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HOPE COLLEGE • H O L L A N D . M I C H I G A N

"SPERA IN DEO'

S E P T E M B E R 3 0 . 2 0 0 9 • S I N C E 1887

V O L .

MIPs on campus

Looking at the 'minor in possession' Erika Ter Louw GUEST W R I T E R

M o s t college s t u d e n t s are fa- • miliar with t h e feared t e r m M I R M i n o r in Possession. However, m o s t are not i n f o r m e d of Hope's and t h e city of Holland's policy regarding this subject. The state of Michigan n o w h a s o n e of t h e strictest laws in t h e c o u n t r y regarding M i n o r s in Possession. In 2004, Gov. Jennifer G r a n h o l m signed law Public Act N o . 6 3 w h i c h m a d e several c h a n g e s to t h e state's policy. The following are five substantial c h a n g e s that w e r e m a d e according to t h e Michigan.gov website: 1. The definition of being "in possession of alcohol" n o w explicitly includes blood alcohol content. 2. T h e n e w law gives judges discretion t o use jail t i m e w h e n a y o u t h has a prior M I P conviction and fails t o c o m p l e t e any t r e a t m e n t , screening or c o m m u nity service activities o r d e r e d by t h e c o u r t or fails t o pay any fine. 3. T h e n e w law gives a firstt i m e o f f e n d e r t h e break of not having a m i s d e m e a n o r record if h e or she c o m p l e t e s p r o b a t i o n requirements. 4. T h e n e w law sets u p a syst e m with t h e secretary of state for tracking first t i m e o f f e n d e r s of t h e Michigan MIP law a n d c o m p a r a b l e local o r d i n a n c e s . 5. T h e n e w law p e r m i t s 19 and 20 year olds w h o c o n s u m e d alcohol the o p t i o n t o use this as an affirmative defense. Taking this into consideration, Hope's d e p a r t m e n t of c a m p u s

safety m u s t work u n d e r this law with regard to alcohol violations o n c a m p u s . Therefore, it is always a possibility that t h e local police will g e t involved. However, according to c a m p u s safety Patrol Sergeant C h a d Wolters, "That d o e s n o t m e a n that every violation o n c a m p u s will involve getting an MIP. If people are cooperative, t h e r e is a better c h a n c e t h e violation will be h a n d l e d by t h e college." F r o m January to D e c e m b e r in 2008, five M I P s were issued to s t u d e n t s o n c a m p u s . 2007 included 21 violations, 2006 seven a n d in 2 0 0 5 there were 13 liquor law violations o n c a m p u s . W o l t e r s states that " m o s t violations occur at off c a m p u s locations. The college o b t a i n s that i n f o r m a t i o n f r o m t h e Holland Police D e p a r t m e n t , and t h a t inf o r m a t i o n is f o r w a r d e d to stud e n t development." Likewise, t h e Holland City Police D e p a r t m e n t issues liq u o r violations. In 2007, 304 violations w e r e d o c u m e n t e d ; in 2008, 276 violations w e r e issued. These statistics would include violations received by H o p e students. Knowing these statistics, t h e q u e s t i o n n o w is what can b e d o n e t o lower t h e m . According to t h e D e a n of S t u d e n t s Richard Frost, there a r e t h r e e m a i n things t h a t H o p e targets. First, H o p e f o c u s e s o n t h e dev e l o p m e n t of s t u d e n t s by asking questions such as W h o are you as an individual?, W h a t d o your responsibilities include? a n d

' Is-.

C O N S E Q U E N C E S —

>

PHOTO BY A N N GREEN

S t u d e n t s who choose t o t a k e part In underage d r i n k i n g run t h e risk of

r e c e i v i n g a minor in possession. H o w will this impact w h o you will b e c o m e ? Secondly, t h e college f o c u s e s o n w h a t t h e H o p e n o r m is. Surveys s h o w that t h e average H o p e s t u d e n t d o e s not drink; therefore, t h e a d m i n i s t r a t i o n makes it a priority t o i n f o r m s t u d e n t s of this social n o r m . Lastly, H o p e d o e s have a strict set of rules and policies. As a result, there are specific c o n s e q u e n c e s to s t u d e n t s ' actions, and it is " n o t a right b u t a privi-

lege" t o b e involved in activities on campus. Taking all of this into c o n sideration, Frost says t h a t their m a i n priority is to help s t u d e n t s figure out "who [they] are with regards to values and w h o [they] a r e in t h e o u t s i d e world." If a s t u d e n t is charged with an MIP, h e or she is guilty of an i n f r i n g e m e n t of Hope's policy regardless of w h e t h e r t h e violation o c c u r s o n or off c a m p u s . In t h e s t u d e n t h a n d b o o k , M I P s

fall u n d e r violation 18.1 w h i c h states t h e following: "Violations of local, state a n d / o r federal laws and statutes by any s t u d e n t will be c o n s i d e r e d violations of allc a m p u s policies, w h e t h e r t h e incident o c c u r s o n or off t h e campus." After an incident r e p o r t h a s b e e n filled or t h e college has received a call f r o m the police dep a r t m e n t , H o p e pursues it as an SEE M I P ,

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New international students embrace Hope Elena Rivera GUEST WRITER

The Phelps Scholars p r o g r a m , whose students are housed in Scott Hall, is in its largest year with over 80 participants f r o m c o u n t r i e s ranging f r o m C a m e r o o n to C h i n a . A l t h o u g h m o s t college s t u d e n t s feel anxiety a b o u t m o v i n g t o a different state or living in a d o r m with o t h e r people, t h e fear is magnified w h e n a p e r s o n is migrating c o n t i n e n t s and cultures. M e l o d e e Jackson ('13), w h o has lived in Kenya since her p a r e n t s m o v e d there w h e n she was three m o n t h s old, is still w o r r i e d a b o u t m e e t i n g people. "To me, ( H o p e College) is a big

t i m e adjusting." c a m p u s . People don't k n o w each Similarly, Monica Wittig other," said Jackson. "At m y high ('13) f r o m C a m e r o o n loves t h e school, at least I k n e w everyone's "friendliness of faces." p e o p l e and t h e H a n n a h vibrant spiritual Stewart ('13), life. I ' m not used to the who came from Jackson said Egypt, loves w a y girls dress, like t h a t o n e of t h e the c o m m u n i t y . laying out in s w i m biggest things "1 don't think suits... girls w o u l d she h a s had to [Hope] is t o o never do that in get used to is all big. Scott Hall is t h e texting. Egypt. especially really "Ilookaround friendly and o p e n — M E L O D E E JACKSON at lunchtime t o new cultures. I ('13)55 and everyone think t h a t general is texting. If atmosphere s o m e o n e doesn't look like helps me feel less homesick," they're texting, looking closer said Stewart. "Honestly, at a big shows they're texting u n d e r t h e school I would have a h a r d e r

W H A T ' S INSIDE NATIONAL

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ARTS

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table." Stewart has had to get used to t h e differences in fashion: "I'm not used t o t h e way girls dress, like laying o u t in swimsuits... girls would never d o that in Egypt." Stewart also can't place a n a m e o n t h e culture shock she's experienced c o m i n g to America. "In big g r o u p s with lots of A m e r i c a n s , I stop and kind of feel o u t of place. It's so w h i t e c o m p a r e d to Egypt. Usually I'm in a place of a lot of cultures and countries, and it's not so big o n diversity here." Creative ways of c o m b a t i n g homesickness surround the international students.

Going nuclear— Iranian nuclear situation investigated Page 3 Got a story idea? Let us k n o w at anchor@hope.edu. or call u s j t j g j ^ T g T T ^

"I t a u g h t my f r i e n d s w o r d s I like to use [from back home]," said Wittig. "For example, asha' m e a n s s y m p a t h i z i n g or apologizing, a n d I taught my r o o m m a t e t h a t word." Stewart said, "I b o u g h t a b u n c h of tourist T-shirts t o wear, as well as a lot of Egyptian jewelry." Jackson b r o u g h t a book she wrote, her "End of Times" journal, which contains p r o s e she w r o t e a b o u t Kenya and her friends. She also h a s jars of A f r i c a n red dirt and M o m b a s a sand, w h i c h r e m i n d her of the smell of Kenya and her family's SEE P H E L P S , PAGE 1 0

lovely— Sounds serenades Holland

Metropolitan

Opera Page 6


CAMPUS

THE ANCHOR

SEPTEMBER 3 0 , 2 0 0 9

T H I S W E E K AT H O P E

Wednesday Hip Hop Club

Sept. 3 0

D o w Dance R o o m s 9 p.m.

Hope examines interfaith dialogue Dean of Duke Divinity speaks at second annual World Christian Lecture Series

Thursday Oct. 1 Computer Science Colloquium VWF 1 0 4 1 1 a . m .

Philosophy Speaker Series: "Freedom in the Garden of Eden" M a a s Conference R o o m 4 p.m.

Math Colloquium VWF 1 0 4 4 p.m.

Friday Biology Seminar

Oct.

2

Science Center 1 0 2 9 3 p . m .

Physics and Engineering Seminar VWF 1 0 4 3 p.m.

Taylor Swift 2 0 0 9 Fearless Tour Van A n d e l A r e n a 7 : 3 0 p.m.

SAC Movie: "Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen" V W F 1 0 2 8 p.m., 1 0 : 3 0 p . m

Saturday Oct. 3 American Red Cross: "Bake Sale and Beyond" 2 7 0 James Street 1 0 a.m.

1 1 2 t h Pull EAN NE

Black River 3 p.m.

Sunday Oct. 4 World Communion Sunday

F A I T H A M O N G O T H E R F A I T H S — Rev. Dr. Samuel Wells, dean of Duke University Divinity Chapel, speaks at on Friday n i g h t on t h e I m p o r t a n c e of i n t e r f a i t h d i a l o g u e . Gretchen Wilson

DeVos 7 p.m.

GUEST WRITER

Tuesday Oct. 6 CIS Opening Convocation D i m n e n t Chapel 7 p.m.

Amnesty International Meeting M a r t h a Miller 1 5 9 8 p.m.

IN BRIEF CALLING

ALL

FRESHMEN

AND SOPHOMORES!

O n c e again it is t i m e to start t h i n k i n g a b o u t participating in t h e Nykerk C u p C o m p e t i t i o n . If you are interested m a k e s u r e you a t t e n d t h e u p c o m i n g rallies: Nykerk Men's Rally Monday, O c t o b e r 5 8 p.m.-Phelps Dining Hall •Free pizza* Nykerk W o m e n ' s Rally Wednesday, O c t o b e r 7 9 p.m.-Dimnent Chapel N o experience necessary

H o p e College is h o m e t o all kinds of traditions. The Pull has been o n c a m p u s since 1898, Nykerk since 1936, Vespers since 1941 and t h e Critical Issues S y m p o s i u m since 1980. Although t h e declaration of a "tradition" typically waits until t h e event has been going o n for a long time, t h e W o r l d Christian Lecture series looks like it may merit early titling. O n l y a part of H o p e since 2008, t h e World Christian Lecture Series is organized by a c o m m i t t e e t h a t selects and brings in a p r o m i n e n t Christian figure—an artist, minister, scholar, politician or o t h e r leader. It is f u n d e d by an a n o n y m o u s d o n o r in t h e interest of expanding H o p e s and t h e s u r r o u n d i n g

o p p o r t u n i t i e s for creative play t o disadvantaged children. Rev. Trygve Johnson and professor Dr. M a r k H u s b a n d s i n t r o d u c e d the 2009 Lecture Series o n Sept. 25. Johnson spoke of the. lecture series as a m e a n s for "engagement in hard questions" while H u s b a n d s stated earlier, "The need for C h r i s t i a n s to u n d e r s t a n d but also affirm instances of genuine good in t h e religious c o m m i t m e n t s and faith of o t h e r s is crucial." Wells did n o t disappoint w h e n presenting "Not Even in Israel Have I Found Such Faith: A Christian Vision of Faith A m o n g O t h e r Faiths." Wells' formal talk focused largely o n t h e three aspects of a Christian n o t i o n of faith: the historical tradition, the confidence in a h a r m o n i o u s n e w f u t u r e a n d faith's existence as a

