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Campus unrest study calls for moral leadership ( A P ) While calling s t u d e n t t e r r o r i s t s a n d t r i g g e r - h a p p y o f f i c e r s c r i m i n a l s , t h e Presidential C o m m i s s i o n on C a m p u s Unrest S a t u r d a y urged President N i x o n to e x e r c i z e m o r a l l e a d e r s h i p to h e l p prevent violence a n d build u n d e r s t a n d i n g IN U R G I N G N I X O N to assert m o r a l l e a d e r s h i p t o achieve an u n d e r s t a n d i n g b e t w e e n o p p o s i n g f a c t i o n s , f o r m e r Pennsylvania G o v . William S c r a n t o n said at a n e w s c o n f c r c n c e S a t u r d a y , " U p t o n o w - s i n c e t h e epis o d e s of t h i s s p r i n g - t h e r e h a s not been t h e k i n d of l e a d e r s h i p t o bring a b o u t t h e k i n d of r e c o n c i l i a tion we h a v e b e e n t a l k i n g a b o u t SCRANTONS STATEMENT p o i n t e d t h e finger m o r e f i r m l y at

N i x o n i h a n t h e w o r d s of t h e report. At t h e n e w s c o n f e r e n c e w i t h the entire c o m m i s s i o n , S c r a n t o n said a t t e m p t s t o m a k e p o l i t i c a l issues of hair s t y l e s a n d m o d e s of dress are " r a t h e r i n f a n t i l e a n d kindergartenish." The remark

c a m e in r e s p o n s e to a q u e s t i o n a b o u t Vice P r e s i d e n t S p i r o T. A g n e w ' s c o m m e n t a r y on s t u d e n t s THE COMMISSIONS final r e p o r t to the P r e s i d e n t b l a m e s government actions and inactions at all levels f o r c o n t r i b u t i n g to c a m p u s u n r e s t , a n d it c i t e s " u n w a r r a n t e d h a r s h n e s s " by law e n t o r c e m e n t o f f i c i a l s in s o m e instances. But s o m e college a d m i n i s t r a t i o n s a l s o c a m e in for c r i t i c i s m f o r the p a n e l views as u n d u e l e n i e n c y . THE NINE-MAN COMMISS I O N , e s t a b l i s h e d last s p r i n g s o o n a f t e r c a m p u s killings at Kent S t a t e

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H o p e College a n c h o r

September 28, 1970

Student leaders meet

Cabinet explains N ixon policy by Tom Donia and the Associated Press S o m e 1 , 2 0 0 s t u d e n t s a n d college a d m i n i s t r a t o r s g a t h e r e d in W a s h i n g t o n o v e r t h e w e e k e n d to hear P r e s i d e n t N i x o n ' s t o p c a b i n e t members explain administration policy. S T U D E N T C O N G R E S S President Marshall Anstandig and Dean of S t u d e n t s R o b e r t DeY o u n g r e p r e s e n t e d H o p e at t h e f o u r - d a y m e e t i n g of t h e A m e r i c a n A s s o c i a t i o n of S t u d e n t G o v e r n ments. Billed as an o p p o r t u n i t y f o r " o p e n dialogue," the c o n f e r e n c e was o b v i o u s l y d i s a p p o i n t i n g t o many student representatives. " I t ' s f u t i l e t o get d i a l o g u e w i t h s o m e of t h e N i x o n a d m i n s t r a t ion," commented Anstandig.

T a l k i n g t o t h e m y o u get t h e pict u r e of t h e g o v e r n m e n t a l c o m plexity that makes following t h r o u g h on p r o g r a m s i m p o s s i b l e . " D E Y O U N G DESCRIBED the c o n f e r e n c e as ' V e r y d e m a n d i n g . " He said s t u d e n t s w e r e " v e r y candid a b o u t w h a t t h e y felt t h e Nixon administration should d o . " I n c l u d e d in t h e list of s p e a k e r s w a s S e c r e t a r y of D e f e n s e Melvin L a i r d , A t t o r n e y G e n e r a l , Selective Service D i r e c t o r C l e m e n t T a r r and S e c r e t a r y of t h e I n t e r i o r W a l t e r J. H i c k e l . But t h e real issue at the m e e t i n g , a c c o r d i n g to A n s t a n d i g , was the immediate pullOci: of U.S. t r o o p s f r o m V i e t nam. A N D I T W A S O N t h a t issue that administration officials were h a r d e s t t o pin d o w n . " I t w a s

IN C O N F E R E N C E - S t u d e n t C o n g r e s s P r e s i d e n t Marshall A n s t a n d i g talks w i t h D e a n of S t u d e n t s R o b e r t D e Y o u n g a b o u t t h e a d d r e s s e s d e l i v e r e d at t h e s t u d e n t g o v e r n m e n t m e e t i n g h e l d over t h e w e e k e n d in Washington.

in to

"'It is i m p e r a t i v e t h a t t h e President bring us t o g e t h e r b e f o r e m o r e lives are lost a n d m o r e p r o perty destroyed and more universities d i s r u p t e d . "WE R E C O M M E N D that the P r e s i d e n t seek t o c o n v i n c e p u b l i c o f f i c i a l s a n d p r o t e s t o r s alike t h a t devisive a n d i n s u l t i n g r h e t o r i c is dangerous." T h e r e p o r t also urges an e n d t o the Vietnam war. T h e c o m m i s s i o n , h e a d e d by S c r a n t o n , r e p o r t s that o n l y a small m i n o r i t y of s t u d e n t s , f a c ulty m e m b e r s a n d a g i t a t o r s are bent on d e s t r u c t i o n of universities. T H E R E P O R T U R G E S swift r e m o v a l f r o m c a m p u s e s a n d vigorous p r o s e c u t i o n of p e r p e t r a t o r s ot violence. At the s a m e t i m e , t h e c o m m i s sion a c c u s e d s o m e a u t h o r i t i e s of a b u s e ot p o w e r . " T o o m a n y law e n f o r c e m e n t oil icers have r e s p o n d e d with un-

w a r r a n t e d h a r s h n e s s a n d f o r c e in seeking to control disorders. "ACTIONS-AND inactions of g o v e r n m e n t at all levels has contributed to campus unrest. The w o r d s of some political l e a d e r s have h e l p e d t o i n f l a m e it. "Law enforcement officers have o f t e n r e a c t e d i n e p t l y or overr e a c t e d . At t i m e s t h e i r r e p o n s e has d e g e n e r a t e d i n t o u n c o n t r o l l e d violence." T H E C O M M I S I O N says disaff e c t e d s t u d e n t s see t h e war as t h e s y m b o l of m o r a l crisis a n d in a n a t i o n w h i c h , by its a c t i o n s , is d e p r i v i n g even law of its legitim a c y in t h e e y e s of s t u d e n t s . " M u c h of t h e n a t i o n is so p o l a r i z e d t h a t on m a n y c a m p u s e s a m o a j o r d o m e s t i c c o n f l i c t or an unpopular intiative in foreign p o l i c y c o u l d trigger violent protest a n d , in its w a k e , c o u n t e r violence and repressions." WHILE THE COMMISIONERS s o u g h t to f i n d u n d e r l y i n g c a u s e s f o r v i o l e n c e , t h e y a r e s t r o n g in

:( iiniinucd on pu^c 6, column ji

Colleges vie for RCA minority study funds

OPE COLLEGE

83th Anniversary—3

in O h i o a n d J a c k s o n S t a t e Mississippi, had this t o say Nixon:

o b v i o u s that s t u d e n t s h a d o b j e c t i o n s to t h e w a y Laird f i e l d e d q u e s t i o n s , " D e Y o u n g said. " H e was e v a s i v e . " D e Y o u n g s t a t e d t h a t he was i m p r e s s e d w i t h t h e " c o n c e r n on t h e part of t h e s t u d e n t s a b o u t n a t i o n a l p r o b l e m s . It w a s a very responsible audience." ONE OF THE ANNOUNCED s p e a k e r s , Vice P r e s i d e n t S p i r o T . A g n e w , c a n c e l l e d his s c h e d u l e d address s o m e t i m e S a t u r d a y . No r e a s o n was given for t h e cancell a t i o n , a l t h o u g h " n o b o d y felt bad t h a t he d i d n ' t c o m e , " A n s t a n d i g said. Agnew's decision not to speak f o l l o w e d on t h e heels of a s p e e c h F r i d a y by H i c k e l , w h o s p o k e o u t a g a i n s t " t h e r h e t o r i c of p o l a r i z a t i o n " in a s p e e c h w h i c h s e e m e d t o p u t h i m at o d d s again w i t h t h e vice p r e s i d e n t . " O F C O U R S E R I O T I N G and v i o l e n c e are n e g a t i v e , " Hickel t o l d t h e g a t h e r i n g . " S o is t h e r h e t o r i c of p o l a r i z a t i o n . As h a r d as we may t r y , we c a n n o t tear t h e nation together. " S o m e p e o p l e f e a r an e c o n o mic d e p r e s s i o n , " H i c k e l c o n t i n u e d . "1 fear m o r e a d e p r e s s i o n of t h e spirit. A n d t h e r e is n o e x c u s e for it." WHAT THE NATION needs, he said, is a n o t h e r m a n like Britain's Prime Minister Winston Churchill, w h o "voiced the greatn e s s of a p e o p l e . " H i c k e l , in a n o w - f a m o u s plea t o P r e s i d e n t N i x o n last M a y . m a d e it clear he t h o u g h t A g n e w ' s s h a r p c r i t i s m of y o u n g d i s s e n t e r s was dividing the nation. H I C K E L DID N O T m e n t i o n Agnew Friday, even indirectly, a n d aides said he was s p e a k i n g of polarization " f r o m many quarters.' B u t , in a q u e s t i o n - a n d - a n s w e r period following the speech, H i c k e l was a s k e d , " W h a t is S p i r o A g n e w d o i n g " in t e r m s of k e e p i n g t h e c o u n t r y together'.' (Continued on page f), column I)

R e p r e s e n t a t i v e s of t h e t h r e e Reformed Church in A m e r i c a colleges m e t in C h i c a g o over t h e w e e k e n d to discuss the disposition of a S 5 0 , 0 0 0 f u n d p l e d g e d by t h e c h u r c h t o aid m i n o r i t y students and programs. A S S O C I A T E D E A N f o r Acad e m i c A f f a i r s J o h n S t e w a r t , Assistant Dean of Students Mike G e r r i e , D i r e c t o r of D e v e l o p m e n t William D e M ee ster and s o p h o m o r e Dee Dee S t e w a r t attended the meeting for Hope, t a l k i n g over the m o n e y with a d m i n i s t r a t o r s f r o m C e n t r a l College and N o r t h w e s t e r n College. T h e f u n d s were set aside by t h e G e n e r a l S y n o d of t h e R C A t o assist m i n o r i t y s t u d e n t s a n d develo p p r o g r a m s a i m e d at special min o r i t y s t u d y p r o g r a m s at t h e t h r e e colleges. C e n t r a l C o l l e g e a l r e a d y has a black s t u d i e s p r o g r a m a n d N o r t h w e s t e r n has i n c l u d e d a c u r r i culum centered around the American I n d i a n . H o p e has a f e w classes in black s t u d e s , b u t n o e x t e n s i v e program. ACCORDING TO GERRIE, t h e g r o u p was a " t a s k f o r c e " w h i c h will r e c o m m e n t t o t h e G e n eral P r o g r a m C o u n c i l , t h e t o p

e x e c u t i v e b o d y of t h e R e f o r m e d C h u r c h o r g a n i z a t i o n , h o w best t o distribute the m o n e y . " W e felt a c e r t a i n p o r t i o n of t h e $ 5 0 , 0 0 0 s h o u l d be set aside for c o o p e r a t i v e p r o g r a m s a m o n g t h e c o l l e g e s , " G e r r i e said. " T h i s might m e a n faculty exchanges, meetings with faculty representatives t o d i s c u s s m i n o r i t y g r o u p problems or c o n f e r e n c e s with student leaders." HE S A I D A B O U T $ 1 5 , 0 0 0 w o u l d be reserved for s u c h p l a n s , w i t h an a d d i t i o n a l $ 2 0 , 0 0 0 g o i n g to direct assistance scholarships a n d f i n a n c i a l aid t o s t u d e n t s . " T h e original m o n e y w a s i n t e n d e d for recruiting minority s t u d e n t s , " Gerrie c o m m e n t e d , " b u t General S y n o d has i n s t r u c t e d us t o s p e n d t h e m o n e y this a c a d e m i c y e a r . That means we'll spend the m o n e y on s t u d e n t s a l r e a d y o n campus." T h e s c h o l a r s h i p f u n d will be a d m i n i s t e r e d by t h e G e n e r a l P r o g r a m C o u n c i l . A n y s t u d e n t req u e s t i n g f i n a n c i a l aid will s u b m i t an a p p l i c a t i o n t o t h e c h u r c h g r o u p . T h e m o n e y m a y or m a y (Continued

on page 6, column

2)

T H E L O N G P U L L - F r e s h m e n w a r m u p t h e i r m u s c l e s a n d v o i c e s in p r a c t i c e f o r t h e a n n u a l f r e s h m a n - s o p h o m o r e pull over t h e Black R i v e r . T h e t w o t e a m s will c o m p e t e O c t . 9 in t h e t r a d i t i o n a l e v e n t t h a t p i t s class a g a i n s t class.


