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Hope College • H o l l a n d , Michigan • A s t u d e n t - r u n n o n p r o f i t p u b l i c a t i o n • S e r v i n g the Hope College C o m m u n i t y for 116 years

Odd-year pulls 18-foot victory Sophomores prevail in Hope's 105th Pull

a

John Rodstrom S P O R T S EDITOR

After three grueling hours filled with sweat and blood, the ' 0 5 pull team finally tasted what it had been d r e a m i n g of f o r o v e r a year: the sweetness of victory and the chill of the Black River. A rapid succession of aggressive heaves and tenacious strains g a v e '05 an early lead and sent them well on their way to an 18 foot, 10 inch victory in the lOS"1 Pull. Fueled by a disappointing loss a year ago, odd year relied heavily upon its experience and determination f o r their victory. Because the winning team is never known until the final measurement is taken, the ' 0 5

team gave an extra burst of intensity in the final minutes of the contest. 4t I thought to myself that I ' m never g o i n g to get this chance back, and I have to give it all I ' v e

more PULL on 5

AA/CHO/=r PHOTOS BY C H A D S A M P S O N Top left: The Pull rope is used in preliminary ceremonies as well as the event itself. Above: Matt Baer ('05) and Lindsay White ('05) controlled pit 6 for the sophomore team.

Task force recommendations implicated Gay-straight alliance given go-ahead under new name Kurt Koehler SENIOR STAFF REPORTER

Six months after the President's taskforce on sexuality released its findings, work has begun to implement the taskforce's recomm e n d a t i o n s . T h e main t a s k f o r c e ' s r e c o m mendations include creating an environment favorable to the discussion of controversial subjects and educating students on issues involving sexuality. The college's attempt to create an environment conducive to discussion consists of the virtues of public discourse. J a m e s Bultman, Hope C o l l e g e president feels that despite

criticism that they are too simplistic, the virtues have an important role to play. "Are they principles that people should k n o w already? Yes. D o w e always practice t h e m ? N o . It serves as a reminder f o r eve r y o n e , " B u l t m a n said. "I certainly w o u l d like f o r Hope to h a v e the ability to discuss controversial issues of our time in an educated, civil way." To affect the education of students on is-

44

sues of sexuality, the college has established a programming committee on issues of sexuality. mmmmmmmmm—mm J a m e s Herrick, Prof e s s o r of C o m m u n i c a tions and P r o g r a m m i n g C o m m i t t e e Chair, outlined the c o m m i t t e e ' s responsibilities. "The Programming C o m m i t t e e should 'seek to p r o v i d e a variety of college-wide educational events that address a broad range of issues relating to sexuality,' and also 'provide opportunities f o r students to learn n e w information. engage in moral and theological re-

All of us encounter homosexuals everyday. -James Bultman

7/

flection, and make educated decisions about a wide range of sexual concerns facing college s t u d e n t s . ' " Herrick said. According to Herrick, the committee has worked on deciding which recommendations the c o m m i t t e e should f o c u s on, how it can come u p with events that educate and provide an opportunity f o r reflection on issues of sexuality, and h o w it can avoid duplicating what others are already doing on campus. ' T h o u g h w e are still very early in the process, already we have two proposals for campus events in front of us. A n d , w e are working jointly with an academic department on c a m p u s to help develop one of these events,"

more TASK FORCE on 2

Alumni share experiences, wisdom Hope alumni return from the workforce to give advice

f o c u s e s and a one-on-one student-to-alum

Jen Troke

school. "I did not fully appreciate at the time that choosing law school... meant that I would later have to do the hard work of figuring out what kind of lawyer 1 wanted to b e , " C h a r n i n said. "I had m e r e l y d e l a y e d the choice of ' w h a t do I want to be when 1 grow u p ? ' for three years." The discussion will cover four main areas: business, government and public service, law, and media and communication. About five alumni f r o m each area will be present, many of them recent graduates. John Lunn, professor of economics, thinks this is an impor-

C A M P U S B E A T EDTTOR

M a n y students go to college without exact expectations f o r what their post-college l i f e will l o o k like. U n f o r t u n a t e l y , m a n y graduate facing the same d i l e m m a . David Charnin, a recent Hope grad, envisions a solution. T h e problem will be dealt with on October 11 at a discussion called "Jumpstart Your F u t u r e : C a r e e r C o n v e r s a t i o n s with H o p e

ANCHOR P H O T O C O U R T E S Y C A R E E R S E R V I C E S

"Jumpstart Your Future" is the latest event career services is supporting to answer questions.

Anchor @ Hope.Edu (616) 395-7877

Alumni." T h e session will be broken into segments designed to be compatible with a busy schedule. S e g m e n t s will deal with questions directed toward different age groups, career

DAA students Infocus, Page 3

'05 wins Pull Pull spread. Pages

mixer. C h a r n i n e x p e r i e n c e d the c o n f u s i o n s of post-college decisions when looking into law

tant part of the idea. "Students often will hear business people

'Everyman' Opens Arts, Page9

speak, often C.E.O.s. But a C.E.O. is a long way away from remembering what it was like as an entry person," Lunn said. "And so the idea was to get more recent alums." T h e discussion will not only f o c u s on the future, however. Other helpful alumni can provide deals with choosing classes that will be useful later. "The purpose is to provide a forum for students to learn about career options with a liberal arts background, to have contact with relatively recent alums, so that it can help th e m as they think about planning their f u ture," said Dale Austin, director of the office of career services. Charnin plans to personally consider the discussion. "I'll be listening to hear what I could have done had I taken a different path," Charnin said.

Football loses Sports, Page 12


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C A M P U S

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B E A T

O c t o b e r 2, 2 0 0 2

'Party Patrol' cracks down on unruly parties New policing grant seeks to curb massive parties Dave Yetter GUEST WRITER

Local l a w - e n f o r c e m e n t officials announced Tuesday the creation of a Controlled Dispersal Program, designed to actively combat underage drinking. T h e p r o g r a m ' s main focus is policing parties involving u n d e r a g e drinking. T h e p r o g r a m w a s m a d e possible by a $17,918 grant being dubbed "Party Patrol," offered t h r o u g h the O f f i c e of H i g h w a y Safety Planning. "If we hear about a party ahead of time, w e ' r e not g o i n g to let the party h a p p e n , " said Sgt. Jack Waterway of the M i c h i g a n State Police. T h e procedures being followed in the p r o g r a m d i f f e r greatly f r o m t h o s e f o l l o w e d in the past. Formerly, if an officer received a call that a party w a s g o i n g on, he drove to the house. By the time the of-

ficer tried to gain entry to the house, most of those at the party scattered, and only t w o or three subjects were apprehended. T h e department believed that this was a problem because people then got into their cars and drove h o m e drunk. U n d e r the n e w l y created C o n trolled Dispersal Program, o f f i c e r s will be trained to surround a party venue and establish an inner and outer perimeter to make sure no one can leave the scene. T h e officers will then try to gain consent to enter the house by talking to either the residents of the house o r the landlord. If they cannot obtain consent, they will seek a search warrant to gain entry to the residence. W h e n the officers do gain entry to the location, the partiers will be separated into three groups: T h o s e w h o are 21 and older, those in the 18-20 year range, and those w h o are 17 and under. Those w h o are 21 and older and can legally drink in the state of Michigan and will not be charged with any crime. T h e y will have to find a safe ride h o m e and leave the party. T h o s e w h o are in

the 18-20 age group will be issued citations and will have to find a safe ride home. People 17 and younger will have their parents contacted and asked to c o m e to the scene to pick t h e m up. For those wondering w h y these new procedures are being put into place. Waterway cited the problems associated with underage drinking. ' T h e first reason is safety," said Waterway. "We just don't want to see anybody get hurt." He also mentioned alcohol overd o s e s , v i o l e n t b e h a v i o r and unplanned o r unwanted sexual activity as risks at underage parties. Officers address these parties in t w o primary ways. First, the n e w methods will be used if a patrolling officer spots a loud party or if there is a call to the department about a party taking place. S e c o n d , o f f i c e r s will s c h e d u l e nights when they k n o w that parties will be taking place, such as after a big football game. If the officers get a tip or k n o w ahead of time where and w h e n a party will take place, they will go to that location, talk to

the residents, and try to prevent that party f r o m happening. Although they will respond to reports of parties, they seek out small parties with no unruly behavior. " W e ' r e not going to go knocking on your door if y o u ' v e got a party of 10 people and there's no noise c o m p l a i n t o r loud m u s i c , " said Sgt. Mark Bos of the Holland Police Department. "Something has to d r a w o u r attention to the party before w e ' l l react. W e ' r e looking f o r the bigger, unruly, disorderly parties." While the Holland Police Department thinks that this is an important issue, some students at H o p e think that there are m o r e pressing things for them to worry about. Jay Manojlovick ( ' 0 4 ) feels that there are m a n y other problems in the Holland area that need to be addressed before addressing underage drinking at parties. "It's said that they are spending so m u c h money on college drinking when there are issues of domestic violence occurring which should b e of a lot h i g h e r p r i o r i t y , "

Problems plague off-campus voters Anjey Dykhuis

within a few hours. On Tuesday, she tried to vote again, and again received an error message. She contacted student congress again early that afternoon. Around 4:30, half an hour b e f o r e the polls closed, van H o u w e l i n g e n received an e-mail telling her that the p r o b l e m w a s unresolved and that she needed to e-mail her vote to Bryan R i m m k e ('03), student congress vice president. S h e was asked to tell all of her friends w h o could not vote that they needed also to e-mail their votes to R i m m k e . A n u m b e r of students had the same prob-

