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ANCHORED INSIDE Draft changes inminent New board members Students may vote at school Science center progressing

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"Birds of America" Blanton's criticism of religion DeWitt Cultural Center opens A look at freshman women Jackson: a profile

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Presidential search begins second year by Bob Roos A l t e r a full year w i t h o u t a p r e s i d e n t , H o p e is still at least a semester away f r o m gaining a successor for that position, acc o r d i n g to C h a n c e l l o r William V a n d e r l u g t . " i t will be J a n u a r y or F e b r u a r y at the earliest before the j o b will be f i l l e d , " V a n d e r l u g t said T h u r s d a y . AT PRESENT Vanderlugt and T r e a s u r e r and Business Manager Clarence H a n d l o g t e n exercise t h e j o i n t responsibility and a u t h o r i t y of the p r e s i d e n t . T h i s situation is the result of a recent m o v e by the Board of Trustees. At the same time, t h e board n a m e d H a n d l o g t e n to t h e newly created post of e x e c u t i v e vice p r e s i d e n t .

4 84th Anniversary-1

Tuition

H o p e College, H o l l a n d , Michigan 4 9 4 2 3

S e p t e m b e r 20, 1971

raise upheld

Price freeze aids college President N i x o n ' s decision for a t e m p o r a r y wage-price freeze has provided a financial b o o s t to Hope College by freezing most f a c u l t y and staff salaries at last y e a r ' s level while allowing this y e a r ' s increase in tuition and r o o m and board fees. T h e wage-price f r e e z e , issued by e x e c u t i v e o r d e r a f t e r Nixon had declared the n a t i o n to be in an e c o n o m i c state of e m e r g e n c y , p r o h i b i t s increases in any f o r m of " ages and prices above their August 15 level in all cases e x c e p t where variances have been granted by the President's Cost of Living Council (CLC). T H E F R E E Z E applies even if an increase, e f f e c t i v e a f t e r August 15, was agreed u p o n b e f o r e August 15, e x c e p t in cases w h e r e the w o r k e r had actually accrued pay at the new rate, or, if there were s u b s t a n t i a l t r a n s a c t i o n s at the new, higher prices. T h e C L C s t a t e d August 26 that teachers were only e x e m p t e d f r o m the freeze if they had "eit h e r p e r f o r m e d work prior to August 15 u n d e r a new c o n t r a c t calling for a wage increase or if t h e t e a c h e r was eligible to have earned a salary at the new rate prior t o August 1 5 . "

T H E CLC F U R T H E R stated t h a t , "If t e a c h e r s have reached a new a g r e e m e n t o n pay scales for the c o m i n g school year and the c o n t r a c t does not go i n t o e f f e c t until S e p t e m b e r 1, the teachers m a y not receive the pay i n c r e a s e . " Most H o p e staff and f a c u l t y m e m bers have c o n t r a c t s e f f e c t i v e Sept e m b e r 1. T h e only f a c u l t y or staff m e m bers at Ho p e t o receive pay increases are those w h o have assumed positions carrying increased responsibility a n d workl o a d s , such as newly a p p o i n t e d d e p a r t m e n t c h a i r m e n , a n d those w h o were p r o m o t e d as a result of m e e t i n g " c e r t a i n e d u c a t i o n a l req u i r e m e n t s , " such as receiving an a d v a n c e d degree. O T H E R PAY raises, such as t h o s e due for merit and longevity, were not allowed by the CLC. T h e C L C ' s ruling regarding increases in t u i t i o n and r o o m and board fees a n n o u n c e d before August 15, b u t n o t a p p l y i n g until a f t e r August 15, as in the case of H o p e ' s increased fees f o r the present academic y e a r , was t o p e r m i t t h e m during the freeze if " s u b stantial t r a n s a c t i o n s " at the new rate had o c c u r r e d prior t o August 15. According t o E x e c u t i v e Vice

R e f u s i n g to reveal the n a m e s of the m e n or the d a t e s of their visits, V a n d e r l u g t indicated that the a d m i n i s t r a t i o n is " t r y i n g to p r o t e c t their n a m e s for their own sakes." He went o n to say that t h e Presidential Search Committee will m e e t with t h e E x e c u t i v e

President of t h e College Clarence H a n d l o g t e n , H o p e had received e n o u g h early p a y m e n t s t o m e e t t h e criteria. H a n d l o g t e n said t h a t the freeze w o u l d have n o e f f e c t on s t u d e n t salaries o n c a m p u s . He e x p l a i n e d that the college pays the minim u m wage to s t u d e n t s .

T h e d u t i e s of the president had previously b e e n carried o u t by the E x e c u t i v e Council, c o m posed of H a n d l o g t e n , Dean f o r A c a d e m i c A f f i a r s M o r e t t e Rider, V a n d e r l u g t and Dean of S t u d e n t s R o b e r t D e Y o u n g . T h e reason for the change is t h e b o a r d ' s feeling that "it may bec o m e m o r e d i f f i c u l t to w o r k w i t h o u t centralized responsibility and a u t h o r i t y as t h e year progresses," a c c o r d i n g t o a l e t t e r f r o m board C h a i r m a n Hugh De Pree. V A N D E R L U G T revealed t h e newest development in the search for a president w h e n he said that t w o c a n d i d a t e s for t h e post will visit H o p e ' s c a m p u s within the next three weeks.

'anchor' wins highest collcgc press honors T h e Hope College anchor has been awarded t h e " A l l - A m e r i c a n " rating by the Associated Collegiate Press for its issues last semester u n d e r the e d i t o r s h i p of Gerald Swieringa. The a w a r d , t h e highest given t o a college n e w s p a p e r , was m a d e a f t e r critical e v a l u a t i o n by the ACP's staff of p r o f e s s i o n a l j o u r n a lists. " A l l - A m e r i c a n " s t a t u s is defined as " u n u s u a l l y high q u a l i t y and especially creative or distinctly lively, a p p e a l i n g w o r k " in various areas of n e w s p a p e r production. The anchor received " M a r k s of D i s t i n c t i o n " in the

areas of coverage and c o n t e n t , writing and editing, editorial leadership and physical a p p e a r ance. J u d g e G. D. Hiebert especially c o m m e n d e d the paper f o r its " f o r t h r i g h t " editorial leadership and " b r i g h t , readable p a g e s . " The anchor m o v e d up one category f r o m the previous year in its classification based on school enr o l l m e n t . This is the seventh c o n secutive s e m e s t e r t h e anchor has received the " A l l - A m e r i c a n " rating. T h e ACP is a n a t i o n a l organization d e d i c a t e d t o p r o m o t i n g high s t a n d a r d s a m o n g college and university papers

A

CLARENCE HANDLOGTEN Committee of the Board of T r u s t e e s O c t . 11 in D e t r o i t . T h e m e e t i n g ' s p u r p o s e will be to decide w h e t h e r to r e c o m m e n d o n e of the t w o visiting c a n d i d a t e s to the Board of T r u s t e e s . In the event that o n e of t h e m e n is r e c o m m e n d e d , the b o a r d will m a k e its final decision w h e t h e r to a p p o i n t him w h e n it m e e t s Oct. 23. ALTHOUGH DePree indicated that t h e c a n d i d a t e s slated to visit the c a m p u s are at present the m o s t serious c o n t e n d e r s , Vanderlugt could not predict the c h a n c e s of either of t h e m being r e c o m m e n d e d . " I f one of them gets the appointment, we're not sure he would acc e p t , " he a d d e d . While on c a m p u s , t h e t w o m e n will talk to only a limited n u m b e r of f a c u l t y m e m b e r s and s t u d e n t s . S t u d e n t m e m b e r s of the search c o m m i t t e e "will set up the c o n t a c t s b e t w e e n t h e c a n d i d a t e s and the students," Vanderlugt said. T h e faculty m e m b e r s and s t u d e n t s will report their o p i n i o n s of the candid a t e s t o the m e m b e r s of t h e search c o m m i t t e e .

Local resident files suit against college and city by Gerald Swieringa H o p e College's p r o p o s e d academic science c e n t e r may have its day in c o u r t b e f o r e its day of g r o u n d breaking. T H E C O L L E G E and the zoning appeals b o a r d of Holland may be b r o u g h t t o c o u r t as c o - d e f e n d e n t s in a suit filed with the Ottawa County Circuit Court charging the college and the zoning b o a r d with violations of the city z o n i n g o r d i n a n c e . The alleged violations stem f r o m the college's plans t o erect the c e n t e r allegedly w i t h o u t c o m p l i a n c e with p a r k i n g restrictions, rear y a r d set-backs and h e i g h t restrictions established by the z o n i n g o r d i n a n c e . Mrs. Marguerite Pollock, o w n e r of the h o m e at 4 6 H. Graves Place, filed the suit S e p t . 7 a f t e r the college was g r a n t e d a variance to the o r d i n a n c e by the city z o n i n g appeals b o a r d . Mrs. Pollock charges t h a t the i n t e r p r e t a t i o n by the appeals board of t h e o r d i n a n c e as a p p l i c a b l e t o H o p e was e r r o n e o u s . MRS. P O L L O C K S property was originally being s o u g h t by the college as part of t h e c o n s t r u c t i o n

site for the p r o j e c t e d c e n t e r . However, her price was c o n s i d e r a b l y b e y o n d that which the college was willing to pay. In response, the college o p t e d for a re-designed science c e n t e r b o r d e r i n g Mrs. P o l l o c k ' s p r o p e r t y . When the plans were f i n i s h e d , it was discovered that the college n e e d e d to p r o c u r e a variance f r o m the city z o n i n g o r d i n a n c e , as the p r o j e c t e d edifice would be c o n s t r u c t e d inside the t w e n t y - f o o t back yard set-back g u a r a n t e e d by the o r d i n a n c e . T h e building would stare back at Mrs. Pollock f r o m 16 feet. AN O P E N H E A R I N G of t h e z o n i n g appeals board was held July 22 at which H o p e applied for t h e variance. In a d d i t i o n t o the back yard set-back, the plans lacked s u f f i c i e n t p a r k i n g space. A f t e r s o m e discussion, the a p p l i c a t i o n for variance was denied. A n o t h e r hearing was s c h e d u l e d f o r August 12. Mrs. P o l l o c k ' s a t t o r n e y , R o b e r t Gillette, raised procedural questions as to H o p e ' s right t o a s e c o n d hearing. His o b j e c t i o n s were s u b j e c t t o a l a t e r ruling and the h e a r i n g pro-

c e e d e d . Gillette c o n t e n d e d t h a t the college still violated the city o r d i n a n c e and suggested that the college either re-design the building or acquire m o r e p r o p e r t y . When asked w h o s e p r o p e r t y he was referring to, Gillette ans w e r e d , "Mrs. P o l l o c k ' s . " S E C R E T A R Y of t h e Board of T r u s t e e s Willard Wickers repres e n t e d Hope at the h e a r i n g and s t a t e d t h a t it was t h e college's policy t o pay o n l y a fair m a r k e t value f o r p r o p e r t y a n d that the college could not pay Mrs. P o l l o c k ' s price.

*yr

T h e hearing p r o c e e d e d with Gillette q u e s t i o n i n g l a n d s c a p i n g plans and Wickers assuring him t h a t while s u c h plans were n o t finalized, they w o u l d be pleasing b o t h to Mrs. Pollock and the c o m m u n i t y . H o p e was g r a n t e d t h e variance. G I L L E T T E s t a t e d , " R i g h t after the variance was g r a n t e d , we c o n t a c t e d the B o a r d of T r u s t e e s and asked h o w they w o u l d att e m p t t o c o m p l y with t h e requirem e n t s . We h a v e n ' t heard f r o m the college y e t . " continued on page 8, column 1

P O L L O C K HOME—Mrs. Marguerite Pollock of 4 6 E. Graves Place h a s filed a suit in O t t a w a C o u n t y Circuit C o u r t charging t h e college and t h e Holland z o n i n g b o a r d of a p p e a l s with violations of t h e city z o n i n g o r d i n a n c e in t h e c o n s t r u c t i o n p l a n s f o r t h e p r o p o s e d a c a d e m i c science center.


Hope College anchor

Two

September 2 0 , 1971

Rider announces 1971-'72 board appointments Dr. M o r r e t t e L. R i d e r , dean for academic affairs, has a n n o u n c e d a p p o i n t m e n t s t o H o p e ' s decisionmaking boards for the 1971-72 academic year. A P P O I N T E D C H A I R M A N of the A c a d e m i c A f f a i r s B o a r d was H u b e r t Weller, p r o f e s s o r of Spanish and c h a i r m a n of t h e d e p a r t m e n t of foreign languages. Members of t h e b o a r d i n c l u d e as secretary Dr. J o h n E. H o p k i n s , assistant p r o f e s s o r of c o m m u n i c a t i o n and c h a i r m a n of t h e d e p a r t m e n t , Dr. R i c h a r d T . B r o c k m e i e r , associate p r o f e s s o r of physics. Dr. Irwin J. Brink, p r o f e s s o r of c h e m i s t r y , Dr. Leslie R. Beach, p r o f e s s o r of p s y c h o l o g y . Dr. A r t h u r H. J e n t z , p r o f e s s o r of P h i l o s o p h y , Dr. J o h n W. H o l l e n b a c h , p r o f e s s o r of English, a n d R o b e r t C o u g h e n o u r , associate p r o f e s s o r of religion. Stud e n t s a p p o i n t e d t o t h e b o a r d were Eric B r o w n , Dean G e n t e l , S c o t t Oliver, a n d Bruce S m i t h . T h e A c a d e m i c A f f a i r s Board has j u r i s d i c t i o n over t h e f o r m a l e d u c a t i o n p r o g r a m of t h e College. It e x a m i n e s p r o p o s a l s f o r m a j o r a c a d e m i c c h a n g e , and p r e p a r e s r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s of consideration by t h e a d m i n i s t r a t i o n and the Board of T r u s t e e s on s u c h p r o p o s als APPOINTMENTS t o s t a n d i n g c o m m i t t e e s u n d e r t h e b o a r d were also m a d e . Elected t o the C u r r i c u l u m C o m m i t t e e were C h a i r m a n , Dr. Harry F. Frissel, p r o f e s s o r of physics a n d c h a i r m a n of t h e dep a r t m e n t , J o h n W. S t e w a r t , associate d e a n f o r a c a d e m i c affairs

and assistant p r o f e s s o r of h i s t o r y , Leroy L e b b i n , assistant p r o f e s s o r of library science a n d d i r e c t o r of libraries, J e n t z , Frissel, J a m e s E. B u l t m a n , assistant p r o f e s s o r of religion and acting c h a i r m a n of the d e p a r t m e n t . Dr. D. Ivan D y k s t r a , p r o f e s s o r of p h i l o s o p h y arrd c h a i r m a n of the d e p a r t m e n t . S t u d e n t s selected f o r the c o m m i t t e e were Paul S m i t h and Dave Peterson. C h o s e n f o r the C u l t u r a l Affairs C o m m i t t e e were, as c h a i r m a n . Dr. Harrison R y k e r , assistant professor of m u s i c . Rider, Brockmeier, J o h n J a c k s o n , music ins t r u c t o r , Dr. R o b e r t Elder, Jr., assistant p r o f e s s o r of political science, and David S m i t h , assist a n t p r o f e s s o r of a r t . S t u d e n t s appointed were Jerry Sittser, Brenda B o o t s and J o h n S c h m i d t . THE I N T E R N A T I O N A L Educ a t i o n C o m m i t t e e for 1 9 7 1 - , 7 2 is m a d e u p of C h a i r m a n Linda Palm e r , assistant p r o f e s s o r of f r e n c h , Dr. Paul G . F r i e d , p r o f e s s o r of h i s t o r y and d i r e c t o r of international education, Hollenbach, Dr. F. Phillip V a n Eyl, associate p r o f e s s o r of p s y c h o l o g y , and Dr. R a l p h O c k e r s e , associate p r o f e s s o r of biology. S t u d e n t s a p p o i n t e d t o t h e c o m m i t t e e were Colin Braat and Dean G e n t e l . A p p o i n t e d t o the C a m p u s Life Board were DeYoung, Rev. William C. Hillegonds, college c h a p l a i n , N o n a K i p p , associate d e a n of s t u d e n t s , D e V e t t e , K r a f t , Dr. David Marker, associate professor of p h y s i c s and d i r e c t o r of t h e c o m p u t e r c e n t e r . Dr. E l d o n D.