O b c tc tii - r i t i c s o n u n i c t e e H O P E

C O L U C F

HOMECOMING W E E K E N D : OCTOBER 9 - 1 1

COOLBEANS COFFEEHOUSE

KNICKERBOCKER

This w e e k l y c p e r - ^ - i c n i g h t gives Hop*? s t u d e n t s o p p o r t u n i t y t o 36 f c m for other students. ! n t e ested h p e r f c r r r ng? Enidi 1 s a o j 1 h o p e . e d u

FRIDAY OCTOBER 9 The fall film series continues with a French film playing at the Knickerbocker. "Seraphine" will show on Monday-Saturday, Sept. 28-Ocl. 3, at 7:30 p.m.. The film is in French with English subtitles. Tickets are $6 for regular admission and $5 for students and senior citizens. Tickets cab be purchased at DeVos ticket office or at the door. The sleeper hit was a surprise winner of five awards a the French Academy Awards. Best picture and with best actress honors for Yolande Moreau were among the awards recieved.

m o d e of living in t h e present. He expanded o n these ideas regarding h o w they relate to interfaith dialogue, especially w h e n the Christian n o t i o n of faith in t h e f u t u r e tense t e n d s to b e c o m e vague w h e n b r o u g h t u p a r o u n d those of o t h e r faiths. In the tradition of M o u w set before him. Wells spoke both in a m o r e formal evening setting o n Sept. 25 and a second t i m e at Sept. 27's Gathering. Both talks were o p e n to both the s t u d e n t b o d y and Holland c o m m u n i t y , but, as can be expected, m o r e s t u d e n t s were present for his message o n Sunday night than Friday. M u c h can be learned f r o m his perspective and f r o m t h e c o n t e n t of lectures in the series to come, both in the Christian hearts o n c a m p u s and t h e hearts of so many o t h e r beliefs represented.

C ^ o c i a l

Sing it. Say it. Play it. M o r a l e it!

' S E R A P H I N E ' TO S H O W AT

Holland c o m m u n i t y ' s e d u c a t i o n o n global theological issues facing Christianity today. In 2008, Dr. Richard Mouw, president of Fuller Theological Seminary of Pasadena, Calif., spoke o n t h e topic of "Intellectual Hospitality: W h y Christians Should Make R o o m for New, and even Strange, Ideas." This year's speaker. Rev. Dr. Samuel Wells, c o n t i n u e d the general t h e m e of Christianity's interaction with things unfamiliar. WellscametoHopefromDuke University w h e r e he is the d e a n of chapel and research professor of Christian ethics in addition t o being an Anglican priest, author, h u s b a n d and father of two. Wells h a s also d o n e a good deal of urban regeneration work and h a s set up a n o n - p r o f i t organization with t h e mission of providing

Homecoming Hoedown @ TuesJnk's Farm from 8 pm - 1 2 am

' Trsnspo nation ptovided - buses leave from DeVVitt flagpole " Line dancing from 9-11 ' Snacks and S'mores! " Hay ides! SATURDAY OCTOBER 1 0

-

Wednesday nights in the Kletz from 9-11 p.m.

Homecoming Tailgate @ Smallenburg Park from 12-2 pm

\

* Food (meal clan exchanae ci $5) ^ ' Ultimate Bags Tournament " Infiatabtes! I Homecoming Football Game @ 2 pm

" Homecoming King & Queen crowning at half time Homecoming Dance @ Ha worth from 9 pm to 1 am

* Tickets on sale at the SLID for $8, or $10 at the door KyiTituLHit.fiope.cdu11tadent/life/^acf?t

WEEKEND

MOVIES

T K S weekend Oct 2-3; Transformer s 2

Friday &. Saturday © 8:00 and 10:30 in Vanderwerf 102, $2 mote

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SEPTEMBER 3 0 . 2 0 0 9

NATIONAL

THE ANCHOR

3

G 2 0 leaders meet in Pittsburgh to discuss global economy Pittsburgh Summit last week was the first international conference hosted by President Obama Emma Blaglonl NATIONAL CO-EDITOR

Pittsburgh welcomed an influx of people onto its streets as global leaders f r o m a r o u n d the world gathered o n Sept. 24 - 25 for the latest G20 s u m m i t in an effort to prevent a n o t h e r global financial crisis. It has been almost six m o n t h s since the G 2 0 last m e t in L o n d o n on April 2 for the London summit. A m o n g the pledges m a d e by the G20 at the L o n d o n s u m m i t were a $500 billion pledge for the IMF to lend to struggling e c o n o m i e s , $250 billion to e n h a n c e world trade and $100 billion for the international b a n k s to use to lend to the poorest countries. The G20 summit in Pittsburgh was arranged to check o n the pledges made at the L o n d o n s u m m i t , as well as decide o n the limits for bankers' b o n u s e s and w h a t type of s t r u c t u r e should r u n the global economy. T h e G20, which s t a n d s for the G r o u p of 20, was established in 1999 in r e s p o n s e to the Asian financial crisis of the late 1990's in o r d e r to i m p r o v e global c o m m u n i c a t i o n for the original G8 c o u n t r i e s . T h e i r first m e e t i n g took place

Most monetary pledges to the IMF by the G 2 0 at the L o n d o n S u m m i t were successfully c a r r i e d out by this September's m e e t i n g . T h e leaders of the G20 believe the pledges are proving successful, thus enabling the world to look f u r t h e r into the f u t u r e and prevent a f u t u r e financial crisis. O n e i m p o r t a n t element in 66 the discussion of r e f o r m at the [The G 2 0 S u m m i t Pittsburgh S u m m i t was the in Pittsburgh t o o k ] issue of bankers' b o n u s e s , a bold and concerted controversial topic. A c c o r d i n g to the BBC's action. A n d r e w Walker, the G 2 0 — PRESIDENT BARACK leaders decided "they w a n t OBAMA ON THE SUCCESS OF THE SUMMIT b o n u s e s to be linked to longt e r m p e r f o r m a n c e and to 55 enable b a n k s to claw t h e m back in s o m e cases." T h e G 2 0 m a d e the decision that they would only cap the the U n i t e d King dom a n d the bank's b o n u s e s if the a m o u n t United States. released was a potential t h r e a t T h e G 2 0 is o f t e n joined to their financial s o u n d n e s s . by Spain, t h e N e t h e r l a n d s The Pittsburgh Summit and representatives from international institutions also called for a change in IMF voting. T h e IMF is an such as the W o r l d Bank, i n t e r n a t i o n a l institution that the International M o n e t a r y oversees the global financial Fund and the World T r a d e institution, aiming to stabilize Organization. exchange rates and e n h a n c e The G20 summit in d e v e l o p m e n t a r o u n d the world. Pittsburgh was the first Currently, industrialized international s u m m i t hosted c o u n t r i e s m a i n t a i n 57 p e r c e n t by President Barack O b a m a .

in Berlin o n Dec. 1 5 - 1 6 , 1999. T h e G 2 0 is m a d e up of f i n a n c e ministers and central b a n k g o v e r n o r s f r o m Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Ca na da , China, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Russia, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, S a u t h Korea, Turkey,

of the voting power in decisionmaking while developing c o u n t r i e s have 4 3 percent. T h e United States p r o p o s e d at least a 5 percent shift in voting at the recent meeting, which would provide the industrialized countries with a voting power of 50 percent and the developing countries with 50 percent. Many global leaders, including U.K. P r i m e Minister G o r d o n Brown, c o m m e n t e d on the new world o r d e r they believe to be e m e r g i n g . T h e y believe the G 2 0 f o r u m to be a m o r e accurate reflection of the world order. T h e leaders at the s u m m i t decided that the G 2 0 f o r u m would be in charge of the world's e c o n o m i c c o o p e r a t i o n , and, as a result, the original G8 s t r u c t u r e would fade out. According to Brown, " T h e G20 will now be seen as the p r e m i e r e e c o n o m i c organization for dealing with issuesofeconomicmanagement a r o u n d the world." The G20 summit in Pittsburgh received an overall positive r e s p o n s e . In c o m m e n t i n g o n the s u m m i t . President O b a m a said it took "bold and c o n c e r t e d action."

Pledge Tracker W h e n t h e G 2 0 m e t in L o n d o n in April, t h e y m a d e a set of p l e d g e s in a n e f f o r t to pull t h e w o r l d o u t of its e c o n o m i c recession. H e r e is t h e p r o g r e s s m a d e o n e a c h pledge: $1.1 trillion s u p p o r t p a c k a g e directed towards the International M o n e t a r y Fund t o help countries fight t h e e c o n o m i c crisis: P a r d y met $5 trillion s t i m u l u s s p e n d i n g t o help boost the countries' own e c o n o m i e s : Partly m e t S h i f t t h e I M F v o t i n g p o w e r s to give m o r e v o t i n g p o w e r t o u n d e r represented countries: M e t R e g u l a t e h e d g e f u n d s at a level e q u a l t o m o r e strictly s u p e r v i s e d investment funds: Not met C u r b international tax havens: Met Increase restrictions o n bank b o n u s e s : Partly m e t Establish a Financial Stability B o a r d in a n e f f o r t t o p r e v e n t f u t u r e e c o n o m i c crises: M e t

C o u r t e s y of BBC Pledge T r a c k e r : http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/business/8266820.stm

Iran's nuclear facility subject to investigation: Will Iran give its consent? Eric Anderson NATIONAL CO-EDITOR

T h e ongoing t h r e a t of Iran's nuclear capabilities c a m e to a h e a d at a recent meeting of the U n i t e d Nations. T h e U N Security Council approved a m e a s u r e p u t f o r t h by President Barack O b a m a that, if fully effective, would p u t an end to all the u n a n s w e r e d q u e s t i o n s that have plagued the diplomatic relationships w i t h Iran. President Obama's resolution did not single o u t Iran; rather it looked to take steps t o w a r d s greatly reducing a global nuclear presence. However, Iran w a s singled o u t d u r i n g council m e e t i n g s . Nicolas Sarkozy, president of France, even w e n t as far as to say, "Iran is violating the

Security Council's resolutions right before our eyes." Even Russia, an ally of Iran, joined in the host of c o u n t r i e s offering formal rebukes against Iran. D e c e m b e r has b e e n set as the deadline for Iran to a d h e r e to the stipulations of the investigation. The criticism directed at Iran was amplified days after the resolution with the discovery of what is believed to be a secret nuclear e n r i c h m e n t facility near the city of Q o m . W h i l e Iran h a s m a i n t a i n e d that their nuclear p r o g r a m was established with the express p u r p o s e of generating electricity, the newly revealed facility s e e m s to be located within a heavily guarded military base.