S E N I O R STAFF R E P O R T E R

T h e H o p e p o p u l a t i o n went to the polls again last w e e k to put in their votes and have their voices heard. Ryan McFall, computer-science professor, designed the online voting system f o r Hope. Student congress intended to increase voter turnout, especially a m o n g o f f - c a m p u s students, by i n t r o d u c i n g online v o t i n g . T h i s year, the system is up and running. But what happens if there is a glitch in the p r o g r a m ? W h e n the polls o p e n e d , m a n y s t u d e n t s logged on to K n o w H o p e and proceeded to cast their votes. Most students' votes went through the system and w e r e tallied accordingly, but some o f f - c a m p u s students received

lem. "The only reason I can think of w h y people c o u l d n ' t vote is that they lived o f f - c a m p u s and had not given Hope an address of resid e n c e , " McFall said. But according to various sources, these students did everything right and still were not

error messages. On Monday, Liz van H o u w e l i n g e n ( 4 05) logged on and tried to vote, she said, but she received an error message. S h e then c o n tacted student congress with her problem. W h e n they called her back later that night, they said they would probably h a v e it fixed

T A S K

F O R C E from

Herrick said. According to Herrick, the c o m mittee is trying to be especially sensitive to the needs of students. Student congress plans to be active in this process. "I look f o r w a r d to watching this document as well as other findings f r o m the task force be implemented throughout the c a m p u s . A s a m e m ber of student congress, I ' m confi-

able to vote. " N o b o d y k n e w to e-mail Bryan R i m m k e (until the last minute), so h o w is that fair? Our votes didn't count," van Houwelingen

Houwelingen said. Even if their votes wouldn't have made much of a difference, all students' voles should be counted. " W h a t e v e r problems a f e w students may have had voting o f f - c a m p u s did not affect the outcome of the elections. More o f f - c a m p u s people voted in this fall election than in any other year," R i m m k e

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Campus Brief

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Address on welfare reform today at Calvin College. T h e a d d r e s s is b e i n g p r e s e n t e d t h r o u g h the N o k o m i s Lecture Series sponsored by the West Michigan W o m e n ' s Studies C o u n c i l , a n d will be presented in the Fine Arts Center

.i ?

said.

under a f r a m e w o r k suggested by the Task Force Report. One of these groups is G L O B E (Gay, Lesbian Or Bisexual Equality), and the other is our first discussion group," Herrick said. "This second g r o u p will be focusing on issues related to homosexuality and sexual orientation, and will be k n o w n as the Sexuality Round Table: A F o r u m for G a y and Straight Students. T h i s is the same

Cam u B e

m

Hope is part of a coalition of area colleges sponsoring the lecture "Working W a g e s ? " by Barbara Ehrenreich today at 7 p.m.

"Take Back the Night," a campus protest calling attention to issues of assault on women, occurred on Thursday night. Katie Klein ('03), president of the Women's Issues Organization (WIO), addressed participants.

1

dent that w e will be proactive in this endeavor," said Colleen Evans ('03), student congress president. In light of the taskforce's recommendation that discussion and support groups be set up the programm i n g c o m m i t t e e reversed last year's decision to prohibit the G a y Straight F o r u m f r o m meeting on college property. ' T w o student groups are meeting

Camvus Brief -/ L ^ a m p i i s ^ 4 npus Brief

said. Voting online also maintains voter anonymity. E-mailing votes to student congress eliminates that and introduces the possibility of bias to the system. For s o m e people, online voting is the only w a y to vote because they are otherwise too busy. "About 15 of my friends didn't vote because they didn't have the time to, and the system didn't work. T h e w a y it w a s s u p p o s e d l y resolved m a k e s it so that there is not a representative sample - the w h o l e p u r p o s e of a e l e c t i o n , " v a n

Manojlovick said. Phil Lapper ( ' 0 6 ) feels that cracking d o w n on parties will encourage students to drink on campus. "I think it's going to encourage d r i n k i n g in d o r m s . If you c a n ' t drink at a party, then kids will be drinking in their rooms and that is what w e d o n ' t want," Lapper said. While the police department will be involved in any cases involving Hope Students, the O f f i c e of Public Safety is not involved in this project. Although not directly inv o l v e d , the a d m i n i s t r a t i o n d o e s approve of the m o v e and wants to limit underage drinking. Richard Frost, dean of students, said he does not think that partying at Hope is a major issue, but that the a d m i n i s t r a t i o n n e e d s to pay some attention to the topic. Frost said the p r o g r a m should h a v e a positive impact on students by helping to limit the amount of out-ofcontrol parties. " I w o u l d h o p e that s t u d e n t s w o u l d r e a d this i n f o r m a t i o n because it should certainly discourage them," Frost said.

auditorium at Calvin. Motivated by the debates on welfare reform, Ehrenreich left her life as a write to spend a year working a variety of low-income jobs, to see h o w people could survive on wages of six o r seven dollars per hour. She wrote a book entitled "Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America." T h e West M i c h i g a n W o m e n ' s

Studies Council was f o r m e d in late 2001 to i n f o r m women of g e n d e r issues and c o l l a b o r a t e with other programs to enhance the l i v e s of w o m e n in West Michigan. The council sponsored talks by Margaret C h o and Lani Guinier during the 20010 2 school year. The public is invited. Admission is free.

group that sought recognition last year as the Gay-Straight Forum. I appreciate both g r o u p s ' efforts to give the f r a m e w o r k a c h a n c e to w o r k , and I believe the other m e m bers of the P r o g r a m m i n g C o m m i t tee would concur." According to Bultman, the college believes that it is better f o r these groups to meet in the open rather than underground. " I t h i n k t h a t the h o p e of the taskforce is that both organizations would work under the umbrella of the taskforce, and that they would not be operating undercover, but would have the opportunity to meet u n d e r t h e f r a m e w o r k of t h e taskforce," Bultman said. "I don't think that either G L O B E or what was called the f o r u m would be advocating openly in w a y s that are contrary to the college's position. T h e y have every right to feel the way they do on these issues, but the college also has every right to underscore its position." In line with the college's position o n h o m o s e x u a l i t y , B u l t m a n believes that homosexuals should be

treated fairly and with respect as any other person would be. "All of us encounter h o m o s e x u als everyday. I think our role is to treat all people with love and care," Bultman said. C a m p u s d e p a r t m e n t s , like the counseling center, are working to fill that role. The counseling center f o l l o w s the guidelines of p r o f e s sional organizations like the American Psychological Association, which state that homosexuality is not an illness or a disorder requiring treatment. "We have provided counseling for students who, for some reason, have self-identified themselves as homosexual. Most of the time it's f o r the same things that a n y b o d y else c o m e s seeking counseling for. It might be d e p r e s s i o n , anxiety, panic attacks, grief over the loss of a parent or a grandparent - those same issues. On occasion, w e will have someone w h o will c o m e in to talk about the process of coming out to family m e m b e r s , " said Kristen Gray, director of the c o u n s e l i n g center.


T K e

A n c h o r

S P O T L I G H T

O c t o b e r 2, 2 0 0 2

Talent in arts supported by DAA music, begin practicing months

" T h e s e students all m u s t intend to either m a j o r or m i n o r in the area

Designated artists add to campus life

"[The DAA] is one of the reasons the arts are as strong as they are here." -Stuart Sharp, music department head

t h e y ' r e c o m m i t t e d to." S h a r p said. T h e award d r a w s in students tale n t e d in all the v a r i o u s art f o r m s .

Nicole Lantz

" W e get s o m e really good p e o p l e as a r e s u l t , " S h a r p said. "It

Spotlight Editor

M o s t students w h o attend H o p e can attest to the fact that not j u s t

m e a n s that w e get students w h o are interested in the arts w h o w o u l d be

anyone gets accepted here. The s t a n d a r d s m a y not be as high as Ivy

d r a w n to H o p e m o r e than if w e d i d n ' t h a v e a n y special s c h o l a r -

League, but most students here take

s h i p s f o n t h e m . It's o n e o f the rea-

pride in their w o r k . S o m e d e s e r v e recognition as stand- outs in spe-

s o n s the arts are as strong as they

m a j o r deciding factor," B r o w n said. B e l l o w s had similar t h o u g h t s .

and e v e n m o r e than a y e a r a h e a d of their audition. "I started p r a c t i c i n g in A u g u s t b e f o r e my s e n i o r year," H a t c h said. T h e auditions c a n be intense c o m petitions. F o r t h o s e in t h e area of music, students are e x p e c t e d to c o m e to H o p e t o audition in f r o n t of the m u s i c d e p a r t m e n t , w h e r e the m o o d is very s o l e m n a n d dignified. O n e r e a s o n H a t c h c o n s i d e r e d her-

"If I h a d n ' t c o m e to H o p e ' s

self a l o n g shot, h o w e v e r , w a s be- •

dance program, I wouldn't have considered continuing

c a u s e she w a s u n a b l e t o m a k e h e r

cific areas. In the arts, t h e s e students h a v e b e e n a w a r d e d the D e s -

are h e r e . " B e c a u s e they r e c e i v e a scholarship for a d e c e n t portion of tuition

ignated Artist Award.

c o s t s at H o p e , a u d i t i o n i n g for the

if they paid m e t o n s of m o n e y . "

audition. "I h a d to c o m e and sing in f r o n t of the entire m u s i c faculty in F e b -

E v e r y year, the D A A is g i v e n t o o u t s t a n d i n g students in v o i c e , in-

a w a r d is not t a k e n lightly. "I w o u l d n ' t h a v e b e e n a b l e t o

R e g a r d l e s s of the money, receiving the D A A is c o n s i d e r e d a great

r u a r y of m y senior year. T h e day I t o o k o f f [of s c h o o l ] t o c o m e t o

strumental and vocal music, theatre

c o m e to H o p e if 1 h a d n ' t w o n , " said

a c c o m p l i s h m e n t . T h e D A A s are

H o p e there was a huge snowstorm.

and creative writing. " W e ' r e interested in strong per-

Kristi H a t c h ( ' 0 5 ) , a D A A for vo-

g e n e r a l l y told t h a t they h a v e rec e i v e d the a w a r d in the spring b e -

1 had t o send in a t a p e , " H a t c h said. O r i g i n a l l y f r o m N e w York, Bel-

f o r e the c o m i n g school year.

l o w s also b e g a n practicing m o n t h s a h e a d of time. " A t the t i m e I w a s getting ready to play for a N e w York guild c o m p e t i t i o n , " B e l l o w s

"If I d i d n ' t like it h e r e , " B e l l o w s said, "I w o u l d n ' t b e h e r e at all, e v e n

cal m u s i c . T h e scholarship w a s n ' t as crucial

f o r m e r s , t h o s e w h o will c o n t r i b u t e to o u r e n s e m b l e s and will be leaders in the d e p a r t m e n t s , " said Stuart

for Lindsay Brown ('05), dance D A A , or D a v i d B e l l o w s ( ' 0 5 ) , or-

"I f o u n d out in M a r c h . [ M y m o m and 1] d i d n ' t think that I w a s g o i n g

S h a r p , head of the m u s i c d e p a r t -

g a n D A A , but definitely i n f l u e n c e d

to get it, s o o u r first reaction w a s to

m e n t a n d one of the D A A j u d g e s . W i n n i n g the a w a r d carries with

their decision for w h e r e to g o to col-

l a u g h - 1 w a s really e x c i t e d ! " H a t c h

said. " T h a t h e l p e d m e to p r e p a r e a

lege. "It h e l p e d a lot, b u t it w a s n ' t the

said. S t u d e n t s , e s p e c i a l l y t h o s e in

lot." T h e d a n c e a n d writing p r o g r a m s

it large responsibility.

