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Traditional Pull Pits Class Against Class By George Arwady P U L L - 1. to exert torce o n so as to c a u s e to m o v e t o w a r d the s o u r c e of the fore.' 2. to d r a w ap a r t , tear 3. to stretch b a c k a n d forth repeatedly 4. to s t r a i n to the point of i n j u r y . T h e s e a r e Webster's definitions )f the pull. The H o p e College pull m e a n s all of these t h i n g s a n d m u c h more. It m e a n s t r a d i t i o n a l s t r u g g l e - a battle between classes in which spirit is the w e a p o n a n d g l o r y the prize. T h i s Centennial y e a r the battle will be renewed as the f r e s h m a n a n d s o p h o m o r e classes meet Oct. 8 on the b a n k s of the Black River. B e g u n in 1 8 9 8 a s a s i m p l e tugof-war, the pull, o v e r the y e a r s , h a s evolved f r o m a s p o r t to a science, whh specific rules, techniques, a n d t r a d i t i o n s . Basically 18 m e n f r o m e a c h of the two classes line u p o n o p p o s i t e b a n k s of the river. On a s i g n a l the 3 6 competitors s p r i n g into action with s h o v e l s , e a c h d i g g i n g a hole which will s e r v e as his s u p p o r t a n d b r a c e t h r o u g h o u t the g r u e l i n g struggle. T h e r o p e used this y e a r will stretch ten feet b e y o n d the last, or a n c h o r m a n of e a c h t e a m . Wheji

the holes a r e d u g , a n d the g u n fired, the pull begins. In u n i s o n , each team a l t e r n a t e s h e a v e s a n d Ipcks in o b e d i e n c e to s i g n a l s giv• en b y their respective c o a c h e s . T h e object of the pull is to d r a g the oth€r team into the Black River tor a f r i e n d l y swim. 1 he pull is b a s i c a l l y a n e n d u r a n c e s t r u g g l e . Last y e a r it lasted for o v e r two a n d a half h o u r s . 1 his y e a r the f r e s h m a n a n d s o p h o m o r e c o a c h e s predict a c o m p a r a ble m a r a t h o n . While size a n d strength a r e i m p o r t a n t , most vital f a c t o r in the p h y s i c a l sense is the p o w e r of e a c h t e a m m e m b e r to continually endure great pressure o v e r an extended p e r i o d . In o r d e r for a student to g o t h r o u g h such a n o r d e a l as the pull for his class' g l o r y , it is essential that a g r e a t deal of class spirit exist not o n l y in the i n d i v i d u a l m e n c o m p e t i n g , but in the class as a whole. E a c h m e m b e r of the t e a m chooses his o w n m o r a l e girl, w h o s e duty is to keep her m a n in peak condition both mentally and p h y s i c a l l y t h r o u g h o u t both the l o n g practices a n d the pull itself. It is a n h o n o r a n d a g r e a t respon-

sibility to be a m o r a l e girl. However i m p o r t a n t the m o r a l e girls are, t h o u g h , the u p p e r c l a s s coaches for both t e a m s e m p h a s i z e that the s u p p o r t of the entire class behind the pull t e a m is the single factor which c o n t r i b u t e s most to success. A d d i n g to the excitement this year a r e two c a t a l y s t s . Not o n l y does the pull t a k e place d u r i n g Hope's Centennial Homecoming, but Sports Illustrated magazine is s e n d i n g a r e p o r t e r a n d a p n o t o g r a p h e r to H o p e to give the pull n a t i o n w i d e c o v e r a g e . The q u e s t i o n u p p e r m o s t in e v e r y o n e ' s m i n d , of c o u r s e , is which team will be in the r i v e r on Oct. 8. As u s u a l , the f r e s h m e n a r e decided u n d e r d o g s due to the o l d e r class' y e a r of experience b o t h as a pull team a n d a class. T h e freshmen, h o w e v e r , h a d a g r e a t turnout for pull p r a c t i c e this week a n d s h o u l d be a b l e to pull on e q u a l terms of s t r e n g t h with the v e t e r a n s . The a n s w e r to the q u e s t i o n of which team will be v i c t o r i o u s is a n y o n e ' s guess. The o n l y t h i n g p r e d i c t a b l e a b o u t next F r i d a y is that there will be a m a m m o t h s t r u g g l e on the b a n k s of the Black.

H E A V E - F r e s h m a n pull coach Denny Farmer bellows instructions to the pull team and the morale girls chime in support. Less than 40 men remain on the team as both frosh and sophs make final preparation for the pull next Friday.

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OLLAND, MICHIGAN

79th ANNIVERSARY — 3

Hope College, Holland, Michigan

September 30, 1966

Alpha Phi Omega:

Bases Existence on Service By Tom Hildebrandt

SERVICE AWARD—Dean William S. Mathis presents the $500 Fraternity Service Award, established by an anonymous donor, to the Fraternal Society. Receiving the award for the fraternity are Carl Walters, vice president, and Gary Garwood, president.

Fraternal Society Wins Social Service Award The F r a t e r n a l Society h a s been chosen to receive the first a n n u a l $ 5 0 0 Social Service A w a r d , acc o r d i n g to Dean of Men Robert De Y o u n g . This a w a r d is the result of a n a n o n y m o u s d o n a t i o n m a d e to e n c o u r a g e service to the school a n d t o w n o n the p a r t of H o p e ' s social fraternities. T h e F r a t e r s were c h o s e n b y a p a n e l of j u d g e s m a d e u p of the five p r o f e s s o r s w h o were candid a t e s for H o p e ' s O u t s t a n d i n g Professor of E d u c a t i o n a w a r d last year: C h a p l a i n William Hilleg o n d s , Dr. A r t h u r Jentz, Dr. J a m e s A. Prins, Dr. H e n r y ten H o o r a n d Dr. K e n n e t h Wfeller. T h e decision w a s m a d e o n the b a s i s of letters s u b m i t t e d to the p a n e l b y the five fraternities e n u m e r a t i n g their respective service ac h i e v e m e n t s for the c a m p u s a n d c o m m u n i t y last y e a r . The Fraters participated in m a n y varied service projects during the year. The fraternity donated $ 1 , 0 0 0 to the SCSC fund. This m o n e y was raised by a canv a s s of Fraternal Society alumni. The Fraters m a d e the highest individual member d o n a t i o n to the H o p e - H o l l a n d - H a m l e t drive of a n y of the fraternities, as well as assisting in the c a n v a s s itself.

T h e F r a t e r s a l s o actively p a r ticipated in the b l o o d d o n a t i o n d r i v e , the H i g h e r H o r i z o n s prog r a m a n d the m u s c u l a r d y s t r o p h y drive. T h e y h a n d l e d the Punt, Pass, a n d Kick contest f o r eight a n d nine-year-olds for the city of H o l l a n d . Several m e m b e r s of the f r a t e r n i t y served as c o a c h e s a n d a s s i s t a n t s at West O t t a w a schools. One of the m a i n services of the f r a t e r n i t y w a s its a n n u a l Christm a s p a r t y given to 2 0 p h y s i c a l l y h a n d i c a p p e d c h i l d r e n in the pediatric section of the H o l l a n d school system. E n t e r t a i n m e n t , refreshments a n d a S a n t a C l a u s were p r o v i d e d for the c h i l d r e n at the p a r t y held in the b a s e m e n t of the f r a ternity house. Members of other fraternities, when asked what they thought of the award, agreed that the Fraters deserved it but questioned what would be done with the money. Several noted that the Fraternal Society is already the most heavily endowed fraternity. Frater president Gary Garwood, when asked about the disbursement of the award, noted thatthere w a s n o stipulation o n h o w the m o n e y should be spent. He said, however, "a portion of it will be reinvested in a charitable project."

A n y o n e w h o h a s g o n e to a H o p e football or b a s k e t b a l l g a m e c a n r e m e m b e r seeing a n u m b e r of m e n in d a r k blue b l a z e r s busily t r y i n g to keep the p r o c e e d i n g s r u n n i n g s m o o t h l y . T h e y a r e the m e m b e r s of the N u Beta c h a p t e r of the national service f r a t e r n i t y A l p h a Phi O m e g a , which w a s o r g a n i z e d o n this c a m p u s in 1 9 6 1 for precisely that p u r p o s e — service. The c o n s t i t u t i o n of A l p h a Phi O m e g a states t h a t the p u r p o s e of the f r a t e r n i t y is service to c o u n t r y college, c o m m u n i t y , God a n d the brothers. T o a c c o m p l i s h these a i m s , the f r a t e r n i t y w o r k s o n m a n y projects i n c l u d i n g a s s i s t i n g at r e g i s t r a t i o n , u s h e r i n g at football a n d b a s k e t b a l l g a m e s , o r g a nizing a n a n n u a l b l o o d d o n a t i o n drive, w o r k i n g in the Higher Horizons p r o g r a m a n d performing v a r i o u s c o m m u n i t y services. A C C O R D I N G TO Dan K e r s h ner, president of APO, the f r a ternity w o r k s in close contact with the A d m i n i s t r a t i o n a n d o t h e r g r o u p s o n c a m p u s , a n d picks u p

Mortar Board Series Presents 'Macbeth' Tonight Mortar Board will sponsor two s h o w i n g s of the motion picture "Macbeth" at 7 a n d 9 p.m. in Snow Auditorium. There will be an a d m i s s i o n charge of 5 0 cents. Maurice E v a n s and Judith Anderson p l a y the lead roles in the film which premiered on the Hallmark Hall of F a m e television series and w o n five E m m y Awards. When released to commercial theaters as a color motion picture, it was acclaimed b y newspapers around the country as one of the best interpretations of a Shakespearean d r a m a o n film, m a i n l y due to the superb performances of Mr. E v a n s a n d Dame Anderson. The presentation is the seco n d in a series of films s p o n s o r e d by Mortar Board.

m a n y j o b s d u r i n g the y e a r . In his o p i n i o n , the a d v a n t a g e of a g r o u p like APO o n c a m p u s is convenience. " C a m p u s g r o u p s h a v e a definite p l a c e to g o to w h e n they need s o m e t h i n g like u s h e r i n g d o n e , " he s a i d . W o r k is di vi ded o n a volunteer b a s i s . E a c h m e m ber merely s i g n s u p for the p r o ject that interests h i m . K e r s h n e r sees the relation between the social f r a t s a n d APO a s a f r i e n d l y one. He feels that the b r o t h e r h o o d is respected o n c a m p u s for the w o r k t h a t it does a n d , a l t h o u g h it is not c o n s i d e r e d a s the social " i n - g r o u p , " most students recognize that it h a s a p l a c e in the college c o m m u n i t y . O N E R E A S O N f o r the u n u s u a l social position of the f r a t e r n i t y is that " A l p h a Phi O m e g a is not a typical social f r a t e r n i t y . In fact it's not a social f r a t e r n i t y at all. We d o h a v e s o m e s o c i a l events.^ but we exist m a i n l y for s e r v i c e , " president K e r s h n e r s a i d .

He sees s o m e c o m p e t i t i o n for r u s h e e s between APO a n d the social f r a t s , but c o n s i d e r s it m i n o r , b e c a u s e the two a t t r a c t different tvoes of people. As K e r s h n e r put it. It s a difference in e m p h a s i s . T h o s e interested in social functions will r u s h a s o c i a l frat, while those l o o k i n g for service o p p o r tunities will r u s h APO. We lose s o m e m e m b e r s to the social f r a t s , but not a g r e a t n u m b e r . " IN ORDER to alleviate this s o m e w h a t a n d to p r o m o t e b r o t h e r h o o d in the m e m b e r s . A l p h a Phi O m e g a is i n c o r p o r a t i n g s o m e aspects of s o c i a l fraternities into its p r o g r a m . It h o p e s to h a v e a f r a t e r n i t y h o u s e o n e d a y , a n d for the time b e i n g h a s set u p headq u a r t e r s in M a n d e v i l l e C o t t a g e where the m a j o r i t y of residents a r e m e m b e r s of APO. It is a l s o t r y i n g to increase its social life with events t h r o u g h o u t the y e a r a n d p l a n s to c o n t i n u e h o l d i n g a n informal.

Hootenanny to Support Senate Missions Fund T o m o r r o w night at 8 p.m. the Pine Grove will be the scene of the all-college h o o t e n a n n y , sponsored by the K a p p a Delta Chi Soror-. ity in cooperation with the Student Senate. Mike V o g a s is emcee for the event at which C h a p l a i n William Hillegonds and Gene Pearson will give short talks. V o g a s will introduce the entertainment for the evening which includes the Greenbriars, the S h a d y Hollow Singers, the Y o u n g 'uns, Jackie N y b o e r , Carol and C a n d y ( a freshman duo), and Rick Noetzel, a student from the University of Illinois w h o specializes in "blues." In addition, there will be a skit presented by Dave V a n Heust and Co. During the course of the e v e n i n g . K a p p a Chi members will " p a s s s the hat" for contributions to the Student Senate Missions Fund.