T h e investigation will t o u c h o n m a n y d i f f e r e n t a s p e c t s of Iran's seemingly shrouded nuclear p r o g r a m . T h e chief d e m a n d will be that w h a t e v e r Iran h a s established be o p e n to a complete investigation by the International Atomic Energy Agency. This would allow the search for violations to e n c o m p a s s any suspicious areas in the e n t i r e country. Individual scientists will also be q u e s t i o n e d in an a t t e m p t to gain a n u n p r e c e d e n t e d amount of insight. The O b a m a a d m i n i s t r a t i o n is not completely c o n f i d e n t that Iran will m e e t all of the d e m a n d s set forth in the past few days. T h e y are c o n f i d e n t , however, that the investigation will be

The Growth of a Global Nuclear Presence - The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty ( N N P T ) aims to limit the spread of nuclear weapcms globally. - 1 8 9 countries have signed the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. - Of t h e 189 N N P T countries, only t h e United States, Russia, t h e United Kingdom, France a n d China have a d m i t t e d t o possessing nuclear weapons. - India, Pakistan a n d N o r t h Korea are the only t h r e e sovereign nations to a d m i t to possess ing nuclear w e a p o n s b u t did not sign the treaty. - The United States w a s the first c o u n t r y to develop and test nuclear weaponry. - Myanmar, Syria a n d Israel have also b e e n accused of possessing nuclear weapons, alt h o u g h these claims have yet to be confirmed. - Currently, Russia possesses t h e m o s t active warheads with the United States in second.

http://www.fas.org/nuke/guide/israel/nuke/farr.htm

successful in getting a n s w e r s to key q u e s t i o n s that Iran has evaded for s o m e t i m e . China has c o m e o u t against the san ctio n s put f o r t h by President O b a m a and the G-8, arguing that instituting such a s h o r t - t e r m deadline would not b e an effective way to address Iran's nuclear capabilities. However, the Italian Foreign Minister and c u r r e n t chair of the G 8 Franco Frattini s u p p o r t s the D e c e m b e r deadline. Unfortunately, Iran has r e s p o n d e d to these d e m a n d s with little e n t h u s i a s m . Instead, the country's president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad

h a s m a d e such offers as an invitation to the United States to sell u r a n i u m f r o m Iran for medical p u r p o s e s . T h e dismissive n a t u r e of the dialogue has proved to only slow the process of getting Iran to take the d e m a n d s seriously. Nevertheless, the resolution for a nuclear f r e e world passed and Iran has until D e c e m b e r to a d h e r e to the investigation. Results may s o o n be seen as to the t r u e potential a n d a m b i t i o n s of Iran's nuclear p r o g r a m , bringing to conclusion a d a n g e r o u s game of hide and seek.

Jit grace (RpiscopdChurch outdoors are open to a(L Our tabCe is too. "We worship. "We serve. 'We Cove. 'We grow. 'We carefor sety and neighbor and invite you to join us on the journey, the adventure that isfaith Sunday Services: 8:15 and 10:30am

(Education for all ages: Sunday 9:15am

555 Michigan five Hollandf MI (616)396-7459 graceepiscopafholland.

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4

NATIONAL

THE ANCHOR

THIS WEEK

IN QUOTES

Palin attempts to bypass the mainstream media Cory Lakatos

s a y i n g that the s w i n e flu c o u l d b e s p r e a d at c o l l e g e k e g parties. T h e y say if you attend a keg party and come h o m e feeling n u m b and v o m i t i n g p r o f u s e l y , y o u ' r e p r o b a b l y fine." - Conan O ' B r i e n during his Friday night monologue on ' T h e Tonight Show.*

"I w o u l d like s o m e w a y to d i s a p p e a r w h e r e p e o p l e d o n ' t s e e m e a n y m o r e at s o m e point." - Michael Jackson in a taped interview with his advisor Rabbi S h m u l e y Boleach, years ago.

" O u r n a t i o n is p r e p a r e d to w a r m l y s h a k e all t h o s e h a n d s w h i c h are h o n e s t l y e x t e n d e d to us." - Iranian President Ahmadinejad at the UN General Assembly meeting in N e w York.

"I think it's i m p o r t a n t t o realize that I w a s a c t u a l l y b l a c k b e f o r e t h e election." - President O b a m a in response to David Letterman's question regarding racism's role in the protests against his healthcare reform plan.

a c c u s e d of a lack of k n o w l e d g e in t h e p a s t , Rajesh Kothari, a fund manager who attended t h e s p e e c h , said t h a t "it s e e m e d like s h e did h e r h o m e w o r k now, this t i m e around."

W h i t e H o u s e press s e c r e t a r y Ari Fleischer. "It's t h e ideal way Following her sudden for her to k e e p in t o u c h , t o rev r e s i g n a t i o n as t h e g o v e r n o r of up her b a s e and go a r o u n d t h e A l a s k a i n July, f o r m e r R e p u b l i c a n m a i n s t r e a m media." vice presidential candidate Palin's c o m m e n t s o n her S a r a h Palin s e e m e d t o d r o p Facebook page about endoff t h e political m a p . She of-life p r o v i s i o n s in t h e has recently r e t u r n e d to the p r o p o s e d h e a l t h c a r e bill p u b f i c eye, a n d h e r i n t e n t i o n s even prompted a response as well as t h e p e r c e p t i o n of from President Obama h e r by t h e A m e r i c a n p u b l i c during his speech to a joint a r e unclear. session of C o n g r e s s . Palin s p o k e in p u b l i c Some Hope College f o r t h e first t i m e since h e r students are notably r e s i g n a t i o n at t h e 16 ,h C L S A m o r e s k e p t i c a l of Palin's I n v e s t o r s ' F o r u m in H o n g unconventional tactics. K o n g , S e p t . 21-25, w h i c h " W h i l e I believe using social w a s a l s o h e r first a p p e a r a n c e n e t w o r k i n g sites is a g e n i u s outside North America. idea for c a m p a i g n i n g , I While her speech was also believe t h a t w i t h o u t c l o s e d to t h e m e d i a , an t h e s u p p o r t of m a i n s t r e a m e x c e r p t is p o s t e d o n Palin's m e d i a t h e c a m p a i g n will go F a c e b o o k page, a n d it h a s nowhere," said N a y t Snyder P H O T O BY A N N G R E E N ('12). still b e e n widely c o v e r e d in P A L I N O N T H E W E B — Palin uses t h e s o c i a l n e t w o r k i n g s i t e Amber Wilson ('12) the press. Facebook t o c o n n e c t w i t h her f o l l o w e r s and share her o p i n i o n s on The f o c u s of t h e a d d r e s s c o m m e n t e d o n the p o l i t i c a l issues. was how "common sense implications of Palin's c o n s e r v a t i v e s see t h e w o r l d resignation from the a p p e a r i n g o n television or o t h e r g o v e r n o r s h i p of Alaska: "I t h i n k at large." U n d e r this h e a d i n g Former President Bill fell t h e t o p i c s of U.S.-Asian C l i n t o n , f o r m e r Vice P r e s i d e n t mainstream media outlets. by r e s i g n i n g in t h e m i d d l e of commercial relations, the war Al G o r e , f o r m e r U.S. Federal However, she has been building h e r t e r m as g o v e r n o r , she's Reserve Chairman A la n a c o n s i d e r a b l e following o n s a b o t a g e d any c h a n c e s h e m i g h t o n terror, t h e role of C h i n a and I n d i a in t h e global e c o n o m y Greenspan and South African social n e t w o r k i n g sites s u c h h a v e at office - she's r u i n e d h e r a n d h u m a n r i g h t s . She also Archbishop Desmond Tutu as Twitter. H e r F a c e b o o k p a g e o w n t r a c k record... I d o n ' t t h i n k h a v e all a d d r e s s e d t h e C L S A c u r r e n t l y lists h e r as h a v i n g any a m o u n t of m a i n s t r e a m mentioned t h e "Tea Party M o v e m e n t " a n d said t h a t t h e I n v e s t o r s ' F o r u m in t h e past. 901,180 s u p p o r t e r s , s e c o n d or non-mainstream media b e s t way t o c o m b a t r e c e s s i o n is Palin w r o t e a 1 , 1 1 0 - w o r d only t o t h e p r e s i d e n t , and t h e a t t e n t i o n is going t o c h a n g e tally g o e s u p every day. that." t o " s p e n d less a n d t a x less a n d o p i n i o n piece for t h e Wall allow t h e p r i v a t e s e c t o r t o g r o w Street Journal, criticizing " F a c e b o o k is p e r f e c t l y s u i t e d It is still u n c l e a r w h e t h e r a n d prosper." President Barack Obama's for s o m e o n e as p o l a r i z i n g Palin i n t e n d s to r u n for t h e as Sarah Palin," said f o r m e r p r e s i d e n c y in 2012. Though Palin h a s b e e n p r o p o s e d health care reforms. SENIOR STAFF W R I T E R

"Health officials are n o w

SEPTEMBER 3 0 . 2 0 0 9

In t h e article Palin s t r e s s e d that increased government i n v o l v e m e n t will be t o o costly a n d will n o t solve t h e p r o b l e m . Except for these two i n c i d e n t s , Palin h a s n o t b e e n

P ERSPECTIVES

" I f y o u like h i m a n d y o u p a y $1 a n d his f a c e will

A Spotlight on Africa: Zimbabwe and Somalia

a p p e a r on y o u r F a c e b o o k

S a m u e l Tzou

choose him, then you

p a g e . T h e n in a d d i t i o n t o h u m a n f r i e n d s y o u will h a v e gorilla f r i e n d s . " - Lillian Nsubuga, of the Uganda Wildlife Authority, talking about the creation of a "Friend a Gorilla" website that will allow people to befriend gorillas on Facebook and raise money for their protection.

"It h a p p e n e d v e r y fast. All of a s u d d e n e v e r y t h i n g w a s u n d e r water. I w a s not a b l e to s a v e a n y t h i n g e x c e p t t h e shirt I a m w e a r ing." - G e o r g e Andrada, a Manila bus driver, in regards to Tropical Storm Ketsana which hit the Philippines, bringing about the worst flooding in decades in the capital of Manila and surrounding provinces.

"If they will n o t assist the i n c l u s i v e g o v e r n m e n t in r e h a b i l i t a t i n g our economy, could they p l e a s e , p l e a s e s t o p their filthy, c l a n d e s t i n e , d i v i s i v e antics." - Robert M u g a b e to western countries at the UN General Assembly meeting.

GUEST WRITER

A Western scholar o n c e stated that the "darkest thing about Africa has been our ignorance of it." This s t a t e m e n t has t h e same application to people all across America; it does not exclude H o p e College. To better inform students a b o u t Africa, The A n c h o r is exploring different issues that are currently trying t h e continent. These are events that barely scrape the headlines of t h e N e w York Times or t h e links of Google News, but they are equally i m p o r t a n t . As the United States b e c o m e s m o r e involved in African countries, knowledge of these events is b e c o m i n g increasingly relevant. Zimbabwe In February, Z i m b a b w e leader Robert M u g a b e agreed t o a power sharing g o v e r n m e n t system with opposition party leader M o r g a n Tsvangirai. M u g a b e retained his position as president t h r o u g h t h e agreement, and Tsvangirai received t h e position of p r i m e minister. M u g a b e b e c a m e p r i m e minister of Z i m b a b w e and was elected president in 1987 after a constitution m a n d a t e d by himself. The agreement, however, h a s not been effective so far. "This has been a forced marriage of two people that were never m e a n t to meet," Zambia's n e w finance minister said in

a S e p t e m b e r 2008 Newsweek report. "There is suspicion, disrespect and derision." M o s t of this unrest was studied by Australian political analyst Claire M o o r e w h o declared in 2007 that t h e Gross Domestic P r o d u c t of the c o u n t r y decreased nearly 30 p e r c e n t starting in 2002. M o o r e said this wasn't t h e only problem. "A b o t d e of milk to feed your family can cost 10,000 Z i m b a b w e a n dollars o n e day and up to 17,000 Z i m b a b w e a n dollars t h e next day," M o o r e said. "Many people in Z i m b a b w e are starving at t h e m o m e n t ; they c a n n o t afford to eat. The u n e m p l o y m e n t rate is so high that people have s t o p p e d collecting t h e figures." M u g a b e has been accused of multiple incidents of c o r r u p t i o n internationally. Aside from stirring u p wars in t h e Democratic Republic of Congo, Mugabe has used military intimidation tactics as well as election rigging to keep t h e M o v e m e n t for Democratic Change's Tsvangirai f r o m taking power. W h i l e certain e c o n o m i c progress has been made, r e p o r t s of Mugabe's c o r r u p t i o n c o n t i n u e t o spread, and t h e two sides still c a n n o t s e e m to agree on security or d e v e l o p m e n t issues. "Everyone across the political divide wants to see this g o v e r n m e n t succeed," Tsvangirai said in t h e Newsweek report. " N o o n e benefits f r o m this government sliding backwards to

where it was before." Even so, analysts believe m u c h m o r e work has to be d o n e in t h e c o u n t r y and nationally. "[Zimbabwe] is a c o u n t r y that was o n c e k n o w n as o n e of t h e most rich and successful countries in t h e region and w h e r e there was great hope," M o o r e said. "That h o p e has been d a s h e d a n d what has o c c u r r e d in Z i m b a b w e over t h e last 10 years is a shame. As [an international) c o m m u n i t y we can do things t o make these issues public and t o show o u r s u p p o r t for t h e people in Zimbabwe." Somalia In t h e fall of 2008, C A T O Institute political analyst Simon Tisdall declared Somalia a "state of anarchy". "Somalia arguably constitutes the world's biggest single h u m a n i t a r i a n disaster, and that's including Sudan, Zimbabwe and Congo," Tisdall said of t h e transitional g o v e r n m e n t . "Ten t h o u s a n d people have been killed in Somalia since 2007; m o r e than o n e million are internally displaced. T h o u s a n d s m o r e have fled at risk to their lives across t h e Gulf of Aden to Yemen. M a n y did not make it." Over a year later, analysts are saying that Somalia is in a worse state than before. N e w s sources a r o u n d t h e world reported o n t h e piracy occurring off t h e coast of Somalia o n merchandise ships.

