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VOL. N O .

Hope welcomes global students

What didyou do this summer? "I killed 10 d w a r v e s and t w o dragons while guarding m a i d e n s as a lifeguard, but also, 1 had an internship doing graphic d e s i g n . " -Christoff Visscher ' 1 2

Gretchen Baldwin STAFF W R I T E R

The last w e e k e n d in August m a r k e d t h e e n t r a n c e of a r o u n d 750 first-year s t u d e n t s into H o p e College. T w e n t y of these new arrivals were international s t u d e n t s - four-year, full-time s t u d e n t s f r o m across t h e globe w h o have c h o s e n t o s p e n d t h e i r college years in Holland. Their homes range from Canada to C h i n a to Brazil. Some, like Carmina O'Sullivan-Scimemi ('14) f r o m Poland, are A m e r i c a n citizens w h o live abroad with their families. O t h e r s , like David M w e e ( 1 4 ) of Kenya, are setting foot o n United States soil for the first t i m e in c o m i n g t o Hope. Since these international s t u d e n t s e n t e r with different levels of experience with A m e r i c a n culture, H o p e p u t s o n an o r i e n t a t i o n tailored t o t h e specific n e e d s of s t u d e n t s coming in from overseas. Beginning six days b e f o r e t h e entire class of 2014 arrived, this year's o r i e n t a t i o n dealt with general s u b j e c t s such as finding one's way a r o u n d c a m p u s and navigating t h e m a d n e s s of Phelps. It also included events

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"I explored d o w n t o w n C h i c a g o with friends and had m y first e x p e r i e n c e w o r k i n g at a f a s t - f o o d restaurant." - Katie H o l m w o o d ' 1 4 P H O T O BY

GRHCHEN^^DWIN

F L Y I N G H I G H — Flags o u t s i d e t h e M a r t h a M i l l e r Center represent t h e c o u n t r i e s of Hope's new I n t e r n a t i o n a l s t u d e n t s . like a bonfire, a c a n o e i n g trip and a q u e s t i o n - a n d - a n s w e r panel of international s t u d e n t s w h o have already spent t i m e at H o p e . In having this o r i e n t a t i o n , the international community at H o p e immediately begins t o grow together. Establishing a solid c o m m u n i t y with a c o m m o n b o n d allows t h e m to b e better p r e p a r e d to face w h a t can b e for any i n c o m i n g first-year an extremely d a u n t i n g transition. Despite this huge change, the feedback from Hope's newest international s t u d e n t s has been all e x c i t e m e n t over

meeting new people and, according to Yoonsun Ro ('14) of S o u t h Korea, t h e "welcoming a t m o s p h e r e of the students." As a primarily A m e r i c a n s t u d e n t body, we c a n c o n t i n u e this welcoming atmosphere by getting involved in the International Relations Club, attending some of Hope's m a n y multi-cultural events or a t t e n d i n g H o p e College Global Coffee H o u r o n Sept. 9. The IRC will b e h o s t i n g t h e event at 11 a.m. T h u r s d a y in t h efirstfloor r o t u n d a of t h e M a r t h a Miller Center.

"1 d a n c e d with middleschoolers on m a n y occasions while chanting nono b s c e n e words...as a youth intern." - Garrett Stier ' 1 2

"I w o r k e d at a c o m detasseling c o m p a n y driving tractors." - Z a d a Harris ' 1 4

Richard Ray named provost Chris Russ ASSISTANT S P O R T S EDITOR

Following t h e r e t i r e m e n t of Provost Dr. James Boelkins at the end of t h e 2009-2010 school year, a position h e had held since

2002, H o p e College e m b a r k e d o n a nationwide search t o find his r e p l a c e m e n t . However, it t u r n s o u t t h e college didn't need t o search very far for t h e n e w a p p o i n t e e . In May t h e College _ a n n o u n c e d that t h e office had been filled by a m a n w h o h a s b e e n a p a r t of t h e H o p e c o m m u n i t y for almost t h r e e decades, Dr. R. Richard Ray Jr.

Dr. R i c h a r d Ray

P H O T O COURTESY O F P R

Ray c a m e to H o p e in 1982 as a professor of kinesiology. In 2003 he was a p p o i n t e d chair of t h e d e p a r t m e n t of kinesiology a n d five years later he b e c a m e t h e d e a n of social sciences. As a kinesiologist, h e w o n a n u m b e r of awards and h o n o r s . M o s t prominently, in June 2006 he w a s elected to the National Athletic Trainers' Association Hall of Fame.

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Some of Ray's other a c c o m p l i s h m e n t s in his t i m e at H o p e include guiding t h e college t h r o u g h its 2004 reaccreditation by The Higher Learning C o m m i s s i o n of t h e N o r t h Central Association of Colleges a n d Schools, and aiding t h e athletic training p r o g r a m in b e c o m i n g a full accredited m a j o r at Hope. Ray e a r n e d his undergraduate degree from t h e University of Michigan in 1979 and e a r n e d his master's and d o c t o r a t e f r o m W e s t e r n Michigan University. As t h e provost, Ray h a s adopted the far-reaching responsibilities of t h e position. Ray d e s c r i b e d his responsibilities as "pretty m u c h anything having t o d o with t h e a c a d e m i c p r o g r a m at t h e college." Further explaining his position, Ray said, "I work with a lot of p e o p l e in helping to make

sure t h a t t h e a c a d e m i c p r o g r a m is of t h e highest possible quality for o u r students." For m u c h of t h e decision m a k i n g process, he w o r k s with a g r o u p k n o w n as t h e dean's council. The council includes each of t h e college's deans, library director Kelly Jacobs, director of general e d u c a t i o n Lorna Jarvis and d e a n for a c a d e m i c services and registrar Jon Huisken. "The dean's council considers q u e s t i o n s related to t h e a c a d e m i c p r o g r a m a n d we work with faculty t o get those q u e s t i o n s answered." Ray said W h e n Ray was asked what goals h e w a s w o r k i n g t o w a r d s as provost he reiterated three p r i m a r y goals that he recently shared in a speech t o t h e school's faculty.

Jazzy Japan— Hope s Jazz Ensemble returns from a summer in Japan. Page 5 Got a story idea? Let us know at anchor@hope.edu, or call us a t 3 9 5 - 7 8 7 7 ^

"Improvising t h e overall quality of t h e a c a d e m i c p r o g r a m " w a s t h e first goal he laid out. This first p o i n t included three subpoints, t h e first of w h i c h was to improve t h e writing skills of t h e s t u d e n t body. The second subpoint as stated by the provost w a s "improving o u r s t u d e n t s ' cultural competence." " N o w t h a t we have an increasing n u m b e r of s t u d e n t and faculty of color, we have an even greater responsibility to make s u r e we're reaching our goals in this p a r t of t h e c u r r i c u l u m and we're not right now." W o r k i n g toward the strengths of each individual p r o g r a m w a s the t h i r d su b - p o i n t he described. S E E P R O V O S T PAGE 2

Get Involved!— Learn about Hope s many extracurricular activities. Page 6- 7


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T H I S W E E K AT H O P E Wednesday Sept. 8 Last Day to Drop/Add Classes Fulbright Information Session

New Writing Comer available Administration and faculty take steps to improve students' writing skills

4 p.m. Granberg Room. Van Wylen

Madalyn Muncy

Library

ASSISTANT CAMPUS EDITOR

Friday Physics Seminar

Sept. 10

3 p.m. VanderWerf 104. "Time Reversal Symmetry Breaking in Superconducting Devices." presented by Dr. Stephen Remillard.

SAC Weekend Movie 8 p.m. and 1 0 : 3 0 p.m.. VanderWerf 102.

Mentallst Christopher Carter 8:30 p.m. Knickerbocker Theatre, sponsored by SAC.

Saturday Time to Serve

Sept. 1 1

9 a.m.-3 p.m. Campus-wide c o m m u nity service projects

SAC Weekend Movie 8 p.m. and 1 0 : 3 0 p.m.. VanderWerf 102.

Sunday The Gathering

Sept. 1 2

8 p.m.. Dimnent Chapel

Tuesday Sept. 14 Skills for Successful Interviewing 1 1 a.m., Maas Conference, sponsored by Career Services.

IN BRIEF

HOPE SENIOR LEADS MACKINAC BRIDGE RUN Laura Hunnell ( M l ) was one of 12 fitness ambassadors chosen by Gov. Jennifer Granholm to lead the 53rd annual Labor Day Mackinac Bridge Run. Fitness ambassadors were chosen for their unique and inspiring stories. Hunnell led 400 runners across the five-mile bridge. She began running with her father and was a member of her high school track team. In May, she and her father completed a marathon in Traverse City. Mackinac Bridge Labor Day runners are randomly selected from an online registration process.

GRAD PRAISES RESEARCH EXPERIENCE Hope graduate Shirley Bradley (MO) published an article entitled " M y Passion for Research" in the September 2010 edition of "Enzymatic," the newsletter of the Undergraduate Affiliates Network of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. The article reflects on her four years working with Dr. Maria BumatowskaHledin, professor of biology and chemistry at Hope. She discusses the academic advancement that research at I lope College provided her and her reasoning to give back by sharing her experiences with others through scientific demonstrations for younger students. Bradley majored in biology and chemistry with minors in political science and mathematics and is now pursuing a doctorate in biochemistry and molecular biology at the Mayo Clinic.

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It is that t i m e of year: t h e syllabi have been d i s t r i b u t e d and t h e p a p e r s are l o o m i n g . College s t u d e n t s of every m a j o r a r e req u i r e d t o write, and b e c o m i n g a better w r i t e r takes a lot of p r a c tice. All s t u d e n t s can let out a sigh of relief: t h e H o p e College Writing C o r n e r is o p e n for business! Located in Van Wylen Library on t h e m a i n floor near t h e refere n c e desk, t h e W r i t i n g C o r n e r provides peer t u t o r s of a variety of m a j o r s w h o will guide t h e w r i t i n g process in a side-by-side m a n n e r . The c o r n e r will also s p o n s o r w o r k s h o p s for s t u d e n t s every m o n t h o n specific writing topics. T h e W r i t i n g C o r n e r replaces t h e writing t u t o r i n g services of the Academic Support Center and is currently directed by t h e English d e p a r t m e n t . As a result, t h e t u t o r i n g services have b e e n expanded. W r i t e r s of every ability level and m a j o r are e n c o u r a g e d t o m a k e an a p p o i n t m e n t or to d r o p in. " W r i t i n g is a process - every writer of every skill level and every m a j o r n e e d s feedback," explained English d e p a r t m e n t chair Dr. David Klooster.