Nicole

uui

Lantz

na lie to you I'M

g v n n u

i ife

iir

I'm not gonna lie to

NOT GONNA LIE TO YOU

to vc

• • i m

lie U

[to d a n c e ] as f a r as I plan t o . " - L i n d s a y Brown ('05)

run differently than music. The D A A i s n ' t s o m e t h i n g that d a n c e r s can p r e p a r e for m u c h . B r o w n c a m e

"I w o u l d n ' t h a v e b e e n able to c o m e t o H o p e if I h a d n ' t

f r o m h e r h o m e in Boise, I d a h o to

won." - K r i s t i Hatch ('05)

audition. "I c a m e in J a n u a r y and I w e n t to d i f f e r e n t classes in j a z z and t a p , " B r o w n said. ' T h e p r o f e s s o r s c a m e a r o u n d and o b s e r v e d e v e r y o n e . We d i d w o r k at the ballet bar and they

Intramural equality: My

Spotlight editor

touchdown is 9 points?

Problems with the •ules of ntramurals Could someone please explain the I M

s p e c i a l r e c o g n i t i o n in t h e i r p r o grams; they're just students who h a p p e n t o be very talented. " [ T h e D A A is] different in d a n c e than in m u s i c . I d o n ' t e v e n k n o w w h o else got it in the d a n c e d e p a r t -

Get in to t h e Games!

until I got better. T h e g a m e for me was no longer as

rules to m e ? You see, I ' m

f u n as it c o u l d h a v e been.

pretty sure t h e r e ' s g o i n g t o b e special r u l e s that I

W h e r e did the c o m p e t i t i o n b u t not the other w a y

g o ? I u n d e r s t a n d that a lot of I M g a m e s a r e n ' t t a k e n very

need t o k n o w a b o u t . Intramurals are b a c k in full

around. Although temporarily f o r g o t t e n , the rules c o n t i n u e d t o

swing again, a n d with t h e m , m y frustrations. L a s t year I signed up f o r c o - e d i n t r a m u r a l

nag at m e . T h e issue c a m e back u p with the start of c o - e d football. A

d o get really c o m p e t i t i v e , especially in the finals.

basketball. O n the first play, a

t o u c h d o w n b y a guy is worth t h e

t e a m m a t e passed m e the ball. As soon a s the ball t o u c h e d niy

traditional 6 p o i n t s , but if a girl scores, the t e a m r e c e i v e s 9. In

of s c o r i n g i s n ' t the s a m e b e c a u s e I k n o w that half of the

h a n d s , the g u y s on the o t h e r

addition to this, g u y s can only

team backed away f r o m me

m a k e so m a n y c a t c h e s in a row. E v e r y o n e yells, " O k , this o n e ' s

like I had a disease. T h e girl g u a r d i n g m e c o n t i n u e d to c l a w

g o t t o be c a u g h t b y a g i r l . " T h e

at the ball a n d f o r c e d m e to d r i v e to the h o o p , b u t left with

t e a m starts l o o k i n g for a short p a s s and d o u b l e t e a m s the girls,

little resistance that m a d e for an easy l a y - u p .

w h o r e c e i v e a rare c h a n c e to c a t c h the f o o t b a l l . Q u i t e frankly, I d o n ' t e n j o y r u n n i n g u p and d o w n

seriously, but s o m e t i m e s they

In basketball, the c h a l l e n g e

other t e a m w a s d e f e n s e l e s s . If m e n d o try to b l o c k a g i r l ' s shot, t w o p o i n t s are a u t o m a t i cally a d d e d to the o t h e r t e a m ' s score. I w o u l d rather play t h e

g a m e r u l e s that b o t h e r m e , it's the m i n d s e t b e h i n d t h e m that

b e g a n t o get irritated. A f t e r all, I really d i d n ' t h a v e to d o m u c h .

m e n . T h a t alone should be e n o u g h t o c o m p e n s a t e w o m e n if they a r e n ' t as g o o d . If they need

upsets m e . Ultimately, I d o n ' t k n o w

I d i d n ' t h a v e to f a k e , d i d n ' t h a v e to dribble a r o u n d a n y o n e .

m o r e h e l p than that, I start to q u e s t i o n if they should e v e n b e o n

All that I h a d to d o w a s m a k e

the t e a m . I d o n ' t a p p r e c i a t e the h a n d i c a p

an easy b a s k e t . Of c o u r s e I could m a k e a lay-up. O n l y later d i d I d i s c o v e r the r e a s o n s for the insufficient defending. My teammates explained that w h e n I or any other girl receives the ball, g u y s c a n ' t steal the ball o r attempt to b l o c k a shot. T h e y ' r e

that I s u p p o s e d l y n e e d to play on the team. M a n y w o m e n w h o play d o h a v e e x p e r i e n c e a n d talent. T h e y c a n dribble a basketball w i t h o u t it b e i n g stolen a n d shoot without being blocked. A n d for me, I u n d e r s t a n d that they will p r o b a b l y get the ball m o r e than I do. I accept this. If I really c a r e d e n o u g h , I w o u l d g o practice alone

w h a t the solution is. I a g r e e that m a n y g u y s are better at

saying that w o m e n a r e n ' t e x p e c t e d to be as g o o d a s the level of the g a m e . I am being told that I a m not as g o o d as m y m a l e t e a m m a t e s and, in order to c o m p e n s a t e f o r that, I r e c e i v e special privileges. But I ' m no princess; let's play the game.

if t h e y p a i d m e t o n s o f money." - D a v i d Bellows ('05)

of the situation. " T h e f a c u l t y at H o p e really t o o k

A/JCHOf? P H O T O S

m e in. I d i d n ' t h a v e t o a u d i t i o n

A n n e k e

w h e n I got t o H o p e like the rest of

BY

M e e t e r

the voice students. W h e n I got t h e r e , the p r o f e s s o r said, 4 0 h , here,

up." Bellows didn't feel pressured with competition. Beside being able

y o u ' r e with m e , " ' Hatch said. S h e

to m e e t a lot of other students at

also c o m m e n t e d o n a d o w n side. ' T h e professors definitely don't

the D A A rehearsal, he d i d n ' t f e e l that w i n n i n g the s c h o l a r s h i p dras-

let m e s l a c k , " H a t c h said. " S o m e -

tically c h a n g e d his life. W h e n asked

t i m e s it s e e m s like the o t h e r stud e n t s are w a i t i n g f o r m e to m e s s

if he felt held to a h i g h e r standard,

C = 3

m o r e D A A o n 11

C Z D

C = 2

C Z D

C T D

C = 3

Spaghetti Night at the Kletz

Movutoy

i-vw^ts

sports. But f o r intramurals, instead of g i v i n g w o m e n an a d v a n t a g e , they are giving women a disadvantage by

I d i d n ' t like it h e r e , I

w o u l d n ' t be h e r e at all, e v e n

quite as m u c h of a secret. Hatch described t h e p o s i t i v e s and n e g a t i v e s

N o w , g r a n t e d , this is

are generally set u p f o r w o m e n to d e f e n d w o m e n and m e n to d e f e n d

"If

B r o w n said. W h o the D A A s in m u s i c are i s n ' t

ball stolen e v e r y single t i m e or n e v e r get the ball at all.. intramurals, r i g h t ? It isn't a big deal. B u t it's not so m u c h the

up. M y t e a m w o u l d g i v e m e high f i v e s e v e r y t i m e , a n d I

m e n t . I t ' s k i n d of h u s h h u s h , "

g a m e fairly and either h a v e the

the field f o r nothing. I n t r a m u r a l s

T h e situation r e p e a t e d itself. I ' d get the ball, dribble around my d e f e n d e r , and m a k e a lay-

basically useless. W o m e n c a n try to steal the ball f r o m m e n ,

watched." M o s t of the D A A s a r e n ' t given

art

at tht . s t f l r t U v 0 n t 6:00

ydghts hCUtzl t r y sovue m a t

or

v e g g k spflghettt. with f r e s h gflrltc

bread

ayida

soda

S t i U h u n e r y ? i t ' s all

for ottly b a c t e f o r i-Kore!

C o k v c c

y o u enkt t a t .

N0W t h a t ' s t h e K l ^ t z !