Greij, associate p r o f e s s o r of biology, Dr. E l i z a b e t h R e e d y , prec e p t o r in English and D e n n i s E. Hull, i n s t r u c t o r in e c o n o m i c s and business a d m i n i s t r a t i o n . S t u d e n t s a p p o i n t e d t o t h e board were Tim F r i t z , Ron P o s t h u m a , Bob Tanis, Jackie G r e e r , B o b S c h e l l e n b e r g and Merlin W h i t e m a n . THE PURPOSE of the C a m p u s Life Board is t o c o n s i d e r and initiate policies o n all phases of the c o - c u r r i c u l a r p r o g r a m , e s t a b lish policies f o r s t u d e n t c o u n s e l i n g and t o request its c o m m i t t e e s or S t u d e n t C o n g r e s s to consider and m a k e r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s on m a t ters t h a t a f f e c t these areas of t h e college o p e r a t i o n . Appointed to the Extra-Curricular Activities C o m m i t t e e , a c o m m i t t e e u n d e r t h e C a m p u s Life Board, were Jackson, Gary Demarest III, d i r e c t o r of the counseling center. Reedy and Dr. William V a n d e r b i l t , assistant p r o f e s s o r of p h y s i c a l e d u c a t i o n . S t u d e n t seats w e n t to Gary A b e l , Kevin H o l l e m a n , and Lynn Walchenbach. A p p o i n t e d t o the Religious Life C o m m i t t e e were C h a p l a i n Hillegonds, David Vanderwel, Kraft and Dr. Charles A. H u t t a r , P r o f e s s o r of English and C h a i r m a n of t h e D e p a r t m e n t . S t u d e n t s c h o s e n w e r e Dan M c A u l i f f e and Bill A l t o . APPOINTED TO the S t u d e n t C o m m u n i c a t i o n s Media C o m m i t tee were R. Dirk J e l l e m a , assist a n t p r o f e s s o r of English, Dr. Richard V a n d e r v e l d e , associate

Freshmen effected

Student deferments imperiled Male s t u d e n t s w h o e n t e r e d college this s u m m e r a n d t h o s e w h o have enr o lled as f r e s h m e n this fall will not q u a l i f y f o r s t u d e n t deferm e n t s if p e n d i n g c h a n g e s t o the Selective Service Act n o w u n d e r consideration by C o n g r e s s are passed i n t o law.

THE D E F E R M E N T p h a s e o u t will n o t apply t o s t u d e n t s w h o e n r o l l e d f u l l - t i m e in t h e 1970-71 a c a d e m i c year. S u c h s t u d e n t s will be eligible f o r s t u d e n t d e f e r m e n t s if t h e y c o n t i n u e t o m a k e satisfact o r y progress in their fields of study.

HOWEVER, Selective Service indicated that the deferment p h a s e o u t is unlikely t o result in the i n d u c t i o n of m a n y f r e s h m e n in the near f u t u r e .

In f u r t h e r e x p l a n a t i o n of t h e p r o b a b l e e f f e c t s of the d e f e r m e n t p h a s e o u t , Tarr said that of the 19 y e a r olds liable t o be i n d u c t e d in 1 9 7 2 , a b o u t half will be disqualified on m e n t a l , m o r a l o r physical grounds. "This means that a maxi m u m of 5 0 , 0 0 0 m e n will be d i r e c t l y a f f e c t e d in 1 9 7 2 by t h e s t u d e n t d e f e r m e n t p h a s e o u t , " he said.

" T h e 18 year olds will receive their l o t t e r y n u m b e r s in 1 9 7 2 , and they will n o t be s u b j e c t to induction until 1973, when draft calls s h o u l d be l o w , " Selective Service D i r e c t o r C u r t i s W. Tarr said. " T h e 19 y e a r old f r e s h m e n received their l o t t e r y n u m b e r s August 5 of this year and will be subject to i n d u c t i o n n e x t y e a r , at least one-half s h o u l d have high e n o u g h l o t t e r y n u m b e r s t o preclude their i n d u c t i o n , " he w e n t on.

T A R R S A I D T H A T college s t u d e n t s will not be d r a f t e d in the m i d d l e of a s e m e s t e r or t e r m . "If called while e n r o l l e d , t h e y will be allowed t o p o s t p o n e their induct i o n until t h e end of t h e s e m e s t e r or t e r m , " he said. "If in their last a c a d e m i c year, t h e y will be able

WORShip s u n f u y ,

s e p t e t t i B e p

2 6 ,

1 9 7 1

D i m n e n t Memorial Chapel PREACHER Chaplain William Hillegonds

to postpone their induction until after graduation." T a r r advised i n c o m i n g f r e s h m e n and s t u d e n t s w h o s t a r t e d t h e i r p r o g r a m of s t u d y in t h e s u m m e r of 1971 or later not t o file a p p l i c a t i o n s f o r s t u d e n t d e f e r m e n t s even t h o u g h t h e c u r r e n t law a u t h o r i z e s g r a n t i n g d e f e r m e n t s t o s t u d e n t s in f u l l - t i m e p r o g r a m s of s t u d y . "IF THE P E N D I N G Selective Service legislation d o e s not p a s s , " T a r r said, "it w o u l d n o t be in a r e g i s t r a n t ' s best i n t e r e s t t o o b t a i n a s t u d e n t d e f e r m e n t which w o u l d e x t e n d his liability until age 3 5 . S h o u l d C o n g r e s s c h a n g e t h e legislation to provide for deferments for new incoming freshmen, w h i c h is most u n l i k e l y , applicat i o n s for d e f e r m e n t s will not be j e o p a r d i z e d by d e l a y i n g their submission until a f t e r passage of t h e new l a w . " The President's authority for t h e i n d u c t i o n of all m e n u n d e r 3 5 , e x c e p t f o r t h o s e w h o have or w h o have had d e f e r m e n t s , e x p i r e d on J u n e 3 0 , 1971. If Congress d o e s not reinstate t h e general i n d u c t i o n a u t h o r i t y , t h e P r e s i d e n t could aut h o r i z e t h e i n d u c t i o n of t h o s e r e g i s t r a n t s w h o h o l d or have held deferments. In this unlikely e v e n t . Selective Service o f f i c i a l s believe that m a n p o w e r r e q u i r e m e n t s of the Dep a r t m e n t of D e f e n s e p r o b a b l y c o u l d be m e t by i n d u c t i n g t h o s e y o u n g m e n w h o have recently d r o p p e d d e f e r m e n t s because t h e y g r a d u a t e d , d r o p p e d o u t of s c h o o l , or c h a n g e d their o c c u p a t i o n s .

p r o f e s s o r of m a t h e m a t i c s , Hull, Dr. J a m e s Seeser, T h o m a s L. R e n n e r , p u b l i c i n f o r m a t i o n director, a n d Miss K i p p . S t u d e n t appointments were Sue Hop, Doug Iverson, Debbie Smith, B e t t y G a y d o s and T o m Stuit. The Student Conduct Committee f o r '71-^72 will be Dean Gerrie. Miss Kipp, Greij, and R a y m o n d E. S m i t h . S t u d e n t J o a n K a c e w i c h was also s e a t e d . Alvin W. V a n d e r b u s h , professor of political science, was selected as c h a i r m a n of t h e Adm i n i s t r a t i v e A f f a i r s Board. T h e o t h e r m e m b e r s are Dr. William V a n d e r L u g t , c h a n c e l l o r of the college. R i d e r , D e Y o u n g , Clarence J. H a n d l o g t e n , t r e a s u r e r and business m a n a g e r . Dr. Elliot A. Tanis, p r o f e s s o r of m a t h e m a t i c s and chairman of the department, R y k e r , and Dr. Henry t e n H o o r , p r o f e s s o r of English. S t u d e n t s selected f o r t h e Board were B o b S c o t t , C h u c k C o u s i n e a u and Mark DeRoo. The Administrative Affairs B o a r d has j u r i s d i c t i o n over m a t ters of o r g a n i z a t i o n and a d m i n i s t r a t i o n , p u b l i c r e l a t i o n s , and stud e n t w e l f a r e . It m a y design o r revise the campus committee s t r u c t u r e a n d areas of responsibility, and a p p r o v e t h e college c a l e n dar. S E L E C T E D FOR t h e b o a r d ' s C o m m i t t e e on A d m i s s i o n s a n d Financial Aids w e r e T h o m a s D. La Baugh, d i r e c t o r of a d m i s s i o n s a n d

Roger Davis

Miss N o n a K i p p h a s a c c e p t e d t h e p o s i t i o n of assistant dean f o r s t u d e n t a f f a i r s , a post l e f t v a c a n t by t h e d e p a r t u r e of Miss J e a n e t t e Sprik at t h e e n d of t h e 1 9 7 0 - 7 1 academic year. A native of M o n t a n a where h e r f a t h e r was a M e t h o d i s t m i n i s t e r . Miss Kipp received her B.A. f r o m M o o r h e a d S t a t e College in Minnes o t a . She e a r n e d h e r M.A. a n d P h D in t h e fields of higher e d u c a tion and s o c i o l o g y at the University of Denver. B e f o r e c o m i n g t o H o p e , Miss Kipp w o r k e d as a h e a d r e s i d e n t , assistant d e a n of s t u d e n t s , a n d a d m i n i s t r a t i v e assistant to t h e c h a i r m a n of t h e sociology d e p a r t m e n t at the University of Denver.

L

MISS N O N A KIPP

Williams accepts call to California church Assistant C h a p l a i n Samuel Williams has left H o p e ' s c a m p u s t o accept a call t o the ministry at Oakland C o m m u n i t y Reformed C h u r c h in O a k l a n d , Cal. Williams, w h o left T h u r s d a y with his f a m i l y , received the call t o O a k l a n d in early August. He a c c e p t e d , a c c o r d i n g t o Chaplain William Hillegonds, because " H e felt for n o w he w a n t e d t o be back in a c h u r c h , a l t h o u g h he thoroughly e n j o y e d his three years at Hope." Prior t o his a r n v a l at H o p e , Williams was m i n i s t e r at P e n b r o o k

DEIS GUITAR GALLERY " T h e f i n e s t in f o l k , classic, a n d f l a m e n c o guitars".

Martin, Guild, Hofner, Alvarez, Y a m a h a , H a r m o n y . Vega, B a c o n , & F r a m u s b a n j o s . Also r e c o r d e r s , h a r m o n i c a s , a c c o r d i o n s

t

A p p o i n t m e n t s t o the A t h l e t i c C o m m i t t e e were G o r d o n M. Brewer, d i r e c t o r of athletics and assist a n t p r o f e s s o r of physical educat i o n , Dr. William A. D e M e e s t e r , assistant t o t h e p r e s i d e n t f o r planning and d e v e l o p m e n t , R o b e r t R i t s e m a , assistant p r o f e s s o r of j music a n d c h a i r m a n of the d e p a r t ment, Vanderbush, and John Van I w a a r d e n , associate p r o f e s s o r of m a t h e m a t i c s . T h e c o m m i t t e e ' s s t u d e n t seat was g r a n t e d t o Brad Lyons. A P P O I N T E D TO t h e S t u d e n t Standing and Appeals C o m m i t t e e w e r e Dr. H e r b e r t L. D e r s h e m , assistant p r o f e s s o r of mathematics, Gerrie, Dr. Norman W. R i e c k , associate p r o f e s s o r of B i o l o g y , Dr. J a m e s H. R e y n i e r s e , associate p r o f e s s o r of p s y c h o l o g y , and Dr. t e n H o o r . S t u d e n t s app o i n t e d t o t h e C o m m i t t e e were B o b W o l f f , D o n D e B r u y n and J o y Crawford.

New assistant dean of students arrives

Handling the following brands: Organist

f i n a n c i a l aid, Bruce H i m e b a u g h , admissions counselor, Stewart, DeYoung, Tanis, Dr. D o n a l d H. Williams, associate professor of c h e m i s t r y , Daniel Paul, a s s o c i a t e p r o f e s s o r of e d u c a t i o n . Dr. D o u g l a s L. H e e r e m a , associate p r o f e s s o r of e c o n o m i c s and chairm a n of t h e D e p a r t m e n t , M. Harold Mikle, associate p r o f e s s o r of art, a n d Dr. F r a n c i s G. Fike, associate p r o f e s s o r of English. S t u d e n t s a p p o i n t e d to the c o m m i t t e e w e r e E u n i c e K o s t e r and Mark R o b e r t s .

