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H o l l a n d . M i c h i g a n • A s t u d e n t - r u n n o n p r o f i t p u b l i c a t i o n • S e r v i n g the Hope C o l l e g e C o m m u n i t y f o r 117 y e a r s

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P u l l ' s S a m F i l c i k ('07), R o b J a c k s o n ('06) f a c e o f f .

Phi Sigma Kappa colony recognized Steve Adair S P O R T S EDITOR

This past week the newest fral on c a m p u s . Phi S i g m a K a p p a , r e ceived their national certification after a process that spanned nearly a year. At the forefront of this proc e s s w a s c u r r e n t p r e s i d e n t and founder of the Phi Sig colony here at Hope, Christian Viel ( ' 0 4 ) . For Viel, the choice to start a frat rather than j o i n one became obvious. ' T h e reasons w h y I w a n t e d to start the fraternity was that I wanted

to get m o r e involved on c a m p u s and in the Holland community. I wanted to create a group that would be on c a m p u s f o r the c o m m u n i t y to help out others w h o are less fortunate than ourselves. We want to be known in the community as m e n of character. With that I also felt that I wanted help with life after college. By starting a National Fraternity one can meet people f r o m all across the country." After giving m u c h thought to the idea, Viel went ahead with his plan

and after a long process just to get status on c a m p u s as a group, they w e r e granted status as a colony of Phi S i g m a Kappa on N o v e m b e r 10, 2002. "We had to go through many processes in order to obtain this. First w a s to be allowed on c a m p u s for which w e went through the C a m p u s Life board and through the Extra-Curricular Activities Committee (ECAC). T o go through this we had to present our ideas and show that enough m e n were interested. F r o m

there the National Chapter allowed us to be recognized as a G r o u p of Phi Sigma Kappa." Gaining colony status w a s only the beginning f o r Viel, w h o then had to round u p m e m b e r s h i p . It became clear that the Phi Sigs were a special g r o u p last winter as m a n y of those active in the c o m m u n i t y can r e m e m b e r their n u m e r o u s f r e e hot chocolate d a y s on the DeWitt Patio as well as their black and red short school bus. Viel says it was

see NATIONAL o n 2

Paper postings prohibited because of hazards Kirsten Winek COPY EI>TOR

The Hope College Campus Safety Department and the Occupational H e a l t h a n d Fire S a f e t y Division have issued n e w rules regarding the posting of signs, posters, flyers, and similar items around c a m p u s due to the fact that they are fire hazards. T h e correct placement of signs and posters is on the bulletin boards scattered around c a m p u s in academic and residence halls that have been p r o v i d e d f o r this p u r p o s e . Signs and posters are not allowed on any e n t r a n c e d o o r s , h a l l w a y walls, or in stairwells for important safety reasons. T h e s e signs could catch fire and prevent or hinder students, staff, and faculty from safely exiting a burning building. According to Jerry Gunnink of

H o p e ' s Occupational Health and Fire Safety Division, ' T h e s e measures have been put into place bec a u s e of the sheer m a g n i t u d e of postings that have been appearing in academic buildings in the stairw e l l s and front e n t r a n c e d o o r s . " Gunnink continued, saying, "Fire code prohibits placing class C c o m bustibles in a stairwell. Storage in stairwells has the potential to catch fire and create s m o k e and fire which would h a m p e r people f r o m getting out of the building. Stairw e l l s are designed to be ' s m o k e f r e e ' barriers so that people h a v e access out of the building in a fire situation." T h e n e w rules are most likely to affect people w h o put up posters or flyers for specific c a m p u s and community events. Departmental news updates in the form of signs o r fly-

P H O T O S BY R O B O N D R A

N i c k D e K o s t e r ('06) h u g s a t e a m m a t e after t h e i r v i c t o r y i s a n n o u n c e d . See P u l l I n s e r t

ers are usually posted correctly on bulletin boards near their respective Departmental Offices, so the recent changes will affect them little or not at all. Posters f o r the current main stage play, I p h i g e n i a and O t h e r Daughters, were placed around c a m p u s b e f o r e the n e w rules were put into effect, and many have since been taken d o w n d u e to their placements. Luckily, the H o p e Poetry Blitz will not be affected. Poetry Blitz is an annual spring semester event that involves each poetry student putting u p o r hiding 2 0 different poems around campus. T h e goal of this project is to bring the gift of poetry to H o p e ' s students, faculty, and staff. Jack Ridl, professor of English, said, "We put (the poems) in surprising places, just the w a y poems tend to take us by surprise."

Ridl c o n t i n u e d , " I w o u l d not think that the policy about paper postings will affect our enthusiasm or our purpose. I always ask the students not to post any p o e m s in prohibited places, to be more imaginative in where they place or hide them. I ' v e been told a couple (of poems) f r o m last year are still in hiding." T h e enforcement of the n e w paper posting rules is the responsibility of the Hope community. If papers are posted in stairwells, on e n t r a n c e d o o r s , or s i m p l y not p l a c e d o n b u l l e t i n b o a r d s , they should be taken down. T h e c a m p u s c o m m u n i t y needs to work together to k e e p c a m p u s b u i l d i n g s free of paper signs and posters that could bring about dangerous situations, especially in stairwells, in the event of a fire.

Campus Briefs

Sigma Xi lecture features anthropologist T h e annual Sigma Xi leetiire ai H o p e C o l l e g e will r e v i e w the role (hat genetic information e a h play in ttndecstanding the origins of N a t i v e A m e r i cans.JDr. E m o k e Szatbmary.an a n t h r o p o l q g i s r , will p r e s e n t 4k Geheiic fividende o n the Origins of t h e Aboriginal Peoples of North A m e r i c a " on. M o n d a y at 5 p.fti. tn- r q p m 1000 o f the college's n e w s d e r i c e center.

Concerns about student safety On T h u r s d a y a Campiis Security Alert w a s posted regOTding a criminal in vestigation o f a c a m p u s incident i n v o l j d n g a non-student against a H o p e student on Tuesday. T h e suspect e l u d e d o f f i c e r s from H o l l a n d P<)Uce Department durmgquesT tioning, but late Friday night the suspect w a s take& into custody by l a w c n f o r c q n d h t at a location a w a y fr^m campiis. T h e c a m p u s lock-down, initiated b e c a u s e of security concerns, continued through Monday moming.

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Anchor@Hope.Edu (616) 395-7877

Orchestra

Arts, page 6

Porn on your campus? Infocus, page 4 and 5

Big rope, big action Pull Insert

Women's Soccer Sports, page 8


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CAMPUS BEAT

O c t o b e r 1, 2003

Lecture series continues during Tulipanes Mackenzie Smith C o p y Eonw

T h e next lecture in the Searching the Sacred series will be held M o n d a y at 3:30 p.m. in the M a a s A u d i t o r i u m . T h e f e a t u r e d speaker. Dr. Gaston Espinosa, will be discussing his research into "Trends in Latin American Religions in the Americas." He will present information about h o w the social location of Hispanics - w h o and where they are - relates to their religion, beliefs, and spirituality. Espinosa originally hails f r o m California. He received his Ph.D. f r o m the University of California; afterwards he served as a professor f o r several years at Westmont College, C A . He then conducted his post-doctorate work at Northwestern University, IL, where he n o w teaches and holds a postdoctoral fellowship. He has published numerous articles and a book, and is currently working on another book relating to his research into Latino

religion and spirituality. This research included conducting the largest survey ever taken on the religiosity of Latinos. Espinosa took a three-year leave f r o m t e a c h i n g to d i r e c t t h e H i s p a n i c Churche s and Public Life Study, which was sponsored by a $1.3 million grant f r o m the P e w Charitable Trusts. H i s findings have caused quite a stir in the thinking of a c a d e m ics w h o study the Hispanic religious community. According to Miguel de la Torre, professor of religion and longtime acquaintance of Espinosa, m a n y previous assumptions about Latino spirituality were proven false by his research. A lot of n e w information that had not even been considered by scholars in this discipline was uncovered in the process of Espinosa's work. Espinosa's visit to Holland is in conjunction w i t h T u l i p a n e s , the West M i c h i g a n Latino art and film festival being held Fri-

CIS kicks off with dinner, keynote address Last night, Gerald P. McKenny, Director of the Reilly Center for Science, Technology, and Values at Notre Dame, opened CIS with a keynote lecture titled, "Science in its place."