Ray steps into role as provost • Provost, from page 1

Ray t h e n explained his s e c o n d m a j o r goal for t h e college. " W h i l e we're simultaneously trying to b o o s t quality, we're also trying to r e d u c e t h e cost of delivery of t h e a c a d e m i c p r o g r a m , so that t h e dollars t h a t o u r s t u d e n t s pay t o go h e r e go as far as possible." T h e third goal laid o u t by Ray will be t o e n c o u r a g e an a t m o s p h e r e of t o g e t h e r n e s s o n the campus. W h e n asked if he had any t h o u g h t s or advice for t h e s t u d e n t s of H o p e College, Ray said, "1 h o p e t h a t every s t u d e n t will consider h i m or herself t h e C E O of their o w n c o r p o r a t i o n . R e m e m b e r t h a t college is a 40 h o u r p e r week plus o v e r t i m e job and that h a r d work not only pays off, but it also provides great joy. I h o p e s t u d e n t s take that message to heart."

HOTO BY K A T Y C A R L S O N

W R I T E IT O U T — Located on t h e first floor of t h e Van Wylen Library, t h e new W r i t i n g Corner is available t o help s t u d e n t s improve t h e i r w r i t i n g s k i i i s . W r i t i n g i m p r o v e m e n t has been a recent p o i n t of discussion a m o n g faculty. Their PreCollege C o n f e r e n c e was entitled " W r i t i n g at Every Level: From First-Year C o m p o s i t i o n t o Writing in t h e Majors." H o p e College faculty m e m b e r s are d e d i c a t e d t o b e t t e r serving s t u d e n t s w h e n it c o m e s t o writing. The n e e d for a better writ-

ing c u r r i c u l u m strategy c o m e s f r o m five r e c e n t studies ranging f r o m s t a n d a r d i z e d tests, such as t h e Collegiate Learning Assessm e n t , t o taking writing s a m p l e s to asking s t u d e n t s to r e p o r t o n their writing habits. F r o m there, results w e r e c o m p a r e d to o t h e r colleges. H o p e s t u d e n t s s e e m to write fewer papers, p r e p a r e fewer d r a f t s and t h u s a d v a n c e

less in their writing ability. Klooster explained that all of these variables together "painted a picture t h a t we could d o a better j o b at helping s t u d e n t s b e c o m e better writers. W e need higher s t a n d a r d s in o r d e r t o get s t u d e n t s to write m o r e d r a f t s and longer papers." SEE WRITING PAGE 1 0

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Obama:'Cautiously hopeful, but hopeful' The Obama administration struggles to remain optimistic about the forthcoming Mid east peace talks. M a t t h e w Lee CO-NATJONAL EDITOR

For t h e first t i m e since D e c e m b e r 2008, Israel and Palestine a r e r e s u m i n g peace talks. T h o u g h the talks have started m u c h t h e s a m e as past efforts, the Obama administration and others involved are hoping for a different o u t c o m e . Secretary of State Hilary C l i n t o n is set to sit d o w n with Israeli P r i m e Minister B e n j a m i n Netanyahu and Palestinian A u t h o r i t y President M a h m o u d Abbas o n Thursday. President Barack O b a m a held a w o r k i n g d i n n e r with Abbas, N e t a n y a h u , Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak and King Abdullah II of Jordan Sept. 1. "I a m hopeful—cautiously h o p e f u l , but h o p e f u l — t h a t w e c a n achieve t h e goal t h a t all f o u r of t h e s e leaders articulated," O b a m a said b e f o r e t h e dinner. The cautious a t t i t u d e of t h e Obama administration stems f r o m t h e fact t h a t these t w o c o u n t r i e s have d o n e this before. In December 2008 the p e a c e talks b e t w e e n Israel a n d Palestine e n d e d shortly b e f o r e Israel attacked H a m a s in G a z a . Israel claims t h a t t h e attacks w e r e in response t o t h e shelling f r o m H a m a s militants in Gaza. T h o u g h the t w o c o u n t r i e s have b e e n h e r e before, t h e r u m o r

of p e a c e talks is a g l i m m e r of h o p e rarely seen b e t w e e n t h e t w o countries. O b a m a campaigned o n this issue, saying f r o m day o n e of his presidency he would work to bring peace to the region. He

told C N N . "A m o m e n t in t i m e w i t h i n which there r e m a i n s t h e possibility of achieving t h e t w o - s t a t e solution, which is so essential to c o m p r e h e n s i v e peace in t h e region, t h a t difficult

p r o b l e m s in t h e future." T h o u g h t h e r e is hope, t o p officials close t o t h e negotiations r e m a i n c a u t i o u s and claim it is hard t o remain optimistic a b o u t a p e a c e deal at t h e m o m e n t . They

T O G E T H E R A S O N E — The Palestinian flag (left) and the Israeli flag (right) areShdwh tbgetFTer as one flag. The two countries have been In conflict with one another for quite some time and this graphic Is symbolic of the hope for a peaceful future. kept that p r o m i s e by a p p o i n t i n g f o r m e r Sen. G e o r g e Mitchell t o b e a m e d i a t o r b e t w e e n t h e two countries. "There is a w i n d o w of o p p o r t u n i t y right now," Mitchell

as it may be for b o t h leaders, a n d we recognize t h a t difficulty for b o t h of t h e m — t h e alternatives for t h e m and t h e m e m b e r s of th e ir societies p o s e far greater difficulties and far greater

downplayed t h e r e c e n t n e w s by saying that n o o n e expects t o reach an a g r e e m e n t in t h e next week. Just t h e fact t h a t m e e t i n g s are p l a n n e d is h o p e in itself

US combat missions end in Iraq Amy Alvlne

SENIOR STAFF W R I T E R

i n c i d e n t s in Iraq have been t h e s p e e c h that all U.S. t r o o p s in t h e O n Aug. 31, President Barack lowest o n r e c o r d since t h e war c o u n t r y will leave Iraq by t h e O b a m a delivered an address began, and t h e f r o m t h e oval office a b o u t t h e e n d elections have of t h e c o m b a t mission in Iraq, been credible o n g o i n g security challenges and with strong t h e need to rebuild o u r country. t u r n o u t s . But The Iraq W a r (or O p e r a t i o n in t h e end, it Iraqi F r e e d o m ) officially began boils d o w n to seven years ago o n M a r c h 20, t h e p e o p l e of 2003. W i t h Iraq's u n e m p l o y m e n t Iraq t o resolve at a high and t h e e c o n o m y o n the internal unstable g r o u n d , a f u t u r e of d i f f e r ences lasting p e a c e and l o n g - t e r m t h a t are prosperity s e e m s a n y t h i n g but. i m p a c t i n g "A war to d i s a r m a state •JtUMJ t h e country, b e c a m e a fight against an building a insurgency," O b a m a said. democratic Currently, there are 49,700 form of t r o o p s in Iraq, and since t h e government beginning of t h e war t h e r e have a n d b e e n 4,420 U.S. t r o o p casualties. m o n i t o r ing The U n i t e d States h a s r e m o v e d their streets. 100,000 t r o o p s a n d e q u i p m e n t " T h e f r o m t h e c o u n t r y n o w as g r eatness O p e r a t i o n Iraqi F r e e d o m d r e w of our t o an end. d e m o c r a c y is To s h o w t h a t t h e U.S. g r o u n d e d in c o m m i t m e n t to Iraq is still our ability to unwavering, a transitional force Photo by Sgt. Ry Norrls, Courtesy of US A r m y m o v e beyond of U.S. t r o o p s will r e m a i n in ON THE WAY OUT - 3rd Infantry Division Task o u r differences. Iraq with a different mission. Force Marne soldiers board a C-17 leaving Contln-and to learn According to O b a m a , this n e w from our mission will include "advising gency Operating Base Spelcher In Iraq. experience as and assisting Iraq's security we c o n f r o n t t h e m a n y challenges end of next year. forces, s u p p o r t i n g Iraqi t r o o p s The efforts of the U.S. forces ahead," O b a m a said. in targeted c o u n t e r t e r r o r i s m To be o n t h e defense, t h e in Iraq have not b e e n vain. missions and p r o t e c t i n g our c o u n t r y n e e d s to e m p l o y t h e "We've m e t our responsibility," civilians." necessary resources.Thisdefense O b a m a said. The security O b a m a also c o n f i r m e d in h i s

will s o o n be seen in A f g h a n i s t a n with t h e arrival of m o r e t r o o p s b e c a u s e t h e president o r d e r e d t h e d e p l o y m e n t of m o r e t r o o p s to fight t h e Taliban force. But c o m e August 2011, t h e United States will begin a transition t o A f g h a n accountability. The r e d u c t i o n in t h e n u m b e r of U.S. t r o o p s in Afghanistan, however, will be d e c i d e d by t h e a m o u n t of g r o u n d activity. A l o n g with talking a b o u t t h e e n d of t h e war in Iraq and t h e f u t u r e of activity in Afghanistan, t h e p r e s i d e n t also a d d r e s s e d o u r e c o n o m i c issues at h o m e . " "Unfortunately, over the last decade, we've not d o n e what's necessary t o s h o r e up t h e f o u n d a t i o n s of o u r o w n prosperity," O b a m a said. " W e s p e n t a trillion dollars at war, o f t e n financed by b o r r o w i n g f r o m overseas. This, in turn, h a s s h o r t c h a n g e d i n v e s t m e n t s in o u r o w n people, a n d c o n t r i b u t e d to record deficits...Our most urgent task is to restore our economy." Efforts to encourage i n n o v a t i o n are taking place to end U.S. d e p e n d e n c e o n foreign oil. To bring his 18-minute s p e e c h to a close, t h e president c o n c l u d e d t h a t t h e U.S. n e e d s to "earn victory t h r o u g h the success of o u r p a r t n e r s a n d t h e s t r e n g t h of o u r o w n nation."

and the Obama administration has vowed to do a n y t h i n g it can. A c o m p r e h e n s i v e Middle East p e a c e deal has been o n e of O b a m a ' s t o p foreign policy goals. "President Abbas, you are my p a r t n e r in peace. A n d it is up to us, with t h e help of our friends, t o conclude t h e agonizing conflict b e t w e e n o u r peoples and t o afford t h e m a n e w beginning," P r i m e Minister B e n j a m i n N e t a n y a h u said at t h e Sept. 1 dinner. A b b a s said it was t i m e to end t h e bloodshed. " W e want p e a c e b e t w e e n t h e t w o c o u n t r i e s . ... Let us sign a f o r m a l a g r e e m e n t for peace and put an end t o this long p e r i o d of suffering forever," he said. Israeli and Palestinian leaders have agreed to m e e t again o n Sept. 14 and 15, and roughly every two weeks thereafter, Mitchell said. The leaders have said t h a t for negotiations t o succeed, they " m u s t be kept private" a n d "treated with t h e u t m o s t sensitivity," Mitchell a d d e d .