3 W E S T 8TH S T R E E T

HOLLAND

C o m m u n i t y C h u r c h in St. Anne, 111. He had f o r m e r l y been a religion i n s t r u c t o r and chaplain at S o u t h e r n N o r m a l School in Brewt o n , Ala. Williams is a g r a d u a t e of C e n t r a l College and Western Theological S e m i n a r y . Due t o the r e s t r u c t u r i n g of the s t u d e n t c h u r c h last fall, Williams will n o t have a successor in the post of assistant chaplain. Hilleg o n d s will be assisted by f o u r students.

Nine faculty members receive education honors N i n e m e m b e r s of the H o p e College f a c u l t y have been selected f o r i n c l u s i o n in the 1971 e d i t i o n of O u t s t a n d i n g E d u c a tors of A m e r i c a . H o p e f a c u l t y m e m b e r s selected w e r e L a m o n t Dirkse, associate p r o f e s s o r of education; William J a m e s Giddis, p r o f e s s o r of e d u c a t i o n ; C h a r l e s A. H u t t a r , professor of English; Arthur Jentz, associate professor of p h i l o s o p h y ; David Marker, associate p r o f e s s o r of physics; David G. Myers, associate p r o f e s s o r of p s y c h o l o g y ; J a m e s H. Reynierse, associate p r o f e s s o r of psychology; Elliot A. Tanis, associate p r o f e s s o r of m a t h e m a t i c s ; and S h e l d o n W e t t a c k , associate professor of c h e m i s t r y .


Hope College anchor

September 2 0 , 1971

Three

Court hands down ruling giving students local vote by Peter Orbeton

the f i f t h F r i d a y b e f o r e a n y election.

S t u d e n t s at H o p e will be able to claim their college r e s i d e n c e as their residence t o r v o t i n g purposes a c c o r d i n g to a decision h a n d e d d o w n by t h e Michigan S t a t e S u p r e m e C o u r t o n August 27. T H E C O U R T ruled as u n c o n s t i t u t i o n a l u n d e r t h e U.S. Cons t i t u t i o n a part of s e c t i o n M b of t h e Michigan E l e c t i o n Law 44 which provides that . . . no electors shall be d e e m e d to have

Holland City Clerk D o n a l d W. S c h i p p e r said that it was his interp r e t a t i o n t h a t s t u d e n t s w h o have been e n ro l l e d at H o p e w h o were on o f f - c a m p u s p r o g r a m s last year are eligible t o register. Since the c o u r t declared s e c t i o n 116 of the Election Law unconstitutional, this does cover t i m e in the past which s t u d e n t s have s p e n t at H o p e . S c h i p p e r e m p h a s i z e d (hat this is a local i n t e r p r e t a t i o n and no directive has been received on this m a t t e r .

gained or lost a residence . . . while a s t u d e n t is at an institution of l e a r n i n g . " U n d e r the ruling s t u d e n t s must be t r e a t e d t h e same as o t h e r registrants in t h a t no special q u e s t i o n s , f o r m s or i d e n t i f i c a t i o n m a y be r e q u i r e d of s t u d e n t s . T h e basis for the c o u r t ' s decision was a suit filed in 1968 in A n n ^ A r b o r b y eight University of Michigan s t u d e n t s w h o were d e n i e d v o t e r registration. T h e denial was u p h e l d in the circuit c o u r t and t h e a p p e a l s court b e f o r e being o v e r t u r n e d by t h e s u p r e m e c o u r t . IN O R D E R T O v o t e in Michigan, the registrant m u s t be a U.S. citizen and have been a resident of Michigan f o r at least six m o n t h s prior to an e l e c t i o n . In a d d i t i o n , the City of Holland requires city r e s i d e n c y prior to

To conduct

T H E 18 T O 21 year old voter also has t h e s a m e eligibility to run f o r o f f i c e as any o t h e r e l e c t o r unless a specific minim u m age is a r e q u i r e m e n t for the o f f i c e . O n c e a s t u d e n t has registered t o vote in H o l l a n d and if the s t u d e n t has been previously registered in a n o t h e r v o t i n g place, n o t i f i c a t i o n will be sent t o the f o r m e r v o t i n g place that the stud e n t has c h a n g e d residency and his n a m e will be t a k e n f r o m the previous v o t i n g roll, S c h i p p e r stated. T h e city c l e r k ' s o f f i c e on the s e c o n d f l o o r of the city hall will be o p e n 8 a . m . t h r o u g h 12 a . m . and 1 p . m . t h r o u g h 5 p.m. Monday through Friday for any person wishing to register to vote in H o l l a n d .

1

} A C A D E M I C S C I E N C E C E N T E R - C o n s t r u c t i o n d r a w i n g s t o r the p r o p o s e d c e n t e r have been f o r w a r d e d to f e d e r a l o f f i c i a l s f o r a p p r o v a l . T h e building will be l o c a t e d across f r o m D i m n e n t Memorial Chapel o n CoIIeue A v e n u e b e t w e e n 12th Street a n d Graves Place.

Plans

to HEW

Science center progresses by G a r y Gray Building p l a n s f o r H o p e ' s n e w Academic-Science Center have been c o m p l e t e d and the college is now awaiting governmental approval of the d r a w i n g s b e f o r e c o n s t r u c t i o n bids are solicited and c o n s t r u c t i o n can begin.

survey

AdAB considers calendar by G e r a l d Swieringa The Administrative Affairs Board discussed the i m p l e m e n t a tion of a t w o s e m e s t e r a d v a n c e d calendar w i t h the first s e m e s t e r e n d i n g b e f o r e C h r i s t m a s at its m e e t i n g last M o n d a y . THE ADVANCED calendar was discussed and a p p r o v e d by a voice v o t e by the f a c u l t y in a special pre-college conference S e p t e m b e r 9. I m p l e m e n t a t i o n is scheduled f o r the fall s e m e s t e r 1972. Dean f o r A c a d e m i c A f f a i r s M o r e t t e R i d e r i n t r o d u c e d a prospective c a l e n d a r t o t h e b o a r d w h i c h w o u l d allow classes to begin o n A u g u s t 25 w i t h the first s e m e s t e r e n d i n g D e c e m b e r 21. T h e second s e m e s t e r w o u l d begin J a n u a r y 8 and t e r m i n a t e May 7. C H A N C E L L O R Villiam Vanderlugt h i n t e d that o p p o s i t i o n m a y arise t o the c a l e n d a r f r o m s t u d e n t s o b j e c t i n g t o the " A u gust 25 to N o v e m b e r 21 g r i n d . " T h e first v a c a t i o n s c h e d u l e d under the new c a l e n d a r is T h a n k s giving, 13 w e e k s i n t o the semster. Student Congress president Bob S c o t t suggested t h a t " s t u d e n t s might p r e f e r o n e day of vacation for T h a n k s g i v i n g and a c o u p l e of d a y s off in O c t o b e r . " S t u d e n t Congress s e c r e t a r y - t r e a surer Charles C o u s i n e a u replied that p a r e n t s would o b j e c t if students were unable to come h o m e for t h e T h a n k s g i v i n g holiday. VANDERLUGT suggested that classes could begin s o m e w h a t earlier and t h e r e b y t h e O c t o b e r v a c a t i o n c o u l d be addVvW-

..

v •

•-i.-. v_w. s*. f

ed w i t h o u t loss to the T h a n k s giving v a c a t i o n . R i d e r c o m m e n t ed that this was infeasible due to f a c u l t y p r e s s u r e t o begin classes as late as possible. C h a i r m a n of t h e board Alvin Vanderbush a s k e d , " H o w can we best s a m p l e s t u d e n t o p i n i o n on this i s s u e ? " R i d e r replied that a p r e c e d e n t had b e e n set last year by polling s t u d e n t s in the English 31 classes. T h i s proc e d u r e was agreed u p o n and Rider was appointed t o app r o a c h D i r e c t o r of E d u c a t i o n a l R e s e a r c h J a m e s S n o o k regarding t h e survey. RIDER FURTHER asked that the b o a r d place on its agenda a p r o p o s a l dealing with the c r e a t i o n of a special " i n t e r i m " session at t h e end of the

spring t e r m . T h e session w o u l d be a v o l u n t a r y session of app r o x i m a t e l y t h r e e weeks in d u ration and o f f e r t h r e e s e m e s t e r h o u r s credit. " M y h o p e is that it will be a pretty innovative semester. Offc a m p u s p r o g r a m s , foreign studies, field trips and c o m p l e t e t h e a t r e p r o d u c t i o n s could bec o m e a part of t h e i t i n e r a r y , " Rider stated. Dean of S t u d e n t s R o b e r t DeY o u n g a d d e d t h a t the p h y s i c a l e d u c a t i o n d e p a r t m e n t c o u l d offer a c o u r s e to k e e p those stud e n t s engaged in spring s p o r t s o c c u p i e d a f t e r t h e regular semester ends. T h e b o a r d will f u r t h e r discuss the c a l e n d a r at its O c t o b e r 4 meeting.

T H E B U I L D I N G will be located across f r o m D i m n e n t C h a p e l on College Ave. b e t w e e n 12th St. and Graves PI. E x e c u t i v e Vice President Clarence Handlogten said t h a t while the college has titles t o ail the l o t s c o m p r i s i n g m e site, t h e o w n e r of an a d j a c e n t parcel is sueing the college e i t h e r t o buy h e r p r o p e r t y or alter the p r e s e n t c o n s t r u c t i o n plans. A c c o r d i n g t o H a n d l o g t e n the suit is t h e only forseeable o b s t a c l e to c o n s t r u c t i o n if the federal officials give t h e i r o k a y . He a d d e d that since the plaintiff has expressed interest in not p r e v e n t i n g c o n s t r u c t i o n of the Science Center, a s o l u t i o n t o the d i f f e r e n c e s b e t w e e n the l a n d o w n e r and the college w o u l d p r o b a b l y be f o u n d . H A N D L O G T E N said t h a t present c o n s t r u c t i o n plans have been f o r w a r d e d to t h e D e p a r t m e n t of Heal t h, E d u c a t i o n and Welfare. Final a p p r o v a l of the drawings m u s t be g r a n t e d by the d e p a r t ment before tentatively granted federal m o n i e s can be released. T h e s e f u n d s include a $1 million g o v e r n m e n t grant and a $2 million low-interest loan. H a n d logten said t h a t HEW must ascertain t h a t the d i m e n s i o n s in the final c o n s t r u c t i o n plans a p p r o x i m a t e those of the p r e l i m i n a r y drawings which were previously approved. Government regulations also s t i p u l a t e t h a t all f l o o r s be accessible to the h a n d i c a p p e d .

Also, equipment specifications must a l l o w c o m p e t i t i v e bidding. R E M A I N I N G f u n d s n e e d e d for the c e n t e r will be provided by a $ 5 0 0 , 0 0 0 Kresge Challenge G r a n t and $ 5 0 0 , 0 0 0 in m a t c h i n g f u n d s which, a c c o r d i n g to H a n d l o g t e n , must be secured t h r o u g h H o p e ' s a l u m n i , f r i e n d s , and the R e f o r m e d C h u r c h in America. While the m a t c h i n g f u n d s had not been entirely f o u n d when the anchor went to print S u n d a y , the e x e c u tive vice p r e s i d e n t was c o n f i d e n t that the m o n e y would be available by t o d a y , the deadline d a t e established by the Kresge F o u n d a t i o n . The Science C e n t e r will h o u s e the g e o l o g y , c h e m i s t r y , biology, and p s y c h o l o g y d e p a r t m e n t s . T w o lecture halls, a m u s e u m and a green h o u s e and aviary will be i n c l u d e d in the s t r u c t u r e as well as c l a s s r o o m s , several l a b o r a t o r i e s and f a c u l t y o f f i c e s .

Fall Semester f

Welcome to Holland, Hope-ites SEE US FOR

HELPWANTED Sparetime or full time opportunity earn as much as $27.00 per thousand and up t h r u mail service, addressing and/or stuffing envelopes, handwritten or typed. Guaranteed money making deal. Send $2.00 cash or M . 0 . for complete instructions and list of firms using these services to . . . C and S Company Dept 971, P 0 Box 522, Harrah,Gkla 73045

- ISRAEL

Brandeis U n i v e r s i t y / T h e J a c o b H i a t t I n s t i t u t e S t u d y in J e r u s a l e m , I s r a e l / J u l y - D e c e m b e r , 1971 ( 4 0 ) s t u d e n t s f r o m 25 universities enrolled in 1 9 7 0 ) J u n i o r s and Seniors eligible

A SPECIAL STUDENT CHECKING

930

ACCOUNT.

F o u r c o u r s e s / H e b r e w not r e q u i r e d / E a r n 16 credits C o s t : S 2 0 0 0 / T u i t i o n , r o o m , b o a r d , r o u n d - t r i p travel S o m e financial aid available. Write t o d d a y for i n f o r m a t i o n / a p p l i c a t i o n d e a d l i n e March 1st.