According to Chaplain Hillegonds, the m o n e y will be given to the Pleasant Hill Reformed Church, of Grand Rapids. The m o n e y will be used to take care of the costs of needed repairs or to aid in c o v e r i n g the expenses of equipment for the week-day recreation p r o g r a m . Last year when K a p p a Chi and the Student Senate teamed up to raise m o n e y for Hope's p r o p o s e d Student Cultural-Social Center, the h o o t e n a n n y raised $ 3 5 0 . This year's co-chairmen of the event, Judy Munro and Laurie Noetzel, urged students to "give till it helps." The co-chairmen stated that "group h o o t i n g " is a better w o r d to describe the p r o g r a m , for the audience Is g o i n g to be requested to sing a l o n g at v a r i o u s times throughout the^evenlng.


September 30, 1966

Hope College anchor

Page 2

Applications Available

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Fulbright Deadline Draws Near " T h e time is d r a w i n g n e a r when students interested in receiving F u l b r i g h t , D a n f o r t h , Rhodes a n d other s t u d y g r a n t s must start doing s o m e t h i n g a b o u t it," said £)r. Paul Fried, the c a m p u s F u l b r i g h t P r o g r a m A d v i s o r . He noted that the a p p l i c a t i o n deadlines for m a n y g r a d u a t e g r a n t s a n d fellowships a r e r a p i d l y a p p r o a c h i n g . Dr. Fried a n n o u n c e d the deadline for a p p l i c a t i o n s f o r F u l b r i g h t g r a n t s is October 21. Dr. J o h n H o l l e n b a c h , L i a i s o n Officer f o r the D a n f o r t h Fellowships, s a i d that those w h o wish to be nominated for a fellowship s h o u l d see him within the next eight or ten d a y s , since n o m i n a t i o n s must be m a d e by a faculty committee by October 12. Applications f o r Rhodes S c h o l a r s h i p s a r e also d u e shortly , a c c o r d i n g to Dr. Fried. The D a n f o r t h F o u n d a t i o n w a s f o u n d e d in 1927 by the late William H. D a n f o r t h , St. Louis busin e s s m a n a n d p h i l a n t h r o p i s t . Its p r i m a r y aim is to s t r e n g h t h e n education t h r o u g h p r o g r a m s of fel-

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lowships a n d w o r k s h o p s , a n d t h r o u g h g r a n t s to schools, colleges, universities a n d other educ a t i o n a l agencies. T h e F u l b r i g h t p r o g r a m b e g a n in 1946 with the s i g n i n g of the F u l b r i g h t - H a y e s Act, a n d is intended to increase m u t u a l u n d e r s t a n d i n g between the people of the United States a n d other countries. A l t h o u g h Djr. Fried noted that H o p e students h a v e not been extremely successful in w i n n i n g g r a n t s a n d fellowships, he emp h a s i z e d , o n the other h a n d , that

Vanderjagt Is First in Forum Of Opinions " T h e Republican point of View," a n a d d r e s s by State Senator Guy V a n d e r J a g t , will be the first of p r e s e n t a t i o n s in Hope College's F o r u m of C o n t r a r y Opinion at The All-College A s s e m b l y will be held at 10:30 a.m. next M o n d a y in Dimnent M e m o r i a l Chapel. A h o n o r g r a d u a t e of Hope College, Sen. V a n d e r J a g t holds the B.D. degree f r o m Yale University and the LL. B. f r o m the University of M i c h i g a n Law School. He w a s N a t i o n a l O r a t o r i c a l C h a m p i o n in 1952, undefeated in four y e a r s of intercollegiage e x t e m p o r a n e o u s speaking; M i c h i g a n D e b a t e C h a m p i o n f o r three consecutive v e a r s a n d , in 1956. was selected " O n e of the Five Most Outstanding Y o u n g Men in M i c h i g a n . " He served o n the Michigan Senate's A p p r o p r i a t i o n s Committee a n d was A d m i n i s t r a t i v e Aide to f o r m e r C o n g r e s s m a n Robert J. Mc Intosh, n o w Director of Michi g a n Department of C o m m e r c e a n d one of Gov. R o m n e y ' s chief political a d v i s o r s . Voicing the o p p o s i n g point of view will be U. S. Sen. Philip H a r t w h o will s p e a k on F r i d a y , October 21, at 8 : 1 5 p . m . in Dimnent C h a p el. The o n l y C o n t r a r y Opinion deb a t e will be that with N o r m a n T h o m a s a n d Kenneth C r a w f o r d .

w i n n e r s h a v e not been u n u s u a l l y r a r e . The first Hope g r a d u a t e to be a w a r d e d a F u l b r i g h t g r a n t w a s Kzra G e a r h a r t , w h o studied Germ a n literature at the University of Vienna in 1952. G e a r h a r t later e a r n e d his d o c t o r a t e degree a n d n o w is c h a i r m a n of the G e r m a n d e p a r t m e n t at Hope. Since then, f o u r m o r e H o p e students h a v e won F u l b r i g h t s , including Cheryl R i c h a r d s o n , w h o won a g r a n t last y e a r to s t u d y o r g a n in Vienna with Anton Heiller. G r a d u a t e g r a n t s h a v e been won by other m e m b e r s of the Hope faculty besides Dr. G e a r h a r t . Mr. J a m e s Tallis w a s a w a r d e d a F u l b r i g h t g r a n t to s t u d y h a r p s i c h o r d a n d i m p r o v i s a t i o n in A m s t e r d a m . Dr. J o h n Barlow t a u g h t u n d e r a Fulb r i g h t g r a n t at T h a m m a s a t University in B a n g k o k , T h a i l a n d where he set UD a o s v c h o l o g y department and experimental labora t o r y . Mr. R ichar d B r o c k m e i e r was a w a r d e d a Wood row Wilson S c h o l a r s h i p after his g r a d u a t i o n f r o m H o p e in 1959. Other g r a d u a t e study g r a n t s h a v e been w o n by Hope a l u m n i . T w o m e m b e r s of the class of 1964 David Mouw a n d David Hollenb a c h , won b o t h W o o d r o w Wilson a n d D a n f o r t h Fellowships. L y n n e V a n d e Bunte, a l s o a '64 g r a d u ate, was a w a r d e d a M a r s h a l l S c h o l a r s h i p u n d e r a p r o g r a m established in 1 9 5 3 by the British g o v e r n m e n t a s a tribute to General George C. M a r s h a l l . Eleven h a v e won W o o d r o w Wilson Schola r s h i p s in the p a s t five y e a r s , including A l a n Cole, who g r a d u a t ed last y e a r .

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Evangelism the 'Good News' Of Annual Geneva Retreat The " g o o d n e w s " must be carried " w h e r e the action is," whereever " G o d is at work in the w o r l d . " So concluded Rev. Kdwin Mulder at the final discussion at this y e a r ' s Geneva Retreat. T h i s culminated a weekend of discussions lectures, conferences a n d recreation o n the s h o r e of L a k e Michigan. " W h a t is e v a n g e l i s m ? " " W h y s h o u l d there be e v a n g e l i s m ? " " W h e r e must there be e v a n g e -

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T w o H o p e students spent a m o n t h in Y u g o s l a v i a this s u m m e r p a r t i c i p a t i n g in a s e m i n a r at the University of L j u b l j a n a . S o p h o m o r e s Keith T a y l o r a n d Neal Sob a n i s were a m o n g 18 A m e r i c a n students to t o u r the c o u n t r y a n d attend a s e m i n a r in which the political, economic, a n d social as-

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DISCUSSION—Dave Grissen and two retreaters from the Navigators talk over a point brought out at the Geneva Retreat held at Camp Geneva last weekend. The theme of the retreat was "campus evangelism."

Donia, Sobania, Taylor Attend Yugoslav Seminar

10-page reports

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:ts of the two n a t i o n s were compared. In a d d i t i o n , senior Bob Donia served a s a d m i n i s t r a t i v e a s s i s t a n t to the faculty of thg program. In a d d i t i o n to the A m e r i c a n students, sixteen Y u g o s l a v students and four American professors p a r t i c i p a t e d in the s e m i n a r , which was set up jointly by the (ireat L a k e s Colleges Association a n d the United States State Department. E a c h d a y a Y u g o s l a v a n d a n A m e r i c a n p r o f e s s o r lectured o n the s a m e aspect of political, e c o n o m i c or social life in their respective countries. Later in the d a y , the lecturers discussed their a d d r e s s e s with the students. Each student also p r e p a r e d a s e m i n a r p a p e r o n s o m e aspect of the Yugoslav system.

You are invited to worship with us. Sunday services are at 10 A.M. and 7 P.M.

l i s m ? " These a n d other q u estio n s were a m o n g the m a n y touched up o n by Rev. Mulder in his a d d r e s s to the Geneva Retreat. Rev. Mulder, a Reformed C h u r c h evangelist, is a g r a d u ate of Central College, attended Western Theological S e m i n a r y a n d once served a c h u r c h in Holland. " E v a n g e l i s m , " intirrrated Mulder, "literally m e a n s ' s p r e a d i n g g o o d news.' Simply because ' g o o d news' is not s o m e t h i n g a p e r s o n keeps to h i m s e l f , " continued Mulder, " w e a r e interested in evangelizing." The S a t u r d a y p r o g r a m w a s highlighted by the d i s c u s s i o n , " Ev a n g e l i s m - H o w We Do It," led by Rev. W a r r e n Day of United C a m pus C h r i s t i a n Fellowship, Miss C h a r l o t t e S i m p s o n of Inter-Varsity, Rev. Stan Voth of Y o u n g Life, a n d Dave Grissen, w h o is active in the N a v i g a t o r s . In the c o u r s e of the d i s c u s s i o n the questions " H o w c a n e v a n g e l i s m be c a r r i e d out effectively?" a n d " W h e r e mut it t a k e p l a c e ? " , were posed by the v a r i o u s leaders. " T h e Y o u n g Life a p p r o a c h , " r e m a r k e d Rev. Voth, " i s to l o v e . " In a c t u a l practice, this h a s resulted in people o p e n i n g both their h e a r t s and their lives to God. This is the notion of e v a n g e l i z i n g in s p h e r e s of activity i n d e p e n d e n t of the c h u r c h , he said. As such, " t h e world is full of people just w a n t i n g 'to d i a l o g u e a b o u t Christ i a n i t y , ' " as w a s suggested b y Mr. Grissen.

MACBETH Judith Anderson

Tot Stapler

Maurice Evans Tonight Only

Snow A u d .

7 & 9 P.M.

HOPE CHURCH (including 1000 itaples) Larger size CUB Desk Stapler only $ 1 . 4 9 N o bigger than a pack of g u m - b u t packs the punch of a big deal! Refills available everywhere. Unconditionally guaranteed. Made in U.S.A. Get it at any itationery, variety, book store!

INC.

INVITES YOU TO WORSHIP 11 A.M. M o r n i n g W o r s h i p Service

Glen O. Peterman — Pastor Charlotte Heinen — Dir. of Chr. Ed.

W Z * * P»P!A!P GO 04 l SUHMSNY

FALL FASHIONS

6 : 4 5 P.M. School of Christian Living ( A d u l t Discussion Groups)

Long Island City, N.Y. 11101

]UMO UBD noiC uiaji jooqat •IMi| jsatpuaq a q j s.ji ' j p u a d • p u s j|ooq ••»ou • o j )xaK {iCeM a m Xq 'u® «apf peq * iou if ip{i{M—• • jajdBis XOX • no A»» 3 '(SC «l P»PP» 01

FINE

James Tallis Organist and Choir Dir.

AMBASSADOR Shop

Church Located o n 11 t h B e t w e e n River a n d Pine Across f r o m Centennial Park


September 30, 1966

Hope College anchor

Page 3

Race Issue Not a Factor

Negro Candidate for State Office Defends Republican Party Affiliation His n a m e is George Washington. He is the Republican candid a t e lor Michigan Secretary of ate. The thing that is distinc.. v e a b o u t the mil n, that sets him apart f r o m the h u n d r e d s of other office seekers in this eke lion y e a r , is i wit George W a s h i n g t o n is a Negro. This week Mr. W a s h i n g t o n

m a d e H o p e one of the s t o p s on his c a m p a i g n trail. While he w a s here, he discussed s o m e of the unique aspects of his situation. " I n the last several weeks, I've m a d e political speeches in towns where s o m e of the whites h a d never seen a N e g r o b e f o r e , " he said. He is b a s i n g his c a m p a i g n on statewide issues relating to the of-

EXPLAINS CANDIDACY—George Washington, Republican nominee for Michigan Secretary of State, discussed his campaign in anchor office Tuesday afternoon. He was later given a tour of the campus.