Following the opening keynote address, five group conversations took place. Here, Steve Hoogerwerf and Paulette Chaponniere speak about science and Christianity in the Herrick room.

day through next Thursday. He will actually be speaking twice during the weekend - on Sunday at 1:30 at the Herrick District Library and then on M o n d a y at Hope. H i s talk on Sunday will f o c u s on Selena, the Latina pop star, and h o w and w h y the Hispanic c o m m u nity made this little-known talent into an idol of sorts. Because it is part of the Tulipanes festival, c o m m u n i t y members, as well as students, are invited to Espinosa's M o n d a y afternoon lecture. M a n y local ministers are expected to a t t e n d as they seek to b e t t e r u n d e r s t a n d Latino religious culture in order to more effectively reach out to that part of the Holland community. Seminary students are encouraged to attend for much the same reason. However. Hope students m a y benefit just as much from Espinosa's speech as those who c o m e for more specialized reasons. After all, by 2050 - about ihe time current students will

be receiving Social Security - one in f o u r people in the United States will be of Hispanic descent. T h e goal of the Searching the Sacred series, and of this lecture in particular, is to " p r o v i d e d i f f e r e n t w i n d o w s into a w h o l e other spiritual d i m e n s i o n . . . ( a n d to) encourage diversity of thought," according to de la Torre. T h e religion d e p a r t m e n t ' s aim in bringing speakers to c a m p u s is to open students' eyes to the diversity of this world and to help th e m see b e y o n d the protected atmosphere of this small campus. Espinosa will address Hope students and the Holland c o m m u n i t y at 1:30 p.m. in M a a s Auditorium on Monday. There will be o n e other Searching the Sacred lecture this semester, given by David C u n n i n g h a m , a n e w m e m b e r of the Hope religion department faculty, about his book, "Reading is Believing: T h e Christian Faith through Literature and Film."

Art in the Pine Grove

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ROB ONDRA

Monday in the Pine Grove featured various cardboard sculptures. Students were required to do these self-portraits as part of their Basic Sculpture class.

NATIONAL from 1 b e c a m e clear that the Phi Sigs were a special g r o u p last winter as m a n y of those active in the c o m m u n i t y can r e m e m b e r their numerous f r e e hot chocolate days on the DeWitt Patio as well as their short black and red school bus. Viel says it was all part of the plan. " W h e n you are a colony you are affiliated with Phi S i g m a K a p p a but not 100%. You are a learning group and have many tasks that the group needs to complete. These are c o m munity service, brotherhood events, scholarship a c h i e v e m e n t s , and creating a local constitution and by-laws along with m a n y other tasks. W h e n completing this process we needed to create a petition sheet stating why and what we w e r e about. T h i s petition was about 150 pages in length and involved the tasks and h o w we completed each one." T h e administration has taken the Phi Sigs seriously as well, granting them permission to use the Centennial Cottage as their onc a m p u s house for this year. One cloud hanging over the Phi Sigs has been the w a y they

have been received by the rest of the Greek community. Last y e a r ' s rush saw many fraternities on c a m p u s , local groups with limited resources, get fewer n e w m e m b e r s while the Phi .Sigs d r e w well over 25 m e m b e r s . M a n y locals lashed out at the administration, claiming the Phi Sigs had an advantage due to the fact that their n e w m e m b e r s did not need to go through N e w M e m b e r Education nor did they need to pay dues. Due to this dissension, the Phi Sigs w e r e not granted m e m b e r s h i p in the local fraternity council, the Interfratemity Council (IFC), and no time table has been set on when they will discuss the issue of Phi S i g m a K a p p a further. While the Phi Sigs did have some advantages, this y e a r ' s national group will have a N M E and d u e s m u c h like local groups currently have. ' T h e dues w e have are what we h a v e created them to be. We h a v e insurance through nationals but other than that w e create a budget and d u e s are based on that. T h e national office does not f u n d us at all but through na-

tionals w e have scholarships that undergrads can apply f o r and receive money for school." A s for the other Greeks, Viel chose to be positive. "We are trying to m a k e a positive impact on everyone on campus. We want to be k n o w n on c a m p u s and not exclude ourselves f r o m anyone. We want to be sociable to everyone and m a k e others realize that w e are a great group of guys on campus. With the other Greeks on c a m p u s w e hope that things get better, which they have and w e h o p e to plan c a m p u s - w i d e events with them. With these events, w e plan on promoting the Greek scene at H o p e . " Phi Sigma Kappa will no doubt add Hope College to their history. "Phi Sigma Kappa w a s f o u n d e d in 1873 at Massachusetts Agricultural College, n o w k n o w n as U M A S S . F r o m there is has spread to over 100 colleges across the country and even in Canada. In August 1985, Phi Sigma Kappa merged with Phi Sigma Epsilon to be the largest merger in the fraternity world," said Viel. Viel went on to add that m a n y f a m o u s

people have called Phi S i g m a Kappas their brothers. " S o m e F a m o u s Phi Sigs are Dan Patrick f r o m E S P N , Dick E n b u r g (sports announcer always seen on March Madness), Don Knotts (actor), Frank Gifford (sportscaster), Robert M o n d a v i (owner of M o n d a v i Winery), L o u Bondreau (Baseball Hall of F a m e m e m b e r ) , and Jack Welsh ( C E O of General Electric)." T h e Phi Sigs will hold their first formal rush and N M E this winter. W h a t will it take to be a part of H o p e ' s first National? "We are looking f o r m e m b e r s that want to share the same ideals as u s , " said Viel. "We are a bunch of g u y s that focus on business and a c c o m p l i s h i n g these tasks, but at the same time w e have a great time in accomplishing this. W h e t h e r it's going to National Conventions in Savannah, going f r o m house to house collecting pop cans for Dance Marathon, or having weekly brotherhood events at the cottage, w e are a bunch of g u y s that like hanging out and having f u n . W h e n it comes to business, w e get it d o n e . "


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A f t e r r e a d i n g t h i s w e e k ' s l e t t e r s to t h e E d i t o r , 1 h a v e of t h o u g h t s that o c c u r r e d to m e a f t e r w a r d s . F i r s t , J o h a n n a S w a n s o n , in r e s p o n s e t o A n d r e w K l e c z e k ' s l e t t e r ( A n c h o r 9 / 2 4 ) s t a t e s , " C a t h o l i c i s m is n o different than Christianity." W h i l e I understand where she h a s m a d e t h i s c o n n e c t i o n t o K l e c z e k ' s letter, I a m a f r a i d that she misunderstood what he meant by saying that p e o p l e of other religions and C a t h o l i c s w o u l d not be a f r a i d t o t e a c h at H o p e if t h e e n v i r o n m e n t w e r e m o r e understanding. In the past. Catholics h a v e not b e e n treated in the s a m e f a s h i o n as Christians f r o m o t h e r denominations, especially those f r o m the reformed tradition. Also, Kleczek does not m o c k the idea of C r e a t i o n i s m . H e i n s t e a d is u p s e t t h a t , at o n e p o i n t , p e o p l e at H o p e d i d n o t w a n t e v o l u t i o n t a u g h t a s a s c i e n t i f i c

K l e c z e k does not expect H o p e to be perfect; h e only wishes that the college could collectively m o v e closer to the ideals of a " p e r f e c t " liberal arts college. Second, Jen T r o k e ' s claims that last w e e k ' s article o n p r e m a r i t a l s e x at H o p e e n d e d o n a b i a s e d n o t e , w h i l e n o t completely unfounded, do not ring true with me. The

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I disagree with Andrew Kleczek w h o may have had a bad experience here. M a y b e getting out and meeting the broad range of people on this c a m p u s would h a v e helped improve his perception of our religious m a k e u p . We do have other religions here. Catholicism is no different than Christianity; I for one happen to be Catholic, I love Hope, and I k n o w others here w h o are Catholic. If f r i e n d s expel a person f r o m

their ''social-religious circle" just because that person belongs to a specific group, what sort of friends are they? T h e point of being a liberal arts college is that there are many choices, and people are free to do what they please. Besides, H o p e s t u d e n t s are a d u l t s ; being your o w n person should not be so hard a n y m o r e . I think the writer needs to e x a m ine his prejudices; Hope is in fact a Christian school, h e n c e the enorm o u s population of Christians. If that isn't comfortable f o r him, w h y

did he c o m e here? He mocks the thought of creationism, yet I wonder — has he ever really listened to it? Just as we m a y learn f r o m other ideas, so too, he m a y learn f r o m us. Hope, like anyplace else, never promises to be perfect. Neither do any of the p e o p l e that attend or teach here — so w h y does he expect it to be that w a y ?