O L D E S T A N D MOST M O D E R N

THE HIATT INSTITUTE

IN H O L L A N D / Z E E L A N D

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Brandeis University Waltham, Massachusetts 02154

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Four

H o p e College a n c h o r

September 20, 1971

Change prescribes changes As a r e s u l t of c h a n g e s w h i c h h a v e o c c u r r e d since t h e e n d of t h e 1 9 7 0 - 7 1 a c a d e m i c y e a r , H o p e s t u d e n t s this y e a r will possess a larger m e a s u r e of f r e e d o m a n d o p p o r t u n i t y t h a n ever b e f o r e . T h e prod u c t s of t h e s e c h a n g e s will have i m p o r t a n t i m p l i c a t i o n s f o r t h e college a n d its p l a c e in the c o m m u n i t y . On A u g u s t 27 t h e Michigan S u p r e m e C o u r t ruled t o allow s t u d e n t s to claim their college r e s i d e n c e as t h e i r r e s i d e n c e f o r v o t i n g p u r p o s e s . This ruling, c o u p l e d with t h e passage of t h e s t a t e law w h i c h will l o w e r t h e m a j o r i t y age t o 18 as of J a n u a r y

1 c o u l d e v e n t u a l l y result in t h e galvaniz a t i o n of H o p e ' s s t u d e n t b o d y i n t o a p o t e n t p o l i t i c a l f o r c e at t h e local level. B e c a u s e of the c o u r t ' s ruling, m o s t H o p e s t u d e n t s may n o w register t o v o t e . S t u d e n t s w h o are n o w 21 y e a r s of age or over are eligible to v o t e in a n y e l e c t i o n , a n d t h o s e w h o are b e t w e e n 18 a n d 21 are eligible in n a t i o n a l e l e c t i o n s . A f t e r J a n u a r y 1, w h e n t h e n e w m a j o r i t y age law t a k e s e f f e c t , all s t u d e n t s 1 8 or o l d e r m a y v o t e in local e l e c t i o n s as well as n a t i o n a l e l e c t i o n s , p r o v i d e d t h e y have satisfied s t a t e a n d local r e s i d e n c e r e q u i r e m e n t s by e l e c t i o n t i m e . Since t h e m a j o r i t y age law is n o t e f f e c tive u n t i l J a n u a r y 1, and since t h e n e x t s c h e d u l e d e l e c t i o n is n o t until J u n e 1 9 7 2 , t h e b e n e f i t s of the n e w v o t i n g p r o v i s i o n s will n o t m a t e r i a l i z e i m m e d i a t e l y . A l t h o u g h t h i s m a y be a s o u r c e of t e m p o r a r y f r u s t r a t i o n f o r s t u d e n t s , it is h e l p f u l in t h a t it will give all m e m b e r s of t h e college c o m m u n i t y t i m e t o t h i n k a b o u t t h e i m p l i c a t i o n s of the

In t h e i n t e r i m , s o m e w o r t h w h i l e m e a sures s h o u l d be t a k e n t o e n c o u r a g e stud e n t s t o register t o v o t e . O n e possibility is s e t t i n g aside a special d a y f o r s t u d e n t r e g i s t r a t i o n . S t u d e n t C o n g r e s s c o u l d req u e s t a local p a r t y o r g a n i z a t i o n or civic g r o u p t o a r r a n g e f o r t h e p l a c e m e n t of a r e g i s t r a t i o n c e n t e r o n c a m p u s . If all H o p e s t u d e n t s register, a c c o r d i n g t o C i t y Clerk D o n a l d W. S c h i p p e r , r e d i s t r i c t i n g of t h e c i t y of H o l l a n d m a y b e c o m e n e c e s s a r y . H o p e s t u d e n t s p e r h a p s c o u l d gain t h e d e t e r m i n i n g voice in c h o o s i n g t h e city councilman f r o m their district. A n o t h e r i m p o r t a n t result of t h e n e w m a j o r i t y age law is t h e e x t e n s i o n of drinking privileges which it involves. A f t e r Janu a r y 1, t h e c o l l e g e ' s r u l e t h a t s t u d e n t s m a y c o n s u m e n o a l c o h o l on c a m p u s will bec o m e m o r e u n e n f o r c a b l e t h a n ever, a n d t h e r u l e ' s i n c o n s i s t e n c y with s t u d e n t s ' social s t a t u s as a d u l t s will b e c o m e increasingly obvious. If t h e rule r e m a i n s u n c h a n g e d , clandestine d r i n k i n g in t h e d o r m s will rise. A sensible a n d p r o b a b l y p r o f i t a b l e way to p r e v e n t this w o u l d be t h e sale of a l c o h o l i c beverages in t h e s t u d e n t c e n t e r , an idea w h i c h has a l r e a d y b e e n d i s c u s s e d by s o m e a d m i n i s t r a t o r s . Such a m e a s u r e w o u l d disc o u r a g e excessive d r i n k i n g in t h e r e s i d e n c e halls ( w h e r e p r o h i b i t i o n will p r o b a b l y be m a i n t a i n e d in any c a s e ) . It w o u l d also improve the s t u d e n t s ' a t t i t u d e toward the a d m i n i s t r a t i o n a n d , if h a n d l e d wisely by t h e s t u d e n t s , w o u l d increase t h e a d m i n i s t r a t i o n ' s f a i t h in t h e m . T h e c o m b i n e d e f f e c t of all t h e s e changes will be t o a l l o w s t u d e n t s t o a s s u m e a g r e a t e r s h a r e of r e s p o n s i b i l i t y f o r their political a n d social c o n d u c t .

T h e n , as plans f o r t h e b u i l d i n g progressed, t h e a r c h i t e c t s a n d e n g i n e e r s t o o k o v e r . T h i n g s g o t t o o c o m p l i c a t e d f o r stud e n t s t o deal with e f f e c t i v e l y . S t u d e n t interest w a n e d . N o w , t h e c e n t e r is n e a r i n g c o m p l e t i o n . But it still lacks t h e s t u d e n t t o u c h . T h e walls are largely bare, at t i m e s even c o l d in a p p e a r a n c e . F u r n i s h i n g s have been don a t e d , b u t m u c h r e m a i n s t o be a c q u i r e d . S t u d e n t s m a y be able t o aid in this a s p e c t by a d d i n g t h e c h a r m t o m a k e a h a n d s o m e building a h o m e for more than 2,000 s t u d e n t s . P l a n t s , w o r k s of a r t or reprod u c t i o n s , d i s p l a y s a n d o t h e r m a t e r i a l s can all be p r o v i d e d e i t h e r by s t u d e n t s or through student-initiated projects. N o d o u b t c l u b s on c a m p u s will w a n t t o a s s e m b l e impressive d i s p l a y s f o r t h e m a n y display areas. P e r h a p s h o u s i n g u n i t s will w a n t to get t o g e t h e r f o r a b e g i n n i n g - o f the-year "scavenger h u n t " to collect items w h i c h t o w n s p e o p l e or local m e r c h a n t s w o u l d be willing t o d o n a t e t o t h e college. F r a t e r n i t i e s m a y wish to c o n t r i b u t e a S a t u r d a y t o small f u n d - r a i s i n g p r o j e c t s or even t o t h e m a n a g e r of t h e n e w c e n t e r in o r d e r t o p e r f o r m a n y small t a s k s . We e n c o u r a g e s t u d e n t s t o c o n t a c t J o h n J a c k s o n , t h e c e n t e r ' s f u l l - t i m e m a n a g e r . He will discuss s u g g e s t i o n s or o f f e r s of service with e i t h e r individuals or r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s of clubs and organizations. L e t ' s n o t f o r g e t : it is a student c e n t e r .

anchor

OLLAND, M I C H I G A N

PRESS

P u b l i s h e d d u r i n g t h e college y e a r e x c e p t v a c a t i o n , h o l i d a y and e x a m i n a t i o n p e r i o d s b y a n d f o r t h e s t u d e n t s or H o p e College, H o l l a n d , M i c h i g a n , u n d e r t h e a u t h o r i t y of t h e S t u d e n t C o m m u n i c a t i o n s M e d i a C o m m i t t e e . S u b s c r i p t i o n p r i c e : $7 per year. Printed by the Composing R o o m , G r a n d Rapids, Michigan. Member, Associated C o l l e g i a t e Press, U n i t e d S t a t e s S t u d e n t Press A s s o c i a t i o n . O f f i c e l o c a t e d o n g r o u n d floor o f G r a v e s Hall. T e l e p h o n e 3 9 2 - 5 1 1 1 , E x t e n s i o n 2 3 0 1 and 2 2 8 5 . T h e o p i n i o n s o n t h i s page are n o t necessarily t h o s e o f t h e s t u d e n t b o d y , f a c u l t y o r a d m i n i s t r a t i o n o f H o p e College.

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N e w s editor F e a t u r e s editor Critiques editor

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From building to home T h e c u l m i n a t i o n of seven y e a r s of planning, dreaming, financial scheming and bitterly disappointing setbacks, the DeWitt C u l t u r a l C e n t e r has at last o p e n e d its e x p a n s i v e glass d o o r s . A l t h o u g h t h e b u i l d i n g i n t e r i o r is still s o m e w a y f r o m being c o m p l e t e d , a l r e a d y t h e f a c i l i t y is p r o v i d i n g n e e d e d s p a c e f o r such w e l l - a t t e n d e d activities as d a n c e s , f i l m s , t h e a t r e and m u s i c . By f a r t h e g r e a t e s t c o n t r i b u t i o n will be in t h e area of t h e a t r e , w h e r e a versatile t h e a t r e - c o n c e r t l e c t u r e hall replaces an a n c i e n t a t t i c playhouse, a converted chapel and r o o m s that had been adapted for p e r f o r m a n c e s but originally d e s i g n e d f o r o t h e r p u r p o s e s . Most s t u d e n t s on c a m p u s , a n d m a n y f a c u l t y as well, p r o b a b l y never k n e w t h a t a s t u d e n t c u l t u r a l a n d social c e n t e r ( o n c e k n o w n as t h e SCSC) began as a s t u d e n t p r o j e c t . T h e idea was i n i t i a t e d by s t u d e n t s , t h e first f u n d s c a m e f r o m s t u d e n t p o c k e t s , and student fund-raising drives and p l a n n i n g was a i d e d by s t u d e n t o p i n i o n . T h e drive f o r t h e c e n t e r was o p e n e d O c t o b e r 9, 1 9 6 4 , with a s t u d e n t rally on t h e f r o n t lawn of t h e n - P r e s i d e n t Calvin A. VenderWerf's home. Almost immediately s t u d e n t s o r g a n i z e d c o m m i t t e e s to p u s h f o r an early c o n s t r u c t i o n d a t e . T h e c e n t e r b e c a m e t h e f o c u s of s t u d e n t a t t e n t i o n f o r m o n t h s , even y e a r s . A l u m n i , p a r e n t s a n d f r i e n d s of t h e college d o n a t e d m o n e y t o student projects.

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The reason ivhy by A r t B u c h w a l d T h e " W h y A r e We in V i e t n a m C o m m i t t e e , " o t h e r w i s e k n o w n as W A W I V N C , h e l d its m o n t h l y m e e t i n g at t h e S t a t e D e p a r t m e n t last w e e k , a n d f o r t h e first t i m e t h e r e was an air of p e s s i m i s m in t h e r o o m . As e v e r y o n e k n o w s , W A W I V N C was set u p m a n y y e a r s ago t o p r o v i d e P r e s i d e n t s of t h e U n i t e d S t a t e s w i t h solid r e a s o n s f o r A m e r i c a n i n v o l v e m e n t in V i e t n a m . SOME O F T H E R E A S O N S the c o m m i t tee has c o m e u p w i t h in t h e past are: A. T o h a l t C o m m u n i s t aggression f r o m the N o r t h . B. T o let R e d C h i n a k n o w we m e a n business. C. T o p r e v e n t S o u t h e a s t Asian c o u n tries f r o m falling like d o m i n o e s . D. T o k e e p A m e r i c a n b o y s f r o m h a v i n g t o fight o n t h e s h o r e s of H a w a i i . E. T o p r o v e t o H a n o i we are n o t a helpless g i a n t . F . T o m a k e sure t h e S o u t h V i e t n a m e s e p e o p l e c a n c h o o s e t h e i r o w n l e a d e r s in democratic elections. THIS L A S T O N E was e v e r y o n e ' s f a v o r - . ite. P r e s i d e n t N i x o n k e p t r e p e a t i n g it in every s p e e c h a b o u t I n d o c h i n a . S e c r e t a r y of State Rogers, Ambassador Ellsworth Bunker in S a i g o n a n d A m b a s s a d o r David B r u c e in Paris all said t h e s a m e t h i n g : ' T h e U n i t e d S t a t e s w a n t s n o t h i n g f o r itself. It is o n l y in S o u t h V i e t n a m to assure t h a t t h e p e o p l e t h e r e can d e c i d e t h e i r o w n f a t e . " Y o u c a n i m a g i n e w h a t h a p p e n e d at t h e W A W I V N C m e e t i n g w h e n t h e y w e r e inf o r m e d t h a t P r e s i d e n t T h i e u w o u l d be t h e o n l y o n e o n t h e b a l l o t in t h e p r e s i d e n t i a l e l e c t i o n s o n O c t o b e r 3. THE C H A I R M A N O F T H E c o m m i t t e e said, " G e n t l e m e n , I have j u s t h e a r d f r o m P r e s i d e n t N i x o n . H e is very d i s a p p o i n t e d t h a t n o o n e has c h o s e n t o r u n against P r e s i d e n t T h i e u a n d is o n c e again h a r d p u t t o e x p l a i n w h a t t h e U n i t e d S t a t e s is d o i n g in V i e t n a m . " "Well, it isn't o u r f a u l t t h a t Vice Presid e n t K y w o u l d n ' t r u n against T h i e u , o r t h a t G e n . M i n h b o w e d o u t of t h e race w e e k s a g o , " a n a s s i s t a n t s e c r e t a r y of p u b l i c affairs said.

" H o w did we k n o w t h a t T h i e u w o u l d rig t h e e l e c t i o n s so b a d l y t h a t even t h e o p p o s i t i o n w o u l d see t h r o u g h h i m ? " a US1A p s y c h o l o g i c a l w a r f a r e e x p e r t said. T H I E U S H O U L D H A V E w a r n e d Ky a n d M i n h t h a t t h e y e i t h e r had to run against h i m in d e m o c r a t i c e l e c t i o n s or t h e y w o u l d b e s h o t , " a C I A m a n said. ' T h a t ' s n o t t h e p o i n t , g e n t l e m e n , " the c h a i r m a n of t h e c o m m i t t e e said. " T h e fact is t h a t T h i e u is r u n n i n g a l o n e . T h i s is not o u r c o n c e r n e x c e p t t h a t since i t ' s n o w difficult for President Nixon to defend the A m e r i c a n p r e s e n c e in V i e t n a m t o g u a r a n tee f r e e e l e c t i o n s , we have to f i n d him a n o t h e r r e a s o n t o e x p l a i n w h y w e are still there. N o w t h i n k . " " S u p p o s e , " an A I D m a n said, " t h e P r e s i d e n t says t h e r e a s o n we are in V i e t n a m is t o p r o t e c t t h e A m e r i c a n d o l l a r ? " "I d o n ' t f o l l o w y o u . " " W E L L , WE A L L k n o w every high o f f i c i a l in t h e S o u t h V i e t n a m e s e g o v e r n m e n t h a s a secret Swiss b a n k a c c o u n t w h e r e h e has s t a s h e d a w a y m i l l i o n s of dollars. N o w , if t h e s e o f f i c i a l s t r a d e d t h e i r dollars in S w i t z e r l a n d f o r m a r k s o r F r e n c h f r a n c s w h i l e t h e d o l l a r is f l o a t i n g , it c o u l d h u r t us b a d l y . " B u t as long as we r e m a i n in S o u t h V i e t n a m t h e s e o f f i c i a l s will have f a i t h in u s a n d will k e e p t h e i r d o l l a r s in S w i t z e r l a n d . " "It's t o o c o m p l i c a t e d , " the chairman said. "I w a n t s o m e t h i n g s i m p l e . " " S U P P O S E WE S A Y w e ' r e in V i e t n a m because we must p r o t e c t f r e e d o m wherever it is f o u n d , " a P e n t a g o n m a n said. T h e r e was d e a d silence in t h e r o o m . F i n a l l y t h e c h a i r m a n said, " T h e r e has t o be a r e a s o n t h a t n o o n e has y e t t h o u g h t of." A State D e p a r t m e n t man scribbled s o m e t h i n g on a s h e e t of p a p e r a n d t h e n raised his h a n d . " T h i s is it. T h e P r e s i d e n t m u s t g o o n television t o m o r r o w night a n d tell t h e A m e r i c a n p e o p l e t h e o n l y r e a s o n w e are in V i e t n a m is b e c a u s e i t ' s t h e r e . " C o p y r i g h t 1971, Los Angeles Times


Hope College anchor

September 20,1971

P E T E R IS b e t r a y e d by the American d r e a m . He is the naturalist w h o wants to r e t u r n to N a t u r e , only to find that there is n o t h i n g to which he can return. He c a n n o t go to the w o o d s to find himself, because the w o o d s have been destroyed in o r d e r to plant s y m m e t r i c a l red, white and blue c o m m e m o r a t i v e gardens. Peter believes, like T h o r e a u , that N a t u r e o f f e r s the o p p o r t u n i t y to find h a r m o n y with the universe.