Phi Delta Chi Enters Full Activities of Fraternities Phi Delta Chi, H o p e ' s sixth social f r a t e r n i t y , h a s chosen a comm o n n a m e , e x p a n d e d its m e m b e r ship, and entered into all p h a s e s of f r a t e r n i t y life o n the s a m e b a s i s as H o p e ' s five other m a l e Greek letter societies. The m e m b e r s of the new f r a t e r n ity will be k n o w n as the Centurians. Besides the reference to the R o m a n g l a d i a t o r s , one of the reas o n s the n a m e was chosen is that Phi Delta Chi is s t a r t i n g in Hope's Centennial year. Acting o n I P C p e r m i s s i o n to increase m e m b e r s h i p up to 2 5 without h o l d i n g a f o r m a l r u s h , Phi Delta Chi held a closed r u s h this fall. The f o u n d i n g m e m b e r s held a b l a c k b a l l meeting and sent out bids. Five rushees, a c c o r d i n g to president Paul Verduin, accepted their bid: T o m Roberts, Ed Dobbin, Ray F y l s t r a , A1 A a r d s m a a n d .loe F a v a l e . This b r o u g h t the total m e m b e r s h i p u p to 15. The new pledges will h a v e a limited a m o u n t of duties. A c c o r d i n g to Verduin, they will be required to work o n projects such as picking apples to raise m o n e y for the frat. In a d d i t i o n , each m a n is required to d o a n h o u r a n d a half of work for the actives each week. Whether pledges will be put t h r o u g h a "hell n i g h t " initiation h a s not yet been decided.

BOOKS FOR PENNIES Today and Tomorrow 9 East 8 t h , n e x t t o t h e W a r m Friend H o t e l S p o n s o r e d By t h e A A U W

The C e n t u r i a n s will participate in all interfraternity s p o r t s this y e a r , including football. They intend to build a float f o r the homec o m i n g p a r a d e a n d p a r t i c i p a t e in the fall rush in competition with the established frats. They will compete for the scholastic t r o p h y a n d a l r e a d y a r e a full m e m b e r of the I F C . While they will not h a v e a f o r m a l this y e a r , the new g r o u p will give several parties. Centurian D a v i d C o u r t n e y h a s designed a crest a n d o r d e r s for fraternity pins a n d sweatshirts h a v e been made. Members of other fraternities a d m i r e d the efforts of Phi Delta C hi to get started. T h e y predicted, however that they would h a v e trouble c o m p e t i n g in the r u s h with the established frats. C e n t u r i a n Sid Disbrow agreed that " y o u c a n ' t expect a new f r a t to be accepted right a w a y by the r u s h e e s . " He noted however, that " t h e best time for us will be this fall when the older f r a t s will h a v e few openings."

HIGH INCOME JOBS O N CAMPUS Get a high paying job in sales, distribution or market research right on your own campus. Become a campus representative for over forty magazines, American Airlines, Operation Match, etc. and earn big parttime money doing interesting work. Apply right away! Collegiate Marketing, Dept. H, 27 E. 22 St., New York, N.Y.

fice of Secretary of State a n d on his own qualifications, r a t h e r t h a n on a n y a p p e a l of his color. He said that his presence on the slate will be " g o o d for b o t h p a r t i e s . " Mr. W a s h i n g t o n declared, "What' we a r e g o i n g to see is that Michig a n residents will not let race be the m a j o r issue, but will j u d g e the c a n d i d a t e s on their records a n d programs." T H E MAIN responsibilities of the Secretary of State fall in the a r e a of traffic safety, a u t o licensing a n d the a d m i n i s t r a t i o n of the election laws. Mr. W a s h i n g t o n c h a r g e d that his incumbent opp o n e n t , .lames H a r e , h a s allowed " a n excess of political influence" d u r i n g his 12 y e a r s in office. He f u r t h e r claimed that the Michigan point system h a s " n o t been enf o r c e d " as strictly as it s h o u l d . He f a v o r s t o u g h e n i n g both the structure a n d enforcement of the point system. Mr. W a s h i n g t o n feels " q u i t e c o m f o r t a b l e " on the slate because he feels he h a s the q u a l i f i c a t i o n s for the office. Mr. W a s h i n g t o n attended M o r e h o u s e College a n d is a certified public a c c o u n t a n t . He is a f o r m e r c o m m i s s i o n e r of the Michigan Public Service Comm i s s i o n a n d presently holds the position of director of the Michig a n Department of Administration. He is also a n active m e m b e r of the NAACP. ^ IN 1964 President J o h n s o n received a p p r o x i m a t e l y 9 6 per cent of the N e g r o vote in Michigan. Mr. W a s h i n g t o n himself estimated that 99 per cent of all the m e m b e r s of his race generally s u p p o r t the Democratic Party. Why then is Mr. W a s h i n g t o n a Republican? " I believe in a s t r o n g two p a r t y s y s t e m , " he said. " I n the l o n g run, the N e g r o ' s interests a r e best served if both parties are p o p u l a t e d with the colored m a n . " He admitted that in the p a s t the Republican P a r t y h a s " b e e n passive in the a r e a of civil r i g h t s , " but he said that the trend is "definitely a w a y f r o m this t o d a y . " He cited Gov. George R o m n e y as a " g r e a t c h a m p i o n of civil rights in Michigan."

NEW RESIDENTS—Freshmen Jim Schipper, Bill Van Faasen and Tom Bos chat with Michael Gerrie in Kollen Lounge. Mr. Gerrie and James Bekkering are the new faculty residents in Kollen Hall.

College Dorms Receive New Faculty Residents The new resident faculty adviso r s h a v e been a p p o i n t e d to Voorhees, Kollen, K n i c k e r b o c k e r , Kme r s o n i a n a n d A r c a d i a n Halls. Mrs. Gertrude F a i l i n g of Voorhees Hall h a s been extremely b u s y a n s w e r i n g questions posed by her girls. She is " p r o u d of t h e m " a n d • w a s impressed by the fact that a g r o u p of 30 girls f r o m her d o r m went to the Student C h u r c h together last S u n d a y m o r n i n g . The new head residents of the m e n ' s d o r m s report no p r o b l e m s at all. Michael Gerrie of Kollen Hall sees his m a i n duty a s keeping peace within the d o r m a n d e a s i n g the a d j u s t m e n t of the freshmen to college life. About 8 5 to 9 0 per cent of Kollen Hall residents are freshmen. .lames Bekkering, a H o p e g r a d uate of 1965, is helping Mr. Gerrie in Kollen as head resident. He h a s h a d e x p e r i e n c e i n t h i s w o r k before as a n R.A. d u r i n g his last two y e a r s at Hope. Mr. David M a r k e r , assistant p r o f e s s o r of physics a n d resident faculty a d v i s o r of K n i c k e r b o c k e r Hall, feels that his duties a r e to p r o v i d e a home-like a n d intellectual a t m o s o h e r p for the Knicks. So far, Mr. M a r k e r h a s chaper-

oned one of their parties. S p e a k i n g of H o p e s t u d e n t s in g e n e r a l . M a r k er said that he is impressed by the typical s t u d e n t ' s w a r m t h a n d by his i n d u s t r i o u s n e s s in the classr o o m . Hut he also feels there is a lack of intellectual curiosity outside of the c l a s s r o o m . Dr. Richard Brockmeier of Eme r s o n i a n Hall hopes to p r o v i d e a n intellectual stimulus to the men by e n c o u r a g i n g bull sessions. Dr. Brockmeier sees his j o b as a n opp o r t u n i t y to p r o v i d e a m o r e fruitful r a p p o r t between faculty a n d students b y e n c o u r a g i n g informality. Dr. Brockmeier would like to invite other faculty members as s p e a k e r s , with i n f o r m a l question a n d answer sessions afterwards. He thinks that a student would be m o r e willing to attend lectures a n d sessions right in the d o r m r a t h e r t h a n go out to f o r m a l lectures. A r c a d i a n a d v i s o r Glenn V a n Wieren, a '64 Hope g r a d u a t e , enj o y s the a t m o s p h e r e of this d o r m . He feels that the students s h o u l d generally try to solve their own p r o b l e m s , but, s h o u l d the p r o b l e m defy solution, he will help them. Aside f r o m the u s u a l p r o b l e m s of c o o k i n g f o r himself, he g r e a t l y enj o y s the job.

THE STUDENT CHURCH FREE worships

Plastic Coated

Sunday, October 2

BOOK

at 10:45 a.m. Dimnent Chapel

COVERS

Mr. Roger Davis, organist Chaplain Hillegonds, preaching

(Sermon: " W i l l t h e Real Jesus Step F o r w a r d l " )

AT OUR OWN 7 : 0 0 p.m. Holy Communion

BLUE KEY BOOK STORE

10010.

TRINITY REFORMED CHURCH

TULIP CITY LAUNDROMAT The Last W o r d in Convenience

20th and Central Ave, OPEN 24 HOURS

yVko 'b

Morning Worship 9:30 College Sunday School Class . 1 0 : 4 5 Evening W o r s h i p 7:00 College Y o u t h Fellowship 8:15

A.M. A.M. P.M. P.M.

CftUchen?

Central A v e n u e B e t w e e n 9 t h & 1 0 t h Bus Schedule f r o m Campus; M o r n i n g : 9 : 0 5 o n 1 0 t h St., 9 : 1 5 K o l l e n H a l l Evening: 6 : 4 0 o n 1 0 t h St., 6 : 4 5 K o l l e n H a l l

CORD

Veurink's

SEVEN DAYS A WEEK

Students Are Cordially Invited To Attend Any or All Services

Across From t h e B o w l i n g A l l e y


September 30, 1966

Hope College anchor

Page 4

anchor editorial

On a Service Award T

HIS W E E K the Administration presented the Fraternal

Society w i t h a check

C o m p e t i t i o n for service will d e v e l o p b e t w e e n

for

t h e f r a t e r n i t i e s a s it d o e s i n e v e r y o t h e r a r e a

$500. T h i s c h e c k was an a w a r d for out-

of i n t e r - f r a t e r n i t y l i f e f r o m g i r l s t o p i n g p o n g .

s t a n d i n g service to t h e c o m m u n i t y a n d to t h e College

during

the

last

academic

year,

and

SooTi w e w i l l h e a r t h a t o n e f r a t e r n i t y t o o k

t h e j u d g e s felt t h a t t h e F r a t e r s h a d d o n e m o r e

3 0 o r p h a n s t o s e e a m o v i e s o a n o t h e r is h o l d -

i n t h i s a r e a t h a n a n y of t h e o t h e r s o c i a l f r a -

ing

ternities.

And

a

party

for

mentally

retarded

children.

w h a t s t a r t e d o u t . as a n o b l e a w a r d

will

t u r n o u t to b e r e c o g n i t i o n f o r v i c t o r y in t h a t T h e anchor

salutes the Fraters a n d con-

gratulates them on their distinction. A survey of

m

t h e i r letter in c o m p a r i s o n

with

grand

old

game:

"Who's

Got

the

Best

Fra-

ternity?"

the other

e n t r i e s indicates t h a t they w e r e i n v o l v e d in a substantial

number

of

service

projects

last

y e a r , m o s t s p e c t a c u l a r of w h i c h w a s t h e i r s u c -

W

E D O N O T in any w a y w a n t to m i n i -

cessful effort to raise $1,000 for the S t u d e n t Cultural-Social Center fund.

mize

the

role

which

social

fratern-

ities c a n a n d s h o u l d p l a y in s e r v i n g t h e C o l l e g e a n d t h e t o w n of H o l l a n d . W e h a v e maintained m a n y times that fraternities ought

H o w e v e r , s i n c e t h e e s t a b l i s h m e n t of t h e

to re-examine what

they

are

doing and

the

a w a r d last year, w e h a v e c o m e to t h e o p i n i o n

v a l u e of d o i n g it i n o r d e r t h a t t h e i r a c t i v i t i e s

t h a t its p u r p o s e is s e l f - d e f e a t i n g . I t w a s v e r y

a r e of v a l u e .

g e n e r o u s of t h e a n o n y m o u s d o n o r

t o set u p

a n a w a r d of $ 5 0 0 f o r t h e s o c i a l f r a t e r n i t y m o s t active

in

service,

but

we

wonder

if

values

In a d d i t i o n , w e d o n o t w a n t to m i n i m i z e the

achievement

of

the

Fraternal

Society

in

h a v e n ' t b e e n t u r n e d u p s i d e - d o w n in t h e pro-

w i n n i n g the f r a t e r n i t y service a w a r d . In fact,

cess.

it is all t h e . m o r e t o t h e i r c r e d i t t h a t t h e y w o n t h e a w a r d in a y e a r w h e n t h e y d i d n o t k n o w till t h e e n d

(

C

ONSIDER

the

situation.

At

Hope

Col-

performed might

T h e a l m a n i a n of A l m a C o l l e g e printed last week the f o l l o w i n g letter to t h e e d i t o r : Dear Editor: I a m t r y i n g to l o c a t e a n A l m a College s t u d e n t ( F r e d S. -- s o r r y 1 d o n ' t k n o w his last n a m e b u t I believe t h a t he is f r o m B a y City, Mich.) w h o m 1 met o n a v o y a g e of the SS G r o o t e Ceer f r o m Rott e r d a m , H o l l a n d , to New Y o r k City. Due to s o m e u n f o r e s e e n difficulties at the d o c k in N e w Y o r k , 1 w a s left with P'red's b o t t l e of wine. So, n a t u r a l l y , in the interest of better s t u d e n t r e l a t i o n s I w o u l d like to r e t u r n his bottle. T h e r e fore, I a s k y o u to p r i n t the foll o w i n g notice: A C H T U N G ! F r e d f r o m Heidleberg University (sic), please send me name, address and identifying r e m a r k s c o n c e r n i n g y o u r bottle. S o r r y a b o u t the m i x u p .

w a r d e d w i t h a p r i z e s u c h as this.

