staff of more than fifty announcers, engineers and disc 'ockeys, p r o g r a m s centered around music are presented everyday of the week. The records played are the center of the room. Pamphlets m a y be found in the gray steel filing cabinets in the reading room. Some pamphlet series are shelved in the catalogue alcove. Special services this year include a reference librarian, who will give assistance in finding information; an inter-library loan system, a microfilm r e a d e r and microfilms of the New York Times. Also available f o r use are special collections of books and publications. An added a t t r a c t i o n is the new book display located in the catalogue alcove. Here a student or professor is able to sit while browsing. Last year approximately 27,000 books were used by 1,000 students. This was a n increase of 5,000 over any previous figure. The students a r e no longer depending on only a f e w books f o r extra reading. They a r e going into the stacks seeking additional reading. According to Mrs. Singleton, head librarian, "the f a c u l t y members m u s t have done a wonderful job of s t i m u l a t i n g and inspiring more and more students to read more and more books." COKi"

selected f r o m a record library of more than 350 L P records and 300 —45 rpm records. The purpose of this radio station is to serve the students. We would like to h e a r f r o m you. Any suggestions or music preferences f o r programs would be appreciated. These may be placed in the W T A S mail box in Kollen Hall. —Lois C. Bonnema P r o g r a m Director The following is the daily schedule for WTAS. It is subject to change without notice. MONDAY 6:30- 7:45—Tom & T e r r y Show 4:00- 5:45—Tunes in the A f t e r n o o n 7:00- 8 : 0 0 — M a n h a t t e n Melodies 8:00-l 1:00—Stardust S e r e n a d e 11:00-12:00—Die S c h l a f m u t z l n e Uhr TUESDAY 6:80- 7 : 4 5 — C a r a v a n 4:00- 5:45—Tunes in the A f t e r n o o n 8:00- 8 : 3 0 — S t a r d u s t S e r e n a d e 8:30- 8:45—Model Melodies 8:45- 9 : 0 0 — S t a r d u s t S e r e n a d e 9:00-10:00—Stairways to t h e S t a r s 10:00-11:00—Evening S e r e n a d e 11:00-12:00—Melodies Till Midnight WEDNESDAY 6:30- 7:45—Tom & T e r r y Show 4:00- 5:45—Tunes in the A f t e r n o o n 7:00- 8:00—Something Cool 8:00- 8:30—Stardust S e r e n a d e 8:30- 8:45—Model Melodies 8:45- 9:00—Charlie's Specials 9:00-10:00—Bruce's Si)ot 10:00-11:00—Stardust S e r e n a d e 11:00-12:00—Melodies Till Midnight THURSDAY 6:30- 7 : 4 5 — C a r a v a n 4:00- 5:45—Tunes in the A f t e r n o o n 7:00- 8:00—Variety a t Seven 8:00- 8 : 3 0 — S t a r d u s t S e r e n a d e 8:30- 9:45—La Musique 8:45- 9 : 0 0 — S t a r d u s t S e r e n a d e 9:00-10:00—Rendevous with R h y t h m 10:00-11:00—Stardust S e r e n a d e 11:00-12:00—Melodies Till Midnight FRIDAY 6:30- 7 : 4 5 — C a r a v a n 4:00- 5:45—Tunes in the A f t e r n o o n 7:00- 9:00—Serenade a t Seven 9:00-11:00—Friday Frolics 11:00-12:00—Melodies Till Midnight 12:00- 1:00—Late P e r SATURDAY 9:00-12:00—Rousing R h y t h m s 1:00- 4:00—Music Box 4:00- 5:45—Tunes in the A f t e r n o o n 7:00-10:00—Rendevous with Rhythm 10:00-12:00—Saturday Specials 12:00- 1:00—Late P e r SUNDAY 2:00-11:00—Sunday S e r e n a d e

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HOPE

C O L L E G E

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Page Eleven

YM - YW R e o r g a n i z e To Meet Hope's Expanding Enrollment Years Program Outlined President John Hood of the YMCA-YWCA h a s announced the theme f o r this year's " Y " work as "The Challenge of a Christian Life." In keeping with this year's theme, the " Y " opened the school year with the traditional Freshman beach party, held in Carnegie Gymnasium and Vespers, held in the Pine Grove. President Hood went on to say that the Tuesday night meetings this year will be more varied and interesting. The " Y " will a t t e m p t to reach out into all aspects of life and bring students a vital, everyday Christianity .