N e w s n e t w o r k s stated that t h e piracy has t o d o with t h e inability of t h e c o u n t r y to control m u c h of its coasts and cities. Islamist g r o u p s are launching attacks t h r o u g h o u t the country. The most p r o m i n e n t group, AlShabab, has control of nearly all of the south and central parts of the country. The sole parliament and the g o v e r n m e n t stronghold is t h e formerly developed city Mogadishu. The g o v e r n m e n t has declared t h e nation in an official state of emergency and is appealing to foreign countries for military aid. A n African U n i o n force f r o m Burundi and Uganda has entered the c o u n t r y to s u p p o r t t h e Transitional Federal Government. "The bloodshed is getting only wor§e as Somalia becomes yet another b a t d e g r o u n d in the proxy war between the West and militant Islam, with t h e Shabab fighting' to t u r n Somalia into a global jihad factory and t h e West, led by the United States, d e t e r m i n e d to prevent that," said foreign c o r r e s p o n d e n t Jeffery Getdeman. As of Sept. 18, t h e only area that t h e government controlled in the s o u t h e r n central area of t h e country was t h e key city Mogadishu. "This war is increasingly spiraling away f r o m Somali control," G e t t l e m a n said. "It's becoming internationalized."


THE ANCHOR

THIS WEEK IN ART

Former Hope Professor Jack Ridl publishes new poetry book Annelise Belmonte

p o e m s . O n c e that felt A R T S EDITOR established, I felt free to d r a w o n this wealth Former Hope College of material t h a t was professor and nationally there in t h e world of acclaimed a u t h o r Jack Ridl h a s sports, s o m e t h i n g that published a new anthology of is unusually e m b e d d e d p o e m s entitled "Losing Season" throughout American after t h e miserable season society." e n d u r e d by a fictional high Mostly everyone school basketball t e a m . h a s felt the rush of From custodian to elation when their benchwarmer to former favored t e a m w i n s and cheerleader, t h e b o o k goes the humiliation of a t h r o u g h t h e players involved d e v a s t a t i n g loss. in the season without Emerson states, c o m p r o m i s i n g entirely character "Jack Ridl creates a studies. book of p o e t r y that T h e m a i n character of t h e will appeal t o both p o e m s is t h e h i s t o r y teacher lovers of p o e t r y and a n d coach of t h e team, w h o those w h o r u n f r o m begins to be k n o w n solely as P H O T O BY A N N G R E E N it." "Coach." "Coach's Wife," "Coach's The c h a r a c t e r s are P O E T R Y I N M O T I O N — Jack Ridl, former Hope College professor, D a u g h t e r " a n d his r e p u t a t i o n finally relaxes In r e t i r e m e n t and c e l e b r a t e s his new book of poetry,not simply s t e r e o t y p e s but are also affected by t h e o u t c o m e real p e o p l e with d e p t h and " L o s i n g Season." of t h e game. e m o t i o n t h a t any reader can Hope's o w n Derek E m e r s o n , 66 relate to. use today. d i r e c t o r of Events W h a t got m e w r i t i n g Poet C o n r a d Hilberry said of However, and C o n f e r e n c e s , [Losing Season] w a s the v o l u m e t h a t it is " u n m a t c h e d , the impact reviews that, that 1 r e a l i z e d that I had I believe, a n y w h e r e in A m e r i c a n of losing "Sports fans finally b e c o m e m y o w n poetry...These poems are a game will recognize so compelling, so varied, so affected person and poet. Most themselves and familiar to a n y o n e who h a s felt me very o t h e r s a n d will of m y life I w a s k n o w n t h e i m p a c t of high school s p o r t s much. It's be able to interact as 'the coach's son.' that they may well i n t r o d u c e a astonishing with t h e p o e m s . n e w genre." t h e things The non— JACK RIDL Of t h e r e c e n t press coverage, t h a t h a p p e n s p o r t s p e o p l e will FORMER HOPE PROFESSOR Ridl feels " e m b a r r a s s m e n t and and are said also find plenty 99 joy a n d g r a t i t u d e and a lot of after merely of c h a r a c t e r s t o h e a d shaking. These are things losing season b e c a u s e such a losing a g r a b o n t o and o n e doesn't solicit. To have t h e m season is what m a k e s people g a m e . It was a storyline to h a p p e n h a s been lovely and p a u s e a n d reflect o n their roles e x t r e m e l y follow, because Jack Ridl awkward." h a r d o n m y in t h e g a m e and in life." in t h e e n d ,this is "Losing Season" is available "Losing Season" took Ridl sister and m e to listen t o a n d see n o t a book a b o u t basketball b u t for $16 and is available at t h e over 20 years t o write, and h e t h e m e a n - s p i r i t e d stuff a f t e r a a b o u t people." H o p e - G e n e v a Bookstore as well claims t h e r e w a s likely a n o t h e r loss. After all, these p e o p l e were O n e of t h e people that may as area booksellers and A m a z o n . half a book of p o e m s t h a t didn't taking it o u t and r i p p i n g o n o u r have influenced t h e book is For m o r e i n f o r m a t i o n , visit m a k e it t o the final m a n u s c r i p t . daddy." Ridl's father, f o r m e r University But after retiring in 2006 after www.ridl.com. W i t h such a premise, o n e of Pittsburgh and W e s t m i n s t e r 35 years of teaching, e v e r y t h i n g might w o n d e r why Ridl would College coach C.G. "Buzz" finally c a m e into place. f o c u s o n t h e devastation caused Ridl. Jack Ridl insists t h a t his " W h a t got m e writing it b e t h e loss of t h e game. experiences with his f a t h e r are w a s t h a t I realized that I had " W h y losing?" E m e r s o n not t h e basis of t h e b o o k . finally b e c o m e my o w n p e r s o n asks "Because in t h e e n d we "I g r e w u p in a small t o w n . and poet. M o s t of my life I was have a n o t h e r depressing selfAlso, my father was a remarkably k n o w n as 'the coach's son.' So I e x a m i n a t i o n of a p o e t w h o finds successful and acclaimed coach, s p e n t a lot of years developing writing c h e a p e r t h a n therapy? o n e w h o developed several of my o w n identity as a writer of No. Ridl takes u s t h r o u g h a the strategies that m o s t t e a m s

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G r a n d Rapids-based band Sidetrack will be playing at t h e N e w Holland Brewery o n O c t . 2 f r o m 9 p.m. until m i d n i g h t . T h e r e will be original s o n g s as well as crowd-pleasing songs f r o m artists like Johnny Cash, Kings of Leon and Z Z Top. They've s h a r e d t h e stage with Bullet for My Valentine, Tantric, D o p e and Days of t h e New. Sidetrack h a s a p o p / rock sound, and has been feat u r e d o n Fox News. Their s o n g s include "For t h e Girls" and "Radio Waves." Sidetrack's original music can b e f o u n d o n iTunes as well as o n their MySpace page.

A movie being p r o d u c e d in Holland by Tic Tock studios, " W h a t ' s W r o n g W i t h Virginia?" will be filming at a local beach h o u s e o n Q u i n c y Street off-ando n f r o m Sept. 29 to O c t . 12. Scenes are to take place in the house, backyard and maybe t h e neighbor's house. The h o u s e is s c h e d u l e d to be d e m o l i s h e d after s h o o t i n g so set designers will have free reign. O t h e r sites inc l u d e Q u i n c y Street, G r a n d Haven City Hall and L e m o n Fresh L a u n d r y 8c Dry Cleaning in Holland. Dustin Lance Black, w h o w o n an Academy Award for his screenplay of "Milk," w r o t e and will b e d i r e c t i n g t h e film.

O n O c t . 3 there will be a c o o k o u t a n d music festival called Porkapalooza at t h e Red H o r s e Ranch. T h e r e will be chefs f r o m all over t h e Michigan area and o n e f r o m Chicago. Bands include: Dave Boutette, Delilah DeWylde & The Lost Boys, Ben B u e l t m a n n and P o n t c h a t r a i n with a s h o r t set by David Teske, M a r k Duval & Two Track M i n d , M o u n tain M e n a n d M i d t o w n Underg r o u n d . At 3 p.m. t h e r e will b e a H o g Calling Contest. Tickets are $8 in advance and $12 at t h e gate. Parking will be $5 per car. The event will be f r o m n o o n until 10 p.m. o n 62nd St. in Fennville. The event will be s p o n s o r e d by N e w Holland Brewing. Apply to be a volunteer at h t t p : / / p o r k . n e whollandbrew.com/

Wednesday Sept. 30 Knick Film Series: Seraphine K n i c k e r b o c k e r Theatre. 7 : 3 0 p.m.

Thursday Oct. 1 Knick Film Series: Seraphine K n i c k e r b o c k e r Theatre. 7 : 3 0 p . m .

Theater Luncheon Juniors and seniors active In the theater d e p a r t m e n t m e e t In the Barber Room In Phelps at 1 1 a.m. Discussion will focus on graduate school and portfolio applications.

Friday Oct. 2 Knick Film Series: Seraphine Knickerbocker Theatre, 7 : 3 0 p . m .

IN BRIEF MARGARET COGSWELL: RIVER F U G U E S

The next exhibit featured at t h e D e P r e e Art Gallery is River Fugues by M a r g a r e t Cogswell. Cogswell's exhibit will o p e n Tuesday, O c t . 6 and will r u n until Saturday, Nov. 7. Internationally k n o w n artist Cogswell uses space, sound, s c u l p t u r e and video t o explore t h e relationship of A m e r i c a n rivers to p o s t - i n d u s trial A m e r i c a n culture. River Fugues, an ongoing project, foc u s e s o n t h e vital role of w a t e r in our world today. Cogswell links the rural landscape with u r b a n i n d u s t r y and technology. The i m p o r t a n c e of industrialization versus t h e e n v i r o n m e n t is highlighted in Cogswell's River Fugues. D r e a m s of prosperity mix with disillusionment as b o t h river w a t e r s and climate are c o n nected.