Yours truly. Hank Higgins

Sincerely, Paul Weiss 4 0 0 N . River R o a d Apt. 1 4 0 7 W. L a f a y e t t e , I n d . 4 7 9 0 6 Late last y e a r , the Eastern E c h o of Eastern M i c h i g a n U n i v e r s i t y published this letter to the editor: Dear E d i t o r : On b e h a l f of all w h o l o v e the

i Published

E d i t o r ' s note: T h e a n c h o r d o e s not p l a n to eliminate the letters to the editor section of the paper. In fact, we e n c o u r a g e all students and faculty to write w h e n e v e r they p l e a s e on a n y subject of c a m p u s interest. D e a d l i n e for all letters is 6 p . m . W e d n e s d a y , a n d in case of s p a c e limitations, we reserve the right to edit.

anc

OLLAND, MIOUOAN

weekly during the college year except vacation,

holiday and exam-

ination periods by and for the students of Hope College, Holland, under the authority of the Student Senate Publication^ Board.

Michigan,

Entered as second class matter at the post office of Holland, Michigan. i942), nt the special rate of postage provided for in Section IW1 of Act of Subscription: $5 per year. Printed: 'Aeeland Record, Zeeland, Michigan Congress, Oct. 3, 1917, and authorized Oct. 19, 1917. Member: Associated Collegiate Press. Michigan Collegiate Press Assn. Office: Ground Floor of Graves Hall. Phone: 569 2122 Editor John M. Muldet

\

we

to be re-

also Service o u g h t

to be s o m e t h i n g which

is

f o r b e i n g is t o r e n d e r s e r v i c e t o t h e C o l l e g e

not

and community.

o u g h t t o b e a p r o d u c t of t h e c h a r a c t e r of a

I n s t e a d of g i v i n g t h e a w a r d

English l a n g u a g e , 1 d e m a n d that y o u d i s c o n t i n u e y o u r r e g u l a r section of letters to the e d i t o r . T o o l o n g h a v e y o u r few literate r e a d ers c r i n g e d at y o u r w e e k l y s a m p l i n g of u n i n f o r m e d , u n i n t e l l i g e n t , incoherent, misspelled a n d malpunctuated student fulminations. In y o u r M a y 5 e d i t i o n , f o r e x a m ple, o n e P a u l V o o r h e i s d e c l a r e s t h a t a n article h a s c a l u m n i a t e d h i m , a n d t h a t he w i s h e s to "reite r a t e . " His m a l a p r o p i s m , g r i m l y a m u s i n g a s it is, typifies the e n o r mities c o m m i t t e d e v e r y week b y y o u r r e a d e r s h i p ; a n d it w o u l d a r gue y o u r w i s d o m a n d g o o d taste if y o u w o u l d h e n c e f o r t h c e a s e to serve as a public m o u n t i n g - p l a c e for r a s c a l s w h o b r u t a l l y a n d b r a zenly r a p e their m o t h e r t o n g u e .

they h a d

However,

b u t o n l y five w e r e e l i g i b l e f o r t h e a w a r d ,

bought

in

fraternity or

Letters to Other Editors

be r e w a r d e d .

q u e s t i o n w h e t h e r any service ought

h a v e o n e service f r a t e r n i t y w h o s e sole r e a s o n

Editor's Shorts

the service w h i c h

l e g e w e h a v e n o w six s o c i a l f r a t e r n i t i e s ,

t h e s i x t h o r i g i n a t i n g late last year. W e

'One of the hardest w o r k i n g b o y s on the pull team.'

that

an

the

market

individual.

place;

When

rather,

we

it

start

to the m e n

g i v i n g m o n e t a r y p r i z e s f o r s e r v i c e , it b e c o m e s

o n c a m p u s w h o m a k e it t h e i r b u s i n e s s t o s e r v e ,

s o m e t h i n g else — p a y m e n t f o r services r e n d e r -

t h e a w a r d is g i v e n t o o n e of t h e s o c i a l f r a t e r n -

e d . I t is a p i t y t h a t w h a t w a s a m a g n a n i m o u s

i t i e s a n d t h e r e s u l t is t h a t its w h o l e p u r p o s e is

g e s t u r e o n t h e p a r t of t h e d o n o r w i l l b e p e r -

defeated. W h a t did

verted

not h a p p e n

last y e a r be-

by

fraternity competition.

Given

the

cause the a w a r d was a n n o u n c e d late, b u t w h a t

n a t u r e of t h e f r a t e r n i t y s y s t e m , o n e c o u l d e x -

most assuredly will

p e c t little else.

happen

this year

is t h i s .

Readers Speak Out

Dear Editor... Staying away from "Virginia W o o l f doesn't mean being afraid of h e r ! T o m y m i n d , the o n l y aspect of t h e a n c h o r c o m m e n t a t o r ' s obs e r v a t i o n s a b o u t the " W o o l f film w h i c h is w o r t h y of n o t e is the imp r e s s i v e skill with w h i c h he ope r a t e s the k e y b o a r d of v e r b i a g e w h i c h is a c c e p t e d s t a n d a r d a m o n g " i n - c l r c l e s " of l i t e r a r y a n d a r t criticism. T h e a r t of s p e a k i n g eleg a n t l y a b o u t not so elegant topics t r u l y h a s r e a c h e d m i n d a n d perception n u m b i n g hights. But t h e n , w h a t else c a n we expect, since the science of s e m a t i c s w h i c h is s t r i c d y a c h i l d of the twentieth c e n t u r y p r o v e s to u s t h a t after m a n h a d lost his f a i t h in e v e r y t h i n g else, he f i n a l l y l o s t e v e n the t r u s t in the v e r y w o r d s he w a s uttering a n d started to investigate the m e a n i n g of w h a t h e w a s s a y ing, with the result of h a v i n g left t o d a y not w o r d s , but o n l y s m o k e s c r e e n s of w o r d s . M a y b e this could be seen as a n e x c u s e for the four-letter w o r d talkfest of the film, the desperate hunt for s u b s t a n c e in w o r d s which h a v e g o n e stale a n d h o l l o w . But I a m not willing to concede this point, for I think I still h a v e a g o o d l y a m o u n t of faith left, g o o d old h u m d r u m e v e r y d a y bourg e o i s faith. A n d u s i n g s o m e of the definitive l o c u t i o n s with which this particular strip o f c e l l u l o i s is brimm i n g , I s i m p l y state; The film stinks! I E N T E R E D the f i l m at the tail end, the last " g a m e ' , a n d the tender " l o v e " scene, a s the a n c h o r c o m m e n t a t o r w o u l d h a v e it, I

think. In the o v e r a l l context of the film a n d its p o r t r a y a l of a " l o v e l y " f a m i l y life t h a t h a s b e e n g o i n g o n f o r s i x t e e n y e a r s , this final scene s h o u l d m o r e r e a l i s t i c a l l y be c a l l e d a scene of utter m e n t a l a n d e m o t i o n a l e x h a u s t i o n , of deceptive q u i e t u d e a f t e r a n o r g a s m of sick intellectual a n d p h y s i c a l f r e n z y w h e n the f o r c e s f o r — intentionally sought a f t e r ? — f u t u r e o u t b u r s t s of like n a t u r e a r e reg e n e r a t e d . But L o v e ? — N o ! I m a n a g e d to s t a y f o r quite a while t h r o u g h the a b u s i v e a n d utterly idiotic r e p r e s e n t a t i o n of college f a c u l t y life u n r o l l i n g f r o m the b e g i n n i n g of the film, t a k i n g it s q u a r e l y o n m y b o u r g e o i s faculty c h i n a n d v a l i a n t l y h o l d i n g o n to m y s e a t while s w a l l o w i n g ag a i n a n d a g a i n the r i s i n g w a v e s of i n d i g n a t i o n . But w h e n it c a m e to t h e b a r s c e n e a n d the g y r a t i n g m o t i o n s of " t h e w i d e o p e n a v e n u e to the p r e s i d e n t ' s o f f i c e , " m y s i s s y feelings g o t t h e better of me. I r o s e a n d t o g e t h e r with m y wife w a l k e d o u t of the d i r t . T h e p i c t u r e in the a r r h o r g i v e s m e e v e r y r e a s o n to be g l a d t h a t we m i s s e d w h a t followed. T H E F I L M a n d its a n c h o r c o m m e n t a r y r e m i n d m e of a p o e m written in Middle H i g h G e r m a n b y the m e d i e v a l poet N e i d h a r t v o n Reuental. T h e a g e of c h i v a l r o u s poetry h a s entered its s t a g e of decadence. K n i g h t h o o d is impoverished, the p e a s a n t s h a v e b e c o m e rich t h i n k i n g they, too, will be knights, s i m p l y b y t a k i n g o v e r courtly m a n n e r s a n d the style a n d f o r m of courtly poetry. T h e y h a v e m a s t e r e d the outer t r a p p i n g s , but

a l a s , the s u b s t a n c e is m i s s i n g . In the p o e m , the first flower of s p r i n g h a s b e e n f o u n d in the fields. The y o u n g p e a s a n t , on a Sund a y ' s w a l k , s o l i c i t o u s l y c o v e r s the t e n d e r b e a u t y with his t o p h a t a n d h u r r i e s off to l e a d his b e l o v e d cerem o n i o u s l y to the first j o y of s p r i n g . E l e g a n t d i a l o g u e with rich poetic i m a g e r y a n d b r i l l i a n t l y form u l a t e d t r o p e s s h o r t e n s the w a l k of t h o s e w h o h a v e c o m e a l o n g to a d m i r e the d e d i c a t i o n of the first h a r b i n g e r of s p r i n g . EXPECTANTLY the g r o u p s u r r o u n d s the top hat. The y o u n g p e a s a n t lifts it g r a c i o u s l y a n d und e r n e a t h a p p e a r s — a pile of hum a n e x c r e m e n t s ( w h i c h Liz w o u l d h a v e c h a r a c t e r i z e d with a s h o r t e r a n d m o r e effective w o r d ) . T h e would-be knight stands revealed a s still a c l o d - h o p p e r n o t w i t h s t a n d i n g all h i s e l e g a n t p h r a s e ology. N e i d h a r t ' s p o e m e n d s there, b u t not so o u r m o d e r n encounter with stylistically e n h a n c e d a n d sublima t e d refuse. T h e r e a r e f o r c e s w h o e a r n e s t l y w a n t to p e r s u a d e u s to sit in it, w a l l o w in it, a n d a c t u a l l y to m a k e u s b e l i e v e t h a t we e n j o y it. S u r e , " W h o ' s a f r a i d of V i r g i n ia W o o l f is definitely a n e x p e r ience, b u t c o n t r a r y t o the c o m m e n t a t o r ' s o p i n i o n , I t h i n k it s h o u l d b e m i s s e d at all c o s t s . A S E N S I T I V E square and b o u r g e o i s like me w o u l d like to hurl s o m e of the a d v i c e which is s o drastically g i v e i ) in the film right b a c k at it a n d holler: " W h y don't y o u g o d d a m s . o . b ' s shut u p ! " G e r h a r d F. M e g o w


September 30, 1966

Hope College anchor

Anatomy

Page 5

of a Slum

Hough Riot: Cry From the Voiceless Ghetto Editor's note: The following article written by senior Sue Eenigenburg is the first of a two-part series on her experiences this summer in Cleveland. Ohio. She worked for the Inner-City Protestant Parish in the Hough district, which has been described as Cleveland's Harlem. This area was the scene of Negro rioting during the summer. By Sue Eenigenburg

H

A D H A R V E Y C O X b e e n there, he w o u l d h a v e a p p l a u d e d my s u m m e r ' s c e l e b r a t i o n in t h e "Secular C i t y . " I p r a i s e d its vastness a n d variety; I m i n g l e d with black a n d w h i t e ; i p a r t o o k of the honesty of b e i n g h u m a n ; I j a b b e d at m e a n i n g less t r a d i t i o n . A n d in all this I liked t h e t o u c h of a w i d e f r e e d o m in w h i c h I learned r e q u i r e d r e s p o n s i b i l i t y .

And h a d Michael H a r r i n g t o n been there, he w o u l d h a v e w a l k ed with m e t h r o u g h the u g l y " o t h er A m e r i c a " of the H o u g h a r e a . Poverty blatantly sears whole n e i g h b o r h o o d s a n d p e o p l e of the ghetto. My initial c o n f r o n t a t i o n with s u c h a v a s t , u n o r d e r e d disp l a y of the p o v e r t y w h i c h to m o s t A m e r i c a is h i d d e n , s c a r e d m e b y its s t e n c h , its g a r b a g e - s t r e w n hallw a y s a n d y a r d s , its filth a n d s q u a l o r of twisted d i r t y b l a n k e t s on b e d s , its s i n k s h e a v y with unw a s h e d d i s h e s , a n d its r a t s p l a y ing in a p a r t m e n t s w h e r e c h i l d r e n played.

