086 board of foreign missions rca 1918

Page 1

Eighty-sixth Annual Report

Board of "

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Foreign Missions

L:r:^h‘

Reformed Church in America

1918 7 Hr-

m't

SENMtoW VltsiERH 1HEQL06

R E F O R M E D C H U R C H B U I L D I N G 25 East Twenty-second Street, N e w Y o r k


B O A R D OF FOREIGN MISSIONS MEMBERS OF THE BOARD 1916— 1919 R ev. f . F. BERG, D.D. R e v . W. P. BRUCE, D.D. R e v . EDWARD DAWSON R e v . WM. B. HILL, D.D. R e v . MALCOLM

J. H. WHITEHEAD JOHN BINGHAM T. G. HUIZINGA, M.D. M r . V. H. YOUNGMAN J. MACLEOD, D.D. R M

ev. r.

1917— 1920 R e v . E. J . BLEKKINK, D.D. R e v . E. G. READ, D.D. R e v . W. H. S. DEMAREST, D.D. R e v . C. H. STEWART, D.D. R e v . LEWIS FRANCIS, D.D. M r . WM. L. BROWER R e v . T. H. MACKENZIE, D.D. M r . CORNELIUS DOSKER R e v . J. P. SEARLE, D.D. 1918— 1921 R e v . HENRY E. COBB, D.D. M r . A. P. COBB R e v . J. ADDISON JONES, D.D. M r.W. E. FOSTER R e v . JOHN ENGELSMAN M r . A. H. MOORE R e v . H. J. VELDMAN M r . E. E. OLCOTT R e v . A. VENNEMA, D.D.

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD R e v . HENRY E. COBB, D.D., President R e v . J. P. SEARLE, D.D., Rice President R e v . J. H. WHITEHEAD, Recording Secretary R e v . W. I . CHAMBERLAIN, P h .D., Foreign Secretary

M r.F. M. POTTER, Associate Secretary R e v . W. J. VAN KERSEN. Holland, Mich., District Secretary M r . HOWELL S. BENNET, Treasurer R e v . J. L. AMERMAN, D.D., Assistant Treasurer, Emeritus EXECUTIVE c o m :m i t t e e

R e v . T. H. MACKENZIE, D.D., Chairman M r . JOHN BINGHAM R e v . J. F. BERG, D.D. M r . A. P. COBB R e v . W. H. S. DEMAREST, D.D. M r.W. E. FOSTER R e v . WM. B. HILL, D.D. M r . A. H. MOORE R ev. J . H. WHITEHEAD M r . E. E. OLCOTT E x officiis: T h e P r e s i d e n t a n d V ice P r e s i d e n t

ARABIAN MISSION TRUSTEES R e v . J. P. SEARLE, D.D. R e v . J. H. WHITEHEAD M r . JOHN BINGHAM OLCOTT

R e v . H. E. COBB, D.D., President R e v . LEWIS FRANCIS, D.D. R e v . T. H. MACKENZIE, D.D. M r . E. E.

MEDICAL ADVISERS CONDICT W. CUTLER, M.D., 13S West 76th Street, New York CHARLES N. DOWD, M.D., 127 West 72nd Street, New York LILIAN K. P. FARRAR, M.D., 40 West 96th Street, New York C. OTTO STUMPF. M.D., Queens, Long Island, N. Y. .T. G. HUIZINGA, M.D., Zeeland, Michigan



T he R ev. H enry E. C obb , D.D. President of the Board of Foreign Missions


Eighty-sixth Annual Report of the

Board of Foreign Missions of the Reformed Church in America T h e Sixty-first Y e a r of Separate Action Organized, 1832

Independent, 1857

Incorporated, 1860-

MISSIONS A m o y , China, 1842 Arcot, India, 1853 Japan, 1859 Arabia, 1894

Presented to the General S y n o d at A s b u r y Park, N . J. June, 1918



THE R EFORMED CHU RC H PROGRESS CAMPAIGN Since the printing of the report of the B o a r d of Foreign Missions, S y n o d has m e t and passed u p o n the unusually import­ ant recommendations laid before it this year. T h e step most farreaching in its consequences, not only to the Foreign B oa rd but to the activity of the individual church, w as the adoption of the Five-Year P r o g r a m for the R e f o r m e d C h u r c h Progress Cam pa ig n, which was proposed to the churches through S y n o d in a most impressive memorial. Tha t w e m a y have this o b ­ jective continually before us in our work, special attention is called to the recommendations of the B o a r d on pp. X L V I I a nd X L V I I I w hi ch delineate the relationship of the Foreign B o a r d to this great F o r w a r d M o v e m e n t , a nd w hi ch were adopted in toto b y Synod. T h e r e is also given here in full the report of S y n o d ’s C o m m i t t e e on the Memorial, the adoption of w h i c h by General S y n o d has committed all of us to this great progressive effort during these c o m i n g five years.

REPORT OF SYNOD’S COMMITTEE To the General Synod of the Reformed Church in America. Fathers and Brethren: Y o u r Committee to act upo n the Memorial presented by our six boards relative to a Five-Year 'Denominational Program, is impressed by this spectacle of the whole Denomination stepping forward to be counted into the vast enterprises of an aroused world. W e have had forward m o v e m e n t s of m a n y sorts in recent years, but never have wte had a united and correlated m o v e m e n t of all our boards and agencies based op a wide Denominational Program. S o natural does this plan seem today that w e w on de r w h y it has not crystallized before. W e note that other de­ nominations are n o w taking this step or are hard at w o r k pro-


secuting such plans. T h e sacrificial spirit of the hour d e m a n d s unified effort and unified control. T h e President of the United States, through the Federal Council of Churches, has called every church to raise its p o w e r to the very utmost efficiency as a w a r measure. If w e are heedless to this call w e shall become very seriously embarrassed and possibly submerged in the surge of high causes which m a r k the present hour. Should not en­ thusiasm for our task, as the R e f o r m e d Church I N A M E R I C A . be equal to that displayed by the R e d Cross or the Y. M . C. A. ? Both of these agencies in large degree look to the Christian C hurch as their mother. Shall w e seem to live in spite of the w a r or in the w a r ? Secretary of W a r B aker’s slogan ought to apply with us, “In it to win it.” W e are called to m a k e our contribution as a de­ nomination. It is a most real challenge. Leave it unanswered in this General S y n o d and w e shall not contribute much. W e shall discover ourselves “dwelling apart in the peace of our self-content” in the very midst of a threatened world. W e are, therefore, proud w h e n our splendid secretaries re­ act as o ne m a n to such a world situation a n d then unite to tell us that w e as a denomination are drafted into the c o m m o n cause. Believing in our church w e would answer as eager volunteers. W e would, therefore, respectfully r e c o m m e n d : 1. That this plan to promulgate a Five-Year Denominational P r o g r a m be approved with a cheer. 2. That the several boards concerned be requested to organize a Joint Committee for five years to prosecute this plan. 3. That this Joint Committee be e m p o w e r e d to employ an Executive Secretary if such a course be d ee me d wise at any time during the five years. 4. A s a concrete expression of wha t ought to be achieved on the financial side, that General S y n o d declare its purpose to advance year by year its financial support of its boards and funds concerned in this Program, so that by 1923, it shall a m o u n t to $1,000,000.


5. That w e e m p o w e r the Joint Committee to adopt s o m e scheme of awarding a suitable service flag or other distinguish­ ing marks in the printed reports of the individual church’s w o r k so that the progress of this P r o g r a m m a y be adequately visual­ ized for our people and our children.

APPENDIX

-

T h e Committee further suggested the following ten lines of development as necessary for the individual church in carrying out this p r o g r a m : ' . . 1. 2. 3. 4.

T o endeavor to double its commu ni ca nt membership. T o secure at least one candidate for the ministry. T o provide efficient training for Bible School Teachers. T o organize Y o u n g People’s Societies into Training Classes for Christian Service.

5.

T o see that every m e m b e r is a subscriber or regular reader of s o m e R e f o r m e d C hurch periodical. 6. T o organize an effective M e n ’s Missionary Committee. 7. T o enlist every w o m a n of the C h u r c h in a W o m e n ’s M i s ­ sionary Organization. 8.

T o adopt systematic and proportionate giving.

9.

T o contribute pro rata to all denominational Boards.

10. service.

To

render effective community,

national, and

world


L.


ANNUAL REPORT, 1918 T h e B oa rd of Foreign Missions respectfully presents to General S y n o d its Eighty-sixth A n n u a l Report and the Sixty-first of its separate a nd independent action. . T h e year has been characterized by m a r k e d and unique events, all of these the m o r e conspicuous because of the wide background of the Great W o r l d W a r in which, during the year, the United States has b e c o m e an active participant and to which, during the s a m e twelve months, all the countries in Asia, where our missionaries live and labor, have b ecome even m o r e closely related. F r o m every point of view this has been an eventful year. Judging b y its activities and responsibilities toward the foreign missionary enterprise of the Christian Church, the R e f o r m e d C hu rc h in A me ri ca has stood loyally b y its obligations in the midst of turmoil a nd conflicting claims maintaining m e n and w o m e n in the various fields and providing m e a n s necessary to the task undertaken. It has not only been an eventful year; it has been a great year in the history of the B o a r d ’s relation’ to the C hurch at h o m e and the Churches in Asia growing u p under its nourishing care. It has been a year in which m e n ’s souls have been tried a nd their judgments tested. A policy of abridge­ m e n t has been urged in' the interests of the advancement of the great National task that is n o w clearly paramount. These have naturally been applied to interests and obligations most remote. Appeals of an imperative character have crowded in upon us a nd u p o n our Constituency. In the midst of these c o m m a n d i n g external events and of m a n y justifiable distractions from without, the internal A d m in is ­ trative A g e n c y of the B oard has undergone a vital and critical transformation. W e still feel and shall long continue to feel the loss of the helpful companionship and fruitful cooperation of our late President, Dr. John G. Fagg. H o w ev er , the prompt assumption of the duties of his office by his successor, our n e w


iv

FOREIGN MISSIONS

President, his quick comprehension of its responsibilities and duties, his sympathetic understanding of our administrative relations to the C hurch at h o m e and to the missionaries abroad, his strong and effective cooperation and leadership, have m a d e this transition an invigorating experience. T h e Executive A g e n c y of the B o a r d has similarly under­ gone an important change in the H o m e Secretaryship. After four years in this relationship, the Rev. E. W . Miller, D.D., felt constrained to withdraw from this service in October, 1917. M a n y expressions of sincere appreciation have reached the B oa rd of Dr. Miller’s helpful and sympathetic relations to ministers and missionaries during his incumbency of this office. T h e following action w a s taken b y the B o a r d : R esolved . 1. That the B oa rd deeply sympathizes with Dr. Miller in the impaired condition of his health a n d expresses its earnest and sincere hope for his complete restoration. 2. That the B oa rd expresses hearty appreciation of all that Dr. Miller has been able to d o in this important office for the promotion of the cause of Foreign Missions. Advantage w a s taken of the presence in this country o n furlough of the Rev. L. J. Shafer and he w a s invited to assume, temporarily, the position of H o m e Secretary. T h e B oa rd records with gratitude its appreciation of the valuable character of M r. Shafer’s cooperation during the year. Active and judicious in the carrying out of his tasks in the office and most responsive and diligent in his visits to Churches and Soceties, he has borne a large share in the unusual results of the year. H e will carry back with him, as he n o w returns to Japan, the confidence a nd the best wishes of the B oard and of the Churches. T h r o u g h this relationship the Mission in Japan will be brought still closer to us and w e to it as it enters upon its n e w reorganized life. These events in the inner life of the Board, while of unusual importance were by n o m e a n s the most eventful of the year. O u r representatives a nd colleagues on. the mission fields have had their unusual experiences. T h e Service Flag of the B o a r d


bears upon its white field nineteen blue stars and upo n its red field, one golden star. This golden star represents Mrs. Arthur K. Bennett. Commissioned as Dr. Christine Iverson in 1909 as a medical missionary to Arabia, she gave her life in March, 1916, in w a r service while attending upo n Turkish prisoners of war, fro m w h o m she contracted typhus fever, the Hospital in Basrah being then in R e d Cross service under the Medical Department of the British Expeditionary Forces in Mesopotamia. O f the nineteen blue stars, two stand for m e m b e r s of the Board,— the President and Dr. J. Addison Jones, w h o have both been in w a r service in connection with the Y. M . C. A., one in a southern c a m p in the United States a nd the other in France. O f the remaining sixteen blue stars, thirteen represent missionaries, in fact and in embryo, all of w h o m w ould be in the mission field at this time or in the near future had they not responded to the call of the great National task n o w so clearly paramount. O f this number, eight are physicians, thus bringing our medical w o r k under peculiar strain. T h e B o a r d does not complain of this drain u p o n the strength of our missionary forces already wea ke ne d .by other causes. It points out, however, that our missionaries are sharing in the service of our country in the time of its peril a nd this by voluntary service. 'Several of our appointees to ordained missionary service have waived their exemptions under the military service law and have thus volun­ tarily m a d e themselves liable to such service. This is a noble record and one in .which the B o a r d and the C hurch m a y well take pride. If a nd w h e n these m e n in the Providence of G o d are permitted to carry out their life purpose in the mission field, they will be enriched with an experience and with a consciousness of loyalty to the immediate duty that is b ou nd to raise their ideals of missionary service and add great value to that service. Turning n o w to the details of our administrative respon­ sibility : • W h e n the B oa rd in October last confronted its annual task of m a k i n g the. appropriations to the Missions, a task which always involves profound concern, but in this first w a r year particularly so,Rafter prolonged consideration it adopted a policy


of caution and yet of courage. It resolved to limit its appro­ priations to the w o r k of the Missions, and the maintenance of the status quo, denying all appeals for advance although grievous disappointment w a s involved in this limitation. It further re­ solved to meet fully its obligations in the matter of missionary maintenance holding itself liable to increased charges on this account as the economic conditions caused by the w a r in China, India and Arabia might necessitate additional appropriations for the maintenance allowance of the missionaries. In the course of the year this has occurred adding considerably to the obliga­ tions of the Board. T h e B oa rd furthermore resolved to'meet the extra expendi­ tures occasioned by the w a r conditions, such as enhanced rates of exchange, of travel, and of freight transportation. W hi le this policy w a s hardly m o r e than one of simple honesty, it none the less required courage to undertake it in a year of such financial confusion and strain, m o r e especially w h e n the year began with a deficit balance of $29,500, the largest of m a n y years. W h a t n o w is the story of the year ? • T h e Board stood to its obligations. It sent out to the M i s ­ sions thirteen n e w missionaries of the sixteen commissioned dur­ ing the previous year, three having been detained, not by the Board, but by the call of the country to National service. It w a s aided in this undertaking by the generous cooperation of the Milton Stewart Evangelistic Fund, which m et the expense .of the outfit and travel to the field. T h e B oa rd further recognized its obligation to missionary maintenance on the fields b y adding to the allowance of the mis­ sionaries in India, China and Arabia because of the altered economic conditions in those countries, revealed not b y the ap­ peals of the missionaries, but by conditions laid bare to the inquiries of the Deputation of the B oa rd w h e n visiting the missionaries t wo years ago and confirmed b y later investigations. O n their part, the missionaries abroad report to the C hurch at h o m e clear evidences of Divine favor resting on their en­ deavors. In each one of the mission fields there have been developments that have led to present achievements and give


promise of challenging opportunities in the future. These are set forth in the paragraph that follows upon the Mission Fields. Suffice it to record here in this S u m m a r y of the story of the year that, while the Missionary Forces and the associated Native A g e n c y have remained about the same, there has been either steadiness or distinct progress in all the items that customarily indicate the year’s activities. In two, in particular, is there cause for especial gratification. T h e n u m b e r received fro m these non-Christian environments on confession of faith into the Church of Christ increased in the year by 2 5 % , while the contributions of the indigenous churches, as the outward expression of their n e w Christian allegiance, have increased about 4 0 % . W e measure our devotion to this phase of our C h u r c h ’s life in good part by the financial outcome of the year at home. In order to meet in part the additional obligations of this year certain to rise ;put of w a r ’s alarms, and as a further committal to our o w n spiritual purposes in the midst of m a n y and pressing National claims, the B oa rd proposed, and secured the cordial cooperation of the Board of Domestic Missions, in a plan calling for an additional fund for Missions based upon O n e D a y ’s I n c o m e f r o m every m e m b e r of the R e f o r m e d Church. W e ventured to anticipate about $15,000 from this source. S o m e of the most courageous a m o n g us hoped for $20,000. This plan w a s entered into heartily by the C hurch in general and our highest anticipa­ tions have been well nigh doubled as the fund reports about $35,000 received during the year. This w a s apportioned a m o n g the four Boards of Domestic and Foreign Missions, our o w n separate share being $12,615.17. T h e gifts of the Churches this year through the usual chan­ nels for the regular w o r k of the B oa rd are $184,523 as against $175,661 last year. T h e receipts from legacies are $43,827 as against $18,281 last year. T h e gifts for Special Objects are s o m e w h a t less than those of last year, $23,1.34 against $27,910. T h e receipts of the Arabian Mission have been very similar to those of last year, $35,795 against $35,725, while the contribu­ tions for Special Objects in tTiis Mission have exceeded those of last year by about $5,000. Apart fro m legacies and interest


viii

FOREIGN

MISSIONS

on invested funds the contributions of the Churches for our regular w o r k have arisen to $270,820, an increase of $11,497 above last year which recorded the best results then attained in our history. T h e total receipts f r o m all sources last year were $302,453. B y approval of General S y n o d w e set for ourselves the goal this year of $325,000 and w e have attained it in the receipt of $325,292, a gain of $22,839 over lastyear and the highest in our history by a considerable amount. There are one or t wo corollories in this pleasing story that add to our gratification. ' T h e per capita giving, which is always significant and in which w e hold such an honorable place of leadership a m o n g the Churches in America, has risen fro m $2.31 to $2.46 for all re­ ceipts jind fro m $1.98 to $2.04 for the contributions of the Churches alone. Moreover, these gratifying results are a c c o m ­ panied with the satisfactory condition that only about 7 % of the B o a r d ’s income has been expended on h o m e charges, which include the cultivation 6f missionary interest at h o m e and the administration of w o r k abroad, .as against 9 % last year. ' M a y w e n o w complete the story by pointing out the prac­ tical effect of these unusual receipts upon our obligations? 1. W e have rem ov ed the staggering deficit of $29,500 with which w e began the year. 2. W e have m et all our obligations to the maintenance of our regular w o r k in China, India, Japan and Arabia. 3. W e have m e t the extra expense of the increased m a i n ­ tenance allowances of our missionaries on all four fields.' . 4. W e have maintained the ante bellum rate of gold trans­ mission to A m o y for the maintenance both of the w o r k and of the missionaries at an added expenditure of approximately $7,500. . 5. W e have m et all the cost of exchange in our transmis­ sions to China thus far charged against us although there is a very probable liability of approximately $11,000 still to be met w h e n the bills for exchange c o m e in on account of borrowings fro m funds awaiting expenditure on the field w h e n these shall be returned.


THE

S T O R Y O F THE. Y E A R

ix

In other words, w e have m et the obligations inherited from 1917 and all the obligations at present resting upo n us both regular and special created by w a r conditions, both for the Board and the Arabian Mission, and our credit is unimpaired. ' In addition to this gratifying result to the financial aspects of the year, the t wo large funds undertaken by the Board during the year have practically been completed. 1. T h e A m o y C o m m e m o r a t i o n a nd F a g g M emorial F u n d of $75,000 has been definitely subscribed to the a m o u n t of $50,000 while the balance is confidently expected from plans n o w clearly laid down. 2. T h e Basrah .Educational F u n d of $25,000 is likewise definitely subscribed to the a m o u n t of $15,000 and the balance is well assured. T h u s these extra funds amounting in all to $100,000 have been secured within this year. THE

MISSION

FIELDS

B y a striking coincidence that can be nothing less than a challenging Providence, each one of our Missions records events a nd developments in the past year that point to a future bright with promise though it m a y call for strength and courage to meet it. Ja p a n .

.

T h e Mission in Japan is looking forward with eagerness to the developments of its plans of concentration in evangelistic w o r k growing out of its reorganization as one Mission and the transfer of the fields to the north to the G e r m a n R e f o r m e d Mission & nd the C hurch of Christ in Japan m a k i n g possible a m o r e organized, definite and clear prosecution of its work, both educational and evangelistic, in m o r e concentrated fields. China.

-

T h e oldest Mission of our B oa rd at A m o y , China, is con足 fronting the enlarged responsibility for the evangelization of the N or th River District by m e a n s of the C o m m e m o r a t i o n and


M emorial F u n d and points to this important opportunity for enlarging its work. India . „ T h e evangelistic opportunity in India also is one that has greatly stirred the Arcot Mission. This is, in great part, the result of the M a s s M o v e m e n t in India. T h e Indian Church Board, upon which the Mission has devolved largely the respon­ sibility for evangelistic work, has divided into the various Circles of this B oa rd responsibility for a definite n u m b e r of additions to the South India United C hurch within the present calendar year arid there is fair prospect that there will be an addition of 7,500 to this Church as the result of the special evangelistic campaign of this year. A rabia . T h e opportunities of the w o r k inland, both to the north and the west of our stations along the Persian Gulf, are so striking as to be accounted for only as answers to the prayers of our mis­ sionaries for three decades as they have labored in earnestness and expectancy for the opening of the interior. T h e fruitful valleys of the Tigris and the Euphrates in the region of M e s o ­ potamia to the'north of Basrah, the wide territory of the great Sheikh of Riadh to the best of Bahrein would seefn n o w by varying circumstances to be open to the advance of Christian propaganda a nd the hearts of our missionaries in these stations are deeply stirred at the prospect of the great opportunity long delayed. T H E MISSIONS A T W O R K

.