I

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AricHor

I N F O C U S

O c t o b e r 2, 2002

Surveillance at hope:Who is watching? Exploring how Hope monitors student communication, movement, and misbehavior

Gadgets that will getcha Library surviellence cameras

David Gutierrez INFOCUS EDITOR

There are eyes and ears on this c a m p u s that cannot be seen, but they are very real. These invisible observers in the sky, the silent listeners on the other side; they all are watching and recording c a m p u s m o v e m e n t and c o m m u n i q u e s . Maintained by the offices of P u b l i c S a f e t y and C o m p u t e r I n f o r m a t i o n Technology (CIT), they are the Big Brother of the Hope College community. features. We could install a closed circuit camera surveillance system that would monitor T h e college implements a number of surthe Residence Halls on campus, but that has veillance and recording methods in an attempt yet to happen." to maintain the safety, order, and accountabilT h e c o l l e g e p h o n e s y s t e m can also be ity of the student body. Whether one is aware monitored if necessary. Records of calls can of this or not, m o v e m e n t in and out of resibe checked if suspicious activities necessidence halls, phone calls, and computer usage tate such action. If students find themselves can and is monitored, as well as logged on a harassing daily basis. calls, a phone switch W i t h the installacan be attached to that tion of the new access ry and respect a p a r t i c u l a r l i n e to c a r d s y s t e m f o r the residential halls. Pub- student's privacy as much record who called and at what time. lic S a f e t y is able to "We don't have view the t i m e s of a as possible. s t u d e n t ' s entry into -Carl Heidman, ^ ^ constant laps o r anything like that," their particular resiDirector, CIT J j Lafata said. "But, if dential building. t4 s o m e o n e r e p o r t s reEach card is perpeated harassment, w e have an L E D display sonalized f o r a particular student, said Serwe hook u p to their line that tells us the time geant M i k e Lafata, Public Safety. if w e get and origin of the phone calls. This lets us track a report of suspicious o r destructive activity the location of the calls." in a certain area and see people fleeing into a T h i s system applies to o n - c a m p u s housing Residence Hall, w e can go back to the office only. Students living in cottages go through and check the computers and it gives us a listing of w h o entered, and at .what time." T h e r e is also a n e w door alarm system and H o p e is one of the first schools to be using it. W h e n doors are propped or pennied, an alarm is activated after 30 seconds that notifies Public Safety. 4 T h i s is state-of-the-art equipment," Lafata said. ' T h e system itself has various add on

a different process. " W e d o n ' t directly m o n i t o r the c o t t a g e phone systems," Lafata said, "but we can trace calls through Ameritech P h o n e C o m p a n y . " T h e school also implements a n u m b e r of video surveillance techniques to monitor suspicious activity. Time lapse cameras, along with a pinhole cameras are among the tools

Email tracking through Webmail

AMCHOFf G R A P H I C BY C H A D S A M P S O N

used to watch any specific area of c a m p u s for prohibited activity. While the larger cameras are used to view general areas on campus, such as parking lots and building entrances, the pinhole cameras are more focused on "sting" operations where a dorm r o o m or office has been vandalized or where property has been stolen. "We use the pinhole cameras when the area is smaller, about the size of a d o r m r o o m , " Lafata said. "We can hide it in a bookshelf somewhere overnight to check for any intruders that steal or d a m a g e a part of that area." Public Safety isn't the only place on camp u s that can trace communication within the campus. C o m p u t i n g and Information Technology (CIT) is capable of tracking emails sent and received within the Webmail system. "It's not something we d o on a regular basis," said Carl Hiedman, director of CIT. "If Public Safety or the Holland Police ask us to, w e can tell them that a message was sent f r o m point A to point B, but it's something w e don't do often. W e try and respect a student's privacy as much as possible." M u c h of the tracking that goes on within the C I T o f f i c e s concerns m a s s emails and virus prevention. " W h e n a mass email to over 300 people is sent on Webmail, w e receive an alert and then check f o r viruses, but that's about it," said Heidman. " W e aren't sitting in here reading

Personalized access cards

Call tracing and phone logs

A/JCHOR PHOTOS

BY ROB O N D R A

emails; that's not what we want to deal with." While Hope is willing and capable to monitor student communications and m o v e m e n t within the c a m p u s , they m o r e c o n c e r n e d about using these capabilities f o r the students, and not against them. "Most of this stuff is precautionary, or used after a problem has been recognized," Lafata said. " W e only use this equipment a handful of times each year; it's around just in case."

A

History of the Pull This year marked the 105th anniversary of the Pull. Here are some facts from its long history. The Pull started in 1898 "Since 1909. the sophomore class has won 57 Pulls, the freshmen have won 29 Since 1909. even year has won 51 Pulls, odd year has won 35 Since 1909, there have been four cancellations and four draws The longest Pull was three hours and 51 minutes in 1977 The shortest Pull was two minutes and 40 seconds in 1956 The 2001 Pull was won by even year, with a distance of 21 feet, 10 inches This year's Pull was won by odd year, with a distance of 18 feet, 10 inches AMCHOR PHOTO

BY C H A D S A M P S O N

Meghan Betka ('03) observes the Odd Year Pull Team lock in after a heave.

V


Anchor

PULL

O c t o b e r 2, 2002

105 Pull ends In odd year vlcteiy Pull f r o m 1 got, because there's no more time on the rope," said Matt Baer, ' 0 5 Puller. Despite the exertion and pain endured for three hours, the Pullers w e r e true to the end. ' T h e entire time that 1 w a s on the rope, 1 took every heave like it was the first one. Every time it happened, we started over with the next one," said Landon Lapham, '05 Puller. T h e Pull requires m u c h mote than the use of o n e ' s hands; it is a test of total physical and mental stamina. Blisters and sore muscles are only the beginning of the pain involved, but almost any Puller will say the same thing: 'It w a s worth it.' "It's a w e s o m e once you push yourself past what you think you can do. It's good f o r

Odd year celebrates their triumph with a traditional in the Black River

you," said Briand Mulder, ' 0 5 Puller. dip " M y feet hurt, my legs hurt, my hips hurt, but it's all o k , " said Jared Gall, '05 Anchor. T h e chill of the river is something that ' 0 6 will h a v e to wait until next year to experience, but ' 0 5 wasted no time in leaping into the river and celebrating wildly. "The first few feet, 1 w a s starting to get worried 1 w a s going to lose my boots, but you go out a little further and it gets solid. It's cold and nasty as all heck to look at, but its nice to be in there. We w o n - it feels great to be in the river and horrible to be standing on the side of i t " Gall said. Baer agreed. "I never thought s w i m m i n g in the dirty Black River would be so much fun. All the work w e had to do w a s worth it," Baer said. A s the victors celebrated in the river, the sportsmanship of the contest showed itself as odd year and even year traded chants of " ' 0 5 Pull team, a w e s o m e Pull team; ' 0 6 Pull team, a w e s o m e Pull team." Although often overlooked, s w i m m i n g in the Black River is an integral part of the Pull. A s the winning team frolics in the m u d d y water, the losing team is forced to stand upon the river bank and watch. ' T h e thought of never being in the river is a horrible thought, and just having to think of having to see those red shirts in the river o n e more time, two years in a row is enough to make you so mad that you'll work and do anything to win," said Quinn Ellsworth. ' 0 5 Moraler. W h e n asked what the Pull w a s all about, and what the key to victory was, every Puller, Moraler, or Pull Coach responded

Eric Goltz ('03) calls for a 17 up

with the same answer, ' T e a m w o r k . " " Y o u ' v e got to work together because one guy can't do any-

thing on his own. If one guy d o e s n ' t do what he needs to do, then the whole team is screwed. Every single guy has to do his part.," M u l d e r said. " I ' m so proud of our team. It's about family love and a lot of tradition. T h e r e was a lot of odd year pride out here today " said Megan Betka, ' 0 5 Pull Rep. Although the Pull m a y s e e m like nothing other than a good old fashioned tug-of-war to s o m e o n e w h o has never participated in it, there is actually a great deal of strategy and techniques that are very important to

Fans watch as the odd year team gains rope

victory. "Call sets on pull day are very important. You h a v e to k e e p the right pace so that people d o n ' t get exhausted. You can only really heave strong when y o u ' r e still fresh, so you have to pace it. W h e n the opposition is coming, you h a v e to throw a strain," said Eric Goltz, ' 0 5 Pull coach. A f t e r the loss to the class of '04, the Pull C o a c h e s f o r odd year sat d o w n and totally r e v a m p e d their strategy. "We went back to the drawing board and redid everything. We had our priorities, and w e did what w e had to do to win," said Josh Egedy, ' 0 5 Pull Rep. At one point during a 17-up, (a time in which the A n c h o r re-ties the knot around his body due to rope m o v e m e n t , and the Puller in pit 17 stands u p to act as a pseudo anchor), Gall slipped and almost fell over. Although no slack w a s lost to the ' 0 4 team, the knot w a s tied too short, and Gall was almost completely out of his pit. " W e ' d try and get it the right length to tie in, but it's not always right. A f e w t i m e s I w a s actually off my board, and y o u ' r e not supposed to do that. Luckily enough, w e were able to p o p a couple of heaves so I could get back on the board," Gall said. Re-tying the Anchor knot is no easy task, because the length of rope tied around the A n c h o r weighs approximately 2 5 0 pounds. In addition, the thick, wet rope kinks easily, making it more difficult to manage. "All you can do is hurry, just hurry up and do a good j o b on it," said Nate Moore, '05 A n c h o r Coach. Because of the extreme weight of the rope wrapped around him, and because he spends the entire three hours standing on his board, some might be led to believe that the A n c h o r is more important than the rest of the team. However, this is not the case. "The anchor has no more meaning than anyone else on this rope, he's just another person there, it's just a different j o b , " M o o r e said. Every Puller, Moraler, and Pull Coach celebrated in their own unique ways, but the emotions felt by everyone were the same. "I c o u l d n ' t feel better than I do right now. I ' m just so proud to see these guys c o m e out like that and win," Moore said. ' T h i s will probably last forever, not the elated feeling, but it's something I ' m always going to look back on, and remember how hard it was and that it paid off," said Abbi H a f f m a n , ' 0 5 Moraler.

j o h n Hecksel ('05) gets a refreshing drink from j s | y | o r a | e r i Hannah Allen ( ' 0 5 )

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PHOTOS BY C H A D SAMPSON


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Josh VanDop ('05) sits in his "shark fin". Cynthia Blaszak('06) keeps her eyes glued to the coach for the call.

Nick Dekoster ('06) and Melissa lpema('06) in pit #1 feel the toll of pull day.

During The Pull travel across the river was made pri by boat.

Brian Hammer ('06) the even year anchor goes into a strain. Moraler Kathleen port him.

Andrew Stoepk yells with all hi: during an odd \ strain. Strains I hold on to the r during opposin heaves.


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John Falatco ('05) inches up in his pit and prepares for Nicole Skory ('06) to relay the heave call.

Odd year pull coach Eric Goltz ('03) give the heave call.