W a s this a p a r a d o x ? H a d m a n m i s u s e d his f r e e d o m , o r w a s t h e r e a n y to b e g i n w i t h ? T h e y told u s t h e r e w o u l d be a riot in C l e v e l a n d t h e s u m m e r of 1966. Hot nights w o r e into s t e a m ing d a y s , but the q u i e t w a s a n uneasy calm before a brewing storm. How well 1 r e m e m b e r b e i n g told b l u n t l y b y a N e g r o : " 1 h a t e all white p e o p l e . " 1 h a d no a n s w e r no r e b u k e o r l o u d l y - v o i c e d defense of m y color. T h e s a m e night a N e g r o a r g u e d that a riot w a s u s e f u l a s a " p r e s s u r e t a c t i c . " She p u t riots i n t o the s a m e c a t e g o r y a s sit-ins a n d d e m -

KEEPING THE PEACE—National Guardsmen patrol Hough Avenue to prevent looting of burned stores and further rioting during the racial violence that occured in the Hough district of Cleveland this summer. onstrations. The horror and b l o o d i n e s s of a riot b e i n g used in the n a m e of a " p r e s s u r e t a c t i c " w a s a s t a r t l i n g c o n f r o n t a t i o n with the l o n g - r i d i n g f r u s t r a t i o n of a g h e t t o which h a d n o voice. As if

Faculty Focus

Names and Addresses Editor's note: This week's Faculty Focus column is written by Stuart Wilson,

instructor

in

English

at

Hope, who served last summer as assistant director of the Hope College Vienna Summer School. Mr. Wilson received his B.A. form Hope in 1960 and his M.A. from the University of Michigan in 1961. By Stuart Wilson A student a n d I chatted for a few m i n u t e s , s t a n d i n g u n d e r a tree t h a t w a s s h e d d i n g the last few d r o p s of the a f t e r n o o n r a i n . He a s k e d the i n e v i t a b l e q u e s t i o n s , "How was your summer?" and " W h a t ' s the p o i n t of g o i n g o v e r there?" 1 tried to a n s w e r the latter a n d f o u n d myself c o n f u s e d in m e m ories, i m p r e s s i o n s , a n d i m p r e s s i o n s of m e m o r i e s - r a w m a t e r i a l that is h a r d to f o r g e into coherent f o r m . Finally, however, " c o n t a c t " c a m e to m y m i n d . Next, 1 w a s surprised by majestic "inter-pers o n a l e n c o u n t e r " a n d its c o u s i n , " c r o s s - c u l t u r a l " s o m e t h i n g o r other. H a n d y p h r a s e s Tiat a r e neither a c c u r a t e n o r e n l i g h t e n i n g . T h e p o i n t of g o i n g o v e r t h e r e is h i d d e n " l i k e " the p o i n t of a S y m p h o n y o r like the p o i n t of s a y i n g , "I'm s o r r y . " " I t is different f o r e a c h of u s , " I told h i m . 1 S T R U G G L E D with the m e m ories. In W a r s a w , we met a m a n w h o t o o k u s s h o p p i n g . He t o o k us p a s t the s h o p s t h a t c a t e r to t o u r i s t s . He s h o w e d us f u r c a p s , b a s k e t s with l e a t h e r c o v e r s , a m ber n e c k l a c e s , b o o k s a n d r e c o r d s . We w e r e not p a r t i c u l a r l y interested at first. It w a s a n o t h e r s h o p p i n g t o u r in a s t r a n g e city. We were a little tired of s e e i n g " W h a t they h a v e to sell." ( A m e r i c a n pasttime. ) But his e n t h u s i a s m w a s c o n t a g i o u s a n d we b o u g h t a f u r c a p m a d e " f r o m the white f u r of the t h r o a t of the fox t h a t m a k e s y o u r

STUART WILSON l a d y s o p r e t t y . " We a l s o b o u g h t a b a s k e t with a l e a t h e r c o v e r a n d a r e c o r d i n g by the W a r s a w Philharmonic. He w a s n ' t interested, h o w e v e r , in l o o k i n g into the w i n d o w s of p a w n s h o p s - d u s t y w i n d o w s full of d u s t y jewelry. We s t o p p e d o n l y briefly at two o r three. T h e r e w e r e m a n y . We t h o u g h t of the w a r b e c a u s e t h e s e a r e the s p o i l s of w a r , still w a i t i n g to be c l a i m e d after 27 years. "I W A N T y o u to be h a p p y . I h o p e y o u a r e h a p p y with t h i n g s y o u ' v e b o u g h t , " he s a i d . " I f I could 1 would buy you a d a n c i n g b e a r to t a k e b a c k to A m e r i c a . T h e n y o u w o u l d smile all the time. I w a n t y o u r t h o u g h t s of P o l a n d to be h a p p y o n e s . " He s h o w e d us t h a t W a r s a w a n d P o l a n d a r e a l i v e a n d a n x i o u s to p r o v e t h a t they a r e a l i v e . A Vie n n e s e p r o f e s s o r , a m e m b e r of the S u m m e r S c h o o l f a c u l t y , told m e of the results of i s o l a t i o n . " F o r a t i m e y o u r e m e m b e r w h a t it w a s like to get a letter f r o m E n g l a n d , " he s a i d . " T h e n y o u s a w a G e r m a n

s o l d i e r w a l k i n g d o w n the street a n d f o r g o t . T h e n y o u b e g a n to w o n d e r w h a t w a s h a p p e n i n g to y o u a n d y o u b e g a n to be a f r a i d b e c a u s e y o u d i d n ' t c a r e if y o u g o t a letter o r not. Y o u fell into y o u r s e 1 f. C o n n e c t i o n w a s broken." IT S T H I S fe a r s o m e g a p t h a t o u r Polish f r i e n d b r i d g e d . O n l y when you know a n a m e and an address and have some shared memories are national boundaries c r o s s e d . T h e n t h e r e is h o p e a n d a s m a l l m e a s u r e of confid e n c e - o n b o t h s i d e s of the b o u n dary. A C z e c h o s l o v a k i a n artist g a v e us r e p r o d u c t i o n s of a w o o d - c u t of the St. C h a r l e s B r i d g e in P r a g u e . He c a n ' t s e n d his w o r k o u t of the c o u n t r y to be s o l d a n d d i s t r i b u t e d b e c a u s e it is p a r t of the n a t i o n a l p r o d u c t i o n of the State. He t a l k e d to us a b o u t the State. We c a r r i e d 4 0 w o o d - c u t s a c r o s s the b o r d e r in o u r b u s . T h e s t u d e n t a s k e d , " I s it w o r t h while to g o o v e r t h e r e ? " I rememb e r e d a n old l a d y in a m a n ' s c o a t w a l k i n g d o w n the street. As s h e passed our bus and a y o u n g boy s t a n d i n g b e s i d e it, I h e a r d s o m e Polish w o r d s e x c h a n g e d . She stopped a n d went o v e r to the b u s , t o u c h e d its s i d e s a y i n g , " A m e r i kanski, A m e r i k a n s k i . " Ameri c a n s were t h e r e , r i g h t in W r o c l a v , s t a n d i n g in f r o n t of the hotel. I T H I N K n o w t h a t the s t u d e n t w a s a s k i n g m e a b o u t credits, culture, l e a r n i n g G e r m a n a n d the like. His w a s a n a t u r a l q u e s t i o n a n d I m a d e it h a r d e r t h a n he m e a n t it to be. I s h o u l d h a v e realized m y m i s t a k e . I s a w his b a f f l e d l o o k w h e n I answered him. "When you are the o n e with m o n e y , time, a n d f r e e d o m , d o n ' t y o u s o r t of h a v e a r e s p o n s i b i l i t y to g o - n o t to p r o mote democracy necessarily-but to s h o w t h a t y o u t o o a r e still a l i v e a n d interested in n a m e s a n d addresses."

The Best of Peanuts PEANUTS

VOLi KNOU) WMV > MOU'RE WUR

oo6woo$e

BORNEO DOWN?BECAME V0U SINNEP, THAT'S (OM^'

event itself: " F R E E D O M , N O W , RIOT! F R E E D O M , NOW, RIOT!" T h e n i g h t of J u l y 18, 1 entered m y h o m e — a s q u a t , yellow-brick a p a r t m e n t b u i l d i n g t y p i c a l of the d e c a y i n g s t r u c t u r e s which j a m med t h o u s a n d s of p e o p l e into s q u a l i d flats. I c r a w l e d into m y i r o n - p o s t bed w h i c h n i g h t l y s w u n g f r o m the wall. O u r w i n d o w f a c e d t o w a r d H o u g h Ave. - a block a n d a naif a w a y - o n e of the c i t y ' s worst for prostitution, crime a n d g a n g rowdiness. T h e night a i r s o u n d e d o f s h o t s at first m u f f l e d , then m o r e distinct a n d c l o s e r t o g e t h e r . S i r e n s set off the g u n - b l a s t s in a frighte n i n g , eerie s o u n d . O v e r h e a d a helicopter b u z z e d in circles. 1 l a y in b e d - f e a r f u l a n d u n c e r t a i n at what was h a p p e n i n g . The radio g a v e n o clues. T o this u n e a s y , frightening c l a m o r 1 was forced to d r o w n m y n e r v o u s w o n d e r i n g in sleep. 'Instant Urban Renewal' By m o r n i n g the w o r d w a s o u t ; a riot h a d r i p p e d t h r o u g h the H o u g h area. Fire b o m b s had torn u p b u i l d i n g s a n d fires were still

B E I N 6 P U N 1 5 M E D FOR

T H A T ' S T H E WAV T H E S E ALU)AVS UjORK 1

«

Unchecked Looting F i r e s r a n a h e a d of the fire dep a r t m e n t a n d l o o t i n g went o n before p o l i c e m e n ' s eyes. T h e y were o r d e r e d b y Police Chief K i c h a r d W a g n e r not to a r r e s t - it w o u l d incite f u r t h e r r i o t i n g . W a g n e r ass u m e d a n a i r of a s s u r a n c e : " This s i t u a t i o n will not get out of h a n d b e c a u s e I've got m y men t h e r e to see t h a t it w o n ' t . " But W a g n e r ' s c o n f i d e n c e r a n g low i n a 4 ( ) ( ) - m a n s q u a d w h o were helpless in a battle a g a i n s t s n i p e r s a n d a r s o n i s t s . M a y o r R a l p h I . o t h e r , the s y m bol of City H a l l ' s ineffectual treatment of C l e v e l a n d ' s East 'side s l u m , l a b e l e d the riot " s h a m e f u l , " but w a i t e d until the riot w a s well u n d e r w a y to call out the N a t i o n a l ( i u a r d . 1 he unit? f i n a l l y a p p e a r e d o n the scene e a r l y the third d a y . A l t h o u g h well-liked in a n all-Neg r o n e i g h b o r h o o d - p a r t of the l a r g e r c o m m u n i t y of 6 0 , 0 0 0 Neg r o e s in C l e v e l a n d - w h o s e child r e n we h a d p l a y e d with a n d taught and whose y o u n g people we h a d b e c o m e f r i e n d s with, we were in a d a n g e r o u s p o s i t i o n in an area where outside agitators could e a s i l y m a r k us f o r a s n i p e r a t t a c k . We were forced to m o v e out of the a r e a except d u r i n g the day. I r e m e m b e r the p r o p h e t i c w o r d s of a g r o u p of t e e n a g e r s with ( Continued on Page 7 )

BOMBED AREA—Only the walls remain of what was once a dry-cleaner shop in the Hough district of Cleveland where brutal race riots erupted during the summer. Scenes such as this were not uncommon in the area.

Reprinted

S O M E T H I N G VOU O l P U } I ? 0 N 6 !

THINGS

the final s i g n of i m p e n d i n g d o o m , the d a m o r i n g s of a b u s - l o a d in which we were r i d i n g s i g n a l e d the

r a g i n g o n H o u g h Ave. N e a r o u r a p a r t m e n t , a n e m p t y h o m e destined to b e t o r n d o w n in t h e city's Urban Renewal project, h a d instead c o m e d o w n in a blaze. T h e y called it, " I n s t a n t I ' r b a n R e n e w a l . " H o u g h w a s ripe f o r r i o t i n g . T h e night of the 18th a N e g r o w a s refused a d r i n k of w a t e r b y a whiteoperated b a r o n H o u g h Ave.,called I'he 7 9 e r s . T h e N e g r o r a n o u t , yelling to the p e o p l e o n the street. An a n g r y c r o w d f o r m e d w h i c h w r e c k e d the b a r a n d i n s p i r e d h o o d l u m s to s m a s h , loot a n d b u r n white-owned s t o r e s up a n d d o w n the a v e n u e . Within a few d a y s , stores a n d offices which h a d fermented h a t r e d in the n e i g h b o r h o o d f o r illegal p r a c t i c e s a n d o v e r - c h a r g i n g , h a d been p i l l a g e d and b u r n e d . H o u g h Ave. w a s d u b b e d : " T o m b - S t o n e Territory."

by permission

of the

Chicago

HER WNP DESERVES TO BE BLEAHED!