I John Hood, President of YMCA

Jone Kloossen, President of

YWCA

The Cabinet There has been some question as to the purpose of the YMCAYWCA Cabinet and its duties. Each member on Cabinet has a specific task to perform throughout the year besides attending the Cabinet meeting. However, at these meetings, the members present their problems which are then discussed by all. These Cabinet representatives are selected by the Executive Committee to represent the members of Y. If anyone has a problem and would like to attend a Cabinet meeting, he is cordially invited. Each Cabinet meeting is opened with devotions. You may now be wondering— Who are the Cabinet members and what are their duties? Co-Presidents John Hood and J a n e Klaasen have the responsibility to see t h a t worthy enterprises are promoted f o r permeating all things t h a t we do with the Spirit of Christ. Co - Vice Presidents Diane Sluyter and Stu Wilson have the privilege of setting the standard of the programs. It is their duty to encourage Christian attitudes on all subjects t h a t pertain to life. Secretary Marlene Gouwens has the privilege, through the minutes she writes, of preserving the continuity of the Cabinet's t h o u g h t s and purposes. The Chapel speakers f o r Tuesday mornings are selected by Marlene. Treasurer Don Gallo has the duty to dispense the funds of the group.

all phases of student life to groups interested in the program of the college. Music Chairman Carol Nieuwsma provides f o r the musical emphasis of the program in the Chapel on Tuesday mornings and also a t the regular meetings.

Some top speakers have been scheduled f o r these " Y " meetings. Rev. Harold Englund of Midland Reformed Church addressed the group at the fall banquet, and other noteworthy men are lined up f o r the f u t u r e : Dr. Elton Trueblood (October 21), Rev. Donald Butpne, Dr. George Buttrick and Mr. Hobert Mitchel.

Tuesday night is "Y" night! . . . Pie night means " Y " night! . . . Another Tuesday is here a g a i n ! Time f o r another " Y " lecture . . . and so goes the conversation about " Y " night on Hope's campus. But, is that really all " Y " is? Is it only a Tuesday night affair t h a t just comes naturally ? The student " Y " organization is one of the most meaningful and yet misunderstood groups on campus. Yet, " Y " is an organization f o r all of us. W h a t really is the Young Men and Young Women's Christian Association? It is an international Christian student movement, one of the g r e a t e s t of its kind in the world. The " Y " is active on over 600 college campuses in the United States alone. At Hope the " Y " a t t e m p t s to show the student how his faith should relate to everyday life. It's program is designed to "Make Christ King of the Campus." For the first time Hope's YMCA and YWCA have officially united under one constitution f o r m i n g a joint organization. The new cabinet met together last spring fully realizing that Hope's enrollment is expanding. A new program was planned to meet the needs of the student body. Thus, they originated the "commission" program of "Y". The commissions are special interest groups, centering around the three p a r t s of the "Y" Triangle — Body, Mind, and Spirit. The Social Activities, Social Responsibilities, and Christian Faith Commissions now enable more students to get field actual experience in their chosen area. The governing body of the YMCA-YWCA is the 24 member student cabinet, assisted by co-advisors, Miss^Holleman and Dr. De Haan. A program committee meets weekly with the commission chairmen to plan programs. But, behind these commissions is the most important part of " Y " — the students.

Deputation

Publications Chairman Joan Clayton is responsible f o r all articles and correspondence to be written concerning the Y.

Deputation is a committee in the " Y " appointed to put on p r o g r a m s f o r Sunday evenings, youth groups, Membership Chairmen Judy Van and couples clubs. In charge of this Dyke and Rowland Van Es encourcommittee a r e Ronald Lockhorst age all students to participate in and Marilyn Scudder. the constructive p r o g r a m of Y. There are usually five people on Social Chairmen Beth Wichers and Hal Whipple carefully plan the a deputation team. One person social activities of this organiza- usually speaks on Hope College and another on a Christian topic. tion. Publicity Chairmen Carol Joelson There is usually a solo or a group and Paul Fell thoroughly acquaint to offer some type of special music. the students with the p r o g r a m of Y. One person leads the devotions, District and State Representa- scripture and prayer and another tives Carolyn Kleiber, Steve Mit- plays the piano or organ. Usually ternacht, and Ron Stockhof strive one of the speakers takes charge in their important offices to work of the program. together p r a y e r f u l l y in planning the s t a t e Y conference.

Social Activities

F r e s h m a n Representative Roger Sample carries out the aims and endeavors of the Y by comunicating the Y to his class and by other Planning social and recreational duties. activities are the purpose of the World University Service Chair- Social Activities Commission. Servman Marge Wood has the oppor- ing as the officers are Jim Stringtunity to promote this worthy or- er, Chairman; Nancy Mulder and ganization on campus and at the Adena Yonan, Publicity; Jack Zellconferences. weger, Secretary; and Miss M. L. Religious Emphasis Week ChairThese members have pledged that Bried f r o m the Physical Education men Marge Ten Haken and Mel w h a t they do in their offices will department is serving as advisor. Van Hattem are making it possible determine to a high degree the useThe Social Activities Commission f o r students of this campus to find fulness of this organization on this plans to sponsor several Tuesday a living dynamic faith. This week campus and the Kingdom of God. night " Y " p r o g r a m s in addition to will be November 17-20. the meetings of the commission itMission Drive Chairmen Shirley Meiste and Chuck Hesselink encourage students to give of t h e i r p r a y e r s and money f o r the support of Christian work in this country and others. Deputation Chairmen Marilyn Scudder and Ron Lokhorst encourage students to give of their time and t a l e n t s to f a i t h f u l l y represent

The " Y " enrollment f o r this year of 1958-59 is bigger than ever. At present there are 319 members. This is a v a s t improvement over past years. New members are still welcome! If interested see J u d y Van Dyke or Rowland Van Es.