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THE ANCHOR

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Hope College Concert Series features We Know Jackson, Bella Ruse, Philip & Trixie on Oct. 3 Llndsey Wolf ASST. A R T S EDITOR

|azz, rock, pop and folk lovers alike can unite for o n e great night of music this Saturday, Oct. 3. We Know Jackson, Bella Ruse and Hope's very own Philip & Trixie are performing at the Park Theatre at 8 p.m. The three men of the eclectic We Know Jackson band are Chris Janowiak on keys and lead vocals, Isaac Hansen o n bass and backup vocals and Peter Breithaupt o n d r u m s and backup vocals. All three attended Western Michigan University as music majors, and in January of 2007, they formed We Know Jackson. To associate this talented band with just o n e genre would not do them justice. Their music draws f r o m a variety of genres, including funk, pop, rock and soul. The band's sound can be described as "fresh and exciting... with a touch of goodness." We Know Jackson writes and records their own music. The guys perform around West Michigan; popular spots include the campus of Western Michigan University and here at Hope. To check out their upcoming performances and to listen to

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W e Know J a c k s o n

their music, follow We Know Jackson on their Facebook page. From Minneapolis, comes the jazz and folk style of Bella Ruse. The two-person band composed of singer Kay Gillette and guitarist Joseph Barker was formed in 2008. Both Gillette and Barker are Hope grads. In fact, Gillette trained as a classical singer at Hope until she was encouraged by Barker to pursue jazz. The two artists combine "classical sensibilities, folk roots and mutual love of jazz into something else entirely." They play a variety of music, includingclassicjazzand original folk and pop songs. Feist, Yael Naim and Edith Piaf are a few of the band's influences. Bella Ruse has a record label with Upton Avenue Records and you

can buy their first EP on their webpage: www. bellaruse.com. The threeband concert will also include Philip & Trixie, a group composed of current and former Hope chapel band members. Philip & Trixie has been an ongoing project since last summer. The band started with lead singer Jonathan Ytterock o n acoustic guitar and Samantha Pedigo as lead vocals, but has grown in size to include

playing together for chapel and the Gathering services. Pedigo,

Philip & Trixie

Oegema and Kadzban have all graduated from Hope but currently reside in Holland. A n d r e w For those Kadzban iiTlnr«l7 -live Jt t l i • glucxT frirt J.curious of on electric the meaning guitar, of the bands Benjamin name, Ytterock Oegema explained, "I've on d r u m s found that the and Jacob band's name B u 11 a r d has been a bit on bass misleading. A lot guitar. of people think The bass ^ ^ r; f; ^ ^ Bella Ruse that Philip and position Trixie are Samantha and I. But has been filled in with different really, Philip and Trixie are two friends, but Jacob will play the mice that had invaded Sam's Oct. 3 show. The band met at Hope after house last summer."

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Sufjan Stevens, Bob Dylan and Ryan Adams are a few of the band's influences. Like We Know Jackson and Bella Ruse, Philip & Trixie cannot be categorized under just one genre. Ytterock said, "1 like to leave [the genre) up to the listener. If I say that we play jazz, I t u r n certain people off. If I say we play folk/rock, I t u r n people off. I find that a lot of Hope Students don't come out to explore new music. I hope that that's changing as new classes come." The folk sounds of Philip & Trixie appeal to a wide variety of listeners. Philip & Trixie fans can follow the band on their MySpace page for show updates. The band is currently working o n recording a live show, and hopefully sometime soon they will release a CD. The bands will perform Saturday, Oct. 3 at 8 p.m. at the Park Theatre. Tickets are $5 for the public and free for Hope students.

The Metropolitan Opera comes to Holland movie theaters Ann Malone GUEST WRITER

The Italian opera "Tosca" combines "Puccini's glorious musical inspiration with the melodramatic vitality of one of the great Hitchcock films," says James Levine, the conductor

of The Metropolitan Opera's performance of "Tosca" which is one in the lineup of "The Metropolitan Opera Series Live in HD 2009-2010." Shown at the Holland 7 Movie Theater o n Waverly Road, the show lineup includes "Hamlet,"

Welcome S O H O S O H O

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"Les Contes d'Hoffmann" and "Carmen" to name a few. Playing at over 15 theaters in the Michigan area, it can easily be argued that these viewings are making the fine arts more accessible. But can a live recording really be as moving

Students

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and emotional an experience as seeing a truly live performance? At opera dress rehearsals before an audience has paid for a ticket, the atmosphere of beauty and elegance permeates through the theater. The audience m e m b e r s dress as though they are attending opening night (the company wants the feel of an actual performance), the theater is beautiful and opulent and the set is stunningly detailed. The costumes are magnificent, rich works of art in themselves. A live orchestra is incredibly powerful, yet subtle, allowing the singers to take the stage. O n e can't fully understand that power of the music until one is sitting in front of a performance, witnessing fully the emotion of the lyrics. Love, anger, scorn and happiness are much more transmutable when the singer is right in front of a viewer. Live opera envelopes viewers in its world. But o n a big screen without the atmosphere of a theater, one has to wonder how the story translates. At the movies, there is usually a sense of disconnect. For an audience, most movies have no lasting impact. Opera, on the other hand, is supposed to have an impact; it's supposed to entertain, but like a great concert, it's supposed to inspire and move its audience. Another flaw is the lack of live orchestra. Technology has enabled us to capture minute details of live performances.

but it hasn't captured the feeling of a live orchestra—the vibrations and overtones of those perfect notes working together in harmony with a singer. You simply can't capture the excitement of the opera in a movie theater. This isn't to say there aren't advantages. For a parent, a senior citizen or a student, it is much easier to hop in the car to the movies to see "Tosca" then it is to charter a flight to New York City. It's also easier than planning an entire trip into Chicago, Grand Rapids or Detroit just to watch o n e show. Tickets for a good seat to see "Tosca" as a part of the Detroit Opera House's 2009 season can cost anywhere f r o m $21 to $363. To see "Tosca" as a part of The Metropolitan Opera Series Live in HD, it costs $10 as a student and $20 for general admission. So despite it being a less engaging experience, it is definitely safe to say that for Hope College students, it is much easier to drive to the Holland 7 then to the Detroit Opera House. Puccini's "Tosca" will be playing at the Holland 7 on Saturday, Oct. 10 at 1 p.m. and Wednesday, Oct. 28 at 6:30 p.m. Tickets are available at the theater ticket window. To see the rest of the 2009 season lineup, visit http://www.gqti. com/met.aspx.


THE ANCHOR

7

Where'd all the water go? This year's Critical Issues Symposium focuses on the availability of fresh water in our world today Ayanfe Olonade Features Co-Editor

Last Christmas. I watched a documentary called "The Grand Canyon Adventure: River at Risk." I was visiting some family down in Houston, and my uncle had heard about this must-see movie. The whole family got in the car, and while driving my uncle began to let us in on some facts about this movie. He told us that his friends had been talking about the movie all week at work. He said he knew two fathers and their daughters who took a rafting trip down the Colorado River. I really wanted to see "Seven Pounds," starring Will Smith, but for some reason, my uncle really persisted that we watch this documentary. Well, it was the holidays and I was up for anything outdoors - even if it meant watching a documentary I really didn't know much about. That documentary got me thinking about one of life's most important resources - water. Every single day, people all around the world use water - some in excess, while some barely have enough. But with every twist and turn, as 1 watched that documentary in IMAX, I realized how vital this resource is. This year the Critical Issues Symposium is calling for us to engage in further thought and discussion about water. The theme for this year's CIS is "At Water's Edge: Complacency, Thirst and Action." "I cannot think of a more critical issue in the world than water," said Alfredo Gonzales, associate provost and CIS Co-Chair. Gonzales also said that sometimes w e forget how important water is. If you don't have water, you die. The UN estimates that 40 percent of the world could face life-threatening water shortages by the year 2050. Gonzales said that in some developing countries, women spend five to six hours trying to get water from long distances. The younger generation has to help get water and this, in most cases, hinders their education. The result, Gonzales said, is an increasing rate of poverty in those regions. But it is so easy to get caught up with what people experience outside the U.S. with water. The water crisis is actually closer to us in Holland, Michigan, than we think. Being surrounded by the largest water reservoir in the world, the Great Lakes, it seems water should be the least of our worries. But the reality is we are facing a serious problem of pollution and water conservation in the Great Lakes Region. According to the World Health Organization, 884 million people lack access to clean water, and as a result, over 1.8 million children die from chronic diarrhea, a water-borne disease. W H O also estimates that 80 percent of all disease worldwide results from contaminated water, inadequate sanitation and poor hygiene. With the increasing problem of pollution of the water surrounding us, our health is at risk. This year CIS keynote speakers are world class water experts Peter H. Gleik and Joan B Rose. They, along with other prominent speakers from outside and within the Hope community, will lead us in two days of engaging and challenging discussions on why and how water issues affect us as students, faculty, staff and fellow individuals. Gonzales said he believes that for students, it is an academic responsibility and Christian responsibility to search for ways to solve the problems our world is facing with water. One of the visions Hope College has for its graduates is that they would be servants and leaders to a global society. That is why it is essential for students to grapple with global issues like water and how it is affecting our world. Robert Glenon, a prominent author of many articles and books including the acclaimed book "Unquenchable," challenges his readers to begin to treat water as a valuable and exhaustible public resource. The truth is that water is a basic commodity for which there is no substitute regardless of price, Glenon says. It is important that w e begin to think about ways w e use water. It is easy not to think about the importance of taking definite conservative steps like having trayless dining or not having an extra long shower, but a few years from now, our habits on how w e treat water will affect not only ourselves, but the people around us. On Oct. 6-7, get ready to participate in a thought-provoking CIS. It's all about water and it's about time w e start caring. " A s individuals we do not live in an island," Gonzales said. "What may not touch us now, will eventually reach out and touch us."

College-savy ways t o save w a t e r ~ Be aware of any leaks or drips from faucets. Dripping nonstop all day, everyday can certainly add up. Make sure all faucets are completely turned off before you walk away. - Take shorter showers. Be shower efficient. Turn off the water while you wash your hair to save up to 150 gallons a month. ~ Stop leaving the water on while shaving, washing your face or brushing your teeth. There's no need to have water running non stop when ~ ~ ~ ~

y o u ' r e not directly using the water. When washing dishes by hand, don't let the water run while rinsing. Fill one sink with wash water and the other with rinse water. For cold drinks keep a pitcher of water in the refrigerator instead of running the tap. This way, every drop goes down you and not the drain. Washing dark clothes in cold water saves both on water and energy while it helps your clothes to keep their colors. Share water conservation tips with friends and neighbors.


8

VOICES

THE ANCHOR

SEPTEMBER 3 0 , 2 0 0 9

Quote for thought

Musings on mutual misunderstandings

Kate S c h r a m p f e r Columnist

Karen Patterson Co-Editor-in-Chief

Never give up! "You should never give up, even if you're falling off a cliff. You never know what might happen on the way down." - N a n c y Farmer, author of "The Land of Silver Apples."

A culture of waste In recent years, the cool, hip thing has been to become "green" and to be environmentally friendly. However, what started as a fad has become a cultural issue. I'll admit, I was skeptical when all of a sudden the world's supply of celebrities and athletes started shouting, "Save the environment! Recycle! Conserve water!" It seemed like this was just a phase people were going through, like super-blonde highlights or Ugg boots. I think it was when A1 Gore went and made a movie, though, that I really took notice. While I still haven't seen the movie, it's becoming nearly impossible to get away from the message. I know that as college students, we are constantly being preached at. O u r professors tell us to study harder, o u r advisors tell us to think about the future, and our parents tell us not to become total screw-ups (some are more tactful about this than others). I don't want to preach, especially since I'm no expert on environmental issues. I would like to take the opportunity, though, to point out some things that maybe we haven't thought about. This years Critical Issues Symposium topic is water. Water is something that many of us take for granted, whether or not we realize it. A few weeks ago I had a chance to meet with Alfredo Gonzales, one of the administrators responsible for putting CIS together every year. He shared some different ideas to get students riled up that the committee came up with. My personal favorite was the concept of turning the water off in all of the dorms except Cook. There was a pause while I processed what it would mean and then I burst into a fit of giggles. Cook Hall would be stormed at all hours of the day with students begging to use the bathroom, brush their teeth and shower. Since the bathrooms are set up within the suites, any outsiders would have to call in favors to people they know living in Cook. Those unlucky enough not to know anyone residing there (primarily freshmen), would either resort to showering in the Dow locker rooms or pulling the emergency showers in the science center labs. As amusing as the concept is, obviously the school isn't going to turn the water off in any single dorm much less all of them. They're working to come up with other initiatives, though. Phelps going trayless has been a big one and is forefronting the initiative. However, the water issue can't involve just the administration coming up with ideas. There's a student group working to help further the campus's knowledge, but we have to take this and run with it, too. I'm not going to give out little snippets of sound advice because then I'd be preaching, and with tongue firmly in cheek I'd hate to be accused of that, but I definitely want to encourage people to go out next week to the Critical Issues Symposium. Yes, 1 realize that it's a free day f r o m classes and going shopping with friends or curling up and having a movie marathon sounds much more tun. 1 just don't understand why anyone would want to waste an amazing opportunity to learn something not just about our campus but about the world around us and how what we do affects it. Shoot, I still ended up preaching a little....