—Johanna Swanson (*06)

Anchor article supports opinion, not fact To the Editor:

t h e o r y b e c a u s e t h e y b e l i e v e d t h a t it c o n f l i c t e d w i t h Christian ideals involving the creation of the world.

v.'

Hope doesn't claim to be perfect, don't expect it to be To the Editor:

decided to use m y space this w e e k to respond to a c o u p l e

3

Having worked for the A n c h o r f o r the past two or three years, I know the emphasis placed on journalistic integrity. T h a t ' s w h y the last p a r a g r a p h of the Infocus article (Anchor 9/24) was a bit surprising to me. T h e paragraph states, ' T h e important lesson to be learned f r o m examining our sexuality at H o p e is this: T h o s e w h o have taken v o w s of abstinence should find

this to be a place where they can stay committed to this and be supported, and those w h o choose to h a v e sex should be educated and encouraged to do it safely." I d o n ' t want to pick out this reporter specifically, as I am aware that it's difficult to stick to journalism when writing a story. However, since this "lesson" is not an objective truth but an opinion (and a rather controversial one), I don't think it belongs in an Anchor article.

—Jen Troke ('04)

p u r p o s e of this series, as stated b o t h in the E d i t o r ' s Voice c o l u m n and the I n f o c u s story in the 9/17 edition of the

Letters to the Editor Guidelines

Anchor, w a s to foster dialogue and a healthy atmosphere to discuss the sexuality of H o p e students. T h e last

O p e n t o a n y o n e w i t h i n t h e college a n d r e l a t e d c o m m u n i t i e s

paragraph of the article e n c o u r a g e d safe-sex education for

T h e A n c h o r r e s e r v e s t h e right t o e d i t d u e to s p a c e c o n s t r a i n t s

students w h o c h o o s e to b e sexually active. Although I

N o p e r s o n a l a t t a c k s , p o o r t a s t e o r a n y t h i n g p o t e n t i a l l y libelous

u n d e r s t a n d t h a t J e n s e e s t h i s a s a c o n t r o v e r s i a l v i e w , it

L e t t e r s c h o s e n o n a f i r s t c o m e first s e r v e b a s i s , o r a r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s a m p l e is t a k e n

w a s written with the intention of fostering this open,

N o a n o n y m o u s letters, unless discussed with Editor-in-Chief

healthy e n v i r o n m e n t in w h i c h to share o u r f e e l i n g s w i t h each other.

E d i t o r - i n - C h i e f m a y v e r i f y i d e n t i t y of w r i t e r T h e A n c h o r r e s e r v e s t h e r i g h t t o r e f u s e p u b l i c a t i o n of a n y l e t t e r s u b m i t t e d

Thank you Johanna and Jen for sharing your thoughts w i t h t h e A n c h o r a n d t h e rest o f t h e c o m m u n i t y . K e e p t h e l e t t e r s c o m i n g ; t h i s k i n d o f d i a l o g u e is w h a t t h e A n c h o r m e a n s to develop on campus.

Anchor Staff

Anchor Staff

Anchor Staff

Staff

Anchor Staff

editor-in-chief managing editor arts editor sports editors copy editors

photo editor business manager distribution manager advisor

Nick Denis Anjey Dykhuis Maureen Yonovitz Brad Vanderberg Steve Adair Nicole Lantz Mackenzie Smith Kirsten Winek Rob Ondra Danielle Koski Keirsten E. Schwanbeck Mark A. Lewison

L e t t e r s o v e r 5 0 0 w o r d s in l e n g t h will n o t b e c o n s i d e r e d f o r p u b l i c a t i o n

Mail letters to the Anchor c/o Hope College, drop them off at the Anchor office (located in the center of Dewitt, behind WTHS), or e-mail A n c h o r @ h o p e . e d u

Watch this space! In 2001, Student Congress used $ 5 0 0 of the student activity fee to buy this scrolling marquee sign in the lobby of the DeWitt Center. Although active in 2001, the sign has yet to display anything since. A s a service to you, the Anchor will keep track of h o w m a n y w e e k s it has been blank since installed.

This week's count: 105

Breakfast at Night! 0 10:00p.m.-11:30p.nn. []

Staff Reporters: Jennifer Cencer, Erin L Hotta. Erin Sanborn, Allison Schneider, A.J. Smith, Jordan Wolfson, Joe Turbessi, Katrina Baker, Andy Borozan Senior Staff Reporter: Katie Taylor

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Photo Assistant: Anneke Meeter

T u e s d a y

Columnist: Meridith De A viia

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The Anchor is o product of sluJcnl effort and is funded through the students of Hope College, funding which comes through the Hope College Student Congress Appropriations Committee. Letters to the editor are encouraged, though due to space limitations the Anchor resen es the right to edit. The opinions addressed in the editorial are solely those of the editor-in-chief Stories from the Hope College News Service are a product of the Public Relations Office. Oneyear subscriptions to the Anchor are available for $20. We reserve the right to accept or reject any advertising.

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Picture it: you re researching online when you click on a related of a half-dressed model pops u pornographic w e b site. It's noi window, and most students pre t e m p t a t i o n of p o r n is e v e r y w increasing amount of it easily acc young people n o w have a greaU

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& 6 " P o m lies in the extreme of the same spectrum as sexy pictures." - U t s a b Khadka ('06)

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"Pornography is where the person is nude, whilft a sexual picture is l i k e ÂŁ f c o m e hither, I ' m cute.' - E m i l y Liang ('05)


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O c t o b i r 2003 Even ymar wins!

Anjey Dykhuls MANAGING E D n o f l

that they had the Pull in the bag after the first half hour. At 3:45 p.m., Kevin Neckers ('74), a former puller and Pull coach, decided that the rope w o u l d go to even year. "Pull today is decided in the first thirty minutes, and I think t h e y ' v e got it in the bag," Neckers said. E v e n so, s o m e pullers had their d o u b t s before they heard the final call. "I w a s n ' t sure until the end (if we had won or not). It w a s a really good battle. I felt good through the whole thing, but they were pulling hard, too," said Pat Meers ('06), the