Trihnne


Page 6

Hope College anchor

September 30, 1966

The Fifth Column

The Eight 0'Clock Blues By Gordy Korstange

NEW COTTAGES—Oggel Cottage, directly across from Vorhees Hall, is but one of the four new women's cottages created this year. The others are the Spanish House, or Centennial Cottage, located opposite Centennial Park at 275 Central Ave., Godfrey Cottage, situated on the corner of College Ave. and Graves Place, and Bouma Cottage, which is the second floor of the health clinic, located on the corner of College Ave. and 12th Street.

A l o n e ! T h e last s o u n d s of the o r g a n h a d f a d e d , l e a v i n g m e sitt i n g silent in t h e b a l c o n y . It w a s quiet n o w in c h a p e l . T h e s t u d e n t s , like e a r l y m o r n i n g s h a d o w s , h a d a p p e a r e d o u t of the c o o l n e s s of n i g h t , r e m a i n e d in quiet s e r v i t u e f o r half a n h o u r , a n d then d i s a p p e a r e d i n t o th" orightness which s i g n a l e d t h e r e l e a s e of d a y . P'or t h i r t y m i n u t e s they h a d filled the n e o - G o t h i c v a s t n e s s of the s t o n e b u l w a r k . S o m e s t u d i e d , s o m e d o z e d a n d s o m e even listened. But the c h a p e l w a s e m p t y n o w , a n d in the m a s s i v e silence o n e c o u l d feel t h a t s o m e t h i n g w a s wrong.

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I AM N O T s p e a k i n g of the chapel attendance question. That p a r t i c u l a r m a n i f e s t a t i o n of Dutch c o l o n i a l i s m h a s b e e n d e b a t e d into a b s u r d i t y f o r fifty y e a r s . N o , the p r o b l e m which bothered me w a s the p h y s i c a l b u l k of the b u i l d i n g itself. T h e c h a p e l is e a s i l y the m o s t impressive structure on campus ( e x c l u d i n g the W a r m F r i e n d Motel). M a n y h a v e s e n s e d this at n i g h t w h e n t h e y w a l k p a s t the e x t e r i o r l i g h t s . w h i c h cast t h o s e g i a n t s h a d o w s , g i v i n g the buildi n g the v i s a b l e p r e s e n c e of a m o n o lithic v a u l t . O t h e r s h a v e w a n d e r e d into the c h a p e l in the d a r k n e s s a n d h a v e h e a r d the o r g a n p l a y i n g h a u n t i n g l y . T h e m y s t e r i u m is all a r o u n d o n e at these t i m e s ( p a r t i c u l a r l y w h e n all d o o r s except o n e a r e l o c k e d f r o m the i n s i d e ) . C o u l d it be t h a t the c h a p e l c o m e s a l i v e at n i g h t ? " T h e c h a p e l ' s a fine a n d priv a t e p l a c e , b u t o n l y the r a s h d o there e m b r a c e . " To answer my own questionn o , the c h a p e l d o e s not c o m e a l i v e d u r i n g t h e n i g h t o r the d a y . Of c o u r s e , in d a y l i g h t the b a s e m e n t is filled w i t h s t u d e n t s a t t e n d i n g c l a s s e s . But b y w a l k i n g u p a few stairs one c a n enter a s a n c t u a r y w h i c h is a l m o s t a l w a y s e m p t y s a v e f o r a n o c c a s i o n a l o r g a n student. T h e p r o b l e m w h i c h c o n f r o n t ed m e a f t e r the s e r v i c e t h a t d a y w a s w h a t to d o with this w a s t e d space? IT W A S N ' T t o o difficult to figu r e o u t a n a n s w e r to this q u e s t i o n . W h a t h a d h a p p e n e d to o t h e r build-

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i n g s w h i c h h a d o u t l i v e d their f u n c t i o n a l p u r p o s e ? Of c o u r s e , they were m a d e into m u s e u m s . A p r i m e e x a m p l e of this c a n be f o u n d o n Holland's own Windmill Islam M u l t i t u d e s of c u l t u r e s e e k e r s h a v e f l o c k e d to this s y m b o l of Dutch i n v e n t i v e n e s s . It's a b o u t time the t o u r i s t s see the o t h e r side of Holland. If p e o p l e will t r a v e l m a n y miles to see the w i n d m i l l , they c e r t a i n l y will s t o p to see a n i m p r e s s i v e b u i l d i n g like the c h a p e l . Stock the b u i l d i n g with a u t h e n t i c DutchA m e r i c a n relics, s t a r t a few o l d l e g e n d s ( p e r h a p s we c o u l d d i g u p a Dutch m a r t y r ) , t u r n o n the p u b l i c i t y , a n d the c h a p e l will o n c e m o r e be a " g o i n g c o n c e r n . " A d v e r t i s e m e n t s could easily be m o d e l e d o n the w i n d m i l l ' s c a m paign: press releases concerning its r e s t o r a t i p n ( t h e r e will have to be a c o n c e s s i o n s t a n d in the b a s e m e n t . ) , s t o r i e s a b o u t the old Dutch m i n i s t e r h i r e d a s c u r a t o r , a n d h u m a n interest a d s s u c h a s . " 8 0 0 People Visit the H o p e C h a pel E a c h D a y - W h y H a v e n ' t Y o u ? " o r " S e e K x o t i c Dutch M a i d ens D a n c e T h e i r S e n s u a l K l o m pen." T H I S PROGRAM, b a r e l y outlined as it is, is t h e a n s w e r to the c h a p e l p r o b l e m . In this s e c u l a r a g e b u i l d i n g s just d o n ' f h a v e th p r i v i l e g e of e x i s t i n g in t h e m s e l v e s . As a m u s e u m the c h a p e l will be a fitting m o n u m e n t to Dutch ing e n u i t y , a c o n t i n u i n g s o u r c e of r e v e n u e a n d a m u c h needed storage place for H o p e a n a l i a .

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f l o o d , pestilence, o r w a r , it's poll u t i o n , e r o s i o n a n d blight. Really, the w a y t h e y r u n d o w n the p r o p e r t y a n d then c o m e a r o u n d p l e a d i n g for help, they're a dubio u s i n v e s t m e n t . Well, w h a t is it this t i m e ?

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The C h a i r m a n (worriedly): Let's see, t h e r e ' s a s u p e r n o v a e r u p t i n g in the G a l a c t i c X I I Reg i o n , O r i o n ' s Belt is s a g g i n g a n d I noticed a definite r u s t s p o t o n the B i g D i p p e r . I f i t ' s n o t o n e t h i n g , it's a n o t h e r . W h a t h a v e y o u g o t there? Gabriel: A n u r g e n t f r o m earth, Sir.

message

T h e C h a i r m a n ( f r o w n i n g ) : That trouble s p o t ! it it isn't famine,

G a b r i e l : T i g h t m o n e y . Sir. The C h a i r m a n : Tight m o n e y , e h ? 1 h a t s a new one. ( s i g h i n g ) Well, I s u p p o s e d I'll h a v e to d o s o m e t h i n g . Get off a n i n s p i r a t i o n r i g h t a w a y to t h e F e d e r a l Res e r v e B o a r d to r e d u c e the p r i m e interest r a t e . N o w , let's see, a b o u t t h a t s u p e r n o v a in G a l a c t i c X I I , if I . . . Gabriel: E x c u s e m e . Sir, but red u c i n g the p r i m e interest r a t e will set in m o t i o n definite i n f l a t i o n a r y p r e s s u r e s o n the entire e c o n o m y and . . . T h e C h a i r m a n : W h a t ? Oh, I s u p p o s e y o u ' r e r i g h t . Well, t h e n , h a v e t h e m k n o c k off i n v e s t m e n t t a x credits to d i s c o u r a g e p l a n t expansion. Now, about Orion's belt, if I hoist u p Betelgeuse a c o u p l e of m i l l i o n l i g h t - y e a r s a n d . . Gabriel: F o r g i v e me, Sir, b u t t h e y ' v e tried t h a t a n d it's h a v i n g n o i m m e d i a t e effect. F u r t h e r m o r e , t h e y ' r e w o r r i e d a b o u t its o v e r a l l l o n g - r a n g e d e f l a t i o n a r y tendencies. The C h a i r m a n : Deflation, eh? Then they'll be on o u r b a c k s a b o u t t h a t . H e r e I ' v e g o t a m i l l i o n cosmic p r o b l e m s o n m y h a n d s , a n d y o u c o m e in e v e r y five m i n u t e s with o n e of their p l e a s l o r heip. ( w e a r i l y ) Well, lei s see, t o c r e a t e a balanced money market.with neither i n f l a t i o n a r y n o r deflationa r y pressures... (suddenly elated) I ' v e g o t the s o l u t i o n ! I d o n ' t k n o w w h y I d i d n ' t t h i n k of it s o o n e r . Gabriel ( e a g e r l y ) : What d o y o u w a n t me to do, Sir? T h e C h a i r m a n (with a n a i r y w a v e of d i s m i s s a l ) : B l o w , Gabriel, b l o w .


September 30, 1966

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The View From Here

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Slums Breed Racial Explosion | Victory in Rhodesia? | ( Continued F r o m Page 5 ) w h o m we were f r i e n d s : " Go h o m e ! " T h e y were u n a b l e to p r o tect us, but were f e a r f u l for o u r safety. 1 hat week was a f r i g h t e n i n g week of disaster. We were on e d g e n e r v o u s a n d bewildered at a time w h e n we l e a r n e d q u i c k l y w h a t " f e a r " m e a n t . C o m i n g f r o m quiet s u b u r b a n or small town neighborh o o d s , we were t h r u s t into a n a r e n a of h a t e a n d f e a r , n e r v o u s l a u g h t e r a n d w a i t i n g - w a i t i n g for it to end. People w h o m we loved were t h r e a t e n e d to leave their h o m e s ; it b e c a m e d a n g e r o u s for white a n d N e g r o f r i e n d s to d r i v e t h r o u g h the ghetto a r e a or into the prejudiced white surrounding neighborhoods. N ational G u a r d s m e n blocked off the a r e a , a n d a s if in a w a r - z o n e , we were a s k e d to state o u r b u s i n e s s when entering or leaving. Destruction in the Millions 1 he destruction in cost was in the millions. F o u r were dead a n d c o u n t l e s s injured. M a y o r Locher and city officials expressed " a l a r m " at the " d i s g r a c e f u l , lawless b e h a v i o r of the r i o t e r s . " After all that w a s s a i d - d a y s , weeks after the r i o t - 1 c a n o n l y voice al a r m a n d disbelief at the p o o r , irr e s p o n s i b l e o p i n i o n s a n d actions of a city g o v e r n m e n t which refused to accept the b l a m e f o r a n oppressing r e a l i t y - a reality s i g n a l l i n g for a riot at least a y e a r before. Locher and Wagner, undaunted in their s h a m e f u l p o s i t i o n , s o u g h t a s c a p e g o a t for their guilt: " a n organized conspiracy," they c l a i m e d , b e g a n a n d r a n the riot. F o r this w a s the voice of a m a y o r w h o r a r e l y stepped into the ghetto to witness a f r u s t r a t i o n of l i v e s of i n a d e q u a t e h o u s i n g , few j o b opportunities, p o o r schooling, p o o r police p r o t e c t i o n a n d a series of other ills. H o u g h w a s a ghetto without a voice, a n d the city of Cleveland h a d indicted itself w h e n it h a d its riot. 'Conspirators the Cause' A g r a n d j u r y f o r m e d in Clevel a n d to seek out this g r o u p of c o n s p i r a t o r s . T h e r e p o r t that the g r a n d j u r y issued at the end of a week of t e s t i m o n y a n d accusations,- is stilted with a m o r a l i s t i c c o n c e r n a g a i n s t f a i l i n g principles: "Of e q u a l c o n c e r n b y this j u r y a r e the s t e a d y e r o s i o n of ideals a n d principles of G o d a n d country a n d their persistent replacement b y the deification of material idols a n d m a t e r i a l 'principles.' We p r o f o u n d l y believe that a rigid a d h e r e n c e by e v e r y o n e to the est a b l i s h e d law a n d o r d e r of this c o u n t r y s h o u l d i n s t a n t l y replace the g u e r r i l l a w a r f a r e practised in the streets a n d n e i g h b o r h o o d s . " W e believe there s h o u l d be a r e s t o r a t i o n of the q u a l i t i e s of g o o d faith, of h o n e s t y , a n d a willingness to h e a r out the o t h e r p e r s o n o r the other side without r e s o r t to violence a n d d i s o r d e r . . . . " Illegitimacy and crime: A Way of Life T h e f a l l a c y in this statement is its a s s u m e d a p p l i c a b i l i t y to a n a r e a which b e a r s little resem-