Page 2

H o p e College anchor

BACK-TO SCHOOL

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September 28, 1970

More go to Vietnam

Draftees killed at higher rates ( C P S ) A r m y d r a f t e e s have alm o s t twiee as high a c h a n c e of b e i n g killed in V i e t n a m as nond r a f t e e enlisted m e n , a c c o r d i n g to a U.S. A r m y s t u d y . D U R I N G 1 9 6 9 , d r a f t e e s were killed at t h e rate of 3 1 per 1.000 a n d i n j u r e d at the r a t e of 2 0 3 per 1 , 0 0 0 , while first t e r m enlistees were killed at the r a t e of 17 per 1 , 0 0 0 a n d injured at the rate of 1 20 per 1 . 0 0 0 . T h e r e a s o n d r a f t e e s t e n d t o be killed at a m u c h h i g h e r rate is that t h e A r m y , in a p r o c e d u r e differe n t f r o m p r e v i o u s wars, allows m e n w h o enlist f o r t h r e e y e a r s t o c h o o s e w h a t j o b t h e y w a n t . Be-

Fall war protest dates announced for Michigan Two antiwar demonstrations have b e e n s c h e d u l e d in Michigan as part of the fall " o f f e n s i v e " against t h e V i e t n a m War. A d e m o n s t r a t i o n in Ann A r b o r will f o l l o w t h e University of Michigan's h o m e f o o t b a l l g a m e O c t . 3. The second major demonstration is s c h e d u l e d for O c t 3 1 - a m a r c h f r o m W a y n e S t a t e U n i v e r s i t y to Kennedy S q u a r e in d o w n t o w n Detroit. Plans f o r the d e m o n s t r a t i o n s were a n n o u n c e d by J a m e s Laff e r t y , a lawyer w h o h e a d s the D e t r o i t c o a l i t i o n t o E n d t h e War, a n d by T e r r y H i l l m a n , a c o o r d i n ator for the Student Mobilization Com mittee. Plans f o r similar d e m o n s t r a t i o n s at H o p e College are s c h e d u led t o get u n d e r w a y this w e e k . A g r o u p of s t u d e n t s w h o a t t e n d e d the Student Mobilization Committee organizational meeting Thursday night will be in c h a r g e . T h e d e m o n s t r a t i o n s are p a r t of a n a t i o n w i d e p r o t e s t similar to last fall's M o r a t o r i u m Day activities.

c a u s e of this, d r a f t e e s w h o m a k e u p 56 p e r c e n t of t h e m e n e n t e r i n g the A r m y , tend to make up a m u c h higher p e r c e n t a g e of c o m bat units. W I L L I A M K. B R E H M , assistant s e c r e t a r y of t h e A r m y for m a n p o w e r and reserve a f f a i r s , explains t h a t " t h e p o p u l a r j o b s are t h e o n e s f o r w h i c h p e o p l e enlist. T h e y d o n ' t enlist f o r t h e hardc o r e c o m b a t skills. T h a t is why draftees tend to populate the h a r d - c o r e c o m b a t skills: 7 0 percent of t h e i n f a n t r y , a r m o r and artillery are d r a f t e e s . " A Defense D e p a r t m e n t manp o w e r e x p e r t told a r e p o r t e r f o r National Journal, a newsletter which requested the Army study, that " w e ' v e s t u d i e d this p r o b l e m very c a r e f u l l y . P e o p l e d o n ' t d e e m t o enlist in t h e A r m y to f i g h t . We r e c o g n i z e t h e i n e q u i t y this c a u s e s in a s h o o t i n g w a r . but we d o n ' t k n o w what to do about i t . "

C O L L E G E G R A D U A T E S are slightly less likely t o be assigned to c o m b a t d u t y b u t t h e r e are n o figures separating draftees from e n l i s t e e s a m o n g college g r a d u a t e s . A b o u t 3 6 p e r c e n t of t h e g r a d u a t e s w h o e n t e r e d t h e A r m y in 1969 were assigned t o c o m b a t j o b s , c o m p a r e d with t h e overall rate of 4 3 p e r c e n t . S o m e 61 p e r c e n t of the g r a d u a t e s w e r e d r a f t e e s . The higher death r a t e of d r a f t e e s in V i e t n a m w o u l d have been e n d e d by an a m e n d m e n t t o the military p r o c u r e m e n t bill, w h i c h w o u l d have b a r r e d t h e s e n d i n g of d r a f t e e s to V i e t n a m unless t h e y v o l u n t e e r e d t o g o . T h e a m e n d m e n t , a u t h o r e d by Sen. William P r o x m i r e , (D-Wisc ), was r e j e c t e d by a v o t e of 2 2 - 7 1 . Michigan S e n a t o r Philip Hart v o t e d in favor of t h e a m e n d m e n t , while Sen. R o b e r t G r i f f i n v o t e d against it.

Hollenbach to handle Danforth inquiries Inquiries a b o u t the D a n f o r t h g r a d u a t e f e l l o w s h i p s , t o be aw a r d e d in M a r c h , 1 9 7 1 , are being h a n d l e d b y Dr. J o h n H o l l e n b a c h , c h a i r m a n of t h e English d e p a r t ment. T h e f e l l o w s h i p s are o p e n to m e n a n d w o m e n w h o are seniors or r e c e n t g r a d u a t e s of a c c r e d i t e d colleges in the U n i t e d S t a t e s , w h o have a s e r i o u s i n t e r e s t in college t e a c h i n g as a c a r e e r , a n d w h o plan t o s t u d y for a P h . D in a field c o m m o n the the undergraduate college. A p p r o x i m a t e l y 1 20 f e l l o w s h i p s will be a w a r d e d in M a r c h , 1 9 7 1 . C a n d i d a t e s must b e n o m i n a t e d b y liaison o f f i c e r s of their u n d e r g r a d u a t e i n s t i t u t i o n s by Nov. 1, 1 9 7 0 . T h e f o u n d a t i o n d o e s not

a c c e p t direct a p p l i c a t i o n s f o r t h e fellowships. D a n f o r t h g r a d u a t e f e l l o w s are eligible for f o u r y e a r s of f i n a n c i a l a s s i s t a n c e , with a m a x i m u m annual living s t i p e n d of $ 2 , 4 0 0 f o r single f e l l o w s a n d $ 2 , 9 5 0 f o r married f e l l o w s , plus t u i t i o n a n d fees. D e p e n d e n c y a l l o w a n c e s are available. F i n a n c i a l n e e d is n o t a condition for consideration. The Danforth Foundation, c r e a t e d by the late Mr. a n d Mrs. William H. D a n f o r t h in 1 9 2 7 , f o c u s e s its a c t i v i t i e s in t w o m a j o r a r e a s , e d u c a t i o n a n d t h e c i t y . In t h e s e areas t h e F o u n d a t i o n adm i n i s t e r s p r o g r a m s and m a k e s g r a n t s t o s c h o o l s , colleges, universities a n d o t h e r p u b l i c and private agencies.

Refute Nixon9s charges

College heads reject blame ( A P ) President N i x o n w a s told b l u n t l y F r i d a y t h a t college adm i n i s t r a t o r s are i n d e e d s t a n d i n g up t o be c o u n t e d on c a m p u s u n r e s t - a s he suggested t h e y d o in a recent s p e e c h . "1 tried t o stress t o N i x o n the p o i n t t h a t a d m i n i s t r a t o r s were b e i n g u n f a i r l y b l a m e d f o r things t h a t t h e y had or had n o t been d o i n g , " said Dr. Logan Wilson, p r e s i d e n t of the A m e r i c a n C o u n c i l on E d u c a t i o n ( A C E ) . "1 d o n ' t t h i n k t h e r e was a n y q u e s t i o n about the point getting across."

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W I L S O N A N D S O L M. Linowitz, chairman of t h e A C E ' s special committee on campus t e n s i o n s , met w i t h the P r e s i d e n t t o discuss r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s m a d e by t h e c o u n c i l last spring a n d t h e progress t h a t has b e e n m a d e since then. T h e P r e s i d e n t i n d i c a t e d t h a t he was very e n c o u r a g e d by t h e progress b e i n g m a d e a n d by t h e t e n o r a n d d i r e c t i o n of t h e r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s in t h e r e p o r t . L i n o w i t z said. " H e said that he felt t h e r e p o r t a n d t h e r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s were

1

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c o n s t r u c t i v e a n d i m p o r t a n t and he c o m m e n d e d the academic comm u n i t y o n w h a t it was d o i n g on its o w n i n i t i a t i v e . " IN A S P E E C H at Kansas State University on S e p t . 16, P r e s i d e n t N i x o n said: "It is t i m e f o r res p o n s i b l e u n i v e r s i t y a n d college a d m i n i s t r a t o r s , f a c u l t y a n d stud e n t leaders t o s t a n d u p and be c o u n t e d . O n l y t h e y can save h i g h e r e d u c a t i o n in A m e r i c a ; it c a n n o t be saved by g o v e r n m e n t . To a t t e m p t t o b l a m e g o v e r n m e n t f o r all t h e w o e s of t h e u n i v e r s i t i e s is t o seek an e x c u s e , n o t a r e a s o n , for their t r o u b l e s . " Wilson said t h e p o i n t of m e e t ing w i t h N i x o n F r i d a y w a s " t o i l l u s t r a t e t h a t a d m i n i s t r a t o r s are n o t sitting on their h a n d s . Many are b e i n g u n f a i r l y t a r r e d with a b r u s h of i n d e c i s i v e n e s s . " T h e A m e r i c a n C o u n c i l on Edu c a t i o n issued a r e p o r t last spring c o m p a r i n g c a m p u s p r o t e s t s in 1 9 6 8 - 6 9 with t h o s e of 1 9 6 9 - 7 0 . T h e n it f o l l o w e d u p in A u g u s t and S e p t e m b e r with a questionnaire to colleges a n d u n i v e r s i t i e s o n w h a t t h e y were d o i n g t o c o p e with potential disorder. D R A F T

M O N E Y BACK GUARANTEE ON A L L WE S E L L

ONE OF THE LARGEST SELECTIONS OF SCHOOL SUPPLIES IN WESTERN MICHIGAN

C O U N S E L I N G S E R V I C E

HOLLAND

We cash personal

Dimnent Chapel basement Monday-Friday, 4-8 p.m. -

checks

STATIONERS SERVING WESTERN MICHIGAN SINCE 1900 DOWNTOWN NEXTTOPENNEYS

You'll really like to browse in our store, and we'll be glad

Did you ever help anyone respect himself?

392-5425

HIGHER HORIZONS John Boonstra Basement of V a n V l e c k

Available anytime

392-5772


September 2 8 , 1 9 7 0

Hope College anchor

PageS

84 attend meeting

Milliken promises aid May start Hope SMC chapter to control campuses A g r o u p of 8 4 s t u d e n t s m e t in Winants Auditorium Thursday evening and m a d e tentative plans for cintinuing d r a f t counseling a n d a n t i - w a r a c t i v i t i e s at H o p e this y e a r . THE

MEETING

which

G o v . William G . Milliken said last w e e k M o n d a y he h a d prep a r e d g u i d e l i n e s f o r s t a t e h e l p in coping with c a m p u s disorder and potential violence, including bomb threats.

was

" C A M P U S D I S O R D E R is primarily the responsibility of campus authorities," the governor said. " B u t t h e s t a t e is p r e p a r e d t o meet its responsibilities when n e c e s s a r y t o i n s u r e p r e s e r v a t i o n of public order and the o p p o r t u n i t y f o r l e a r n i n g . T h i s o p p o r t u n i t y , as well as f r e e d o m of e x p r e s s i o n , is b e i n g c h a l l e n g e d by t h o s e w h o would resort t o crime, violence and i n t i m i d a t i o n to e n f o r c e their will."

o p e n t o all s t u d e n t s , also s a w t h e first s t e p t o w a r d f o r m a t i o n of a Student Mobilization Cimmittee c h a p t e r o n t h e H o p e C a m p u s . If s u c c e s s f u l , t h e s e e f f o r t s will m a r k t h e f i r s t o r g a n i z a t i o n of a n t i - w a r a c t i v i t i e s here o n a n y t h i n g m o r e t h a n a t e m p o r a r y basis. J o h n Boonstra presided over the m e e t i n g , which p r o d u c e d a plan i n v o l v i n g e i g h t g r o u p s of s t u d e n t s . E a c h g r o u p will h a v e a particular task, concerning either d r a f t c o u n s e l i n g o r s o m e t y p e of anti-war work. O N E G R O U P W I L L b e involved in d r a f t c o u n s e l i n g in Holland's Spanish American comm u n i t y , a n o t h e r will try t o c o m municate with businessmen and c h u r c h e s o n a n t i - w a r issues, o t h e r s will h a n d l e p u b l i c i t y a n d f u n d raising, a n d so o n . A s h e e t t o be distributed t o d a y will list t h e groups. S t u d e n t s i n t e r e s t e d in j o i n i n g a g r o u p m a y fill o u t a n d r e t u r n o n e of t h e s h e e t s . At t h e b e g i n n i n g of t h e m e e t ing, B o o n s t r a e x p l a i n e d t h a t its p u r p o s e was t o seek m o r e permanent c o m m i t m e n t s to anti-war a c t i v i t i e s t h a n h a d b e e n t h e case d u r i n g t h e K e n t S t a t e crisis last spring. " W e ' r e t a l k i n g a b o u t a c o n s t a n t m o v e m e n t to f o c u s o u r efforts t o w a r d ending the war and the d r a f t , " he said. H E W E N T ON t o r e a d a s t a t e m e n t by t h e H o p e C o l l e g e Board o f T r u s t e e s w h i c h c o m mended Hope students for their "sensitivity" and "responsibility" d u r i n g t h e K e n t S t a t e crisis. In the last p a r a g r a p h , t h e B o a r d , r e f e r r i n g to t h e p e a c e movement, promised to work

In a m e m o r a n d u m t o college a n d u n i v e r s i t y p r e s i d e n t s a n d local officials, he said: t4

G E T T I N G O R G A N I Z E D - R o g e r Prindle a n d J o h n Boonstra lead a m e e t i n g of 8 4 s t u d e n t s t o d i s c u s s t h e o r g a n i z a t i o n of a S t u d e n t M o b i l i z a t i o n C o m m i t t e e . If it g e t s u n d e r w a y t h i s w e e k , t h e SMC w o u l d p r o b a b l y be b u s y p l a n n i n g f o r a n O c t . 31 d e m o n s t r a t i o n . w i t h s t u d e n t s " t o assess o u r i d e a l s and c o n s i d e r t o g e t h e r w h a t s t e p s we m a y t a k e t o m e e t t h e s e m u t u a l goals." Commenting on this, B o o n s t r a s a i d , " T h i s is a s e m i c o m m i t m e n t o n their p a r t , s o m e t h i n g we c a n hold t h e m to this year."

t i o n of t h e d r a f t , w i t h d r a w a l of all U . S . t r o o p s f r o m S o u t h e a s t Asia, a n d a c c o r d i n g t o its b r o c h u r e s , " a n e n d to all f o r m s of c a m p u s complicity with the w a r . " SMC m e m b e r s h i p application c a r d s w e r e available t o s t u d e n t s after the meeting.

L A T E R IN T H E meeting, Boonstra mentioned the acute need for draft counseling volunteers. He s t r e s s e d t h e f a c t t h a t t h e counseling w o r k w o u l d have a d i f f e r e n t o r i e n t a t i o n t h a n t h e rest of t h e p r o g r a m , in t h a t it w o u l d seek o n l y t o p r o v i d e y o u n g m e n with t h e f a c t s a b o u t a l t e r n a t i v e s to t h e d r a f t .