Want to get your Naturally, The Anchor is always l o o k i n g for p r i n t savvy students t o j u m p on board the staff! The national section is always l o o k i n g for eager and w i l l i n g w r i t ers. No experience is necessary.Come check o u t the o p p o r t u n i t i e s t o get your name in p r i n t as a w r i t e r ! Influence t h e awareness of w o r l d events on campus! Email t h e staff at anchor@hope.edu or c o m e t o one of our Sunday m e e t ings at 6 p m in t h e Anchor office t o talk w i t h the nat i o n a l staff. We look f o r w a r d to working w i t h you! t

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THE ANCHOR

T H I S S U M M E R IN QUOTES

NATIONAL Progress, challenges noted on Katrina's fifth anniversar

SEPTEMBER 8 . 2 0 1 0

Lacle R a w l i n g s GUEST W R I T E R

" S o m e said h e w a s crazy. But t h e y d i d n ' t c o u n t o n what would happen when o n e f o r c e of n a t u r e m e t another." - P r e s i d e n t O b a m a in h i s s p e e c h at X a v i e r U n i v e r s i t y , o n t h e c o l lege p r e s i d e n t ' s p r o m i s e t o r e o p e n the university mere m o n t h s after t h e Katrina disaster.

" S c h o o l is n o t all t h a t it c a n be. Right now, it is a place for m o s t people to determine that their goal is t o get o u t as s o o n as possible... now, I have successfully s h o w n that I w a s t h e b e s t slave... 1 excelled at e v e r y s u b j e c t just f o r t h e p u r p o s e of excelling, n o t l e a r n i n g . A n d q u i t e frankly, n o w I'm scared." - V a l e d i c t o r i a n Erica G o l d s o n in h e r c o n t r o v e r t i a l g r a d u a t i o n a d d r e s s at C o x s a c k i e - A t h e n s High S c h o o l , C o x s a c k i e , N.Y., o n J u n e 25. *

" D o n ' t get sick. A n d if you d o get sick, die quickly." - Rep. Alan G r a y s o n (D-Fla.), d e s c r i b i n g his v i e w of t h e R e p u b lican h e a l t h c a r e p l a n .

" N a n c y Pelosi, I t h i n k , h a s got: t h e m all l i q u o r e d u p o n sake a n d you know, they're making a suicide r u n here."

Five years after the vicious Hurricane Katrina p u m m e l e d the Gulf Coast, President Barack Obama traveled to Xavier University in New Orleans to share updates on the aftermath as well as his usual enthusiasm for hope. In a speech on Aug. 29, O b a m a encouraged people affected by the hurricane not to dwell on the experiences of the past but to instead look at New Orleans as a "symbol of resilience and community." "New Orleans could have remained a symbol o f d e s t r u c t i o n and decay; of a s t o r m that c a m e and the inadequate response that followed," O b a m a said. "It was not hard to imagine a day when we'd tell our children of a o n c e vibrant and w o n d e r f u l city laid low by indifference and neglect," O b a m a said. "But that is not what h a p p e n e d . It's not what h a p p e n e d at Ben Franklin. It's not what happened at Xavier. And that's not what happened across N e w O r l e a n s a n d t h e Gulf Coast. It is t r u e that this city has b e c o m e a symbol. But it's a symbol of resilience, of community, of the f u n d a m e n t a l responsibility we have for one another." Obama's speech also gave particular attention to reconstruction of the defaced infrastructure throughout Louisiana and the plague of unemployment, which has reached 15 percent in s o m e

" T h i s is really a y e a r to shine. If that m e a n s I ' v e got to break out m y Batm a n dance, then I'll d o it." - Bershawn "Batman" Jackson, O l y m p i c b r o n z e m e d a l i s t in 4 0 0 meter hurdles, on h o w to bring i n c r e a s e d a t t e n t i o n t o his s p o r t .

"It all sort o f m a k e s sense, if y o u r thinking is; " G u l f C o a s t " plus "bad thing h a p p e n i n g " plus ("government r e s p o n s e " m i n u s "secret m a g i c p o w e r s they are s u p p o s e d to h a v e over the e l e m e n t s " ) multiplied by " W h a t e v e r , it's a slow n e w s day o t h e r w i s e " e q u a l s "Katrina Z O M G ! " - W riter f o r the H u f f i n g t o n Post Jason Linkins describing the growing popularity o f t h e p h r a s e " O b a m a ' s Katrina."

t i o n a l S p a c e S t a t i o n c a p t u r e d t h i s s h o t of H u r r i c a n e Earl. areas of Louisiana, He also assured the citizens of Gulf states that his administration will insure that those displaced by t h e storm will once again find the o p p o r t u n i t y to reside in their h o m e t o w n s . Adding further to his priorities, the president expressed that the c o n s t r u c t i o n of hospitals, libraries, roads a n d bridges, sewer systems andlastly, schools, which have been allotted $1.8 billion, will be the focus of continuing efforts in the onceflooded city of N e w Orleans. Probably one of the most significant long-lasting effects of Hurricane Katrina (and also Rita and Wilma) is to teach

emergency response programs to work m o r e efficiently and to increase preparations in the event of a major disaster. The Red Cross has expanded its capacity by adding enough supplies in warehouses across the nation for a disaster twice the size of Katrina. It has also improved organizational m e t h o d s involved with large disaster relief. The Federal Emergency M a n a g e m e n t Agency, which u n d e r w e n t much public scrutiny after its failures in dealing with the destruction in the s u m m e r of 2005, has admittedly tried to learn from its mistakes. The administrator of

FEMA, Craig Fugate, said "this anniversary serves as a reminder that we must always be preparing for the next disaster," according to a public statement by FEMA on Aug. 29. As this year's tropical storm season fuels up, the nation is thankful that t h e most recent hurricane, Earl, mostly blew itself o u t . Hurricane Earl, a category 4 storm at its peak, weakened to category 2 as it blew n o r t h along t h e east coast, spitting 20-foot waves and heavy winds. M o d e r a t e flooding and power outages affected t h o u s a n d s of residents. Fortunately, n o loss of life was reported.

BP seeks permanent fix for Gulf Coast oil leak also sabotaged efforts. In spite of Hurricane Earl, BP estimates the relief drilling will be finished by mid-September if weather The record Gulf Coast oil spill permits. that has had m a n y Americans In addition to p e r m a n e n t l y angry at the giant oil c o m p a n y plugging the oil leak, BP BP is almost over. But is attempting to reduce the effects have b e e n the leak's d a m a g e t h r o u g h e n o r m o u s . Total job the creation of an escrow losses equal nearly account that will pay m o n e y 100,000. The t o u r i s m to those w h o suffered industry estimates damage, loss of i n c o m e and a loss of $3 billion. livelihood or w h o have other Mar i n e life such as outstanding financial claims m a m m a l s , birds and against BP. fish struggle as they The first deposit into fight for their lives. this account, an a m o u n t of O n e of the hardest about $3 billion, was m a d e hit industries is fishing earlier in August—ahead and tourism. W i t h of schedule, according to a fishermen out of jobs, press release. BP has hired many of "BP has decided to t h e m to work cleaning make this deposit early to up the spill. demonstrateitscommitment One woman to meet its pledge to restore observed t h e impact PHOTO COURTESY OF F E M A both the livelihoods of those on a local fisherman: M A K I N G A M E N D S — W o r k e r s a t t e m p t t o c a p t u r e an oil-covered pellaffected by the oil spill "I was with a next door c a n as BP f o c u s e s o n c l e a n - u p e f f o r t s In t h e Gulf Coast. and the environment," the neighbor, and he's a s t a t e m e n t said. 42 year old fisherman, The next deposit is scheduled sealant and eliminate any new and he just broke d o w n crying," 206 million gallons of oil gushing for t h e end of this year and leaks. "It will virtually assure into the Gulf of Mexico. With she said. "It was a shock to see should total near $2 billion. BP us that there's no chance of oil all these statistics, everyone is him so upset. He's afraid we're also plans to continue deposits of leaking into the environment," not going to have anything left. holding their breath as the final $1.25 billion for each susequent retired Coast G u a r d Admiral steps to plug that leak begin. W e all are." quarter. Under that timeline, full Thad Allen told reporters. O n July 15 a cap was placed To date m o r e than $8 billion financial reparations won't be Thft procedure, which was over the well to temporarily stop has been spent to clean up this disaster. Various efforts the oil from spilling into t h e gulf. scheduled to occur immediately, m a d e until the end of 2013. Mlkella Bryant

- S e n . L i n d s e y G r a h a m (R-S.C.) said of t h e D e m o c r a t s ' final p u s h f o r t h e h e a l t h c a r e bill.

P H O T O BY D O U G L A S S W H E E L O C K , COURTESY OF

EARL APPROACHES — Astronaut Douglass W h e e l o c k on board the Interna-

GUEST W R I T E R

include using s k i m m e r boats to locate and clean u p the

oil. BP has also enlisted the local fishermen to d o this job, giving t h e m financial support while they are out of work. The oil spill o c c u r r e d o n April 20, resulting in 11 deaths and

p e r m a n e n t . A new blow-out preventer was attached to the well Sept. 4. BP now must drill into the old well by p u n c t u r i n g it, and then p u m p i n g c e m e n t into the b o t t o m . This will finalize the

Now, BP is currently carrying out its new plan to make the sealant

was delayed d u e to Hurricane Earl. Strong currents in the area


THE ANCHOR

Tulip Time wants your artwork Caltlln Klask A R T S CO-EDITOR

P H O T O C O U R T E S Y OF H O P E P R

JAZZ ENSEMBLE PERFORMS IN J A P A N Larry Figueroa, piano; Z a c h Pedlgo, bass; Nate Roberts, g u i t a r ; and David Webster, drums t o u r e d Japan t o g e t h e r t h i s s u m m e r .