E d i t o r ' s n o t e : This w e e k ' s anchor review is written by critiques editor Kay H u b b a r d . She reviews Birds of America by Mary Mc Carthy (Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, $ 6 . 9 5 ) . Birds of America is a b o u t the betrayal of a y o u n g American s t u d e n t trying to live his life, according to the dicta of K a n t , by trusting everything good and b e a u t i f u l . Peter Levi is an introspective, t h o u g h t f u l , consciencestricken idealist w h o views with growing h o r r o r the decay of the moral and natural o r d e r . T H E BIRDS in the b o o k illustrate the betrayal. When Peter and his m o t h e r return to R o c k y Port a f t e r f o u r years they find that commercialization and m e c h a n i z a t i o n have t r a n s f o r m e d the s t u r d y New E n g l a n d town i n t o a tourist trap full of souvenier shops. The c o r m o r a n t s , which were Peter's favorite c o m panions during the last visit, are n o w h e r e to be f o u n d . T h e y have left the n o w u n f r i e n d l y shores. The owl in the wild life s a n c t u ary has died. But these changes can be explained by the n a t u r a l order: t h e c o r m o r a n t s are migra-

However, Peter has n o Walden P o n d , and the more he searches for a place where N a t u r e will n o t be " o r d e r e d and l a b e l e d , " the m o r e f r u s t r a t e d and hopeless he b e c o m e s . Without h a r m o n y with N a t u r e , Peter c a n n o t find harm o n y with himself. She is, a f t e r all, "his o t h e r m o t h e r , " and witho u t her he has n o f o u n d a t i o n and n o stability. ting and old animals o f t e n die. The really devastating incident with a bird h a p p e n s in Pans. A black swan a t t a c k s and nearly kills the bird-loving s t u d e n t . In the delirium b r o u g h t on by the infection Peter m e e t s his great c o u n selor, Kant, w h o i n f o r m s him o m i n o u s l y t h a t , " N a t u r e is d e a d , mein kind"

College hosts Japanese students during summer It d o e s n ' t h a p p e n o f t e n that s o m e o n e is surprised at t h e size of C h i c a g o - b e c a u s e it's " n o t so big a f t e r all." Nonetheless, it happ e n e d this s u m m e r w h e n 3 9 stud e n t s f r o m J a p a n , mostly T o k y o residents, participated in a fiveweek I n t e r n a t i o n a l S u m m e r Session at Hope. THE PROGRAM, sponsored by the Council on I n t e r n a t i o n a l E d u c a t i o n a l E x c h a n g e , began July 17 w h e n the group arrived in Holland following a t w o - w e e k G r e y h o u n d bus t o u r of the West. The s t u d e n t s left Hope August 21. U n d e r the leadership of Professor Utaka Hayashi of Meiji Gakuin University, T o k y o , and Miss Y o k o Narita, also of T o k y o , the J a p a n e s e s t u d e n t s had t o u r e d t h r o u g h Los Angeles, San Francisco and much of the S o u t h w e s t b e f o r e arriving in Kansas City, the j u m p - o f f point to H o l l a n d . D U R I N G T H E I R stay at Hope the s t u d e n t s a t t e n d e d classes in conversational English and heard lectures from five H o p e professors. T h e entire program at H o p e was directed by G. Larry Penrose, i n s t r u c t o r in h i s t o r y . Penrose was assisted by David Baas, head English i n s t r u c t o r , and s t u d e n t assistants Karin G r a n b e r g , w h o graduated f r o m Hope in 1966, Hope seniors J o h n T r a y l o r and G a r r e t t D e G r a f f , j u n i o r Kay Gae and s o p h o m o r e J o y c e Fisher. Each of the five lecturers presented a series of lectures in the area of their special interest in an e f f o r t t o s h o w , t h r o u g h these diverse areas, s o m e t h i n g of the American c h a r a c t e r and way of doing things, a c c o r d i n g to Penrose. T h e lectures also were part of the English i n s t r u c t i o n . D R . D O N A L D Williams, associate p r o f e s s o r of c h e m i s t r y , presented the first series of lectures on A m e r i c a ' s e n v i r o n m e n t a l crisis. Next t h e Japanese s t u d e n t s heard lectures on " E n v i r o n m e n t a l Politics" f r o m assistant p r o f e s s o r of

h i s t o r y , Earl Curry. In c o n j u n c tion with these lectures the group travelled t o C o n s u m e r ' s Power n u c l e a r generating p l a n t in S o u t h Haven and t o Lansing f o r a briefing f r o m a state official on the d y n a m i c s of Michigan p o l l u t i o n politics. T h e third series was f r o m assistant professor of t h e a t r e J o h n T a m m i on the American t h e a t r e . I n c l u d e d with this series was a trip t o G r a n d Rapids to see a t u m - o f the-century m e l o d r a m a . Under the Gaslight, p e r f o r m e d by a community-theatre group. THE URBAN Environment was Howard l a m s ' topic. T h e ins t r u c t o r in sociology focused on the d e v e l o p m e n t and present-day s t r u c t u r e of Chicago in preparation f o r t h e Chicago field trip, which included an overnight stay at the I n t e r n a t i o n a l House, Chicago University. Finally, associate dean for acad e m i c affairs and assistant professor of history Jack S t e w a r t att e m p t e d to outline the American Character in the f i f t h series. D U R I N G T H E last week the J a p a n e s e s t u d e n t s stayed with families in Holland. Mrs. N o r m a n T i m m e r , h o m e s t a y c h a i r m a n , was responsible f o r selecting the families and preparing t h e m f o r the students. According to the J a p a n e s e stud e n t s , h o m e s t a y , with its i n t i m a t e c o n t a c t with an entire American f a m i l y , is one of the most e n j o y able and rewarding aspects of the International Summer Session. Similarly the students were pleased to meet and befriend H o p e s t u d e n t s and t o w n s p e o p l e t h e y met during the five weeks. O N T H E E V E N I N G of August 7, the Japanese s t u d e n t s t o o k their American a q u a i n t a n c e s on a t h r e e and one-half h o u r trip t o t h e i r h o m e islands via individual and g r o u p p e r f o r m a n c e s of traditional and c o n t e m p o r a r y art f o r m s and several e x h i b i t i o n s .

C A P I T A L I S M has ravaged the world where Peter was c o m f o r t a b l e . Mass p r o d u c t i o n has m a d e bread readily accessible and very cheap, but the bread is flat and tasteless. It is n o longer the staff of l i f e - o r it is the staff of a very insubstantial life. The b o o k deals with political b e t r a y a l also. Peter campaigns f o r J o h n s o n , laughing at his m o t h e r because she " d o e s n ' t trust h i m h e ' s t o o c o m m o n . " He a t t a c k s her for longing f o r " t h e good old days when one could vote f o r N o r m a n T h o m a s . " But LBJ does n o t k e e p American Boys f r o m dying on

Asian shores as Peter had h o p e d he w o u l d . The final blow is the b o m b i n g of Hanoi which Peter sees as stupid and c o m p l e t e l y immoral. T H E MOST difficult betrayal for Peter to accept is his own betrayal of his image of himself. When he leaves Rocky Port to study at the S o r b o n n e he has what he thinks are all of the "right" credentials, including membership cards f o r SNCC, C O R E and SANE. He is an idealist and an egalitarian. In Paris he is appalled by the destruction of art objects by the F r e n c h revolutionaries; the masses of tourists, especially Americans, drive him to distraction; and the French clochards are t o o smelly to tolerate. Peter grows m o r e and more aware that his social and moral positions are not as pure as he would like to believe. He likens his own disillusionm e n t to 'Candide's; b u t , unlike the s t u d e n t of Pangloss, Peter has n o garden of his own to cultivate. MISS MC C A R T H Y ' S b o o k does not o f f e r any solutions to Peter's f r u s t r a t i o n . T h e p r o b l e m s are exposed w i t h o u t mercy. T h e little old garden club ladies w h o detest flowers and the m e r c e n a r y French c h a m b e r m a i d s are examples of the loss of vitality and h u m a n i t y in the m o d e r n world. T h e r e is m u c h a f f e c t i o n in s o m e of the o t h e r c h a r a c t e r i z a t i o n s especially Peter's m o t h e r , a twicedivorced harpsichordist w h o h a t e s

modem appliances (especially blenders) and goes t o jail for refusing to replace an historical plaque that she removes f r o m the h o m e they rent in R o c k y Port ^ but n o one is pure. T h e y are all victims of the d e c a d e n c e of o u r times. Although the b o o k is admittedly c o n c e r n e d with philosophical and moral issues, it never b e c o m e s totally intellectual and devoid of e m o t i o n . The characters and situations d o not seem cont r i v e d - i n fact, they may be, for some readers, t o o real for c o m fort.

Theatre to hold major production tryouts in DCC The Hope College t h e a t r e dep a r t m e n t will have t r y - o u t s for its first m a j o r p r o d u c t i o n M o n d a y and T u e s d a y , S e p t e m b e r 2 0 and 21, f r o m 7 to 10 p . m . in the main theatre in the DeWitt Cultural Center. The p l a y , ÂŤ n original work by play wright-in-residence Fred Gaines, will be the college's entrant in the American College T h e a t r e Festival. Several smaller shows will also be cast. The play will be p e r f o r m e d in the e x p e r i m e n t a l t h e a t r e in the new DeWitt Cultural C e n t e r . It will be the first d e p a r t m e n t a l prod u c t i o n in the new building.

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Criticism

of religion by Bob Blanton

O my soul, d o not aspire to i m m o r t a l life, but e x h a u s t the limits of the possible.Pindar, Pythian Hi Looking back through the prodigious vista of time, it is obvious that man has consistently, t h r o u g h the use of s o m e methodology or system of d o g m a , att e m p t e d to explain or give meaning to his existence. T h r o u g h o u t history he has d e m o n s t r a t e d his genius at creating m y t h s and believing in t h e m . He has c o n t i n u ally sought s o m e " h e a v e n l y " or " u n e a r t h l y " e x p l a n a t i o n f o r the r o u t i n e and d r u d g e r y , the pain and fear of this life. R E L I G I O N T H E N and n o w c o n t i n u e s to be the main f a c t o r involved in this p h e n o m e n a . Because there are many varieties of religion I will specify what religion I intend to w n t e a b o u t . T h e kind of religion which I shall consider is one in the J u d e o Christian tradition which, f o r the m o s t part, e q u a t e s religious faith with faith in G o d . I N T E L L E C T U A L L Y there is n o reason to s u p p o s e any religion t r u e , and judging by recent hist o r y , least of all Christianity. I c a n n o t say I believe in god or i m m o r t a l i t y . Nor d o I believe in Jesus as god's only b e g o t t e n son. T h e only thing that was b e g o t t e n was god and it was f r o m o u r insane imagination. I guess it is rather reassuring, f o r those of y o u w h o believe, to k n o w that there is a big b r o t h e r in the sky looking over y o u and y o u r

troubles. It also m u s t give y o u a good feeling t o k n o w that y o u will never die, b u t will have eternal life in heaven. However, it is not my i n t e n t i o n to seek w h a t is desirable or pleasant, as y o u who believe do, but rather t o seek what is true. Albert C a m u s was correct in saying, " I n all religions man is freed of the weight of his own life." T H E E X I S T E N C E of god is not of crucial i m p o r t a n c e here. 1 d o not pretend to be able to prove that there is no Christian god. (The burden of proof h o w e v e r rests with you w h o put f o r t h the idea.) I equally c a n n o t prove that Allah exists. In fact the w h o l e q u e s t i o n of the existence of any god is b e y o n d knowledge itself. However, s o m e t h i n g can be said a b o u t the p e r p e t u a t o r s of religious faith ( t h o s e c r e a t u r e s that are m a d e in the likeness of the creator). I s o m e t i m e s w o n d e r h o w a man or w o m a n can p r e t e n d to k n o w that which he does not k n o w . Quite simply I mean, h o w can a person in the a d m i t t e d absence of evidence f o r m d e f i n i t e conclus ions as to the m o d e in which existing f o r m s of life origin a t e d ? I d o n ' t k n o w . But, j u d g i n g by the m a n y people who believe in such ignorant religious assertions, it must be easy. P E R P E T U A T O R S of religious faith should u n d e r s t a n d that God and i m m o r t a l i t y ( t h e central dogmas of the Christian religion), find no s u p p o r t in science. N o t h i n g out of all the knowledge we have a c c u m u l a t e d suggests that there is

a G o d . People w h o believe in G o d do so on a purely e m o t i o n a l basis. They are not p r o n e to reason and definitely n o t backed by f a c t . All a r g u m e n t s t h a t I have h e a r d which claim to prove his existence have n o rational meaning. In conclusion, I would like to state the following: I can live with what I k n o w and d o not need to shape my life according to something I d o not k n o w and c a n n o t prove. I can accept the fact that I am alone in a world filled with people w h o are just as alone. I agree with Karl Marx w h o w r o t e : "Man makes religion, . . .religion is the self-consciousness and selffeeling of man w h o has e i t h e r not yet f o u n d himself or has already lost himself a g a i n . " Religion disuades man f r o m facing his h u m a n c o n d i t i o n . I AM NOT naive enough to believe t h a t appeals to reason can alter reality. People will c o n t i n u e to entertain ignorant beliefs and have them s t u f f e d b e t w e e n their ears. Why? Because they are desirable and pleasant (just as it ib pleasant to think ourselves virtuous and our enemies wicked). Mark Twain once wrote " T h e r e isn't a n y t h i n g so grotesque or so incredible t h a t the average h u m a n being can't believe i t . " Whether it be the belief tha f there is a God w h o created man heaven and earth or that Ultra Bright toothpaste gives y o u ! m o u t h sex-appeal, m a n has proven Twain correct.