Indicated by survey

T h e f o r m a t i o n of a local c h a p ter of t h e S t u d e n t M o b i l i z a t i o n C o m m i t t e e w a s also d i s c u s s e s d u r ing t h e e v e n i n g . T H E SMC IS A n a t i o n a l y o u t h organization dedicated to aboli-

College s t u d e n t s a c c e p t t h e use of c o n f r o n t a t i o n t a c t i c s a n d r e j e c t t h e m e t h o d s used by c a m p u s a n d civil a u t h o r i t i e s to q u e l l s t u d e n t protests, according to a survey r e l e a s e d by a r e s e a r c h t e a m at t h e Center for Research and Developm e n t in H i g h e r E d u c a t i o n l o c a t e d at t h e U n i v e r s i t y of C a l i f o r n i a at Berkeley.

Graduate Record

on contracts and tenure status

Exam dates set

The organization supported a r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s t a t i n g t h a t in t h e f u t u r e c o n t r a c t u a l l e t t e r s of reappointment should minimally state c o n d i t i o n s of s a l a r y , r a n k , a n d t e n u r e s t a t u s or t h e n u m b e r of y e a r s r e m a i n i n g in t h e p r o b a t i o n a r y p e r i o d b e f o r e t e n u r e is achieved. Also, the suggestion was m a d e that annual departmental reports contain a statement describing the c o n c r e t e m o v e s m a d e t o aid in t h e a t t a i n m e n t of t e n u r e . A l s o at t h e S e p t e m b e r m e e t i n g , appointments were made to special A A U P c o m m i t t e e s . Dr. D. Ivan D y k s t r a w a s n a m e d c h a i r m a n of a g r o u p t o d e a l w i t h m a t t e r s of

PRIVATE AND COMMERCIAL GROUND SCHOOL

governance. Dr. Henry T e n H o o r a n d G e o r g e R a l p h will w o r k w i t h him. Dr. E l i z a b e t h R e e d y acc e p t e d t h e c h a i r m a n s h i p of a c o m m i t t e e c o n c e r n e d with s t u d e n t affairs. T h e A A U P is a n a t i o n a l o r g a n ization concerned with matters r e l a t i n g to p r o f e s s i o n a l i n t e r e s t s , s u c h as c o l l e g e g o v e r n m e n t , s t u dent rights a n d responsibilities, academic freedom, professorial e c o n o m i c s t a t u s and the improvem e n t of c o l l e g e a n d u n i v e r s i t y teaching. A l t h o u g h t h e o r g a n i z a t i o n is n o t a u n i o n , it d o e s o f t e r serve as a grievance board, according to Dr. R o b e r t C o u g h e n o u r , c h a p t e r president.

E d u c a t i o n a l T e s t i n g Service a n nounced today that undergraduates and others preparing to go t o g r a d u a t e s c h o o l m a y t a k e the Graduate Record Examinat i o n s o n a n y of six d i f f e r e n t t e s t dates during t h e current acader.iic year. T h e first t e s t i n g d a t e for t h e G R E is O c t . 2 4 . S c o r e s f r o n t h i s a d m i n i s t r a t i o n will b e r e p o r t e d t o t h e g r a d u a t e s c h o o l s a b o u t D e c . 1. S t u d e n t s planning to register f o r t h e O c t o b e r test d a t e are a d v i s e d that a p p l i c a t i o n s received by E T S a f t e r O c t . 6 will i n c u r a $3 l a t e registration fee. After Oct. 9, t h e r e is n o g u a r a n t e e t h a t a p p l i c a - t i o n s f o r t h e O c t o b e r test d a t e c a n be p r o c e s s e d . T h e o t h e r five t e s t d a t e s a r e D e c . 12, J a n . 16, F e b . 2 7 , A p r i l 2 4 , a n d J u n e 19.

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Hope College

Starts

Special

OCT. 6 - $35.00

T H E S U R V E Y O F 1 , 4 5 2 college s e n i o r s w a s c o n d u c t e d o n t e n campuses selected to represent d i f f e r e n t i n s t i t u t i o n s b y n a t u r e of size, g e o g r a p h i c l o c a t i o n , s t a t e o r private control, e c o n o m i c backg r o u n d of t h e s t u d e n t b o d y . M o s t of t h e s t u d e n t s were w h i t e m i d dle-class m e n a n d w o m e n w i t h above average academic r e c o r d s w h o g r a d u a t e d last s p r i n g a n d summer. W h e n a s k e d if t h e y b e l i e v e d t h a t s o m e f o r m of c o n f r o n t a t i o n "is n e c e s s a r y a n d e f f e c t i v e " in c h a n g i n g t h e n a t i o n ' s social a n d p o l i t i c a l d i r e c t i o n o n l y o n e percent c o n c l u d e d that c o n f r o n t a t i o n w a s u n n e c e s s a r y . N i n e t e e n perc e n t s u p p o r t e d o n l y s o m e f o r m of ''peaceful petitioning." F I F T Y - T W O P E R C E N T felt t h a t " n o n - v i o l e n t m a s s p r o t e s t is the only feasible way t o persuade o f f i c i a l s t o r e s p e c t t h e will of t h e p e o p l e . " N i n e t e e n p e r c e n t answ e r e d t h a t t h e " u s e of d i s r u p t i v e tactics and t h e d e s t r u c t i o n of p r o p e r t y if o f t e n n e c e s s a r y t o change the status quo. And nineteen percent stated that " a l t h o u g h s o m e m a y get badly hurt, actual physical con-

f r o n t a t i o n a n d v i o l e n c e m u s t at t i m e s be r e s o r t e d t o in o r d e r t o a f f e c t social c h a n g e . " T H E S U R V E Y A L S O rep o r t e d t h a t : - F i f t y p e r c e n t of t h e seniors indicated they were or " w o u l d have b e e n " p a r t i c i p a n t s in V i e t n a m war p r o t e s t s , a n d 3 6 p e r c e n t i n d i c a t e d t h e y w o u l d be in s y m p a t h y w i t h s u c h p r o t e s t s . -Seventy-three p e r c e n t of t h e seniors agreed that "basically, the U.S. is a racist s o c i e t y " a n d 17 percent disagreed. - F i f t y - s i x p e r c e n t of t h e s e n i o r s o p p o s e s u s p e n s i o n of d i s m i s s a l of students " w h o disrupt the normal f u n c t i o n i n g of t h e c a m p u s b y protest activities". T w e n t y - o n e p e r c e n t f a v o r s u s p e n s i o n of dismissal. - D e s p i t e t h e f a c t t h a t n o n e of t h e s c h o o l s i n v o l v e d in t h e s t u d y h a d e x p e r i e n c e d t h e massive use of police f o r c e , 4 6 p e r c e n t of t h e s e n i o r s see t h e p o l i c e as i n s t i g a t o r s of v i o l e n c e a n d o n l y 2 8 p e r c e n t disagreed. T h e research team was unable t o p r o v i d e t h e n a m e s of t h e s c h o o l s i n v o l v e d in t h e s t u d y u n d e r t h e t e r m s of t h e i r c o n t r a c t s with participating institutions.

JUST ARRIVED A new selection of

It's The

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T h e m e m o r a n d u m i n c l u d e s an u p d a t i n g of g u i d e l i n e s f r o m t h e governor's 1969 m e m o r a n d u m to

Students accept confrontations

AAUP chapter hears report At a m e e t i n g of t h e H o p e c h a p t e r of t h e A m e r i c a n A s s o c i a tion of U n i v e r s i t y P r o f e s s o r s last M o n d a y Dr. M o r e t t e R i d e r , d e a n for academic affairs, presented a report dealing with the m a n y q u e s t i o n s raised in t h e p a s t f e w years regarding professorial contracts a n d tenure.

I T H I N K I T IS e s s e n t i a l t h a t local u n i t s of g o v e r n m e n t , enf o r c e m e n t a g e n c i e s , f a c u l t i e s , administrations and students d e v e l o p a p p r o p r i a t e p l a n s t o prevent v i o l e n c e . It is e v e n m o r e important that efforts be undertaken to resolve the underlying conflicts that cause the tensions w h i c h result in v i o l e n c e . "

campus administrations. Among t h e n e w m a t e r i a l was t h i s c o m ment: "THE RECENT INCREASE in b o m b i n g s a n d b o m b t h r e a t s h a s presented a new problem to many municipalities and academic comm u n i t i e s . In t h e e v e n t y o u are faced with such emergencies the S t a t e P o l i c e are p r e p a r e d t o assist y o u . T h e y have acquired sophisticated b o m b disposal e q u i p m e n t a n d h a v e i n c r e a s e d the n u m b e r of t r a i n e d s p e c i a l i s t s to h a n d l e this t y p e of p r o b l e m . " Milliken n o t e d that t h e Nat i o n a l G u a r d , at his d i r e c t i o n , had r e c e i v e d special t r a i n i n g in t h e use of n o n - l e t h a l w e a p o n s f o r p o s s i b l e use o n c a m p u s a n d o t h e r s i t u a t i o n s . B u t he e m p h a s i z e d t h a t t h e S t a t e Police have t h e p r i m a r y res p o n s i b i l i t y f o r t h e S t a t e ' s response to disorder, and that g u a r d s m e n w o u l d be u s e d o n l y in extreme emergency. M I L U K E N ADDED4 "The A t t o r n e y ^ G e n e r a l has i n d i c a t e d t h a t h e has a s s i g n e d a task f o r c e of a t t o r n e y s t o be available f o r consultation and assistance to c a m p u s a n d local o f f i c i a l s in t h e e v e n t of c a m p u s d i s o r d e r . " T h e g o v e r n o r ' s g u i d e l i n e s also e m p h a s i z e d t h e i m p o r t a n c e of " c o n s t a n t e x c h a n g e of i n f o r m a t i o n " a m o n g i n s t i t u t i o n s , local agencies and the State Police.

All $2.50 bang

RECORDS pop jazz classical at discount prices

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$1.88 Sept. 28-Oct. 5 only A status address for fine togs PARK TOWNSHIP AIRPORT

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Seven East Seventh Weekdays 1 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.

Saturdays 9:30 a.m-5:30p.m.

BLUE KEY BOOK STORE


September 28, 1970

H o p e College anchor

Page 4

Campus Unrest report: a challenge to Hope The report of the President's Commission on Campus Unrest took no one by surprise when it was released Saturday, even though the document itself was closely guarded during its preparation. Several weeks ago the Associated Press leaked the preliminary thinking of the commission, and since then politicians and academicians have been busy preparing replies to what they thought the report would say. Several conservative groups, including the Young Americans for Freedom, blasted the report before it was released, charging that it would try to whitewash "permissive" college administrators. One commission member, a 22-year old and one of the only four blacks on the panel,

cmclfor editoriol spoke out his feelings in a speech earlier this month. He had said that the rhetoric of certain politicians was doing great harm to any possiblity of reconciliation between college students and the rest of the country. Vice President Spiro T. Agnew promptly and publicly asked for his resignation. The young black did not resign. Now that the report has been made public, it is clear that most of the charges and allegations made against the commission were unfounded. The document is a careful, candid study of an explosive issue. Its recommendations are far-reaching yet concise. And it puts a great deal of responsibility for correcting the situation of college campuses on President Nixon. Naturally, the White House staff was in a flurry Saturday. Nixon couldn't make any statements because he hadn't read the report (perhaps purposely delaying reading it until his return from Europe-surely by that time most of the arguments over the report will have been nooled down). So a White House spokeman faced newsmen and told them that the President had already acted upon the recommendations wether wholly or in part. Legislation that originated in the White House, if passes by that devil Congress, would take care of the whole problem. Or so the argument went. It would be easy to blame the President for such a stance. The "we've-already-taken-steps-to-rectify -the-situation" line, now coming from the White House, will undoubtedly be heard over and over in State

government and even campus administration halls. It is frightening that such a vast report could so easily be rationalized into sterility, more frightening is the response from colleges: "We don't have those problems here." When Hope College considers the commission's report, that second response could cross our minds. But Hope College does share many of the conditions tha report refers to: a sense of student alienation, racial tensions, increased political activity. If the college sincerely wishes to alleviate these mounting pressures and insure that they do not come to a position where they cannot be dealt with intelligently, then it must act now. Discussions must begin, proposals must be brought forth, and clear policy must be set. In many areas there is reason for student concern: remnants of the in loco parentis policy, so popular during the 1950's and 60's, still remain to frustrate students. The commission report explains how that policy has backfired on well-intentioned college administrators and actually led to increased campus unrest. A tight curriculum strangles the creativity out of some students, offering them requirements instead of motivation. A limited view of education has meant that students are "rewarded" primarily for classroom work; the value of experience outside the classroom generally is given only lipservice. What sort of plans can possibly help in the goal of avoiding campus unrest? The commissioners noted that work-study programs are a neat intermediary between "academia" and "the real world." They heard testimony regarding the work-study plan at Antioch College, a school where politics lean to the left. Antioch was closed peacefully during the April student "strike," and the work-study program was credited with helping to undermine student grievances that could have led to violence at that institution. Fresh, new ideas breezed on to the agendas of most of the committees and boards at Hope last year. Some of those ideas have already been implemented; others are still hanging fire. Several of these ideas are ones that will go a long way toward preventing campus unrest here. Those proposals that still cling to agendas covered with summer's dust must be activated, discussed, and acted upon. Not one board has met yet this year. Can we afford to wait?

Because of new awareness A new service has been added to the anchor this week. Beginning with this issue, the paper will contain the latest national and international news from the Associated Press. We added this feature because we feel there is a new awareness on campus of news and newsmakers. Too often reliable news from outside the campus was not readily available, or it was inconvenient for students to buy and read. We cannot compete with other media: television, radio and daily newspapers. Rather, we

will try to keep the campus informed of news that is particularly meaningful to college students. Our policy will be to provide news from other campuses, changes in laws and policies that affect students and major news-making events from around the world. As always, our first obligation will be to cover campus news. But we hope that students will also take advantage of the new service to keep themselves up to date on happenings in "the world out there."