It's been a long week. The quarter mark of the semester has come and gone, and I hardly noticed it; I've been so busy. My to do list is endless: I cross one thing off only to scribble down six more. There are a million e-mails in my inbox, waiting impatiently to be answered. There are meetings and clubs and lectures that I want to attend. They're all laying claim to my time, which suddenly seems more and more limited. W h e n do I get to just sit and chill with friends? W h e n do I get to hang out at Lemonjello's or go to the beach to watch the sun set? W h e n do I get to sleep, for that matter? I honestly don't know the answer to that. W h e n I arrived at Hope about a month ago, I felt like I was standing on the very top of a mountain. I could see everything around me clearly. I knew what I wanted to do and how I was going to do it, and it was going to be a piece of cake. I was excited, I was energized, and I couldn't wait to begin. I don't feel like that so much anymore. I still love Hope, but I feel like I'm falling, sliding hooshing down the mountain now. So much to do, so much to think about! I try to dig in my heels, to grab hold of something, anything, to slow me down, to break my fall, but I can't. I can't change the fact that I have a test in two days that I need to study for, but don't know where I'll find the time. I can't change the fact that on Friday night there are four separate social engagements all going on at once, and I can't go to all of them, so I'm going to have to pick one. I can't change the fact that I only got five and a half hours of sleep last night, and probably won't get much more tonight. It's overwhelming. I'm falling down this cliff and I can't see what's at the bottom. I don t know what's going to happen by next week, let alone by the end of the year. W h a t am I supposed to do? That's where the quote for thought comes in: "You should never give up, even if you re falling off a cliff. You never know what might happen on the way down." Yes, I'm insanely busy. You are too, I bet. But that's part of college, right? It may feel like you just took a tumble off a cliff, but it's such a rush! You are falling, but it's a thrilling, exhilarating free-fall! And the things that make life so crazy, the things that happen on the way down—really, they're so much fun! They're what college is all about! So don't give up when you feel swamped with all the stuff you need to do. Spread your arms wide and fall with style. Take in all you can, and enjoy the surprises the free-fall brings. See you at the bottom! Kate knows you are super busy, but encourages you to never give up!

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VOICES

SEPTEMBER 3 0 , 2 0 0 9

Chris O'Brien

Bryant Russ

Assistant Sports Editor

Columnist

Adam didn't finish

College and acne

The Genesis creation account tells of how God gave Adam the job of naming all t h e animals (Gen. 2:19&20). I imagine Adam laughing his head off when he saw some of the creatures God had invented. "What are you thinking, God? A 6 foot bird that can't fly! Really?" I can also see Adam taking a knee at the sight of a beautiful peacpck, or the formidable lion. Each new creature must have given him a new understanding and appreciation of God—a God who is as wild as a horse, lovely as a swan and as awesome as an elephant. But here's the cool part: Adam didn't finish. Sure, we've got names for most of the animals, but what about everything else God created? Today I was walking in the library and randomly picked up a book titled, "Applications for the Study of Organic Reactions", and thought, "What the heck?" I don't even know what an organic reaction is, but I can picture God thinking, "Hmm, I'm going to make something crazy," then hundreds of years later somebody comes along and discovers this thing God built into the world's DNA and says, "I'll call this phen o m e n o n an organic reaction." Everyday something new is discovered that tells us more about the wonder of creation, and therefore the wonder of the creator. O u r imaginative ideas about God get more complex, more organized, more awe-struck and wonder-filled as we learn and discover new things in the fields of biology, astronomy, cosmology, mathematics, zoology and geology, to name just a few. O u r eyes should be opened wide in consideration and curiosity of this crazy place in which we live. So dig deep. Explore. Learn new things. It just so happens that if you're reading this article you're probably a college student. Perfect. That's pretty much our job. 1 know, I know, what I'm describing as fun and exciting isn't exactly the same thing as trying to punch out an eight-page paper at 2 a.m., but it can be incredibly helpful to see learning as discovery instead of the tedious path to a good job. So have a look around.

College and acne. The two should not go hand in hand, but yet they do. I thought that after the epic acne battles of middle school I would be in the clear, I was wrong then. I thought that after fighting the occasional battles in high school that there would be no possible way this could continue into college. But no, acne lingers around a college campus like a bad case of the swine flu, waiting to prey on unsuspecting students. As college students, we are left with very few defenses that are even remotely effective. If you are a girl you have some makeup and cover-up options, but for guys the same extra layer of concealer does not fly as well. Guys are left with the "grow a beard defense" for the lower half of the face and the "wear a ridiculously curved hat" approach for the forehead. Both prove to be mediocre strategies at best. So how can a college student defeat acne? Do you come at it with a full court press or slow the game down to a 2-3 zone? (Use a blitz or a prevent defense for the football fans.) Clearasil/OXY pads Apply this burning layer of rubbing alcohol to the facial region and watch your pimples painfully... not go away. Proactiv/off-brand AcneFree 3-bottle solution A decent strategy. However, there are many flaws. First off, Proactiv is advertised by Jessica Simpson for a reason. Sure, they tried to throw in P-Diddy to make it cool for guys to use it too, but let's be honest, nothing says not-macho better than rolling into your d o r m bathroom with three bottles of Proactiv in one hand and your wash cloth/cotton ball combo in the other. And coming in with the acne free off brand is not fooling anyone either.

RS. An organic reaction is a chemical reaction involving organic compounds, The oldest organic reactions involve the combustion of organic fuels with types of fat to make soap. (Thanks, Wikipedia.com.)

Bryant still isn 'C really sure what an organic reaction is...

Jlettvi fa the Zditow Sexuality Roundtable sees contradiction in decision to not host speaker

Over the course of the past month, the Hope College Sexuality Roundtable: A Forum for Gay and Straight Students (GSF) has worked to organize and facilitate an event featuring Dustin Lance Black, screenwriter of the award-winning film "Milk," on Hope's campus. O u r intentions were to facilitate an academic discussion of the social a n d political implications of the events surrounding the life and times of Harvey Milk; more specifically, the implications of these events for conversations surrounding issues of homosexuality in communities such as Hope College and Holland. The event was to take place this semester and was supported by several academic

9

From the inside out

Beautiful Feet

Dear Editors:

THE ANCHOR

Sincerely, Sexuality Roundtable: A Forum for Gay and Straight Students (GSF) Leadership: Seth Carlson ('10) Timothy Brandt ('10) Claire Roembach - Clark ('12) Meagan Johnson ('12)

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stration of prejudice, discrimination, and censorship, which is unacceptable. We apologize to our fellow Hope students for the board and president's shameful handling of this situation. We hope that this embarrassment to Hope College's academic and Christian reputation can be properly redressed by our community's response, in the form of ongoing discussion.

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Stay away from milk and sweets Can't give up my Phelps chocolate milk, soft serve ice cream and oreo bits milkshake alongside a piece of the always not-as-satisfyingas-it-looks frosted cake.

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Acutane medication The dangerous alternative. It will eliminate all future breakouts in your life, but may have the scariest side effects of any drug out there. The fine print is horrifying, with possible side effects of depression, suicidal tendencies, strokes and seizures, just to name a few. O n top of the possible side effects, are warnings such as staying out of the sun as much as you possibly can. So yes, if you have high self-esteem and are willing to spend six months in a cave, the results are worth it. At the end of your six months, you can literally rub a Pizza H u t P'Zone on your face and see no consequences arise.

and honesty] as they participate in campus discussions, whether in the classroom, in conversations, or during public events. (These values] are not intended to inhibit the free and energetic expression of views. Rather, they are offered as a set of commitments guiding public expression that should foster and energize an open and constructive discussion of our varying perspectives." GSF continues to strive to abide by these commitments, and if Hope's very "Reason for Being" is to be "a place of open inquiry," its board, president and donors must support this vision, as well. We are dismayed by the contradiction evident in the College board and president's decision, and believe it is a clear demon-

ceedingly disappointed that the college's board and president have chosen to take this stance, especially considering the academic nature of this event, and notes the contradiction evidenced by the fact that another academic department has, in fact, received the college's permission to host Black for a similar event. Hope College declares in its "Reason for Being" that it is "a place of open inquiry, acceptance of intellectual challenge, rigorous engagement with hard questions, and vigorous but civil discussion of different beliefs and understandings." In addition, according to Hope's "Virtues of Public Discourse," Hope's students "will have opportunities to practice [the virtues of humility, patience, hospitality, courage.

departments. Last week, however, the dean of students informed GSF that the college board and president's office would not allow the event on campus, and that their position was non-negotiable. The dean of students enumerated two reasons for this decision. First, "Dustin Lance Black's advocacy would be too strong for campus." Second, the event and Dustin Lance Black would "polarize" the campus, prompting counter responses f r o m other groups that would further impede the discussion of these emotionally charged topics. In addition, concerns were raised about donor support, which could place stress on the college's finances. GSF's leadership board is ex-

Secondly, if you are on Proactiv and, heaven forbid, you forget to p u t it on one morning or night, your acne attacks more strongly than ever before. To get the best results from Proactiv you truly have to sell your soul over to it and apply it day and night for two months/two years.

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NEWS

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SEPTEMBER 3 0 . 2 0 0 9

Battle over Black River: Hope anticipates 112th pull b a n k s of t h e Black River near U S . 31 a n d M-21). The public is invited. Admission is free.

H O P E PR - T h e H o p e College Pull tug-of-war, a 112year tradition, will be held o n Saturday, O c t . 3, at 3 p.m. o n t h e

The Pull, first held in 1898, is an annual fall highlight at Hope. Inthecompetition,freshmanand s o p h o m o r e teams, e n t r e n c h e d

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in shallow pits on opposite sides of t h e river, a t t e m p t to gain t h e most rope through their strength and s t a m i n a . Each t e a m has 18 s t u d e n t s o n t h e r o p e as "pullers" and a n o t h e r 18 acting as guides and m o r a l e boosters, or "moralers." The f r e s h m e n are coached by t h e j u n i o r class while t h e s o p h o m o r e s are i n s t r u c t e d by the seniors. The coaching arrangement also leads to a rivalry b e t w e e n the even-year and odd-year classes. This year's Pull will pit m e m b e r s of t h e Classes of 2012 (sophomores) and 2013 ( f r e s h m e n ) against o n e another. The s o p h o m o r e s will be o n t h e n o r t h side of t h e river (nearest Lakewood Boulevard) and t h e f r e s h m e n will be o n t h e s o u t h side of t h e river (nearest M - 2 1 / C h i c a g o Drive). The Class of 1 1 , w h i c h will be coaching the f r e s h m e n , w o n last year's Pull. T h e class had also w o n as f r e s h m e n , t h e first class since t h e Class of 2000 to win b o t h years. In 1977, t h e Pull set a record for length and u n i q u e n e s s . The freshmen and sophomores

tugged for t h r e e h o u r s and 51 m i n u t e s b e f o r e judges called a tie d u e to darkness. In contrast, t h e shortest Pull lasted two m i n u t e s and 4 0 s e c o n d s in 1956. N e w rules were i m p l e m e n t e d in 1978, following t h e 1977 m a r a t h o n , limiting the event's d u r a t i o n . The rules n o w allow the j u d g e s to d e t e r m i n e the winning class by m e a s u r i n g t h e

P H O T O BY A N N G R E E N

a m o u n t of r o p e pulled f r o m t h e o t h e r t e a m if o n e t e a m has not claimed all of t h e rope within t h r e e hours. Through the years, the sophomores and even-year classes have held t h e edge in t h e win-loss c o l u m n . Since 1909, t h e s o p h o m o r e s have taken 62 contests to t h e f r e s h m a n class's 30; t h e eveny e a r / o d d - y e a r split for t h e s a m e p e r i o d is 53 t o 39. There have been four d r a w s and four cancellations since 1909.