Jazz ensemble takes 20-day tour of Japan over summer Katie Schewe A R T S CO-EDITOR

In July, t h e H o p e Jazz C h a m b e r E n s e m b l e was given t h e experience of a lifetime to t o u r t h e culturally rich c o u n t r y of Japan. This w a s t h e first t i m e t h e e n s e m b l e had b e e n given t h e opportunity to go abroad. O v e r t h e course of t h e trip, t h e s t u d e n t s e m b r a c e d the jazz m u s i c and culture of Japan. The s t u d e n t s w h o went o n t h e 20-day trip included Larry Figueroa ('11), piano; Z a c h Pedigo ('12), bass; N a t e R o b e r t s (12), guitar; and David W e b s t e r ('13), d r u m s . The s t u d e n t s a t t e n d e d 20 s h o w s d u r i n g their stay a n d also p e r f o r m e d as a g r o u p o n four occasions. This allowed t h e s t u d e n t s t o not only experience jazz in a completely n e w setting, b u t to share their talents a n d passion as well. "The entire p o i n t of this trip was n o t t o have s o m e

exciting adventure, but t o learn and to share our love of m u s i c with m e n and w o m e n of a very different culture," W e b s t e r said. The s t u d e n t s got t o experience m a n y different areas of Japanese jazz, but they also e m b r a c e d o t h e r aspects of t h e c u l t u r e as well. The s t u d e n t s got t o travel t h e area, enabling t h e m t o experience t h e u n i q u e a n d rich c u l t u r e that Japan has to offer. R o b e r t s w r o t e two songs d u r i n g t h e i r stay in Japan. At t h e group's final show, they p e r f o r m e d these songs. This allowed t h e s t u d e n t s to s h o w c a s e t h e work that had b e e n inspired by their experiences o n t h e tour. Reflecting o n his trip W e b s t e r said, "Truly, this trip will be o n e t h a t I r e m e m b e r for t h e rest of my life. 1 w a s able t o explore o n e of m a n k i n d ' s greatest cities, but m o r e importantly, I learned a little s o m e t h i n g of what m a d e that city tick, a n d that was t h e t r u e i m p o r t a n c e of this journey."

It's not Tulip Time quite yet, b u t t h e Holland Area A r t s Council w a n t s W e s t Michigan artists to start t h i n k i n g a b o u t t h e D u t c h flowers. T h e Art in Bloom p o s t e r c o m p e t i t i o n for Tulip T i m e 2011 h a s begun. Each year, t h e A r t s Council selects a p o s t e r design f r o m a local artist a n d p u t s it to use as t h e a d v e r t i s e m e n t for Tulip Time. A n e n t r y fee of $25 is required, w h i c h allows u p to t w o submissions of artwork. All works m u s t b e s u b m i t t e d by O c t . 31. Besides t h e obvious p e r k s - like t h e w i n n i n g p o s t e r design displayed at the t h i r d largest t o w n festival in A m e r i c a and advertised t o over a million t o u r i s t s - cash prizes will b e given for first, s e c o n d a n d third place w i n n e r s . The j u r o r s this year are ready for anything. Scott LaFontsee of LaFontsee Galleries in G r a n d Rapids h a s served o n t h e G r a n d Rapids Gallery Association for years. T h e a Grigsby, an awardw i n n i n g painter f r o m Holland, is t h e executive director of t h e Holland Historical Trust. A n d lastly, Daniel Borchers, a professional f r a m e r a n d C e n t r a l Michigan Uuniverstiy a l u m n u s , o w n s the Frame and M a t S h o p s you might see in Holland, G r a n d Haven and Rockford. If you're still blase a b o u t entering, c o n s i d e r this: a n e w twist o n t h e c o m p e t i t i o n h a s g o n e into effect this year. In a style similar to reality shows like A m e r i c a n Idol, j u r o r s will only c h o o s e t h e t o p 20 posters.

The standings f r o m t h e r e are u p t o t h e people. All 20 works will go o n display t h r o u g h o u t Tulip T i m e 2011 while visitors and locals j u d g e and deliberate. A f t e r t h e voting, victory will b e given t o o n e p o s t e r designer. N o w that you're interested, h e r e are a few details you may n e e d to k n o w : -All entries must be s u b m i t t e d in digital f o r m to t h e Holland A r t s Council website. -Don't w o r r y a b o u t adding t h e Tulip T i m e logo or i n f o r m a t i o n ; that can all be a d d e d later. -Don't w o r r y a b o u t m a k i n g a poster-sized artwork, either. Just keep standard poster d i m e n s i o n s in m i n d so t h a t n o drastic c h a n g e s n e e d to be made. -Looking for advice f r o m t h e A r t s Council? "Marketability of t h e image will b e o n e of t h e p r i m e considerations in t h e selections of this year's art," their website reads. -Any q u e s t i o n s can be a n s w e r e d by M a r y S u n d s t r o m , a P r o g r a m D ir e c to r at t h e A r t s Council. Call her at (616) 396-3278 for m o r e i n f o r m a t i o n , or visit the website at www.hollandarts.org.

G R A P H I C BY B R I T T A N Y L A P H A M

Critic's Corner: Arcade Fire goes back to 'The Suburbs' Joel H o f m a n GUEST W R I T E R

C o m i n g off of t w o incredibly successful a l b u m s in b o t h t h e critical and p o p u l a r realms. A r c a d e Fire was left with a large task in c o n t i n u i n g to evolve b o t h musically and lyrically. W h i l e 2004's "Funeral" talked a b o u t d e a t h and renewal, and 2006's " N e o n Bible" dealt with

political and religious issues, "The Suburbs" shows t h e band's m a t u r i t y with less pretentious, but m o r e m a t u r e lyrical c o n t e n t

dealing with the inability of being able t o c o m e h o m e . A s we g r o w older, h o m e will never be t h e same, no m a t t e r h o w m u c h we w a n t t o r o m a n t i c i z e it. A r c a d e Fire c a p t u r e s this s e n t i m e n t in varied ways o n t h e i r t h i r d LP. Though the title "The Suburbs" m a y resemble a red flag to s o m e listeners d u e to t h e often played out nature of artists reminiscing a b o u t m u n d a n e s u b u r b a n life. Arcade Fire takes their third major release to a level that is nothing s h o r t of epic. Songs float on a cloud of hazy guitar and lavish string arrangements that give t h e relatable lyrics an a t m o s p h e r e of e m o t i o n a l intensity. The a l b u m starts with t h e catchy title track (and first single) that includes a

r h y t h m i c p i a n o at its f o u n d a t i o n , while r e v e r b - d r e n c h e d guitars add a d r e a m y landscape to t h e core of t h e s o u n d . From the opening chorus, t h e listener is i n t r o d u c e d t o t h e t h o u g h t f u l insights of lead singer W i n Butler, w h o claims that, " S o m e t i m e s I can't believe it, I'm m o v i n g past t h e feeling." T h r o u g h lines like this, it b e c o m e s a p p a r e n t t h a t Butler and t h e gang w a n t to tell t h e listener h o w hard it is to r e t u r n t o a place you o n c e called h o m e . The m a i n t h e m e of the a l b u m references t h e reality of g r o w i n g u p and leaving h o m e b e h i n d , but the b a n d takes s o m e space t o even make a few jokes a b o u t their past in s o n g s like "Rococo." The song is representative of a c h a m b e r p o p n u m b e r t h a t builds in intensity until a s y m p h o n y of strings and h a r m o n i e s collide in t h e final c h o r u s , creating a s w e e p in g s o u n d that w a s h e s t h e listener away despite t h e s o m e w h a t comical w o r d play. In a similar vein t o Vampire Weekend's " O x f o r d Comma," the song essentially makes f u n of know-it-all s u b u r b a n kids w h o use w o r d s they can't u n d e r s t a n d , h e n c e t h e title "Rococo" (an

elaborate baroque style of decoration). As t h e a l b u m closes, t h e listener gets a break f r o m t h e guitar-heavy s o u n d with t h e likely second single "The Sprawl II ( M o u n t a i n s Beyond Mountains)." Instead of guitar, layers of synthesizers move t o the f o r e f r o n t of t h e m i x while t h e female voice of Regine C h a s s a g n e (wife of W i n Butler) takes t h e lead singing duties. The m o s t striking line c o m e s in t h e c h o r u s of this slow b u r n i n g yet climactic s o n g w h e n C h a s s a g n e sings: "They h e a r d me singing and they told me t o stop, quit these p r e t e n t i o u s things and just p u n c h t h e clock." W i t h this line. A r c a d e Fire truly captures t h e ambitions of s u b u r b a n life being t h r e a t e n e d by the seemingly practical lifestyle of blue-collar industry. Throughout the album. A r c a d e Fire covers a lot o g r o u n d by including a sprawling 16 tracks, yet t h e way the s o n g s flow s h o w that t h e band h a s a knack for p u t t i n g together a cohesive a l b u m in an age w h e r e iTunes singles are t h e d o m i n a n t f o r m of musical purchases.

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T H I S W E E K IN A R T Wednesday Sept. 8 Amateur Coffeehouse The Kletz - 9 : 0 0 p.m. - 1 1 : 0 0 p.m.

Friday The Amber Beads

Sept. 10

Red Barn Theatre - 7 p.m.

Monday Sept. 13 Sandra Hansen - Artist Talk Freedom Village - 1 0 a.m.

IN BRIEF

COMEDY GROUP SECOND CITY RETURNS SEPT. 17 C o m e d y g r o u p e "Second City" will r e t u r n t o H o p e College o n Friday, Sept. 17. They will p e r f o r m at t h e Knickerb o c k e r at 7:30 p.m. The g r o u p will p e r f o r m skits f r o m their p r o g r a m "Fair & Unbalanced." S o m e notable a l u m n i of "Second City" include Tina Fey, Bonnie Hunt, Steve Carell, Stephen Colbert, Ryan Stiles, M a r t i n Short, Mike Myers, C h r i s Farley a n d more. Their past performances in Holland have been widely popular, so prospective attendees are encouraged to buy tickets as soon as possible. Tickets are $18 for general admission and $13 for seniors, available at the ticket office located in DeVos Fieldhouse.