F r o m parents and friends to distant relatives and strangers, the class of 2 0 0 6 found itself surrounded by support f r o m the moment it arrived at the Black River Saturday. Some participants had family drive f r o m u p to six hours a w a y to watch them at the rope. It was a grand day f o r even year. Sporting pit names like "General A n i m o s ity," "Killer Rabbit," and "Kaiser Soze," the sophomores c a m e to the Pull with good hupuller f r o m Pit 16. mor, good preparation, and high hopes. W h e n all was said and done, Donnie Hart " ' 0 6 really c a m e out and performed to the ('04), a coach, gave the final speech. " O v e r peak of their abilities," said Barry Teshima the past three weeks, w e ' v e learned about ( ' 0 4 ) , an even y e a r c o a c h . " T h e y really p r i d e , b r o u g h t it t o d a y about takand I ' m proud of ing p r i d e them. Everything in ourwe taught them, selves and they did. E v e r y in the thing we asked t e a m ," them, they did, no Hart said. questions asked." " I ' m honAfter three est when I h o u r s of grueling say, I ' v e e f f o r t , the results never were announced b e e n a n d the C l a s s of Wm prouder to 2006 k n e w for a wear red fact they had w o n and to the intense tug-ofEven year's m o t t o was " W e d o n ' t mess w e a r t h is war by 12 feet and a r o u n d , " and the team t o o k it t o heart t o ' 0 6 . G e t 8 inches. take h o m e the rope Saturday afternoon. ready, w e "I can't even dew o n this." scribe (the m o m e n t they a n n o u n c e d w e ' d The team spirit w a s strong in every parw o n ) - it was unreal. Seriously, there aren't ticipant, f r o m the coaches to the pullers to words," said Rachel Cochrane ('06), moraller the morallers. T h e Pull has long been confor Pit Eight. sidered a relationship building event, not just T h e elation of this 2006 victory w a s even a rivalry between freshmen and sophomores, greater because of their loss last year to the and this year w a s no exception. Class of 2005, but some onlookers thought

m

A Z / C H O n P H O T O S BY R O B O N D R A AND ANJEY D Y K H U I S

From b e h i n d Dave Sedjo ('06), even year's anchor, o n l o o k e r s c o u l d see up t o the banner d i s p l a y e d at the front of the line. " F r o m they beginning of the Pull when they were twenty individuals (to now).. .they c a m e together as a definitely o n e team today. It w a s a w e s o m e , " s a i d R a c h e l Peckenpaugh ('04), even year coach. Hart was also impressed by the team effort put forth b y the Class of ' 0 6 . "They really c a m e together. It w a s absolutely amazing to watch d o w n the line, to see th e m as one machine working together," he said. E a c h coach w a s willing to c o m m e n t on h o w well the pullers and moralers had performed, c o m e together, and trained as a team. ' T h e y worked hard f o r three weeks and they really pulled it together for today," said Mike Ross ('04), another even year coach. "They came with an intensity and I ' m really proud of what they w e r e able to put together today. T h e y started off rocky (on t e a m w o r k ) at the b e g i n n i n g of practice but they really brought it together over the past three w e e k s and today they just fired the cannon together on everything." As f o r the win, everyone on the south side of the river w a s elated. Nothing could be heard but cheers and excitement for long moments after even y e a r ' s victory w a s announced. Although many sophomores admitted to feeling confident of the win during the Pull, others w e r e not certain until the final verdict c a m e

I've never been prouder to wear red and to wear this '06. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Donny Hart ('04), even year coach ('06), Pit 2 puller, had their doubts until the end. "I saw that orange mark sliding back but I honestly didn't k n o w ( w e ' d won) until he said it," Deboest said. His t e a m m a t e C a s e y Preuniger ('06), Pit 10 puller, didn't agree. "I was crying, and my body went numb. I K N E W we were going to win. To rip rope like w e did that first half hour.. .we won in the first half hour."

in. "I didn't really think about (winning), I just Zach Z i m b l e m a n ('04), thought about pulling signals t o his team. the whole time and you just h a v e to f o c u s on keeping intense the whole time," said Nick DeKoster ('06), Pit

Pullers J o n Rink ('06) and Mike DeYoung ('06) share a m o m e n t of v i c t o r y after the results of this year's Pull were announced.

1 puller. DeKoster may not have even thought about the win and some may have seen victory in the near future, but others, like Jesse Deboest

T h u m o s , " gives


2

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O c t o b e r 1, 2003

Puller J o n Rink ('06) pulls with all his might as moraler Rebecca Rooy ('06) cheers h i m on.

A n c h o r David Betke ('07) jfaii w a t c h e s f o r the next call.

Even year alumni, j o i n e d by c o a c h Zach Z i m b e l m a n ( 05) celebrate even year's victory.

Matt S i m o n ('07) heaves as his moraler Sam Pedigo ( f

J o s h Vandop ('05), gives a heave call to the o d d year team.


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Anchor David Sedjo ('06) feels the burn as odd year heaves on the rope.

awaits the lock-m call. Ryan Specht ('07) performs a "17 up," allowing the anchor to pull in more rope.

The '06 Pull team reels in the rope at the end of Saturday s three hour t u g of war.

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Matt Simon ('07) and Sam Pedigo ('07) collapse after three hours of extreme physical and mental exertion.


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O c t o b e r 1, 2 0 0 3

Freshmen struggle mightily at 106th Pull A.J. Smith QTAPF RePORtcn For three grueling hours last Saturday, the f r e s h m a n team pulled and strained at the rope, eliciting constant cheers and encouragement f r o m the gathered crowd. Starting at 3 p.m.. the Pull team for the class of 2007 pulled the rope in f r o m the Black River and settled into their pits. For the next three hours, they heaved in unison to bring more rope to their side of the river, strained to keep rope f r o m being taken back f r o m them, and g a v e everything they had. At the end. however, everyone felt the disappointment w h e n they learned that the sophomore team had gained twelve feet, eight inches more of rope then they had.

WL Odd year coach Ben Sanders ('04) shows frustration at this year's loss.

E m o t i o n s w e r e high as the team watched the rope being pulled in by the class of 2006. Pullers and moralers stood h u g g i n g after what everyone has described as a very good effort. "They c a m e out and gave every drop of everything they had," said coach Ben Sanders, 44and w e as c o a c h e s are so proud of them." Observers were disappointed as well, having gone f r o m the highs of seeing the team pull rope in to the l o w s of finding that the s o p h o m o r e s had w o n . W h i l e e v e r y o n e agreed the o u t c o m e w a s unfavorable, they also said that they would all be back the next year, ready to take on the next class. Even so, the odd year Pull team held nothing against the even year team. "They had the heart, they wanted it," said Matt Baer ('04),

Coach Josh Vandop ('05) watches his pull team try to gain rope.

odd year coach. " O d d y e a r did an a m a z i n g j o b , " c o m mented Mike Ross ('04), an even year coach. " T h e y had a great coaching staff w h o did a great j o b putting together that team. T h e y s h o u l d take a lot of p r i d e in w h a t they achieved, as well. T h e team stood on the bank of the Black River watching the celebrating sophomores. Slowly, the crowd dispersed and the team started to leave. Despite the loss this year, the '07 Pull team ' agree that, all in all, the Pull and the three weeks of intense training leading u p to it were very rewarding and an experience that will not be forgotten, and they will be back next year to take on the Class of 2008. "Next year we'll be b a c k . . . and ready," said Matt S i m o n (*07), odd year puller.

Next year we'll be back ~ and ready. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Matt Simon ('07)

Puller Dustin Ruch ( 07) locks in on the rope.

They had the heart; they wanted it. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Matt Baer ('05)

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'07's pull team heaves to win rope from even year. A K C H O n P H O T O S BY A J S M I T H A N D NICK D E N I S