Erin Beeson ('05) holds the rope for the anchor during a seventeen up. Moraler Quinn Ellsworth ('05) holds Erin up.

Jared Gall ( 06) anchor for odd year, strains.

Paul Kelly ('06) looks to his moraler Amy Sisson ('06) for support. (•05) light ir •P •e

ANCHOR GffACRH/C A NO fHOTOS BY CHAD SAMfSO//


8 Anchor

PULL

The

O c t o b e r 24, 2002

Even Year tastes defeat at the hands of Odd Year Freshman class makes Pull debut and looks towards next year for revenge Danielle Koski BUSINESS MANAGER

T h e y pulled until their h a n d s were raw. T h e sweat trickled down their faces with pain evident in their eyes. T h e y fought f o r the rope, yet on this day, the rope w a s not to be theirs. This year really was not an even year, no matter what the calendar says. T h e pull team of ' 0 6 started this odyssey three weeks ago. T h e y ate as a team, they trained as a team, they worked as a team, and on Saturday they felt the sting of defeat as a team. " I ' m proud of them; they worked hard, they worked really hard," said Matt Clouse ('04), an alumni of pull team '04, after watching the ' 0 6 pull team. For most of the duration of the pull, the even year team kept the mark on the rope within a few feet to several feet of the initial starting point, but as the time waned, and the second hour started, the odd year team heaved more and the rope p r o g r e s s i v e l y slipped f r o m e v e n year's hands. In the last half hour though, even year m a d e a rally, and gave it all they had, but in the end, they had lost too much rope and had too little time to gain it back. " W h e n you could hear (the Pullers and Moralers) screaming and getting pumped u p in the last five minutes, and t h e y ' d been through it f o r three hours, they never g a v e in and they never g a v e up," said Scott H i n z e ( ' 0 4 ) , a n o t h e r Pull alumni. A s each puller f r o m each pit was told to stand d o w n f r o m the rope, the crowd continued to cheer. Their applause seemed to e m p h a s i z e that the Pullers and Moralers had done their best and they worked hard.

A/ZCHOf? P H O T O S

BY C H A D S A M P S O N A N D R O B O N D R A

Even Year watches from the banks of the Black River as Odd Year celebrates their victory. "I think they did really well, and the anchor tore it u p , " said Emily C u m m i n g s ('04), a former moraler. First time observer of the Pull, M a r y A n n L e l a n d , the mother of even year Puller David Leland, also w a s proud of h o w hard each Puller and Moraler had worked. " I ' m impressed, these kids have worked hours and hours and t h e y ' v e done a good j o b , " Leland said. The rope slowly was dragged through the m u d and taken to the opposite bank of the river after even year c a m e u p 18 feet 10 inches to short. Yet, though the team was let d o w n by the d a y ' s e v e n t s , m o s t agreed that they will be back next year to reclaim the 18 feet of lost rope and more. "It w a s a great battle, and ' 0 5 1 guess just wanted it more. We'll be back next year to take it f r o m odd year," said Pat Mears ('06), an even year Puller. The tears and sadness were present, but also a sense of respect

f o r the other team, and a feeling of accomplishment f o r what the even year team had d o n e were also there on the banks of the Black River. "I have a lot of respect f o r '05, they did an a w e s o m e j o b today, and w e both worked really hard, and we had a lot of heart," said Katie Skaff ( ' 0 6 ) , an even year Moraler. "Pull is just an intense battle, but I ' v e never felt more rewarded by an experience I ' v e been through," said David Leland ('06), an even year Puller. A s the ' 0 6 Pullers stood on the b a n k of the Black R i v e r and watched the odd year team splash into the murky water of the river, a chant o f " ' 0 6 pull team, family pull t e a m " began. That " f a m i l y " will be back next year on the banks of the Black River to do battle again, but this time they will be experieenced and wiser, and maybe 2 0 0 3 will be the year of ' 0 6 .

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Above: Brian Holda ('06) stays strong in the anchor pit as fans and coaches cheer on.

Brian Mulder {'05), Paul Kelly ('06), and Abbi Halfman ('05) chant away as the annual Rope Run takes place the day before the Pull.

$


Anchor

ARTS

O c t o b e r 2, 2 0 0 2

5

^Everyman poses lifers great questions Medieval morality play shown this weekend in DeWitt Rebecca Hillyard STAFF REPORTER

W h a t d o e s E v e r y m a n do when f a c e d with p e r s o n a l i t i e s such as Beauty or Death? And what will happen w h e n he meets with Five Wits? The answer lies in the Hope Theater production of " E v e r y m a n , " a medieval morality play that follows the character E v e r y m a n on his final j o u r n e y after he has been confronted by Death. Written at the end of the 15th century, " E v e r y m a n " i? the first Mainstage Theater Department production of this year. It will be directed by Theatre Professor John Tammi. " ' E v e r y m a n ' is probably the finest and the best surviving morality play of the Middle Ages. T h e hallmark of this dramatic g e n r e is the use of allegory, which is employed to d r a m a t i z e the m o r a l s t r u g g l e thought by medieval Christianity to be universal for every individual,"

T a m m i said. " W e ' v e not d o n e a medieval play in all the years I've been here and this seemed like a good time to do it." T h e cast consists of seventeen m e m b e r s w h o play the roles of God, Everyman, a Doctor, Death, and the attributes that join E v e r y m a n on his journey. In addition to the cast, many students are serving in technical capacities that are crucial to producing the play. Libby Sturrus ( ' 0 3 ) acts as assistant director to John Tammi, and Heather Wiegand ( ' 0 3 ) s e r v e s as S t a g e M a n a g e r . R y a n G r a v e s ( ' 0 3 ) l e n d s his technical ability to the Theater Department yet again as he takes charge of lighting design. Micah M a a t m a n ('04), mentored by guest artist Todd Engle, is scenic designer while Rachel Jamieson ( ' 0 5 ) is scenic and properties assistant to E n g l e ' s properties design. Abigail Youngerman ('05) and Michelle Bombe, Professor of T h e ater, are co-designing costumes. In addition to playing the role of the Doctor, Patrick G l a u b ( ' 0 3 ) is s e r v i n g as t h e p r o d u c t i o n ' s dramaturg. H i s role is to research the history and background of the

PHOTO COURTESY J O H N TAMMI

Everyman (right), played by Patrick Kearney ('03), tries to convince Fellowship, played by Jared Abram DeBacker ('05), to go with him on his final journey in the Hope College Theater production of "Everyman." production and to share his findings with both cast and crew, oftentimes playing a significant part in h o w the production is shaped. "I think what makes 'Everyman* so m e a n i n g f u l is that the journey this character takes is so universal,"

said Patrick K e a r n e y ( ' 0 3 ) , w h o plays the role of Everyman. ' ' A u diences in the Middle A g e s could relate to it and so can 21st Century College students." Everyman lasts one hour and will be p e r f o r m e d this T h u r s d a y

through Saturday at 8 p.m. in the DeWitt M a i n Theater. Admission is $7 f o r the general public and $4 f o r students and senior citizens. T h e box office is open w e e k d a y s f r o m 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturdays f r o m noon to 5 p.m.

Student talents showcased in year's first Artscape Opus brings literature to life tonight in the Kletz Maureen Yonovitz A R T S EDITOR

W h e r e can one find friends and classmates reading some of their personal w o r k in front of an audience? F r o m 9 t o 11 t o n i g h t , t h e f i r s t O p u s Artscape of the year c o m e s to the Kletz. O p u s Artscapes, sponsored by Opus Magazine, a tri-yearly, student-run publication featuring student artistic and literary work, are an opportunity f o r all those interested to share their work with other m e m b e r s of the Hope community.

"Artscapes are exciting because they give students a chance to experience the feeling of public reading and because they allow the Hope c o m m u n i t y to interact and share their literary artwork," said Melissa Sexton . . .

( 05). opus staff

will be passed around during the reading. "It gives those w h o would never h a v e their poetry/stories heard otherwise a chance," said J o s e p h Tolton ( ' 0 5 ) , O p u s staff m e m b e r . • • • • • • • H H H H B B H H f c ' A n d , just because o n e d i d n ' t g e t into — . O p u s this last time d o e s not m e a n that m h h h w e will not let o n e

simply reading that piece," said Meridith DeAvila ('04), O p u s editor-in-chief. T h e O p u s staff is looking f o r w a r d to hearing what other students h a v e d o n e and encourages anyone w h o m a y want to get involved with O p u s to c o m e and experience

rant for fifteen minutes on the microphone." T h o s e w h o do not choose to read are also encouraged to attend to be able to hear readings p e r f o r m e d in the a u t h o r ' s o w n voice. " R e a d i n g s give us a chance to hear perhaps an explanation of a piece, and we can hear the nuances of w o r d s or p o e m lines and s o m e t i m e s w e gain a different view than by

DeAvila said. T h e r e is no charge and all are invited to stop by, g r a b a c u p of Cool Beans coffee, and enjoy s o m e original student work.

Artscape is Tonight

member. • h h h h h w h h h Readings usually start out with Artscape Award winners, five students w h o s e submissions h a v e been c h o sen by O p u s to receive $ 1 0 and have their n a m e s on publicity posters a n n o u n c i n g the reading. T h i s time, however, the event will begin with readings by predetermined O p u s staff, and will then be followed by an open mic to which all are welcome. A sign-up sheet

what it's all about. "I hope that Artscape will continue to grow, and I ' m e x c i t e d to h e a r the n e w i d e a s , "

Second annual Tulipanes festival begins soon Events spotlight Hispanic heritage

val hosts m o r e than films. "It was difficult to limit ourselves to this n u m b e r because there are literally thousands of films, scholars, a r t i s t s , a n d m u s i c a l g r o u p s to choose f r o m , " DeLaTorre said. T h e festival is not a spin-off of Holland's Tulip Time, although the name may lead some to believe otherwise. It is simply named after the flower for which this area is known, only honoring it in Spanish. "The ' s p i n - o f f suggestion implies we are copyists without originality and in need of something or s o m e o n e else to model ourselves f r o m , " DeLaTorre said. "We have our o w n identity, and our o w n w a y of c e l e b r a t i n g it in an e n t i r e l y

Anjey Dykhuis SENIOR STAFF REPORTER

Tulip Time is o n e of the bestk n o w n characteristics of Holland, but in 2001, during the height of Hispanic Heritage Month, a c o m m i t t e e h e a d e d by D e b o r a h D e L a T o r r e b e g a n the T u l i p a n e s Latino Art & Film Festival, a sevenday festival celebrating the history of Latino art and films. But it is not focused solely on those of Hispanic heritage. " F o r those w h o are u n f a m i l i a r with Hispanic-themed events, this is an easy, low-stress, accessible and a f f o r d a b l e way to learn and have f u n , " said DeLaTorre, founder and Board President of Tulipanes. Tulipanes, a non-profit organization run entirely by volunteers, with Hope College as o n e of its senior s p o n s o r s , b e g i n s O c t o b e r 4 and continues through the 1001. Every day of the festival will be filled with various films, activities, exhibits, and lectures.