VOCAL COMPETITION ON SEPT. 2 5 The Nicholas Loren vocal c o m p e t i t i o n will b e held o n Sept. 25 in W e s t O t t a w a at t h e P e r f o r m i n g A r t s C e n t e r of Harb o r Lights school. The application deadline is Sept. 18. E-mail your application to julia@hollandchorale.org. You m u s t be 16 o r older to apply. If you apply, you will be notified by Sept. 20 a b o u t specific dates and t i m e s for t h e c o m p e tition. T h e r e is a cash prize of $1,000 for the winner, w h o will p e r f o r m with t h e rest of t h e finalists at t h e Holland Area A r t s Council o n Nov. 7.

FARMERS MARKET FEATURES CHEFS The Holland F a r m e r s m a r k e t w e l c o m e s t h e chefs of deBoer bakery for a cooking d e m o n s t r a tion. The d u o will d e m o n s t r a t e h o w to cook egg dishes such as o m l e t s using fresh eggs, vegetables, and c h e e s e which c o m e s straight f r o m t h e m a r k e t . The d e m o n s t r a t i o n will begin at 10 a.m. o n Saturday, Sept. 11. The chef series will c o n t i n u e every Saturday with a n e w feat u r e d chef(s) each week.


6

TNR ANCHOR

FEATURES

SEITEMBER 8 , 2 0 1 0

bdefe o n e c m » p t f s — m o i m tuIldfeV It is a new school year - classes are in session, professors are handing out homework, schedules are getting busier... So now what?To keep from getting too stressed out, check out these awesome activities both on- and off-campus!

Support Hope's sports teams W h o would not want to watch some good 'ol competition and support the Dutch and Dutchmen?This fall, you have the opportunity to watch our teams in action.

Pholo by Bethany Stripp

Spend quality time with friends While everyone may have homework, spending quality time with your friends should be a priority. Take some time out for yourself and out ol your busy schedule to build those relationships again. Just don't

V

spend all of your time putting off your homework because classes and homework should be priorities, too.

4

Play a n i n t r a m u r a l s p o r t W h y not relieve your stress by kicking a ball around or throwing a football? For the first part of the semester, four different intramural sports are offered: men's soccer, men's flag football, coed flag football and women's volleyball. Sign-ups and more information are online at KnowHope. Time to grab some friends and lead your team to victory!

Have a date w i t h the Pine Grove This is one of those cheap dates — you know, the one where you do not need to spend extra money buying nice clothes and trying to impress your date. The Pine Grove likes you just the way you are. Soak up the sun, play some Frisbee golt, throw a football around or hang out with friends. What's more beautiful than the sunlight streaming through those giant pine trees? Do not worry; the Pine Grove will not be upset if you are late.


7

SEITTEMBtR 8. 2 0 1 0

By: Alyssa Barigian and John Rebhan w»il

H '

Hill

Go for a run W h o does not like an invigorating run? Grab your iPod and make sure to blast your most ' ^

embarrassing songs because no one will ever know

r -£\yh

you love to run to Lady GaGa or the Backstreet ii/

v ' ,1 %

*1 •#

f Photo by Anna Leach

i J

«

Boys. If you are by yourself, you could even sing out loud, because singing next to a running buddy might be a little weird. How far you run is also up to you. 2k? 5k? Around the world? Down the block and back? It is totally up to you.

Go t o the beach Michigan has the largest n u m b e r of lakes out of any other state, so this is an easy one to fulfill.The Holland State Park is a bike ride away, but if you are with a large group of people, it is even simpler to carpool over. You can get your fill of sand, swimming, beach volleyball and possibly even a boat ride. Do not take too many pictures next to Big Red, though, lest you look like a tourist.

Visit G r a n d R a p i d s There are some pretty cool cities near Holland, such as Grand Haven and Muskegon. O n e of the most popular would definitely be Grand Rapids. It is the home of the Griffins hockey t e a m — s o m e of the players even play up for the Detroit RedWings when injuries occur. It is also home to many fantastic music venues so you can see your favorite band p e r f o r m . O f t e n you will hear of a movie being shot downtown, so why not grab a friend and head over to see if you can sneak a peek of someone famous or even be in the background of a shot? R e m e m b e r , f r e s h m e n ; t h e O c t o b e r R u l e is still in e f f e c t , so d o n o t e v e n t h i n k of t a k i n g any of t h e s e ideas and using t h e m f o r a d a t e !

Photos by Holly E v e n h o u s e


8

VOICES

THE ANCHOR

SEPTEMBER 8 , 2 0 1 0

Seniors Back at it., for the last year. Senior moments

Paradoxical perspectives Karen Patterson

Charlie Walter

>-Editor- in- Chief

Columnist

Senior Scramble The phrase"hit the ground running" has taken on a new meaning for me this first week of classes. In my previous semesters at Hope, the process has been a gentle easing into the pool of busy in which we seem to reside. On the first day of class, it's dipping a toe in, then sitting with my legs dangling in, before sliding down all the way by the second week of class. N o t so this year. I didn't just j u m p off the high diving board for a cannonball; I took a running start first. I will admit though, that I love being busy—it's the environment in which 1 do the best. However, this year the madness of my schedule is tinted by a long shadow cast by a large clock: one that counts down my time at Hope College as a student. In high school being a senior was the equivalent of being invincible. Four years ago the class of 2007 ruled with an iron fist. Well, maybe that's a gross exaggeration, b u t it certainly was a good feeling. We'd worked hard for 12 years to be on top and we were going to savor it. Being a senior meant getting to spray paint obscene gestures on the football field, saran wrap freshmen to poles and go on week-long trips that served no real academic purpose. We also had the anticipation of college—moving on to something bigger and better—looming on the horizon. In some ways I miss being a high school senior. Because now people have started asking, "What are your plans post-grad?" and other such questions. Some of us know exactly where we'll be and what we'll be doing, but I'm guessing that most seniors are in a place similar to my own. I know what I want to d o and know where I'd like to go, but I'm

Dryer sheets Kaili D o u d Columnist

Just grand! Yours?

not necessarily sure how to get there. Being in the oldest class on campus is a strange feeling. This whole week I kept walking around waiting to run into friends from the classes of 2009 and 2010. To suddenly see more people that I don't recognize than people I do is a bit disconcerting. Nonetheless, it's an exciting time and I do have to admit that as nervous as 1 am to leave the comfort of being a student, I have f u n thinking about what comes next. The class of 2011 has had a crazy ride—we survived a norovirus plague that saw the entire campus shut down; we were prompted to confront and discuss big issues of equality, homosexuality and religion as Hope is Ready began; and we rallied together and held one another up through the loss of two friends and classmates. We've seen some of the most successful sports seasons the school has ever had. O u r class has seen a Hope theater production get invited to p e r f o r m in Washington D.C. and helped further the development of an already outstanding performing arts program. And we still have eight m o n t h s to goFreshmen year our orientation theme was "Let the Journey Begin," and while moving on f r o m a good thing can be difficult, I'm excited for this final .journey at Hope. We're walking into a world with a lot of variables up in the air, but we're not the first to go through this experience and we won't be the last. For now, that is enough for me. Worrying about "the real world" can wait until May. Karen would like to move to Europe after Hope. Who wants to join me?!

Well, folks, it's that time again for everyone to seemingly care what you did for the two and a half months they didn't see you. That's right. It's time for everyone to ask you how your summer was. Now, I cannot assume that the question is entirely empty for everyone: certainly there are many who genuinely take interest in the warm-weathered affairs of, well, every single person they walk past en route to class. But the truth is, most probably don't. 1 really don't mean to be cynical. However, I do often find myself improvising a

ANCHOR

James Nichols Ann Malone

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So I skipped my first class of the semester, as in, Tuesday at 11 a.m.—the first class on my schedule. Fall semester, senior year. This is the end, and I skipped the beginning of it. 1 woke up that morning on my usual bed of hardwood floor and tiny rug and thin blanket in my house out on 20th Street. A little sorer than usual, a bit more ornery. It had been, after all, my third straight night of falling asleep to Planet Earth six minutes into an episode. (Will I ever make it through Shallow Seas?) As I biked into Hope, my borrowed bike chafing me the entire mile and a half, 1 thought to myself, "I really don't feel like going to Japanese I today." I parked my borrowed crotch-rocket heap at Lemonjello's and walked inside, immediately lifted in spirit by the smell of coffee. 1 sat down with a one-third cup of Organic Mind, Body, Soul; I love the onethird. Three refills, and the coffee always stays hot. I opened my Bible to Job. As I read the beautiful, poetic lines, soaking in the imagery of the uncontainable Leviathan and the ostrich mother that cares nothing for its babies (Job 39), I took a long hard look at my life. Do I want to start a whole new language three years after I finished my language requirements? Do I really want to do partner exercises where I ask the person to my right, "How are you doing?" and they respond, "Not bad. And you? How are you doing on this day?" (As if this is the way people converse!) Most importantly, though, I said to myself, "Charlie. Do you really want to go into class four times a week?" Japanese I, MTWF. W h a t is this, freshman year?

As a fresh, I did not know the wideopen country of T / R ' classes. Or ' W ' class. Or T , every other week.' But now it's senior year, in which I am giving the cold shoulder to anything with a M{T)WF on it. With the last minute shuffling of Japanese 101 out of the way, I am now living a two-day class week and a four-day weekend. To the freshmen, don't feel bad— there's just not that much you can do to avoid the three- or four- day- a- week classes. Dropping the pre-med may be the first step;c'mon, be a leader, be the first. Half of you are going to drop it anyways. To the seniors, if for some deity-forsaken reason you are still showing up to class four days a week, check yourself. You could cut that commitment in half or even by 75 percent by taking a lengthy, three-hour night class (that will, most likely, end up containing a well-deserved potluck snack-time). Like the Leviathan of Job, I must be uncontained, unraveled. Like the ostrich mother, I must avoid taking on too much responsibility, for fear of shredding my own young. Meaning, go light on the class load. Sip some coffee. Watch that huge, black Newfoundland bear-of-a-dog lumber on by. Senior year: 1 Freshman year: 0

host of extraordinary accomplishments each time someone pops the question. "Oh my goodness! Hi! How was your summer?!" "Oh, pretty great, pretty great. I domesticated a herd of wild stallions and figured out exactly what I'm going to do with my life...but that was just July. How about you?" You see my point. Generally, a truthful answer to, "How was your summer?" entails reliving flashes of monotonous work and the occasional, "I went to visit cousins in Atlanta." And no one wants to do that.

right? Many people spend their summers laying out on the beach, but I would imagine that most of us were likely to have sat behind a counter taking crumpled dollar bills in exchange for ice cream. Or, working at summer camps and having a great time...but that's a different story. Forgive me for generalizing. I'm sure many of us really did have great summers and are eager to talk about them. My problem is that I had a great summer but I'm really not eager to talk about it at all...