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i essay assignment !b site and the image inviting you to her fficult to close the bly would, but the re. And w i t h the ible on the Internet, rhance than ever to porn. For this )n, it w o u l d be iwhile to take a look

at pornography and h o w it affects the lives of students at Hope and elsewhere. First, it would be helpful to define pornography, which isn't easy given such a broad subject that can be cast in both positive and negative light. U.S. S u p r e m e Court Justice Potter Stewart famously said that he could not d e f i n e it, but added, "1 k n o w pornography when I see it." A s it appears in the Webster Dictionary, porn means writings, pictures, etc. intended primarily to a r o u s e sexual desire. In 1986, the government created another definition: any depiction of sex to which the person using the word * objects. Though it may be hard to agree on an exact definition, there's no arguing that by college, most students have been e x p o s e d to, o r at least are f a m i l i a r with p o r n o g r a p h y . According to a 2 0 0 0 survey done with 857 s t u d e n t s f r o m f i v e r e l i g i o u s l y affiliated colleges ( w w w . n a t i o n a l c o a l i t i o n . o r g ) , the average age for Christian college students to first have contact with p o m is 13. According to the survey's w e b site, " W h e n these students first viewed pornography, w h e t h e r by accident or intentionally, 4 2 percent felt inclined to view it again.... 41 percent admitted to intentionally visiting a sexually explicit web site. T h e survey revealed an even higher amount, 68 percent, among male students." Of c o u r s e , w e d o n ' t k n o w if this

reflects Hope students with any accuracy at all. Carl Heideman, Director of C o m p u t i n g at C1T, claimed, "In respect for our students, faculty, and staff, w e do not track any use patterns." However, many schools today are stepping in when it c o m e s to their students' access to Internet p o m . Seattle Pacific University, f o r example, is another Christian school that found that p o m sites accounted for 6.75 percent of ali sites visited by c a m p u s computers during a three-week period. Shocked and alarmed by these findings, the school installed a program to b l o c k all c a m p u s c o m p u t e r s , f r o m t h e s e s i t e s . A s published on www.nationalcbaliti6n.org, S P U ' s blocking policy read, "We a f f u r n that sexualil>' is a gift f r o m God that helps d e f i n e us as h u m a n beiiigs. We h o p e t h a t if y o u s t r u g g l e w i t h t h e p r o b l e m of p o m o g r a p h i c w e b sites, you will r e m e m b e r that the blocking message you m a y get is not o n e of j u d g m e n t and c e n s o r s h i p , but a r e m i n d e r that you have a c o m m u n i t y of people w h o value y o u . w h o think you are worth more than that w e b site suggests, and w h o need you." Indeed, p o m o g r a p h y can b e c o m e a serious problem f o r m a n y people. Kristen Gray, H o p e ' s Director of Counseling, claims that she d o e s n ' t see m u c h of this at Hope. However, in the past she has seen a f e w student nil< viewing cases of p o m addiction. "It can start with mild and progress to m o r e and more graphic," she explained. But w h y is porh addicting? And what are the signs that it has b e c o m e a serious p r o b l e m ? According to Gray, " S o m e o n e has a p r o b l e m w h e n the f a n t a s y of porn b e c o m e s m o r e attractive than reality." Porn, w h e n v i e w e d in the privacy of o n e ' s b e d r o o m or c o m p u t e r screen,' can p r o v i d e w h a t f e e l s l i k e an escape. "People m a y l i k e it b e c a u s e t h e experience provides an end-result (sexual s t i m u l a t i o n ) t h a t is favorable," Gray said. G r a y also p o i n t e d o u t that i t ' s e a s y to • wL A -

assume that porn addicts are males, and that isn't always true. However, our culture probably has that gender bias because most p o m o g r a p h i c images are of f e m a l e s and are targeted at males. This is the reason that many feminists and others are against p o r n . T h e y would argue that it is the picture of violent sexual behavior against wo me n , portraying them in an abusive and degrading way. There is also strong e v i d e n c e out there that v i e w i n g it f o r an extended period of time can lead to violent acts such as rape. For this reason, many people believe p o m should be illegal. However, others would argue that such a law would violate freedom of expression and that sexually explicit imagery is really art of the h u m a n body. Such a claim. Gray feels, "is a sad c o m m e n t on our culture." In her opinion, p o m — not a r t — e n c o u r a g e s p e o p l e to act in a sexually inappropriate manner. So h o w do Hope s t u d e n t s feel a b o u t it? S o p h o m o r e s Andrew Abela, Austin Mitchell, and Oliver O ' B r i e n have all viewed porn online and in magazines. However, they each insist that they don't look at it with the purpose of b e c o m i n g sexually aroused. "It's kind of f u n n y — j u s t entertainment," they agreed. Abela, Mitchell, and O ' B r i e n said that in their experience, p o m at H o p e is a lot milder than in a m a l e d o r m of a b i g u n i v e r s i t y . Obviously, as long as p o m o g r a p h y exists, there is going to be a lot of controversy revolving it, and young people are at the center as major consumers or possibly future advocates against it. It's important to examine h o w our culture is defining sexuality and at Hope. start here can that

(Porn) is kind of funny — just entertainment. —Andrew Abela ('06), Austin Mitchell ('06), Oliver O'Brien ('06)

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pomograpny. --Jeff W h e e l e r ( ' 0 4 )

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sexual arousal pornography." - R i c h Van Voorst ( ' 0 4 )

"In an art photo, the f o c u s in on the m e a n s to get that photograph, but in p o m , the only object is to see the stuff on the w o m a n . " - G l e n n Lester ( ' 0 5 )


ARTS

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O c t o b e r 1, 2003

Hope Symphony performs 8 p.m. Friday Jordan Wolfson Staff Rhporthr

Music is an aspect of our lives that defines us, makes us w h o w e are and helps create something truly magical. Well, it is time to experience that magic once again because at 8 p.m. Friday the H o p e College Orchestra will perform in Dimnent Chapel. The Orchestra itself is composed of 25 students playing w o o d w i n d s , brass, and percussion; the other 50 m e m b e r s e m p l o y a m u l t i t u d e of string instruments. T h e Orchestra will bring s o m e very f a m o u s pieces to the table f o r all to enjoy. Most if not all of the pieces that the Orchestra will play are of a m o r e upbeat nature, so those w h o are fond of rousing p e r f o r m a n c e s will surely get their fill at the concert. T h e

concert will begin with "Variations on A m e r i c a " by Charles Ives, followed by "The M o l d a u " by Bedrich Smetana, continuing with " P o p s H o e d o w n " by Richard Hayman and ending with " B o l e r o " by Maurice Ravel. "I think everyone should c o m e see this p e r f o r m a n c e because w e h a v e rehearsed very hard for this concert and the music is the coolest 1 have ever played in an ensemble," said Steve Horeni ( ' 0 7 ) , w h o plays piano for the Orchestra. Horeni also p l a y s the c e l e s t a , an i n s t r u m e n t chosen especially f o r " B o l e r o . " " I l o v e t h i s s o n g so m u c h , " Horeni said. " H e starts with a theme and repeats and then adds a c o u n t e r t h e m e a n d k e e p s interchanging it until all the instruments build to a climactic ending."

A M C H O f ? P H O T O BY R O B O N D R A

Grant Gould ('04) keeps the beat for the Orchestra while In rehearsal for Friday's 8 p.m. concert. All are w e l c o m e and encouraged to attend this event. " T h e s t u d e n t s , not o n l y m u s i c m a j o r s but c a m p u s - w i d e should try to s u p p o r t their f e l l o w s t u d e n t s a n d . . .expand their cultural insights

into the world of classical mu s ic , " said Richard Piippo, orchestra director. " T h e program I think is an exciting collage of familiar c o m p o sitions, with m a n y different m o o d s and colors highlighted. I w e l c o m e

all students, faculty, and c o m m u nity to enjoy an evening with the Hope College S y m p h o n y Orchestra." The general public is invited, and admission is free.

Concert features two guest artists W i n d S y m p h o n y opens season with Dimnent performance Joe Turbessi STAFF REPORTER

A/VCHOff

PHOTO COURTESY STEVEN WARD

Dr. Wesley Broadnax of MSU c o n d u c t s the w i n d s y m p h o n y Tuesday.