PHOTO COURTESY TLAFF

Actress and singer Vaneza performs at the Knickerbocker on Saturday as part of the Tulipanes festival. Events include, "Bananas is M y Business: T h e Carmen Miranda Story," sponsored by H o p e College W o m e n ' s Studies, Interdisciplinary, and Multicultural A f f a i r s

Departments. It will be shown in M a a s Auditorium on Oct. 9 at 7 p.m. Tulipanes has already been recognized as the largest Hispanic film festival in Michigan, but the festi-

unique way." T h e week provides events for all ages and backgrounds. " O u r role also informs those inside and outside the Hispanic culture of our achievements and success," DeLaTorre said. " T h e T u l i p a n e s Festival is an entirely unique concept in the country, and [when you altend| you can b e c o m e a part of history in the making."

Arts Brief

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Arts Brief

Collage concert is Thursday Collage, an annual concert f o c u s i n g on m a n y of H o p e ' s m a j o r m u s i c g r o u p s , is presented Thursday at 11 a.m. in Dimnent Chapel this Thursday. The free concert is being run by Brian Coyle, Professor of Jazz Studies. T h e 5 0 - m i n u t e concert includes soloists, chamber groups, and larger e n s e m b l e s from the music department performing short pieces one after the other with no applause in between. Because of a time conflict. Collage, originally scheduled as two concerts at a later date, has been moved back a week and shortened to only one concert. Although its main purpose is the recruitment of prospective students into the music departm e n t , C o l l a g e is open to all w h o are interested in hearing about music at Hope.


OPINION

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Everyone needs to contribute to diversity 1 a m s u r e that e v e r y o n e h a s a l r e a d y read t h e c a m p u s - w i d e e m a i l s sent f r o m P r e s i d e n t B u l t m a n a n d " C o n c e r n e d S t u d e n t s " by now. I b o t h a g r e e and d i s a g r e e with s o m e p o i n t s in t h e letters. T h e minority students w h o were concerned enough have reason t o be c o n c e r n e d . O r rather, m o r e t o t h e p o i n t , w e a s a c a m p u s c o m m u n i t y h a v e a r e s p o n s i b i l i t y t o m a k e s u r e that they a r e c o m f o r t a b l e . Hate, w h e t h e r real or p e r c e i v e d , i n t e n t i o n a l or not, is a scary t h i n g f o r a n y o n e t o f a c e . T h i s h a t e is e v e n w o r s e w h e n it is p o i n t e d at a s p e c i f i c e t h n i c g r o u p . At t i m e s , it is h a r d t o s e e h o w s o m e t h i n g m a y b e o f f e n s i v e t o all m i n o r i t i e s if you y o u r s e l f are not a m e m b e r o f that m i n o r i t y . I a m n o e x c e p t i o n to I a m the o n e w h o is r e s p o n s i b l e f o r t h e o f f e n d i n g

V a n d e r p r o v a d v e r t i s e m e n t . 1 w a s trying f o r h u m o r , and it w a s o b v i o u s l y s e e n in an i n f l a m m a t o r y light. I w o u l d like to m a k e it c l e a r that V a n d e r p r o v is not r e s p o n s i b l e f o r a n y t h i n g in t h e a d vertisement. A l t h o u g h w e m u s t strive to a c c e p t t h e s e m i n o r i t i e s , a n d try t o m a k e t h e m feel at h o m e w i t h us, t h e street m u s t g o b o t h w a y s . In t h e letter f r o m " C o n c e r n e d S t u d e n t s " t h e w o r d i n g calls t h e f e e l i n g s that led u p t o the e m a i l e d a p o l o g y f r o m J o h n O m e e " f e i g n e d c o n c e r n . " I a m inclined t o b e l i e v e t h a t J o h n ' s c o n c e r n w a s real; o t h e r w i s e h e w o u l d n o t h a v e b o t h e r e d c o m p o s i n g t h e apology. Also, w h e n citing the Vanderprov advertisement, the c o n c e r n e d s t u d e n t s i m p l y that it w a s w r i t t e n w i t h a d e r o g a t o r y slant toward minorities, specifically black students. I have two probl e m s w i t h this. First, a s I h a v e a l r e a d y s t a t e d , I m e a n t n o t h i n g d e r o g a t o r y b y t h e l a n g u a g e u s e d in t h e a d v e r t i s e m e n t . S e c o n d , b y s a y i n g that t h e l a n g u a g e in t h e ad, and the p a r t y s i g n s , s p e c i f i c a l l y r e f l e c t o n b l a c k c u l t u r e is p r o m o t i n g a d e v a s t a t i n g ster e o t y p e . I a m o r i g i n a l l y f r o m St. C l a i r S h o r e s , w h i c h is a t o w n only ten m i n u t e s n o r t h of Detroit, and I a m n o stranger to " g h e t t o " p e o p l e a n d t h e i r l a n g u a g e . T h e p e o p l e that 1 k n o w w h o s p e a k this w a y a r e not o n l y b l a c k . I k n o w p l e n t y of w h i t e , H i s p a n i c , and e v e n o r i e n t a l p e o p l e w h o s p e a k in E b o n i c s . B y c l a i m i n g that t h e b l a c k p o p u l a t i o n is s i n g l e d o u t b y t h e u s e o f this lang u a g e is t a k i n g a g i a n t s t e p b a c k w a r d i n s t e a d of t a k i n g t h e intended step forward. O n e side is n o t w h o l l y to b l a m e f o r this p r o b l e m . T h e r e w a s m i s c o m m u n i c a t i o n , and s o m e m e m b e r s o f o u r c o m m u n i t y g o t o f f e n d e d . All of us, m e m b e r s o f t h e m i n o r i t y o r m a j o r i t y , m u s t w o r k t o g e t h e r t o r e c t i f y this s i t u a t i o n , and m a k e this c o m m u -

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Parking is not adequate, says student a spot at all, so you have to look for the "best illegal spot." Last week I love Hope, but 1 think that it is after going out with friends I tried time we called them out on seri- to park my car around 2:00am. I ously ripping off the student body. d r o v e around for at least fifteen I paid $ 175 for a parking pass at the m i n u t e s until I finally g a v e up. beginning of the year just to be al- Since you can't park on the street lowed to park my car in student lots. overnight (Holland will charge you That's a rip-off in itself if you ask $10 for that as I have already found me, but I could keep my complaints out), I parked in what I thought was to myself if spending way too much the best alternative to a marked for a silly sticker was the end of it. spot: on the end of the row in the Unfortunately, it's not the end at all. grass. The next afternoon I went to Each time 1 try to park my car I have move my car into a designated parkto drive from lot to lot searching for ing space and found that terrible a parking spot, and you belter just orange envelope on my windshield forget it if you get back late at night. proclaiming that I owed the school Of course, I think that I could even $25 because they sold more parkkeep my complaining to a minimum ing permits than they have spaces. if long parking-spot-hunts were as As you can imagine 1 was a little far as it went. That's not the end of irritated. I didn't overreact though it though; many times you can't find because I thought that if I explained To the Editor:

Anchor Staff

Anchor Staff Staff

Anchor

Staff

Nick Denis Chad Sampson Jen Troke Maureen Yonovitz Ben DeHaan John Rodstrom spotlight editor Nicole Lantz infocus editor David Gutierrez photo editor Rob Ondra copy editors Rebekah Oegema Abbie Matthews business manager Danielle Koski distribution manager Ellen Vigants advisor Mark Lewison Senior Staff Reporter: Anjey Dykhuis, Kurt Koehler Staff Reporters: OHmAHmov, Brianna DiSaMo, Jared Gall, Rebecca HiHyard, Katy Korenstra, Kristen Morin editor-in-chief production editor campus beat editor arts editor sports editors

To the Editor: In light of the recent popularity of the pickup-line party, the Hope College administration has decided to implement a similar activity as part of next year's Freshman orientation. Every entering freshman will receive a pickup line in his or her orientation packet, and each has to find the person with the same pickup line before the end of orientation. T h e n each lucky couple will bec o m e engaged to be married the summer after senior year, since their marriage is G o d ' s will (otherwise they wouldn't have the same pickup line). Marriage is one of Hope college's oldest and most Godly traditions

To the Editor: It was encouraging to see a sizable portion in the last Anchor issue (9/25), in which the Hope College Symphonette and Wind Symphony were highlighted. Maureen Yonovitz wrote an informative article concerning the first concerts of the season and there was even a picture of the Symphonette working in a rehearsal. I only wish that articles like these were a norm and not an exception. Hope College is a Liberal Arts school, w h i c h by definition represents a wide range of academic study. This includes serious study in the fields of art, dance, and music. Being a violin p e r f o r m a n c e major, I can honestly speak for the high intensity program that is underway at this institution. There are

2002 fall semester, Issue #6 of 25

ahead on that one: Some females will simply have to marry other females. Since the Bible never mentions anything about l e s b i a n i s m (only gay men), this should be OK with God. However, in light of uncertainty, the Hope College administration has recruited a task force of leading Christian men to pray for 16 hours a day to discover God's opinion on lesbianism. In the meantime, the administration has decided that a f e w female students going to hell is not as important as all Hope College men having a wife to cook his meals and raise his children.