A moy. T h e Seventy-fifth Anniversary year of the founding of the A m o y Mission has been one of normal growth on the field. T w o experiences of the year stand out in the report of the A m o y Station: the one, the disastrous typhoon that swept across A m o y on September the 12th; the other, the visit of the evan-


gelistic party under the leadership of M r . B u c h m a n . The typhoon took its toll of life a m o n g the Chinese and did consid­ erable d a m a g e to Mission property, which in s o m e cases it took three m on th s to repair, but it taught valued lessons in renewed dependence and consecration to missionaries and to Chinese as well. O n e Christian f r o m one of the A m o y churches, in grati­ tude for his almost miraculous escape, has decided to give his life to the Christian ministry. In answer to his non-Christian parents’ objection, he proposed telling the m that their son died in the storm and that, therefore, he o w e d his life to the L o r d w h o had rescued it. T h e other striking experience of the year mentioned in the report is the visit of the evangelistic party to A m o y . T h e emphasis w a s put u p o n individual work, and, in the churches, in the Girls’ School— where at one meeting sixty or m o r e promised to do personal w o r k — in the W o m e n ’s School a nd in the Hospital there w a s a real quickening of the Spirit a nd m o r e definite effort to win others to Christ resulted. T h e Tong-an report calls attention to the political back­ ground of the year, which w a s not without its effect upon the work. T h e early part of the year w a s colored by the crusade against the cultivation of the p oppy for opium, which seems to have been entirely successful with the result that, in a District formerly famous for the a m o u n t of its poppy acreage, no o p i u m w a s produced last year. D uring the latter part of the year, because of the national unrest, several of the best m e m b e r s of the Tong-an Church were compelled to leave their families and their business to escape frony unfounded and false charges which were m a d e against them. T h e year, also, has been one of busi­ ness depression, which has, to s o m e extent, limited the extension w o r k of the church. , A m o n g the churches there were'the inevitable lawsuits and discouragements due to the lack of a resident Pastor, but, on the whole, the year w a s one of normal growth, 141 n e w m e m b e r s having been added during the year. A n e w n a m e w a s added to the roll of churches in the Tong-an District by the organiza­ tion of the three Chapels in An- kh oe County into a separate church. A step forward has also been taken on Kolongsu—


the island opposite A m o y , where Mission and c o m m u n i t y resi­ dences are— by the agreement that A m o y pastors alternate living on the island for a year each, to look after 'the families connected with A m o y churches that are living there. Fifteen n e w Chapels have been opened during the year. T h e usual effort w as m a d e to. reach the great mas s of nonChristians in the out-stations. A t one Chapel t w o weeks of special effort resulted in meetings averaging 120 in attendance with 300 present at tffe largest meeting. In several places preach­ ing bands were organized from the membership of the church - to visit outlying villages. T h e Classes of the Ton g- an District decided upon a p ro gr am for the improvement of conditions in the local churches, comprising an effort (1) to rid the church of those imperfections that n o w m a r it, such as quarrels, lax S u n d a y observance, business in forbidden drugs, disobedience to church rules about buying daughters-in-law, a nd inter-marriage with heathen; (2) to secure the church’s revenue by adopting a plan of regular weekly offerings; (3) to teach every m e m b e r to read the Bible and not to admit any n e w m e m b e r w h o cannot read unless there is s o m e valid excuse. A feature of the year’s w o r k at Chiang-chiu \Vas a Bible Conference with 30 preachers in attendance. * In primary educational work, the report reflects the prob­ lem arising f r o m the gradual establishment of G ov er nm en t schools. T h e case of the Kolongsu B o y s ’ School, where the falling off in attendance w a s partly due to the organization of a large G o v e r n m e n t school in the neighborhood, is quite typical of the general situation w here the G o v e r n m e n t schools have been established. In these schools the instruction is free and, in s o m e cases, poor families are paid to, send their girls to the school, while tuition is charged in the Mission schools. There is, however, still a large field in primary education because of the general inefficiency of the G o v e r n m e n t schools and because the worship of Confucius is m a d e a requirement. O n the whole, however, the year in the parochial schools has been a good one. T h e report of the Kolongsu School e m ­ phasizes the need of the introduction of vocational w o r k to meet


the d e m a n d that school education be better adapted to the needs of actual life. Chiang-chiu reports over 100 pupils and a n e w departure in a series of graduation exercises: one session given to singing and recitation by the graduates; one given to the graduation exercises proper; and one day given to manual w o r k exhibit, drill and athletics. This innovation proved so success­ ful that it will probably b ec om e a yearly affair hereafter. T h e Livingston Easter School enrolled over 200 and found great satisfaction in its n e w dining and dormitory building where 160 to 200 boys were fed each noon. • In this school, a dozen boyr are working their w a y through, which is considered to be quite unusual. ' In reading the report, one is struck with the prominence given to athletics in the Chinese schools. T h e Chiang-chiu B o y s ’ School again w o n the championship race open to twelve primary schools in the city. A t the Athletic M e e t of the South Fukien Association, in N ov em be r, T a l m a g e College w o n several firsts and scored a total of 26 points. T h e winning school secured 34 while the next lowest had but 6 points. A t the U n i o n Theological Seminary progress w a s m a d e in giving the students experience in practical Christian work. In addition to teaching in a S u n d a y School and conducting services, the students g o once a w e e k in turn to the Kolongsu Prison, where, by permission of the Municipal Council, they are allowed to preach the Gospel to the prisoners. T a l m a g e College had a year of m a r k e d progress. T h e year opened with the largest attendance and the largest entering class in the history of the school, and it closed with 101 students, which also establishes a record. During the year, the curriculum w a s revised, a n e w B oa rd of Trustees w a s created, and the policy of offering three courses w a s adopted. T h e n e w B oard of Trustees consists of an equal representation of Chinese and Americans and is designed to bring the institution into still closer touch with the church. T h e B oa rd has had several meet­ ings and has already m a d e s o m e definite contributions. O n e of the decisions of the B oa rd is to grant regular Middle School diplomas at the close of a four years’ course, with the definite


understanding that, henceforth, only Certificates of W o r k will be issued to those w h o have failed in any subjects. This n e w regulation is certain to m a k e for better scholarship. . Perhaps the most important change brought about by the n e w B oa rd of Trustees, is the institution of three courses of study: an English Course, the regular Middle School Classics Course, and the N o r m a l Course. This will m e a n additional teachers and added expense, but it will m a k e for greater effi­ ciency and will enable the College to prepare m e n for the F o o c h o w University with sufficient English to carry on the w o r k of the entering class. T h e N o r m a l Course is designed to provide a better equipped teaching force for the lower primary school, but the B oard of Trustees is aware of the fact that a higher N o r m a l Course must soon be added to provide the gentry and the G ov er nm en t schools with a better grade of teachers that will, at the sam e time, be Christian. T h e A m o y Children’s H o m e completed its thirtieth year with 156 children enrolled. T h e chief event of the year w a s the division of the institution into t w o smaller homes, one under the control of our Mission, and the other under- that of the English Presbyterian Church. A house has been purchased ad­ joining the Girls’ and W o m e n ’s schools and it is hoped that this change will m a k e for the better care of the children. ■ T h e Girls’ Schools have had a very successful year. T h e attendance of 64 at the Sio-khe School w a s the largest in its history. These schools accomplish a very important w o r k in Christianizing the girls themselves and in their indirect influence upo n the h o m e s from which they come. T h e W o m e n ’s Schools, also, report a year full of blessings. A s a result of their work, the w o m e n of the neighborhood are taught to read the Bible. In Sio-khe, at the present time, there are nearly 200 such w o m e n , w h o have learned to read the Bible through the w o r k of our School. This w o r k is carried on with little expense to the h o m e 1 Board, the School at A m o y , for example, costing the W o m a n ’s B oa rd only $303 M ex ic an last year. T h e other branches of W o m e n ’s w o r k have been carried on with c om me n d a b l e energy. A t Chiang-chiu, at the time of


MISSIONS A T W O R K , A R C O T

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the Chinese N e w Year, m a n y of the w o m e n of the church were induced to go with the missionaries and Bi'ble W o m e n in groups of two and threes to the h o m e s of their non-Christian friends and neighbors to witness for Christ. Medical w o r k at the H o p e and Wilhelmina Hospital has been s o m e w h a t curtailed, o wi ng to the fact that the hospital w a s open only about six months of the year. Great pleasure is expressed in the n e w outfit for the operating and sterilizing rooms and the electric lighting equipment. T h e Neerbosch Hospital has introduced six nurses into the Hospital to the great benefit %f the work. T h e T o w n - L a m b e r t treatment for o p i u m addicts has also been introduced with excellent results, attracting the atten­ tion of the local official,,who visited the Hospital and issued a mandate advising all o pi um addicts to go there to be cured. This has resulted in gaining the confidence of the people and of the native physicians. A rcot .

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T h e report that comes from the Arcot Mission is one of usual interest and significance. It is by no m e a n s an easy under­ taking to bring into a few paragraphs the review of the w o r k so old, so well established, so multifarious in its m a n y develop­ ments as that in the Aroot Mission. All this w o r k set in the background of the Great W a r in which India is so deeply in­ volved lends a significance to the w o r k of Christian Missions going steadily on in that country. T h e report m a k e s grateful mention of the reinforcements that have c o m e to the mission agency during the year. While there have been five withdrawals, s o m e temporary a nd s o m e per­ manent, there have been ten additions, six of these n e w m e m b e r s added during the year to the Mission. This circumstance is one of peculiar significance and encouragement in view of the deple­ tions of recent years, especially a m o n g the old and m o r e experi­ enced missionaries o wi ng to the sad circumstance of death. D u r ­ ing the year, the 'Mission w a s also gladdened by the visit of a deputation of ladies, m e m b e r s of the W o m a n ’s Board,— Mrs. D e W i t t K n o x , and the Misses V a n Sanford and Olcott.


While this is the fourth year of the Great W a r , in which India has been involved almost f r o m the beginning, a nd whole large num be rs of H in du s and M u h a m m a d a n s from the country have joined the military forces of the E m p i r e and these have been accompanied by not a few missionaries, this contribution on the part of India has been s o m e w h a t localized in the north so that the country as a, whole has not felt the strain of the war. During the year under review, however, an agitation for H o m e Rule sprang u p very suddenly and w a s s o m e w h a t artificially fastered by those w ho se motives were very far f r o m being the highest. This agitation received a large part of its support from the immature student class. Its later developments have been s o m e w h a t in the line of an interracial development of the country o wi ng to the fear on the part of the n o n - B r a h m a n castes that the dominance of the B r a h m a n w ou ld lead, to a condition far less desirable than the m o r e direct control of the British. This development, like the usual m o v e m e n t s in India w h e n not prop­ erly fostered, has led to a cessation of the agitation. O n e H i n d u ■in a long article published in a M a d r a s daily paper under H i n d u management, closed his statements with the words, “ India would be ready for H o m e Rule only w h e n the people all b ecame Chris­ tians.” During the year the British Cabinet sent to India for the purpose of studying conditions upo n the ground the Secretary of State for India and his visit will doubtless result in pro­ posals looking to a larger participation of the people of India in the G o v e r n m e n t of their country in the future. It has been wisely said that the greatest test of the p o w e r of the British people to build' u p governments will c o m e in the period i m m e ­ diately following the w a r when, in India particularly, s o m e large recognition m u s t be given to the loyalty of the people of that country in this time of strain to the Empire. T h e important large evangelistic w o r k of the Mission has been carried on through recent years by the Indian Church B oa rd which has n o w completed its first Sabbatical year. In 1910 the Mission passed over to this Board, c o m po se d both of A m e r i ­ cans and Indians, the latter being in the majority, all the evan­ gelistic w o r k and the funds for the maintenance of the same.


T h e careful study of the conditions resulting f r o m this experience of seven years indicate that the Mission m a d e no1mistake w h e n it thus called in the advice and cooperation of the Indian brethren. ^ T h e report of the year upon the operations of the Indian C h u r c h B oa rd is a very satisfactory one. A study of the statis­ tical tables give abundant cause for thankfulness. N e v e r before has the Mission reported a larger growth, nor one that has included so m a n y of the items of the usual statistical tables. There are ten n e w villages. T h e gain in the n u m b e r of n e w families is 431. O n confession of faith’366 have been received, a gain of 143. T h e communicants n o w n u m b e r 3,593, a gain of 170. N ev er before have so m a n y baptisms been reported, the actual n u m b e r being 1,133, a gain of 339. T h e total baptized^ c o m m u n i t y has thus g r o w n from 7,431 to 8,094, a gain of 658, while the total Christian c o m m u n i t y n o w n um be rs 15,671, a gain during the year of 1,622. N e w S u n d a y schools, eight in number, with an attendance of 569 pupils, are also reported. T h e gain in contributions amounting to Rs. 1,920 Is also very substantial. These figures s h o w that the Churches are m u c h stronger than in the previous year. These gains are largely credited to the Evangelistic C a m p a i g n of which this is the third' year, gaining in force and m o m e n t u m as the years have passed. Grateful mention is m a d e of the following significant comparative re­ sults : T h e gain in the n u m b e r of Christians for the three years is 3,524 or a yearly average of 1,175. F o r the three vears previous to this period, the total gain w a s 1,000 or a gain of 334. T h e total gains of the previous sixteen years are less than the gains for the last three years b y 145. These are assuredly encouraging indications of the growth of the C hu rc h under the fostering care of an organization so largely Indian. A l o n g with the growth in the life and activity of the Church there has been a parallel development in the increase of the use­ fulness of the institutions of the Mission, notably the Arcot T h e o ­ logical Seminary at Vellore, which has this yea'r taken a long step forward. T h e n u m b e r of students has reached the m a x i m u m in the life of the Institution. These are distributed a m o n g sev­ eral Missions that are uniting in the benefits and, in part, in the

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maintenance of this Seminary. Five m e n and t w o . w o m e n students are thus f r o m other Missions. The United Free C hurch of Scotland, the L o n d o n Mission, the Danish Lutheran Mission, and the Australian Presbyterian Mission all have representatives a m o n g the students. T h e year has, therefore, been notable for a large increase in the n u m b e r of students; the admission of a large class of better educated men, and the admission of a large n u m b e r of students fro m other Missions. Voorhees College at Vellore has also had a year of distinct progress. T h e withdrawal of M r . F. M . Potter on account of serious illness and after a period of singular effectiveness as principal left an unexpected and unusual responsibility u p o n a n e w m e m b e r of the Mission, the Rev. L. Hekhuis. H e has, however, w o n the respect of his students and the confidence of the Mission in his wise and effective discharge of his respon足 sible duties. T h e attendance at this institution has n o w risen to about 1,100 students. T h e success of this w o r k as recorded by examinations conducted by the University of Madras, has been very gratifying. T h e appointment to the Vice-Principalship of a former student of the College, w h o w h e n a lad left his ancestral B r a h m a n fold and b ec am e a Christian, M r . V. P. Adishehiah, M.A.,.L.T., is a unique event. Mr. Hekhuis bears good testimony to the unity and good will that has m a r k e d the year both on the part of the staff and the students. T h e M a r y T ab or Schell Hospital at Vellore has continued its history of real usefulness and great p o w e r and is confronting, under Dr. Ida S. Scudder, a period of still larger usefulness in its association with the proposed U n i o n Mission' Medical College for W o m e n in South India which is about to be organized at that station. T h e t wo H i g h Schools at Tindivanam and Madanapalle have been laboring under s o m e disadvantages, the former because of wholly inadequate accommodation. It is very m u c h to be desired that a n e w building be added to m a k e suitable a c c o m m o 足 dation for the m a n y students in this well established H i g h School. H o p e H i g h School at Madanapalle has weathered a very severe storm in the opposition of the Theosophical College. T h e


disaffiliation of this College by the M a d r a s University and the withdrawal of recognition b y the Educational Department has brought about a collapse of this opposition and" increased greatly the opportunity for usefulness of this institution. M r. Joh n D. M u y s k e n s of H o p e College, as principal of this H i g h School, has s h o w n both strength and judgment in his leadership during this crisis. T h e w o r k of the w o m e n of this Mission is very abundant and has been carried o n through the year through their usual agencies of Bible and Zenana w o r k and their schools both for Christian and for H i n d u girls. T h e Girls’ School at Ranipettai has m o v e d steadily forward in its standard and is rapidly devel­ oping into a H i g h School. T h e H i n d u Girls’ Schools are con­ tinuing their ministry of enlightenment and usefulness. T h e Mission desires that the three schools in Vellore be brought to­ gether in a strong single school to form a social and uplifting center for the H i n d u w o m e n of that large station. . T h e Mission has entered upon <a most careful examination of its evangelistic opportunity and has adopted a policy for the promotion of its evangelistic w o r k involving m u c h consideration and large vision. Five principles have been adopted as a basis for this policy: (1) T h e development of evangelistic w o r k is dependent upon the adequate development'of the Mission w o r k as a whole. (2) T h e evangelistic w o r k is at once both the foundation and the end of all other elements in our Mission work. (3) Evangelistic w o r k requires a complete and well trained staff of foreign missionaries, especially devoted to this work. (4) A statement, of policy must be comprehensive enough to allow an ample margin. (5) T h e p r o g r a m mus t m a k e full allowance for the in­ creasing share which the Indian m u s t have in the w o r k n o w car­ ried on by the Mission. In the application of these principles, the Mission has m a d e a study as to its evangelistic staff a nd finds that an addition to the adequate development of its evangelistic work, in view of


the present opportunity, calls for the addition of not less than nine m e n and eleven w o m e n to the staff of the Mission. Certain financial conditions naturally attach to this plan. A s an aim to be entered u po n at once, the field has been divided in accord­ ance with the four Circles constituting'the territory of the Indian C h u r c h Board, these Circles having definitely set before themselves the aim of winning before the close of the year 7,500 souls for the K i n g d o m of Christ. A n appeal is m a d e to the B oa rd for the immediate special appropriation of Rs. 5,000 for the reception and instruction of the villages n o w being received as a result of this effort into the Christian C om mu ni ty . This is a bold plan, but 'who shall say that it is not born of the Spirit of G o d ? ’ Ja p a n .

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T h e report calls attention to the changes brought about by the W a r in Japan. H o w e v e r m u c h or little Japan has taken part in the conflict, she has been able to raise herself fro m a debtor to a creditor nation. This increase of wealth, however, has not been evenly distributed a n d has brought problems of great social seriousness. It is pointed out that Japan is not realizing, in any complete way, the moral issues of the W a r and that the social and moral blessings that m a y accrue to other nations' are not likely to be shared by Japan. T h e year has brought great improvement in the relations of Japan and America by the Ishii-Lansing A gr ee me nt and by the visits to Ame ri ca of various commissions, educational and political. T h e report of this year is the first of the united Missions of the North and South Japan and the consummation of this union with the resulting changes is given >a large place. T h e t w o Missions were united January, 1917, after twenty-eight years of separation, and with this union the whole w o r k of our C hurch in Japan c a m e under one direction. A lo ng with this union a plan of concentration w a s w or ke d out, and the MoriokaA o m o r i Field w a s transferred to the Japan Mission of the R e ­ formed Church in the United States and the Shinshiu Field to the H o m e Mission B oa rd of the Japanese church. _


I he year has been one of steady progress in evangelistic work, 158 baptisms being reported. T h e largest n u m b e r of bap­ tisms in the K u r u m e Station are reported at Shimabara., where the Christians m a d e their last stand in the great persecution over three hundred years ago. T h e Oita Station had the largest n u m b e r of baptisms in its history and the church at Morioka, under the faithful leadership of Pastor Ito, is in a flourishing condition. There is, also, encouragement in the fact that the contributions from the Christians in Oita Prefecture passed nine hundred yen. I he average increase per year having been one hundred yen for five or six- years. A s has been pointed out several times in recent reports, it mus t be r em em be re d that evangelistic work, so far as it is carried o n by the Missions in Japan, is entirely in the field of building up n e w churches. This accounts for the comparatively small n u m b e r of m e m b e r s reported, for, as soon as a church becomes strong enough to take care of itself, it is transferred to the independent Church of Christ in Japan. O n e such church w a s transferred this year, the church at Sasebo in Kyushu. Before the organi-. zation of the church there were thirteen baptisms, which are included in the report of the Mission.. T h e year w a s m a r k e d by special evangelistic effort in K y u s h u by Evangelist Kanamori. Meetings were largely attended, but the actual result in baptisms w a s disappointing. T h e usual difficulties, due to changes of evangelists, are reported. In s o m e places, too, the public schools have s h o w n strong opposition. In K u r u m e , the D e a n of the dormitory of the local girls’ school refused to allow the girls to attend Mrs. V a n Strien’s very successful singing classes in her home, because they sang Christian songs while doing their domestic w o r k and this proved embarrassing to the Dean. H e also maintained that singing while doing w o r k about the house might prove detri­ mental to a girl’s hopes of a successful marriage. After s o m e persuasion, however, the girls were allowed to c o m e if they received the permission of their parents, but singing in the dor­ mitory w a s forbidden. In other places, on the contrary, the schools have proven very friendly. A t Y a n a g a w a , M r. V a n Bronkhorst has started a remarkable class a m o n g the Middle


School students with an average attendance for t wo m on th s of over eighty-five. M r. V a n Strien has an English Bible Class a m o n g the teachers of the sam e school. A t Ichinoseki, in the northern field, also, “the w o r k has continued to receive the good will of teachers in the schools.” . S u n d a y School w o r k has been carried on with the usual vigor, but, in several places, the active opposition of the Buddhist priests has been encountered, and has resulted in decreased at­ tendance, a nd in one case, in the discontinuance of the school altogether. T h e total n u m b e r of scholars reported in the schools of the Mission w a s 3,439. This is 606 less than last year, but this decrease is due, in addition to the reason mentioned above, to the adoption of a n e w rule by the Mission, “according to which the figures for the ‘n u m b e r of S u n d a y School scholars’ are to be based upo n the actual average attendance and not u p o n the enroll­ ment, or on the highest average for any one month, as hitherto.” O u r missionaries have m a d e the usual use of English Bible Classes during the year. Several baptisms have resulted fro m these classes and one splendid y o u n g m a n in one of Miss W i n n ’s classes has about decided to enter the ministry after he finishes Middle School. In addition to the S u n d a y Schools, English Bible Classes, Singing Classes and other W o m a n ’s W o r k already mentioned, factory work, w o m e n ’s meetings and visits in the h o m e s are reported. A t Kagoshima, over three hundred and fifty calls were m a d e upon w o m e n in their homes. Monthly evangelistic mee t ­ ings were also held at a factory where about seventy girls with their matron m e t for the singing of h y m n s a nd an evangelistic address. A t Aomori, Miss ' W i n n visited three hospitals and always found a w el co me by the doctors and nurses. Miss Hospers found a splendid opening, for w o r k a m o n g the students of the Girls’ H i g h School, and has m e t fully sixty of t h e m twice a month. T h e use of the printed page continues to be a conspicuous part of the w o r k of the Japan Mission. W i t h regard to his newspaper/advertising, M r . Pieters reports the following: “T h e n u m b e r of applications for literature is considerably smaller than in 1916, being 961 to 1,351 in that year, but it is


larger than in 1915. T h e book sales s h o w an increase, reaching m o r e than t wo hundred and fifty yen. “T h e reading club has continued its good work, and the a m o u n t of fees paid in by m e m b e r s for the privilege of b orrow­ ing and reading Christian books w a s Y e n 107, as against Y e n 87 the previous year, although the n u m b e r of books .sent out on request w a s only 779, to 910 in 1916.” This w o r k has developed this year into a system of corre­ spondence instruction iu Christian truth. Persons desiring to be baptized, sign a for m of application, binding themselves faithfully to take whatever course of instruc­ tion is laid d o w n for them. T h e n they receive a copy of a cate­ chism and the first f e w weeks of the printed lessons in the Correspondence Course. A t the end of each w e e k the student sends in answers to certain examination questions, which are corrected, graded, and returned to him, with further w o r k to be done. T h e entire course requires honest w o r k for twenty to thirty minutes every day for seventeen weeks. Thirty-four students Kwere registered in this course during the year. T h e catechjsm used is a revision of an older one, with considerable n e w material, prepared by M r. Pieters and published by a T o k y o publishing house. Three editions of 1,000 copies each have been printed and 2,450 copies were sold during the year. 1 Last year M r . Pieters reported another important n e w de­ parture in the organization of Branch Societies in remote places, which were furnished with literature of such a character as to enable t h e m 'to hold regular church services without the presence of a minister. T h e year began with t w o such societies and t wo m o r e were organized during the current year. Altogether the aggegate n u m b e r of persons attending S u n d a y services with the aid of the sermons sent out by M r . Pieters, a nd w h o w o u l d other­ wise have no opportunity of enjoying church privileges, is re­ ported as thirty-five each Sunday. M r . Pieters feels that this m e t h o d contains a partial solution of the problem of supplying isolated communities with the regular preaching of the Gospel. M r . Hoekje* has, also, advertised in the newspapers and M r.