"I think y o u have the w r o n g idea a b o u t what w e mean b y S t u d e n t M o b i l i z a t i o n C o m m i t t e e

art buchwald

John and Martha by Art B u c h w a l d

W a s h i n g t o n has b e c o m e the setting for several n e w t e l e v i s i o n p r o g r a m s . T h e B o l d O n e s , starring Hal H o l b r o o k , f e a t u r e s a U.S. senator dealing with the p r o b l e m s of l e g i s l a t i n g f o r t h e c o u n t r y . N a n c y is a b o u t a P r e s i d e n t ' s d a u g h t e r w h o lives in t h e W h i t e H o u s e a n d is in l o v e w i t h a v e t e r i n arian. ANOTHER ONE IN t h e p l a n n i n g s t a g e and w r i t t e n by a H o l l y w o o d friend of m i n e is t i t l e d J o h n a n d M a r t h a , t h e s t o r y o f a simple a t t o r n e y general of the United States a n d his simple fun-loving w i f e , Martha. M y f r i e n d said in J o h n a n d M a r t h a h e h o p e s t o a n s w e r t h e q u e s t i o n of w h e t h e r a man and w o m a n w h o hate students professors, e d u c a t o r s and S e n . J. William F u l b r i g h t c a n find h a p p i n e s s in W a s h i n g ton. "WE'RE WORKING o n t h e p i l o t n o w , "

m y f r i e n d s a i d . " I t ' s r e a l l y a lot o f l a u g h s . We o p e n with the A t t y . G e n . J o h n a t t e n d ing his f o u r t h c o c k t a i l p a r t y o f t h e e v e n i n g . H e ' s t a l k i n g t o a w o m a n a n d tells h e r p r o f e s s o r s are ' s t u p i d b a s t a r d s ' w h o are ruining the educational institutions. He calls H e n r y K i s s i n g e r , t h e P r e s i d e n t ' s assista n t , an ' e g o c e n t r i c m a n i a c ' w h o likes to h a v e his p i c t u r e t a k e n w i t h Jill S t . J o h n , a n d h e b l a m e s t h e D e m o c r a t s f o r all t h e w o e s in t h e c o u n t r y . " W e l l , w h a t J o h n d o e s n ' t k n o w is t h a t the w o m a n he's talking to w o r k s for W o m e n ' s Wear Daily and e v e r y t h i n g he's t o l d h e r is p r i n t e d in t h e p a p e r . J o h n r e a d s it in b e d t h e n e x t m o r n i n g w i t h an ice b a g o n his h e a d . "YOU CAN IMAGINE t h e f l a p , " m y friend said, c h u c k l i n g on t h e p h o n e . " T h e first t i l i n g J o h n d e c i d e s t o d o is d e n y h e s p o k e t o t h e r e p o r t e r . But M a r t h a h a s a b e t t e r i d e a . While J o h n is p u t t i n g m o r e ice in his ice b a g , M a r t h a s n e a k s t o the upstairs b a t h r o o m of their Watergate

apartment duplex and telephones a United P r e s s r e p o r t e r a n d tells her t h e W o m e n ' s W e a r D a i l y s t o r y is r i d i c u l o u s . " I started to chuckle myself. "NOW HERE IS w h e r e it r e a l l y g e t s f u n n y . A f t e r d e n y i n g w h a t J o h n said, Martha m a k e s m a t t e r s worse by saying the a c a d e m i c s o c i e t y is r e s p o n s i b l e f o r all t h e t r o u b l e s in t h e c o u n t r y , a n d is d e s t r o y i n g t h e U n i t e d S t a t e s . S h e tells t h e r e p o r t e r t h a t p r o f e s s o r s m a k e h e r sick t o h e r s t o m a c h , a n d t h e y ' r e a b u n c h of sidewalk d i p l o m a t s a n d t h e y d o n ' t h a v e a n y rigiit t o say a n y t h i n g . " My friend was roaring with laughter. " I t ' s p r e t t y f u n n y so f a r , " 1 a d m i t t e d . MY FRIEND c o n t i n u e d . " I n t h e n e x t s c e n e M a r t h a h a s t h e ice b a g o n her h e a d and she's r e a d i n g w h a t she told the United Press. J o h n d o e s n ' t k n o w w h a t to d o , so he s n e a k s u p i n t o t h e b a t h r o o m of W a t e r g a t e a n d h e calls his o f f i c e a n d tells t h e m t o deny everything." B u t w h i l e J o h n is o n t h e t e l e p h o n e in the b a t h r o o m , M a r t h a starts calling other r e p o r t e r s c o n f i r m i n g w h a t she said. 'THE NEXT DAY J o h n h a s t h e ice b a g o n his h e a d a n d he r e a d s all t h e t h i n g s Martha has added to the story. " H e r e ' s w h e r e the thing really takes o f f , " m y f r i e n d said. " G u e s s w h o c o m e s to visit J o h n w h i l e h e ' s in b e d . ' " " J o h n Kenneth Galbraith?" 1 asked. "NO, STUPID. H e n r y K i s s i n g e r a n d Jill St. J o h n ! T h e y a n n o u n c e t h a t , t h a n k s to J o h n , t h e y ' r e g o i n g to get m a r r i e d . Martha gets so e x c i t e d w h e n she hears the news that she rushes upstairs to her b a t h r o o m a n d calls t h e A s s o c i a t e d P r e s s . " ' T h a t ' s g r e a t , " 1 said t r u t h f u l l y . "But what are y o u going to d o for the next episode?" "1 d o n ' t k n o w y e t . " m y f r i e n d said. " B u t J o h n a n d M a r t h a will t h i n k o f s o m e thing." Copyright

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1 9 7 0 , Los Angeles T i m e s

COLLEGE

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OLLAND, MICHIOAN

Published weekly during the college year execpt vacation, holiday and examination periods by and for the students of Hope College, Holland, Michigan, under the authority of the Student Communications Media Committee. Subscription price: $5 per year. Printed by the Composing Room, Grand Rapids. Michigan. Member, Associated Collegiate Press, United States Student Press Association and Associated Press. Office located on ground floor of Graves Hall. Telephone 392-5 111, Ext. 2301 or 2285. The opinions on this page are not necessarily those of the student body, faculty or administration of Hope College. BOARD OF EDITORS Editor News Editor Advertising Business Manager REPORTERS Rob Benchley, Candy Drane, Karen Noggle, Terry Recn, Bev Unangst, Rich Van Doren, Mark VanOostcnberg and Eileen Verduin

Tom Donia Dave Dust in* Tim De Voogd Ron Deenik PHOTOGRAPHERS Mike Boonstra, Deb Noe, Tobey Sanford, Tom Siderius and Steve Vandermadc


September 28, 1970

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'Getting Straight': a farce clothed in radical guise Editor's Note: This week's anchor review is written by Critiques Editor Gerry Swieringa. He re-

views Getting Straight, a film by Columbia Motion Pictures, Inc., showing at the Holland Theatre through Wednesday. by G e r r y Swieringa C o n s i d e r t h e plight of Harry Bailey. A f t e r lying d o r m a n t f o r these h u n d r e d s of y e a r s , peacefully c o - e x i s t i n g with t h e C a n t e r b u r y pilgrims a n d m a i n t a i n i n g a comfortable though somewhat o v e r s h a d o w e d p o s i t i o n in Fnglish l e t t e r s , he s u d d e n l y f i n d s himself t h r u s t b e f o r e t h e age of r e l e v a n c y , a v i c t i m of his o w n legacy. E L L I O T G O U L D , AS t h e h a p less b a r - k e e p t u r n e d g r a d s t u d e n t f i n d s t h e p r o b l e m of m a i n t a i n i n g the n a r r a t i v e even m o r e pron o u n c e d in t h e t w e n t i e t h c e n t u r y that it was in t h e f o u r t e e n t h . T h e wares of t h e P a r d o n e r h a v e b e e n r e p l a c e d with t h e c o n c e s s i o n s of a u n i v e r s i t y p r e s i d e n t , a n d if t h e a n a l o g y s u f f e r s , so d o e s t h e plot

of (retting Straight. if G o u l d a p p e a r s e x c e p t i o n a l in his r o l e , it is o n l y b e c a u s e he is s u r r o u n d e d by m e d i o c r i t y . An unbelievable naivete colors the chara c t e r s of the a d m i n i s t r a t i o n a n d the s t u d e n t s . B o t h are ailing f r o m a series of childish p r e s u p p o s i t i o n s t h a t m a k e t h e i r c o n f l i c t a p p e a r at best f a r c i c a l . T H E R E D E M P T I V E e d g e is d e f i n i t e l y reserved f o r t h e stud e n t s , h o w e v e r , and t h e y b o r r o w on w h a t e v e r s y m p a t h i e s t h e y are a f f o r d e d to achieve a f r a u d u l e n t c o m p a s s i o n in t h e h e a r t s of a

r e v o l u t i o n a r y a u d i e n c e . T h e y are activists w h o w o u l d listen spellb o u n d t o " T h e L o n e l y V o i c e of Y o u t h , " a n d bust a c o p for t r u t h . In c o n t r a s t w e f i n d G o u l d , v e t e r a n of t h e " r e a l " str uggle of O x f o r d Mississippi a n d V i e t n a m , n o w c o p p e d out t o t h e e x t e n t t h a t he desires a t e a c h i n g c e r t i f i cate a n d a good lay m o r e t h a n he w a n t his h e a d c r a c k e d . SO T H E Q U E S T I O N b e c o m e s : can H a r r y Bailey r e t a i n his egotistic i n t e g r i t y in the f a c e of t h e r e v o l u t i o n a n d not s u f f e r t h e guilt p a i n s of the u n i n v o l v e d ? U n f i t for s c h o l a s t i c c o n s u m p t i o n and tired of f i g h t i n g , he s t a n d s with t h e v a n g u a r d of h i s t o r y a n d p i c k s his nose. S o m e t h i n g m u s t be said of C a n d i c e Bergan as his activist girl f r i e n d . Like the a d m i n i s t r a t i o n a n d h e r f e l l o w s t u d e n t s , s h e is beset with a s t e r e o t y p e t h a t s t i f l e s her p e r f o r m a n c e as G o u l d ' s collective c o n s c i e n c e i n t o little m o r e t h a n t h e still small voice of a b u s e d womanhood. S H E IS S U B U R B A N girl t a k e n in by t h e p o w e r s of t h e i n t e l l e c t , discovering that mind minus heart is o n l y a f o r m u l a f o r social suicide. O n c e t h e d i s c o v e r y is m a d e , of c o u r s e , she is q u i t e f r e e to j u d g e t h e m e r i t s of t h e m a r t y r ' s role, b u t s u i c i d e is painless a n d she o p t s f o r G o u l d . T h e r e ' s nothing too romantic about a feminine sadist. T h e r e are s o m e t r i u m p h s h e r e t h a t s p a r k l e like brilliant v i g n e t t e s in an o t h e r w i s e d r a b r e vue . N o t able a m o n g these is t h e s c e n e of G o u l d ' s oral e x a m i n a t i o n f o r his Master's degree.

Ky cancels planned address at Win-the-War rally Oct. 3 ( A P ) Vice P r e s i d e n t N g u y e n Cao Ky h a s d e c i d e d n o t t o a d d r e s s a w i n - t h e - w a r rally in W a s h i n g t o n , it was l e a r n e d S a t u r d a y .

His d e c i s i o n r e m o v e s a pot e n t i a l p o i n t of i r r i t a t i o n b e t w e e n Saigon a n d t h e N i x o n a d m i n i s t r a tion.

THE SOUTH VIETNAMESE l e a d e r r e v e a l e d his d e c i s i o n d u r i n g the t a p i n g in Paris of t h e C B S " F a c e t h e N a t i o n " television prog r a m w a s b r o a d c a s t in t h e U n i t e d States yesterday.

U. S. O F F I C I A L S had b e e n l o b b y i n g q u i e t l y t o c o n v i n c e Ky t o c h a n g e his m i n d . Y e t , i n f o r m e d s o u r c e s s a i d , the decisive m o v e in the backstage discussion came from South Vietnam's ambassador t o W a s h i n g t o n , Bui Diem. Bui D i e m flew i n t o Paris Friday t o talk t o the vice p r e s i d e n t , s o u r c e s s a i d , and t o tell Ky t h e d e m o n s t r a t i o n in W a s h i n g t o n n e x t S a t u r d a y did not have the b e n e d i c t i o n of President N i x o n .

Surfing student to attempt Mackinac feat ( A P ) A Saginaw c o l l e g e s t u d e n t s a y s h e will try t o surf t h e five m i l e s a c r o s s t h e S t r a i t s of Mackinac on S a t u r d a y to b e c o m e the first man t o d o so. William S. N a n c a r r o w , 2 1 , a student at Delta C o l l e g e , exp l a i n e d his c r o s s i n g will be m a d e possible by a 10-horsepower motor installed in t h e b o a r d w h i c h is nine feet seven i n c h e s l o n g a n d t w o feet wide. " S i n c e it ( t h e b o a r d ) is n e w o n the m a r k e t , 1 t h o u g h t 1 c o u l d just a b o u t t a k e it a n y w h e r e a n d it w o u l d be a f i r s t , " c o m m e n t e d Nancarrow. He said if t h e t r i p a c r o s s t h e straits works o u t , he m a y try a longer o n e n e x t y e a r ... a c r o s s Lake M i c h i g a n t o M i l w a u k e e .

T H E O C T . 3 R A L L Y , called the "March for Victory," is s p o n s o r e d by a right-wing preacher. T h e Rev. Carl M c l n t i r e . It was felt in t h e U n i t e d S t a t e s that K y ' s a p p e a r a n c e at t h e rally w o u l d not be d e s i r a b l e in t h e p r e s e n t climate. Informants discounted reports of U.S. " a r m - t w i s t i n g " t o c h a n g e the Ky's mind. T H E Y INSISTED the subject had n o t b e e n b r o u g h t u p d u r i n g Ky's t a l k s here with U . S . A m b a s s a d o r David K. E. B r u c e , t h e c h i e f of t h e A m e r i c a n p e a c e t a l k s d e l e g a t i o n . a n d t h a t it w a s not on t h e a g e n d a of t o d a y ' s m e e t i n g of Ky and White House adviser Henry Kissinger. It is u n d e r s t o o d Ky has dec i d e d n o t t o go t o t h e U n i t e d S t a t e s at this t i m e .