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A dream DeWitt Ce b y Mary H o u t i n g Seven y e a r s ot i l r c a m s have b e c o m e e o n c r e t e reality as Ihe DeWitt ( u l t u r a l ( e n t e r o p e n s t o s t u d e n t s tor t h e first t u n e this tall "TIU-: B U I L D I N G s h o u l d be a d y n a m i c pi.ice it s h o u l d d e m a n d a t t e n t i o n , " said C l a r e n c e H a n d l o g t e n . e x e c u t i v e vice p r e s i d e n t ol the college. ' 1 t h i n k it d o e s what we were t r y i n g t o d o . "

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I \ c e p t lor the mhuuI and lighting e q u i p m e n t ot the t h e a t r e and a tew m i n o r t u r n i s h i n g s . Ihe e n t i r e c e n t e r will be c o m p l e t e d a n d r e a d y tor s t u d e n t use w i t h i n t w o t o t h r e e w e e k s , H a n d l o g t e n rep o r t e d . I he b u i l d i n g will be c o m pletely t u r n i s h e d m spite ol a S7l)().()()() d e b t , he a d d e d . T H E S 2 . 8 4 0 , 0 0 0 s t r u c t u r e was m a d e p o s s i b l e by t h e c r e a t i v i t y , i m a g i n a t i o n ami h a r d w o r k ol s t u d e n t s ami l a c u l t y . t h e c o n c e r n and c o o p e r a t i o n ol a d m i n i s t r a t o r s and t r u s t e e s , a n d the g e n e r o s i t y ol a l u m n i and p r i v a t e i n d i v i d u a l s . I h e b u i l d i n g b e a r s t h e n a m e ot Richard and Jack DeWitt, founders a n d o w n e r s ot Big D u t c h m a n C o r p . in / . e e l a n d , w h o d o n a t e d S7()(),00() t o w a r d its c o n s t r u c t i o n . I heir first gilt ot SMK),000 was the largest single gift e v e r received bv t h e c o l l e g e On a cool e v e n i n g in O c t o b e r , 1 ^ 6 4 , t h e D C C was c o n c e i v e d m the midst ot a mass rally on the lawn ot College P r e s i d e n t Calvin V a n d e r W e r t . M o m e n t s earlier, s t u d e n t s h a d p o u r e d o u t of the steaming, overcrowded "twist p i t , " a t e m p o r a r y u n i o n in D u r l e e Hall's J u l i a n a R o o m , a n d c o n g r e g a t e d on t h e P r e s i d e n t ' s l a w n t o d e m o n s t r a t e the need tor a "student cultural-recreational c e n t e r . " " W H A T H O P E College n e e d s is a p l a c e w h e r e a s t u d e n t can l o o s e n his b o w t i e , l a n d in a c o m f o r t a b l e chair and palaver a b o u t Homec o m i n g o v e r a c o u p l e c u p s ot c o f f e e with his girl.

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Social c e n t e r t o u n i f y the c a m p u s and the s t u d e n t b o d y . With its t h e a t r e , art gallery, snack bar, recreation area, bowling alleys, lounges, c l a s s r o o m s and b o o k s t o r e , the DCC fulfills all these needs. I HANDLOGTEN pointed out the " t r e m e n d o u s f l e x i b i l i t y " of the building, an aspect he feels can be easily missed. " T h e theatre, especially, with its e x c e e d i n g ly p o w e r f u l stage, s p e a k s to the

e d u c a t i o n a l p u r p o s e of the buildi n g , " he said. He added t h a t a l t h o u g h it has a s e a t i n g c a p a c i t y of only 6 0 0 , t h e t h e a t r e ' s small ^ h o u s e was purposely designed* that way to enc o u r a g e a u d i e n c e i n v o l v e m e n t . By m e a n s of a h y d r a u l i c - l i f t s y s t e m , the seating p l a t f o r m s in the f r o n t of the a u d i t o r i u m can be raised, l o w e r e d and m o v e d t o the side of the a u d i t o r i u m m a bleacher-like arrangement. In a d d i t i o n , t h e

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o r c h e s t r a p l a t f o r m can be manipulated h y d r a u l i c a l l y i n t o five different p o s i t i o n s . HENRY BOERSMA, supervisor of new c o n s t r u c t i o n and facilities f o r the College, revealed

that the h y d r a u l i c lift system presented p r o b l e m s during c o n s t r u c tion. " T h i s u n i q u e system . . .was a first e x p e r i e n c e of the a r c h i t e c t , t h e a t r e c o n s u l t a n t , seating m a n u f a c t u r e r ' s engi neer s and c o n t r a c t o r s . " he s l a t e d . Another problem encountered was that ot soil drainage due to the b a s e m e n i d e p t h required in the t h e a t r e p o r t i o n of the building. Boersma said. Because the b a s e m e n t is t w o feel below ihe average water table, it was necessary to remove w.j;er f r o m Ihe e x c a v a t i o n with six special p u m p s b e f o r e the l o o t i n g s could be laid. B O E R S M A stressed Ihe fact that m spile of ihe h a n d i c a p s enc'Uintered in c o m p l e t i n g const n u ti- .n. the e n t i r e building will have i v c n . . o n s t r u c t e d and ready tor sliiiKnt o c c u p a n c y within a 2 2 - m o n l h j v n o d Irom plannini: and c o n t r a , i awaids. " M a n y ot the total p i o b l c i n s m c o m p l e t i n g this s t r u c i u r e now seem so u n i m p o r t a n t when y o u have occasion t o see the terrific e n t h u s i a s m of the s t u d e n t b o d y alter having an o p p o r t u n i t y to view the facilities." he r e m a r k e d . "I personally am p r o u d to have had a part in c o m p l e t i n g this m a g n i f i c e n t s t r u c t u r e which is a terrific a d d i t i o n to the Hope ( ollege s t u d e n t facilities." Boersma added. B O E R S M A HAS been with the College since 1 1 >61. w h e n , with the i n t e n t i o n ot s e m i - r e t i r e m e n t , he a c c e p t e d an o i l e r to woik in the ("ollegc s m iintenance depart m e n t . 1 a t e i . d u e to the illness ol the d e p a r l m e n C s s i i p e i i n t e n d a n t . he assumed s u p c m s o i > u-sponsibihtics and the m a n a e c i i u n t of .ill college building facihiies. In early 1 ^ 6 9 Boersma was a p p o i n t e d by H a n d l o g t e n to his present p o s i t i o n , that of supervising all new c o n s t r u c t i o n and facilities. In a d d i t i o n , he o p e r a t e d as the College's liaison man for the DCC with t h e a r c h i t e c t , engi-

neers, c o n s t r u c t i o n contractors and g o v e r n m e n t agencies involved with the e r e c t i o n of the building. A N O T H E R U N I Q U E aspect of the building is its facilities for the handicapped, Boersma p o i n t e d out. R a m p s and elevators bring every part of the building within access of s o m e o n e c o n f i n e d to a wheelchair. Rest r o o m s have special facilities tor the h a n d i c a p p e d , including lowered mirrors and paper towel dispensers. A l t h o u g h the DCC c o n t a i n s s t u d e n t and faculty lounges, student activities rooms, a S t u d e n t Congress o f f i c e and a S t u d e n t P u b l i c a t i o n s o f f i c e , the m a j o r portion ot the building is d e v o t e d to lacilities for the p e r f o r m i n g arts. T H E A T R E w o r k s h o p and design areas a c c o m m o d a t e teaching .md p r o d u c t i o n r e q u i r e m e n t s . In a d d i t i o n to .i m e n ' s dressing r o o m , a ladies' dressing room and a guest artist's dressing r o o m , there are t h e a t r e o f f i c e s , a scenery l a y o u t r o o m , and t w o s e m i n a r r o o m s which can be c o n v e r t e d i n t o small rehearsal r o o m s . I he building also houses a " l i t t l e t h e a t r i " or "circle t h e a t r e , " a c o s t u m e 'orage and laundry r o o m , a scei. lanel storage r o o m a n d a w 'k* :op area, as well as the man and auditonuin. Since its c o r u v m 1 ( >64, s t u d e n t s have pl;o .\ey role in bringing the DC( > to reality, Beginning with a ni> .'est S.M)()0 tund-raising drive. .tude have raised over s 1 ()().()()() ihem elves, I hcv >old but tons, they >(> i a ted .i 'j.is s t a t i o n , they soli-, -t o n t ribuii..ns Irom then i studenis AS S T U D E N T S l v . .m to icali/e tlie p o w e r f u l possibilities ol u n i f i e d , responsible a c t i o n , what had begun as a f r u s t r a t i o n and a dream developed i n t o c o n c r e t e reality. D e d i c a t i o n c e r e m o n i e s will be held at 10 a . m . Oct. 23, H o m e c o m i n g Weekend.


Eight

Hope College anchor

Local resident brings civil suit against Hope continued from page 1 it was at this t i m e t h a t Mrs. Pollock filed suit. In the suit she charges that the variance was g r a n t e d on essentially the same evidence on which it had previously b e e n d en ied , t h a t the premises on which the c e n t e r is to be e r e c t e d have been d es ig n ated as residential, that rear and side yard set-backs have not been h o n o r e d , and t h a t the decision of the appeals board is c o n t r a r y t o law and s h o u l d be set aside by a Writ of S u p e r i n t e n d i n g C o n t r o l . Gillette s t a t e d , " I d e a l l y , we seek to get m o r e restrictions to p r o t e c t Mrs. P o l l o c k . " THE COLLEGE remains far f r o m Mrs. Pollock's price and a Writ of S u p e r i n t e n d i n g C o n t r o l c o u l d conceivably set back the college's building s c h e d u l e , or at

least place f u r t h e r restrictions on the science c e n t e r plans. Regardless of w h e t h e r it s t a n d s or falls, the h o u s e at 46 E. Graves Place is rapidly b e c o m i n g an issue on the H o p e and Holland political scene.

Institute wins grant for study T h e H o p e College I n s t i t u t e for E n v i r o n m e n t a l Q u a l i t y received a $ 1 9 , 9 2 0 grant in July f r o m the W. K. Kellogg F o u n d a t i o n of Battle Creek u n d e r their College Res o u r c e s for E n v i r o n m e n t a l S t u d i e s Program. T h e grant f u n d s will be used over a three year period to enable H o p e f a c u l t y and s t u d e n t s t o design and a d m i n i s t e r s t u d i e s of the Black River w a t e r s h e d .

S T U D E N T R E C A L C I T R A N C E W I N S - Y e a r s of student refusal to o b e y administrative a d m o n i t i o n s to stay o f f the grass finally bore fruit this past summer when the despots of first-floor Van Raalte Hall officially recognized certain hitherto illegitimate transportation routes by constructing sidewalks thereon.

WEieOME BACK TO HOLLAND A WARM WELCOME TO ALL NEW STUDENTS ! • LET US SUPPLY YOUR NEEDS ON A L L HEALTH AND BEAUTY AIDS • THE FOLLOWING REPRESENT A FEW OF OUR COUPON SPECIALS DESIGNED WITH YOU IN MIND.

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BURMA SHAVE SHAVE CREAM

HOT PANTS COLOGNE

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DRIFT & DREAM BATH OIL 8 oz.

35

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September 2 0 , 1971

H

'

Hope College anchor

The freshman female Editor's Note: Former anchor editor Gerald Swieringa takes a humorous look at Flope's freshman women, a subject upon which he, in his several years at Flope, has become expert.