Sorority Rush Events Open Literary Meetings Friday, September 30 6:45-7:45 p.m. Alpha Phi 8-9 p.m. Sorosis Closed Coffees — Invitational Monday, October 3 6:45-7:30 p.m. Delphi 7:45-8:30 p.m. Dorian 8:45-9:30 p.m. Sib Open Coffees Wednesday, October 5 7:30-8:15 p.m. Delphi, Alpha Phi, Kappa Chi Thursday, October 6 7:30-8:15 p.m. Dorian, Sorosis, Sib Final Coffees Saturday, October 8 9:45-10:30 a.m. Sib, Dorian, Alpha Phi 10:45-11:30 a.m. Sorosis, Delphi, Kappa Chi

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THE MORNING AFTER—Buildings marked for urban renewal by the city of Cleveland were razed by the rioters who terrorized the Hough district this summer. Rioters called it instant urban renewal.' b l a n c e to a m i d d l e - c l a s s c o m m u n ity with a m i d d l e - c l a s s m o r a l structure. Like all lower-class areas, whether b l a c k or white. H o u g h could not be j u d g e d b y middle-class s t a n d a r d s . In therecent U.S. S e n a t e s u b - c o m m i t t e e hearings on u r b a n problems, C l a u d e B r o w n , a u t h o r of " M a n child in the P r o m i s e d L a n d , " a b o o k on H a r l e m , a n d a n o t h e r H a r l e m resident testified to the fact that illegitimacy a n d crime were a w a y of life in the ghetto. It is not c o n s i d e r e d " b a d " as middle-class p e o p l e think. It is accepted as the o n l y m e a n s o f s u r vival in a society bereft of anyt h i n g b e a r i n g close r e s e m b l a n c e to what the j u r y r e p o r t calls " l a w s f a s h i o n e d for the benefit a n d protection of e v e r y citizen." The ghetto-dweller w o u l d l a u g h sard o n i c a l l y a n d reply, " W h e n did y o u willingly h e a r m e o u t ? Am I now to listen to y o u ? " The j u r y r e p o r t singled out several ghetto residerfts a n d outside a g i t a t o r s , l a b e l i n g them " b l a c k nationalists" and "communists." 1 a m not d i s c o u n t i n g the evidence n o r a m I e x c u s i n g lawless, hatefilled a g i t a t o r s . But 1 h a v e lost faith in a city g o v e r n m e n t like C l e v e l a n d ' s which fails to reach to the root c a u s e s , a n d which p a s s e s off its b l a m e u p o n frustrated men w h o h a v e acted militantly when law failed to give them a voice. Riots as Communication My reaction t o w a r d the riot is s u m m e d u p in this statement issued b y the C l e v e l a n d Council of C h u r c h e s : " W h a t m u s t be u n d e r s t o o d is that destructive b e h a v i o r a n d g r o u p violence is a f o r m of inarticulate l a n g u a g e in which one g r o u p of p e o p l e c o m m u n i c a t e s with other g r o u p s of people a b o u t its p r o b l e m s , discontents, a n d desn a r a t i o n . The central fact a b o u t a riot is that it represents an exp l o s i o n of feeling a r i s i n g f r o m fest e r i n g discontents that could find n o other, m o r e a c c e p t a b l e avenue of e x p r e s s i o n a n d c o m m u n i cation.

Vander Borgh And Hilmert Hospitalized Hospitalized last week b e c a u s e of v a r i o u s illnessess were Director of F i n a n c i a l Aid, Mr. William .1. Hilmert, a n d f o r m e r p r o f e s s o r of e d u c a t i o n Garrett V a n d e r B o r g h . Mr. Hilmert entered H o l l a n d H o s p i t a l last F r i d a y for a routine examination. He w a s given a n e l e c t r o c a r d i o g r a m test a n d the d o c t o r s d i s c o v e r e d that he h a d suffered a slight c o r o n a r y d u r i n g the last m o n t h or two. The hospital r e p o r t e d that his c o n d i t i o n w a s g o o d , a n d C h a p l a i n William H i l l e g o n d s s a i d t h a t he w o u l d p r o b a b l y l e a v e the h o s p i t a l this weekend a n d s h o r t l y r e t u r n to w o r k as f i n a n c i a l director on a part-time basis. Professor Vander Borgh, who retired two y e a r s a g o as profess o r of e d u c a t i o n , entered H o l l a n d H o s p i t a l with a c a s e of p n e u m o n ia. T h e h o s p i t a l r e p o r t e d that his condition also was good.

" W h i l e the M a y o r calls for a ret u r n to n o r m a l c o n d i t i o n s , it is the very a b s e n c e of m o r e n o r m a l c h a n n e l s of c o m m u n i c a t i o n for ghetto residents t h a t leads to such s e e m i n g l y i r r a t i o n a l and destructive o u t b u r s t s . " Criticism of Cleveland My criticism of the city g o v e r n ment is e x p r e s s e d iif this statement: " T h e single f a c t o r that m a k e s these riots m o s t d a n g e r o u s is the inability or u n w i l l i n g n e s s of city l e a d e r s h i p to u n d e r s t a n d the depth of discontent a n d d e s p a r a t i o n felt by l a r g e n u m b e r s of Cleveland N e g r o e s . T h i s new form of p r o test, which s o deeply s h o c k s o u r self-interests and sensibilities, m u s t be e x p o s e d to cold reality as the p r e l u d e to realistic p r o g r a m s for c h a n g e . Only then will Americ a n society not r e m a i n at the mercy of primitive, f r i g h t e n i n g , i r r a t i o n a l a t t e m p t s b y p r i s o n e r s in the ghetto to d e s t r o y their o w n prison." Any Freedom in a Slum? F r i g h t e n i n g , t e r r i f y i n g - b u t we m u s t face u p to the c r y i n g reality of a p r i s o n e r « t r y i n g to b r e a k the b a r s of this p r i s o n . 1 return to m y initial q u e s t i o n : Was their .any f r e e d o m to begin with?

Editor's note: This column, organized by the International Relations Club at Hope, is the first of a series 'on international affairs. The following article was written by Kiwala Simwanza, from Zambia who is a Junior and a sociology major at Hope. Since R h o d e s i a declared itself i n d e p e n d e n t last N o v e m b e r , observers and scholars have m a d e m a n y p r e d i c t i o n s o n what w o u l d h a p p e n there. With the application of a n e c o n o m i c e m b a r g o a n d the p r e s s u r e of A f r i c a n states o n Britain, m a n y p a p e r s predicted, as did Wilson, R h o d e s i a ' s d o w n fall within weeks. S o m e even predicted a c o u p in R h o d e s i a but to this d a t e n o n e h a s occurred. T h e f a i l u r e of s o m e predictions is due to be i g n o r e d b y the observers. S m i t h ' s d e c l a r a t i o n of i n d e p e n d e n c e did not directly affect the A f r i c a n m a s s e s in the rural a r e a s . 1 h a v e seen statistics in recent p a p e r s p o i n t i n g out the inequalities of l a n d o w n e r s h i p , educ a t i o n a l o p p o r t u n i t i e s , etc., between b l a c k s a n d whites, but these inequalities a r e the result of the adm i n i s t r a t i o n s of British G o v e r n o r s , not of S m i t h ' s regime. IN A D D I T I O N to that. Smith h a s tried to win the A f r i c a n r u r a l m a s s e s by c o o p e r a t i n g with their t r a d i t i o n a l t r i b a l l e a d e r s , the chiefs, w h o s e a u t h o r i t y would be t h r e a t e n e d if A f r i c a n n a t i o n a l i s t s would take over. B e c a u s e of these a n d other reas o n s African, t r i b e s m e n h a v e not reacted. The conflict so far h a s been between the Rhodesian b l a c k s a n d whites w h o live in the towns. The u r b a n Africans, however, h a v e neither the m e a n s n o r the n u m b e r s to s u s t a i n o p p o s i t i o n to S m i t h ' s forces. They will h a v e to use r u r a l m a n p o w e r for their s t r u g g l e but ttiey h a v e not a r r i v e d at the s t a g e yet that they c a n d o this. T o this date, e m b a r g o e s h a v e failed. With a s little k n o w l e d g e of h i s t o r y a s 1 h a v e , I d o u b t whether e m b a r g o e s h a v e ever succeeded. S o u t h Africa is b l a m e d for b r e a k ing the e m b a r g o , but almost half of the South A f r i c a n firms supp o r t i n g the R h o d e s i a n regime, a r e o w n e d b y British or A m e r i c a n investors.

IF T H E P R E S E N T R h o d e s i a n r e g i m e fell, w h o w o u l d t a k e o v e r ? S o m e s a y that the A f r i c a n s w o u l d , but 1 d o u h t it. M a n y A f r i c a n leaders t o d a y a r e either l a n g u i s h i n g in restriction c a m p s o r in u n d e r g r o u n d prisons or are outside R h o d e s i a converted mines. As a result of this state of a f f a i r s , m a n y of these A f r i c a n l e a d e r s a r e quite i g n o r a n t o n current issues b o t h in R h o d e s i a a n d in the w o r l d . T h e y w o u l d h a v e to be reoriented b e f o r e they could r u n the g o v e r n m e n t . O v e r t a k i n g the g o v e r n ment a n d r u n n i n g it a r e two different issues - one c a n o v e r t a k e the g o v e r n m e n t but fail to r u n it. Since all the present experienced civil s e r v a n t s a r e whites, they w o u l d refuse to c o o p e r a t e in t r a i n i n g p r o g r a m s for A f r i c a n s . It w o u l d t a k e s o m e time b e f o r e A f r i c a n s could rule. I believe that a coalition g o v e r n m e n t of British o f f i c i a l s , R h o d e s i a n whites, a n d Z i m b a b w e n a t i o n a l ists ( A f r i c a n s ) w o u l d be the best interim g o v At the last C o m m o n w e a l t h conference, p r o p o s a l s were m a d e to p u s h f u r t h e r s a n c t i o n s t h r o u g h the L'nited N a t i o n s in o r d e r to defeat the R h o d e s i a n regime. But the c r a f t y Smith is at the s a m e Lime g o i n g a h e a d with his p l a n s for a R h o d e s i a n Republic. If R h o d e s i a b e c a m e a republic, other n a t i o n s w o u l d be forced to recognize her a n d this would be to her a d v a n tage. B U T AS TIME p r o g r e s s e s , the r u r a l A f r i c a n e m o t i o n s will be ar o u s e d b y the u r b a n A f r i c a n s a n d the r a d i o b r o a d c a s t s f r o m the n e i g h b o r i n g countries. An upr i s i n g by these A f r i c a n t r i b e s m e n , helped by the independent A f r i c a n states, c o u l d b r i n g new w o r d s in o u r v o c a b u l a r y to describe the racial violence that w o u l d ensue. T h e e x a m p l e of the M a u - M a u uprising in K e n y a s h o u l d b e e n o u g h to r e m i n d one of that possibility. T h e o u t c o m e of R h o d e s i a n situ a t i o n is as difficult to predict a s those of A f r i c a n situations. At least Smith acted in a c c o r d a n c e with the present political trend in Africa, where rulers, b l a c k o r white, c h a n g e o v e r n i g h t . T o m o s t A f r i c a n o b s e r v e r s , " R h o d e s i a is a puzzle in which cleverness wins r o u n d s but not v i c t o r y . "

Review of the News New York City The twenty-first meeting of the General Assembly of the 117-member United Nations opened on a harmonious note with the election of Abdul Rahman Pazhwak of Afghanistan as president. Secretary-General U Thant in a blunt annual report to the General Assembly of the UN condemned the theory of the Vietnam conflict as a "holy war." His fear is plainly that the way to the peace table will be permanently blocked if both sides view the conflict as an ultimate idiological testing ground. U.S. ambassador to the UN Goldberg announced a new U.S. peace proposal which is a combination of the demands made by U Thant and Hanoi. NFL representation was not, in his terms, an "insurmountable" problem. North Korea North Korea joined the Soviet Union in an attack upon Peking. North Korea was for some time an ideological ally of China. Gilbertsville, Ky. Gov. Orval E. Faubus of Arkansas said that "white backlash" could sweep Gov. Wallace of Alabama to the White House by 1968. Washington, D.C. U.S. policy in Asia may be heading toward something close to "colonial rule," Sen. J. William Fulbright said, and he added that he would ask his Foreign Relations Committee to hold open hearings on "the long term objectives" of that policy. "Elder statesman," George Ball (a "dove" who opposed resumption of bombing of North Vietnam afcer the 37-da.v lull early this year), resigned from his post at Under-Secretary of State. He "claimed" no split with President Johnson and Dean Rusk. His replacement is the Attorney General of the United States, Nicholaus Katzenbach, who sports no experience in such a position. German Chancellor Ludwig Erhardt and President Johnson have been having talks this week. President Johnson announced that he would like to visit Germany next spring. Preliminary total of U.S. output will be $739 billion. During World War II, 42 per cent of total U.S. output at that time was spent in the war.