Phil Waalkes ( ' 0 4 )

many students here who put in long hours of practice and study so that Hope College might be well represented through performances like the C o l l a g e C o n c e r t , the D e v o s Showcase, Christmas Vespers, as well as the regularly scheduled semester concerts that require just as much time and energy as all the rest. I feel that the arts generally do not receive the attention that they deserve. There is always at least one full page of the Anchor that is dedicated to sports events and there are usually one or two articles (i.e. the "Ready for a c o m m i t m e n t . . . a l m o s t , " and the " B o w i n g out" articles from the 9/ 25 issue) that give me the feeling of " w e need to fill up space." I am not d o w n p l a y i n g the athletics at Hope but I d p feel that there are s o m e unnecessary and irrelevant

articles that could be replaced with articles of a higher academic nature. I propose that the Anchor reserve a portion of the paper (this does not need to be a large portion by any means) for concert reviews and advertisements of u p c o m i n g musical performances. If there is r o o m e n o u g h f o r three pages of sports and the Pull then I feel that there should be room enough for two paragraphs that would promote the artistic side of Hope College. I am hopeful that these recommendations are taken seriously and that the staff at the Anchor is open to a fuller and more comprehensive representation of the Liberal Arts experience.

Joseph Deller ('03)

Letters to the Editor Guidelines Open to anyone within the college and related communities The Anchor reserves the right to edit due to space constraints No personal attacks, poor taste or anything potentially libelous Letters chosen on a first come first serve basis, or a representative sample is taken No a n o n y m o u s letters, unless discussed with Editor-in-Chief Editor-in-Chief may verify identity of writer

The Anchor is a producl of Mudenl effort and is funded through Ihe students of Hope College, funding which comes through the Hope College Student Congress Appropriations Committee. Letters to the editor are encouraged, though due to space limitations the Anchor reserves the right to edit. The opinions addressed in the editorial are solely those of the editor-in -chief. Stories from the Hope College News Serx'ice are a product of the Public Relations Office. One year subscriptions to the Anchor are available for $20. We reserve the right to accept or reject any advertising.

Anchor

(almost as Godly as The Pull). What better way to ensure that this glorious tradition is upheld through the generations than by creating a 100percent marriage rate? Even if students don't graduate, they will still be holy in G o d ' s eyes because of their marriage. Since they receive such a Godly education at Hope College, married graduates will not divorce. Hope College students know that hellbent feminists who advocate divorce are tools of the devil. In G o d ' s eyes, marriage should come quickly and last forever. Math majors may have already noticed a problem with this system. That's right, what about the 5:1 female-to-male ratio? Well, the Hope College administration is one step

Music should be more prevalent in student media

Photo Assisstant: Ann eke Meeter

the

the situation to the parking appeal board they surely would see that I didn't owe them anything at all. So I wrote my letter explaining to them that there were no e m p t y spaces when I returned to campus, that 1 had gone to move my car the next afternoon, and that I didn't feel that I owed them $25 for the irritation that they had caused me. After that 1 forgot about the whole incident until the next week when 1 got a letter informing me that the parking appeal board had met and denied my appeal of the ticket. They were also kind enough to bill the $25 to my student account for me. Someone call me out on this if I am w r o n g , but I think that H o p e is swindling us and it is time for it to stop. Wendy Schroeder ('05)

A commentary on marriage at Hope College

| nity a better p l a c e t o live, a n d t o learn.

Anchor Staff

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this rule.

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The Anchor reserves the right to refuse publication of any letter submitted Letters over 500 words in length will not be considered for publication.

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Mail letters to t h e A n c h o r c/o H o p e C o l l e g e , d r o p t h e m off at t h e A n c h o r office ( l o c a t e d in t h e c e n t e r o f Dewitt, behind

WTHS).

or

e-mail

anchor@hope.edu


Anchor

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CLASSIFIEDS & MORE

O c t o b e r 2, 2 0 0 2

DAA from 1 O

Student reacts to diversity issues To the Editor:

at large has failed to grasp this c o n -

t h e r e ' s a g o o d reason for that. D o n ' t

In m y t i m e h e r e at H o p e C o l l e g e

c e p t . E d u c a t i o n c o n c e r n i n g an a w a r e n e s s of m i n o r i t y c u l t u r e s c a n

j u d g e p e o p l e b e c a u s e of the w a y that they look, but u n d e r s t a n d that

certainly p r o v e to b e valuable, but they are in n o w a y the m e a n s t o a n end of racism. Forget what you

we a r e n ' t all exactly the s a m e . A t s o m e point the p u r p o s e of the e n -

I h a v e read a g o o d m a n y p o o r l y written letters to T h e A n c h o r , all of which provided a convenient s o u r c e of e n t e r t a i n m e n t but failed

learned in e l e m e n t a r y s c h o o l . Ster e o t y p e s c a n be a v a l u a b l e tool.

tire diversity a w a r e n e s s p r o g r a m w a s c o m p l e t e l y lost, and I lament that. Alright, I ' m f i n i s h e d . I think

T h e r e are distinct d i f f e r e n c e s be-

this is the part w h e r e you f l o o d m y email with nasty letters or s o m e

t o relay in r e s p o n s e to T u e s d a y ' s

tween black and white culture, nerds and j o c k s , p u n k s a n d " g h e t t o "

campus-wide email: H y p e r s e n s i t i v i t y d o e s not p r o -

kids. E v e r y w o r d in that list stirs up s o m e p r e c o n c e i v e d n o t i o n w e

m o t e diversity. It w o u l d s e e m that H o p e C o l l e g e

h a v e formuJated o v e r the last 2 0 s o m e y e a r s of o u r l i v e s , a n d

to p r o v e a n y t h i n g to a n y o n e . N o w , it s e e m s , m y turn has c o m e . I h a v e but one simple piece of information

such b u s i n e s s .

ally s p e a k s t o w a r d s the ineffective-

It h a s b e e n o v e r a y e a r n o w since the A n c h o r started k e e p i n g

S t u d e n t C o n g r e s s j u s t t h r e w it

n e s s of H o p e ' s g o v e r n i n g body. T h e r e are not a lot of things o n

track of h o w m a n y s c h o o l - w e e k s it has b e e n since the electronic sign

a w a y . M a y b e the s i g n s are b r o k e n , but t h a t is n o e x c u s e . If S t u d e n t

c a m p u s H o p e s t u d e n t s can control, b u t S t u d e n t C o n g r e s s is o n e o f

a b o v e the S t u d e n t U n i o n D e s k has

C o n g r e s s w a s g o i n g t o s p e n d that

t h e m . I e n c o u r a g e s t u d e n t s to p r e s -

displayed a n y t h i n g . In m y o p i n i o n , not e n o u g h s t u d e n t s are c o m p l a i n -

much money, they should have b e e n prepared to maintain the signs

sure S t u d e n t C o n g r e s s t o s p e n d m o n e y w i s e l y a n d t o k e e p this in

ing a b o u t this. A c o u p l e o f years

w h e n they b r e a k d o w n . $ 5 0 0 c o m -

m i n d w h e n elections c o m e a r o u n d .

a g o . Student C o n g r e s s spent $ 5 0 0 for e a c h electric sign and they m a d e

prises the budget of s o m e entire student g r o u p s a n d it c o u l d p a y the

a big deal about how they were

y e a r l y s a l a r y of a n A n c h o r s t a f f

c o m p a n y o n e m o r e voice student than the rest of t h o s e taking organ lessons, but besides that, everything

Matt C o o k ( ' 0 2 )

it should b e . " T h e students h a v e to be dedicated to their area of expertise. H a t c h h a s b e e n t a k i n g private v o i c e lessons

Classifieds sifieds

Chi.

Earn $1,000-$2,000 this semester with a proven CampusFundraiser 3 hour fundraising event. Our programs make fundraising easy with no risks. Fundraising dates are filling quickly, so get with the program! It works. Contact CampusFundraiser at (888) 923-3238. or visit www.campusfundraiser.com To Head: How bout are you willing to make the commitment to waking up at the crack of noon, and saying OK, it's gig time. What T-shirt am I gonna wear? Good luck with your stage debut! Imjay- Yipeeee! -Ank staff It's official! www.lylerocks.net Next show is tonight at the Rosebud in Grand Haven at 10:30 with special guests Smash Your Radio!

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"I w o u l d like to be a c h o i r teacher, m a y b e travel a r o u n d the U.S. in the s u m m e r a n d d o s o m e s h o w s , and then probably private l e s s o n s , " Hatch said. S h e w a n t s to see w h e r e life will take her. "I plan to get a church j o b , go to g r a d u a t e s c h o o l , gel a m a s t e r s , " B e l l o w s said. "I m i g h t eventually g o t o get m y PhD. T h a t ' s the o n e thing I h a v e n ' t d e c i d e d o n y e t . " B r o w n also had f u t u r e plans. " I ' d like to b e in a p r o f e s s i o n a l c o m pany, and d o c h o r e o g r a p h i n g for t e a m s in the a r e a , " she said. "If I h a d n ' t c o m e t o H o p e ' s dance p r o g r a m , I w o u l d n ' t have c o n s i d e r e d c o n t i n u i n g as f a r as I plan to. T h e m o r e I get i n v o l v e d , the m o r e I want to." A l t h o u g h very talented, the three d o n ' t e x p e c t or w a n t special treat-

"I h a d my first recital w h e n I w a s 5. I ' m sure I w a s g r e a t , " she said

less of their a w a r d . " I ' m the s a m e person I w a s bef o r e , n o d i f f e r e n t , " B e l l o w s said.

with a hint of s a r c a s m . " B u t I re-

ment. T h e y ' r e still students regard-

m e m b e r getting to w e a r p i n k socks

T h e D A A has b e e n a r o u n d for

with f r i n g e . " B e l l o w s has b e e n p l a y i n g the or-

r o u g h l y 2 0 y e a r s now, a n d continues t o strengthen the arts p r o g r a m s

gan f o r three and a half y e a r s , but has p l a y e d the p i a n o f o r 8 y e a r s

at H o p e . "It u n d e r l i n e s the fact that H o p e h a s f o u r v e r y strong arts d e p a r t -

b e g i n to d a n c e seriously until she w a s 13, s h e ' s b e e n d a n c i n g f o r 13 years. All of the s t u d e n t s h a v e p l a n s to c o n t i n u e d e v e l o p i n g their t a l e n t s

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after H o p e C o l l e g e .

since she w a s in 7 ,h g r a d e , but s h e ' s b e e n s i n g i n g h e r entire life.

prior. E v e n t h o u g h B r o w n d i d n ' t

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HOPE

work." Last y e a r h e w a s r e q u i r e d t o ac-

working together and that's the w a y

s t u d e n t s p r o b a b l y d o n ' t realize it, but t h a t m o n e y is y o u r m o n e y a n d

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"[Being a D A A ] I d o n ' t feel as though I h a v e to d o a lot of extra

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f e s s o r ] is very d e m a n d i n g of all his organ students," Bellows said.

lows said. " W e ' r e all still striving t o b e the best w e can a n d to g r o w

Ryan Wert ('04)

s p e n d i n g their m o n e y wisely. M o s t

ssifieds

he a n s w e r e d yes a n d no. " H u w L e w i s [ H o p e ' s organ pro-

w a s the s a m e . ' T h e music department, specifically o r g a n , is s p e c t a c u l a r , " B e l -

Alumnus criticizes allocation of student funds To the Editor:

n

m e n t s , all of t h e m n a t i o n a l l y acc r e d i t e d , " S h a r p said. With the D A A p r o g r a m e x p a n d ing a n d getting stronger, the arts p r o g r a m s can only get better.