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Ladies, y o u r day has arrived. Equality has been u s u r p e d ; w e have w i t h f o r b e a r a n c e and humility relinquished o u r position as the d o m i n a n t g e n d e r and left wide o p e n the d o o r t o f e m i n i n e pillage. With a c u r s o r y glance through the new Felicitations you will find that y o u o u t n u m ber y o u r m o r e m a s c u l i n e coh o r t s by the ridiculous ratio of six to f o u r . Oh, it was a dark day indeed w h e n the a g e n t s of recruit faltered b e f o r e t h a t caustic e n t r a p m e n t of lace and perf u m e . Let it not be said they went d o w n fighting, n o t h e y fell with heavy b r e a t h i n g . BUT TO T H E victors, the spoils. You have inherited o u r campus, and we in d e f e a t here o f f e r an inventory of y o u r possessions. You have, first of all, the males of y o u r o w n class. Simple, gullible, they will be easy victims f o r w h a t e v e r wiles y o u r charms promote. You'll find them at the mixers, clustered a b o u t an athlete or t w o , h o p i n g to catch the. off-fall f r o m his bicepts. Be wary of their restless

Dutch organist to give recital Tuesday evening Wim V a n d e r P a n n e , an internationally k n o w n organist f r o m the N e t h e r l a n d s , will present a concert Tuesday, at 8 p.m. V a n d e r P a n n e has had several successful c o n c e r t t o u r s in the N e t h e r l a n d s and E u r o p e , and in 1966 he p r e s e n t e d a series of very well received recitals in t h e United States. T h e receipt of m a n y invitations f o r return e n g a g e m e n t s led t o the decision t o organize a t o u r this fall. At p r e s e n t V a n d e r P a n n e is s t u d y i n g special i n t e r p r e t a t i o n s of old and m o d e r n F r e n c h music with Jan Langlais in Paris. Previously he had studied organ with the f a m o u s Dutch t e a c h e r Feike Asma, served as organist and choir master at the Vaste Burcht (Mighty Fortress) C h u r c h in Voorburg, a s u b u r b of the Hague, and c o n t i n u e d his studies with Flor Peeters of Belgium and A r n o S c h o n s t e d t of G e r m a n y .

smiles, their f u r t i v e glances and strained conversations. F o r w h o k n o w s w h a t evil lurks in t h o s e e m p t y m i n d s , w h o k n o w s to what extremes the friendless waif f r o m H o b o k e n will go to achieve success, a c c e p t a n c e , t o c o n f r o n t his social apotheosis. THEY'VE HEARD much a b o u t y o u , y o u see. All t h r o u g h their f o r m a t i v e years y o u have been here waiting f o r t h e m , the college b r o a d , sensual, seductive, with m o r a l s c o m m e n s u r a t e with her bust size. T h e y ' v e sharpened a few eye t e e t h thinking of y o u . And n o w here they are, lean and h u n g r y . H o w are they to k n o w t h a t y o u ' r e the same dull, witless c h i c k s t h e y went t o high s c h o o l with. No, their comprehension of time and place is shattered o n c e t h e y step in the registration line. But if t h e p r e c e d e n t holds, you will ignore this warning and find yourself w r a p p e d in his c l u t c h e s even as he is w r a p p e d in yours. Well, so be it. It will not last long, his ignorance c o u p l e d with y o u r naivete will soon e n o u g h end this fleeting attair in d i s e n f r a n c h i s e m e n t and disillusion. Despair not, you have only begun to s a m p l e the g o o d s awaiting y o u . YOU WILL SEE him, standing t h e r e alone in t h e Pine Grove, his wrinkled hat cast slightly o f f - c e n t e r , his j e a n s torn and r u m p l e d , a cigarette casually lopping f r o m his n e t h e r lip. He's d i f f e r e n t , he carries no Introduction to Liberal Studies u n d e r his arm, n o neatly stenciled H o p e T-shirt over his back. And if you're c a u t i o u s . and silent y o u might creep u p behind his b a c k , waiting in awe for his voice, t h o s e few well chosen w o r d s t h a t will tell y o u what y o u have only begun t o suspect, only b e g u n in y o u r wildest d r e a m s to a n t i c i p a t e , an upperclassman. "I lied a b o u t t h a t , I lied o u t of s p i t e . " W h a t ' s t h a t he's say-

ing? Surely it's not Whitehead, J a s p e r s was never so succinct. It m u s t be, but n o it c o u l d n ' t be, but yes it is, it's D o s t o e v s k y . At last, a mind t o challenge y o u r o w n . You m a y run, you may skip, y o u may linger beside the b u s h e s of Van R a l t e e just for a sight of him. But you w o n ' t speak to him, not yet. F o r first you must be w o r t h y of so high and mighty an intellect. You read, you s t u d y , you stretch the very limits of h u m a n understanding just f o r a w o r d , a c h a n c e to converse with greatness. AND T H E N IT happens, he k n o c k s y o u r b o o k s over. From t h e n on its a mad cycle of f r a t e r n i t y p o k e r games, record hops, c l a n d e s t i n e meetings in the Kletz until you are fairly blinded by the d e p t h of his e x p e r i e n c e . Ah, sweet rom a n c e , w h o would have t h o u g h t it could be so simple, that life could be so full? By now y o u have plucked t w o gems f r o m t h e crown of H o p e ; what m o r e could be left, u n c u t , t e m p t i n g and unpolished in so rich a q u a r r y ? AT F I R S T HE c a m e on kind of strong, a lot of rhetoric you t h o u g h t , not m u c h d e p t h , u p there with his brief-case and neatly ordered notes. Oh, his lectures were well p r e s e n t e d , but he seemed so uninvolved, so removed f r o m the e x t r e m e s of passion. T h e n there was that night w h e n he invited the class over f o r beer and discussion, at his place, h i d d e n deep in the Wauk a z o o woods. Was it t h e fire, the a m b e r scent of falling leaves, the wash of the lake beside his yacht that s o m e h o w told you he was the o n e ? " H e really has his head t o g e t h e r , " y o u tell y o u r roommate, and set off in pursuit of the choicest of the choice, y o u r professor. SO YOU W O R K hard to ace his course and w h e n he gives

WELCOME

Ah, sweet r o m a n c e , w h o would have t h o u g h t it could be so simple, that life could be so full? you a B, well, it's just because he's playing hard to get. It's really not u n t i l he a n n o u n c e s his e n g a g e m e n t to a Clemson grad s t u d e n t w o r k i n g on her PhD in a n t h r o p o l o g y that y o u admit failure. All alone n o w , having rejected and having been rejected, you begin to take a c c o u n t of y o u r life. T h e sweetness of inn o c e n c e , h o w s o o n it vanishes, how like the May fly it spreads

its frail wings for a short-lived day and is gone. There is n o t h ing left, n o t h i n g except vengeance. Hail to thee, Bette F r i e d e n , clench y o u r fist in anger ye trampled and despised sex, this is the d a y of y o u r c o m e u p a n c e . And o u r simple corn-fed cutie, where is she? Brandishing the t o k e n s of her slavery, a vigilante for e q u a l i t y .

STUDENTS

Ebilink Flowers and Gifts welcomes you to Holland For that special time, call us to order beautiful corsages especially made for that special person. Welcome Hope Students

Call 396-5258 Ebilink Flowers and Gifts

Pierced Ear Rings Suede Purses $6.98 - $7.98 Straw Flowers POSTERS Mugs $ 1 . 0 0 ea. Be Sure T o VISIT the

238 River Ave.

A p o t h e c A p y Q l f t

"/7# fc/e Sell 9i 4uk"

B e h i n d the Model Drug Store

OPEN 9 a . m . - 9 p.m. Mon. and Fri. 9 a.m.-5:30 p.m. l u e s , and Thurs. CLOSED W E D N E S D A Y

TZeiiabie -RENTALSSchwinn Raleigh Columbia BIKES

CYCLE & 254 River Ave. at 11th St.

Honda Motorcycles

Reformed Church in America MILWAUKEE AUDITORIUM â&#x20AC;˘ MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN â&#x20AC;˘ OCTOBER 6-9,1971

VILLAGE INN PIZZA PARLOR

Further

Part Time Male or Female

5

BETWEEN 2-4

-ACCESSORIESHollands most complete Ski Shop Hart-K 2-Yamaha

-SERVICE-

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APPLY A T 934 S. W A S H I N G T O N

s h o p

Information Available

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and in

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Blanks

15

" S E E K I N G A NEW C O M M I T M E N T TO AN U N F I N I S H E D T A S K "


Ten

Hope College anchor

September 20, 1971

Jackson: from prison grey to orange and bine by Eileen Verduin

DIRECTOR OF S T U D E N T ACTIVITIES JOHN JACKSON

LARGEST SELECTION OF R E G U L A R A N D C O N T E M P O R A R Y GREETING CARDS IN A L L WESTERN M I C H I G A N GIFTS OF A L L KINDS Piggy banks Snoopy and Peanuts things Party goods Little books

See our FABULOUS COLLECTION of fine m i TING PAPERS by Eaton Mon tag Hallmark

T h e carpet is newly laid and still littered with pieces of packing materials and tracked-in leaves. Shiny plastic tables have been placed in a p a t t e r n of perfect symmetry across the floor and clustered snuggly around each are four new chairs. E V E R Y FEW m i n u t e s , g r o u p s of awed s t u d e n t s s t e p f e a r f u l l y inside t h e door, look cautiously in all f o u r d i r e c t i o n s , and then leave with silent reverence. It is the day b e f o r e the official o p e n i n g of the DeWitt Cultural Center. Inside, it is new, it is quiet, and the general aura is o n e of strange i n c o m p l e t e n e s s , somehow causing one to q u e s t i o n his right to be within the walls. T h e r e is o n e person however w h o m o v e s with assurance t h r o u g h t h e " N o A d m i t t a n c e " signs and sits in the new chairs with as m u c h ease and relaxation as if t h e y had been t r a n s p o r t e d f r o m his own living room. THIS P E R S O N IS J o h n Jackson, the energetic a n d , in his o w n words, " i m p u l s i v e " y o u n g man w h o has b e c o m e the new d i r e c t o r of s t u d e n t activities and general manager of t h e C u l t u r a l Center. New experiences and surr o u n d i n g s have b e c o m e almost second n a t u r e to J a c k s o n . Alt h o u g h claiming T h r e e Rivers, Mich, as his h o m e , he spent his s u m m e r s as a y o u t h on Chicago's s o u t h side "That's w h e r e 1 really grew u p ! " he explained t o the anchor with a grin that seems rarely to leave his face. J A C K S O N R E V E A L E D that f r o m Three Rivers he moved on to Western Michigan University in K a l a m a z o o w h e r e he received his degree in music e d u c a t i o n . He then a c c e p t e d a position as b a n d d i r e c t o r in Bangor, Mich. " A n d t h e n . . . " he c o n t i n u e d his discourse with a n o t e of rising suspense, grinning widely w i t h the e n j o y m e n t of leaving his listners hanging in Bangor w h e n s o m e t h i n g vital seemed to be l o o m i n g j u s t over the next hori-

SPEC1AL

ONE OF THE LARGEST SELECTIONS OF SCMOOL SUPPLIES IN WESTERN MICHIGAN

M O N E Y BACK GUARANTEE ON A L L WE SELL

TO INCOMING

it would be a real acid test of my stability as a person and m y capabilities as a t e a c h e r . " A f t e r f o u r years at F o l s o m , J a c k s o n came to his present position at Hope. THE ADJUSTMENTS from life in prison to life at H o p e are more difficult than m o s t stud e n t s would assume. " M y biggest task is going to be cleaning u p my l a n g u a g e , " J a c k s o n confided. " T h e F r e n c h is so bad in an all male s i t u a t i o n . I'm really scared of b l o w i n g things in the

t e a c h e r s ' l o u n g e or somewhere some d a y ! " S u d d e n l y as the c a m e r a clicked next to his ear, J a c k s o n realized that the interview had taken on a s o m e w h a t f o r m a l note for t h e span of at least a few m i n u t e s . " T h a t ' s m y worst profile, y o u k n o w , " he advised. "If you want me to look good, you ought to stand way over on that side. Just let me m a k e sure my hair is on s t r a i g h t , " he g r i n n e d , bringing his h a n d s up to the l u t t s of A f r o p r o t r u d i n g f r o m the sides of his head SO THAT'S my story." J a c k s o n c o n c l u d e d , letting his eyes scan the room o n e more time, like a f a r m e r surveying the lield he's just c u l t i v a t e d in prep a r a t i o n for sowing. "I love this b u i l d i n g , " he e x p l a i n e d . "I have caressed this building. 1 know it's new, it's d i f f e r e n t , it must still be a c c e p t e d . But it's gonna be what the s t u d e n t s m a k e it." With these words, plus a few parting one-liners f o r a laugh. J a c k s o n picked up his briefcase and straightened his tie. A group of s t u d e n t s e n c o u n t e r e d him as he was p r e p a r i n g to leave. " A r e y o u g o n n a be the guy of this b u i l d i n g ? " they asked. "1 sure a m ! " he grinned and p r o c e e d e d to exit w i t h o u t having to look a r o u n d to see where he was going.

FRESHMEN

GOOD NEWS FOR ALL PEOPLE WHO WEAR PANTS r\

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MR. GUY IS HA VING A BOTTOM

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SALE

c We cash persons! checks

zon. "And then . . . I got a bug to move. T o C a l i f o r n i a . " A l t h o u g h he planned to continue teaching music, he was offered a position as music director at F o l s o m prison. "I guess I took the iob because 1 t h o u g h t

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H o p e College anchor

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Wilson grants discontinued T h i s fall, f o r the first t i m e in m o r e t h a n 2 0 years, there will be n o W o o d r o w Wilson Fellowship c o m p e t i t i o n . A C C O R D I N G T O H. R o n a l d Rouse, National D i r e c t o r of the W o o d r o w Wilson N a t i o n a l Fellowship Foundation, "Funds c u r r e n t l y available to the F o u n d a t i o n f o r first year g r a d u a t e fellowships are being used to s u p p o r t over 2 0 0 F e l l o w s d u r i n g the 1971-72 academic year. P r o s p e c t s f o r securing new f u n d s are u n c e r t a i n . "During the c o m i n g year, trustees and o f f i c e r s of the F o u n d a t i o n in c o o p e r a t i o n with representatives of the a c a d e m i c world, will design a new fellowship program taking into ac-

c o u n t recent d e v e l o p m e n t s in g r a d u a t e e d u c a t i o n and in t h e t e a c h i n g p r o f e s s i o n , and seek f u n d s f o r this n e w p r o g r a m , " he stated THE WILSON FeUowships are only o n e of a n u m b e r of p r o g r a m s t h r o u g h o u t the country which have s u f f e r e d f r o m t h e recent decline in fellowship s u p p o r t . R o u s e said. T h e U. S. g o v e r n m e n t , which in 1967 supp o r t e d nearly 1 1 , 0 0 0 f e l l o w s h i p s f o r beginning g r a d u a t e s t u d e n t s , has r e d u c e d or eliminated several programs. It will provide only a b o u t 1,500 new fellowships for 1972-73. At the same time m a n y state g o v e r n m e n t s have similarly reduced the a m o u n t of

Pedagogist Robert Pace to hold piano seminar T h e Hope College music dep a r t m e n t , in c o n j u n c t i o n w i t h the National Piano F o u n d a t i o n , will present a p i a n o seminar Wednesday featuring internationally k n o w n pianist and pedagogist R o b e r t Pace. T h e seminar will be held at the N y k e r k Hall of Music on the Hope c a m p u s f r o m 9 a.m. t o 1 p . m . T h e seminar p r o g r a m will feature f o u r areas: c u r r e n t t r e n d s in p i a n o teaching; music t h a t m a k e s friends, n o t e n e m i e s ; achieving greater effectiveness in private s t u d i o s and school music p r o grams t h r o u g h group p i a n o ins t r u c t i o n ; moving ahead with o u r professions. Pace, long active in t h e field of music, has d e d i c a t e d his c a r e e r t o p e r f o r m i n g , lecturing, and t e a c h ing musicianship at the p i a n o . Since 1952 he has been in charge of p i a n o i n s t r u c t i o n at T e a c h e r s College, C o l u m b i a University, and in 1963 assumed the position of e d u c a t i o n a l d i r e c t o r of the N a t i o n a l P i a n o F o u n d a t i o n . He h a s been p i a n o e d i t o r of the Music Journal and p i a n o c h a i r m a n of the Music E d u c a t o r s N a t i o n a l Conference. Pace's o u t s t a n d i n g success in group p i a n o teaching has led t o

his writing m a n y college t e x t s and music b o o k s on the s u b j e c t . His ideas have been discussed widely on television and radio, and in n a t i o n a l and foreign n e w s p a p e r s and magazines. T h e r e is n o charge f o r particip a n t s . I n f o r m a t i o n and enrollm e n t cards are available at the music d e p a r t m e n t o f f i c e .

support t h e y provide, and a n u m b e r of pr ogr ams f i n a n c e d by c o r p o r a t i o n s and private f o u n d a tions have b e e n d i s c o n t i n u e d . AS A RESULT of rapid growth of graduate schools, m o r e Ph.D.'s have been prod u c e d this year than can be placed, Rouse a d d e d . T h e economic recession and the recent wave of anti-academic s e n t i m e n t across the c o u n t r y have combined to reduce drastically the a m o u n t of m o n e y ^ available f o r college f a c u l t y salaries. As a result of these t w o f a c t o r s the demand f o r college teachers has d r o p p e d just at t h e t i m e w h e n the s u p p l y is increasing. Y o u n g people planning f o r academic careers should m a k e flexible plans. R o u s e advised. It is unlikely that t h e y can e x p e c t to step o n t o the fellowship escalator and be carried s m o o t h l y up t h r o u g h t h e Ph.D. and i n t o an a c a d e m i c post, he said. Many may wish to secure c e r t i f i c a t i o n for s e c o n d a r y s c h o o l t e a c h i n g t o provide an alternative, e i t h e r temporary or permanent, to doctoral work. T h e M.A. is still the a c c e p t e d p r e p a r a t i o n f o r teaching in m o s t j u n i o r and c o m m u n i t y colleges, and s t u d e n t s headed f o r graduate s c h o o l should consider careers in this rapidly e x p a n d i n g sector, he added.