T h e Hope College Wind S y m p h o n y presents its season-opening concert at 8 p.m. on Tuesday in Dimnent Chapel. It will feature guest c o n d u c t o r Dr. Wesley B r o a d n a x of Michigan State University. T h e public is invited and admission is free. Broadnax will conduct Richard W a g n e r ' s "Trauersinfonie" (Funeral Music). In addition, Dan Mattson, Grand Rapids Symphony trombonist and Hope t r o m b o n e instructor, will perform Joseph Turrin's "Illuminations" for trombon e and wind symphony. Wagner composed "Trauersinfonie" for the return of W e b e r ' s remains to his native Ger-

m a n y f r o m England. Weber was a I9 ,h century G e r m a n composer w h o is considered by m a n y to be the founder of German R o m a n tic opera, and he was a very important part of the German musical heritage. It w a s an important moment f o r Wagner (and indeed the musical establishment of G e r m a n y as a whole) w h e n W e b e r ' s remains returned. T h i s is a piece that has great p e r s o n a l meaning to Broadnax, according to Steven Ward, Wind Symphony conductor. Broadnax is assistant director of b a n d s at Michigan State University and also plays bass trombone in several area orchestras. " H e is a terrific conductor and is really m a k i n g a n a m e for himself in the wind symphony world." Ward said. The second piece, Turrin's "Illuminations," was c o m m i s s i o n e d by Hope College in conjunction with several other colleges and will feature Mattson on the trombone solo. W i n d

(Mattson) is an incredible trombone player. -Aaron Hawn ('06) symphony trombonist Aaron Hawn ('06) expressed enthusiasm about Mattson. "He is an incredible trombone player... his solo will be a w e s o m e , " H a w n said. In addition, the wind symphony will perf o r m "Vesuvius" by Frank Ticheli, "Suite in E flat" by Gustav Hoist, and " D a n z a Final" by Alberto Ginastera. All three are works f r o m the twentieth century. Hawn looks forward to the concert. "All of these pieces have pushed me in s o m e w a y to improve my playing, and that's really helped to motivate me," Hawn said. " I ' m really excited about getting to perform this music."

Dance day leads to choreography award Jenny Cancer S T A F F REPORTER

Hope College will co-host the 2 0 0 3 Michigan Dance Council D a n c e D a y on Saturday. All master classes and a concluding showcase concert will be held at the Knickerbocker Theatre, Proceedings f o r this event will include Master Classes in genres such as ballei. M o d e m , rhythm/ lap, jaz'z and swing, T h e showcase concert will begin ai 3 : 3 0 p.m. and will highlight a competition f o r the coveted, statewide Maggie Allesee C h o r e o g raphy Award. Nominated choreographers w h o will be competing f o r the award include associates from Hope's dance department. D a w n M a r i e M c l l h a r g e y of InSync Dance T h e a t r e will be participating in the competition as well as the Aerial Dance T h e atre; both will be performing as featured guests. Linda G r a h a m . Aerial D a n c e Theatre's current

co-artistic director, w a s h o n o r e d with the M a g g i e Allesee C h o r e o g raphy Award in the past. Additionally. D e b r a Kirkland of M.L. K i n g D a n c e W o r k s h o p has been invited to p e r f o r m as a guest artist as well. Choreographers across Michigan whose pieces are nominated for the a w a r d are: A n n e B a k M a r i n e of Eisenhower Center f o r the D a n c e Ensemble; Jordeen Ivanov-Ericson of the Institute of Music and D a n c e a t Mary grove; Sandra Federico, a H o p e g r a d u a t e , w h o is w i t h Pinckney Community High School; Erin Malley; K a y Rediers with Detroit Dance Collective; Kelly Gottesman with the Maggie A l l e s e e D e p a r t m e n t of D a n c e at W a y n e State University; and M a r y C. Geiger with the Michigan Classic Ballet Company. InSync Dance Theatre will present a segment of a piece that w a s an international finalist at the Jazz World Congress in August entitled "Slate of D y s f u n c t i o n . " T h i s

work portrays various pressured m e m b e r s of society and will b e performed by Hope students Lindsay Brown COS). D a w n Flandermeyer COS), Sarah Gardner ("05), M a r i S t u p p y ('05), and J e s s i c a Yokas ('05). Katherine Budris ( 0 4 ) is the dance captain for the piece. Aerial Dance Theater will perform Steven lannacone's, the c o m p a n y ' s co-anistic director, dev e l o p e d w o r k entitled " B o l e r o . " D a n c e r s for this piece will be Melissa Altobelli (407), C y n t h i a Bachuber ( l 04), Kathleen D a v e n -

i

A/VOMOR P H O T O C O U R T E S Y AERIAL D A N C E THEATER

"Bolero," performed by Aerial Dance Theater, w i l l be a m o n g the events taking place o n Michigan Dance Council Dance Day. port C03), M a t t h e w Farmer (*04). Colette Harris ( l 0 4 ) , Tim Heck ('04), Jeffrey Kurtze ('05), Dan Kwiatowski ('04), Jessica M u m f o r d ('05), Lisa Sachs (*07), A m y Vertalka ('07), and Kara Wilson ('04), Hope Dance faculty teaching

master clases include Graham, Tannacone, and Rosanne BartonDeVries, co-director of InSync. Erin Rupert ( ' 0 4 ) will also be a master class instructor. Tickets are $7for adults, 55 for students and senior citizens, and will be available at the door.


SPORTS

O c t o b e r 1. 2003

A n c h o r /

7

Flying Dutchmen do not survive the storm Dutchmen overtaken by thunderous Wheaton offense

fourth quarter. But a tenacious def e n s e and a smashmouth-run game w a s too much for the D u t c h m e n as they ultimately fell to Wheaton 43-

Steve Adair

26.

S t o r t s EO»to*

O n e bright spot of the day w a s another great performance by quart e r b a c k Phil B u t l e r ( ' 0 4 ) , w h o threw the ball well in his 26-42 one touchdown, t w o interception day. Even Butler's day was negated by the d e f e n s e , w h o c o n t i n u a l l y brought pressure and sacked But-

W h e n Hope fans looked at the schedule before the season began, one g a m e looked nearly impossible to win. That g a m e w a s played at Wheaton on Saturday where Hope put up a valiant effort and hung with nationally ranked Wheaton until the

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Dutchmen try to run t h r o u g h a storm of Thunder, but came up empty handed in a tough ground battle.

and drives lost on downs. ler five times for a total Kreps new and improved of 4 2 yards. That comdefense was showing a bined with Dan glimmer of what it hopes Bloemers ( ' 0 4 ) inabilto become. "If the defense ity to run the ball (24 continues to s h o w the imcarries, 4 4 y a r d s , 1.8 provement we have seen yards a carry), led to an so far, we will be fine." inconsistent H o p e ofIn the e n d , h o w e v e r , fense that w a s only able Wheaton's running attack, to make a f e w big plays which piled up 2 1 2 yards, and never looked very w o u l d be t o o m u c h as comfortable. H o p e ' s d e f e nse finally D e s p i t e the d i s m a l broke in the fourth, leadnumbers, Hope looked A/VCHOFt rHOTOS C O U R T E S Y O F MIKE H U D S O N ing to 21 f o u r t h q u a r t e r good early. On H o p e ' s The Wheaton Thunder resounded points. While Coach second drive, after ret h r o u g h Hope's defensive line. Kreps did not like the covering a Wheaton score of the game, he did think his not go away without a fight. Coach f u m b l e on the W h e a t o n 3 0 yard players had something to take away Kreps c o m m e n t e d , "Wheaton is a line, Dan Bloemers scampered into f r o m it. "We played very well at very good team, but we had our opthe end zone f r o m five yards out to t i m e s , a n d not so well at o t h e r portunities to win the g a m e . " Degive the D u t c h m e n an early 7 - 0 times. T h e y made some mistakes s p i t e t h e 1 4 1 3 l e a d , W h e a t o n lead. Wheaton quickly answered too. We capitalized on s o m e of would s h o w Hope no respect and back with their r u s h i n g o f f e n s e , continued to run the ball, scoring them, but not e n o u g h . " running for one touchdown and Next week Hope will come home t w o more times before the half and p a s s i n g f o r a n o t h e r in r o u t e to claiming a 22-14 lead at halftime. to play their first conference game claiming a 13-7 lead after the first of year against last y e a r ' s M I A A T h e t w o teams c a m e out on the quarter. champion Alma. The game will be field in the second half geared u p The D u t c h m e n would stick at Holland Municipal Stadium on for more big scoring drives, but it around in the second and w o u l d Saturday at 1:00 p.m. would be the d e f e n s e that w o u l d again call Bloemers' n u m b e r to get into the end zone. T h e score sent a message to the Wheaton crowd that H o p e , the other o r a n g e and blue team on the field that day, would

shut things d o w n in the third quarter. Neither team would score again until the fourth as drives were continually broken up by interceptions

A l m a will be another challenge to the Flying Dutchmen The 2 0 0 2 Scots went 9-2, c h a m p i o n s of the MIAA.