/

R y d e r and Miss C o u c h have published monthly papers. M r. R y d e r has, also, opened an .office in the t o w n with a reading room, which is well patronized. ■ T h e educational w o r k of the Mission comprises two, boys’ schools, Steele A c a d e m y at Nagasaki a n d the Meiji Gakuin at Tokyo, the latter including, also, a College Department and a Theological School, and t wo girls’ schools, the Ferris Seminary at Y o k o h a m a and the Sturges Seminary at ShimOnoseki. T h e report of Ferris Seminary speaks of the Institution’s great loss in the death of Mrs. E. S. Booth and of the tender tributes of love and respect” brought by alumnae, teachers and pupils as “testimonials to the life of faithful and loving service Mrs. Booth had for thirty-six years devoted to Ferris Seminary. T h e school year opened with 255 pupils, an increase of 23 over the preceding year. The spirit of the students has been admirable throughout the year. O f 'their o w n initiative, the older girls in the dormitory hold monthly meetings for consultation as to w a y s and m e a n s of m a k i n g the dormitory an ideal h o m e for all. In addition to the neighborhood S u n d a y schools, which reached. an averagfe attendance of 240, the girls collected twenty yen at a concert with which rice tickets were ffought a nd distributed to the destitute in the city. T h e girls, also, m a d e - u p material furnished by a local newspaper into children’s kimonos for dis­ tribution at the N e w Y e a r season, and one evening a w e e k w a s devoted to w a r relief work. Sturges Seminary reports 185 students, 3 3 % of w h o m are Christians. T h e street S u n d a y Schools average 130 each Sunday. T h e Christian E ndeavor Society w a s able to give one hundred and .fifty yen at the dedication services of the n e w church build­ ing in the city. T h e Christmas service took the form of the W h i t e Christmas. T h e girls brought^ together their free-will offerings, amounting to about fifty-eight dollars. This s u m w a s divided between the Board of Domestic Missions of the Japanese Church, the w o r k a m o n g lepers, the poor of the city, a n d the orphan asylum. Steele A c a d e m y reports a very successful year. There are three private schools in the city, and keen competition, but all the students that could be a c c om mo da te d were obtained, and


during the m o n t h of April the enrollment reached 386, which w a s the highest enrollment in the history of the school. T h e last year m a r k e d the completion of the second dormitory at a cost of about Y e n 6,000. Another improvement of the year w a s the tearing d o w n and erection of the exercise shed on another site. This m a k e s r o o m for a tennis court, which has been greatly needed by the boys. T h e spiritual life of the school is in a healthy condition, 14 boys having united with the church last year. There has also been a growing interest in the S u n d a y School with an increased attendance, the enrollment having reached 137. . T h e event of the year in Meiji Gakuin w a s the celebration of the Fortieth Anniversary with appropriate exercises. “T H e forenoon w a s taken up, with a ceremony held in the Chapel and which w a s attended h y a goodly n u m b e r of friends and repre­ sentatives from the Government, Christian institutions and other Christian bodies. N e a r the close of the p ro gr am a special recog­ nition w a s extended to the eight m e n w h o had served the institu­ tion fifteen years or more. ‘‘A t noon, luncheon w a s served to the guests, and early in the afternoon began an interesting pro gr am of field sports which continued until sunset and which w a s attended by over 2,000 visitors. In the evening, an A l u m n i banquet w a s held at the Shiba Sanentei at which about eighty were present. A t this meeting plans were laid which look towards a m o r e effective co-operation between the alumni and the school authorities for the extension of the usefulness of the Meiji Gakuin.” T h e Middle Department has had the largest attendance in its history, the n u m b e r reaching 473. T h e College Department has added an English N o r m a l Course. T w o gifts ,were received duing the year: one of $150 fro m the father of a student w h o died during the year and through w ho se consecration the whole family had b ec om e interested in Christianity; the other of $1,000 f r o m a neighbor of the school in m e m o r y of his wife. A n enthusiastic teacher has aroused encouraging activity along musical lines, t wo very creditable performances having been given in the Chapel. During the flood caused by the typhoon and tidal w a v e in N ov em be r, College and Seminary students were dismissed


f r o m their classes to help in the relief work, which w a s acknowl­ edged by a h a n d s o m e certificate of appreciation f r o m the G o v ­ ernor of Tokyo-fu. '

A rabia.

*

It not infrequently occurs that the preparation of the Annual Report of a Mission is assigned to one of its m e m b e r s w h o h a s ' recently returned from furlough in Ame ri ca during which period he has had contacts with Chistian life and activities in this coun­ try which serve as a vivid background for the recording of ob­ servations of the w o r k of his Mission w h e n he returns to- the field. A n instance of this circumstance appears in the A nn ua l Report of the Arabian Mission for 1917. This w a s prepared by Dr. Paul W . Harrison, who, while recently in Ame ri ca on his furlough, enjoyed multiplied and close contacts with A merican life in general and the sources of Christian activity in Churches and colleges in particular. T h e report prepared by h i m reflects, possibly unconsciously, this recent contact with conditions in A me ri ca as he c o m m e n t s upon the conditions in his Mission field as he finds the m on his return after a brief absence. W e cannot do better, therefore, than d r a w largely fro m these ob­ servations in this review of our Missions for the year which w e present to our o w n Constituency. O f all our mission fields that in Arabia has c o m e closest to the Great W a r and has been most affected by it. Basrah, our oldest and largest station, has been the base for the whole Mes op ot am ia n Expedition carried on by the British Forces. It could not be, therefore, otherwise that not only this northern part of our field but that the whole Persian Gulf should also be seriously affected b y the presence of large a r m e d forces and the changes affected by their presence in the territory which has' been so long familiar to us as a portion of our Arabian Mission. T h e report calls especial attention to these conditions. It has been a year of war, a campaign which has lasted three years and has engaged hundreds of thousands of m e n and is only n o w being carried to a successful conclusion. There has been a profound change in all Arabia but Mesopotamia, the seat of actual hostilities, has been utterly transformed. T h e


external transformation is startling enough. O n e seems to be exploring a n e w country which is a curious mixture of people fro m India, England and Arabia. T h e interior transformation is m o r e m a r k e d and, for those w h o have eyes to see, even m o r e remarkable. M e n walk nearly as fast in Basrah n o w as in N e w York. ‘There is a restless energy in breaking a w a y from old and time-honored habits, a willingness to accept the n e w that is quite a revolution in itself. There are other results larger in scope. A spirit of commercialism fills the atmosprere. T h e grip of Islam on m e n ’s hearts is paralyzed in the face of it and the s a m e mus t be said of Oriental Christianity. There is a thirst for a m u s e m e n t and luxury quite foreign to the spirit of the East which in its intensity could hardly be surpassed in N e w Y o r k itself. Unfortunately, this shattering impact of the W e s t upon the East is b ound to be no temporary thing. S o m e of the m o r e glaring excesses incidental to the period of transition will doubt­ less disappear within a f ew years but, if h u m a n judgment can be trusted at all, w e mus t recognize that there has been a funda­ mental and permanent change in the character of our task. In the Future w e will no longer w o r k in a Social O r d e r which is purely Arabic. T h e w o r k is to be complicated a nd the difficul­ ties increased by a conflict of Eastern and Western ideas in things religious, political and economic. Mesop ot am ia doubtless will be the m o s t completely transformed, but unquestionably the whole of Arabia will be very .profoundly affected. S o m e surprising results are already evident. T h e A r a b is m o r e tolerant than before. This result so .contrary to what w a s anticipated seems to be due to t w o things. In the first place his interest in the next world is fading, and as it fades his reasons for intolerance disappear. In the second place the w a r has s h o w n h i m that after all, Christians.and M o s l e m s are m u c h alike. M u h a m m a d a m intolerance is due in n o small degree to an uncomfortable conviction d o w n in the bottom of his heart that in Christ he faces a better Prophet and in Christianity a better faith than his own. T h e present w a r has m a d e h i m believe that the differences he has seen are only superficial; that fundamentally m e n are m u c h alike, n o matter what their re-


xxviii

FOR EI GN MISSIONS

ligion m a y be. Both what he has heard f r o m E u r o p e a nd what he has seen at h o m e have gone far to convince h i m that all re­ ligions are equally futile and equally powerless in the face of the passions and selfishness of men. Another change of great significance is the definite aba nd on ­ m e n t of all political aspirations. T h e dreams of Pan-Islamism have died hard but they are dead. T h e campaign in M e s o p o ­ tamia with the tremendous forces involved, the heavy guns, the aeroplanes, wireless apparatus, and m a n y other m o d e r n ap­ pliances of w a r have s h o w n the A r a b that his wildest dreams of military operations are m e r e child’s play. . A s one A r a b said, with a touch of Oriental exaggeration, “W e c a m e d o w n from B ag da d to Basrah (500 miles). In the river, steamer touched steamer and on shore tent touched tent for the whole distance.” W h a t the A r a b desires n o w is the protection of a Eur op ea n p ow er and most of them prefer England to any other. A painful result of the w a r has been the collapse of the Protestant Christians, so largely c omposed of old Oriental and corrupt Christian communities. These m e n c a m e f r o m the Christian c o m m u n i t y of the M a r d i n District in T ur ke y and in Basrah quite a little C hurch of this type has g r o w n up. This Protestant c om mu ni ty is the result of missionary w o r k of the Ame ri ca n Board. Originally a most corrupt Oriental Church, it has been quite transformed and m e n from it have carried a very large part of the burden of our evangelistic w o r k in Arabia. T h e w o r k of Bible distribution especially has been largely in their hands. T h e external temptations of these days have proved too m u c h for m a n y of them. M a n y assistants d r a w n so largely from this class are dem an di ng large increases in their salaries if they are to remain in their present positions. M a n y have left. T h e little Protestant Church of Basrah has almost disappeared. After the w a r there will probably be 'a partial recovery, but with their old country placed for the first time after long and weary centuries under a just and staple government, it is doubt­ ful if m a n y will want to -live and w o r k in Arabia. For the future w e are trusting that H e w h o s e w o r k it is will supply what is needed and guide the Mission in its use. ■ H owever, in spite of wars and rumors of wars, of multi-


plied temptations and increased difficulties, G o d has seen fit to s h o w his p ow er in Arabia as never before in the Mission’s his­ tory. T h e prayers of m a n y years are being answered in the opening of .the inland country to the Gospel. This progress centers, as might be expected, around the medical work. E v e r y ­ where the ministries of the doctor are softening hard hearts and m a k i n g friends. E ve ry wh er e the^volume of medical w o r k is increasing and patients fro m far a w a y are taking back reports that open n e w doors. Dr. H o s m o n reports fro m M a s k a t that, in spite of unsettled conditions in O m a n , the w o m e n continue to c o m e from that district although in smaller numbers. In both M a s k a t and K u w e i t approximately 1,500 n e w w o m e n have been seen and treated while in each place the total treatments have a m o un te d to about 5,000. Dr. Mylrea in K u w e i t ha’s treated 2,789 m e n and has had a total of 5,693 treatments, an increase over last year of 3 0 % . In Bahrein the num be rs were larger still. F or m a n y years it has been the hope and the prayer of those w h o have the evangelization of Arabia on their hearts that by m e a n s of this ministry of healing, the great untouched interior country would be opened and G o d is beginning to give us the answer. Dr. Harrison w a s invited by the powerful Sheikh of Riadh to visit h i m .at his inland capital during the past summer. H e reports a most interesting and satisfactory time with every prospect for further and m o r e extended trips. Riadh is m o r e than the capital of central Arabia. In a certain sense, it is the capital of the whole E m p i r e of Islam and perhaps the most important city strategically in the entire peninsula. E v e n o n this first trip it w a s possible to open the clinics with a brief prayer service. It is confidently expected that other similar invitations to visit the interior of H as sa and beyond will follow in the near future. T h e tragedy of the medical situation in the Mission lies in the circumstance that the largest Hospital and the one most closely related to the war, the Lansing Mem or ia l Hospital at Basrah, is closed because of the inability of the Mission to place a physician there. Since the withdrawal of Dr. Bennett and Dr. V a n Vlack. it has been impossible to strengthen the medical


staff of the Mission for the simple but sufficient reason that physicians within the military age are required for National service. N o less than five physicians, w h o in the ordinary course of events would n o w be available for service in Arabia, have been prevented fro m taking u p medical w o r k in that field be­ cause of conditions of the war. Obviously the present conditions and future prospects in Arabia call for a large increase a m o n g the forces. Central Arabia cannot be occupied and held without m e n and especially medical men. T h e long, difficult tedious task of establishing the Gospel in that barren desert country can hardly be done by anyone else. G o d is opening the country to the Gospel a n d H e is using the Mission to dissipate the fogs of ignorance and to melt the hard stony unbelief that bars the w a y to the truth. T h e schools organized by the Mission in all its stations’ and carried by prayer and sacrifice through years of opposition and hatred are at last coming into their own. T h e Basrah school enrolled 100 last year. This year it begins with an enrollment of 130. T h e Girls’ School in this station has an enrollment of 50. A visit to those schools is enough to take the pessimism out of a ny­ body. Their reputation has traveled hundreds of miles a nd is a reinforcement to hard-pressed missionaries to the very limits of the field. E very pupil studies the Bible and gets a. view of Christ’s teaching and of Christian character which mus t m a k e his whole outlook different and* help to m a k e h i m a worthy builder of the Social Order that is to be in Arabia. These schools in Basrah have already contributed to the general educational situation. Rev. Joh n V a n Ess, the Principal, has published an Arabic G r a m m a r which has already passed through t w o edi­ tions and is entering upo n a third, while an A d v a n c e d G r a m m a r is also called for. Rev. J a m e s M o e r d y k has revised a Tex t B o o k for Beginners in English. T h e whole tremendous problem in M es opotamia is being, grappled with a nd one of the major functions of the Basrah School is the furnishing of- teachers for elementary schools throughout the country. Indeed, Mr. V a n Ess has been practically put in charge of the development of educational plans for the n e w British G o v e r n m e n t n o w estab­ lished in southern Mesopotamia. .• .


T h e s a m e thirst for education is beginning to be felt in other •stations. T h e school is Bahrein starts the n e w year with two teachers instead of one. T h e attendance this year n u m b e r e d thirty and there is every reason to expect a m u c h larger attend­ ance. T h e schools in K u w e i t reached twenty-three in attendance. T h e M as ka t school has had a successful year. Altogether the Mission rejoices that at last a thirst for truth a nd advancement is beginnning to appear. It is w e a k as yet a n d has in it m u c h that is unworthy a n d undesirable, but it m e a n s progress and con­ stitutes a great opportunity. A long, weary road is ahead a nd it will require m e n and m o n e y and hard w o r k and patience to meet the situation. B ut our missionaries in Arabia are thanking G o d and taking courage that even there the m ar ch for better' things has begun. A b o v e all, the Mission is grateful to G o d that He' is drawing m e n and w o m e n to Himself. There are perhaps three stages in the progress of the M u h a m m a d a n heart toward Christ. W h e n m e n listen to the G os pe l .with respect and interest instead of insult and reviling, w e recognize that the first stage has been passed. W h e n they, c o m e to hear the Gospel voluntarily and often with great effort, the second stage has been gained, and w h e n m e n personally study and seek, they are approaching Christ Himself. In all the stations of the Mission the time of reviling and insult has passed.. In Hospitals w e hear of sincere and respectful interest. E v e n a determined and long continued Anti­ Christian campaign o n the part of the religious leaders in K uw ei t w a s without serious effect on the work. E ve ry wh er e in the Mission, the stage of respectful interest has been reached. A lmost everywhere, 'also, in the field the attendance of M o s ­ lems at the Arabic services is increasing. T h e K u w e i t services are one of the brightest spots o n the whole Mission horizon. During the uffiole year, the attendance has been above fifty and often approaching or even exceeding one hundred. S u c h inter­ est is a n e w thing in the Mission history and its significance is increased w h e n it is r em em be re d that this attendance remained practically unaffected by a bitter and long continued campaign against the whole Mission and all its activities. "While nowhere else have the audiences reached such a figure as in Bahrein and


Kuweit, the interest has been exceedingly good. O n l y in Basrah has this advance not been in evidence and that is accounted for . in good part by the confusion that prevails o w i n g to the pre­ ponderant presence of the military forces and to the-fact that the' chapel is located within the Mission property s o m e distance fro m the road. ' Bible sales during the year have been large in Basrah where the soldiers bought m a n y Scriptures. O v e r 3,000 were sold. K u w e i t reports a sale of nearly 900. Bahrein, because of a crippled force, sold only 493. Especially encouraging reports c o m e the Bible shops in A m a r a and Nasarieh, out-stations far to the north of Basrah, where there has been a large a m o u n t of direct, personal w o r k both with the Arabs a nd in connection with the Y. M . C. A . ; also with the British Forces. Tlhe report concludes with these impressive w o r d s : O u r supreme object is to bring Christ to m e n and to bring m e n to Christ. W e m a y have to w o r k and pray for the opening of closed doors and m u c h of our effort m a y be spent in removing obstacles. A missionary’s w o r k in Arabia', as elsewhere, is for the one object of winning men. It is because w e see Christ drawing m e n and w o m e n to Himself that hardships b ec om e trifles and difficulties privileges. Flis w o r k in m e n ’s hearts has been especially evident a m o n g the w o m e n of Bahrein and among, the m e n of Kuweit. A m o n g these there are several w h o are apparently sincere in their faith, though none of the m has been baptized as yet. Their very lives are far fro m safe. T h e y are passing through deep waters. T h e fires of evil desires in their o w n hearts and the forces of evil outside conspire to d r a w the m back, but through it all Christ’s strength has been equal for them. These and others like t h e m need the prayer of every m a n and every w o m a n w h o longs for the coming of the K i n g d o m in Arabia, for as w e a k and as ignorant and as imperfect as they are, the honor' of Christ’s n a m e and the establishment of his C hurch depend on them. T h e year behind us has been one of blessing. M a y the one before us be one of faith. W e never faced such difficulties nor such opportunities. H u m a n reinforcements of prayer and m e n never seemed so necessary and all h u m a n resolutions never


before have been so obviously and so utterly inadequate. “A n d w h o is sufficient for these things? Qur sufficiency is fro m G o d w h o also has m a d e us sufficient.” ' -

THE H O M E DEPARTMENT.

T h e w o r k of this Department is carried on by t w o Secre­ taries, the H o m e Secretary, w ho se field w o r k is practically con­ fined to the three Eastern Synods, and the District Secretary, w h o is concerned with the S y n o d of Chicago. T h e m e m b e r s of the B oard from the latter S y n o d are organized into a District Committee with w h o m the District Secretary co-operates in this work. T h e report for .this year, therefore, will be given in two sections, the one for the Eastern, and the other for the Western District. .

Home Secretary’s Report. D eputation W

ork.

Itineraries were arranged for the Rev. A. L. Warnshuis, D.D., the Rev. H . V. S. Peeke, D.D., a nd the Rev. Joh n V a n Ess. In addition, special requests for missionary speakers have been responded to by the Rev. Fred J. Barney, Mr. F. M . Potter, and the Secretaries. A special church card has been prepared for keeping the office informed of the progress-of the missionary in­ terest in each local church, and one feature of this card is the space given to the recording of such missionary visits. It is felt that, in this way, the deputation w o r k of the missionary m a y be m o r e intelligently and systematically conducted. W e again acknowledge the great assistance given by the Classical Agents in the several classes in m a k i n g arrangements for missionary speakers. ■ O n e D a y ’s In c o m e F u n d .

!-------

o

A t the beginning of the present year, the Boards of Foreign and Domestic Missions faced a real emergency brought on by the W a r a nd the resulting increase of the cost of the w o r k at h o m e and abroad. In China alone, for example, a'dollar had only 6 0 % of the purchasing p o w e r which it h a d before the W a r .


This and other abnormal conditions, m a d e an unusual strain u p o n the financial resources of the Boards. A special c o m m i s ­ sion, therefore, w a s appointed by the Boards of H o m e and Foreign Missions to secure the co-operation of the m e m b e r s and adherents of the church in the O n e D a y ’s I nc om e .plan. Suitable literature explaining the plan w a s prepared, and by letters, by advertisement— for which considerable space w a s contributed by the Christian Intelligencer— and by addresses, the matter w a s kept before the people of the church. F r o m October 1st, 1917, to April 30th, 1918, m o r e than thirty-four thousand dollars were contributed. This s u m w a s divided1 in the pro­ portion of the budget of 1917-1918, adopted by General Synod. Inasmuch as the conditions that m a d e this O n e D a y ’s I ncome plan necessary have not changed the C om mi ss io n has decided to r e c o m m e n d that the plan be continued for another year. F oreign M

issions

Su n d a y .

T h e last S u n d a y of February w a s again celebrated as Foreign Missions S u n d a y throughout the denomination. A b o u t 15,000 copies of a special S u n d a y School P r o g r a m were used, and “T h e R e f o r m e d Church in the East,” “O u r W o r k in F o u r Asiatic Lands,” and a special leaflet on “T h e W a r and the Missionary W o r k of the R e f o r m e d Church in America,” were circulated in large numbers. M

issionary

'

-

L iterature .

In addition to the special literature for Foreign Missions Sunday, a . n e w leaflet, entitled, “ W h y Japan,” has been issued. Material is also being gathered for 'a booklet of information and suggestion for missionaries on furlough. Other literature on our shelves has been used by the churches and S u n d a y Schools, but not to a satisfactory extent. W e w ould urge the various organizations in the churche* to m a k e frequent requests for literature for general circulation. . •S pecial N e w s B ulletin . This is a brief bulletin of items of special interest, which is mailed to a list of laymen furnished by the pastors of our


churches. T h e Bulletin has been issued three times during the year, and it is proposed hereafter to give it a regular standing a m o n g the publications of the Board, with one issue in the fall, another at mid-winter, and another in the spring. T h e pastors have been put on the regular mailing list, and about one thous'ahd other n a m e s have been added during the year. A card, catalogue of these n a m e s has also been made. T he M

ission

F ield.

.

. T h e usual w o r k of editing the foreign missions material for the Mission Field has been carried on during the year, and special correspondence w as addressed to the missionaries soliciting m a 足 terial. W i t h the issue of M a y , 1918, the Mission Field enters upon a n e w era, the Gleaner and the Mission Field having been combined into one publication. W i t h this n e w magazine, a n e w cover design has been adopted, and other n e w features are under consideration. T h e subscription price has been raised, for clubs, from 25c to 35c, but its circulation is gradually increasing. O n e could wish that this valuable magazine were in every h o m e in the denomination. N eglected A rabia . This Quarterly, issued by the Trustees of the Arabian M i s 足 sion for free distribution a m o n g those w h o have indicated their especial interest in Arabia, has always been of unusual interest. Because of the rapid changes going on in Mesopotamia it is even m o r e valuable today. T h e mailing list has been revised during the past year. If there are any w h o have failed to re足 ceive the publication on this account, but w h o do not wish it to be discontinued, the office will be glad to get their n a m e s and addresses. T h e circulation of this valuable quarterly could well be m u c h larger than it is. P arish L etters . There are at present seventeen parishes on our records. D uring the year nine different parish letters have been prepared.


and, with the exception of the Arabian parishes, every supporting church a nd society has been covered at least once during the year. It is to be hoped that those w h o receive these letters will send their words of appreciation to the missionary w h o w a s responsible for the material in the letter. Their value lies in the personal contact that is established between the supporting societies'and the missionary and that relationship should be mutual if it is to accomplish the desired end. C orrespondence . In addition to the routine correspondence of the office m a n y letters of acknowledgment have been written, particularly to S u n d a y Schools and individual givers. T h e opportunity thus afforded for personal touch has been greatly appreciated. M

issionary

E d u c atio n_.

T h e Board has continued its co-operation with the JointCommittee on Missionary Education which is c omposed of repre­ sentatives of the four mission boards and the B oard of Publica­ tion and Bible School W o r k . T h e report of the Joint-Committee, m a d e by its Chairman, M r. W . T. Demarest, is as follows: “T h e Committee on Missionary Education has carried for­ w a r d the plans announced to the boards a year ago, and takes pleasure in n o w reporting the publication, about January 1st,. 1918, of t wo missionary story books for Primary and Junior grades in the Bible School. These t w o books, both written by Miss Margaret T. Applegarth under the direction of this Committee, have been received with the warmest commendation, not only in our o w n churches, but by those interested in M i s ­ sionary Education in other denominations. T h e books were published at the expense of this Committee by the B oa rd of Education and Bible School W o r k , and already about one-half of the first Edition has been sold. It is conceded by leaders of missionary education in most of the denominations that no better m et ho d of presenting missionary fundamentals to little children


has ever been presented than is found in these books. T h e R e f o r m e d Church, through them, has taken a place of leadership in this endeavor. Everyone of our'churches a n d Bible Schools should be glad to use this exceptional opportunity of teaching missions to children in the school and in the home. T h e Committee regrets that the course of twenty-four M i s ­ sionary Travelogues, constituting its series of lessons for Inter­ mediate grades in the Bible School is not yet published. M u c h of the w o r k of preparation has been done, and it is expected that this course will be available for the use of schools by the early fall. E a c h of these travelogues will be illustrated by an attractive poster in colors, for wall display, and suitable for permanent adornment of the school or class room. • It is expected that the t wo mission study books for senior and adult grades, one on denominational H o m e Missions a nd one on Foreign, will be written during the coming s u m m e r and be published not later than January 1st, 1919. T h e planning a nd preparation of this Mission Study m a ­ terial has occupied a great deal of the time of the Committee, whose m e m b e r s all occupy places of responsibility wjth their several boards. U n d e r the circumstances the w o r k could not have been pushed to completion in the time originally contem­ plated. T h e matter is too important for haste, and it is “be­ lieved that the C hu rc h will patiently 'await the completion of what the Committee sincerely believes will be recognized as a model system of graded missionary instruction.” ‘ ..