Charlie would like to add that Tuesday Tidings were the most intimidating emails ever. And also, one giant "sumimasen" to Prof. Nakajima. It's not you; it's me!

• see Dryer S h e e t s , page 9

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SEPTEMBER 8 , 2 0 1 0

9

Returning from, what was it?

More than tweed

i

THE ANCHOR

Hope students be 'real' about the transition back to school

W e ' r e a s k i n g p r o f e s s o r s : What's one thing that 99 percent of the student body would never guess you'd pursue? Professor Andrew Le of the Music Dept. responded...

From the inside out

A f t a n Snyder National Co-Editor

I dream of G e m e Jordan I dreamt about Jordan last night (the country, not a person). Actually, the place in my dreams was a strange mix between Jordan and S c o t l a n d two places I've lived in that could not be more different. 1 was hiking through Petra and came to the end of a path, leading through a crevasse between two high walls of red stone. Beyond the crevasse the path opened up and spread into a large fertile plain. Its vegetation generally mimicked that of the Middle East—a soft green yet faded slightly, as if it had been left in the sun too long or as if I was viewing it through shimmering heat that distorted the colors. Other places though looked distinctly Scottish—that full, unrestrained green that only comes through exposure to d a m p mists. There was even a small stone building completely covered in vines. I remember gesturing to a companion, "Look, look! There is Scotland!" I still struggle with trying to reconcile my abroad experiences. I struggle even more when I try to verbalize them in a short period of time. Usually the conversation goes something like this: "Aftan, good to see you again!" "Yeah, it's been a long time!" "How are you? How was your year?" "My year was...good. Life-changing." And that's how I summarize my year abroad. Anyone who has studied off Hope's campus can relate—how in the blazes are we to pack an entire experience and its memories into one short, acceptable sentence? Well, we can't. So we somehow slide back into our Hope College lives and walk around somewhat changed, hopefully changed for the better. And things around us have changed too, and sometimes we don't know whether for better or for worse. This is my first year on staff for The Anchor, so I had to return to Hope a week earlier than usual. I appreciated the rather empty campus—it gave m e a

years ago, I took my first class here at Hope: Introduction to Photography. I failed it. My professor, Steve Nelson, was gracious enough to allow a fellow professor a spot in this popular class, which I attended religiously for about...a month. Things got busy. 1 had performances to prepare for, emails to catch up on, and committee meetings to attend. All things I couldn't skip. I submitted two or three photographs for his viewing pleasure (wrath?), after which I was MIA. Really, I do not recommend this sort of behavior to my students, but after recovering from the initial shame of my epic failure, I decided I would make the most of things. Steve taught me more in one day than teachers from other institutions would've taught in an entire semester, so I took what 1 could remember in my four weeks of photographic education and put my camera to work, with the intense determination to make myself a better photographer. Music is unbelievably great—my life's profession is making and teaching music, after all—but sometimes I find the photographic medium m o r e appropriate and powerful for expressing certain things. There's color and texture in music, but not everyone is able to see and feel it in music as they are in a photograph. Last year, I committed myself to a 365 Project: to take one photograph a day, every day for a year, with the intention of trying new techniques and bettering myself as a photographer. As of writing this, I am on my 340th day, which means I will soon be finished. This journey (which is m o r e arduous than it sounds; try practicing piano every single day for a year! Even I don't do that...) has taken me to completely unexpected territory, and although I remain far (far far far) f r o m finding my style or "voice" in photographic arts, I have learned what comes easily and what I need to continue working at. That is one of the gifts of life, after all: to keep learning. I am still trying, and will always be trying, to find ways to coax smiles from strangers looking into the lens of my camera; to cultivate patience in working with bridezillas; to better understand my camera's histogram; to calculate in my mind the perfect exposure settings. W h i c h is why, at the conclusion of this project, I will begin a new one. Intro to photography was my first class at Hope. My second class was beginning jazz piano, with Professor Steve Talaga. I was doing ok with Steve number two, actually, and in fact lasted longer than I did in photography. Things, however, inevitably got busy again (I completed my doctoral dissertation that semester), and I ended up skipping my final jury (with Steve's permission). Again: I certainly don't advocate this sort of academic behavior. However, I do most certainly encourage all of my students to keep learning and trying new things. Life is too short to not at least try to enjoy its vast range of rich offerings. Perhaps one day, I will enroll in a third class at Hope, and maybe even pass it this time. After all, they say that the third time's the charm.

Dryer Sheets

• K a l l i DoucTs c o l u m n , f r o m page 8

all...so I come up with other things to say. "Your summer was good? Cool. So was mine. So how about those new sandwiches they have in Phelps?" In my opinion, s u m m e r is in the past, and there isn't much use in creating small talk of it. So why not talk about exciting new things in the present? Because those sandwiches really are pretty delicious. And you can even tack on a recommendation to that chat. "I would definitely recommend those sandwiches." See? It's easy, and now you have something to talk about next time! I can only hope that the initial question-popping stage will be over by the middle of September. By then, asking about someone's summer will just be irrelevant and odd. Also by then, we will all be-

Andrew Le's photographic work, including his 365 Project, can be found online at http://imagery.drewle.com, and he himself can be found right here on campus in the Nykerk Building where he teaches piano, piano literature, keyboard skills and chamber music.

chance to rediscover the details that faded in the hot sands of Jordan and misty green of Scotland. The necessity of my student ID (and its pass-code), locating the door of a particular stairwell, where to deposit my lunch tray in the Kletz—these things came back in colorful bursts of realization and a certain amount of embarrassment (especially as I circled aimlessly in the Kletz before the timely rescue of a friend's pity). In many ways I felt like a freshman. Ahem, I'm a senior. At the end of this year I face graduation and the job field. I don't yet have a "plan," but I'm not concerned. I remember being a freshman and not knowing what to do with this next step of life, with all its possible majors, all its organizations and clubs, all its opportunities. Now I'm in the same position again, but after my time abroad I think I have a good handle on the whole Idon't-have-plan-but-I'll-enjoy-life-anyway mentality. What's more, I now have the ability to create new plans and flex when those change. This column did not turn out like I planned. I originally wanted to share specifics about my year abroad, about Scotland and Jordan but mostly Jordan. But I've discovered that while a quick sentence given en route to Chapel is not enough to sum it up, neither is a 500-word column in the student newspaper. I want to be real, to truly share my experience. So if you want to hear it, let's go grab coffee for an hour or two. Or you go find that friend who just returned from a summer, from abroad, f r o m another city. Listen to them, to their story. And then let us listen to yours. Aftan enjoys seeing her Hope family again and playing Frisbee in the Pine Grove. And dark chocolate. She likes dark chocolate.

come nostalgic again for summer, and will actually want to talk about what happened to us in July. Subsequently, everyone will resort to carrying around their summer-experience paraphernalia in order to spark conversations that will probably only last three minutes. Already I am guilty of toting around my Yellowstone Staff Nalgene* and positioning it so the label faces outward. Until then, we will suffer through the inconsequence of easy small talk. So: How was your summer? Kaili is worried that, now, everyone will think is being sarcastic when she asks about summer. promises that, if she asks, she cares. Also, she did tame wild stallions this summer, and she still has solutely no idea what to do with her life.

she She not ab-

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Writing comer now open • W r i t i n g , f r o m page 2 The focus is no longer simply o n teaching students to write a cookie-cutter essay, but rather on d e p a r t m e n t s helping their students learn to write well within their respective majors. "We have a responsibility, especially to our juniors and seniors, to prepare t h e m for graduate school or careers so they are confident in their postcollege years," Klooster said. Peer tutors are currently available 2 p.m. until 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday and 7 p.m. until 10 p.m. Sunday though Thursday. To make an appointment at the Writing Corner, you can call the English D e p a r t m e n t at x. 7620, email writingcorner@hope.edu, o r schedule an appointment through your Google calendar.

SEPTEMBER 8 . 2 0 1 0

Revisiting Orientation Looking back on the fun times of Orientation 2010

O R I E N T A T I O N 2 0 1 0 — The class of 2 0 1 4 (center) Is now settled In t h a n k s to hundreds of orientation assistants who helped them move In (center right) and provided entertainment (top and bot t o m right). The Play Fair (top and bottom left) was also a great way for freshmen to meet new people.

i

i

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Convocation speaker: Make the most of college years Courtesy of Hope College PR With t h e m e m b e r s of t h e incoming Class of 2014 at H o p e College at the beginning of their college experience, speaker Dr. Sonja Trent-Brown suggested ways to make the most of the learning opportunities ahead. Trent-Brown, an assistant professor of psychology, presented the address "A Multi-'tude' of O p p o r t u n i t y " during the college's O p e n i n g Convocation on Sunday, Aug. 29, in the Richard and Helen DeVos Fieldhouse. Approximately 2,000, primarily new students and their families, attended the event, which marked the formal beginning of the college's 149th academic year. The n e w students moved in o n Aug. 27 and returning students moved in Aug. 29. Fall semester classes started on Aug. 31. Trent-Brown included the colloquial short form of the word "attitude" in the title of her address to emphasize that

how the students approach their education will play a key role in what they gain f r o m it. She suggested that they adopt a •multitude of H 'tudes" in pursuing the multiple lessons that their years at H o p e will offer. First, she encouraged the students to embrace the way that the college's "multi-disciplinary" liberal arts education can give them additional perspectives with which to unde rs ta nd the world and make a difference in it. "As we better c o m p r e h e n d the world in which we l i v e its intricacies, nuances and subtleties—we are better prepared to meet its needs, to battle its ills, and to uplift its joys; making i n f o r m e d contributions and providing effective service," she said. Next, Trent-Brown said that they should also take full advantage of Hope's "multicontextual focus," or emphasis o n educating the whole person.