/ Port of the Y program is devoted to the religious side of life. atmosphere, a Hope w o m a n pauses for meditation.

Social Responsibilities

In a q u i e t

to read and entertain the patients. 4. A book drive may t a k e place in which students of the commission will go door to door asking for old books for hospitals, etc. 5. Visit m i g r a n t workers to teach them about religion and to offer them musical entertainment.

"To develop a fuller Christian personality through an awareness of the needs of others by giving of time and t a l e n t " is the aim of the Social Responsibilities Commission. Serving as officers of the commission a r e Judy Van Leeuwen, Chairman; Sue Kirkwood, Secretary; Created to strengthen the religiGom Bruno, Publicity; and Mr. Ver ous life of the individual is the Beek of the Education department Worship Commission. Serving as is serving as advisor. chairman of the commission is Ken Some of the possible service pro- VanderBrock; secretary, Juppie Dajects under consideration: kin; and publicity chairman, Dave self. The p r o g r a m will be of social 1. A Chicago Work week-end in Simala. or recreational n a t u r e such as which students will paint, remodel The first scheduled meeting of splash parties or mixed volleyball. and clean homes in the slum area. which the Worship Commission In addition to the Tuesday night 2. Sending Christmas baskets will have charge will be a fireside programs t h e commission will with food and clothing to a f e w type meeting held at various homes. sponsor several movies on week-end needy families in town. At these informal meetings they nights and a ski trip to Northern 3. To visit Pine Rest Mental Hos- will discuss topics relevant to ReMichigan between semesters. pital or any other type of hospital ligious Emphasis Week. This commission also sponsors informal p r a y e r and devotional meetings 7:30-8:00 A.M. daily in the chapel basement.

Worship

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b Page Twelve

H O P E

C O L L E G E

A N C H O R

Hope Beats Kazoo For Fourth Straight; Ties W i t h Dales For M1AA Lead Meet The Dutch Hope Harriers

Defense Shines in Lopsided Victory

MIA A Standings W 2 2 2 2 1 0 0

Lose First M.I.A.A. Meet

L 0 0 1 1 2 2 3

PFPA 59 12 64 13 79 20 56 58 24 73 7 56 14 71

Hope Hillsdale Albion Hope College lost its first M1AA Alma cross country meet last S a t u r d a y , Adrian 17-43, to a good Kalamazoo Col- Olivet lege team. The meet was held dur- Kalamazoo ing the half of the Hope-Kazoo football game at Angell Field. Kazoo proved to !)e too s t r o n g Knicks and Fraters as Shelb, Fitzgerald, and Creel Remain Undefeated took 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place. Roin Frat Football land Schut again came in first f o r Only two g a m e s were played the Dutch capturing f o u r t h spot last week in F r a t e r n i t y football as with a time of 23 minutes, 52 sec- a third g a m e between the Knicks onds. Kazoo's Milson and Donovan and Arkies were canceled. This captured 5th and 6th place respect- game will be replayed on a later ively while Hope's Tex Bennink date. came in 7th. F i r s t , in a g a m e between the Other Hope winners participatCosmos and the Emmies, the Cosing in the meet were Teusink, 9th, mos whipped the Emmies 36 to 8. DeJong 10th, Wondra 13th, HoogFour touchdowns were scored by endorn 14th and Needham 15th. Kraai while Boithouse and WoltHope's next meet will be Wedman scored one each. The Emmie nesday when they will meet Calvin total was accounted f o r by a lone a t Grand Rapids. touchdown by Jinholt and a s a f e t y .