Flying Dutchmen look to go further into March Madness Dutchmen return to the court with some familiar talent C t a i s t o p t w r CUirfc Last year the Hope College m e n ' s basketball team was nationally ranked the entire season. T h e Flying Dutchmen made it their 24th c o n s e c u t i v e w i n n i n g season and soared back atop the Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association. A pair of crucial victories on the road in the final week of the regular season gained the Flying Dutchmen a league co-championship with Albion and it w a s a record setting 31 st M I A A crown for the Flying Dutchmen. H o p e then e n t e r e d the M I A A tournament on a hot streak. Playing in a 1,300-person capacity gymnasium at Albion Hope, was able to defeat not only rival Calvin, but also Albion on their h o m e floor to win the M I A A tournament. With the win, the Flying D u t c h m e n advanced to the Division III p l a y o f f s for the 17* time in school history. Hope received a first-round bye in the N C A A tournament and re-

ceived home-court advantage in the second round. However, Hope's N C A A tournament run was brief, as the D u t c h m e n fell to WisconsinOshkosh. T h e Hope m e n ' s basketball team entered last season with a star-studded senior class that had m a n y exp e c t a t i o n s to d o great things_and they did. The D u t c h m e n finished with a 23-5 record and w o n the M I A A tournament enabling them to move on to the N C A A tournament. Howe v e r the f a n s , m e dia, and most importantly, the team m e m b e r s felt t h e i r s e a s o n w a s short-lived. And that is precisely w h e r e this s e a s o n ' s team c o m e s into play. One may think that losing the s e n i o r s f r o m last y e a r ' s squad would have a great impact on this year's, but this will not be the case according to some of the returning players. The Flying Dutchmen return many key players, including three starters. Jeff Carlson ( ' 0 6 ) started all b u t the first t w o g a m e s as a

f r e sh m a n , was the second leading scorer at the guard position. Jeff scored an average of 10.2 points a g a m e a n d shot 5 5 p e r c e n t f r o m three-point range. G r e g I m m i n k , ( ' 0 5 ) r e t u r n s as H o p e ' s starting point guard. He averaged nine points and 3.5 assists a game. T h e

bounds last season. T h e D u t c h m e n a h o return point guard Matt Taylor ('04), w h o averaged four points a g a m e and collected 4 9 assists last season. Kleersnyder is looking forward to being a major contributor to the team this year. "I want my teamm a t e s . t o s e e m e as a leader this year, on and off the court. O u r team is going to be really f u n to w a t c h this year and w e are going to be striving toward another conference c h a m p i o n s h i p , " he said. T h e Dutchmen will be looking to make another title run again this year, and the players agree. "We are going to be gunning f o r another M I A A confere n c e c h a m p i o n s h i p this year and getting passed the second round in the N C A A tournament," said guard Daane Griffeth ( ' 0 5 ) . T h e D u t c h m e n lost their all-conf e r e n c e c e n t e r last y e a r in D o n Overbeek. Losing Overbeek might not be as big of a loss as o n e might think. T h e D u t c h m e n will be looking to push the ball u p the court quickly every time. With speed and

We will be more athletic, more of a run-and-gun team... -Travis Spaman ('05)

D u t c h m e n return starting forward Kyle Kleersnyder ('06), who averaged 7.5 points a g a m e , collected 133 rebounds, and had 21 blocks last season. Hope also returns many key bench players f r o m last year's team w h o will be looking to take over those other two starting positions. Forward Andy Phillips ( ' 0 6 ) averaged 8 points a game and shot 4 5 percent f r o m the field. Travis Spaman ( ' 0 5 ) averaged 4.5 points a g a m e a n d p u l l e d d o w n 57 re-

great shooting, look for the Dutch to score quickly and often. "Our team is going to move at a faster pace and we will be more upbeat," said guard Jack Klunder ( ' 0 5 ) . "Look for this speed to be apparent on the defensive side as well." "We are going to be a lot different. We will be more athletic, more of a run-and-gun team and less of a post-up team," said Spaman. "We have been doing a lot to prepare for the u p c o m i n g season. We are all c o n d i t i o n i n g , w e i g h t l i f t i n g and playing on a regular basis." On the defensive side of the ball, the Dutchmen are going to be looking to use quickness, too. " D e f e n sively we will have a smaller lineup, with no d o m i n a t i n g post presence. Our speed will allow us to press more than usual and to get after the ball at all times. Hopefully this should create a lot of fast break points, and w e should be a lot of f u n to w a t c h this s e a s o n , " J e f f Carlson predicted. H o p e ' s quickness, returning experience, and desire to win should give f a n s the excitement they are looking for when they head out to a game this winter.

Cross country picks up the pace at MIAA Jamboree Cross country turns up the heat at MIAA Jamboree Jgnotfar Cgoctf The Flying Dutchmen cross country team ran for a third place finish at this season's first M I A A League Jamboree. T h e M I A A Jamboree standings showed Calvin College finishing in

first place with 17 points, Albion college c o m i n g in second earning 55 points, Hope racing for 78 p o i n t s , K a l a m a z o o g a i n i n g 100 points. Olivet earning 151 points and A l m a finishing at the end with 153 points. T h e winner of the m e n ' s 8K was Calvin runner Dave H a a g s m a with a time of 25:27. T y s o n W a r n e r ( ' 0 6 ) led the Dutchmen pack with an 11"1 place finish and a time of 26:25. Captain

P e t e r D e r b y ( ' 0 4 ) ran f o r a 12* place finish with the time of 26:31. Kyle Williams ( ' 0 6 ) and Matt Casillas ( ' 0 6 ) claimed 15* and 22 nd place with Williams running in a time of 26:54 and Casillas finishing with 27:18. T h e Flying Dutch runners also competed at the M I A A J a m b o r e e finishing in 2 nd place with 65 points, also behind Calvin, w h o won the event with 25 points. T h e rest of the M I A A J a m b o r e e standings for

the w o m e n read Kalamazoo with 74 points, Albion with 127 points. A l m a at 130 p o i n t s , St. M a r y ' s gaining 145 points and Adrian running for 180 points. T h e fastest time f o r the w o m e n ' s 5K w a s 18:15, ran by Jessie Lair of Calvin. T h e fastest Hope time was 19:14 ran by Tina Pike ('05), w h o a c h i e v e d 8,h p l a c e a n d A l i s o n Mejeur ( ' 0 7 ) in 9 ,h place with a time of 19:17. Leslie Tableman ( ' 0 7 ) came in 15* place with a time of

19:55. Ashley Dean ( ' 0 7 ) ran f o r 16* place with a close time of 19:57 and c o - c a p t a i n M a r t h a G r a h a m ( ' 0 4 ) finished 17* with a time of 19:59. Both the m e n ' s a n d w o m e n ' s cross country teams will be competing this Saturday, October 4th at the L a n s i n g C o m m u n i t y College Invitational. T h e race will begin at noon in Lansing, Michigan as Hope runners will look to improve their times f r o m the M I A A Jamboree.