Western District. Rev. W . J. Van Kersen, Secretary.. D istrict C o m m i t t e e . T h e District Committee consists of the m e m b e r s of the B oard residing within the bounds of the Particular S y n o d of Chicago. During the past seven years it. has consisted of six members. This C o m m i t t e e has held regular meetings during the past year at which careful attention w a s given to its special duties, viz..: the arrangements and supervision of the w o r k of the H o m e Base within the bounds of the Particular. S y n o d of Chicago. Its council in connection with the w o r k of the District Secretary has been of great value. Matters referred to it by the Executive Committee were handled with great fidelity. All w h o are connected with the Western District organiza­ tion very m u c h regret that the resignation of Dr. A. V e n n e m a as President of H o p e College and his return to the pastorate in the East will terminate his special connection with the w o r k of the Western District in which his effective co-operation has been most highly appreciated. , The^ Board and the District Committee sustained another great loss by the sudden death of the Rev. M . Kolyn, D.D., of Holland, Mich., w h o passed a w a y very suddenly on the 13th of M a y . His deep interest in the extension of the K i n g d o m , his ready, cheerful and loyal co-operation in all things pertaining to the advancement of its interests and his wise counsel m a d e h i m a most valuable m e m b e r of the Board and of the District Committee. ■ i

M

ission

F ests.

'

These s u m m e r missionary gatherings, held in “ G o d ’s great out-rof-doors,” constitute a striking characteristic of the activities of the churches and communities of this District at a time w h e n m a n y of the activities of the churches are suspended during the s u m m e r months. These gatherings‘have been growing in number, interest and attendance, a n d are a very happy combination of a s u m m e r holiday with the consideration of the vital themes of


the extension of the K i n gd om . T h e y afford a splendid oppor­ tunity for the dissemination from the platform of missionary information and inspiration. All except three of the 39 G e r m a n churches of the Classes of G ermania and Pleasant Prairie and several of the Dutch churches of other Classes held congregational mission-fests In localities where groups of our churches are found near enough to one another to m a k e it possible for the m to meet at s o m e convenient and centrally located place union mission-fests are held. M o r e than a dozen of the m wer e held during the past year with an attendance aggregating several thousand a n d offer­ ings of such proportions as to give considerable relief to: depleted missionary treasuries during the “ lean m o n t h s ” of the year. O n e D a y ’s In c o m e P l a n . This plan, suggested by the Mission Boards of our Church w a s received with considerable favor by a goodly n u m b e r of the churches of this District. T h e campaign w a s launched in Chicago at a joint-conference of the agents of the Domestic and Foreign Mission Boards led by the Field Secretary of the Board of Domestic Missions a n d the District Secretary. A t this meet­ ing the plan w a § discussed and the fullest co-operation w as pledged. T h e campaign w a s conducted along lines that seemed to be best adapted to the churches of this District. T h e re­ turns s h o w that these efforts were crowned with a large measure of success. C lassical A g en ts .

.

T h e Classical Agents met in special conference in Chicago in connection with the joint-conference mentioned above. T h e great distances m a k e it impossible to have a full attendance. B u t those that found it possible to c o m e spent a very profitable forenoon in the discussion of matters of vital importance to building up interest in foreign missions in the churches. T h e service of several of these m e n has been of considerable value and their reports to their Classes have added m u c h to the strength of the B o a r d ’s appeal.


M

issionary

D eputation W

ork.

T h e District Secretary has received valuable assistance in the presentation of our foreign mission w o r k from missionaries on furlough, residing within the bounds of the Particular S yn od of Chicago. T h e service of these men, always ready to do wha t 足 ever they can, has been very effective and has contributed m u c h to the increase of interest in the w o r k on the foreign field. F inancial G oal A d v a n c e d . A s evidence of the fact that the churches of this District realize the necessity of adopting a bigger financial p ro gr am it is interesting to notice that at the recent meeting of the Particu足 lar S y n o d of Chicago a resolution setting the goal for foreign missions at $100,000 w as passed without a dissenting vote.


MISSIONARIES A N D THEIR M OV EM EN TS . T/he n u m b e r of missionaries in the service of the B oa rd at the end of 1917 is 138. O f these, 36 are ordained and 14 u n ­ ordained m e n ; 42 married a n d 46 unmarried. R eturned

to t h e

F ield.

‘ T h e following missionaries returned to their fields of labor after furloughs in this country: T o China, Rev. and Mrs. A. L. Warnshuis, Miss L. V a n d e r Linden, Dr. a nd Mrs. E. J. Stride; to India, M r . a n d Mrs. W . H . Farrar, Miss A. E. Hancock, Miss D. M . H o u g h t o n ; to Japan, Rev. E. 5. Booth, Miss S. M . Couch, Miss H . M . Lansing, Mr. and Mrs. W . E. H o f f s o m m e r ; to Arabia, Miss J. A. Scardefield, Miss F a n n y Button, Rev. G. J. Pennings, Dr. and Mrs. Paul W . Harrison, Rev. and Mrs. G. D. V a n Peursem. R eturned H o m e

on

Furlough.

F r o m China, M r . H e r m a n R e n s k e r s ; from India, the Misses J. and S. TeWinkel, Miss H . W . Drury; from Japan, Rev. and Mrs. H . V. S. Peeke, Miss J. A. Pieters, Rev. H . Kuy pe r; from Arabia, Rev. F. J. Barny, Rev. a nd Mrs. Joh n V a n Ess. N ew M

issionaries. -

T h e following n e w missionaries entered upo n service in the course of the year: In China, Rev. and Mrs. H . M . Veenschoten, M r . I. J. L u b b e r s (under appointment but detained by. a call to National service) ; in India, Rev. and Mrs. H . E. V a n Vranken, Rev. and Mrs. J o h n C. V a n W y k , Miss Wilhelmina Noordyk, M r . C. R. Wierenga; in lapan, Rev. and Mrs.,H. V. E. Stegeman; in Arabia, Rev. and Mrs. H . A. Bilkert, Mis s M . C. V a n Pelt. ' N e w A ppointments.

■The following n e w appointments have been m a d e :

To

China, Rev. H a r v e y I. Todd, Rev. and Mrs. H e n r y P o p p e n


(appointed last year; will enter upo n service this year); to

India, Rev. J a m e s H . Potter and his fiancee, Miss Helen Beardslee, Miss Clara M . Coburn, Miss M a u d e S. Scudder and M r. E. Paul M c L e a n ; to Japan, Miss M a y B. Dejnarest ( w h o returns to Japan after several years of residence in A m e r i c a ) ; Miss A n n a M . Fleming'; to Arabia, Mrs. Sharon J. T h o m s , ( w h o returns to Arabia after several years of residence in America), Dr. ^ouis P. D a m e and his fiancee, Miss Elizabeth Purdie, a nd Dr, Walter N o r m a n L e a k (a graduate of Cambridge University, w h o has been in A r m y Service in Egypt). It is a gratification to be able t6 record that m a n y of these missionaries n o w under appointment have already b e c o m e at足 tached to s o m e individual Church or group as the representative on the field and supported in this relationship. O fficers

and

M

emb ers of t h e

B oar d .

T h e terms of the following m e m b e r s of the B o a r d expire with this session of the General S y n o d : Rev. Rev. Rev. Rev.

H e n r y E. Cobb, D.D. M r. M r. J. A d d i s o n Jones, D.D . Mr. John Engelsman Mr. H . J. V e l d m a n Rev. A. V e n n e m a , D.D.

A. P. C o b b W . E. Foster J. J. J a n e w a y E. E. Olcott

Just as the year closed, the B oard learned of its serious loss in the death on M a y 13, 1918, of the Rev. M a t t h e w Kolyn, D.D., a m e m b e r of the Board since 1900. A substitution will, there足 fore, need to be m a d e in the class of 1917-20.


H elen B earihlke

James H. Potter Amsterdam, N. Y. U n i o n C o l l e g e '12

Newbury, N. H. M t . H o l y o k e ’18

H a r t f o r d Theological S e m i n a r y ' \ $

T O JOIN T H E A R C O T MISSION

Louis P.

D ame

Chicago, HI. Medical University

College, of III. *1/

E lizabeth P urdis Chicago, 111. Chicago Normal Moody Bible

College Institute

’08

T O JOIN T H E A R A B I A N MISSION Mr. Potter and Dr. Dame have both responded to the call of country and are in the national service, so that the departure of the above lor their chosen fields is delayed. Dr. Leak is also still detained in the service of the British Army.


E dwin P aul M cLean

C lara M. Coburn

Holland, Mich.

Hudsonville, Mich. Hope C o l l e g e *18 To engage in educational work in India,

Amherst College University of Chic a g o Hope C o l l e g e ’18

To succeed Mr. Muyskens as principal of Hope High School, Madanapalle.

M aude S. Scudder Moss Landing, Cal. J o s e S t a t e N o r m a l C o l l e g e ’17 To engage in educational work in India. Departure for the field postponed.

San


M ay B. D emarest Roxbury, N. Y. Holyoke ’07

Mt.

Miss Demarest served in the Japan Mission from 1912-14, being connected with Ferris Semi­ nary 1913-14. She returns now to her original field.

A nna M. Fleming Toronto, Canada Toronto

Bible

College

’18

Miss Fleming will take up the secretarial work of the Japan Mission.


M es. Siiaeon J. T homs Indianapolis, Ind. College Kennedy

of

School

Missions of

’17

Missions

’18

Mrs. Thoms returned to America on the death of her husband in 1913, and now courageously returns to her work in Arabia.

H arvey I. T odd Hyde Park, N. Y. R u t g e r s ’15 N e w

Brunswick

Seminary

’18

Mr. Todd is to engage in evangelistic work in China.


FINANCES. R eceipts, B oard

of

F oreign M

issions.

T h e receipts of the Board for its regular w o r k were $246,­ 396.05, of which $184,523.20 were from collections, $43,827.25 from legacies, $9,593.28 from the O n e D a y ’s I ncome Fund, and $8,452.32 from interest on invested funds. There were, also, received for Special Objects outside of the appropriations $23,­ 134.79 and a further s u m of $1,000 from the B oa rd of Foreign Missions of the R e f o r m e d C hurch in the United States as a first instalment in settlement of property adjustments o wi ng to the transfer of the field of the North Japan ’Mission to that Board m a k i n g a total of funds received for the regular w o r k Oif the B oa rd of $269,530.84. A m o n g the largest of these gifts to Special Objects were $5,729.63 fro m the W o m a n ’s Board, $4,141.85 for the A m o y D i a m o n d Jubilee F u n d $2,292.31 for N e w s p a p e r Evangelization in Japan, $1,010 for Additional Building for Steele A c a de my , and $2,383.92 for the A m o y Hospital Fund. A n addition of $2,426.27 w a s m a d e to the Scudder Memorial Fund. _ / \

R eceipts, A rabian M

ission.

F r o m collections there wfere received $35,795.37, from lega­ cies, $394.87, and fro m interest <on invested funds, $796.85. There were also contributed to Special Objects outside of appro­ priations the s u m of $5,825.99. T h e portion which c a m e to this Mission from the O n e D a y ’s I nc om e F u n d w a s $3,021.89. T h e total is, therefore, $45,834.97, an advance of nearly $7,000 u pon the receipts of the previous year; T otals .

T h e combined receipts of the B oard and of the Arabian Mission were $325,292.08, being $22,839.06 m o r e than the total a m o u n t received last year. A table presenting summaries of the above figures appears on the following page.


F or

the

R egular W

RECEIPTS. B o ar d .

o r k of t h e

F r o m Collections: Churches, S. S., Y. P. S . . . . . . . . $108,277.96 W o m a n ’s B oa rd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59,584.97 Individual Gifts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16,660.27

Legacies, n e t . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . O n e D a y ’s I nc om e F u n d . . . . . . . . Interest on F u n d s . . . . . . . . . . . . .

$184,523.20 $43,827.25 9,593.28 8,452.32

Special Objects outside the appropria­ tions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23,134.79 Sale of North Japan Buildings.... 1,000.00 Additions to F u n d s . . . . . . . . . . . 8,926.27 F or

the

A rabian .M

$246,396.05

, 33,061.06

ission.

Collections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Interest on F u n d s ........... x

$35,795.37 796.85 $36,592.22

.

Special Objects outsideappropriations $5,825.99 O n e D a y ’s I ncome F u n d . . . . . . . . . 3,021.89 Legacies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 394.87

45,834.97

Total Receipts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $325,292.08 Deducting: Legacies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i ■ $44,222.12 Interest on F u n d s . . . . . . . '...... 9,249.17 Sale of North Japan Buildings.... 1,000.00 54,471.29 Total of all contributions— 1918. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $270,820.79 Total of all contributions— 1917. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 259,323.52 Gain in contributions, 1918 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $11,497.27 Gain in total receipts, 1918 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22,839.06


H o m e E xpenses

and

P er C apita G ifts.

T h e H o m e Expenses, which include the cultivation of mis­ sionary interest at h o m e and the administration of the w o r k abroad, as, also, the collection and disbursement of all the m o n e y s received, a m o u n t to about 7 % of the B o a r d ’s income which is nearly 2 % less than that of the previous year. T h e total receipts are $325,292.08 if divided by 132,172, the m em be rs hi p of our C h u r c h iafthe beginning of the year, indicate that the average per capita contribution is $2.46. If f r o m the above total w e deduct the legacies received from the dead and interest derived f r o m invested funds, it would appear that gifts f r o m the living average $2.04 per mem be r. These averages are distinctly in advance of those of the previous year which were respectfully $2.31 a nd $1.98. • E xpenditures ,B oard

of

F oreign M

issions.

T h e a m o u n t expended by the B oa rd for its regular w o r k on the field w a s $204,478.98 distributed as follows: A m o y , $49,­ 635.20; Arcot, $78,292.45; Japan, $76,551.33. T h e interest paid upo n monies borrowed by the Board w a s $2,037.88; H o m e E x ­ penses for promotion, collection and administration were $21,­ 770.05. E xpenditures , A rabian M

ission.

T h e a m o u n t expended for the regular w o r k of this Mission w a s $38,294.85 while its share of H o m e Expenses w a s $4,429.91 and the pay me nt on account of interest for borrowed m o n e y $262.25. A detailed statement of the “R e v e n u e and Expenditures” of the B o a r d and of the Arabian Mission appears on the latter pages of this report. .


W O M A N ’S B O A R D T h e receipts of the W o m a n ’s B oa rd from all sources were $98,611.20. O f this amount, $10,499 w a s contributed for the A m o y C o m m e m o r a t i o n and F a g g Mem or ia l F u n d and $1,210.26 were receipts from legacies. There w a s received fro m the O n e D a y ’s I nc om e Fund, also included in this amount, $5,183.11. T h e W o m a n ’s B oard paid during the past year into the treasury of S y n o d ’s Board for w o r k in China, India a n d Japan $68,753.88, of which $7,923.91 were for items outside the appro­ priations for the .regular work. It also m a d e contributions to the Arabian Mission in the s u m of $4,599.84. ' T h e Board deeply appreciates the fellowship and counsel a nd service which it enjoys with the W o m a n ’s B o a r d through w h o s e efforts so large an a m o u n t is secured annually for the maintenance of our w o r k abroad. CONCLUSION. R ecommendations

of t h e

B oar d .

T h e B oa rd m a k e s the following recommendations.: 1. Tha t in view of the satisfactory experience of the past w e renew the recommendation that the last S u n d a y in February be designated for the special presentation of the cause of Foreign Missions in our Churches and in their S u n d a y Schools. 2. That w e continue our approval and recommendation of the Every M e m b e r Canvass n o w in successful use in a large n u m b e r of our Churches as the best m et ho d for enlisting the financial assistance of the entire constituency of our Churches in support of the local C hurch and the denominational agencies. 3. That in view of the continuance of the conditions and the evident attitude of the Church, the O n e D a y ’s I ncome F u n d for Missions be continued another year. 4. That as a concrete expression of our resolve and our faith in its achievement w e as a B oa rd and as a Church definitely and purposefully undertake to m o v e forward our financial goal


CONCLUSIONS A ND RECOMMENDATIONS

xlvii

from $325,000 where it has stood since 1914 to $350,000 as our fair obligation and attainable objective for the c oming year. 5. That in view of the response of the C hu rc h during the first year of the w a r and of the plans being adopted by the lead­ ing denominations in Ame ri ca looking to a distinct and adequate development of Christian service in our country and in nonChristian lands, w e accept for ourselves our part in a general denominational F o r w a r d M o v e m e n t P r o g r a m for the next five years involving the B oard of Foreign Missions in the following: a. T h e increase of the workers so that each Mission shall be brought up to its full previous strength as soon as possible and that within the next five years the actual n u m ­ ber of missionaries on the field be increased by 1 0 % , involving an estimated average addition of 12 a year. b. T h e greater efficiency of our w o r k and the en­ couragement of the features in each field calling at this time for special effort. *• 1. Ja p a n . Concentration and evangelization. .

2. C h i n a . T h e evangelization of the North River District Extension. 3. In d i a . T h e support of the M a s s M o v e m e n t looking to the evangelization and education of the people in the. villages of our Arcot District.

4. A r a b i a . T h e n e w Mesopotamia to the north and the open door to the interior to the west. ■

c. T h e better equipment of the institutional w o r k and care of our missionaries by the 'active support of an approved property list. ' d. T h e adequate maintenance a nd equipment of the Missions. 1. T h e adoption of the principle of increasing the


â–

'appropriations for w o r k during the next five years at least 1 0 % a year on each previous year. 2. T h e definite, progressive increase of the annual budget each year. 3. T h e aim to be an annual budget of $500,000 in . 1923.

In behalf of the Board,

W

m .I. C h a m b e r l a i n , Foreign Secretary. L. J. S h a f e r , Acting H o m e Secretary.

A p p r o v e d by the Board, M a y 17, 1918. '


T H E A M O Y MISSION, CHINA. Founded 1842. A rea

occupied

6,000 square

miles .

P opulation

. : ;..

3,000,000.

'

Missionaries. — A m o y : Mrs. L. W. Kipp, Miss K. M. Talmage Miss M. E. Talmage, Miss L. N. Duryee, Miss B. M. Ogsbury, Miss E. C. Boynton, Miss W. Murman, Rev. H. P. Boot, Rev. H. P. DePree, Dr. J. H. Snoke, Dr. E. J. Strick, Mr. F. J. Weersing. T o n g - a n : Miss K. R. Green, Miss E. K. Beekman, Rev. Frank Eckerson, Rev. L. A. Talman. Chiang-chiu: Miss M. C. Morrison, Miss Maude Norling, Rev. Steward Day. Sio-khe: Miss Nellie Zwemer, Miss I^eona Van der Linden, Rev. H. j. Voskuil, Rev. H. M. Veenschoten, Dr.' T. Bosch. S h a n g h a i : Rev. and Mrs. A. L. WarnShuis. Associate Missionaries. — Mrs. H. P. Boot, Mrs. H. J .Voskuil. Mrs. H. P. DePree, Mrs. E. J. Strick, Mrs. Steward Day, Mrs. J. H. Snoke, Mrs. T. Bosch, Mrs. F. J. Weersing, Mrs. L. A. Talman, Mrs. H. M. Veen­ schoten. I n A m e r i c a . — Mr. H. Renskers.

1 1 3 1 1 1

2 2 1

1 4 1 3 1

5

1 3 0 1 1

2

4 4 1 3

0

7

0 0 0

0

0 0 0 12 5 58 10 3 0 3 58 0

0

2 2

2 1

3 4 0

0 0 0

0 0 0 0

2 S’! 355 135 82 49 135

u 0 1 0 211 1 0 0

0 0 0 0 4 3 0 6 1 0 3 0 0 6 0 0 1 0 0 14 0 1 5 0 0 2 0 0

78 54 104 142 57

56 58 19 170 122 61

18 11 10 9 2 3 12 4 . 8 17

213

$80

50 253

113

0 n ii

3 3 3 6 0

*3

16 45 29

20 40 35 10 30 63 50 20 20 25 100 60 75

108 59 17 93 160

55 47 106 34 75 47 37 19 117 81

44

28 50 27 29 54 15 18 20 35 12 26 35 4 38 30 10

Totals ............. 16 48 141I83I92I43I88I 6j 11213911311748115651' $624

Native Contributions Exclusive pf Contributions for Schools.

60

tn <U

Domestic Missions.

Infants Baptized.

Communicants.

Removed.

3

2 3 5 7 0 0 4

2 2

||

|

j]

3

3 8 u 0 3 2 *5 1 0

0 5 3 9 0 2 4 11 1 2 1 7 2 1 0 0 4

8 IS

1

Baptized Non-Communicants.

11 3 9 0 10 8 10

Excommunicated.

Constituent Chapels. 1 4 1 3 2

4 1 6 19 2 2 1 0 0 0

1 1 1 0

| Suspended.

|| ||

Sin-koe .............. Tek-chhiu-kha ........ Aw-kang ............ Khoe-hoa ............ Knm-un-hoe .......... Chioh-be ............ Chiang Chiu ......... Sio Khe ............ Thian-po............. Lam-sin ............. Poa-a ............... Ho-san .............. Soa-sia .............. Leng-soa ............ Bi-kong-hoe .......... Tong-an ............. Hong-san ............ Chheng-khe ..........

| Church Organizations.

Names of Churches.

4

| Died.

|] Received on Confession.

1 1 22

1

| Received on Certificate. | Dismissed.

S T A T I S T I C A L R E P O R T O F T H E C H U R C H E S — A M O Y M I S S I O N — 1917—

$3,008 l’879 729 6,260 901 580 1,291 449

444 364 862 587 614 465 80 1,058 1,148 358 $21,077


R E P O R T F O R 1917 A M O Y

DISTRICT.