"At H o p e we identify three primary contexts within which we want students to grow—the academic, the co-curricular and the spiritual," she said. "Hope strives to be a place where the integration across these multiple contexts forges interconnections that produce m o r e substantial learning outcomes for students than could any of the single contexts alone." Third, she noted that the students should be open to the different styles of learning, or "multidirectional pedagogy," that they would encounter, f r o m traditional classroom teaching, to h a n d s - o n laboratory sessions, to field placements, servicelearning projects and more. "First, it encourages us to be open to learning in ways that may be very different f r o m what we have been accustomed to, because, you know, it may turn out that it works for you," she said. "Second, our 'multi'tude' encourages us to j u m p right in with full willingness

to participate. If we only give something a weak, half-attempt, we're already putting ourselves at a disadvantage for reaping m a x i m u m benefit f r o m the experience." Fourth, she encouraged t h e m to be open to the many prospects that the college will offer for "multicultural encounter," f r o m on-campus coursework to domestic or overseas off-campus study to learning f r o m others at H o p e who are f r o m different races and traditions. "We've heard about the necessities of globalization and being able to participate effectively in the changing world, in effect, becoming adept global citizens. So, yes, this will be i m p o r t a n t for your careers, but m o r e importantly, for your lives" she said. "Our 'multi'tude' here encourages openness, hospitality, patience, honesty, humility and compassion. It also undergirds courage—it can be scary moving outside your comfort zone, making 'first

contact,' not knowing what you might find and how it might change your life... change you." Trent-Brown also asked the students to pursue the multiple attitudes in a unified way, "thoughtful, intentional and prayerful in discerning amongst the choices." She reflected o n the way that the Christian faith informs learning at Hope and cited PhUippians 2:1-11, in which Paul calls for his readers to follow Christ's example and act in faith and humility, and with regard for others. "It has been said that 'it is your attitude... that determines your altitude,' meaning that you can achieve new heights in your life if you are intentional about your attitude," she said. "Class of 2014, there is no limit to the heights you might achieve sharing the attitude of Christ, and a 'multi-'tude approach to your education, you just have to rise to the occasion."


SEPTEMBER 8 ,

2 0 1 0

SPORTS

THE

Teams 'poised to impress' in fall season James Nichols

Bethany Strlpp

CO-EOITORHN-CHIEF

SPORTS EDITOR

ANCHOR

11

T H I S W E E K IN SPORTS Friday Women's Soccer

Sept. 10

vs. W h e a t o n a t 6 p . m .

Women's soccer

Men's soccer

T h i s year, t h e Flying D u t c h want to win, plain and simple. After a disappointing 8-9-1 W ^ . campaign last year, coach Leigh Sears' t e a m is setting t h e bar high. Experience should n o t be a p r o b l e m as t h e t e a m h a s 20 r e t u r n i n g letter-winners. Kelsey Bos (11), Kara M a r s m a n ( 1 1 ) and Kristen Schwenk ( 1 1 ) are this year's captains. W i t h t h r e e years of experience each, leadership is definitely s o m e t h i n g they are capable of. Last season's leading goal scorer, Tricia Bajema ( 1 3 ) will be back for her s e c o n d year, along with a slew of o t h e r s t a n d - o u t sophomores. Following in the impressive f o o t s t e p s of last year's f r e s h m a n class, t h e class of 2014 s h o u l d have a lot t o look f o r w a r d t o in t h e next four years w h e n it c o m e s t o women's soccer. Evidence of this could be seen at the Flying Dutch's first g a m e against C o r n e r s t o n e University as a good n u m b e r of f r e s h m e n received a m p l e playing time. Cassie V a n d e n B o s c h , Raisa Yewah, Katie Gabriel and Rachel Rebhan all s h o w e d coach Sears what they can do, m o v i n g t h e ball u p and d o w n t h e field with t h e

Having e n o u g h r e t u r n i n g players isn't s o m e t h i n g t h e nien's soccer t e a m h a s to w o r r y a b o u t this year. W i t h 18 A % r e t u r n i n g letter-winners, t h e Flying D u t c h m e n w ^ 1 are poised t o i m p r e s s again this season. ) If n o t for a 1-0 loss to Calvin in t h e final g a m e of last season, t h e D u t c h m e n would have been c r o w n e d M1AA c h a m p i o n s for t h e fifth t i m e in nine years. C o - c a p t a i n s Logan Neil ('12) and | o h n T u r n e r ('11) lead this year's s q u a d during their first full season in t h e newly built Van A n d e l S t a d i u m . " W e have great leadership f r o m m a n y players including c a p t a i n s this year," head coach Steve Smith said. " M a n y of t h e juniors will also i m p a c t t h e t e a m in total t e a m play including S h a u n G r o e t s e m a

f

(12):

As has been t h e story for t h e past 20 years, t h e Flying D u t c h m e n will be guided by Smith. W i t h a .765 career win percentage. Smith k n o w s w h a t it takes t o f o r m a w i n n i n g t e a m a n d w h a t t o expect out of his t e a m each season. "1 a m expecting a great season in regards to b o t h success o n t h e fields and relationships within t h e team," Smith said. "I expect players t o c o n t r i b u t e this year."

poise of an u p p e r c l a s s m a n .

Men's cross country Women's cross country Captains Kevin Richardson (11) t e a m as t h e Flying title. Last year, t h e for t h e second t r a i n i n g is p a r t goal.

The w o m e n ' s cross c o u n t r y t e a m enters t h e season with high expectations. The Flying D u t c h was r a n k e d s e c o n d in t h e Great Lakes Region a m o n g o t h e r N C A A Division III w o m e n ' s c r o s s - c o u n t r y t e a m s in a preseason poll, four places higher t h a n it finished last year. The t e a m h a s several key r u n n e r s r e t u r n i n g this season, including multiple f o r m e r all-MIAA athletes. "(The w o m e n ' s cross c o u n t r y team) r e t u r n s their t o p 10 r u n n e r s f r o m last year's t e a m and have a d d e d m a n y n e w solid f r e s h m a n and transfer runners," coach M a r k N o r t h u i s said. "Seven of t h e r e t u r n i n g r u n n e r s h a v e been all-MIAA in t h e past, a n d t h e t o p ^ 12 r u n n e r s should challenge for all-MIAA h o n o r s this season."

"Last April in o u r t e a m m e e t i n g we set goals for this season and t h e n talked a b o u t w h a t it would take to m e e t those goals," coach M a r k N o r t h u i s said. " O n e of t h e m a j o r factors in achieving these goals w a s to c o m m i t to a very strong s u m m e r training p r o g r a m . O u r r e t u r n i n g runners, have s h o w n in t h e first t w o weeks of practice that they worked hard this

vs. Olivet at 6 : 3 0 p . m .

Saturday Women's Soccer

Sept. 1 1

vs. D e P a u w a t 5 p . m .

Tuesday Women's Soccer

Sept. 14

vs. S i e n a H e i g h t s 7 p . m .

IN BRIEF

STRONG START FOR CROSS COUNTRY TEAMS Both t h e men's and w o m e n ' s cross c o u n t r y t e a m s o p e n e d their season o n Sept. 4 at t h e Vanderbilt Invitational. The t o u r n a m e n t , f o u n d e d in 1966, was originally k n o w n as t h e H o p e Invitational but was ren a m e d in 2002 in h o n o r of form e r H o p e coach Bill Vanderbilt. The Flying D u t c h placed first, led by Emily Fischer ( 1 1 ) w h o also finished first overall. C o r n e r s t o n e and Albion finished second and third respectivly. T h e H o p e w o m e n have w o n seven of t h e past ten Vanderbilt invitationals. The Flying D u t c h m e n placed s e c o n d o u t of five t e a m s at t h e invitational. - M I A A o p p o n e n t Albion placed first. They were led by N a t h a n Love ( 1 2 ) w h o finished in second, 20 s e c o n d s behind Cornerstone runner Alex G r e e n . The H o p e m e n last w o n t h e invitational in 2008.

MIAA PLAYERS OF THE WEEK Football: Kyle Warren ( 1 1 ) Free Safely

summer." M e n ' s Soccer: Shaun Groetsema ( 1 2 ) Forward/Midfielder

Women's golf

Men's golf The men's golf t e a m is c o m i n g off o n e of its best seasons ever, w i n n i n g t h e M I A A for t h e sixth t i m e in seven years and placing n i n t h in t h e N C A A Division III c h a m p i o n s h i p , t h e best a H o p e men's golf t e a m has ever d o n e . Having lost only o n e golfer to g r a d u a t i o n , t h e t e a m will r e t u r n m a n y players w h o e x p e r i e n c e d this success. O n c e again t h e Flying D u t c h m e n have just o n e senior o n t h e team, captain C h r i s Ansel ( 1 1 ) . Nicholas C a m p b e l l (12), | o h n C a n n o n (13), Austin Farah (13), A d a m Peplinksi ( 1 3 ) , and A n d y T h o m s o n ( 1 2 ) also r e t u r n f r o m last year's s q u a d . Sean La D o u c e (13), M a t t h e w N o o r d h o f f (13), and Jason Vander Klok ( 1 4 ) r o u n d o u t t h e roster. H o p e , like all o t h e r M I A A teams, will host o n e c o n f e r e n c e t o u r n a m e n t this season. Hope's t u r n will c o m e o n Monday, Sept. 27, w h e n t h e M I A A t e a m s will gather at W u s k o w h a n Players C l u b for t h e sixth j a m b o r e e of t h e season. O n Saturday, t h e men's golf t e a m traveled to Battle Creek to c o m p e t e in t h e Lou Collins Invitational h o s t e d by Olivet College. They placed sixth out of 15 teams, o n e stroke behind rival Calvin College. Ansel finished highest o u t of Hope's golfers as part of a seven-way tie for seventh place with a t w o day score of 7 4 - 7 7 - 1 5 1 . C a m p b e l l was next for t h e D u t c h m e n as part of a three-way tie for 14th place.