Hope students and MIPS • MIP, f r o m p a g e 1

Always boarding. Never bored. When the walk close in. it's lime for a toad inc- And there's no better way few getting around Holland than riding the MAX. Our 8 fixed routes go everyvvhere • to fte mate, stores, bowling aod movies. You do^'t have to be a finance rnajo' to know that ridins MAX sa-ves big buc'<s. One wayi fares are s l i l l j u s i $ ! . 0? buy a Student Semesle? Pass fo' S50fo^ unlimited -ides on the eight $xed bus routes all semester long. Visit www.catchamax.org for bus routes and schedules or t o purchase a bus pass onlim*.

allegation. Students are i n f o r m e d of t h e charge, may decide if they feel t h e y are r e s p o n s i b l e o r not, share their side of t h e story, a n d t h e n H o p e will make t h e i r decisions with this i n f o r m a t i o n a n d any evidence. O n c e H o p e has m a d e their decision and a s t u d e n t is f o u n d t o b e in violation of t h e regulations, there a r e several a v e n u e s of action. S o m e of these include b u t are not limited to: a c o m p u t e r - b a s e d alcohol e d u c a t i o n p r o g r a m , c o m m u n i t y service, alcohol a d d i c t i o n sessions with t h e counseling services, r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s by t h e courts, or r a n d o m breathalyzer tests. Regardless of t h e c o n s e q u e n c e s ,

s t u d e n t d e v e l o p m e n t is t h e office t h a t w o r k s with these issues. C a m p u s safety is involved with t h e aid a n d t h e safety of an intoxicated s t u d e n t as well as t h e disposal of material. In t h e end, t h e office of stud e n t d e v e l o p m e n t recognizes t h a t only a small percentage of t h e s t u d e n t b o d y is affected by MIPs. In these cases they feel t h e r e are t w o r e s p o n s e s : to ack n o w l e d g e t h e violation and get mad, or to a c k n o w l e d g e and learn. Frost feels strongly that his "role is t o e d u c a t e responsibility" a n d to h e l p s t u d e n t s learn. Overall, h e c o m m e n d s t h e stud e n t b o d y and h o p e s s t u d e n t s c o n t i n u e learning w h o they a r e with regards to their values a n d h o w it will impact their f u t u r e s .

New studens join Phelps Scholars • P h e l p s , from page 1 m e m o r a b l e vacation t o t h e seashore. "I h e a r d f r o m f r i e n d s 1 n e e d t h e m e m o r i e s of sun and w a r m t h d u r i n g t h e cold m o n t h s , so I b r o u g h t t h e sand," said Jackson. Finally, Stewart a n d Wittig commented on how their experience in living in different c o u n t r i e s has given t h e m a global perspective. "I'm not used to h o w rich (America] is. I get a n n o y e d w h e n all p e o p l e talk a b o u t is music and movies," said

Stewart. "They don't have any idea w h a t it's like for people in t h i r d world countries, for t h e f a r m e r s there." Wittig said, "I wish I could bring my f r i e n d s to Egypt to get a taste of t h e culture. I also want t h e m t o see a n e w point of view and get involved in helping o t h e r c o u n t r i e s in need back home." This idea of o n e p e r s o n affecting c h a n g e in o t h e r s is n o t h i n g new, but p e e r s e d u c a t i n g each o t h e r a b o u t t h e world a r o u n d t h e m will never lose its value.


SPORTS

SEPTEMBER 3 0 , 2 0 0 9

THE ANCHOR

Enthusiasm builds as stadium nears completion Daniel Owens GUEST W R I T E R

Excitement is in t h e air for t h e H o p e College m e n s and w o m e n ' s soccer t e a m s . Talented rosters, a s u m m e r trip t o Europe and t h e o p e n i n g of a multi-million dollar s t a d i u m give t h e players r e a s o n to believe t h e 2009 season will b e a memorable one. O n t h e men's side, t h e Flying D u t c h m e n a r e off to a solid start, posting a record of 4 - 2 in n o n c o n f e r e n c e play. Despite losses t o W h e a t o n and Elmhurst by a single goal, t h e t e a m r e m a i n s optimistic a b o u t their progress. "Things have gone well so far this season. We've had a few m i n o r setbacks and c o m e o u t flat in s o m e games, b u t we've also defeated t e a m s r a n k e d eighth and t e n t h in t h e nation. Those wins over North Park a n d Kenyon were h u g e confidence-builders as we go into c o n f e r e n c e play," senior captain Saab Schwiebert ( 1 0 ) said. Schwiebert is o p t i m i s t i c about t h e team's c h a n c e s for success in t h e M1AA. " W e are going to do all w e can to w i n conference, and if we are able t o c a r r y t h e m o m e n t u m f r o m o u r n o n - c o n f e r e n c e w i n s into t h e M1AA season, I think we can bring h o m e t h e championship," Schwiebert said. The men's t e a m began their q u e s t for t h e title in fine fashion with a 1-0 w i n over K a l a m a z o o in t h e c o n f e r e n c e o p e n e r last week and c o n t i n u e d by defeating Trine, 2-1, o n Saturday. "We've had s o m e y o u n g guys step u p and m a k e i m p o r t a n t c o n t r i b u t i o n s right away. Jeff E k d o m ('13) scored the g a m e winner against Kalamazoo, and Shaun G r o e t s e m a ('12) has

played a huge role in t h e success of our defense. H e d r o p p e d back to sweeper this year after s p e n d i n g last season as a forward and o u t s i d e midfielder and has played p h e n o m e n a l l y well for us," Schwiebert said. The Flying Dutch's season t h u s far h a s been a m i x t u r e of exhilarationanddisappointment. After o p e n i n g t h e season with t h r e e consecutive wins, they finished n o n - c o n f e r e n c e play with a .500 record of 4-4. v " N o n - c o n f e r e n c e play went well. In s o m e games we were given o p p o r t u n i t i e s to s h o w h o w m u c h talent we have as a team, and in o t h e r g a m e s we had the c h a n c e to take step back and learn f r o m o u r mistakes as a team," senior c a p t a i n Kirsten K a u f m a n ('10) said. K a u f m a n is eager t o o p e n u p M I A A this week. "We have a lot of talented players and a very strong f r e s h m a n class with Tricia Bajema ('13), Ali Epolito ('13) a n d Lindsay lipping ('13) leading t h e way. Right n o w it's just a m a t t e r of p u t t i n g the whole picture together t o m e e t our high expectations. I believe we will have a successful season in t h e MIAA," K a u f m a n said. F r e s h m a n f o r w a r d Lindsay lipping is grateful for t h e s u p p o r t s h e has received f r o m the upperclassmen on the team. "It's been great to be a p a r t of t h e team," Jipping said. " C o m i n g in n e w as a f r e s h m a n , I like h o w e v e r y o n e h a s b e e n so nice t o m e and easy to talk to. The captains have b e e n helpful, and there is definitely great c a m a r a d e r i e o n t h e team." Part of this c a m a r a d e r i e was f o r m e d o n t h e team's trip t o

GUEST WRITER

In m o s t s p o r t s , athletes dread t h e p a r t of practice w h e n coach says, "Everybody o n t h e line." For t h e H o p e College men's cross c o u n t r y team, their r u n n i n g is not a few sets of sprints. R u n n e r N a t e Love ('12) described what "on t h e line" m e a n s for t h e H o p e cross

country team. "(We run] a two-mile w a r m up, followed u p by t w o 800 m e t e r s at a fast pace, t h e n f o u r 1,200 m e t e r r u n s fast paced," Love ( 1 2 ) said The men's cross c o u n t r y t e a m r u n s a b o u t 10 miles in each practice. This m a y s e e m like an excruciating task, b u t t h e t e a m is able t o u s e this t i m e to help build unity a m o n g t h e members.

208 W 18th St. Holland, MI 49423-4123

OPEM Monday-Wednesday Thursday-Saturday Sunday

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Sept. 30

vs. Trine 6 : 3 0 p.m.

Saturday Men's Soccer

Oct. 3

vs. A l m a at 2 : 3 0 p.r

Tuesday Men's Soccer '

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Oct. 6

vs. A d r i a n at 4 p . m .

syH&i?.. <-•f: IN BRIEF VOLLEYBALL ON TOP OF

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O n Saturday, Sept. 26, Hope's volleyball t e a m took o n Calvin b e f o r e over 1400 fans in DeVos Fieldhouse. Both t e a m s were u n d e f e a t e d in M I A A play going into t h e m a t c h . The Flying D u t c h swept t h e Knights in t h r e e sets, 25-22, 25-25, 25-18. Kara Vand e G u t c h e ('11) and Jacie Fiedler ('12) led t h e t e a m with ten kills P H O T O BY A L I S O N G A R Z A each. Kristen Johnson ('10) had 18 digs and Andrea Helminiak F I N A L G A M E A T B U Y S — The l a s t home g a m e on Buys Ath('10) had 36 assists. The t e a m l e t i c Fields t o o k place on Sept. 1 6 a g a i n s t Elmhurst. had 14 blocks total. The volley" W e a r e having t h e official ball t e a m n o w h a s sole posession E u r o p e over t h e s u m m e r . dedication o n O c t . 17 and we of t h e t o p s p o t in t h e M I A A with "Europe definitely b r o u g h t would love to have p e o p l e stay a 6 - 0 M I A A record and a 13-1 o u r t e a m closer since we w e r e a r o u n d o n Fall Break t o see the record overall. They will look to able t o s p e n d everyday together. game. It's going to be a sweet i m p r o v e o n that t o n i g h t as they That h a s translated o n t o o u r event," Schwiebert said. take o n T r i n e at 6:30 p.m. field play and improved o u r T h o u g h t h e dedication of the communication," K a u f m a n said. s t a d i u m may n o t be until Oct. MIAA W h a t e v e r their r e c o r d s may P L A Y E R S O F THE WEEK 17, t h e first g a m e o n t h e turf be at t h e e n d of t h e season, b o t h t o o k place Sept. 29 w h e n t h e t e a m s eagerly await t h e o p e n i n g men's t e a m took o n Albion. Football of Van Andel Stadium. S t u d e n t s can catch t h e m Kyle Warren C o n s i d e r e d t o be o n e of t h e in action again o n Saturday as Defensive Player of the Week p r e m i e r facilities in Division they take o n Alma. The w o m e n ' s III, t h e soccer-specific c o m p l e x first g a m e at Van A n d e l is next Football will h o u s e b o t h t e a m s and seat Josh Echtinaw Tuesday. a r o u n d 1,400 spectators. Special Teams Player o f the Week