This is the seventy-fifth year since the Gospel first c a m e to A m o y . O n e w o u l d long to report a year of striking p r o g ­ ress, but all that can be said is that there has been gradual growth. T w o experiences stand out strikingly as o n e looks back over the year. T h e first is the t y p h o o n that visited A m o y , S e p t e m b e r 12th, a n d left ruin a n d death behind it. T h o s e w h o w e r e o n K o l o n g s u at the time passed a very a n x ­ ious night, not k n o w i n g w h a t the next m o m e n t m i g h t bring, as houses crashed a n d c r u m b l e d before the storm. B u t our lives w e r e mercifully spared a n d im m a n y w a y s the protection of Providence w a s realized. It h a d its valuable lessons, not only for the missionaries, but to some' Chinese Christians it also brought n e w consecration. W i t h the sight of corpses w a s h e d ashore, the unavailing search of boat people for miss­ ing m e m b e r s of the family or crew, a n d the w r e c k e d launches a n d junks in the harbor, there c a m e a sense of the special favor G o d h ad s h o w n that o ne w a s not a m o n g the missing or m o u r n i n g ones. O n e Christian, an attendant at o ne of our A m o y churches, w h o w a s o n o ne of the cargo boats in the harbor that night, w a s w a s h e d off b y the storm into the raging sea. H e caught the boat, clung to it, w a s again w a s h e d off, a n d again caught hold of a boat. T h r o u g h vari­ ous dangers, he finally got ashore. H e c a m e to the pastor a n d said, “ I a m going h o m e to tell m y parents I shall d o the L o r d ’s w o r k a n d prepare to be a preacher. T h e y are heathen a n d object, but I shall tell t h e m that their son died in the storm. M y life has 'been, brought bac k out of death a n d I o w e it to the L o r d w h o rescued me. T h e loss to Mission property w a s h e a v y a n d the d a m ­ age d houses a n d schools, surrounded b y debris, w e r e a sadlooking sight w h e n daylight d a w n e d , after the storm h a d passed. It w a s three m o n t h s before s o m e of the houses w e r e


again repaired, although several contractors b e g a n w o r k i n g at once o n houses a n d schools. T h e B o a r d ’s kind response to our appeal for a special repair fund has m a d e it possible to restore the d am ag e. T h e second experience that stands out in the year’s w o r k is the visit of the evangelistic party, h eaded b y M r . B u c h m a n , that brought inspiration a n d n e w ideals of service to all w h o w e r e privileged to attend their meetings. Outside of the g roups in schools, there w e r e eight for m e n a n d w o m e n with about t we nt y persons in each group. N o g r o u p m e t m o r e than four times, a n d yet, in spite of the limited n u m b e r of meetings a n d limited attendance, their influence has been great. T h e y have brought a m o r e spiritual tone in our work. F o r a n u m b e r of w or ke rs it has m e a n t the putting aside of sin that w a s hindering the w i n n i n g of souls, the keener realiza­ tion that m e n are m o r e important' than things, the convic­ tion that w e need to labor m o r e for the individual a n d d e p e n d ■ less o n speaking to crowds, a n d the witnessing of miracles of grace. So, in regard to the special evangelistic c a m p a i g n w h i c h M r . E d d y is to conduct here, there is a spirit of hop e a n d expectancy because people in the churches are giving themselves m o r e largely to personal work. Evangelistic W o r k

Sin K oe C h u r c h . T h e w o r k m the Sin K o e C h u r c h has suffered because of the poor health of the pastor, w h i c h m a d e it necessary at the close of the year for h i m to lay his pastoral w o r k aside for a short time. H e w e n t o n a trip to Singapore to rest a n d to try to raise m o n e y for the debt that they hav e o n their school buildings. T h e w o r k they b e g a n at a place o n the m ainland called Sin-oa has been continued. Afternoons, after the service, a b a n d of f r o m eight to twelve goes out street preaching, a n d at night they report o n the w o r k at the evening prayer meeting, a n d prayer is offered for this evangelistic effort. T w e n t y - t w o n e w m e m b e r s w e r e a d d e d during the year.


T ek C h h i u K h a C h u r c h . T h e T e k C h h i u K h a C h u r c h h a d as an assistant to the pastor a y o u n g m a n w h o graduated f ro m Nanking Theological Seminary. D u r i n g the s u m m e r , illness, m a d e it necessary to give h i m three or four m o n t h s of rest, a n d so s o m e of the church activities have suffered.’ D u r i n g the first half of the year there w a s a g r o u p of wor ke rs w h o w e n t out weekly, t w o a n d two, a n d h a d a meeting o n S u n d a y m o r n i n g s to discuss their problems a n d to report; but after the s u m m e r this w o r k w a s not resumed. After the afternoon service, s o m e of the m e m ­ bers g o out street preaching. E leven n e w m e m b e r s w e r e re­ ceived during the year, all but o ne h aving to be baptized.

K hoe H oa C h u r c h . T h e K h o e H o a C h u r c h has experienced steady growth, adding nine m e m b e r s during the year.. A n e w school building w a s completed. A t the close of the year the pastor felt, that, after serving the church six years, he should resign. Classis felt it best to dissolve the relationship, urging h i m to stay until a successor w a s secured. T h e church has set about calling another pastor at once, a n d it is h o p e d that the former pastor m a y soon receive a call so as to continue in the work.

O K ang Ch u r c h . T h e O K a n g C h u r c h continues in a rather w e a k condi­ tion, being still without a pastor. A t o ne of the stations, Na-au, it s e e m s as if the h a r m o n y b e t w e e n the m e m b e r s , that w a s broken several years ago, is being restored; yet w h e n s o m e still refuse to contribute to the church finances it is evident that there is still w o r k to be d o n e to unite t h e m m o r e fully. A t a second station, Kio-thau, the leaders are old a nd the church sadly needs y o u n g e r m e n ; at K a n g - t h a u they hav e y o u n g e r m e n but they need purified lives a n d m o r e consecra­ tion if they are to be of use. T h e church has decided to call a pastor, and if the right m a n is chosen there m a y be m o r e hop e for the future.


P h a i -bo

and

C h e -c h i u C h u r c h e s .

T h e t w o stations supported a n d m a n a g e d b y the Sin K o e a n d T e k C h h i u K h a churches both hav e h a d trials. D u r i n g the first part of the year, thieves broke into the house of the school teacher, adjoining the Phai-bo Church, a n d not only took a w a y m a n y things but bruised the teacher about the hea d so that he w a s in the hospital for s o m e time. A t the other station, Che-chiu, a church m e m b e r w h o h a d h a d a w e d d i n g for his son w a s threatened because he w o u l d not c o m p l y with the village c u s t o m of giving a heathen theatre for the people o n the occasion. T h e official w a s asked to post a proclamation asserting liberty of religion, a n d soon the threatenings ceased a n d the fears of the church w e r e dispelled. K ol o n g s u C h u r c h . A step forward this year has been the securing of a pastor to look after the families connected with A m o y churches that are living o n Kolongsu. After m o n t h s of discussion/a plan agreed to b y all the churches w a s finally reached a n d the a r r an ge me nt m a d e to have A m o y pastors alternate in living o n K o l o n g s u for a year each, to take charge of this work, lu Hoai-tek, the pastor of the E - m n g K a n g C h u r c h (English Presbyterian) w a s the first to carry out. the plan a n d he has d o n e faithful work.

Educational W o r k U

nio n

T heological C ollege .

M r . D e P r e e has represented^the Mission o n the teaching staff of the U n i o n Theological College o n Kolongsu. T h e foreign m e m b e r s of the faculty during the year have been Rev. A. J. H u t c h i n s o n of the L o n d o n Mission, Rev. H . P. D e P r e e of the A m e r i c a n R e f o r m e d Mission, a n d Rev. H . W . O l d h a m of the English Presbyterian Mission. T h e Rev. C. K . T a n of the L o n d o n - M i s s i o n church o n K o l o n g s u has c o n 足


tinued to give valuable help in teaching'and in the oversight of the work. T w o n e w students have entered the College, o ne c o m i n g fro m T a l m a g e College a n d the other being the son of the pastor of the W e s t Street C h u r c h in Chinchew. T h r e e stu­ dents w e r e graduated a n d at the graduation service w e w e r e fortunate in having the Rev. J. C a m p b e l l Gibson, D.D., of S w a t o w , give the address. . . D u r i n g the second term an interesting experiment w a s m a d e in devoting a n hou r a w e e k to a discussion of matters connected with the war. Progress has been m a d e during the year in giving the students experience in practical Christian work. In addition to teaching in a S u n d a y School a n d c o n ­ ducting services, the students g o once a w e e k in turn to the K o l o n g s u prison w h e r e b y permission of the Municipal Council they are allowed to preach the Gospel to the prisoners. T h e College Y. M . C. A. has held fortnightly meetings a n d has had the benefit of a n u m b e r of addresses fro m various speakers, both Chinese a n d foreign. T h e Sports C o m m i t t e e has o rg an ­ ized volley-ball a n d tennis. T h r e e students w e r e appointed as delegates to the Students’ S u m m e r Conference held in A m o y in August. T a l m a g e C ollege .

T h e report for T a l m a g e College is m a d e b y the Rev. H . P. Boot. T h e year 1917 has been a remarkable o ne in the history of this institution. T h e revision of the curriculum, the creation of a B o a r d of Trustees, the adoption of three courses of study, special religious meetings held in A m o y , a n d even the t yp ho on devastation, each a n d all hav e a share in m a k i n g 1917 a banner year in T a l m a g e M e m o r i a l ’s career. T h e ( year o pe ne d with 112 students in attendance, an entrance class of 46 students, both items u nh ea rd of in our school’s history. T h e year closed with 101 students in attend­ ance, w h i c h also establishes a n e w record. Y e t rigid enforce­ m e n t of the rules of the institution caused the withdrawal


of seven in the first term a nd four the second term. O n e case of stealing caused an upheaval, otherwise the withdrawals w e r e d u e to an unwillingness to abide b y decisions that m e a n t dropping back a year d ue to failure in obtaining the passing marks. Aside fro m the usual run of m i n o r ailments, the school has been comparatively free f r o m contagious disease a n d has enjoyed a healthful condition of students a n d teach­ ers. Just at the close there w e r e a f e w cases of smallpox in a mild form, but the w o r k continued uninterruptedly. In c o m m o n with the c o m m u n i t y in general, our institu­ tion suffered great d a m a g e s f r o m the t y p h o o n w h i c h struck this region S e p t e m b e r 12th. W i t h the m a i n building prac­ tically unroofed a n d the roofs of the second building a n d of the head teacher’s residence d a m a g e d , c o m p o u n d walls d o w n a n d interior walls of the m e m o r i a l building d o w n just a w e e k before the time school w a s to ope n its second term, it looked as if w e m i g h t have to postpone opening d a y for a m o n t h or m o r e a n d several so counseled. W e counted o n the g o o d ­ will of the Chinese students a n d teachers to be willing to put u p with a great deal of inconvenience at the start a n d w e r e not put to shame. T o a d d to our discomfort during the year, the big c o m p o u n d wall, put u p the previous year at a n e x ­ pense of nearly $1,000 Mex., w a s so seriously u n d e r m i n e d b y previous t yphoons as to m a k e it necessary to take twothirds of it d o w n in addition to w h a t h a d already fallen. W i t h a broader foundation a n d rebuilt in a different w a y , t h o u g h at an a dd ed cost of $400, w e trust it is n o w u p to stay. T h e t yp ho on d a m a g e to college buildings necessitated a n addi­ tional expense of almost $1,000 Mex., a n d six w e e k s of dis­ comfort. It w a s a blessing that the institution w a s not in session w h e n the t yp ho on occurred, ^or w e m i g h t have to chronicle the loss of m a n y lives. T h e creation of a B o a r d of Trustees with equal represen­ tation of Chinese a n d Americans, will, w e trust, prove a step in the right direction a n d bring the institution still closer to the church at large. W i t h the election of the B o a r d a n d cer­ tain of its p o w e r s subject to the Mission, n o fears as to the


character of the institution need arise. T h e m e n chosen to represent the Chinese on this B o a r d are: the Chinese H e a d M a s t e r of the College, M r. L a w ; Dr. T a n Thian-un, a leading physician,, philanthropist, a n d elder of the S e c o n d Church, A m o y ; a n d the Rev. T a n Chiu-kheng, pastor of the local L o n ­ d o n Mission Church. W h i l e our institution is n o longer a union school, the L o n d o n Mission has n o school of that grade a n d at present they have 22 students in our institution. It is, therefore, quite fitting they should be represented' o n the B o a r d of Trustes, the m o r e so as this leaves the door ajar for a possible union with t h e m later in an institution the character of w h i c h they have helped shape through the pastor’s helpful suggestions. T h e B o a r d has h a d several meetings a n d has m a d e s o m e definite contributions to the future welfare of the school. C o m i n g f r o m a joint Board, these will, w e believe, have a salutary efifect u p o n all concerned. O n e of the decisions of the T a l m a g e B o a r d is to grant regular Middle .School diplomas at the close of a four years’ course with the definite understanding-that henceforth only certificates of w o r k don e will be issued to all such as have failed in' a n y subjects. J ud gi ng f r o m the n u m b e r of students w h o have asked for permission to m a k e u p back w o r k b y re-examination, even at the price of $1.00 per subject, the B o a r d ’s decision to publicly a n n o u n c e at c o m m e n c e m e n t night .w h o receive a diploma a n d w h o receive a certificate of w o r k done, is b o u n d to m a k e for better scholarship a n d m o r e real diplomas. T h e a w a k e n i n g of C hi na d e m a n d s such action. O n l y well-equipped w o r k m a n should be placed o n the m a r k e t henceforth. T h e d a y is fortunately soon at hand, a n d w e are already using this fact as a lever, w h e n the C h u r c h a n d the public can have a choice of the best m e n for work. A n o t h e r decision w h i c h the B o a r d of Trustees adopted a n d has carried into effect is the institution of three courses of study. This will m e a n additional teaching force, a n d hence a dd ed expense; but it will m a k e for proficiency a n d enable our school to prepare m e n for the F o o c h o w University with sufficient English to carry o n the w o r k of their entering class.


T h e courses adopted are: a n English Course, the regular M iddle School Classics Course, a n d the N o r m a l Course. T h a t there is need of m e n with N o r m a l C ourse training can be seen fro m the fact that even the gentry as well as the g o v e r n m e n t emphasize this to such an extent as to run rival schools a n d bring every i nd uc em en t to bear u p o n students. O n e such N o r m a l school with a capacity for 300 students is just n o w being a d d e d in this vicinity, a n d tuition, board, a n d books are offered free— even room, light, a n d bedding. W e are not afraid of competition. W e w e l c o m e it, a n d h o p e w e m a y simply be urged o n thereby to d o even better. W h i l e our present N o r m a l course is intended to provide us with a better equipped teaching force, for the lower primary schools only, the B o a r d of Trustees is alive to the fact that w e m u s t very soon a dd a higher n or ma l course, o p e n to M iddle School graduates only. O u r a i m should be not only to provide an adequate teaching force for all church schools in our region, but to provide the gentry a n d g o v e r n m e n t schools with a better grade of teachers, w h o are Christians. In the present N o r m a l course no English is taught; in the M id dl e School, or Classics course, English is taught as a subject o ne hour per day; in the English course sixteen hours per w e e k are given to English a n d s o m e subjects are taught in English. T h e entering class of 46 students h a d 12 each in the English a n d N o r m a l courses the last term. A poster h a d been p u b ­ lished a n d scattered far a n d wide, informing the public of T a l m a g e M e m o r i a l courses, a n d w e look for a n increase of students next term. A t the A n n u a l Athletic M e e t of the S ou th F uk ie n A s s o ­ ciation, in N o v e m b e r , T a l m a g e College w o n several firsts a n d scored a total of 26 points, while T u n g W e n Institute, the victor, secured 34; a n d the Y. M . C. A. a n d Seventh D a y schools each h a d 6 points to their credit. Financially, the year 1917 is also a banner year. T h e budget, calling for an expenditure of over $10,000 Mex., is the largest in our history. In fees alone v/e h a d $4,205, while from the B o a r d w e h a d $4,390, plus the- t y p h o o n damages.


H o w e v e r , w e w o u l d call attention to the fact that the adoption of three courses instead of o ne course of study will, for the next three years to come, m e a n additional teaching staff, class room, a n d equipment. In things spiritual, w h i c h is the test of a Mission institu­ tion, w e are able to report glad news. T h e Y. M . C. A. has been strengthened in n u m b e r s a n d in w o r k done. D u r i n g the first term three voluntary Bible S t u d y classes m e t on' S u n d a y mornings, under the leadership of o ne native teacher a n d five students, w h o in turn m e t with the Principal on Friday evenings as a N o r m a l Bible class; over fifty students ■entered these Bible classes a n d studied the Acts of the Apostles. Last term the Principal himself h a d the voluntary Bible class of t we nt y men . Fourteen m e n asked for admission to church membe rs hi p. T w o groups of our students attended B u c h m a n meetings, at the close of w h i c h w e h a d a special mee ti ng of all the students, inviting to remain for an after mee ti ng a n y w h o h ad received benefit, w h o w is he d to c o n ­ fess to sins in their lives, a n d w h o desired to d o personal work. Forty-four y o u n g m e n attended this special m e e t i n g ; twenty-four confessed to various sins in their lives, a n d twentyeight determined to do s o m e personal w o r k a m o n g fellow students. A better spirit reigns now . H a r m o n y b et we en stu­ dents a n d teachers is manifest in class r o o m a n d on the field. T h e Preaching B a n d still goes o n its mission every Sabbath, while several y o u n g m e n assist in local church S u n d a y school work, a n d t w o of the graduates, have determined to enter the Seminary. O f the nineteen graduates, seven expect to c o n ­ tinue studies in Tal ma ge . C h u r c h P r i m ary S c ho ols . At« the beginning of the year the A m o y churches discon-, tinued their higher primary w o r k a n d sent their pupils to the U n i o n School at the Y. M . C. A\ in w h i c h they united. T h e school started u nd er several disadvantages, a n d all the w o r k has not fulfilled the hopes of those w h o participated, but a g o o d start has b e e n . m a d e o n a union effort w h i c h is


greatly needed. T h e great inequality in grade of the students fro m the various schools that are brought into this higher primary will decrease, a n d the standard of teaching in the school improve. T h e churches have continued their lower primary w o r k as before. S o also have the churches o n A m o y Island. Alto­ gether, there are 424 students in primary schools a n d 26 in higher primary. G irls’ S c h o o l .

Mis s D u r y e e reports for- the Girls’ School. A g a i n w e record our gratitude to G o d for H i s g oodness to us as a school during the past year. T w o h u n d r e d a n d eighty-seven pupils w e r e enrolled the first term, 104 boarding a n d 183 d a y pupils; a n d 91 boarding a n d 135 d a y pupils the second term. T h e r e has been n o serious illness in the school, but o ne of the d ay pupils died at her h om e. O u r school year ends in the s u m m e r a n d a class of 24 w a s graduated, all but t w o of w h o m w e r e professing Christians: one, a d a y pupil fro m a well-to-do non-Christian family, a nd o ne the daughter of a Christian w i d o w . O n e of the g r a d u ­ ates, a daughter of Rev. lap, othe first Chinese pastor in the A m o y District, is n o w in the United States studying at Northfield Seminary. A n o t h e r is continuing her studies in F o o c h o w . T w o girls sent to us through one of the ladies of the L o n d o n Missionary Society have taught in L. M . S. schools. T w e l v e have this a u t u m n taught in schools connected with our o w n Mission, both boarding a n d d a y schools. O n e taught in a village d a y school w h i c h is supported b y a wealthy A m o y Christian. F o r .various reasons five of o u r teachers left us in the s u m m e r . O n e w e n t to N a n k i n g to continue her studies, the other four taught elsewhere. Their places w e r e taken b y our s u m m e r graduates. _ M i s s P a x s o n ’s a n d M r. B u c h a n a n ’s meetings in the a u t u m n greatly stirred both teachers a n d pupils to the i m p o r ­ tance of every Christian b e c o m i n g a w in ne r of souls. T h e


meetings held b y these workers w e r e limited to groups, so only a few w e r e able to attend. O n e of our teachers, a girl w h o graduated t w o years a g o a n d w h o h a d never before given very clear evidence of being a Christian, at a meeting of the w h o l e school, held to hear reports' of M i s s P a x s o n ’s meetings f r o m those w h o w e r e able to attend, quite openly declared herself a Christian. S h e c o m e s f r o m a family greatly o pp os ed to Christianity. Before the close of the term, o ne pupil, about fifteen years old, told us that she a n d her three sisters held “ family prayers” every day, although n o o ne else w o u l d attend. T h e y belong to a rich non-Christian family with business in Java. S h e also said her m o t h e r scolded because she w o u l d not worship the idols a n d she said, “ I told her I w o u l d o b e y her in other things but not in this.” O n e of the missionaries asked all those w h o had- lately b e c o m e Christians to m e e t with her, a n d about fifty responded to the invitation, while at another m e e ti ng sixty or m o r e promised to d o personal work. Just at the beginning of 1918 G o d called to Himself an old teacher of the school, Mrs. Sia, at the age of seventy-nine. A fuller record of her life will be given elsewhere, but w e w o u l d record here, as well, our appreciation of the m a n y years of faithful service she gav e to the school. Since leaving the school she h a d been living in her o w n h o m e o n Kolongsu. T h e funeral w a s attended b y very m a n y old pupils, every o ne of w h o m could, w e believe, bear record that she h a d never heard Mrs. Sia tell a n untruth nor k n o w her to take a “squeeze” out of a n y Mission m o n e y that passed through her hands. F o r such as her w e thank G o d a n d take courage. >

W

o m e n ’s

Sc h o o l .

Mis s K. M . T a l m a g e reports for the Charlotte D u r y e e Bible School for W o m e n . T h e year has been full of bless­ ings. G o d b y H i s Spirit has been in o u r midst a n d w e hav e seen c h a ng ed lives in m a n y of our pupils. D u r i n g the year w e have h a d m o r e than seventy pupils; s o m e for the year, s o m e for a term, a n d s o m e w h o , for family reasons, w e r e with us only a f e w weeks. O t h e r pupils have

o


been m e m b e r s of the school for t w o or three years. M a n y c o m e fro m heathen families, brought b y s o m e Christian rel­ ative or friend. W e receive these heathen w o m e n , k n o w i n g that the “ Gospel is the p o w e r of. G o d unto salvation” a n d w e have proved it to be so, for m a n y w h o c a m e to us as heathen have left us professing their faith in Christ. O n e w h o w a s with us this a u t u m n 'made great progress in reading, a n d later took part in our prayer meetings, praying for her h u s ­ band. H e w a s opposed to Christianity a n d asked w h a t m e d ­ icine w a s given her that she b e c a m e so c h a n g e d ! T h e visit to A m o y of the B u c h m a n party h a d a w i d e influ­ ence, t h o u g h only the teacher a n d one of the w o m e n w e r e able to attend a n y of the meetings. Reports of the meetings w e r e given at the school a n d several of the w o m e n resolved to d o personal work. T h e y found the opportunity for doing it a m o n g their companions. Thirteen of the w o m e n took other thirteen w o m e n to w o r k a n d pray for. T h e w o r k has be“en m u c h blessed to the workers as well as to those for w h o m "they worked. Often going about the school I found s o m e r o o m locked, a n d w a s informed that w o m e n w e r e mee ti ng for prayer together. S o groups here a n d there m e t to plead with G o d for themselves a n d others. This school has cost the W o m a n ’s B o a r d $303 Mexican, a n d w h e n w e consider the seventy w o m e n a n d girls w h o have been taught the w a y of life through Chirst, w e feel that the m o n e y has been well spent. ' C hi l d r e n ’s H

ome.