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I s s u e 6 of 25, p u b l i s h e d w e e k l y

O c t o b e r 2, 2002

Hope overpowered by Wheaton, loses 49-30 Dutchmen must win remaining games to make playoffs Ben DeHaan SPORTS EDITOR

T h e r e is an old saying about what to do if y o u ' r e in a fight: Hit first and hit hard. Hope managed to hit first, but Wheaton College struck back harder. The T h u n d e r retaliated to H o p e ' s early score with six touchd o w n s in the first half on the w a y to a 4 9 - 3 0 win. Hope is now 1-3 and must win the M I A A to make the playoffs. Turnovers hurt the D u t c h m e n a g a i n , as they lost the ball f o u r times with t w o f u m b l e s and t w o interceptions. T h e y also racked u p eleven penalties f o r 111 yards. T h e D u t c h m e n appeared ready f o r the g a m e , after D a n B l o e m e r s ('04) nearly scored on a 37-yard run on the first play of the game. Phil Butler ( ' 0 4 ) then hit Joel S o l o m o n ( ' 0 3 ) in the end zone f r o m 31 yards out, giving Hope a 7 - 0 lead in the first minute of the g a m e .

Wheaton answered when running back Garrett Granburg recovered his o w n f u m b l e and ran 60yards for the score to even u p the g a m e at 7-7. After forcing Hope to punt on the next possession. W h e a t o n returned the ball to the Hope eight yard line and scored t w o plays later, moving the lead to 14-7. W h e a t o n would waste no time after they got the ball again, and on the first play of the new drive, quarterback C h a d Bradley found Brad M u s s o in the end z o n e f r o m 53 y a r d s out f o r a n o t h e r W h e a t o n score W h e a t o n took the first score in the second q u a r t e r on a 24-yard t o u c h d o w n pass f o r a 28-7 lead. Hope d r o v e into Wheaton territory on the next p o s s e s s i o n , but got picked off on the 3 0 yardline. T h e T h u n d e r w o u l d drive eight p l a y s into the e n d z o n e , taking a dominant 35-7 lead with 3:03 left in the half. T h e D u t c h m e n finally took a piece out of the lead, driving 74 yards d o w n the field, and scoring on Butler's 2 yard pass to D e v o n

fa

A / / C H O f ? PHOTO BY ROB ONDRA

Linebacker Matt Beaver ('04) wraps up the Wheaton running back. Quinn ('04), cutting the lead to 35-

w i t h a 52-yard t o u c h d o w n pass.

14. W h e a t o n , however, w a s not intimidated, and scored a minute later on another 23-yard pass creating a 4 2 - 1 4 lead at the half. H o p e struck first again in the n e w half, as Butler hit S o l o m o n

T h e two-point conversion brought the lead d o w n to 4 2 - 2 2 with 8:59 left in the third. W h e a t o n made their last score with 8:42 left in the game. Hope could get no closer than Jeff

E l d e r s v e l d ' s 27-yard t o u c h d o w n pass from Butler to finalize the gap at 49-30. Hope will n o w enter M I A A c o m p e t i t i o n . T h e Flying Dutchmen will travel to A l m a College next Saturday. Kickoff is at 1:00.

Skating Dutchmen look for repeat winning season David Yetter G U E S T WRPTER

Hockey has never been the most popular sport at Hope. In fact, some students, and maybe even a professor or two, m a y be unaware that H o p e has a hockey team. But that d o e s n ' t stop a group of g u y s w h o love the sport f r o m practicing for hours each w e e k and playing in t w o g a m e s each weekend. " W e play h o c k e y b e c a u s e w e love the g a m e and w e are all very competitive," explained goalie Brad Vanderberg ( ' 0 5 ) . That same competitiveness led the h o c k e y team to a very successful season last year, as it finished the year with a record of 13-12, the first winning record in school history, and qualified f o r the Division 111 tournament in Atlanta. The skating Flying Dutchmen beat Georgetown University 3-1, lost to the University of W y o m i n g 4-3 in overtime and beat the University of Florida 4-0. All three schools have a m u c h bigger enrollment than Hope, and playing each w a s a d e f i n i t e c h a l l e n g e . H o w e v e r , the F l y i n g D u t c h m e n rose to the occasion and ended u p finishing fifth place in the nation among all Division III club teams. It should c o m e as no surprise, then, that head coach Chris Van T i m m e r a n w a s eagerly

run through B r o w n and that he will awaiting the start of this h a v e a hand in a large portion of the season. There was a goals scored. m a r k e d excitement in the Forward John Collins ( ' 0 3 ) will air in early S e p t e m b e r as lend his skills to the o f f e n s e this the hockey team held its year. T h e team will f o c u s on setf i r s t p r a c t i c e s i n c e the ting Collins up with as m a n y shots t o u r n a m e n t last M a r c h . as possible in hopes that he can keep Van T i m m e r a n was able u p the p r e s s u r e on the o p p o s i n g to survey the talent regoalie. m a i n i n g f r o m last y e a r A s i m p o r t a n t as o f f e n s e is in and take a look at the n e w hockey, defense is the key to winplayers. ning big g a m e s , especially if the T h e team lost five playDivision 111 national tournament is e r s f r o m last y e a r b u t within grasp. Fifth-year senior Matt gained five more. The Wynalda ('03) will head the defense hope is that the new team PHOTO COURTESY SCOTT VAN TIMMERAN this year. His strategy will be to try will be as effective as the A Hope player fights for positioning in front of the net. and disrupt the opposing o f f e n s e as o l d , a n d w i l l a g a i n be m u c h as he can and will work on expanding the g a m e where a type of fast break develcompetitive in its division. o p s and one m o v e can m e a n the difference his passing game. Although resting on last y e a r ' s successes Goaltending duties this year will be left to between a goal and a turnover. might h a v e been tempting. Van T i m m e r a n Ben Von Eitzen ( ' 0 3 ) and Brad Vanderberg H o p e ' s p r a c t i c e s h a v e g i v e n V a n has assured the players they will have to work ( ' 0 5 ) . Von Eitzen will be starting goalie and even harder this year if they are to succeed. T i m m e r a n a chance to assess the talent on Vanderberg will back him up. this y e a r ' s team. Although h o c k e y is very T h e y ended up skating and doing conditionAlthough a new and different team, Hope m u c h a t e a m sport, the o u t c o m e will be ing drills day after day so they will be in game is relying on its solid returning players and greatly influenced by H o p e ' s key players. shape w h e n the season starts on Friday. talented n e w team m e m b e r s to p r o d u c e a Captain Scott Van T i m m e r a n serves the Practice starts around 10 p.m. and r u n s great season with strong players and an even team as captain this year. H e is k n o w n f o r until almost midnight. Training typically instronger resolve to prove their playing prowhis strong d e f e n s i v e skills and will aid the cludes speed drills and p o w e r play exercises, ess to their competition. goalie with his experience. specifically h o w to handle the puck while the T h e team opens u p play Friday in an a w a y Mike B r o w n ( 4 03) will be starting center, other team is a m a n down. T h e team pracg a m e against Illinois State University. and the team hopes that the o f f e n s e will be tices 3-on-3 drills, simulating situations in

Hope golfers compete well again Ben DeHaan SPORRRS E D I T O R

In the final tune-up b e f o r e the M I A A c h a m p i o n s h i p s , the H o p e w o m e n ' s golf team took to the links one more time, playing host to the third M I A A tournament of the season at Winding Creek Golf Course. T h e m e n ' s team competed in the John Carroll Invitational. At the w o m e n ' s tournament. T h e Flying Dutch finished the competition in 3rd place with 357 strokes. Saint M a r y ' s College took the meet with 324 strokes, and Albion c a m e

in second with 327 strokes. Emily Colenbrander ( ' 0 3 ) led the Dutch with 8 2 strokes. On the m e n ' s side, the Flying Dutchmen entered the John Carroll Invitational looking to improve one more time after a disappointing fini s h at K a l a m a z o o C o l l e g e l a s t week. T h e y proved to be o n e of the stronger teams in the tournament, placing 3rd out of twelve teams. Denison University, (OH) took first place h o n o r s in the 27-hole t o u r n a m e n t with a final score of 448. John Carroll University (OH)

c a m e in second with 4 6 0 strokes, and Hope took 3rd with 461 strokes. Hope captain Jeff Melville ( ' 0 3 ) led the w a y f o r the D u t c h m e n , shooting a 108. Melville's round placed him 3rd overall. Justin Spyker ('04) closely followed Melville, shooting a 113 on the day. T h e m e n ' s team will compete on Saturday in another M I A A meet at Adrian College, while the w o m e n will conclude their season at the MIAA championships in K a l a m a z o o Friday and Saturday.

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