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Hope soccer rises to the top of MIAA Adrian for good. Klingenberg carry on to W e d n e s d a y ' s game. T h e Dutch held a c o m m a n d i n g 30completed his hat trick with t w o M e a n w h i l e , the Flying D u t c h 1 shots-on-goal advantage. D a w n quick goals in a span of five minm e n claimed sole possession of first G i l l a m (*05) and Erin Dargas ( ' 0 7 ) utes. Midfielder Ed Huebner ( ' 0 4 ) place with a decisive win Saturday each scored twice while Tess joined the offensive flurry with a at A d r i a n College. For the first Scholz ('06), Catie Neidlinger ( ' 0 4 ) perfect feed to an oncoming Dugan, thirty minutes of play. Adrian was and Laurel Albonico ( ' 0 5 ) each had Brad Vanderberg who sent the ball into the top right on life s u p p o r t in the d e f e n s i v e o n e goal apiece. S P O R T S EDITOR hand c o m e r of the area, fighting off With the women cniising through - With the men and w o m e n in acnet. H u e b n e r also w a v e after w a v e of their matches, they still remain t w o record. tion on Saturday afternoon, most was credited on asHope scoring points behind A l m a students had the w ' p sisting on chances. Finally, College in t h e mighty t u g - o f - w a r K l i n g e n b e r g ' s h at Adrian gave way M I A A . T h e Flying on t h e i r m i n d s . trick. when Karter D u t c h will look to W h i l e the p u l l e r s Minutes later, Klingenberg ('06) c o r r e c t t h a t w h e n a t e d i r t all a f t e r K Devin McNeil ('06) c a m e off the bench they take on visiting noon, the Dutch t o o k a f e e d f rom a n d b u r i e d a s h o t A l m a at Buys Field soccer teams made K l i n g e n b e r g and f r o m the top of the this Wednesday, sure they made their buried the ball into penalty box. O c t o b e r 1 at 4 : 0 0 o p p o n e n t s d o the the back of the net. K l i n g e n b e r g then p.m. same. T h e w o m e n G a m e , set a nd assisted Kevney "Tri-State came continued their match. D u g a n ' s ( ' 0 4 ) goal off a great win shutout win streak The Dutchmen making it 2-0. a g a i n s t St. M a r y ' s with a 7 - 0 blasting will look to keep it Adrian recorded and w e k n e w t h a t at T r i - S t a t e , Indigoing in the M I A A their only point near they were going to # 7 Dan Olson a n a , a n d the m e n w h e n they p l a y at the end of the first come out strong challenges for the walloped Adrian 6Tri-State, Indiana half when an Adrian ball aggressively against us." said 1. Both teams are Tuesday afternoon. player lofted a cross D a w n Gillam. leadThe Dutch are off to a f l y i n g start as they look to near the top in the pass through the wind and right to i n g t h e w a y in take over first place of the MIAA Wednesday. M I A A g o i n g into an open Adrian forward w h o put the points for the Dutch next w e e k ' s action. ball away making it 2-1 at the end this season with six goals and five Finding the back of the net f o r For opponents taking on the FlySports Wrap-up of the first half. assists. "It was nice to see our team the Dutch was a different story. T h e ing Dutch, the chances of finding T h e D u t c h m e n c a m e out flying connect the w a y w e did (against o f f e n s i v e onslaught featured seven the back of the net are as good as Football to start the second half, b u r y i n g Tri-State) and hopefully that will goals f r o m five different scorers. Iraq winning the World Cup. Holly

Men's and women's teams victorious in weekend matches

Nestle ( ' 0 7 ) notched her seventh shutout of the season earning the win with help f r o m the b a c k - u p g o a l k e e p e r s w h o also got to see some time later in the g a m e . T h e shutout victory was the Lady D u t c h ' s seventh in eight games this season and giving t h e m a 7 - 0 - 1

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Golfers in full swing as year progresses Golfers turn to experience to lead them through the MIAA Andy Borozan STAFF R E P O R I E N

T h u r s d a y also p r o v e d to be a great day f o r the H o p e golfers as they dominated play at Lake Doster Golf Course in Kalamazoo. Hope again shot a 303, sixteen strokes ahead of Calvin, the nearest c o m petitor. at 319. Justin Spyker. feeling right at h o m e in K a l a m a z o o , shot yet another 77. But it w a s Ryan Shedd ( ' 0 5 ) w h o c a m e a w a y

T h e t w o w i n s put t h e F l y i n g D u t c h m e n right where they want to be; first place. Hope n o w leads the conference by 18 over second place Olivet, and is n o w a w h o p p i n g 31 strokes ahead of third place Calvin. " T h e strength of our team is our depth." says Justin Spyker out of P o r t a g e . M i c h i g a n . T h e t e a m is c o m p o s e d of three juniors, three

M e n ' s golf is. to put it simply, cruising. The m e n ' s golf team climbed its w a y into first place t h i s w e e k by winning at Alma and Kalamazoo. A l m a ' s Pine River Golf C o u r s e w a s no match f o r Justin Spyker ('05) a n d the F l y i n g D u t c h m e n as they collectively shot a 303. ousting c o n f e r e n c e Golfer Ryan S h e d d o v e r l o o k s a s h o t d u r i n g his o u t s t a n d i n g outing. rival O l i v e t by one stroke. Jussophomores, three incoming freshthe medalist shooting a 69. Inditin S p y k e r . the m e d a l i s t f o r the m a n and Jeff Melville ( ' 0 4 ) w h o , vidually. Ryan is currently second match, shot a sizzling two under par Spyker says, leads the team. overall in the conference while Jus(70) and H o p e ' s Ryan O t t o ( ' 0 7 ) "Jeff Melville, our captain, is a tin is right behind him in third. shot a 75.

Intramural sports heat up as the weather cools Brad Vanderberg S w m s EoJfon For the athletes that are not part of any intercollegiate sports or are gearing u p f o r varsity sports f o r the winter or spring, H o p e ' s Intramural sports p r o g r a m o f f e r s all students to participate in a high level of competition. With the first round of IM sports winding down, a n e w set of sports is being offered with meetings held

this past M o n d a y f o r co-ed basketball, w o m e n ' s wallyball, m e n ' s flag football and co-ed tennis. The early 2 0 0 3 fall schedule has the m e n ' s soccer playoffs beginning this week, while the co-ed flag football. Frisbee golf scrambles and w o m e n ' s three-player volleyball all with another w e e k of competition before their playoffs begin. Throughout the IM season, individual and team points are accumulated f r o m each sport to another.

Winning and participation help totals build all year long. Outstanding teams last year f o r the m e n ' s division w e r e the Fighting Irish, and A C E E for the w o m e n ' s division. Outstanding individuals were Peter Buis f o r the m e n and Elizabeth Jury ( ' 0 5 ) for the w o m e n . Students are encouraged to step outside of their c o m f o r t zones and reach for the extracurricular activities H o p e ' s intramural teams have to offer.

great leader and has been shooting very well." T h e n e w f a c e s h a v e also been making some waves, according to Spyker. "Ryan O t t o ( 4 07) has made a great contribution as well." T h e golf team now controls their o w n destiny as they play at Albion on October 4 and at Calvin on O c tober 6. T h e Lady D u t c h m e n had a different fate this past week, however. T h e y lost their conference lead to St. M a r y ' s College at the League J a m b o r e e at L e n a w e e C o u n t r y C l u b in Adrian. Hope (who collectively shot a 352) c o u l d n ' t catch St. Mary's, whose team shot a 340. Hope n o w trails St. M a r y ' s by j u s t 9 s t r o k e s and will l o o k to league leader Lacey Wicksall ('04) to get H o p e back on top. L a c e y ' s i n d i v i d u a l l e a d is b e i n g c h a l lenged, h o w e v e r , by St. M a r y ' s S t e f a n i e S i m m e r m a n w h o trails the top by only 4 strokes.

HOPE C O L L E G E ANCHOR 141 E I2TH ST PO BOX 9000 H O L L A N D MI 49422-9000

H o p e h o s t s 2002 M I A A c h a m p i o n A l m a Saturday. October 4 Men's Soccer T h e D u t c h m e n are 3 - 0 winner*s against f u t u r e M I A A m e m b e r Tri-State University in Angola, Indiana. T h e Dutchm e n are 5-2-2 overall h e a d i n g into S a t u r d a y ' s h o m e contest against Oiivel, Karter Klingenberg ( 4 06) w a s named M I A A o f f e n s i v e m e n ' s player o f the w e e k Volleyball Cornerstone appears t o h a v e H o p e ' s n u m b e r by beating the D u t c h f o r the second time this season. H o p e fell three sets to one M e n ' s Golf R y a n Shedd ( 4 05) tied an M I A A record s h o o t i n g a 6 7 a t Cleait)rook Golf Club

Non-Profi! Organization U.S. Postage PAID Hope College

10-01-2003  
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