ELLIOT GOULD I N T O T H E S E D A T E w o r l d of s c h o l a r l y i n q u i r y , a world i n t o w h i c h G o u l d has a l m o s t s l i p p e d , is p r o n o u n c e d the pivotal q u e s t i o n u p o n w h i c h his success as a s c h o l a r d e p e n d s : Was F . S c o t t Fitzgerald a homosexual' Rec o v e r i n g f r o m an initial disbelief

in s u c h an a b s u r d i t y , G o u l d ret a l i a t e s in a v i o l e n t t i r a d e t h a t is o n l y m a t c h e d by t h e f l a m i n g viole n c e o c c u r r i n g o n the c a m p u s outside. The effect, a complete destruct i o n of all t h e t e r m s of i n q u i r y s y m b o l i z e d by t h e u n i v e r s i t y , is p o i g n a n t i n d e e d . It is p e r h a p s t h e o n l y m o m e n t in t h e film w h e n t h e m o t i f of radicalism h o l d s u p . O n l y when viewed through the eyepiece of G o u l d ' s oral d o e s the u n i v e r s i t y a p p e a r as a r c h a i c a n d i r r a t i o n a l as the shouting revolutionaries w o u l d have us believe. THE MOST DISAPPOINTING a s p e c t of Getting Straight comes in t h e f o r m of an a f t e r t a s t e o n e experiences upon leaving the t h e a t r e . With such an i n t e n s i t y of e m o t i o n displayed, (Gould seems to be shouting t h r o u g h o u t the e n t i r e f i l m ) t h e viewer feels c o m pelled t o r e a c t . A n d the n a t u r a l r e a c t i o n , t h e r e a c t i o n t h e film b l a t a n t l y a i m s a t . is a m e c h a n i c a l aversion t o t h e u n i v e r s i t y s y s t e m . What is o f fensive a b o u t such a r e a c t i o n is t h a t it is t h r u s t so f o r c e a b l y u p o n t h e viewer. T h e r e are n o c o n c l u sions t o be d r a w n h e r e , no a c t i v e r e s p o n s e t o be s u m m o n e d f r o m

'i

CANDICE BERGEN t h e v i e w e r s ' p e r c e p t i o n , or even f r o m his biases. What is e x p e r i e n c e d i n s t e a d is a m a r s h a l l i n g of e m o t i o n s , a collective r e s e n t m e n t t h a t time can o n l y dissipate rather than strengthen. T h e age is t o o d e m a n d i n g f o r such a response.

The doctor's bag by Arnold Werner, M.D. A d d r e s s l e t t e r s t o Dr. A r n o l d W e r n e r , Box 9 7 4 , East L a n s i n g . Mi. 4 8 8 2 3

seven t i m e s . What is a d i s l o c a t e d s h o u l d e r ? I have h e a r d t h a t t h e r e is n o w a y s h o r t of an o p e r a t i o n t o r e t u r n it t o n o r m a l .

Q U E S T I O N : Can g o i n g bra-less h a s t e n t h e t i m e w h e n b r e a s t s begin t o sag.' O r c a u s e t h e m t o sag more?

Secondly, what do you think of weight l i f t i n g as a m e a n s of k e e p i n g in s h a p e /

A N S W E R : Breasts have very little c o n n e c t i v e tissue a n d are d e p e n d ent on u n d e r l y i n g m u s c l e s t o c a r r y t h e i r w e i g h t . T h e o r g a n itself is p r i m a r i l y f a t t y tissue a n d , i n c i d e n t l y . small b r e a s t s c o n t a i n t h e s a m e a m o u n t of milk p r o d u c i n g g l a n d s as large b r e a s t s . It is considered inadvisable for w o m e n w i t h large b r e a s t s t o go a r o u n d continually without bras, especially if e n g a g i n g in physical acti v i t y , as s t r e t c h i n g of t h e skin a n d w e a k e n i n g of s u p p o r t i v e s t r u c t u r e s can o c c u r . A c c o r d i n g t o o n e s o u r c e , h o r s e - b a c k riding can be particularly wicked. Women are especially • caut i o n e d to- w e a r g o o d s u p p o r t i v e brassieres d u r i n g p r e g n a n c y w h e n b r e a s t s e n l a r g e . Similar breast enl a r g e m e n t can o c c u r w h e n w o m e n t a k e b i r t h c o n t r o l pills, so t h e s a m e w a r n i n g s h o u l d a p p l y . Wom e n w i t h smaller b r e a s t s and g o o d m u s c l e s u p p o r t s h o u l d have little t o fear in going bra-less. A f r i e n d ' s w i f e s u g g e s t s the f o l l o w i n g t e s t : Place a pencil u n d e r t h e b r e a s t parallel t o t h e chest wall at t h e p o i n t w h e r e the b r e a s t j o i n s the c h e s t . Let go of t h e p e n c i l . If t h e p e n c i l d o e s n o t fall g o i n g bra-less is n o t r e c o m m e n d e d . If t h e p e n c i l falls the c h o i c e is y o u r s . Q U E S T I O N : A b o u t t w o y e a r s ago I d i s l o c a t e d m y s h o u l d e r a n d since t h e n it has " p o p p e d o u t " six or

A N S W E R : J o i n t s are held in place by muscles, t e n d o n s and l i g a m e n t s . A d i s l o c a t i o n is a disturbance of the n o r m a l relat i o n s h i p of t h e p a r t s of a j o i n t r e s u l t i n g in i n e v i t a b l e t e a r i n g or s t r e t c h i n g of l i g a m e n t s . O n c e a j o i n t has b e e n d i s l o c a t e d , it bec o m e s easier for it t o " p o p o u t " o n s u b s e q u e n t o c c a s i o n s w h e n an u n u s u a l f o r c e is a p p l i e d to it. F a c h t i m e is a little easier t h a n t h e one before. E x a m i n a t i o n b y an o r t h o p e d i c s u r g e o n s o u n d s i n d i c a t e d in y o u r case. C o r r e c t i v e s u r g e r y e n t a i l s t i g h t e n i n g u p of l o o s e n e d s t r u c t u r e s and o c c a s i o n a l l y t r a n s p l a n t ing a l i g a m e n t . P e o p l e w h o weight lift say it's g r e a t . Most p e o p l e feel t h a t it is s u p p l e m e n t a r y to a w e l l - r o u n d e d exercise program. Excessive weight l i f t i n g can lead to high b l o o d p r e s s u r e . In y o u r case, w e i g h t l i f t i n g t h a t w o u l d involve y o u r injured shoulder should only be at y o u r d o c t o r ' s r e c o m m e n d a t i o n . In f a c t . I'd raise m y a r m slowly in class if I were y o u .

Q U E S T I O N : Since I s t o p p e d shaving m y legs, I've g o t t e n several slightly i n g r o w n hair b u m p s , especially on m y t h i g h s . What can I do t o p r e v e n t these'.'

A N S W E R : A wise d o c t o r f r i e n d tells m e t h a t the p r o b l e m y o u have is r e l a t e d t o d r a w i n g t h e skin up tight w h e n shaving against t h e grain. W h e n y o u release t h e s k i n , the hair s t u b b l e r e t r a c t s b e l o w t h e s k i n ' s s u r f a c e and m a k e s it easy for them to b e c o m e ingrown. Or, if t h e y d o n ' t b e c o m e i n g r o w n , a little lip of t h i c k e n e d skin f o r m s around t h e m m a k i n g a small b u m p . T h i s is e x p e r i e n c e d b y m e n w h o d o t h e same t h i n g w h e n t h e y shave u n d e r their chin. T o avoid t h i s , a l l o w t h e skin t o r e m a i n flat w i t h o u t t e n s i o n w h e n y o u shave y o u r legs, especially if y o u go against t h e grain. Most of t h o s e b u m p s y o u d e s c r i b e will go a w a y by t h e m s e l v e s .

Q U E S T I O N : I am i n t e r e s t e d in f i n d i n g o u t what t h e e f f e c t s of " d r o p p i n g acid and m e s c a l i n e " are on c h r o m o s o m e s . I recently f o u n d o u t t h a t m y f i a n c e has e x p e r i m e n t e d w i t h LSD and m e s c a l i n e a b o u t 10 t i m e s a n d I am terriblyw o r r i e d a b o u t the e f f e c t s o n o u r c h i l d r e n . Please help!

A N S W E R : Relax. T h e talk a b o u t c h r o m o s o m e breakage with the use of LSD was p o p u l a r a b o u t o n e t o t w o y e a r s ago. T h e original s t u d i e s h a d a n u m b e r of t e c h n i c a l p r o b l e m s a n d were p o o r l y c o n t r o l l e d . R e c e n t s t u d i e s have failed t o s h o w a n y d i f f e r e n c e in c h r o m o s o m e b r e a k a g e w h e n g r o u p s of heavy u s e r s of LSD, f o r m e r users of LSD a n d n o n - u s e r s of LSD were c o m p a r e d . C u r r e n t l y , t h e g r e a t e s t risk t o physical h e a l t h among LSD users had been p o i s o n i n g f r o m a n y n u m b e r of a d u l t e r a n t s in the m a t e r i a l s b e i n g purchased.

I The Best of Peanuts PEANUTS

I HATE TO 6EE fall come IT SET? DARK $0 EARLV.,

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iii ———


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Campus Unrest report:

Nixon policy told

Collegescompete

to student leaders at D.C. meeting

for $50,000 RCA minorities money

(Continued from page I)

(Con tinned from page 1)

(Continued from page 1)

" I ' L L A N S W E R t h a t , " Hickel said. " H e ' s o u t raising m o n e y f o r the Republican p a r t y . " When the a u d i e n c e r o c k e d with l a u g h t e r over t h e r e m a r k , H i c k e l added, "There's nothing wrong with t h a t . " Unlike speeches prepared routinely b y a i d s f o r C a b i n e t m e m bers, t h e k e y passages of this speech were w r i t t e n by Hickel himself.

n o t be evenly d i v i d e d a m o n g t h e schools, Gerrie said.

c o n d e m n i n g its use f o r p o l i t i c a l ends. " S t u d e n t s who b o m b and b u m are c r i m i n a l s , " t h e c o m m i s s i o n told the President. "Police and national guardsmen w h o needlessly shoot and assault s t u d e n t s are c r i m i n a l s . " A L L T H O S E WHO applaud these criminal a c t s share in t h e i r evil. We m u s t d e c l a r e a n a t i o n a l cease fire... If o u r s o c i e t y is t o survive, c r i m i n a l a c t s b y s t u d e n t s m u s t be t r e a t e d as s u c h w h e r e v e r they occur and whatever their purpose." The report came under heavy a t t a c k even b e f o r e it was made public, with some Republicans d e c l a r i n g t h e c o m m i s i o n was p a c k e d w i t h liberals w h o w o u l d try t o w h i t e w a s h t h e t r u e p i c t u r e of c a m p u s v i o l e n c e a n d e x c u s e permissive college a d m i n i s t r a t o r s . HOWEVERJHE commission decries a weakening of disciplinary s y s t e m s w i t h i n t h e u n iversities. " A t many universities t o d a y , " t h e c o m m i s s i o n says, " s t u d e n t s e n c o u n t e r little f o r m a l d e t e r e n c e because university administrators a n d f a c u l t i e s have o f t e n failed t o p u n i s h illegal a c t s . " I n p a r t , this has been the result of their s y m p a t h y t o student causes." THE COMMISSION N O T E D a s t u d y by the A m e r i c a n C o u n c i l of E d u c a t i o n w h i c h f o u n d t h a t facu l t y m e m b e r s w e r e involved in t h e p l a n n i n g of over half t h e s t u d e n t p r o t e s t w h i c h o c c u r r e d . It a d d s : " T h e relative f r e e d o m of stud e n t s t o act w i h t o u t fear of imm e d i a t e s e r i o u s c o n s e q u e n c e is r e i n f o r c e d by t h e partial survival of the c u s t o m of t r e a t i n g s t u d e n t s as a d o l e s c e n t s w h o m a y be f o r given t h e i r e r r o r s . " The commission report f o u n d ominous evidence that students are laying in s u p p l i e s and w e a p o n s and o t h e r s are p r e p a r i n g t o t a k e

I T A P P E A R E D t h a t he has d e t e r m i n e d t o p r e s e n t himself as an a l t e r n a t i v e voice, s a y i n g w h a t he thinks the administration should say. "I r e f u s e t o agree w i t h t h o s e w h o settle for cheap answers," Hickel s a i d . " T h e y w a n t t h e gove r n m e n t t o deal w i t h c o n s e q u e n ces, n o t c a u s e s . "These are the people w h o d e m a n d law a n d o r d e r , b u t r e f u s e to concern themselves with why t h e r e is h a t r e d , f r u s t r a t i o n a n d v i o l e n c e in t h e l a n d . " T H E Y WANT A crackdown on drug traffic, but they d o n ' t a d d r e s s t h e m s e l v e s t o w h y t h e r e is the b o r e d o m and emptiness which craves e s c a p e . " Hickel b r o a d e n e d his t a r g e t t o i n c l u d e t h o s e w h o w a n t t o clean air b u t w h o use h i g h p o w e r e d c a r s a n d high o c t a n e fuels a n d t h o s e w h o " w a n t p e a c e , but ... i g n o r e t h e h u n g e r , j e a l o s i e s and lack of c o m m u n i c a t i o n w h i c h cause w o r l d t e n s i o n s . " D e Y o u n g said H i c k e l ' s c o m ments were "well received." The dean a d d e d , " H e was refreshing, well i n f o r m e d , a n d very c a n d i d . "

T H E R E M A I N I N G p o r t i o n of t h e f u n d s will be d i s t r i b u t e d t o t h e individual s c h o o l s t o d e v e l o p special s t u d i e s p r o g r a m s . G e r r i e a n d S t e w a r t have b o t h e x p r e s s e d i n t e r e s t in o r g a n i z i n g a " b r o w n s t u d i e s , " or C h i c a n o , c u r r i c u l u m at H o p e . i n t e r e s t in o r g a n i z i n g a " b r o w n s t u d i e s , " or C h i c a n o , c u r r i c u l u m at H o p e . Gerrie d e s c r i b e d t h e r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s as " c o n c e r n e d " a b o u t att r a c t i n g a share of t h e m o n e y t o t h e i r p a r t i c u l a r c a m p u s . " I t was t e n s e at t i m e s , b u t e v e n t u a l l y w e s e t t l e d o n t h e c o o p e r a t i v e app r o a c h . We w e r e c o n c e r n e d a b o u t t h e idea b e h i n d t h e m o n e y , t o o , a n d t h e r e was n o b a r g a i n i n g as such." MISS S T E W A R T disagreed. " T h e r e was less c o n c e r n f o r h o w t h e m o n e y w a s t o be s p e n t t h a n f o r w h o got t h e m o n e y , " she said. " E v e r y o n e w a s t a l k i n g a b o u t ideas to spend the m o n e y but no one p r o d u c e d any s p e c i f i c p r o p o s a l s . " She said she w a s d i s a p p o i n t e d t h a t the r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s o f f e r e d only " a t a s t e of w h a t t h e y wanted, not a statement that 'this is w h a t we are g o i n g t o d o b y h o o k or by c r o o k . ' " She a d d e d , " I ' m n o t a n y m o r e sure of t h e f u t u r e of black s t u d i e s c o u r s e s at H o p e n o w t h a n b e f o r e I went to the meeting." T h e g r o u p will m e e t again in November to finalize r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s t o the c h u r c h .