A s the Children’s H o m e w a s o p e n e d in 1887, this year completes its thirtieth birthday. O n e h u n d r e d a n d fifty-six children have been enrolled during these years. This year o ne n e w child w a s received. S h e is seven years old, the daughter of a coolie w h o w a s unable to care for his child after his wife died a n d w a s about to sell her. T w o of the girls, nineteen a n d t we nt y years of age, c o m ­ pleted their course of study in the “ D eveloping Character” Girls’ School a n d received their diplomas last June. After


C o m m e n c e m e n t exercises, each o ne sent in a letter of thanks a n d appreciation to the effect that the L o r d h a d so greatly loved t h e m as to o p e n the hearts of the. missionary ladies to love t h e m too, not only in providing a “ H o m e ” for their care a n d comfort, but also in opening the w a y for an educa•tion so that year b y year they h a d been permitted to study in school until they w e r e that d a y enabled to graduate. F o r these t w o great blessings they could never express their grati­ tude, a n d with very h a p p y hearts they could only say “a great big ‘thank you,’ ” a n d h o p e b y useful lives to s h o w their grati­ tude to G o d a n d to the missionaries. B o t h of these girls have, been teaching this fall term. D u r i n g the year t w o of the girls- w e r e m a r r i e d ; one to a Christian business m a n in A m o y . T h e other w a s received into the H o m e in 1898, w h e n only a f e w m o n t h s old, her m o t h e r a n d brothers having died of plague. S h e w a s m a r ­ ried to a preacher in the country, a n d has written since, tell­ ing h o w h a p p y she is in her n e w h o m e a n d of the kindness she has received fro m her n e w relatives. T h e chief event of the year w a s the dividing of the H o m e (which has been connected with both Missions, the English Presbyterian a n d ours) into t w o smaller H o m e s . T h e r e has been a g r o w i n g feeling for several years that the children could be better taken care of if the H o m e w a s divided a n d our half nearer to our house a n d school. This year this w a s accomplished through the offering for sale b y its o w n e r of a house adjoining our girls’ a n d w o m e n ’s schools. T h e fear of its being sold to disagreeable neighbors, as well as the desire of dividing the H o m e , led to its purchase. A cc or di ng to the agreement, the o w n e r w a s allowed to stay in the house t e m ­ porarily a n d in the m e a n t i m e the children, fourteen in all, are being housed in one of our school dormitories w h e r e they are h a p p y a n d contented. B o v s ’ P r i m a r y Sc h o o l . T h e K o l o n g s u B o y s ’ P r i m a r y School is still getting along in poor a n d inadequate, but expensive, rented quarters. A n


effort w a s m a d e during the year to obtain another m u c h better house, but w e w e r e not successful. O u r efforts to m ov e, however, h a d the g o o d effect of prevailing u p o n our landlord to reduce the rent. O u r attendance has fallen off s o m e w h a t , partly because a n e w m a n d a r i n organized a large g o v e r n m e n t school close to ours a n d partly because w e w e r e obliged to raise the fees in order to avoid a deficit. O u r enrollment the first semester w a s 150, the second 135. Fifteen w e r e g r a d u ­ ated fro m the higher primary, 28 fro m the lower. Eight of the' higher primary graduates will enter T a l m a g e College. N e x t to n e w quarters our greatest nee d is the introduc­ tion of vocational work. W e cannot neglect this m u c h longer if w e are going to keep ahead of the better g o v e r n m e n t schools a n d o c c u p y the place that w e should in the n e w reconstructed China. T h e r e is a d e m a n d that school education be better adapted to the needs of actual l.ife. M a n y w a y s have been suggested b y w h i c h w e m a y accomplish this, in A m o y , but unfortunately they all involve at least a m o n e y guarantee to cover possible losses, a n d s o m e w o u l d require an immediate, considerable outlay.

Medical Work H ope

and

W

ilhelmina

H ospitals.

A t the outset w e should point out that this is not an annual report but a report of six m o n t h s only. T h e hos­ pitals w e r e o pe ne d M a y 1st, closed again July 15th for the s u m m e r m o n t h s a n d reopened S e p t e m b e r 15th.•• ' Per ha ps the first thing w h i c h strikes o ne w h e n looking over the statistics a n d report in general is the f ew people treated, for such large a n d well-equipped institutions. T h e r e are several factors w h i c h have brought this a b o u t : first, the hospitals w e r e o p e n only six m o n t h s ; second, for the m o s t of this time they w e r e not fully o p e n e d o n account of the limited staff, only the first floor being o p e n to patients until


October 15th, unless they w e r e either first or second class; third, the hospitals h ad been closed for nearly t w o years; fourth, the fees hav e been raised. W e are greatly pleased with our n e w outfit for the oper­ ating a n d sterilizing rooms. T h e e q u i p m e n t gives eminent satisfaction. T h e e q u i p m e n t of the hospitals consists o f : hot a n d cold running water, a flushing system, a n d a thirty h or se po we r s team boiler w h i c h furnishes s te am for cooking, running p u m p a n d w a s h i n g machine, for sterilizing, a n d for heating operating room. W e have a Scanlan-Morris ‘ W h i t e Lin e ” sterilizing system. W e have also recently installed an entirely n e w operating r o o m set also with “ W h i t e L i n e ” goods, a n d the hospitals are lighted b y electricity. After having been closed for about t w o years, W i l h e l m i n a Hospital, w h i c h is largely under the direction of M i s s M u r m a n , w a s o p e n e d o n the first of M a y without a n y special ceremony. F r o m that time until n o w there have not been as m a n y patients as w e expected w o u l d come. Per ha ps o n e of the reasons for this is that each patient is subjected to a bath at the time of entrance! M a n y Chinese w o m e n consider this anything but pleasant. T h e lower floor of the hospital, w h i c h is intended for general a n d charity cases, has been g e n ­ erally filled. O n the second floor, w h i c h is set aside for private patients, w e have not h a d as m a n y as w e could have wished. T o all these persons, without exception, the Gospel has been preached b y our B i b l e w o m a n , K u n g- ka , w h o has been active in this capacity for the last six years. S ev en children w e r e born in the hospital— m o r e than is usual.. T h e Chinese w o m e n , especially the y o u n g e r genera­ tion, s e e m td’desire m o r e a n d m o r e to secure com pe te nt nurs­ ing. E vangelistic W

ork.

This is under the direction of Mrs. Snoke. T h r o u g h o u t the year the w o r k of- evangelism has been carried steadily on. T h e blind preacher, P o e hia, w h o has w o r k e d so long a n d faithfully in H o p e Hospital, a n d Pastor L i m Po-tek, w h o is


HOPE

AND

WILHELMINA

HOSPITAL

Looking east over the harbor to Amoy City. Engine room, laundry, and kitchen are seen here.

STAFF

OF

THE

NEERBOSCH

HOSPITAL,

SIO - K H E , A M O Y


SIGNING T H E

A

DEED

PASTOR

FOR THE

AND

A K - S I A P R O P E R T Y . — See page 34

HIS FLOCK, C H K O A - C H H U - C H E


n o w in charge of evangelistic w o r k in the hospital, have faith­ fully preached the Gospel in the w a r d s a n d b y the beds. T h e pastor has preached to the out-patients o n all dispensary days a n d has conducted services for all the in-patients in the large Bonthius M e m o r i a l Chapel every S u n d a y m o r n i n g a n d W e d n e s d a y evening.- T h o s e w h o could read Chinese char­ acters have been helped a n d e ncouraged to read the Bible a n d h y m n book. ■ T h e B i b l e w o m a n in W i l h e l m i n a Hospital, K h n g - k o , has d o n e faithful, efficient w o r k a n d her e x a m p l e has been in accord with her precepts. W h e n the b u r d e n of nursing has been heavy, a goodly share of it has fallen u p o n the shoulders of our B i b l e w o m a n , she being M i s s M u r m a n ’s m o s t exp e ­ rienced helper. E m p h a s i s is laid o n Christian exercises. T h e Gospel is preached daily in the small chapel b y Mrs. Snoke, the B i b l e w o m a n , or s o m e visiting sister. After the B u c h m a n meetings a personal w o r k e r s ’ g r o u p of eight m e m b e r s w a s formed.

CHIANG-CHIU

DISTRICT.

Evangelistic W o r k T h e Chiang-chiu District comprises five organized churches a n d eight chapels or out-stations. In this report each church with its out-stations or associated chapels will be taken u p separately. C h i o h -be C h u r c h . T h e Chioh-be church has h a d the s a m e pastor as f o r m ­ erly, A n g K h e k Chhiong, w h o is one of the m o s t experienced leaders of the A m o y •churches. C h i a n g -c hi u C h u r c h .

,

D u r i n g the s u m m e r m o n t h s the pastor of the Chiang-chiu church left for the Straits Settlements a n d is not intending to return, so that church is n o w temporarily served b y a


preacher until it can arrange for another pastor, not a very easy matter in our section of China. O

ut -stations .

-

T h e t w o out-stations of this church, Sin-tng a n d K a w - a w , have h a d preachers a n d Sin-tung has s h o w n signs of g r o w t h in the n u m b e r of attendants at services. Associated with the church at T hian-po is the chapel of E - g a w . T w o w e e k s of special effort w e r e given to this church in co-operation with the pastor, three preachers a n d a B i b l e w o m a n . T h e highest attendance at the meetings w a s over 300; the average for the evening meetings w a s 120. T h e meetings for w o m e n w e r e held during the afternoon. T h e r e are three out-stations c on­ nected with the S o a Sia church, a n d each year they hold at each center a f e w days of special evangelistic meetings, de­ signed to reach the surrounding villages which, so far as possible, are visited during that time. In these efforts the pastor of the church, the preachers of the chapels, a n u m b e r of office bearers a n d the missionary w o r k together, s om et im es dividing into three separate preaching b an ds a n d going out into the villages during the d a y to preach, in the evening holding a mee ti ng in the church or in o ne of thd villages. • T h e L e n g S o a church has just lost their pastor, w h o has resigned. H e has been in that church for about twelve years a n d has m a d e it o n e of the m o s t e xe mp la ry churches in the w h o l e synod. Special meetings held for eight days at E-lang, the out-station, w e r e very successful in helping the church a n d in adding to the n u m b e r of inquirers. M r . D a y has given as large proportion of his time as possible to these special evangelistic efforts. Besides these, a Bible conference w a s held in October in Chiang-chiu for the preachers of this dis­ trict a n d the Sio-khe district. A t this conference six m i s ­ sionaries took part and,’including the preachers of the L o n ­ d o n Mission, it w a s attended b y over thirty preachers. It w a s indeed a conference w o r t h while, helpful to the missionaries a n d Chinese alike.


W

o m e n ’s

W

ork.

In connection with the general evangelistic m o v e m e n t at the Chinese N e w Year, special w o r k for non-Christian w o m e n w a s d o n e b y the missionaries, B i b l e w o m e n , a n d a n u m b e r of the Christian w o m e n of the church. It w a s decided not to hold public meetings as, for several days following the Chinese N e w Year, w o m e n are not supposed to w a l k abroad, so w e w e n t to them, going t w o or three together to the h o m e s of friends, neighbors or relatives, a n d to different villages, to take the m e s s a g e of the Gospel. In this w a y m a n y w o m e n w e r e reached a n d our church w o m e n , in w o r k i n g for others, w e r e themselves m a d e m o r e earnest a n d faithful. A n u m b e r of t h e m signed their names, promising to give an afternoon a w e e k to going out to w o r k for others. W h i l e s o m e have gra d ­ ually lost interest in it, others have been faithful a n d m a n y calls have been m a d e to witness for the Master. After the fifth of the N e w Year, the small chapel of the church w a s open daily for s o m e days. T h e attendance of the w o m e n at church has been g o o d throughout the year a n d several have learned to read the Bible in the colloquial— a decided help to those w h o w o u l d g r o w in grace a n d the k n o w l e d g e of Christ. Several w o m e n have been received into the church a n d fifteen babies, children of former school girls, hav e been baptized. T h e t w o city B i b l e w o m e n have again d o n e faithful work. T h e y both attended a conference held in A m o y for Bible­ w o m e n last s u m m e r a n d received m u c h help f r o m the Bible • classes a n d Christian fellowship they there enjoyed. Mis s Morrison has given m u c h time to calls in the city a n d nearer villages, realizing m o r e a n d m o r e the great importance of this part of the work. _ _ A s o ne travels through the cities a n d t o w n s of C hi na one is impressed a n e w with the m a g n i t u d e of the undertaking of Jesus Christ, i. e., to save the world. H e r e are millions of people w h o have not yet so m u c h as heard of H i s n a m e ; millions sick in b o d y a n d m i n d a n d no one to help t h e m ; millions w h o cannot even read or write a n d w h o live a n d die


in sin a n d dirt a n d ignorance. H e r e in o ne village is a w o m a n dying of a t u m o r because the hospital is too far a w a y from her h om e. H e r e is a m a n ill a n d miserable with a loath­ s o m e skin disease because he does not k n o w e n o u g h to bathe. H e r e are children b e c o m i n g addicted to s m o k i n g a n d g a m ­ bling a n d worse, because they have nothing better to do. A n d here a n d there a n d e ve ry wh er e are souls dying because they hav e not Jesus Christ. But, in spite of all this, in spite of the perseverance of Satan a n d lack of Christian workers, the K i n g d o m is surely if slowly growing.: T h e r e are, at the pres­ ent time, thirteen chapels in the Chiang-chiu District, outside the city, w h e r e thirteen preachers or pastors are at w o r k pro­ claiming the Gospel. T h e r e are m a n y staunch church m e m ­ bers also doing their u tmost to w i n souls for Christ. . D u r i n g the past year, several of the w o m e n hav e b e c o m e interested a nd -are attending the meetings regularly, s o m e of t h e m having to w a l k from six to ten miles to church. A t Tiu-ka' about sixty w o m e n publicly expressed their desire to k n o w Christ. Educational W o r k

_

'

T h e establishing of g o v e r n m e n t schools throughout the m o r e important centers of our district, t h o u g h in itself a splendid m o v e m e n t t ow ar d the education a n d enlightenment of China, has h a d a deterring effect u p o n our Mission schools, in m a n y cases m a k i n g it all but impossible to get pupils a n d to finance the schools. U p o n first thought, o ne k n o w ­ ing schools as they are at h o m e w o u l d say, “T h e n let the scholars go to the g o v e r n m e n t schools.” B u t there are t w o great objections to this policy; as things are at present, m a n y g o v e r n m e n t schools are inefficient, a n d in all they require the worship of Confucius, t h e .Chinese “g o d bf education a n d learning.” A t Sin-tng o ne n e w school has been organized this year b y the preacher a n d the former* pastor of the Chiang-chiu church. T h e first ter m they h a d over forty pupils a n d h ad


a kindergarten or beginners’ grade connected with the school. It is c o m p o s e d almost entirely of heathen boys' but has h ad a very helpful influence u p o n the church a n d c o m m u n i t y . This year the w o r k was, t h o u g h with difficulty, financed b y the church a n d its friends, a n d received n o aid fro m the Mission. T h e school at Thian-po has h a d the s a m e teacher a n d has g r o w n in n u m b e r s a n d efficiency. It is also a decidedly evangelistic force. S u n d a y s it invites non-Christian boys to attend its S u n d a y school period. A t C h i o h Be, the large school has h ad a g o o d year. T h e pastor of the church gives m u c h of his time to its super­ vision a n d has a goo d staff of teachers to help him. This school c o m p a r e s very well with the district boarding schools of Tong-an, A m o y , Chiang-chiu, a n d Sio-khe. T h e Chiang-chiu B o y s ’ L o w e r a n d H i g h e r P r i m a r y School has had a very successful year, enrolling over a h u n ­ dred pupils. Last year the'head teacher w a s c h a n g e d to other w o r k in A m o y a n d a n e w o ne chosen. This h a d been the first step in advance. Since then the w h o l e spirit a n d w o r k of teachers a n d pupils has greatly improved. T h e year w a s brightened b y our' school again w i n n i n g the cha mp io ns hi p race o p e n to twelve primary schools in the city— this being also our second such victory in succession. W e closed the year with a series of graduation exercises, one session being given to singing a n d recitations b y the graduates, one given to the graduation exercises proper, a n d o ne d a y to m a n u a l w o r k exhibit, drill, a n d athletics. T h e experiment w a s so successful that it will probably b e c o m e a yearly affair. G irls’ S c h o o l .' T h e total enrollment for the year has been 102 pupils,, the largest n u m b e r the school has had. T h e teachers have all don e faithful w o r k a n d will, w e trust, all continue with us another year. T h r e e of our students w h o later studied in A m o y are n o w teaching, o n e in our primary grade a n d t w o in kindergartens. T w o others are n o w studying in A m o y .


F o u r times a w e e k the pupils hav e h a d calisthenics a n d m u c h i m p r o v e m e n t can be seen in the w a l k a n d carriage of the older pupils. T h e general health of the pupils has been good. T h e a u t u m n opening of school w a s saddened b y the death of a d a y pupil w h o w a s b ur ne d b y the over­ turning of a lamp. S h e w a s fro m a non-Christian family a n d h a d studied but one term; but she h a d learned to pray a n d sing a f ew h y m n s a n d in dying she told her m o t h e r not to be sorrowful for G o d w o u l d save her. A s a result her m o t h e r a n d g r a n d m o t h e r have been attending church arid hav e put a w a y their idols. T h r e e girls, daughters of m i n o r mandarins, w h o have read for several terms, hav e c o m e to believe; as a result, o ne has been forbidden to return. T w o pupils have been received into the church a n d t w o or threfe m o r e are ready to take that step. K

indergarten .

W o r k m a y s om et im es be discouraging, people m a y s o m e ­ times be disappointing, but the w o r k in the kindergarten is a lways interesting, a n d the children m o s t responsive. W e h a d 97 children o n the roll the first ter m a n d 90 during the last ter m — too m a n y , really, for our c r o w d e d quarters. All of t h e m have don e well in their studies and, in so far as w e have been able to judge, they hav e all learned to k n o w a n d to love Jesus. Their bright eyes are all aflame with love w h e n they tell H i s story or sing that beautiful h y m n of L u t h e r ’s, “A w a y in a M a n g e r . ” O n e little girl w a s called h o m e last s u m m e r . S h e w a s very ill with fever a n d w h e n her m o t h e r asked her if she thought she w o u l d get better, she said she- did not k n o w but thought she w a s going to be with Jesus. S h e w a s only six, but died h a p p y in the gift of that w onderful faith. T h e kindergarten h a d to be closed several w e e k s earlier than usual the last term, as m a n y of the children h a d smallpox a n d measles a n d the old caretaker w a s taken with leprosy. M a n y of the dear little faces are n o w badly p o c k - m a r k e d a n d scarred a n d all because of the lack of proper treatment.


SIO-KHE

DISTRICT.

Evangelistic W o r k A hopeful attitude has characterized the Sio-khe church during the past year,’for, although they called a pastor a n d their invitation w a s not accepted at that time, they h a d reason to believe that a subsequent call w o u l d be favored b y him. This has since been m ad e. A n organized S u n d a y school has been maintained throughout the year a n d that has don e m u c h to m a k e u p for the lack of a pastor. T h e preaching hall has not d o n e m u c h this year. T h e m a n in charge is little m o r e than a janitor so not m u c h could be expected of him. All the other Chinese workers of the place w e r e m o r e than b u s y a n d the missionary has been prevented partly b y lack of health a n d partly b y reason of w o r k in other places fro m maintaining a n y regular w o r k in the preaching hall. E chay, the only out-station of ,the church, has also don e well. A t the beginning of the year t w o m e m b e r s w e r e received a n d during the year several n e w hearers have been added. In the a u t u m n a series of meetings w e r e held, our first attempt at anything of this kind. O u r a i m w a s to get a heathen audience to m e e t in the s a m e place for m o r e than t w o weeks, to preach to t h e m the Gospel a n d the truths of the Bible, so that those w h o c a m e for nearly all the meetings w o u l d begin to have s o m e conception of w h a t the Christian teaching is. P oa -a . In Poa-a also there w a s a g o o d deal of activity in church politics. T h e pastor w h o has been resigning for s o m e years so far succeeded that the church w a s allowed to call another pastor in his' place. O n e out-station, Toa-ke, has b ou gh t land during the year, thereby deciding for the present the location of their church building w h i c h m o v e d twice in the last eight years. This w a s possible through the n e w preacher w h o w a s appointed last year. ■T h e H a w - s a n church has been steadily gaining- since the building w a s r e m o v e d to the n e w place. S o m e of the efforts of


the last preacher have been well followed u p b y the pastor w h o has been there n o w for a year a n d a half. H e s h o w s an increase in the m e m b e r s h i p this year. N o t only have regular expenses been properly .met but the church Has enter­ tained the classis. M r . Voskuil w a s church exa mi ne r this year a nd the church gav e as g o o d a report of itself as a n y he has e x a m i n e d in China. T h e progress is not large but it is of the substantial kind w h i c h counts in church life a n d w h i c h does not easily suffer reaction. In the t w o out-stations they have h a d only o ne preacher, partly because the o ne is small a n d not far distant fro m the other. F o r preacher they h a d a very able t h o u g h uneducated elder of the h o m e church, w h o is very diligent a n d especially capable in getting o n with the people. H e has been a help to the pastor as well as a g o o d preacher for the out-station. H e said he h a d been preacher, elder a nd deacon to the t w o chapels. A school w a s m a i n ­ tained b y the local church w h i c h w a s attended b y several of the boys from one of the chapels. T h e teacher is a cousin of the pastor, who. is n o w asking for admission to the Bible School so as to b e c o m e a preacher too. " W

o m e n ’s

W

ork.

W e are thankful to report that as a result of the schools for w o m e n a n d girls started b y Mrs. K i p a n d Mrs. V a n D yc k, there are nearly 200 w o m e n in the district able to read the Bible. B u t few of t h e m k n o w h o w to study it a n d to find its hidden treasures, therefore in F e b r u a r y w e h a d a class for Bible study, o n the K o r e a n plan, hoping to keep it u p every year. W e invited only w o m e n w h o could read a n d w h o could m a n a g e to leave their small children at h o m e . T h e n because of a long drought the river w a s too l o w for boats to reach t w o of our larger stations a n d the w o m e n oould not afford to c o m e in sedan chairs. F o r t w o years the w o m e n w h o c a m e to the N e w Y e a r ’s meetings w e r e the guests of the Mission, but w e decided it w a s best to let the w o m e n ' s h o w their appreciation of the class b y paying their o w n expenses. This explains w h y our class w a s small, but all w e r e in earnest


a n d m a d e real study of the first part of Genesis a n d of M a t them. Before the class closed Mrs. Sites f r o m F o o c h o w c a m e a nd w a s a great inspiration to us all. •

Educational Work B oys ’ S c h o o l . T h e b o y s ’ school has h a d a g o o d year, with a record enrollment— 72 for the first term a n d 62 for the second. T h e teaching staff w a s c h a n g e d during the year as o ne of the old teachers w a s c o m p r o m i s i n g us a n d the school so badly he h a d to be removed. In the higher primary w e h a d no g r a d u ­ ating class, as the only candidate dro pp ed out of school in the middle of the fall term. T h e boarding d ep ar tm en t has been running better this year than at a n y time before, d ue to the fact that o ne of the teachers w a s willing to take over responsibility for it. G irls’ S c h o o l . D u r i n g the spring term w e h a d the largest enrollment w e have ever h a d — 6 4 girls. O u r school building needed an entire n e w roof a n d other extensive repairs a n d c h a n g e s ; a n d w e extend our heartiest thanks to the W o m a n ’s B o a r d of so p romptly sending us the m o n e y . T h e w o r k w a s b e g u n in O c t ob er a n d for the fall ter m w e received only 36 girls, since w e could use only half of the building at a time. N e x t term our school will hav e a n additional dormitory, a far better a ssembly room, kitchen a n d dining-room, a n d will be in every w a y better equipped a n d m o r e attractive. W

o m e n ’s

Sc h o o l .

This school, too, h a d the largest enrollment in its h i s to ry 19 the first term a n d 8 the second. E v e r y o ne of the w o m e n m a d e g o o d progress a n d m a n y of t h e m have, w e trust, through faith in Christ, entered H i s K i n g d o m . T h e Chinese teachers in both schools have h a d the m o s t difficult part of the w o r k a n d w e feel the success of the w o r k is largely d u e to their love a n d tact a n d faithfulness.


W e w e r e glad to w e l c o m e M i s s B o y n t o n last M a r c h , but at the July Mission mee ti ng it w a s decided that she w a s m o r e needed in A m o y . In her place M i s s V a n d e r L i n d e n w a s appointed. S h e arrived just before T h a n k s g i v i n g a n d has since d o n e m o r e than her share of all the w o r k in the district. Medical W o r k N eerbosch H

ospital .