Gene Van Don gen—Center Gene is a junior j u s t over 6 feet and tips the scales a t 195 pounds. Offensively, he is quick off the m a r k and h a r d hitting in executing his blocks. Defensively he is hard to fool and tackles fiercely. He w a s put out of action by a knee injury in the opening game with E a s t e r n but is now ready and In the W.A.A. volley ball tourfull of zeal to make up f o r lost nament, Thursday n i g h t saw much time. action. Soph A continued t h e i r winning w a y s as well as the seniors. Both teams r e m a i n unbeaten. The J u n i o r s suffered by losing two games, one to the Sem wives and the other to Soph B. The Soph B team, by the way, entered the win column with two s t r o n g defeats, Frosh C won one and lost one and Frosh B lost one* The standings a r e : Soph A 5-0 Seniors 4-0 Seeem Wives 3-2 Soph B 2-2 Hopeives 2-2 Frosh B 2-2 Juniors 1-3 Frosh C 1-4 Frosh A 0-5 At an executive board m e e t i n g George Peelen—Tackle of Women's Athletic Association, George is an aggressive tackle held on the eighth of October, it and a real t e r r o r to enemy passers. was decided t h a t nine f r e s h m a n He is from Kalamazoo, Michigan girls who had shown interest in and is a junior. He is an all-round being on W.A.A. board would run player with no discernible weakf o r the f o u r positions open. ness. He stands six feet two, The voting was done on a classweighs 200 pounds and applies all wide basis through t h e two A.S.A.'s of this to t h e business a t hand on Friday, October 10. The candiwhen he blocks and tackles. dates were: B a r b a r a Gray, Nancy Guldenschuh, •Ellen Frink, Sophie Bremner, Carol Sikkema, *Donna Fisher, *Diane Claussen, Ula Oosterbaan, and *Helen Beinert. •Winners.

WAA Highlights

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Hope's football t e a m moved to a first place tie with Hillsdale in the MIAA race following its 27-0 win oover Kalamazoo College before 1,700 Homecoming f a n s in Kalamazoo last Saturday. The Dutch and the Dales each have 2-0 MIAA records. Hillsdale seeking its fifth s t r a i g h t championship stopped Albion 20-13 Saturday. Hope h a s a 4-0 overall mark.

In the other game, the F r a t e r s beat the Indies 20 to 2. Three T.D.'s and a s a f e t y accounted f o r Hope struck early against the the victor's total. They were scored Hornets and built up a 20-0 halfby Remmels, Buursma, and Rit- time lead in s h u t t i n g out t h e Horsema. The Indies gained their two nets f o r the second s t r a i g h t year. points by a s a f e t y . Three minutes a f t e r the s t a r t of the game, Hope had its first touchS t a n d i n g up to now a r e : down. Mike Blough recovered a Knicks 2 0 Kalamazoo unsuccessful punt atFraters 2 0 t e m p t on the one y a r d line. Two Cosmos 2 ] plays later halfback Duane Voskuil Sems 1 1 knifed off tackle f o r the score. Bill Arkies 1 1 Huibregtse converted.

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i i James DeWitt—Tackle " T i g e r " a s he is called by his t e a m m a t e s comes to us f r o m Muskegon, Michigan. He is a senior, six f e e t one and weights 185 lbs. Having no high school football experience, Tiger h a s worked his way u p to number one line replacement t h r o u g h determination and steady development. He is powerful, combative and well schooled. H e charges fiercely when he plays in the line and blocks well. His presence is a boon to the team.

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Trophies

Hope failed to score in the third q u a r t e r , but held Kalamazoo scoreless also with some terrific defensive work. • E a r l y in the f o u r t h q u a r t e r Huibregtse grabbed a Kalamazoo pass and moved to the Hornets twentyeight. Six plays later Ron Bekius crashed off tackle f r o m the f o u r to score. Huibregtse's conversion was good. The Hornets penetrated Hope t e r r i t o r y only three times in the game. This f a c t plus five intercepted passes speak well f o r the Hope defensive unit. Coach Russ De Vette again emptied his bench and used forty-one players.

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Hope doubled the yards gained by Kalamazoo in the contest two hundred forty-two to one hundred twenty. Most of Hope's s t r e n g t h came in its rushing g a m e whera Midway in the second q u a r t e r Hope picked up one hundred nineIndies 0 2 Emmies 0 3 halfback Pete W a t t returned a Kal- ty-nine yards. amazoo punt f r o m his own 37 to MIAA Standings the Hornets 46. A f t e r a series of W L P F PA • # • # • • • • • # • #j» • • • • • • # • # • # •# • # • # « # • # * # •# • # « # plays q u a r t e r back Paul Mack hit 2 0 59 12 W a t t with a six yard pass f o r the Hope TD. Huibregtse's kick was wide. Hillsdaye A & W ROOT BEER 2 0 64 13 A f t e r a pass interception by Jim Albion 2 1 79 20 DRIVE IN Mohr and a 15 y a r d p a s s f r o m Alma 2 1 56 58 Open 7:00 A.M. Mack to end Ron Bronson, Pete 1 2 24 73 Complete B r e a k f a s t W a t t scored his second touchdown Adrian 0 2 7 56 C A T E R TO H O P E S T U D E N T S of the game, on a one yard plunge. Olivet Huibregtse converted. Kalamazoo .... 0 3 14 71 Meal Tickets at Discount

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10-17-1958