Since you have no respect for the grass of Hope College I can see why you have no respect for your hair. - C H U C K THE BARBER

Study calls for leadership

A C T I V I T I ES S U N D A Y

M O N D A Y

t h e law i n t o their o w n h a n d s against p r o t e s t o r s a n d m i n o r i t i e s t h e y dislike. IT W A R N S T H A T v i o l e n c e m u s t e n d , b e c a u s e n o n a t i o n will t o l e r a t e v i o l e n c e f o r long w i t h o u t repression. " H i s t o r y o f f e r s firm proof that repression, once starte d , is a l m o s t i m p o s s i b l e t o c o n tain." T h e c o m m i s i o n e r s said c a m p u s protest focuses on three major q u e s t i o n s : w a r , racial i n j u s t i c e a n d t h e u n i v e r s i t y itself. In recommending that N i x o n call a series of n a t i o n a l meetings designed t o foster unders t a n d i n g a m o n g t h o s e n o w divide d , the c o m m i s s i o n says: WE U R G E T H E P R E S I D E N T t o review t h e n a t i o n a l c o m m i t m e n t to full social j u s t i c e a n d t o be aware of increasing c h a r g e s of r e p r e s s i o n . We r e c o m m e n d t h a t h e t a k e s t e p s t o see t o it t h a t t h e w o r d s a n d d e e d s of g o v e r n m e n t d o no e n c o u r a g e belief in t h o s e charges." T h e r e p o r t is b r o k e n d o w n i n t o a series of r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s a n d p e t i t i o n s t o v a r i o u s s e g m e n t s of s o c i e t y as well as t h e P r e s i d e n t : - F O R G O V E R N M E N T , "We strongly u r g e g o v e r n m e n t o f f i c i a l s at all levels of g o v e r n m e n t t o r e c o g n i z e t h a t their p u b l i c s t a t e m e n t s c a n e i t h e r heal or divide... We urge p u b l i c o f f i c i a l s t o r e j e c t demands that entire universities be p u n i s h e d b e c a u s e of t h e ideas or excesses of s o m e m e m b e r s . . . We urge p r o m p t e n a c t m e n t of strict c o n t r o l s o v e r t h e sale, t r a n s fer and p o s s e s s i o n of e x p l o s i v e materials." - F O R LAW E N F O R C E M E N T , " T o o f r e q u e n t l y t h e local p o l i c e f o r c e s have b e e n u n d e r m a n n e d , improperly equipped, poorly trained and unprepared for camp u s d i s t u r b a n c e s . We t h e r e f o r e urge p o l i c e f o r c e s , especially t h o s e in smaller communities, to improve their capacity to respond in civil d i s o r d e r s . "

O C t O B e R T U E S D A Y

-FOR THE NATIONAL G U A R D , " W e urge t h a t it have sufficient tactical capability and n o n - l e t h a l w e a p o n r y so t h a t it will use d e a d l y f o r c e o n l y as t h e a b s o l u t e last r e s o r t . . . S e n d i n g civil a u t h o r i t i e s o n t o a college c a m p u s a r m e d as if f o r w a s - a r m e d o n l y t o k i l l - h a s b r o u g h t t r a g e d y in t h e p a s t . If this p r a c t i c e is n o t changed. tragedy will come again." -FOR THE NATIONAL G u a r d , " W e u r g e t h a t it have sufficient tactical capability and n o n - l e t h a l w e a p o n r y so t h a t it will use d e a d l y f o r c e o n l y as t h e absolu t e last r e s o r t . . . S e n d i n g civil aut h o r i t i e s o n t o a college c a m p u s a r m e d as if f o r w a r - a r m e d o n l y t o kill-has b r o u g h t t r a g e d y in t h e p a s t . If this p r a c t i c e is n o t changed, tragedy will come again." -FOR THE STUDENTS, " T h e y must recognize that they are c i t i z e n s of a n a t i o n w h i c h w a s f o u n d e d on t o l e r a n c e a n d diversity and they must b e c o m e m o r e understanding of those with whom theu differ... Students must f a c t t h e f a c t t h a t giving m o r a l s u p p o r t t o t h o s e w h o are p l a n n i n g violent a c t i o n s is m o r a l l y despicable." In c o n c l u s i o n , the c o m m i s s i o n said, t h e r e m u s t b e c o n t i n u e d progress toward ending the war a n d of achieving racial a n d social j u s t i c e . " T h e m o s t i m p o r t a n t of all t h e c o m m i s s i o n ' s r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s rests w i t h the P r e s i d e n t , " said t h e r e p o r t . " O n l y t h e P r e s i d e n t has t h e p l a t f o r m and t h e prestige t o u r g e all A m e r i c a n s a t o n c e t o s t e p b a c k from the battlelines to which they are f o r m i n g . " O n l y t h e P r e s i d e n t . . . c a n eff e c t i v e l y calm t h e r h e t o r i c of b o t h p u b l i c o f f i c i a l s and p r o t e s t o r s w h o s e w o r d s in t h e past have t o o o f t e n h e l p e d f u r t h e r divide t h e country rather than reunite it."

CALENDAR

W E D N E S D A Y

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i Football, Kalamazoo, H o m e , 2 p.m.

7 Dr. Richard Sickinger, Austrian Cultural Institute (Lecture, 3:30 p.m., Wickers A u d i t o r i u m )

tl

12

Paul Oliveros, Music C o n c e r t

Electronic

Professor Ougires ( F r e n c h ) , Public Address, 7 : 3 0 p.m.

14

13 Study in Japan, nation Education

18

19

20

8

Inter

21

F reshman— Sophomore X Pull Student Church Geneva Retreat OmmStudent C h u r c h Geneva R e t r e a t Football, Alma, Away, 2 : 1 5 p . m . j n o t leave y o u b e r e f t ; I am c o m i n g back t o y o u . In a l i t t l e w h i l e the world will see me no longer, b u t y o u w i l l k n o w t h a t I a m in m y F a t h e r , and y o u in me and I in y o u . T h e m a n w h o has

15

Soccer, Calvin, A w a y , 3 : 3 0 p.m. Cross C o u n t r y , Kalam a z o o , H o m e , 4 p.m.

Longstreth and Escosa, Duo-harpists, H o l l a n d Civic Center Hope S t u d e n t s free w i t h I .D.

N e w Y o r k Brass S o c i e t y , C h a p e l , 8 : 1 5 p ' m , free w i t h I.D.

22

23

Skie C l u b M o v i e , Winants, 9 p.m.

Student Church Geneva Retreat Football, Alma, Away, 2:15 p.m. Soccer, A l b i o n , H o m e , 2 p.m. Cross Country, Alma, A w a y ( F o o t b a l l Half t i m e )

16

HOMECOMING Soccer, P u r d u e U n i v e r s i t y , Calumet, Home, 3 : 3 0 p.m.

to

Soccer, M a r y k n o l l n a r y , H o m e , 4 p.m.

17 Football, Olivet, A w a y , p.m.

24 HOMECOMING

Semi

Football, 2:15 p.m

Albion,

Cross Country, H o m e , 11 a.m.

25

26

27

28

fop homecominq events watch the anchop

29

2

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30

31

W i l l i a m Everson, F o r m e r l y " B r o t h e r A n t o n i n u s " , Poet In Residence, Public Reading 8 : 1 5 p . m . , Chapel

Centurian House, All Campus Open House, 8:30-12:30 Football, Adr.an, Away, 2 p.m. Soccer, Wheaton, A w a y , 2 p.m. Cross Country, Adrian, A w a y , 11 a.m. Kappa Delta C h i , Date Night


|

September 28, 1970

Hope College anchor

Page 7

f

Austrian officer to discuss Age of indulgence' cultural interchanges Sat. Agnew blasts permissiveness i I

Dr. R i c h a r d S i c k i n g e r , d i r e c t o r of the A u s t r i a n I n s t i t u t e in N e w Y o r k , will visit t h e c a m p u s d u r i n g t h e c o m i n g w e e k e n d t o visit with s t u d e n t s a n d discuss c u l t u r a l interc h a n g e s w i t h his c o u n t r y . S i c k i n g e r will have d i n n e r at Marigold L o d g e w i t h s t u d e n t s a n d f a c u l t y S a t u r d a y , w h e r e he will discuss p r o b l e m s related t o cult u r a l i n t e r c h a n g e s . T h e h i s t o r y dep a r t m e n t will h o s t a tea S u n d a y in t h e P r e s i d e n t ' s H o u s e f o r t h e dire c t o r , a n d O c t . 5 at 3 : 3 0 p . m . he will l e c t u r e in Wichers A u d i t o r i u m on Austrian history. Sickinger was a p p o i n t e d cult u r a l a f f a i r s o f f i c e r f o r t h e Austrian e m b a s s y in t h e U n i t e d S t a t e s in J u l y , a n d p r e v i o u s l y h e l p e d t o w o r k o u t t h e initial a r r a n g e m e n t s for the establishment of t h e V i e n n a S u m m e r S c h o o l in 1 9 5 6 . F o r t w o years he also t a u g h t at t h e s u m m e r sessions in V i e n n a . In 1 9 5 8 he j o i n e d t h e A u s t r i a n Cultural Affairs program, and for f o r t h e n e x t ten y e a r s he served as d e p u t y d i r e c t o r of t h e A u s t r i a n

Institute in London. From 1 9 6 9 - 1 9 7 0 he was in V i e n n a again as h e a d of t h e Division f o r I n t e r iiaiiv/nai i \ ec il da ti i ou n s in n a t i o n a l oSuc i ce un it i if i c R t h e A u s t r i a n Ministry of E d u c a tion.

by VERN HAUGLAND

RICHARD SICKINGER

A base in Cuba w o u l d e n a b l e t h e Soviets to k e e p m o r e submarines on station for longer p e r i o d s of t i m e w i t h o u t t h e n e e d f o r r e t u r n i n g to h o m e p o r t s f o r servicing and resupply. U.S. Polaris s u b s use b a s e s at H o l y L o c h , S c o t l a n d . R o t a , S p a i n , and o n t h e P a c i f i c island of G u a m for this p u r p o s e . I n f o r m a t i o n on the Russian a c t i v i t y at C i e n f u e g o s c a m e f r o m American U2 reconnaisance p l a n e s , t h e same a i r c r a f t w h i c h f u r n i s h e d t h e first solid p r o o f of Russian missiles in C u b a o n O c t . 24, 1962.

( A P ) Airline p o l i t s are dem a n d i n g t h e s h e l t e r of b u l l e t rp r o o f i *. • . c o c k p i t d o o r s m o r e t h a n ever. n o w t h a t a r m e d m a r s h a l s ride their p l a n e s as a g u a r d against hijackers. T H E A I R L I N E P i l o t s Associat i o n ( A L P A ) e m p h a s i z e d this in a s t a t e m e n t filed F r i d a y w i t h t h e Federal Aviation Administration in s u p p o r t of t h e b u l l e t - p r o o f c o c k p i t r e q u i r e m e n t p r o p o s e d by the FAA. "Now that armed security g u a r d s ha ve b e e n p l a c e d o n air carrier a inr^c ir a fnt,, tiwt h e p ou s^saiibuiilm i ty ui of g u n f i r e in t h e c a b i n h a s i n c r e a s e d , a—n d- it -- is likely. t h a t b u l l e t s .f .r.o. m .. the cabin may accidentally enter rA oaiu t h e flight d e c k , " A L P A said, SECRETARY' OF"fransportat i o n J o h n A. V o l p e said F r i d a y f e d e r a l g u a r d s will n o t h e s i t a t e t o s h o o t if o t h e r m e a s u r e s fail t o halt a hijacking. V o l p e said s h o o t i n g will be d o n e as a last r e s o r t and a d d e d : " W h e n it c o m e s t o t h e lives of 200 American passengers and c r e w m e n as o p p o s e d to t h e life of o n e h i j a c k e r , t h e r e is n o q u e s t i o n of w h a t w e ' r e g o i n g t o d o . " VOLPE MADE THE remarks as he signed an a g r e e m e n t giving t h e FBI j u r i s d i c t i o n over h i j a c k -

331 College KENTUCKY FRIED CHICKEN of H O L L A N D 4 0 W. 16th S t . ,

Telephone No. 396-1471

age of i n d u l g e n c e has e r o d e d personal responsibility and c o r r u p t e d d i s c i p l i n e . It has r e p l a c e d r e s p e c t f o r a u t h o r i t y w i t h f e a r of repression." T H E C A U S E O F c a m p u s viole n c e , A g n e w said, "lies n o t in an a l i e n a t e d g e n e r a t i o n b u t in t h e i n d i v i d u a l s in b o t h g e n e r a t i o n s t h a t have m a d e a f e t i s h o u t of indulgence." In his a t t a c k o n p e r m i s s i v e n e s s , A g n e w s a i d , "A permissive p a r e n t sees his child c o m e t o t h e d i n n e r t a b l e w e a r i n g d i r t y c l o t h e s , his h a n d s u n w a s h e d and his hair unk e p t " a n d t h e n r e a d s t h e b o o k by Dr. B e n j a m i n S p o c k , " o u r f o r e m o s t a u t h o r i t y o n c h i l d r e n , " telling him t o avoid " b o s s i n e s s . "

ings while a plane is o n t h e g r o u n d the ^ d e r a l Aviation Adminis t r a t i o n r e s p o n s i b i l i t y if t h e p l a n e ic is aQii rr Kb ro*rr nn eo . A n u m b e r of m i l i t a r y p e r s o n nel are b e i n g t r a i n e d at F t . Dix, N.J., f o r service as sky m a r s h a l s , a n d s o m e of t h e m s h o u l d be b o a r d i n g p l a n e s t o d a y , V o l p e said. CAPT. C H A R L E S H. Ruby, A L P A p r e s i d e n t , said t h e u n i o n has e n d o r s e d t h e s e c u r e - c o c k p i t concept f o r several y e a r s a n d "wants action n o w . " A L P A said t h e F A A r e q u i r e m e n t t h a t t h e d o o r t o t h e flight d e c k be k e p t l o c k e d has failed t o

" W H O DO Y O U s u p p o s e is t o b l a m e w h e n , 10 y e a r s l a t e r , t h a t child c o m e s h o m e f r o m college a n d sits d o w n at t h e t a b l e w i t h d i r t y , b a r e feet a n d a d i s o r d e r l y f a c e t u l of h a i r ? " t h e vice president asked. T h e vice p r e s i d e n t ' s s p e e c h was p r e p a r e d f o r a Wisconsin R e p u b l i can d i n n e r in behalf of J a c k Ols o n , c a n d i d a t e for g o v e r n o r , and J o h n E r i c k s o n , w h o is o p p o s i n g D e m o c r a t i c Sen. William P r o x m i r e f o r the S e n a t e .