L o o k i n g back over the m a n y b u s y /days a n d nights w e feel that this hospital is gaining in the confidence of the people a n d also of the native physicians. Moreover, a m i d all the natives, the hospital tries to uphold the standard of the Cross, having led several to Christ. A l t h o u g h the hospital is placed in a village of only a f e w thousand inhabitants, in 1916 w e h a d a n attendance of 2,808, a n d this year of 3,895, including the m a n y patients seen in their homes. T h e hospital preacher is the busiest m a n of all. Before the early chapel service he talks with the patients a n d at seven o ’clock at night he is often at the bedsides speaking w o r d s of comfort a n d help. Converts of this m a n tell h o w m u c h they o w e to his patience, endurance a n d prayer. O n e of the outstanding features this year w a s the intro­ duction of nurses in our hospital. It w a s a n e w experiment a n d so far has proved satisfactory. . A t present w e hav e six girls, all eager to serve their people a n d eager to learn n e w m e t h o d s of caring for the sick. T h e s e girls are Christians a n d exert a profound influence u p o n the patients. Dr. B o s c h introduced the T o w n - L a m b e r t treatment for o p i u m addicts a n d has h a d excellent results. It d r e w the atten­ tion of the local official, w h o visited the hospital a n d issued a m a n d a t e advising all o p i u m addicts to g o to the hospital to be cured. T h e official himself is very friendly, t oward Mission hospitals, since once he w a s found w o u n d e d , a nd cared for b y a foreign physician. H e invited the missionaries to his h o m e ; it so h a p p e n e d that the official of Peng-ho, the capital city, w a s also present. T w e n t y years a g o the Mission w a n t e d to introduce the Gospel there, but w e r e violently


prevented. T h a t night the official invited t h e m to c o m e to Peng-ho, offering to furnish a hall for preaching, a place to see patients, sleeping-place for assistants a n d servants, a n d besides is willing to p a y all their traveling expenses. T h e y are seriously considering accepting the invitation. W e wis h to make'special m en ti on of the course in Chris­ tian Ethics that Mrs. Voskuil is teaching the nurses a n d the instruction she is giving the hospital servants. L o o k i n g bac k ­ w a r d at the year 1917, w e can be thankful for the progress; looking sideward, w e receive the gratitude of scores of Chinese friends; but w e m u s t look u p w a r d also to H i m “W h o healeth all our diseases.” T h e n if w e look forward to 1918 w e feel that w e m u s t progress, that w e m u s t g o o n w a r d a n d forward with H i m , for H i m .

TONG-AN

DISTRICT.

P olitical. Politics affect missions m o r e quickly than missions affect politics. Politics affect the people for w h o m missions exist so intimately that it b e c o m e s a factor not negligible. In the T o n g - a n District the political b a c k g r o u n d for the w o r k of the first ter m w a s filled with the crusade against the cultivation of the p o p p y for opium. T h e g o v e r n m e n t s e e m s to have been successful a n d the District, formerly f a m o u s for the a m o u n t of its p o p p y acreage, produced n o o p i u m this season. It re­ quired soldiers a n d h e a v y p u n i s h m e n t but the feat w a s a c c o m ­ plished. In the second ter m w e felt the national unrest a nd several of our best m e m b e r s a n d friends h a d to flee to places u nder British jurisdiction because they w e r e charged with aiding a n d abetting the “ Southern Rebels.” T h o u g h the charges w e r e u n f o u n d e d a n d false in every case, yet there w a s n o chance for a just trial a n d the m e n h a d to forsake business, families, a n d church, a n d hide. This has seriously affected the church finances in s o m e places. T o n g - a n C o u n t y also has h a d six m o n t h s of the m o s t shamelessly avaricious a n d


. 28

FOREIGN

MISSIONS

flagrantly purchaseable magistrate that it has k n o w n in a generation. B usiness D epression . T h r o u g h the w h o l e year the effect of the W o r l d W a r has m a d e itself m o r e a n d m o r e bitterly felt. A very large part of local c o m m e r c e has c o m e to be in foreign goods. It has been a year of poor crops in s o m e sections, but A n - k h o e h a d o ne of its best rice, crops within m e m o r y . T h r o u g h o u t the District it has been one of the worst years for business that the merchants have ever suffered. Business depression has h ad t w o imm ed ia te effects in our work. It has put families into s orrow a n d trouble, s h o w i n g t h e m the uncertainties of this world, giving us an opportunity to present the gospel of a Savior’s help a n d comfort. In limiting the extension w o r k of the church it has produced an unfortunate reaction o n those w h o have w o r k e d a n d prayed for opportunities a n d openings a n d w h e n they appear find the church unable to g o ahead a n d take advantage of such results. O u r preachers feel the rising cost of living as m u c h as w e do. It'seems that there is not an evangelistic w o r k e r in our District w h o is living within his salary, a n d probably only three are not running into debt. f S e p t e m b e r ’s great storm left a w a k e of h av oc through the T o n g - a n District also. It destroyed about four-fifths of the crop of “d r a g o n ’s eye,” a n d one-half of the sugar cane. F e w houses escaped d a m a g e a nd m a n y w e r e ruined. Evangelistic W o r k H

o n g -s a n

Church.

A renegade m e m b e r w h o lately joined the R o m a n C a t h ­ olics m a d e m u c h trouble for H o n g - s a n b y instituting t w o lawsuits o n u nf ou nd ed charges against a m e m b e r a n d m e m ­ bers of the consistory. T h e s e legal matters d e m a n d e d so m u c h of the pastor’s time at the county seat that in one


stretch he w a s out of his o w n pulpit seven Sundays. F o r several m o n t h s this church carried o n a regular w e e k - d a y preaching service for a large g r o u p of villages within their territory a n d secured a regular attendance of about ten at their nearest chapels. O f that ten only one or t w o still c o m e (the court matters stopped the w e e k - d a y services), but they have arranged to have o ne of our Christian teachers in charge of their school next year. A b o u t fifteen years a g o this church h a d a chapel at Chin-be a n d n o w they are planning to reopen it. T h e urgency of the opportunity lies in the establishment there of four schools, all u nder o ne m a n a g e m e n t , built a n d supported b y a m a n of that village, w h o has b e c o m e wea lt hy in business abroad. T h e y have a b o y s ’ primary, a girls’ primary, a n d a b o y s ’ middle school, already enrolling over 200 pupils, a nd in 1918 they will o p e n a n ormal school. T h e y plan to a c c o m ­ m o d a t e a thousand pupils in all. S o m e departments are free a n d in others the charges are l o w ; poor families are (pa *d a dollar a m o n t h for sending their girls to school. T h e influ­ ence of a n d addition of so m a n y educated m e n a n d w o m e n to the’ c o m m u n i t y as the faculties of these schools include, is assurance of intellectual enlightenment a n d constitutes a great call to the church to carry in the real Light. T h e neces­ sity of reducing our expenses for evangelistic w o r k in 1918 s e e m s unbearable here. ■ T h e Ang-tng-thau chapel is o n e of the oldest in the Mission, but is in a dilapidated village. It requires special grace to dwell a n d w o r k in such a stagnant spot, yet the old couple w h o g a v e u p business a few years a g o to g o there have d o n e splendidly. T h e church only raises about a h un dr ed dollars a year a n d this year they h ad a h e a v y repair bill. Also o ne family that contributes $20 m o v e d a w a y a n d the $20 c o n ­ tributed b y a m e m b e r living in A m o y w a s lost in transit. Y e t w h e n they heard of the flood disasters in N o r t h China they said they m u s t d o s om et hi ng to help their o w n country­ m e n in distress, a n d out of their o w n poverty a n d need they collected a n d forwarded $12. *


Eng-te-thau is the pastoral residence a n d has the m a i n strength of the church. If the proposed transfer of L o n ­ d o n Mission stations to our Mission is m ad e, H o n g - s a n will double its territory. %

T o n g -a n C h u r c h . T h e T o n g - a n C h u r c h reports m a n y encouraging things, n o n e m o r e so than the i m p r o v e m e n t in its pastor w h i c h b e g a n about the middle of D e c e m b e r . T h e m a i n event in Siangchun-thau, the church at w h i c h he resides, w a s the meeting of Classis there in D e c e m b e r . T h e r e w a s a fine spiritual tone to the mee ti ng a n d its m a i n e mphasis w a s o n things vitally connected with the highest interests of the church. T h e y decided to m a k e the effort to (1) rid the church of those i m ­ perfections that n o w m a r it,— such as quarrels, lax S u n d a y observance, business in forbidden drugs, disobedience to church rules about b u y i n g daughters-in-law a n d inter­ marriage with heathen; (2) secure the church’s revenue b y adopting a plan of regular w e e k l y offerings; (3) teach every m e m b e r to read the Bible a n d not to admit a n y n e w m e m b e r w h o cannot read unless there is s o m e valid excuse. . Chioh-jim has h ad a ■'most encouraging g r o w t h in the n u m b e r of m e n in its congregations. A wealthy business m a n of that village but lately residing in A m o y b e c a m e converted a n d offered m o n e y to build a n e w church. T h a t w a s a great e n c o u r a g e m e n t for n o w w e hav e to p a y a high rent for a poorly situated building a n d it gav e the church a startling r e c o m m e n d a t i o n to the village. W h i l e w e w e r e selecting the site the wealthy friend died suddenly a n d his family decline to carry out his wishes for the church. T h e brightest, busiest spot in the w h o l e T o n g - a n church is at Au-ho-a. O n F e b r u a r y 24th, the 75th anniversary of the arrival of Dr. Abeel in A m o y , the T o n g - a n Consistory a n d the t w o A m e r i c a n pastors w e r e invited to dine together a n d celebrate the occasion b y planning s o m e church advance. It w a s decided to ope n a chapel at Au-ho-a, just outside the W e s t Gate of T o n g - a n City, in the business center, a stone’s


t h r o w from the place first rented as a Gospel Hall in T o n g - a n fifty years ago. It is h o p e d that this chapel m a y rapidly b e c o m e self-supporting. A reading roonj has been a valuable feature in this work. CiniExc-KHE C h u r c h .

,

This year a n e w n a m e is a d d e d to the roll of churches. T h e organization of the three chapels in A n - k h o e C o u n t y into a separate church has been completed a n d n a m e d the C h h e n g - k h e Church. T h e Preachers’ F u n d appointed four preachers to this church for the year a n d t h e y have been travelling about investigating the claims of several villages for the distinction of opening the first additional chapel. T h e official, act of separation w a s performed in the spring at the Siang-chun-thau chapel w h e n the T o n g - a n C h u r c h dismissed 55 m e m b e r s to f o r m Chheng-khe. T h e first business meeting of the n e w organization w a s held in S e p t e m b e r at C h h o a chhu-che. It w a s m a d e a three day s ’ convention a n d Pastor L i m B u n - k h i o k gav e a splendid series of addresses o n “T h e Church.” . A t the Poa-nia chapel the year b e g a n with a r o w d y attack b y m e m b e r s of an idol’s procession f r o m Au-keh. T h e building w a s d a m a g e d , furniture broken a n d the teacher beaten. A lawsuit developed a n d w h e n things looked worst for us the L o r d sent a heathen m a n w h o h a d a reputation as an e n e m y of the church to c o m p e l A u - k e h to m a k e peace with us. A b o u t ten miles fro m Poa-nia is the village of Ng-peh. A N g - p e h m a n n o w in business in F o r m o s a w a s converted there a n d o n his return h o m e this year did such fine personal w o r k tha.t m e n fro m three families have b e c o m e regular attendants o n the S u n d a y services. C olporteurs .

"

T h e value of our colporteurs has been e mp ha si ze d b y their accomplishments. Largely as a result of their w o r k o ne m o r e village is ready to op e n a chapel. One, Brother Pa, has given


several m o n t h s of his w o r k to the region centering at Po-be a n d has preached in m a n y villages never before visited. H e a n d his wife hav e taught about t we nt y people to read the R o m a n i z e d colloquial. H e has been especially successful in getting g o o d audiences for meetings held each evening in dif­ ferent houses. T h e other colporteur has i m p r o v e d both in his faithfulness a n d .effectiveness. H e w o r k s mostly in the m a r ­ ket t o w n s of A n - k h o e County. T h e w o r k of a traveling medicine m e r c h a n t has been very encouraging a n d s h o w s w h a t could be d o n e in using such m e n if there w e r e a fund to provide t h e m with books. This m a n is a Christian w h o covers a big region in his travels. H e takes advantage of daily opportunities to preach tfye Gospel a n d has found nothing better for his use than Christian books. T h e y m a y for m the excuse for opening a religious conversation a n d they always continue the impressions if left with the m a n a p ­ proached. T h e revival at O-chi is d u e largely to his efforts.

Educational Work An- attempt to maintain closer relations b e t w e e n all the schools of the District has resulted in our w i n n i n g the consent of all our schools to carry n o pupils b e y o n d the fourth year, but to send those w h o can study further to the Livingstone Easter School. T h e principal of that school has d o n e valuable w o r k in assisting the missionaries in supervising the outstation d a y schools, especially in insisting o n uniformity of curriculum a n d arranging the daily schedules. “C h h o a -c h h u -c h e .

.

T h e C hh oa -chhu-che b o y s ’ school w a s taught b y a y o u n g m a n w h o w a n t e d another trial after he h a d been unsatisfactory as a student in T a l m a g e College. H e proved incompetent a n d w a s dismissed at the close of the first term. This is our only out-station that has a girls’ school. T h e preacher’s wife again saved the school b y taking charge of it, for w h i c h she received n o pay. In the second ter m w e w e r e able to send


'

A M O Y MISSION

33

■O

t h e m a graduate of the K o l o n g s u girls’ school a n d they ar­ ranged to have the smaller pupils fro m the b o y s ’ school attend also. C h i o h -j i m .

' /

T h e principal resigned in mid-year to accept an attractive business offer. T h e t w o other teachers s h o w e d a splendid spirit a n d determined to “carry on.” A n g -t n g .

'

T h e primary school has done fairly well but in the second term slipped bac k f r o m the fine w o r k of the first term. T h e d e v el op me nt of the Agricultural-Industrial course there has been o ne of the big features of our year. T h e m a n in charge is ingenious a n d enthusiastic a n d a w i d e interest has been aroused. A m o r e p e r m a n e n t organization has been planned a n d m o s t encouraging promises of local support secured. L a c k of proper school a n d dormitory r o o m m a d e it u nwise to increase the enrollment of pupils, but for next year a m p l e a c c o m m o d a t i o n s have been m a d e available. L ivingstone E aster S c h o o l . In J a n ua ry w e graduated a class of six boys, all of w h o m entered T a l m a g e College, second year. O u r enrollment this year has been over 200 a n d each n o o n w e fed fro m 160 to 200 boys in o ur n e w dining room. This progress has stirred u p our R o m a n Catholic neighbors to advertise a free school a n d they have tried in m a n y w a y s to involve us in trouble. T h e Seventh D a y Adventists also o pe ne d an opposition school. M o s t visitors at the school have r e m a r k e d with pleasure the fact that pupils d o all the w o r k there that boys can do. T h e t w o large buildings are kept clean, about 400 meals are served each day, a n d yet the only hired help is a cook a n d o ne coolie. A dozen boys are w o r k i n g their w a y through, a n d that is remarkable for China. A n o t h e r remarkable adv an ce is the pupils’ attitude t ow ar d physical exercise. T w o of our teachers


FOREIGN

MISSIONS

c..

are quite athletic a n d like to play with the boys. D u r i n g the second ter m w e secured the free help of a graduate of the provincial military school. T h e boys enjoy their m a r c h i n g drill. A m o n g the visitors w h o have spoken at the school a n d been ” especially helpful w e r e Consul a n d Mrs. C. E. G a u s s a n d M r. T. M . Elliott, Y. M . C. A. Secretary. G irls’ S c h o o l . After years of waiting, the Ak-sia property w a s finally secured a nd our last N e w Y e a r ’s vacation w a s spent in getting the absolutely necessary cleaning a n d repairs d o n e so that it m i g h t be used as an A n n e x . D u r i n g the spring ter m w e h a d 82 n a m e s o n the roll a n d 55 during the fall term. T h e girls c a m e f r o m 14 different chapels a n d their influence o ug ht to be widespread over the district. In J u n e five girls g r a d u ­ ated fro m our school a n d w e n t d o w n to A m o y to study fur­ ther. D u r i n g the spring term w e h a d t w o serious cases of p n e u m o n i a w h i c h caused us a g o o d deal of anxiety. W e feel m o r e a n d m o r e that the care of a school is a great task a n d a great responsibility, but a great opportunity, too, to m o u l d the lives of these girls for Christ. This school is in charge of Mis s B e e k m a n . W

o m e n ’s

Sc h o o l .

T h e W o m e n ’s School, w h i c h is in charge of M i s s Green, o p e n e d with a g o o d enrollment. S o m a n y w o m e n w is he d to read that w e b e g g e d the use of t w o of the r o o m s of the n e w a n n e x of the girls’ school for extra sleeping quarters for the w o m e n . T h u s w e w e r e able to house 30 w o m e n , w h e re as our o w n building a c c o m m o d a t e s only 24. O u r g o o d Mrs. Li c o n ­ tinues to be the hea d of the school. W i t h but o ne exception there has been a blessed feeling of good-will a m o n g the pupils, for Mrs. Li is a true peace-maker a n d the w o m e n listen to her gladly. O n e w o m a n c a m e for, t w o w e e k s in order to learn to write, so that she m i g h t correspond with her children.


In the spring, because of a shortage of funds, w e dismissed school a m o n t h early, a n d so w e hop e to keep within our abbreviated appropriations for the year. F or the fall term w e w e r e unable to b o r r o w again the t w o r o o m s of the a n n e x so w e used a small native house for our overflow sleeping quarters. T h e first of the year w e started s o m e children’s meetings in the village a n d have h ad volunteer helpers for t h e m fro m the w o m e n ’s school pupils; the w o m e n have also g o n e out with us or b y themselves o n preaching visits to the h o m e s of their heathen friends. T h e w o r k of the W o m e n ’s School is purely evangelistic, but "apart from that there is steady a n d constant visitation a n d teaching d on e both a m o n g the w o m e n of the church a n d a m o n g the heathen w o m e n . T h e r e have been four full-time Bible W o m e n a n d one w o m a n giving part time. T h e s e w o m e n have paid lengthy visits to the various chapels and, starting out f r o m t h e m as a center, have w o r k e d in the surrounding villages. T h e w o m e n of the churches have themselves don e considerable w o r k for their less favored sisters a n d s o m e of t h e m have taught others to read a n d s o m e of t h e m d o indiv­ idual w o r k for the Master. E v e n t h o u g h s o m e of the Chris­ tian w o m e n d o not m a k e the effort to tell of the G o o d N e w s , still at the N e w Y e a r time t h e y ‘are all eager to preach; a n d so, last year, as our c u s t o m is, w e m a d e a rather complete canvass of the villages within range of T o n g - a n a n d several n e w people w e r e touched a n d have since then c o m e to church. T h e r e are endless possibilities in this w o r k a n d no hindrance to the universal preaching of the Gospel tin a n y of our villages about here. T h e greatest difficulty about this out-of-door work, however, lies in the lack of workers. T h e harvest is ripe but w h e r e are the laborers?


T H E A R G O T MISSION, INDIA.

T h e Mission occupies: Jn the Chittoor District,

" " "

N o r t h A r c o t District, S o u t h A r c o t District, M y s o r e State,

.

Sq. Popula. Miles. tion. 5 Taluqs (Counties) and parts of 2 others 4,104 805,991 7 “ “ ** part of 1 other 2,816 1,289,935 2 “ 4< “ “ “ 1 “ 1,017 529,669 1 “ ** '* “ '* 1 '* 340 75,788

Total.......... 15 Taluqs (Counties)

5

8,277

2,701,383

Languages. — 1,6 00,700, Tamil; 950,000, Telugu; 150,600, Hindustani; Kanarese, etc. Missionaries.— Arni: Mr. W. H. Farrar. Chittoor: Mrs. J . A. Beattie, Miss E. W. Conlin, Rev. H. E. Van Vranken. Katpadi: Rev. B. Rottschaefer. M a d a n a p a l l e : Dr. L. H. Hart, Rev. J. H. Warnshuis, Rev. J. C. Van Wyk, Miss W. Noordyk. P a l m a n e r : No missionary resident. Punganur: No missionary resident. Ranipettai: Rev. E. C. Scudder, Miss J. C. Scudder, Miss A. B. VanDoren, Mrs. H. Honegger, Dr^B. W. Roy. T i n d i v a n a m : Rev. W. T. Scudder. Vellore: Rev. L. R. Scudder, Miss Ida ‘S. Scudder, M.D., Miss Gertrude Dodd, Miss A. E. Hancock, Mrs. S. W. Scudder, Miss D. M. Houghton, Rev. L. Hekhuis. Mr. C. R. Wierenga, Miss C. Durick. M a d r a s : Mrs. J. H. Wyckoff, Miss C. C. Wyckoff. Associate Missionaries— M r s . ’L. R. Scudder, Mrs. E. C. Scudder, Mrs. W. T. Scudder, M.D.. Mrs. W. H. Farrar, Mrs. B. Rottschaefer, Mrs. B. W. Roy, Mrs. J. H. Warnshuis, Mrs. L. Hekhuis, Mrs. J. C. Van Wyk, Mrs. H. E. Van Vranken. ‘ In Amer i c a . — M i s s J. V. TeWinkel, Miss S. TeWinkel,' Miss H. W. Drury. Native Helpers.— O r d a i n e d Ministers, 1 9. Other helpers: men, 366; women, 221. Total, 606. B o a r d i n g Schools.— B o y s ’, 9 , Scholars, 493; Girls’, 4, 'Scholars, 364; Theological School, 1. Students, 37; Day Schools, 209, Scholars, 10,348. Total -Schools, 223; Scholars, 11,242. Hospitals a n d

Dispensaries,

11. Patients treated, 84,630.


*

?

y\y^-r

-c— u

rVl VimbaHipalli T

T

8p'

T

j...

*

4

M A P

O P

T H E

A R C O T

MISSION

■7^ fti

Taluk

--

< « % ,

V

Area Population

Area Population

Taluk

htadanapalll

637

137.466

Walajapet

Vayalpad

831

126.676

Arko n a m

Punganur Z

648

107,061

Vellore^

396 X

216.796

no

64.500

432

222.329

Palmaner-

439

50.619

Arni

180

108.944

Chendra^iri X

366

78.300

Cheyar

328

148.366

Chittoor

793

232.850

Polur

686

169.667

Karvetnaffar Z.

190

73,100

Wandiwaah

340

162,620

Chmtamani

272

62.077

Cingee

410

199.470

447

217.329

Mulbagal

X

68

13.71 1 Tindivanam 206,836

Villupuram x

160

112.870

14690 J .088,814

Total

3387

1.612.769

jGudiyatlam

446

|

• Total

\

X = « portion ,only

Grand Total

8277 2.701.383

Photo. Block, Survey Office, M a d r a s

1914

C f


*

o


R E P O R T F O R 1917 '

INTRODUCTION.

In introducing the w o r k of the A m e r i c a n Arcot Mission for 1917 to the reader w e shall m a k e a f ew references to the, districts occupied, together with s o m e of the physical a n d political conditions, before entering into the detailed narrative. R o u g h l y speaking, the territory occupied b y the Mission extends f r o m the sea, a little north of Pondicherry, in a north­ westerly direction for about 225 miles, having a m a x i m u m width of s o m e 75. In the south the land is low-lying, w h e r e rice, g r o u n d nuts or peanuts, cotton, other small grains, sugar-cane, cocoanuts, etc., are g rown. T h e variation in temperature is comparatively small, while the average rainfall in n ormal years is b e t w e e n 40 a n d 50 inches. T h e farther north o ne 1 goes the elevation is higher, rising to a plateau; the air is cooler a n d m o r e bracing, while the rainfall b e y o n d Vellore gradually decreases. In this section w h e n the fields cannot be irrigated fro m streams or wells, the population depends u p o n other grains w h i c h g r o w in rainy season. T h e popula­ tion within districts occupied b y the Mission, roughly speak­ ing, a m o u n t s to about 2,500,000, c o m p o s e d chiefly of H i n d u s and M o h a m m e d a n s . T h e languages spoken are Tamil, Telugu and Hindustani. T h e r e are several places of historical importance in the Mission, such as Arcot, Vellore, W a n d i w a s h , a n d Gingee, places well w o r t h while visiting. W h i l e traveling n or th wa rd on the railway, a visitor w o u l d pass through the railway junction Villupuram, s o m e 100 miles to the southwest of Madras. F o u r miles to the north of this place will be found o ne of the largest village churches of our Mission in this section— Orathur. T w e n t y o d d miles to the northeast lies T in divanam, the center of our w o r k in S ou th Arcot. Rev. a n d Mrs. W . T. S c u dd er are located here. Besides the Church, will be found the H i g h School, Christian Hostel a n d other schools, a n d the Dispensary for W o m e n a n d Children. .