H a g a n (11), N a t e Love ( 1 2 ) and Jordan will lead t h e men's cross c o u n t r y D u t c h m e n look t o claim t h e M I A A t e a m finished second t o rival Calvin t i m e in as m a n y years. A s u m m e r of of t h e team's strategy to r e a c h i n g this

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Last year, t h e w o m e n ' s golf t e a m finished third in t h e M I A A and was r a n k e d 15th in t h e nation in t h e Golf W o r l d / N G C A Division III poll, which w a s c o n d u c t e d by t h e National Golf C o a c h e s Association and Golf W o r l d Magazine. The Flying D u t c h will look to improve u p o n that this year, led by c o - c a p t a i n s M e g a n Scholten ( 1 2 ) and Emily A t s m a (12). Both Scholten and C h a r l o t t e Park ( 1 3 ) were all-MIAA golfers last year. Scholten was also n a m e d to t h e first all-MIAA t e a m her f r e s h m a n year. Lauren Z a n d s t r a (12), Katie Blodgett (11), Shali Clark (13), Maggie M a n g a n (13), and A n d r e a M c C a r t y ( 1 2 ) will also be back for t h e Flying D u t c h this year. N e w faces to t h e t e a m include M a r y Bradley ( 1 4 ) and Rachelle Havenaar (14). The women's golf t e a m hosted its lone h o m e c o n f e r e n c e invitational Sept.7 at M a c a t a w a Legends C o u n t r y Club. O n Saturday, they will travel to A l m a t o c o m p e t e in t h e first w o m e n ' s golf M I A A j a m b o r e e of t h e fall 2010 season. The scores f r o m these j a m b o r e e s will be c o m b i n e d with scores f r o m t h e four o t h e r j a m b o r e e s that will take place this fall. Those totals will be c o m b i n e d with t h e total f r o m the M I A A c h a m p i o n s h i p , which will take place O c t . 8 and 9, to d e t e r m i n e t h e M I A A c h a m p i o n for t h e season. BY BRITTANY LAPHA

M e n ' s Soccer: Logan Neil ( 1 2 ) Goal Keeper

HOPE SOCCER KICKS OFFSEASON The w o m e n ' s soccer t e a m started its season with a 1-0 loss to visiting s q u a d C o r n e r s t o n e o n Sept. 1. The loss c a m e despite o u t s h o o t i n g C o r n e r s t o n e 14-5. The Flying D u t c h also fell 7 - 1 in its Sept. 4 m a t c h against O h i o Northern. The men's soccer t e a m began its season with a 2-0 s h u t o u t win against G o s h e n o n S e p t e m b e r 3. The Flying D u t c h m e n c o n t i n u e d their early season success t h e following day with a 9 - 1 victory over t h e M i k w a u k e e School of Engineering. Shaun G r o e t s e m a ( 1 2 ) scored three goals in t h e match, bringing his w e e k e n d total to four goals in seven shots. Jeffrey E k d o m ( 1 3 ) also e a r n e d a pair of goals against M S O E .


[ 2

SPORTS

THE ANCHOR

SEPTEMBER 8 , 2 0 1 0

Volleyball looks to build on last year's postseason success a great m o t i v a t o r w h e n you look u p and see it d u r i n g practice... b e c a u s e that's w h e r e we w a n t to b e this year, but even further," D e W e e r d t said. "But we k n o w we have t o work our b u t t s off in o r d e r to get back there again." W i t h a lot of key players back f r o m last year's team, t h e t e a m k n o w s w h a t it takes to be successful. " W e k n o w w h a t it takes t o get back [to t h e Final Four], so that's w h y we push each o t h e r and work extremely hard d u r i n g practices so t h a t we a r e ready t o take o n anything," D e W e e r d t said. The t e a m consists of 10 r e t u r n i n g letter w i n n e r s a n d five newcomers. The Flying D u t c h s t a r t e d its s e a s o n Sept. 3 at Calvin, participating in t h e M i d w e s t Challenge. The first m a t c h of t h e season was a little rocky. The Flying D u t c h d r o p p e d t h e first g a m e to M o u n t Union, Ohio, but t h e t e a m r e s p o n d e d by w i n n i n g t h e next two. The Flying D u t c h held o n to w i n t h e first m a t c h of t h e s e a s o n in t h e fifth g a m e by a score of 15-11.

Jake Bajema STAFF WRITER

C o m m i t m e n t is t h e c o r e e l e m e n t for H o p e College's volleyball t e a m . Ever since the final point of last year's Final Four loss t o eventual national champions Washington University-St. Louis, t h e Flying D u t c h have b e e n ready to get back o n t h e c o u r t and start a n e w q u e s t t o w a r d a national championship. The women k n o w t h a t is far d o w n t h e r o a d f r o m w h e r e they a r e now. "As far as goals go, w e w a n t to keep improving every day," senior c a p t a i n Sara D e W e e r d t ('11) said. "If we d o that, we will b e able to m a k e a r u n in t h e N C A A t o u r n a m e n t again." The new decoration in DeVos Fieldhouse, a b a n n e r commemorating the team's Final Four a p p e a r a n c e , h a n g s just t o t h e left of t h e volleyball s c o r e b o a r d . It serves as a c o n s t a n t r e m i n d e r of w h a t t h e t e a m did last year. "It's a great feeling of a c h i e v e m e n t f r o m last year, a n d

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A I M I N G H I G H — Greer B r a t s c h l e ( ' 1 3 ) s e t s t h e ball over t h e net In Hope's w i n over Thiel on Saturday.

"I was p r o u d of t h e way we w e r e able to figure things o u t eventually, b e c a u s e we w e r e kind of all over t h e place at first," D e W e e r d t said. "We have a lot of talented individuals o n this team, and it's neat to see e v e r y o n e c o n t r i b u t e in different ways as o u r t e a m e a r n e d t h e WT The s e c o n d m a t c h o n Sept. 3 went m o r e s m o o t h l y as t h e Flying D u t c h took c a r e of t h e Eagles of C o r n e r s t o n e University in t h r e e games. Saturday, Sept. 4 m a r k e d

t h e h o m e o p e n e r of t h e 2010 c a m p a i g n . The setting c h a n g e d t o t h e DeVos Fieldhouse for day t w o of t h e M i d w e s t Challenge. H o p e took o n t h e T o m c a t s of Thiel College, Pa. The Flying D u t c h took d o w n t h e T o m c a t s in four g a m e s (25: 10, 25-22, 17-25, 25-18) and i m p r o v e d its overall record t o 3-0. Hope dominated the t o u r n a m e n t over t h e w e e k e n d with a 156 t o 3 5 advantage over their o p p o n e n t s in kills a n d

146 to 31 advantage over their o p p o n e n t s in assists. Senior captain Kara Vande G u c h t e ('11) led t h e t e a m with 38 kills. Sophomore Greer Bratschie ('13) has taken t h e place of AllA m e r i c a n A n d r e a Helminiak ('10). Bratschie c o m p i l e d 128 assists over t h e w e e k e n d . Hopes season continues Sept. 10 w h e n t h e t e a m faces off against Olivet. In t h e 5-3 Tigers last m a t c h against the Flying Dutch, they w e r e defeated in t h r e e sets.

Football team drops season opener to Illinois Wesleyan Chris Russ ASSISTANT SPORTS

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B R E A K I N G T H R O U G H - T i m Elzlnga ( 1 1 ) evades a t a c k l e by a n Illinois Wesleyan player Saturday a f t e r n o o n .

EDITOR

H o p e College's football s q u a d e n d e d its season last year with a 3 - 7 overall record, causing t h e p r o g r a m to experience back-toback losing s e a s o n s for t h e third t i m e in t h e past 40 years. But taking a closer look at t h e season p u t s it in a slightly different light. Of t h e team's seven losses, six of t h e m were lost by seven or fewer points, including a o n e - p o i n t , a t w o - p o i n t , and t w o t h r e e - p o i n t losses. A n o t h e r g a m e , against t h e University of Wisconsin Eau Claire, was a s e v e n - p o i n t loss t h a t w a s d e c i d e d in d o u b l e overtime. This p a t t e r n of close calls was c o n t i n u e d in this season's Sept. 4 s e a s o n - o p e n e r against Illinois Wesleyan, a c o n t e s t t h a t was lost

t h o u g h t s o n t h e rankings. "I a m n o t surprised by o u r rankings a f t e r a year w h e n we finished 3-3 in the league," D r o p p e r s said. "We deserve to b e r a n k e d t h a t low. W e did however, lose a lot of those g a m e s by a small margin a n d we k n o w t h a t looking at this year. W e u n d e r s t a n d t h a t every play c o u n t s and t h a t it is up to us t o b e better o n every snap, b e c a u s e every s n a p c o u n t s in a football game." W i t h a n u m b e r of s t a r t e r s a n d key players returning, t h e t e a m is looking optimistically t o t h e rest of t h e season. The D u t c h m e n have five players c o m i n g back t o t h e t e a m with All-MIAA h o n o r s and 14 r e t u r n i n g starters. O n e of t h e All-MIAA h o n o r e e s , Kyle Dietrich ('11), enters the season r a n k e d fifth all-time in yards and catches.

" O u r goal this year is to win," D r o p p e r s said. "With winning, everything else falls into place." Despite all of t h e o p t i m i s m , t h e t e a m d o e s n e e d to address s o m e consistent w e a k n e s s e s in o r d e r to succeed. Their seasono p e n i n g loss m a r k s their 20th straight n o n - c o n f e r e n c e loss. T h e t e a m h a s also not w o n a season o p e n e r since their 2004 campaign. This early season w e a k n e s s was seen last year as t h e t e a m did not e a r n its first w i n until t h e fifth g a m e of t h e year, against c o n f e r e n c e o p p o n e n t Albion. Despite this. Droppers believes t h a t this year's t e a m can o v e r c o m e past w e a k n e s s e s and grow t h r o u g h o u t t h e year. "We k n o w t h a t we have t h e o p p o r t u n i t y to b e an o u t s t a n d i n g football team," h e said.

20-16.

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T h e g a m e started well for t h e D u t c h m e n , w h o held a 10-0 lead at halftime. H o p e stayed in t h e lead t h r o u g h m o s t of t h e g a m e , until a six-play drive at t h e e n d of the f o u r t h q u a r t e r by t h e Titans that resulted in a t o u c h d o w n and p u t t h e m o n top, 20-16. Asaresultofits 3-3conference record in t h e 2009 season, a r e c o r d w h i c h resulted in a f o u r t h place Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association finish, t h e Flying D u t c h m a n w e r e r a n k e d f o u r t h in t h e M I A A p r e - s e a s o n poll. Team Droppers

captain )oshua ('11) explained his

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09-08-2010