P r e v e n t h i j a c k i n g s , s a b o t a g e or ^erference. , . „ , IF T H E D O O R a n d b u l k h e a d separating the flight deck and P a s s e n g e r c o m p a r t m e n t were bulIctproof, but permitted a face-to f a c e c o n f r o n t a t i o n w i t h t h e int r u d e r , w e believe t h a t in m a n y cases the crews w o u l d be able t o dissuade a hijacker f r o m completing t h e c r i m e , " A L P A said.

W I T H O U T M E N T I O N I N G his n a m e , he said P r o x m i r e , " d e s p i t e his f l a m b o y a n t press c l i p p i n g s a b o u t slashing n a t i o n a l d e f e n s e , is a c e r t i f i e d big s p e n d e r . " P r o x m i r e has b e e n a p r i m e o p p o n e n t of such p r o j e c t s as t h e s u p e r s o n i c t r a n s p o r t and t h e C5A s u p e r t r a n s p o r t , while c h a i r i n g a s u b c o m m i t t e e t h a t has f o c u s e d o n costly defense contract overruns.

a n d

FALL FILM FESTIVAL Sunday, October 4 "HELP, MY SNOWMAN'S BURNING D O W N ! "

GRACE EPISCOPAL CHURCH Michigan at 2 3 r d S t r e e t

SHOWN AT BOTH 9 and 11 a.m. SERVICES

THE BEAT GOES ON AT

COFFEE HOUR AND DISCUSSION FOLLOWING

Coral Gables

D E L U X E COSTS NOTHING EXTRA T h a t ' s t h e w a y it is w i t h life i n s u r a n c e . T h e f i n e s t q u a l i t y y o u can b u y c o s t s n o m o r e . In f a c t , it will o f t e n save y o u m o n e y . O u r

SAUGATUCK

c o m p a n y has, f o r y e a r s , b e e n t h e l e a d e r in q u a l i t y life i n s u r a n c e at l o w n e t c o s t . We w o u l d like t o discuss

this q u a l i t y

side of

life

sajeguarding tomorrow

i n s u r a n c e . T h e r e is, of c o u r s e , n o

Dancing

Every Saturday

Night

at the Crow Bar

obligation. GARY C. HOLVICK, Special Agent DOUG WINDEMULLER, Special Agent

r a S -7

The Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Co. 6 East 8th Street

those who know...,

the student chucch will wopship

go to the 'CROW'... Sunday, OGtOBep 4 11:00 a.m. Dimnent Chapel Holy Communion will be celebrated. Chaplain Hillegonds will preach.

We Need your head for our business

Post Barber Shop

V i e t n a m , " A g n e w said in a prep a r e d s p e e c h . " I n t h e past 2 8 y e a r s we have h a d 14 y e a r s of w a r ; it is n o t t h e special a f f l i c a t i o n of t o d a y ' s y o u t h . A n d stud e n t u n r e s t is a p r o b l e m in c o u n t r i e s t h a t are n o t at w a r at all. He said " s o c i o l o g i c a l soreh e a d s " h a t e t o a d m i t it, b u t " t h e

Pilots demand additional cockpit protection devices

Russians constructing Cuban submarine base ( A P ) By e a r l y a n d s t e r n w a r n mg. t h e N i x o n a d m i n i s t r a t i o n is trying to discourage Moscow f r o m b u i l d i n g a m a j o r Soviet naval b a s e in C u b a . THE PENTAGON disclosed e v i d e n c e F r i d a y of w h a t it said a p p e a r s t o be a s u b m a r i n e s u p p o r t base u n d e r c o n s t r u c t i o n in t h e h a r b o r at C i e n f u e g o s , p o s s i b l y f o r use b y missile-firing P o l a r i s - t y p e s u b s n o w p o s i t i o n e d in the Atlantic. S e c r e t a r y of D e f e n s e Melvin R. Laird said, " W h i l e we h a v e s e e n a c t i v i t y a l o n g this line as f a r as C u b a is c o n c e r n e d , it is a little early t o d e t e r m i n e t h e e x t e n t of Russian n a v a l " i n v o l v e m e n t t h e r e . WHITE HOUSE officials quickly r e s p o n d e d b y s a y i n g this c o u n try " w o u l d view t h e e s t a b l i s h m e n t of a s t r a t e g i c base in t h e Caribb e a n with u t m o s t s e r i o u s n e s s . " H o w e v e r , no d i p l o m a t i c r e p r e s e n t atives have b e e n m a d e t o M o s c o w . Officials here immediately d r e w a parallel with t h e 1 9 6 2 C u b a n missile crisis, w h e n Presid e n t J o h n F . K e n n e d y said p e a c e in t h e C a r i b b e a n c o u l d be preserved if Soviet o f f e n s i v e w e a p o n s were r e m o v e d f r o m t h e area a n d kept o u t in t h e f u t u r e . T H I S C O N T I N U E S t o be U.S. p o l i c y , said o n e W h i t e H o u s e official w h o d e c l i n e d t o be q u o t e d by n a m e . But it is o b v i o u s t h e m a g n i t u d e of t h e new naval d e v e l o p m e n t in C u b a is n o t t h e s a m e as e i g h t years ago w h e n Russia placed o f fensive missiles on t h e island 90 miles f r o m t h e U.S. m a i n l a n d . AT T H A T TIME the Soviets had no P o l a r i s - t y p e s u b m a r i n e s , and t h e U n i t e d S t a t e s held a clear military balance. Today, with 13 nuclearp o w e r e d s u b m a r i n e s a r m e d with 16 missiles each a n d 15 m o r e u n d e r c o n s t r u c t i o n , t h e Soviets can s t r i k e d e e p inside t h e U n i t e d S t a t e s w i t h o u t t h e n e e d f o r landbased missiles in C u b a . T H E S E NEW M I S S I L E subm a r i n e s , r e f e r r e d t o as Y a n k e e class, are k n o w n t o be o p e r a t i n g off U.S. w a t e r s .

( A P ) V ice P r e s i d e n t S p i r o T . A g n e w said in M i l w a u k e e F r i d a y n i g h t t h a t " d u r i n g t h e past g e n e r a t on, a ' P h i l o s o p h y of p e r m i s s i v e ness has permeated American l i f e . " He called it a " d e b i l i t a t i n g , e n e r v a t i n g age of i n d u l g e n c e . " " T H E A G E O F i n d u l g e n c e cann o t find an alibi in t h e war in

7:00 p.m. The Coffee Grounds

& Chips 261

EAST 0TH

HOLLAND,

STREET

MICHIGAN

PHONE:

49423

392-5553

Sunday - Thursday 11 a.m. - 9 p.m. Friday and Saturday 11 a.m. - 10 p.m.

Paul's word for patience means in Greek a being under some heavy weight like Atlas, and staying there-there's not a flabby muscle in it!-a stretching, straining, and twisting, like a wrestler who won't let go, not even when he's down, keeps grabbing for an arm, or a leg, squirming out from under and on topi And it doesn't come of reading a few pages, or having a few shining ideals held up in front of you."

*

>

Ck


Hope College anchor

PageS

September 28, 1970

Rain, Spring Arbor bring booters defeat In s p i t e of the incessant rain S a t u r d a y m o r n i n g , a relatively large a u d i e n c e t u r n e d o u t t o see H o p e ' s s o c c e r t e a m lose to Spring A r b o r , 4 - 1 . T h e g a m e o p e n e d w i t h a sterile first q u a r t e r . S p r i n g A r b o r l a c k e d s o m e of t h e i n d i v i d u a l skills of H o p e , b u t this was c o u n t e r e d by t h e i r t e a m play a n d u n c a n n y ability t o be w h e r e t h e ball was. Most of t h e first q u a r t e r was p l a y e d in H o p e ' s half of t h e f i e l d , u n t i l t h e later m i n u t e s w h e n t h e D u t c h gained control. Hope's players were u n a b l e t o c o m p e n s a t e f o r t h e wet grass, a n d m a n y passes missed t h e i r i n t e n d e d receivers. Consequently no goals were scored the quarter. T h e s e c o n d q u a r t e r was d o m i n ated by Hope to the ten-minute m a r k . Right h a l f b a c k Dave Clark passed d o w n t h e wing t o J o h n White w h o s h o t at goal. T h e ball r i c o c h e t e d off t h e cross piece. Spring A r b o r t o o k it d o w n field a n d Jim J e w e l l s c o r e d on an assist f r o m Lloyd Stone house with 9 : 2 0 remaining in the half. Five

m i n u t e s later Spring A r b o r scored a g a i n , this t i m e w i t h B o b I m h o f f s c o r i n g on as assist f r o m Lloyd S t o n e h o u s e . Spring A r b o r had several m o r e o p e n s h o t s o n goal, b u t goalie Evan G r i f f i n s t o p p e d t h e m a n d t h e half e n d e d , 2-0. In t h e t h i r d q u a r t e r t h e D u t c h h a d several c h a n c e s t o score as they repeatedly penetrated Spring A r b o r ' s slow m o v i n g d e f e n s e , b u t Hope's misjudged passes w e r e their d o w n f a l l again. F i n a l l y , w i t h f o u r m i n u t e s left in t h e t h i r d q u a r t e r , Degefa Ft ana s c o r e d on as assist f r o m Sam F u m e y on a c o r n e r kick f r o m J o h n White. T h e q u a r t e r e n d e d , 2-1. T h e f o u r t h q u a r t e r w a s like t h e third-Hope repeatedly penetrated a n d goals failed t o m a t e r i a l i z e until Spring Arbor's Imhoff s c o r e d on as assist f r o m Barry J a c k s o n w i t h ten m i n u t e s lift in t h e g a m e . H o p e r e t a l i a t e d by pene t r a t i n g Spring A r b o r ' s d e f e n s e several t i m e s , but t h e n Spring Arbor scored with t w o minutes left on a s h o t by J a c k s o n assisted by I m h o f f

Aquinas steals top in Hope cross country invitational T H A T ' S A L L — D a v e G o s s e l a r brings d o w n L a k e l a n d ball carrier along with t h e h e l p of t h r e e o t h e r u n i d e n t i f i e d H o p e players in H o p e ' s 7-0 v i c t o r y over L a k e l a n d College last S a t u r d a y .

Shut out Lakeland

Smith's Dutch taste victory T h e sweet t a s t e of v i c t o r y finally f o u n d its w a y to Riverview Park Saturday as c o a c h R a y Smith's Flying D u t c h m e n outc l o c k e d , o u t t a c k l e d , and g e n e r a l l y outplayed the favored Lakeland Muskies, 7-0. HOPE'S CHUCK BROOKS p u n c h e d across t h e goal line early in the first q u a r t e r only t o have his t o u c h d o w n called b a c k as a H o p e player w a s f o u n d o f f side. T h e series e n d e d in a 2 6 - y a r d field goal a t t e m p t by t h e D u t c h ' s Mike Hinga w h i c h n e v e r got off t h e ground due to a bad snap. H o p e c o n t i n u e d to m o v e t h e ball well on t h e g r o u n d t h r o u g h out t h e first half w i t h c o - c a p t a i n

Bob H a v e m a n , f r e s h m e n G r e g Voss, a n d B r o o k s r u n n i n g h a r d f o r y a r d a g e . But H o p e w a s never a b l e t o m u s t e r a s i g n i f i c a n t t h r e a t as Lakeland's fine punter Denny Semph kept the Flying D u t c h m e n huddling around the mid-field stripe. WITH SENIOR QUARTER Groy K a p e r h i t t i n g on s h o r t passes, H o p e m o v e d t o t h e L a k e land 2 6 - y a r d line, w h e r e a b a d p i t c h t u r n e d t h e ball o v e r t o Lakeland. F i r s t half o b s e r v a t i o n f o u n d the H o p e d e f e n s i v e line m a k i n g m o r e of a c o n t r i b u t i o n t h a n in t h e first g a m e t h i s y e a r . L a k e l a n d backs were repeatedly s t o p p e d by

• Skiing Equipment must be coordinated and matched to the skier's ability $30 A and T ALTA SKI, 1 year guarantee $45 KOFLACH Buckle Boot - $7 Aluminum SKI POLES $25 Tyrolia or Cubio Safety Binding $107 Value SAVE $18.12 10% down holds in layaway

the f r o n t line of J i m L a m e r , T e d A l b r e c h t , T e d R y c e n g a and K e i t h Van Tubergen. Rycenga was especially impressive as his lateral m o v e m e n t t o e i t h e r side of t h e field was w o r t h y of a p p l a u s e . I T WAS A SLOW M O V I N G t h i r d q u a r t e r as t h e F l y i n g D u t c h m e n c o n t i n u e d t o m o v e t h e ball while t h e d e f e n s e t h r o t t l e d L a k e land's offense. In t h e f o u r t h q u a r t e r , K a p e r f o u n d F r e m o n t f r e s h m a n Mark Meyer open and c o m p l e t e d a 2 0 - y a r d pass t o t h e L a k e l a n d 13. B r o o k s t o o k t h e pigskin a r o u n d left e n d t o t h e f o u r - y a r d line, w h e r e Voss s c o r e d t w o p l a y s l a t e r . B o t h t e a m s m o v e d slowly f o r t h e r e m a i n d e r of t h e g a m e w i t h H o p e ' s d e f e n s e c o n t i n u i n g its h o l d on t h e M u s k i e s . With 17 s e c o n d s left in t h e g a m e , Dave J o h n s o n i n t e r c e p t e d a D e n n y S e m p h pass on t h e H o p e 35 t o p u t an e n d t o Lakeland's only offensive threat of t h e g a m e .

A field of eight t e a m s was o n h a n d f o r t h e H o p e College Invitat i o n a l cross c o u n t r y c h a m p i o n s h i p Tuesday, and w h e n it e n d e d A q u i n a s was on t o p for the t h i r d t i m e in t h e last f o u r y e a r s . A q u i n a s s c o r e d 4 3 p o i n t s , foll o w e d by Spring A r b o r w i t h 4 8 a n d G r a n d R a p i d s J u n i o r College at 5 3 p o i n t s . T h e n u m b e r f o u r s p o t w e n t t o Calvin w h i c h had 129, then K a l a m a z o o , 138; Hope, 1 4 4 ; Ferris S t a t e , 1 6 3 ; a n d Sagin-

aw Valley C o m m u n i t y College, 254. Individual honors for the f o u r mile event w e n t t o R o b C o o l of G r a n d R a p i d s JC w i t h a r e c o r d t i m e of 1 9 : 4 4 . 3 . Pacing H o p e t o its sixth place finish were Jim M a t t i s o n a n d Brian C l a x t o n , w h o f i n i s h e d 17 and 22 respectively. Freshmen r u n n e r s Nick K r a m a r a n d Rian S o u t h w o r t h finished 3 4 t h and 5 3 r d in t h e f o u r - m i l e e v e n t .