Thirteen per cent of the U.S. output at that time was spent in Korja and 8 per cent of our total U.S. output will be spent this year in war. Baltimore, Md. The Baltimore Orioles won their first pennant and will probably face the Los Angeles Dodgers. fe Madrid, Spain Francisco Franco will announce Oct. 3, during the thirtieth anniversary celebration of his rise to power, how he has begun to institutionalize government in Spain. Franco, with the aid of Hitler and Mussolini, rose to power after a bloody civil war and has ruled as an absolute dictator since. Often he has talked about restoring the Spanish monarchy. Tokyo, Japan Japanese officials see the activities of the Rod Guard in China as a prelude to World War III. They are purging the country so that internal unrest will not thwart distant external activities of a military nature. Two typhoons have killed more than 200 Japanese and a third is on its way. Capetown, South Africa A recent bill that would outlaw all political discussions by Negroes or between Negroes and whites has temporarily been tabled. It also would forbid multi-racial universities. Manila, Phillipines President Ferdinand Marcos proposed a sevennation summit conference to meet in Manila in Octobcr. President Johnson will probably attend. The seven-nations are those involved in Southeast Asian politics and Vietnam will be the central topic and peace the goal. United States Books published across the M.S. and critical of the Warren Report are becoming best sellers instantly and many people are writing their senators asking for another investigation by a different group — to the dismay of many senators. Washington, D.C. The annual dog food sales in the U.S. are double the volume of baby food sales. There are 12 doctors, 11 lawyers, and 40 gas station workers for every 10,000 people in the U.S.

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September 30, 1966

Cross Country Team Places Second in Invitational Meet T h e H o p e College c r o s s c o u n t r y t e a m t o o k a second p l a c e in Hope's i n v i t a t i o n a l meet last T u e s d a y . C o m i n g in first place w a s A q u i n a s with 2 3 p o i n t s ; H o p e followed with 5 5 p o i n t s ; G r a n d R a p i d s J u n i o r College w a s next with 5 6 ; a n d M u s k e g o n C o m m u n ity College trailed with 102. D o u g F o r m s m a set a c o u r s e record b y r u n n i n g the d i s t a n c e in 2 0 : 4 1 , b r e a k i n g the p r e v i o u s rec o r d of 21:29 set by T o n y Mifsud of S p r i n g A r b o r in 1 9 6 3 . T h e o t h e r H o p e r u n n e r s were Cal ()st e r h a v e n ( 21:53), W a y n e Meerm a n ( 2 2 : 5 8 ) , Paul H a r t m a n ( 2 3 : 44), Dan Colenbrander (24:00), 窶「John D p ' a n o ( 2 4 : 0 8 ) , Dick Bisson (24:10), Dave B r u g g e m a n n (24: 54 ), T o m K o o i s t r a ( 2 4 : 5 9 ) , G a r y Peiper ( 2 5 : 0 6 ) a n d R a l p h Schroeder ( 2 6 : 2 1 ).

L a s t S a t u r d a y the c r o s s c o u n t r y t e a m lost a p a i r in their o p e n e r , l o s i n g 19-42 to W h e a t o n a n d losi n g to S p r i n g A r b o r 2 2 - 3 3 . W h e a t o n ' s D a v e Miller w a s the i n d i v i d u a l w i n n e r with a time of 2 1 : 1 0 , followed closely by H o p e ' s D o u g F o r m s m a w h o c a m e in o n l y nine seconds b e h i n d Miller. C o a c h Glenn V a n Wieren w a s p l e a s e d with T u e s d a y ' s o u t c o m e a n d expects the t e a m to i m p r o v e considerably. Tomorrow the t e a m will go a g a i n s t A d r i a n . I'he contest will begin at 11 a . m . at V a n Raalte Field a n d a l s o end there. Mr. V a n Wieren stated that he w o u l d like to see m o r e of the stn dent b o d y at the meet. It wouii: b o o s t the m o r a l e of the t e a m a n d a l s o allow the s t u d e n t s to be p a r : of a n exciting s p o r t i n g event, he said.

Dutchmen Boot Calvin In Double Overtime Win BARRELLING AHEAD窶認ullback Charlie Langeland (43) struggles for that extra yardage as he Epulis a Wheaton defenseman downfield in the game at Wheaton last Saturday afternoon. Hope won 18-14.

Come From Behind Victory

H o p e S l i p s b y W h e a t o n , 18-14 The H o p e College F l y i n g Dutchmen in a n exciting finish scored in the final q u a r t e r of lasl S a t u r d a y ' s football contest to defeat W h e a t o n 18-14. It w a s a late d r i v e that g a v e Hope the g a m e w i n n i n g touchd o w n as the t e a m went 5 9 y a r d s to score with 5 : 2 2 on the clock. The C r u s a d e r s f o u g h t h a r d to cover the lead, but the Dutch defense was u p to it a n d held off two Wheaton rallies a l o n g with a f u m ble recovery. THE TOUCHDOWN drive started with Keith Able r e t u r n i n g a Wheaton p u n t 16 y a r d s to the H o p e 4 1 - y a r d line. Clint Schilstra, r e p l a c i n g i n j u r e d q u a r t e r b a c k G a r y F r e n s , p a s s e d to split end Ray C o o p e r for 12 y a r d s a n d then tossed the ball to Walt Reed for 4 3 y a r d s , b r i n g i n g the ball to the Wheaton f o u r . Senior f u l l b a c k , C h a r l i e L a n g e l a n d , p l u n g e d into the line twice a n d on the s e c o n d try b r o u g h t the ball to p a y d i r t f r o m one foot out. The c o n v e r s i o n attempt failed, but the score r e m a i n e d 18-14 in f a v o r of Hope. Another s c o r i n g o p p o r t u n i t y c a m e after the D u t c h m e n kicked off following the last TD, .and Reed scooped u p a f u m b l e at the Wheaton 45. THIS SCORING threat ended when H o p e r a n out of d o w n s a n d h a d to call o n Ken Feit to p u n t . The center to Feit flew o v e r his head for a 2 5 - y a r d loss, a n d with one minute left to p l a y , the C r u s a ders took o v e r o n the H o p e 38. The next p l a y b r o u g h t W h e a t o n to the 2 1 - y a r d line by w a y of a p a s s f r o m D a v e C a r l s o n to Jerry Webb. On the following p l a y h a l f b a c k D o n Griffen threw to flanker M a r k Pett for a n 1 1 - y a r d gainer. Wheaton then tried four p a s s attempts, which all missed their mark mainly due to the strong rush of the defensive line and the efforts of Feit and Langeland. Hope took over, and Schilstra ran the ball into the ground totakei^ip the seven seconds left in the g a m e . Walt Reed put Hope o n the score board first with a 7 3 - y a r d run, returning Griffen's 4 5 - y a r d punt. The c o n v e r s i o n p a s s from center was bad and Frens, running with the bail, failed to make the tally. The Crusaders came back with a touchdown in the second quarter when halfback Roger Cornelius went through the middle for a 74 yard touchdown. Griffen m a d e the score 7-6 in f a v o r of Wheaton

successfully m a k i n g the p o i n t after. W H E A T O N scored a g a i n a f t e r F r e n s f u m b l e d with tackle L a r r y New r e c o v e r i n g at the H o p e 31. C a r l s o n then p a s s e d 18 a n d 13 y a r d s b e f o r e g i v i n g the ball to Bob Bennett, w h o b r o u g h t the ball t h r o u g h the m i d d l e for the score. Hope's second t o u c h d o w n c a m e when F r e n s rolled out to his left a n d w o r k e d his w a y into the end z o n e f o r the six points. The Dutchm e n tried to tie the score with a two-point c o n v e r s i o n p l a y but failed to b r i n g the ball a c r o s s . The Crusaders gained 247 y a r d s o n the g r o u n d a g a i n s t H o p e ' s 146. W h e a t o n ' s g r o u n d attacc w a s led b y Bennett, w h o c h a l k e d u p 103 y a r d s of their total. H o p e w o n the p a s s i n g g a m e with 77 y a r d s in the a i r but w a s followed closely by W h e a t o n ' s 70 yards passing. THE FLYING Dutchmen's l e a d i n g g r o u n d g a i n e r w a s Able, with 50 y a r d s in 4 0 a t t e m p t s , L a n g e l a n d followed with 3 9 y a r d s

in 11 c a r r i e s , a n d Bill P l o c h o k i went 34 y a r d s in nine tries. F r e n s hit on two p a s s e s out of five a t t e m p t s for 2 2 y a r d s b e f o r e he suffered a h e a d i n j u r y a n d h a d to be r e p l a c e d b y Clint Schilstra. Schilstra hit on two of seven for 5 5 yards. I n j u r i e s a r e s t a r t i n g to t a k e their toll as s e v e r a l of the H o p e s t a r t e r s h a v e been sidelined. G a r y Holvick w a s t a k e n to the h o s p i t a l after the g a m e w h e n he went into a state of s e m i - s h o c k , a result of over-exertion. G a r y w a s released S u n d a y a n d reported T u e s d a y for light p r a c t i c e only. F r e n s suffered a h e a d i n j u r y in the g a m e a n d w a s t a k e n out for the rest of the contest. He a l s o r e q u i r e d a light p r a c t i c e s c h e d u l e at the b e g i n n i n g of the week. Steve P i e r s m a w a s u n a b l e to p l a y in the g a m e due to a leg injury. F R E S H M A N Bill Plochoki suffered a s h o u l d e r s e p a r a t i o n Mond a y in practice a n d m i g h t possibly be out for the r e m a i n d e r of the season. His a b s e n c e c o u l d seriously affect the o u t c o m e of the season.

Last S a t u r d a y , at the b e g i n n i n g of H o p e ' s soccer g a m e , the s u n s h o n e b r i g h t . When the g a m e w a s o v e r , the sun w a s still b r i g h t a n d so were the faces of the p l a y e r s o n the H o p e t e a m . H o p e w o n o v e r C a l v i n College in o v e r t i m e , 4-3.

c a p t a i n Fred S c h u t m a a t d r o v e a l o n g p a s s d o w n the center ot the field to Sende w h o d r o v e t h r o u g h the C a l v i n defensive line a n d booted the ball p a s t the C a l v i n g o a l i e to give Hope a 4 - 3 lead which it never relinquished.

C a l v i n s c o r e d first, t h i r d a n d fifth, but H o p e s c o r e d s e c o n d , f o u r t h , sixth a n d s e v e n t h . With the s c o r e 1-0, D o u g N i c h o l s t o o k a s h o r t p a s s downfield a n d booted the ball into the u p p e r right c o r n e r of the g o a l t y i n g the score.

Sende w a s the big g u n for H o p e with the g a m e - t y i n g a n d w i n n i n g goals. Mocc c o n t r i b u t e d assisting p a s s e s o n the first three g o a l s .

C a l v i n o n c e a g a i n t o o k the lead a n d the half ended with C a l v i n l e a d i n g 2-1. In the third p e r i o d f r e s h m a n Jeff A l p e r i n t o o k a l o n g p a s s on the right w i n g f r o m T o n y Mocc a b o u t 18 y a r d s f r o m thie g o a l . When the C a l v i n g o a l i e left the net to stop the a t t a c k , Alperin kicked the ball into the left side of the net, t y i n g the score a g a i n , 2-2. A n d t h a t ' s the w a y the r e g u l a tion g a m e ended as the f o u r t h period r e m a i n e d scoreless. C a l v i n , for the third time, took the lead, 3-2 a n d with f o u r minutes r e m a i n i n g l o o k e d g o o d en o u g h to win. But t h e n Pierre Sende t o o k a l o n g p a s s o v e r the defensive line f r o m Mocc a n d after f a k i n g left kicked the ball into the r i g h t c o r n e r . S e n d e ' s heroics h o w e v e r , were not t h r o u g h . With one m i n u t e a n d 4 3 s e c o n d s r e m a i n i n g in the g a m e .

T h r e e H o p e p l a y e r s were injui ed d u r i n g the g a m e : D a v e Piet with an a n k l e i n j u r y a n d D o u g Nichols a n d g o a l i e B r i a n Bailey w h o m a y be out for s e v e r a l g a m e s .

Dr. Vander Lugt Represents Hope At Inauguration Dr. William V a n d e r Lugt, Distinguished P r o f e s s ' o r-At-Large will represent H o p e College tom o r r o w at the i n a u g u r a l ceremonies of Dr. S. D o u g l a s C o r n e l l , first president of M a c k i n a c College. I m m e d i a t e l y f o l l o w i n g the investiture of the President, the Peter H o w a r d M e m o r i a l L i b r a r y will be dedicated, followed b y a s y m p o s i u m o n " T h e Place of Lib e r a l Arts P^ducation in B u i l d i n g T o m o r r o w ' s W o r l d . " Guests will be entertained in the e v e n i n g with a reception, d i n n e r a n d perform a n c e of the m u s i c a l " U p With People."

Hope Centennial Medallion A UNIQUE GIFT A PRIZED REMEMBERANCE FIVE DOLLARS

Blue Key Bookstore For Early Student Purchasers Only: A Free Gift Campus-Pac with Each Medallion

09-30-1966