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Twelve

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Hope College anchor

September 20, 1971

Franklin hands Dutch 35-25 setback in opener by Merlin Whiteman The H o p e .College football m a c h i n e , while s h o w i n g t h a t t h e y have p r o m i s e and are a t e a m to be r e c k o n e d with in the Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Associa t i o n , lost to F r a n k l i n College 35-25 Saturday before 3,313 D u t c h fans. A l t h o u g h e x h i b i t i n g o u t s t a n d i n g play at t i m e s , mist a k e s and t u r n o v e r s cost H o p e t h e game. GRÂŁG VOSS picked up where he left o f f last y e a r against T a y l o r . Voss b r o k e o n e of his o w n r e c o r d s S a t u r d a y , as he amassed

s

F O O T B A L L COACH R A Y SMITH

2 5 7 y a r d s in 4 0 carries to set a new single g a m e rushing record. He also f u m b l e d f o r t h e first t i m e in his H o p e c a r e e r ; but it s h o u l d be n o t e d t h a t Voss received hard tackling all d a y , as he will for t h e rest of the s e a s o n - a m a r k e d m a n . J o n C o n s t a n t a d d e d t o the 5 2 4 t o t a l y a r d s H o p e had o n o f f e n s e by c o m p l e t i n g 10 of 16 passes for 115 y a r d s and o n e t o u c h d o w n . U n f o r t u n a t e l y , lapses in D u t c h b l o c k i n g gave F r a n k l i n linemen an o p p o r t u n i t y to prove that Cons t a n t ' s k n e e s are c o m p l e t e l y o k a y . THE GAME o p e n e d with Ho p e receiving. T h e kick-off was followed by a flurry of e x c h a n g e s . When F r a n k l i n gained possession of the ball a f t e r the third exchange of the g a m e , t h e y wasted little time in s c o r i n g t h e g a m e ' s first t o u c h d o w n . A 30-yard pass play f r o m Phil Powell to Bill Bollier with 2 : 3 6 t o go in the first q u a r t e r was one of 19 Powell completed Saturday. The extra point was g o o d . Ho p e had the ball only t w o plays b e f o r e t u r n i n g it back over t o F r a n k l i n o n a f u m b l e . However, Bob L a m e r i n t e r c e p t e d the ball back on the very n e x t play. H o p e o p t i m i s m was s h o r t l i v e d , as Dan Wagner cut in f r o n t of end Jim L a m e r t o snare a pass and race 26 y a r d s u n m o l e s t e d for Franklin's second score. F R A N K L I N GOT the ball right back with g o o d field position when H o p e had a s h o r t p u n t a f t e r a bad s n a p . F r a n k l i n , m a k i n g the most of its o p p o r t u n i t i e s , scored

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R E C O R D S E T T E R - H o p e tailback Greg Voss rambles for a sizeable gain against Franklin Saturday. Voss gained a total of 2 5 7 yards in 4 0 carries during the game, setting a n e w single g a m e rushing record for the college. Franklin managed a hard-earned 3 5 - 2 5 victory over the Dutch. on t h e f i f t h play of that series. Ron Doyle s c a m p e r e d 27 y a r d s for a six-point tally t o m a k e t h e score 20-0 with 9 : 3 0 t o go in t h e s e c o n d q u a r t e r . It l o o k e d like a repeat of last y e a r ' s g a m e at this point. F r a n k l i n kicked o f f and H o p e p r o c e e d e d to move d o w n the field for a score. Voss carried t h e ball across on a f o u r y a r d gallop. T h e extra p o i n t was n o g o o d . H o p e

Open season Tues.

Harriers have high hopes H o p e College's cross c o u n t r y t e a m , s p o r t i n g a new c o a c h , a new cross c o u n t r y c o u r s e , three very p r o m i s i n g f r e s h m e n , and a fast t r a n s f e r s t u d e n t , has a good c h a n c e of w i n n i n g their first conference title since their sole win in 1953. F o r m e r soccer coach Bill Vanderbilt r e t u r n s a f t e r a y e a r ' s leave of a b s e n c e to take u p the reins of the l o n g - d i s t a n c e runners. He welc o m e s l e t t e r m e n Ron B u l t e m a , G e n e H a u l e n b e e k , Nick K r a m e r ,

Bob S c o t t and Marty S t a r k . However, while these five r u n n e r s will be vital for a n y c o n f e r e n c e h o p e s , the t e a m ' s f o r t u n e s will rest primarily on the s h o u l d e r s of f o u r new faces. T h e first of these new faces is j u n i o r Greg Daniels, a transfer s t u d e n t w h o was ineligible last season. Greg is n o t necessarily a new face in the Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association; last spring he t o o k the c o n f e r e n c e two-mile title. In a d d i t i o n t o Dan-

Soccer team stomped by Spring Arbor, 6-0 T h e F l y i n g D u t c h m a n soccer team o p e n e d their season Saturday at S p r i n g Arbor. H o w e v e r , like the f o o t b a l l t e a m , the soccer t e a m ' s o p e n e r was m a r r e d by a loss. H o p e was d e f e a t e d 6-0. Hope, d rather young team, t o o k o n l y eight s h o t s o n the S p n n g A r b o r goal. In c o m p a r i s o n , their o p p o n e n t s had 25 s h o t s at H o p e ' s n e t . S p r i n g A r b o r h a d excellent play f r o m t w o of their h a l f b a c k s . T h e D u t c h were s i m p l y outplayed. Soccer coach Gene Brown greeted nine l e t t e r m e n w h e n preseason p r a c t i c e began. T h e y in-

cluded Rich L o p e z , all-Michigan Intercollegiate A t h l e t i c Association as a f r e s h m a n last y e a r , as well as c a p t a i n T o m G r u n d v i g . A d d i t i o n a l l e t t e r m e n are Neal Bangs, Erie B r o w n , Neal DePaoli, Carlos D e N a s c i m e n t o , Evan Griffin, A1 Havinga and J o h n Van Deursen. Last year the D u t c h were MIAA c o - c h a m p s with Calvin. A repeat this year will take considerable w o r k and o u t s t a n d i n g play f r o m the new players. N e x t game for the b o o t e r s is this Friday at Lake F o r r e s t . T h e first h o m e contest is Sept. 28 against Schoolcraft.

Student Activities Sept. 2 0 - S e p f . 2 6 Tuesday, Sept. 21

Cross Country Hope Invitational

4:30 p.rrk Home

4

iels, H o p e has three fine f r e s h m a n r u n n e r s . Phil Ceeley, a 9 : 3 5 t w o miler f r o m Royal Oak, R a n d y L a w r e n c e , a local b o y f r o m West O t t a w a , and Glen P o w e r s of Scotia, New Y o r k , are b e i n g c o u n t e d u p o n for g o o d times. In pre-season p r a c t i c e and the t e a m ' s i n t e r s q u a d r u n , these f o u r r u n n e r s have p r o v e d close c o m p e t i t o r s . A s e c o n d g r o u p of runners, ususally finishing a r o u n d a m i n u t e and a half f u r t h e r b a c k than t h e first, will n o d o u b t fight it o u t for the n e x t three fastest times on the t e a m . This s e c o n d g r o u p i n c l u d e s K r a m e r , Stark and S c o t t . T o fill o u t a t o p t e n , o n e would p r o b a b l y i n c l u d e B u l t e m a , Jim M a c i e j k o and possibly Haul e n b e e k . Jeff Booi, Bruce King and Tim V a n d e r H a a r have also been in the top ten at one t i m e or another during practice. T h e t e a m ' s first m e e t is a big one. T u e s d a y Hope h o s t s the f i f t h annual Hope College I n v i t a t i o n a l at their new c o u r s e , the Winding Creek Golf Course which is located on East 3 2 n d Street in H o l l a n d . The field i n c l u d e s def e n d i n g MIAA c h a m p i o n Alma, as well as Calvin, K a l a m a z o o , Aquinas, Ferris S t a t e , G r a n d Valley, S p n n g A r b o r and T r i n i t y Christian. T h e meet will s t a r t at 4 p . m .

q u i c k l y regained the ball on a F r a n k l i n f u m b l e and scored o n c e m o r e . This t i m e . C o n s t a n t t h r e w a T D pass to s t i c k y - f i n g e r e d Jim Lamer. The extra point attempt again failed and the half e n d e d 20-12. F R A N K L I N received at the s t a r t of the s e c o n d half, b u t had t o p u n t a f t e r failing t o a d v a n c e the ball. H o p e f u m b l e d , regained possession on a n o t h e r Bob L a m e r i n t e r c e p t i o n , p u n t e d , and regained possession again on a p u n t partially b l o c k e d by Ron P o s t h u m a . However, Hope fumbled once again. Franklin r e c o v e r e d , and scored ten plays later when Bollier c a u g h t his s e c o n d t o u c h d o w n pass of the a f t e r n o o n . H o p e was n o t dead y e t , and p r o m p t l y m a r c h e d d o w n the field.

With 9 : 4 5 to go in the fourth q u a r t e r . C h u c k B r o o k s ran 17 long, evasive y a r d s for a score. T h e try f o r t w o failed. HOPE GOT the ball b a c k , only t o lose it on still a n o t h e r f u m b l e . Again Franklin capitalized on H o p e ' s e r r o r s and scored on a t o u c h d o w n pass f r o m Powell to Keith F i e d l e r with 1:47 left in the final q u a r t e r . T h e D u t c h m e n were t o score o n c e m o r e , h o w e v e r . With less t h a n a m i n u t e and a half t o go, H o p e ' s s e c o n d o f f e n s i v e team s p r i n t e d d o w n the field, in a drive highlighted by Ed S a n d e r ' s amazingly q u i c k r u n n i n g ( 5 0 y a r d s in 4 carries) and finished o f f by a B o b Car l son to Ted Albrecht t o u c h d o w n pass. T h e e x t r a point a t t e m p t by Mike Hinga wa's good. This last score m a d e the final o u t c o m e F r a n k l i n 3 5 , H o p e 25. Next w e e k the D u t c h m e n ent e r t a i n a n o t h e r t e a m f r o m Ind i a n a . G a m e t i m e f o r n e x t week's e n c o u n t e r with Wabash College of C r a w f o r d s v i l l e , I n d i a n a , is 2 p.m.

Student records placed in t u n n e l s to prevent loss T h e m i c r o f i l m e d r e c o r d s of 20,000 former Hope students have b e e n d e p o s i t e d in a h u m i d ity and t e m p e r a t u r e c o n t r o l l e d storage room 85 feet u n d e r ground in a former Grand R a p i d s plaster m i n e by Registrar John Huisken. T h e u n d e r g r o u n d storage area is m a i n t a i n e d by the U n d e r g r o u n d S e c u r i t y C o m p a n y and i n c l u d e s six miles of t u n n e l s which have been c o n v e r t e d i n t o s t o r a g e space. T h e t u n n e l s are o w n e d by t h e Michigan N a t u r a l Storage C o m p a n y . The s t u d e n t records, w h i c h d a t e back 3 0 years, were converted into five rolls of microfilm f r o m g r a d e cards s t o r e d in several file c a b i n e t s in the regist r a r ' s o f f i c e . T h e college, w h i c h plans to retain t h e grade cards, had its r e c o r d s m i c r o f i l m e d as a p r e c a u t i o n in case of fire or theft.

Cliff Haverdink most valuable MIAA trackman H o p e College j u n i o r Cliff Have r d i n k was n a m e d in J u n e the Michigan I n t e r c o l l e g i a t e Athletic A s s o c i a t i o n ' s m o s t valuable trackm a n for 1 9 7 1 . Haverdink h o l d s the Hope t r a c k r e c o r d s in t h e 4 4 0 - y a r d dash (:48.3), the 220-yard dash ( : 2 1 . 5 ) , a n d the 100-yard dash ( : 9 . 6 ) and ran the a n c h o r leg on the D u t c h m e n ' s r e c o r d 4 4 0 - y a r d relay t e a m ( : 4 2 . 9 ) . In t h e 1971 MIAA Field Day m e e t he w o n the 4 4 0 - y a r d dash and finished third in the 2 2 0 - y a r d d a s h . He has c l a i m e d five MIAA gold m e d a l s during his collegiate career.

HOPE STUDENTS, WELCOME TO H O L L A N D AND AN EXCITING COLLEGIATE YEAR IN YOUR LEISURE MOMENTS, WHY DON'T YOU STOP IN A N D EYE OUR LATEST IN FASHIONS TO MAKE THE REAL YOU,

Friday, Sept. 24

Saturday, Sept. 25

Film Series Presentation Endless Summer

Football Wabash

Soccer Lake Forrest Film Series Presentation Endless Summer

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09-20-1971