SEE US FOR A SPECIAL STUDENT CHECKING ACCOUNT.

r§o|| All deposits insured to $20,000 by the F.D.I.C.

H Open Monday Thur Friday 9:30 a.m. - 9 p.m. Saturday 9:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.

OPEN HOUSE THURSDAY EVENING 7 p.m. - 10 p.m.

...for HOPE COLLEGE STUDENTS and FACULTY

O

0 RENTALS

- REPAIRS

SKI FASHIONS

- FITTING

- CUSTOM

-

BOOT EXCEPT

FOR SOME NET ITEMS

(On PRESENTATION of this AD ONLY!)

S?/ /MUS River Avenue at 11th HOLLAND

Phone 3964684

OPEN HOUSE SPECIAL... 10 G A L L O N T A N K , PUMP, F I L T E R , C H A R C O A L , F I L T E R , FLOSS, A I R T U B I N G , ETC, $9.88 Net Item

DOOR PRIZES


Special Supplement

Hope College anchor

Page 1

i

STUDENT EVALUATION OF FACULTY

i

EVALUATION QUESTIONS: H o w would y o u rate the teacher and the way he handled the material? a. extremely interesting and stimulating b. fairly interesting c. of some interest d. boring much of the time e. boring almost all of the time

6.

H o w often is your teacher well organized and prepared for class? a. always b. most of the time c. sometimes d. rarely e. never

2.

The teacher grasps the point of the students' questions and answers them clearly and understandably. a. almost always b. most of the time c. sometimes d. rarely e. never

7.

H o w o f t e n did your teacher stimulate your intellectual curiosity and possible independent thinking? a. almost always b. most of the time c. sometimes d. rarely e. never

3.

How eager is the teacher to speak to students after class? a. encourages outside meetings b. will meet at your request at a mutually opportune time c. will see students only during o f f i c e hours d. discourages outside meetings

8.

4.

H o w tolerant is your teacher to other points of view? a. almost always b. most of the time c. sometimes d. rarely e. never

In my opinion, how well does the teacher seem to know the course material? a. in comp'ete c o m m a n d of subject matter and related materials b. in con" and of course material c. in pooi ommand of course material d. is frequt My stum ed by questions on course material

9.

H o w important was memory for your exams? a. extremely important b. somewhat important c. unimportant

! 'V

How fair a a. very fai b. fair c. unfair

ider is your teacher?

1. General interest

3. Outside meetings

2. Questions

10. In determining your final grade, how important is writing good papers? a. always extremely important b. somewhat important c. unimportant

5. Fair grader

4. Know material

7. Stimulate thinking 6. Organized, prepared

9. Memory for exams

8. Tolerant to other views

1. General interest

10. Writing good papers

S1VE \ MY BRUSH A BACKf

Art

i ÂŤ f

SHEARDY, ROBERT a. 22 22 8 b. 38 38 25 c. 22 22 50 d. 13 13 16 e. 2 2 0

2. Questions

(15) 40 40 20 . 0 0

4. Know material

ERVIN, EDWARD L. a. 62 74 b. 34 25 c. 2 0 d. 0 0 e. 0 0

62 37 0 0 0

NORTON, NORMAN a. 62 79 b. 33 20 c. 4 0 d. 0 0 e. 0 0

44 50 2 2 0

5 27 66 0 0

50 27 11 5 5

13 16 33 22 13

19 25 16 33 5

83 5 11 0 0

2 16 80 0 0

66 26 6 0 0

46 26 26 0 0

66 26 6 0 0

20 33 13 26 6

33 13 40 0 13

93 0 6 0 0

26 46 26 0 0

7. Stimulate thinking 6. Organized, prepared

9. Memory for exams

8. Tolerant to 10. Writing other views good papers

(35) 91 8 0 0 0

91 8 0 0 0

80 20 0 0 0

20 45 31 0 2

74 25 0 0 0

91 8 0 0 0

8 20 71 0 0

62 37 0 0 0

62 37 0 0 0

83 16 0 0 0

87 12 0 0 0

12 58 29 0 0

45 45 8 0 0

66 33 0 0 0

4 8 87 0 0

STABLER, TIMOTHY a. 31 50 50 b. 45 31 45 c. 9 0 4 d. 9 18 0 e. 4 0 0

(22) 59 31 9 0 0

31 50 18 0 0

36 50 9 4 0

13 31 27 4 22

31 27 22 4 13

100 0 0 0 0

9 18 72 0 0

(24)

CHEMISTRY

BRINK, IRWIN a. 20 60 b. 40 26 c. 13 13 d. 26 0 e. 0 0

(15) 60 33 6 0 0

53 46 0 0 0

53 46 0 0 0

73 20 6 0 0

6 40 26 20 6

40 13 46 0 0

33 46 20 0 0

13 26 60 0 0

DOYLE, MICHAEL P. a. 26 53 66 b. 46 33 30 c. 10 13 3 d. 16 0 0 e. 0 0 0

(30) 96 3 0 0 0

53 40 6 0 0

93 6 0 0 0

13 33 40 13 0

40 36 16 3 3

93 3 3 0 0

0 23 76 0 0

NECKERS, DOUGLAS a. 33 46 80 b. 46 33 20 c. 13 20 0 d. 6 0 0 e. 0 0 0

(15) 86 13 0 0 0

46 40 13 0 0

53 20 20 0 6

40 13 33 6 6

26 20 33 6 13

73 20 6 0 0

13 33 53 0 0

52 47 0 0 0

88 11 0 0 0

29 29 23 17 0

41 47 11 0 0

47 35 17 0 0

17 35 47 0 0

70 10 20 0 0

40 50 10 0 0

30 20 40 10 0

30 30 40 0 . 0

20 50 30 0 0

10 40 50 0 0

SMITH, DWIGHT a. 35 76 b. 58 17 c. 5 5 d. 0 0 e. 0 0 BRADY, ALLEN a. 26 53 b. 33 26 13 c. 13 20 d. 0 e. 6 6

5. Fair grader

(36)

f

K

3. Outside meetings

(17) 88 11 0 0 0

WILLIAMS, DONALD a. 50 60 60 b. 40 30 30 c. 10 10 10 d. 0 0 0 6. 0 0 0

100 0 0 0 0 (10) 50 50 0 0 0


1. General interest

6. Organized, prepared

4. Know material

8. Tolerant to other views

ECONOMICS

(16)

31 ' 43 12 12 0

68 12 18 0 0

31 31 37 0 0

6 62 31 0 0

75 25 0 0 0

62 31 6 0 0

12 37 37 12 0

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a. b. c. d. e.

Special Supplement

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Page 2

(31) 48 35 16 0 0

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HISTORY

(13)

DIRKSE, LAMONT 46 a. 15 b. 38 53 c. 23 0 d. 23 0 0 e. 0

46 53 0 0 0

46 46 7 0 0

HENDERSON, JAMES a. 21 47 52 b. 65 0 c. 8 0 d. 4 0 e. 0

P. 34 52 13 0 0

(23) 52 47 0 0 0

SHACKOW, CARL 42 a. 23 b. 38 28 c. 23 19 4 d. 9 e. 4 0

(21) 85 14 0 0 0

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30 61 7 0 0 21 60 17 0 0 19 71 9 0 0

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PETROVICH, 47 a. 41 b. c. 5 d. 5 e. 0

MICHAEL 47 29 47 41 11 23 0 0 0 0

STRAND, WILSON 46 20 a. b. 53 33 13 20 c. 0 d. 6 e. 0 6

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WOLFINGER, HENRY a. 0 7 28 b. 28 50 57 14 28 21 c. d. 14 21 0 6. 28 0 0

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1} BRAND, EDWARD a.s 4 32 b. 20 36 c. 28 20 d. 36 4 e. 12 8

(25) 44 40 16 0 0

HOLLENBACH, JOHN a. 15 15 53 b. 15 38 38 c. 23 23 7 d. 23 0 0 e. 23 23 0

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PANCIK, WALTER 4 a. 0 b. 8 29 33 c. 20 25 d. 41 e. 29 8

(19) 29 45 8 16 0

PR INS, A. JAMES 37 a. 43 31 b. 37 21 c. 15 9 d. 3 0 e. 0

(32) 34 59 6 0 0

63 31 0 5 0 4 37 33 25 0 96 0. 3 0 0

36 52 10 0 0 8 54 37 0 0 59 37 3 0 0

42 57 0 0 0 0 29 37 20 12 68 31 0 0 0

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CASTILLO. MARIA 14 a. 35 71 b. 28 7 c. 35 0 0 d. 7 e. 0

50 42 7 0 0

64 35 0 0 0

78 ri4x 7 0 0

(12) 41 41 16 0 0

66 33 0 0 0

(13) 38 61 0 0 0

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NAME'S DOOUTTLE

4 12 16 45 20

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HEINE, WERNER a. 16 0 b. 25 41 25 41 c. d. 8 8 25 e. .8

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PALMER, LINDA a. 31 63 b. 52 26 c. 10 10 d. 5 0 e. 0 0

(19) 68 31 0 0 0

MEGOW, GEftHARD a. 26 33 b. 46 46 c. 26 20 d. 0 0 e. 0 0 STRAND, GISELA 14 28 b. 47 47 c. 23 19 d. 14 4 e. 0 0

7. Stimulate thinking

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63 36 0 0 0

73 21 0 5 0

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21 47 26 5 0

68 21 10 0 0

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23 33 33 9 0

90 9 0 0 0

4 19 76 0 0

(15)

VICKERS, JUDITH a. 11 55 b. 66 38 c. 16 5 d. 5 0 e. 0 0

50 44 5 0 0

72 27 0 0 0

38 61 0 0 0

61 33 0 5 0

11 0 72 16 0

55 27 16 0 0

88 11 0 0 0

27 44 27 0 0

WATSON, ANN E a. 25 41 b. 8 8 c. 16 25 d. 8 0 e. 41 25

(12) 25 33 41 0 0

41 16 33 8 0

25 33 41 0 0

66 8 0 0 25

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33 8 16 16 25

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(19) 52 47 0 0 0

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78 15 5 0 0

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MATHEMATICS

DERSHEM, HERBERT a. 9 45 54 b. 45 45 36 c. 27 9 9 d. 9 0 0 e. 9 0 0 FOLKERT, JAY a. 8 58 b. 66 41 c. 8 0 d. 16 0 e. 0 0

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VAN IWAARDEN, JOHN a. 23 92 23 b. 61 0 76 c. 7 7 0 d. 7 0 0 e. 0 0 0

7. Stimulate thinking

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PHYSICAL E D U C A T I O N

PARKER, SANDRA a. 31 36 b. 40 31 18 c. 22 d. 9 4 e. 0 4

(22) 27 63 4 4 0

22 59 4 13 0

45 45 9 0 0

50 22 22 0 4

9 27 36 13 13

59 27 13 0 0

27 31 40 0 0

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SCHIPPER, DAUGHN a. 9 31 4 b. 13 36 59 c. 22 22 18 d. 50 9 18 e. 4 0 0

(22) 22 50 27 0 0

9 77 13 0 0

22 40 9 22 4

4 4 27 27 36

27 22 40 4 4

63 27 9 0 0

4 27 68 0 0

PHYSICS

BROCKMEIER, RICHARD a. 33 38 66 b. 28 47 23 c. 23 14 9 d. 14 0 0 e. 0 0 0

71 28 0 0 0

52 47 0 0 0

52 42 4 0 0

38 23 33 4 0

76 14 9 0 0

23 52 23 0 0

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MARKER, DAVID a. 53 73 b. 42 23 c. 3 3 d. 0 0 e. 0 0

(26) 76 23 0 0 0

88 11 0 0 0

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50 30 19 0 0

80 15 3 0 0

3 3 92 0 0

SEESER, JAMES a. 0 13 b. 6 13 c. 6 20 d. 53 40 e. 33 13

(15) 73 20 6 0 0

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33 40 26 0 0

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6 66 20 0 6

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(16) 87 12 0 0 0

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PUTTEN JAMES 18 37 37 50 37 6 0 5 6 0

(21)

ELDER, ROBERT a. 22 61 b. 55 22 c. 16 16 d. 5 0 e. 0 0

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HOLMES, JACK a. 0 15 b. 45 45 c. 25 25 10 d. 20 e. 10 5

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VANDERBUSH, ALVIN a. 52 57 42 b. 28 23 47 c. 4 9 4 d. 4 4 4 e. 4 9 0 ZOETEWAY, JAMES a. 0 23 b. 11 47 c. 35 23 d. 11 0 e. 41 5

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P O L I T I C A L SCIENCE

90 9

STEKETEE, CHARLES a. 0 61 53 b. 46 23 38 c. 30 7 7 d. 15 7 0 e. 7 0 0

WHITTLE, JOHN 18 a. 50 b. 45 45 4 c. 22 d. 9 0 0 e. 0

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2. Questions

(11)

SHERBURNE, FRANK a. 0 7 37 b. 3 14 29 c. 7 40 22 d. 18 11 11 e. 70 25 0 SOMMERS, DEAN a. 10 42 b. 63 47 c. 21 10 d. 5 0 e. 0 0

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MUSIC

HOLLEMAN, a. 10 b. 42 c. 31 d. 15 e. 0

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PHILOSOPHY

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Page 4 1. General interest

MYERS, DAVID G a. 18 43 b. 54 40 c. 17 15 d. 8 0 e. 1 0

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SCHOLTEN, EUGENE a. 17 21 56 b. 17 34 60 c. 30 8 8 d. 17 0 8 e. 17 0 0

43 48 6 10

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BRUINS, ELTON a. 21 68 31 b. 36 c. 26 0 d. 15 0 0 e. 0

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COUGHENOUR, ROBERT 56 a. 52 60 28 36 b. 28 12 8 c. 20 0 0 d. 0 0 0 e. 0 KRUITHOF, a. 13 b. 22 c. 18 d. 18 e. 27

(17) 70 5 23 0 0

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VAN KAMPEN, RUTH 37 62 31 25 35143 12 25 SWFIB d. 18 6 0 e. 12 0 0

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BASTIAN 13 27 31 54 31 13 4 9 13 0

WILSON, DONALD 80 a. 77 b. 19 12 6 c. 3 0 d. 0 e. 0 0 73 26 0 0 0 (25) 88 12 0 0 0 (22) 59 27 9 4 0

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MALCOM, JAMES a. 7 39 21 b. 39 c. 21 25 d. 21 14 e. 10 0

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SOCIOLOGY

SNOOK, JAMES a. 11 35 b. 23 23 c. 29 23 17 d. 23 e. 11 0

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09-28-1970