Men's cross country team has strong start to season Jake Bajema

T H I S W E E K IN SPORTS

Wednesday Volleyball

•4 • I

11

o u t of the H o p e m e n , c o m i n g in "In o u r w o r k o u t s , we have 6V{ out of 218 participants. Coguys o n breaks e n c o u r a g i n g each o t h e r as they run, as well as c a p t a i n M a t t W i e r s u m ('10), t h e only r e t u r n i n g all-MIAA r u n n e r staying in packs at meets," Love o n t h e team, was t h e next Flying said. D u t c h m a n to finish with a t i m e The Flying D u t c h m e n have participated in t h r e e different of 27:09. This past w e e k e n d , H o p e m e e t s so far this year. Their hosted the MIAA jamboree. s e a s o n began o n Labor Day The results of t h e j a m b o r e e w e e k e n d as they h o s t e d t h e d e t e r m i n e o n e - t h i r d of t h e Bill Vanderbilt Invitational at seasonal c h a m p i o n , while t h e Ridge Point C h u r c h in Holland. final m e e t in O c t o b e r d e t e r m i n e s Overall, t h e t e a m finished in the other two-tbirds. t h i r d place. Hope's m e n placed second Love led t h e t e a m with a b e h i n d Calvin with 77 points. 12 ,h place finish, finishing t h e Love led t h e m e n with a fifth course in 26:37. Kevin H a g a n place finish. W i e r s u m was t h e ('11), Jacob Batch ('13), Lucas next H o p e r u n n e r to cross t h e W o l t h u i s ('10) and c o - c a p ta in finish line, c o m i n g in 16 lh place Kent Reschke ('10) also claimed overall. spots 15 t h r o u g h 18 for t h e The t e a m will c o n t i n u e team. preparing for the MIAA O n Sept. 18, the t e a m traveled to East Lansing to ••'championships next week as they travel to Lansing for t h e test themselves in t h e Spartan Lansing C o m m u n i t y College Invitational, h o s t e d by Michigan Invitational. The t e a m will State University. then participate in three m o r e Over 4,500 runners n o n c o n f e r e n c e m e e t s that will participated in this massive 14help t h e m p r e p a r e for the M I A A race event. T h e college races c o n f e r e n c e c h a m p i o n s h i p at t h e included t e a m s f r o m N C A A end of October. Division I, II and III schools. Love o n c e againfinishedfirst

Soccer Shaun Groetsema Defensive Player of the Week F O O T B A L L FALLS TO WHEATON

Hope's football t e a m traveled t o W h e a t o n College o n Saturday t o t a k e o n t h e nationally r a n k e d T h u n d e r of W h e a t o n College. After allowing 20 points in a t h r e e - m i n u t e s p a n in t h e first quarter, the Flying D u t c h m e n held W h e a t o n t o just 12 p o i n t s in t h e remaining t h r e e q u a r ters. Despite scoring in each of t h e final t h r e e quarters, H o p e w a s defeated by W h e a t o n , 2032. Tailback T i m Elzinga ('11) scored t w o t o u c h d o w n s for t h e t e a m on r u n s of 10 and 2 yards. Jared H u d s o n (TO) received a 16 -yard pass f r o m C h r i s Feys ('11) t o score the third t o u c h d o w n for t h e Flying D u t c h m e n . The t e a m w r a p s u p its n o n c o n f e r e n c e season with an 0 - 4 record. They will begin M I A A play o n Saturday at Trine. Their h o m e c o n f e r e n c e o p e n e r will be H o m e c o m i n g o n O c t . 10, as the t e a m takes o n Albion at 2 p.m. at Holland M u nicipal Stadium.


[2

SPORTS

THE ANCHOR

Men's golf team

SEPTEMBER 3 0 , 2 0 0 9

Vollevball defeats Calvin

remains in top spot in MIAA s o p h o m o r e s , and m a n y of t h e m a r e c o n t r i b u t i n g greatly to t h e t e a m . The t e a m s age doesn't w o r r y Strock, w h o actually The Flying Dutchmen thinks they can use their y o u n g m a n a g e d to win the season's t h i r d j a m b o r e e and have n o w age to their advantage. " W i t h such a y o u n g team, I m o v e d into first place in t h e think we can get H o p e College M I A A standings. This p u t s men's golf back to w h e r e it was t h e m well o n their way t o their a few years ago w h e n we w o n m a i n goal a c c o r d i n g to senior the c o n f e r e n c e eight o u t of n i n e c a p t a i n Steven Strock. years," Strock said. "I* k n o w this "If we w i n t h e c o n f e r e n c e , t e a m is capable of w i n n i n g every we get an a u t o m a t i c bid to t h e MIAA tournament from here National C h a m p i o n s h i p in May, a n d o u t and t h a t will be o u r and it has b e e n o u r goal since goal." t h e b e g i n n i n g of t h e season to In o t h e r D u t c h m e n news, get that bid," Strock said. C h r i s Ansel ('11) m a d e school Strock was t h e medalist in history earlier this m o n t h by this most r e c e n t J a m b o r e e as h e scoring H o p e Colleges s e c o n d led H o p e to surpass rival Calvin hole-in-one. W h i l e in o r d e r to win. participating with His r o u n d of his t e a m m a t e s at 71 included a I know this team is Bedford Valley 32 o n the f r o n t C o u n t r y C l u b in capable of winning n i n e a n d 39 o n Olivet at an M I A A t h e back nine. every M I A A tournajamboree, Ansel H o p e finished ment f r o m here on aced t h e 208-yard, at 302 strokes out and that will be par-three 11 th with Calvin our goal. hole. He hit t h e following close — STEVEN STROCK ball into t h e wind behind with CAPTAIN and it b o u n c e d a 304. c o u p l e of t i m e s The t e a m 55 before dropping feels like they into t h e hole. a r e in a great "He said he put his club away position in t h e c o n f e r e n c e n o w b e c a u s e he t h o u g h t it (stopped) that they are up five strokes, but close to t h e hole, b u t t h e n s o m e that doesn't m e a n their hard p e o p l e up by t h e g r e e n started work is d o n e . yelling, and he realized it had "In o r d e r t o stay in first g o n e in the hole a n d just started place, we need to keep w o r k i n g going crazy!" N y k a m p said. hard in practice and m a k e s u r e A h o l e - i n - o n e is exciting a n d we don't settle for anything rare for golfers of every level, so less t h a n first place in every this day m e a n t a lot to Ansel. t o u r n a m e n t , " Strock said. "After I realized t h e ball went T h e Flying Dutchmen's in, I high-fived a n d celebrated d e p t h of talent is key t o with t h e o t h e r two m e m b e r s of maintaining their MIAA m y playing group," Ansel said. position. "It was my first h o l e - i n - o n e a n d " W e have a solid and d e e p t e a m this year w h e r e a lot of it felt great." O n Saturday, t h e t e a m guys can c o n t r i b u t e and play traveled to T r i n e for t h e fifth well continually," Caleb N y k a m p M I A A j a m b o r e e of t h e season. ( 1 2 ) said. "We just have t o stay Despite finishing in second place, focused t h r o u g h t h e e n d of t h e t h e Flying D u t c h m e n d o u b l e d year." t h e i r lead in t h e conference. Although t h e t e a m is young, Strock and Charles O l s o n ('13) their youth is not holding t h e m b o t h took medalist h o n o r s with back f r o m success. The roster includes f o u r f r e s h m e n and five 7 0 strokes each. Kaci Kust

GUEST WRITER

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P H O T O BY A L I S O N S A P Z A

S W E E T T A S T E O F V I C T O R Y — Hope's volleyball t e a m c e l e b r a t e s a f t e r p u t t i n g Calvin away In t h r e e sets on Saturday at DeVos Fieldhouse. See brief o n page 1 1 .

Off-season training pays off for cross country C h r i s Ray GUEST WRITER

c h e m i s t r y is w o r k i n g very well." The t e a m is led by c a p t a i n s Joanne Gabl ('10), Jackie Beeler ('10) and Emily Fischer ('11), including sophomore r u n n e r s Karly Sikma ('12), Kate Nelson ('12) and Kelly Lufldn ('12). W i t h a s t r o n g nucleus of u p p e r c l a s s m e n r u n n e r s leading t h e pack, t h e leadership has not been limited to practices. T h e veterans are also leading t h e s q u a d d u r i n g t h e meets, bringing out t h e best in the underclassmen. " W e have a s t r o n g nucleus of r u n n e r s led by Fischer, Sikma,

However, t h e t e a m is still looking ahead t o t h e rest of the season. The girls have b o t h s h o r t - t e r m a n d longt e r m goals t h a t they would like t o accomplish t h r o u g h o u t the season. R u n n i n g well in upcoming meets, especially against c o n f e r e n c e foes such as nationally ranked Calvin, is always a s h o r t - t e r m goal for t h e team, b u t t h e story behind their l o n g - t e r m goal dates back to last season. " L o n g - t e r m , our goal is t o improve o n our placing at Regionals f r o m last year, w h e r e we got n i n t h place," Fischer said. The team knows the

They can feel their lungs b u r n i n g , their legs g r o w i n g tired and their h e a d s perspiring. That's what the w o m e n ' s cross c o u n t r y deals with every race as they try not only t o improve their individual t i m e s but also t h e overall t e a m time. Already s h o w i n g signs of p r o m i s e in the season, t h e relatively y o u n g t e a m is looking a h e a d t o their conference meets. In t h e t w o m e e t s that t h e t e a m has c o m p e t e d in t h u s far, t h e m e m b e r s s e e m h a p p y with the results. On Sept. 5, t h e t e a m hosted the Vanderbilt upcoming Invitational, conference a 5K meet in meets will which they have a different placed s e c o n d atmosphere behind G r a n d t h a n t h e first Valley State t w o m e e t s of t h e University, season. a Division II "I'm looking school. The f o r ward to the team then big races t h e travelled to most," Fischer the campus said. "I prefer of Michigan ' P H O T O BY H O L L Y E V E N H O U S E big m e e t S t a t e S T A R T I N G S T R O N G — T h e w o m e n ' s cross c o u n t r y t e a m began t h e a t m o s p h e r e , and University to c o n f e r e n c e c o m p e t i t i o n at t h e MIAA j a m b o r e e Saturday. I like c o m p e t i n g r u n in th e ir against big fields w h e r e there's N e l s o n and Lufkin," N o r t h u i s first 6K race, t h e usual distance tough competition." said. "Four f r e s h m e n have for th e ir m e e t s t h r o u g h o u t the Over the w e e k e n d , t h e Flying also s h o w n great p r o m i s e this season. A l t h o u g h scores were D u t c h c o m p e t e d against seven season. They are Sharon Hecker not officially kept, the t e a m w a s o t h e r M I A A t e a m s in t h e first ('13), Katie M a r t i n ('13), Taylor h a p p y with their p e r f o r m a n c e . and only M I A A j a m b o r e e of Mattarella ('13) and M o r g a n "The meet w a s not scored, t h e season. T h o u g h rival Calvin M c C a r d e l (13)." but we were t h e 'unofficial' t o p swept t h e first five places, H o p e T h e team's off-season h a r d Division III t e a m in t h e meet," was able to c o m e in s e c o n d work h a s led to the great work head coach M a r k N o r t h u i s said. overall. Sikma led t h e t e a m with ethic seen d u r i n g t h e season. "This was a very large m e e t a ninth place finish and Fisher With some women running including Division I a n d Division c a m e in tenth. 40 to 55 miles per week in t h e II t e a m s . We held o u r own." Knowing full well that t h e W i t h such p r o m i s i n g results s u m m e r , the w o m e n c a m e into upcoming conference meets the season c o n d i t i o n e d a n d c o m i n g f r o m t h e early season ready to practice. According to could m a k e or break their season, meets, t h e t e a m doesn't s e e m t h e y o u n g t e a m is ready to take N o r t h u i s , t h e t e a m r u n s o n trails, to be b o t h e r e d by its overall o n t h e challenge of b e c o m i n g in parks, t h r o u g h cornfields or to youth. W i t h 27 total athletes o n t h e MIAA's t o p t e a m . With the b e a c h e s of Lake Michigan in t h e team, only t h r e e a r e seniors c o n t i n u e d hard work, they could a typical practice. The r u n n e r s c o m p a r e d to 10 f r e s h m e n . p e r h a p s be carrying a first place don't s e e m to m i n d . "The upperclassmen are t r o p h y with t h e m o n their r u n s "I look f o r w a r d to practice helping the n e w c o m e r s learn h o w t o train a n d race in college," every day. It is so m u c h fun," t h r o u g h the parks, cornfields and to t h e beach. M c C a r d e l said. N o r t h u i s said. "The t e a m

09-30-2009