T h e evangelistic w o r k of the Mission has been divided into four circles. In this, the Southern Circle, there are four pastorates, each with an ordained minister, having a c o m b i n e d C h u r c h c o m m u n i t y of 2,908 individuals, while there are 1,205 students in t o w n a n d village schools. T h e r e are m o r e C a t h ­ olics in this division than a n y other of the Mission. Their ’ w o r k dates back to s o m e 400 years. A l t h o u g h they have constructed m a n y fine churches a n d have a large following they d o but little for the education a n d uplift of their c o m ­ munity. Their presence creates m a n y difficulties. T o gain a comprehensive v i e w of the Mission work, the . visitor w o u l d best leave the railway at T i n d i v a n a m a n d jour­ n ey b y motor. T h e m a i n roads are generally stone laid a n d well maintained b y the G o v e r n m e n t . O n either side will be found fruit or shade trees. Their branches in places m e e t over the middle of the road breaking the glare of the sun a n d giv­ ing coolness a n d shade. T h e scenes in a country village with the thatched or tiled houses a n d the cocoanut trees g r o w ­ ing near by, are always fraught with m u c h interest. T h e r e are n o sidewalks. T h e cattle, sheep, buffaloes, chickens a n d dogs w a n d e r leisurely along, a n d are as m u c h of the t o w n as the people a n d children. T h e crude oil mills with their m o n o t o n o u s m us ic d r a w n b y lazy w a l ki ng oxen, the thrashers of grain, the g r o u p of w o m e n in their gaily colored clothes w al ki ng erect with their brass water vessels on their heads, returning from the well, chattering cheerfully, never fail to e n ­ list o n e ’s attention. A t times the road will pass over the e m ­ b a n k m e n t of an artificial lake or tank w h e r e water is e m p o u n d ed for irrigation purposes. A l o n g this will be seen the grace­ fully drooping a n d delicate leaved b a m b o o s w a v i n g in the breezes, a n d the cocoanut a n d p a l m y r a trees. T h e hills in the distance will be reflected in the waters w h i c h with the green fields, especially towards sunset, m a k e as pretty a pic­ ture as the m i n d can imagine or the eye desire to see. T a k i n g leave of Tin di va na m, he w o u l d journey north­ ward, passing through W a n d i w a s h , a g r o w i n g center of e v a n ­ gelistic work, a n d arrive at Arni, o ne of the three original sta-


tions occupied b y the Mission. H e r e is located a large B o y s ’ C o m p l e t e E l e m e n t a r y School besides the C h u r c h a n d three other schools. T h e r e is n o resident Missionary, the w o r k being under the care of Rev. E. C. Scudder, w h o lives in Ranipettai, a n d M i h s E. W . Conklin, w h o s e h o m e is in Chittoor. O w i n g to lack of workers, n o other a rr an ge me nt is pos­ sible. T h e Evangelistic w o r k about here falls within the b o u n d a r y of the Eastern Circle. T u r n i n g northeast, the next place of visitation w o u l d be Ranipettai, the headquarters of the Eastern Circle, with its four pastorates, comprising a Christian c o m m u n i t y of 5,321 a n d 2,550 in all schools. T h e w o r k is under the care of Rev. a n d Mrs. E. C. Scudder. H e r e also will be found the large General Hospital with Dr. a n d Mrs. B. W . R o y in charge; the Girls’ H i g h School super­ vised b y M i s s A. B. V a n D o r e n ; the L a c e Class under M i s s J. C. Scudder, w h o divides her time b e t w e e n here a n d Palmaner, a n d the H i n d u Girls’ Schools a n d Bible W o m e n w o r k under the supervision of Mrs. L. M . H o n e g g e r . • Traveling n o w to the west, the visitor w o u l d arrive at Vellore the largest t o w n within our borders, the natural center of the Mission. H e r & are located the Theological Seminary, a n d the U n i o n Training School for M e n , both under the supervision of the Rev. L. R. Scudder, w h o is also the C h a i r m a n of the Indian C h u r c h B o a r d a n d of the W e s t e r n Circle; the V o o r h e e s College, Rev. L. Hekhuis, Principal, temporarily assisted b y M r . C. R. W e i r e n g a ; the Schell Hospital, Dr. I. S. Scudder, the Physician in Charge; E u r o p e a n nurses, M i s s D. M . H o u g h t o n a n d Mis s C. Durick. Mrs. S. W . Scudder, Mrs. L. R. Scudder, M i s s A. E. H a n c o c k a n d Mrs. L. H e k h u i s are entrusted with other phases of M i s ­ sion work, while M i s s Gertrude D o d d is the Treasurer of the Mission. T h e plans for a dev el op me nt of a W o m e n ’s M e d ­ ical College in Vellore are well u nder w a y a n d classes are to be o p e n e d in July, 1918. . W i t h i n the b o u n d a r y of the W e s t e r n Circle, the largest in the Mission, are included the Gudiyattam, Serkadu, Chittoor a n d Katpadi groups. T h e g r o w t h of the Christian c o m -


m u n i t y in this Circle last year w a s m o s t encouraging. This n o w a m o u n t s to 5,906, while there are 4,133 students in both village a n d t o w n schools. , N o w turning north o n his journey, the traveler w o u l d pass through Katpadi, the residence of Rev. and Mrs. B. Rottschaefer, w h e r e the Industrial School is located. F r o m n o w on T e l u g u c o m e s to be m o r e a n d m o r e the language of the people. Chittoor w o u l d next be passed, w h e r e will be found the Training a n d Girls’ E l e m e n t a r y Schools. Mrs. M . D. Beattie a n d Mis s Conklin live a n d w o r k here. Palmaner, located to the west, will next be in order of visitation. T h e country is consider­ ably higher a n d less thickly populated. T h e w o r k of this station is mainly evangelistic a n d m a n n e d b y half a w o m a n — Mis s J. C. Scudder, w h o s e energies are divided b e U y e e n Pal­ m a n e r a n d the L a c e Class at Ranipettai. . T u r n i n g northwest, P u n g a n u r will be visited. H e r e are located the Church, M a r y Isabel Allen Hospital a n d schools. T h e large b u n g a l o w still remains vacant— a pathetic sight. This station is not m a n n e d b y even half a w o m a n . T h e r e is not a residential Missionary. Faithful Indian w or ke rs under the supervision of Rev. J. H . W a r n s h u i s care for the work. T h e last stage of the trip' w o u l d take the visitor to M a d a napalle, the center of the T e l u g u w o r k a n d Nor th er n Circle. O n the outskirts will be found the U n i o n Tuberculosis Sanatarium, over w h i c h Dr. L. H . H a r t presides. W i t h i n the t o w n are the Lott Lyles Hospital for W o m e n , supervised b y Mrs. J. H . W a r n s h u i s ; the Girls’ Incomplete S ec on da ry School, w h o s e interests are cared for b y Rev. J. H . W ar ns hu is , since M i s s D r u r y ’s departure for A m e r i c a a n d the B o y s ’ H i g h School a n d Hostel, the interests of w h i c h are entrusted to the care of M r . J. D. M u y s k e n s . T h e Christian c o m m u n i t y c o n ­ nected with the Northern Circle n u m b e r s 1,536, while 1,600 students are found in all the schools. In the a bo ve r es um e all important institutions h av e b y no m e a n s been mentioned. Further, should o n e desire to visit every school a n d church w h e r e the w o r k for w i n n i n g India


for Christ is being undertaken, a journey of hun dr ed s of miles over country roads a n d jungle paths w o u l d be necessary. India probably has felt the ill-effects of the w a r less than a n y country within the British Dominions. T h e people in m a n y w a y s are loyal, apart f r o m a certain class of agitators. A s the m o n t h s have passed, the ill-effects hav e been m o r e keenly felt. T h e railways, because of shortage of coal, hav e greatly reduced their train services besides increasing rates. Coal formerly transported b y steamers is n o w sent b y railway f r o m the north to the south. Traffic has been greatly' c o n ­ gested a n d it is with difficulty that “g o o d s or freight” can be sent or received. T h e price of all cloth has doubled a n d in s o m e cases trebled, entailing m a n y hardships, especially o n the poor, the cost of building material, paper, iron, books, a n d all important articles having risen accordingly. In the bazaars, Japanese articles of inferior quality have largely replaced those of British a n d G e r m a n make. Stores a n d h a r dw ar e are being largely imported fro m America. E x ­ ports not necessary for w a r purposes suffer severely. O w i n g to the lack of steamers for transporting grain over-seas, the prices of foodstuffs fortunately have not fluctuated m u c h , a fact for w h i c h w e are profoundly thankful. T h e Vya r . O n e of the m o s t serious problems n o w facing charitable institutions w h i c h receive m o n e y s from western countries is the matter of exchange. O w i n g to the falling off of trade there is but little d e m a n d for foreign m o n e y . Heretofore w e w e r e receiving over Rs. 3 to every dollar, w h e re as for several m o n t h s the a m o u n t has been considerably less. Unless conditions i mp ro ve w e will have to face serious problems. D epartures . T h e following workers left o n furlough during the year, thereby throwing greater responsibilities u p o n those w h o remain. T h e Misses J. V. :and S. T e W i n k e l a nd Miss M . Rottschaefer. T h e latter is planning to continue her studies in America, so


will not return in the near future. O w i n g to health conditions, M r. F. M . Potter w a s forced to give u p the w o r k in the college and left with his family early in the year. M r. M a s o n Olcott and Dr. C. F. Stube, w h o h a d taken u p educational w o r k for a short time, also sailed for America. Miss H . W . Drury, under orders f r o m physicians, reluctantly left India. T h e failing health of Mrs. W y c k o f f has necessitated her remaining on the hills. In order to be with her mother, Miss Charlotte W y c k o f f has taken u p a post temporarily in the Kodaikanal School for Missionary’s children. A rrivals.

'

It is with pleasure that w e announce the return f r o m fur­ lough of Misses D. M . Houghton, A. E. H a n c o c k and M r. and Mrs. W . H . Farrar; also the arrival of M r . C. R. Wie re ng a w h o has c o m e out for educational work, of Rev. and Mrs. John C. V a n W y k , w h o will take u p the study of the Telugu language; of Rev. a n d Mrs. H . E. V a n V r a n k e n a n d M i s s N o o r d y k , w h o will wrestle with the Tamil. W e extend our hearty thanks to the B o a r d for sending these brethren and sisters in these times' of stress and financial difficulties. W o u l d that the n u m b e r had been larger for others should be in training .to fill the vacant places, not to mention the taking u p of n e w work. O u r ranks are sadly depleted with an ever-growing work. N o r must w e fail to mention the c o m i n g of a very important.personage, al­ though done u p in a small package (capable of growth) of a son and heir in the h o m e of Rev. and Mrs. L. Hekhius. D eputation . W e had the great pleasure of welcoming a deputation of ladies fro m A me ri ca early in the year. Mrs. K n o x a nd the Misses V a n Santford Olcott, and C a m p . T h e only regret w a s that they were unable to remain longer. Their c oming stimulated us and left a sweet fragrance which remained throughout the year. A w a r m wel co me will ever be afforded t h e m again, should their travels lead them to India again or to others of our Church and nation.


POLITICAL

CONDITION.

H o m e R ule. Politics in India have never been as interesting as this last year. T h e educated classes chiefly the B r a h m a n s have been d e m a n d i n g with a n ever stronger voice, a larger share in the G o v e r n m e n t affairs— the Extremists state that they will be satis­ fied only with complete H o m e Rule. A n Indian gentleman w o r d e d his aspirations with these well-chosen words: “ W h a t India wants is her place amongst the nations of the W o r l d ; India wishes to share in the great m o v e m e n t of h u m a n progress to offer her treasures of sweetness, reverence, and knowledge to the c o m m o n w e a l t h of. nations which mee t under the British Flag.” . N o one can c o n d e m n such aspirations. T h e only cause w e have for regret is the method, the time, a n d the leaders selected by the agitators for H o m e Rule. T h e methods adopted have often militated against peace. All well wishers for India cannot but regret that the d e m a n d s have been pressed w h e n England has had to concentrate all her thoughts and energy on the prose­ cution of the world war. H a d leaders been selected w h o had clearly formulated their claims stating that India w a s reasonable in her d e m a n d s and expected greater privileges after the close of the war, m u c h unfortunate agitation and trouble would have been averted. Early in the year conditions throughout India continued to g r o w worse. Several of the provinces prohibited Mrs. A n n i e Besant, the head of the Theosophical Society a n d the ■foremost H o m e R u l e agitator, w h o has a large following in India, from entering their territory. Later the M a d r a s G o v ­ e r n m e n t interned Mrs. Besant with t w o of her lieutenants, one an Englishman. This a dd ed fuel to the fire. Agitation a nd d e m a n d s for their release w e r e heard everywhere. B ec au se of these the S u p r e m e G o v e r n m e n t , with the approval of the H o m e Secretary, released the three. T h e British G o v e r n ­ m e n t has d e e m e d it best to send to India the Right H o n o r ­ able E. S. M o n t a g u e , M.P., the Secretary of State for India, w h o is n o w personally studying conditions. Intimations have


been m a d e that certain concessions a n d privileges w o u l d be granted Indians in the near future. Naturally these events have very greatly stirred India. There are t w o views held, the Moderate and Extremist. A m o n g the latter fortunately are found a very small body of Indian Chris­ tians. T h e majority m a y be classed a m o n g the moderates. T o s h o w the attitude of the Christian body within our Mission vve quote the following resolutions passed at a meeting held recently at Vellore: ■ “Resolved— 1: T h a t w e join our voice with every true pa­ triot and lover of India in desiring that India should b ec om e a self-governing nation within the British E m p i r e a n d take the position a m o n g the great nations of the world that is warranted by hef num be rs and intellectual greatness, a nd w e pledge our­ selves to do all that w e can to hasten the time w h e n this ideal shall b ec om e a fact. . 2: Tha t while w e express this our ultimate aim, w e desire to enter our most emphatic protest against the d e m a n d for H o m e Rule as inopportune and mischievous at a time w h e n the E m ­ pire is engaged in a life and death struggle, as it would tend to distract attention f r o m the supreme efforts to win the war. 3: That w e express it as our opinion that India is not at present prepared for H o m e Rule, until illiteracy has been ban­ ished a nd the masses have been educated, until caste distinction and all divisive influences have been removed, until the people have been prepared for self-government b y the gradual develop­ m e n t of responsibility o n them. W e w ould most emphatically oppose all hasty steps to grant H o m e Rule at present. W e feel that British Rule is needed for a long time to c o m e to hold in check factions which even n o w often clash a nd to deal out even h a n d e d justice to all. 4: That in view of the high educational progress m a d e by the Christian c o m m u n i t y the G o v e r n m e n t m a y be requested to admit the m to a large share in the administration of the country and sufficiently safeguard their interests by m a k i n g provision for their adequate representation on the local administrative bodies and the Councils of the Empire.”


T h e n u m b e r of tributes paid in the papers to Mission work, to the pant Christianity has played in the development of the people and in preparing India for the present demands, have in m a n y ways, been' remarkable. T ributes

to

C ristianity .

O n e H i n d u in a long article published in a M a d r a s Daily under H i n d u management, closed with the words that India would be ready for H o m e Rule only w h e n the people all became Christians. T h e intensity of the.agitation has s o m e w h a t abated. There has also been reaction a m o n g certain classes. M a n y of the less educated state that they enjoy ample peace and prosperity under the present G o v e r n m e n t and do not desire a change. O n e of the causes for the reaction is that the non-Brahmans, w h o are m o r e b ackward in education, realize that, should H o m e Rule be granted the majority of the G o v e r n m e n t offices would be filled with Brahmans, also that Indians are m u c h surer of 'receiving fair play and impartial judgment from a Britisher than f r o m an Indian. A question naturally arises, “H a s this agitation had any detrimental influences o n Mission w o r k especially in the e du­ cational centers, Tindivanam, Vellore or Madanapalle? T h e reply is, practically none, in the t w o former. W e quote fro m Mr. W ar ns hu is ’s report with reference to the latter: “T h e most encouraging feature of the year has been the activity of our enemies. O n e does not hesitate to designate the Theosophists as such even though a s h o w of friendship is m o r e or less maintained. Theosophy, Mrs. Besant, a n d H o m e Rule have loomed large against the horizon a nd claimed m u c h of our attention. Their opposition has been and w a s openly manifested by their disciples. Early in the year our Girls’ Hostel w as „ nightly b om ba rd ed with stones and this caused m u c h distress a nd alarm amongst the inmates— so m u c h so that t w o of our teachers wanted to leave a nd s o m e parents wished to remove their children. In June a mas s meeting w a s held to urge parents not to send their children to our schools. Rival Elementary


schools were opened near our o w n village schools. Their dis­ ciples entered our Christian villages a n d preached against us. and used 'threats to coerce those w h o were friendly. H o m e Rule pro­ cessions mar ch ed round our compound, threats were publicly m a d e that they were going to drive out the Mission. O u r meet­ ings were attended b y r o w d y students w h o m a d e a great deal of noise and interrupted the speakers with questions. O u r policy in the face of this has been to keep quiet a n d allow- circumstances and natural laws to take their course. A s the year closes w e learn the G o v e r n m e n t has withdrawn its recognition and grants f r o m both their H i g h School and College. T h e y intend to maintain a school independent of G o v e r n m e n t but this w e be­ lieve will be a very feeble effort d o o m e d to inevitable failure. T h o u g h w e have experienced evil ait their hands bur sentiment toward the m is one of pity, that their obviously sincere aspir­ ations towards better things should so be misguided and vain. S o m e of their party have openly confessed to us that they are sorry they ever looked to Mrs. Besant to re-establish their school. A n d as for the t o w n in general I a m told that a great- sigh of relief would go u p should the Theosophists’ College leave the place.” E vangelistic C a m p a i g n . In the following pages frequent references are m a d e to the “C a m p a i g n ” or the “W e e k of Evangelism.” A w o r d of explana­ tion m a y be helpful. T h e Churches of the Arcot Mission have united with the' Churches of several other Missions a n d are k n o w n as m e m b e r s of the South India United Church. F o r the past three years, energetic efforts have been put-forth to enlist ■every C hurch m e m b e r in the w o r k of leading others to Christ. In order to do this, not only is suitable literature published and people urged to “ witness” for the Master, but a “W e e k ” is also set apart w h e n every one is asked to m a k e “ witnessing for Christ” the one and supreme effort.


INDIAN

CHURCH

BOARD.

0

• W i t h this year the Indian C hurch B oa rd has completed its first sabbatical year. In October, 1910, the Mission passed over to Ithe Board, composed of both Americans a n d Indians— the latter being in the majority— all the Evangelistic w o r k and funds for the maintenance thereof. A careful study of s o m e of the conditions resulting indicate ;that the Mission m a d e no mistake w h e n it thus called in the assistance and advice of the Indian brethren. In the Councils of the Board w e find the m e m b e r s striving to place greater responsibilities on the Indian brethren, whereas they hesitate to accept them. T h e Indian brother has g r o w n very materially, is relieving the Missionary of m u c h of his work, is taking a m o r e active interest in winning souls for Christ; one is the Vice-Chairman of the Western Circle and renders incalculable assistance to the Chairman. In 1910 there were 10,751 in our Christian c o m m u n i t y whereas the present returns s h o w 15,671 or nearly a 5 0 % increase. These figures are most significant. F u r ­ ther in the last year the percentage of increase w a s ithe highest tabulated for m a n y a year, and this at a time w h e n the n u m b e r of Missionaries devoting their labor to purely evangelistic efforts w a s at a m i n i m u m . W a r conditions and agitations for H o m e R u l e with m a n y an effort to discountenance Christianity s e e m to have h ad a beneficial effect upon ithe w q r k for Christ. F r o m the report of the C h a i r m a n w e present the following facts. A careful study of the statistical tables for the last year gives us abundanit cause for thanking G o d for the success that has attended our work. I believe w e have never before reported a larger growth nor one that has included so m a n y of the items ol our statistical tables. W e have ten p e w villages. T h e gain in the n u m b e r of families is 431; 366 have been received on confession, a gain of 143. O u r communicamts n o w n u m b e r 3,593, a gain of 170. N e v e r before have w e reported so m a n y baptisms. T h e actual n u m b e r is 1,133, a gain of 339. O u r total baptized c o m ­ munity has g r o w n f r o m 7,431 to 8,094, a gain of 658. O u r total Christian c o m m u n i t y n o w n u m b e r 15,671, a gain during the year of 1,622. W e report 8 n e w S u n d a y schools and 569 m o r e


pupils. O u r Ohrisitian E ndeavor Societies s h o w on the whole a very slight gain. W e have m a d e ' a very substantial gain of R s 1,920 u nder contributions. ' These statements s h o w that our Churches are m u c h stronger than they were last year. These gains are largely' due to the Evangelistic Campaign. This is the third year of the Campaign. That our Mission has m a d e a larger gain than it ever has before, shows that the C a m p a i g n is gaining in force and m o m e n t u m . If this is true w e m a y look for m u c h larger results in the year to come. . W

estern

C ircle.

'

T h e Wes te rn Circle has m a d e the largest gains which are little less than phenomenal. B y this w e do not m e a n to claim that these results were .wholly due to our efforts alone. Far from that, the end aimed at w a s so greatly beyond w h a t seemed possible that w e were driven to a constant a nd deep dependence on the H o l y Spirit to achieve it. B u t wha t is true and significant is that the results gained were at the beginning of the year placed before the Circle as our definite aim. A n d all through the year, in de­ pendence on God, w e were using the best methods w e could devise to bring about these results. Without this I do not be­ lieve it would have been possible to accomplish w h a t has been done nor do w e m e a n to belittle the preparation that has been m a d e throughout the year of the Campaign. A n e w spirit had been awa ke ne d, a n e w determination h a d taken possession of m a n y hearts to. m a k e the winning of souls the supreme purpose in life. T h e insistence on Bible study and prayer had quickened into n e w life and activity m a n y of G o d ’s children. There had been a distinct change of purpose in m a n y lives. Early in the year the agents of the W e s te rn Circle after careful consideration and m u c h prayer determined to attempt to win 1,000 souls for Christ, chiefly in the occupied-villages, so as to keep d o w n as far as possible the expenses. A healthy rivalry between the pastorates arose and also .between villages as well. T h e pastors took u p the w o r k and organized to win men. Villages were visited. Conventions


held. Prayer and Bible study circles were kept up. M e n and w o m e n w or ke d for their relatives. O n e m a n held a special prayer meeting in his home, to which he invited his non-Christian relatives a n d told t h e m of his deep longing to have t h e m c o m e to Christ. Several decided then a nd there to accept Christ. Great efforts were m a d e to persuade m a n y ito c o m e out a nd receive baptism at the Harvest Festivals. These results have encouraged the Circle to place before itself a m u c h larger a i m for the coming year. W e have deter­ m in ed to try to win 2,000 from our occupied villages, 500 from n e w villages and to m a k e a beginning in direct efforts to win caste H i n d u s by aiming at winning 50. This p r o g r a m m e has been taken up with enthusiasm. E v e n the Vellore Church, which did not take a very active part in the 1,000 soul campaign, has c o m e into .line. B y action of the Session after careful, consider­ ation they have determined to try to win 300 souls as their share of 2,500. M a n y college masters a nd teachers are faking u p the w o r k with enthusiasm. T h e y s h o w a deep personal interest in the villages assigned to them, calling it their o w n village. In m a n y cases their wives also have joined t h e m in the work. T h e definite' effort to win the caste H i n d u s is a most interesting and significant part of their C a m p a i g n for the n e w year. It is a small and modest beginning. B ut I believe it is fraught with tremendous results. G o d will certainly give us converts from a m o n g these caste peioplelf w e seek them earnestly and in the right way. It has paid to concentrate our efforts so largely on our Christian villages. T h e average strength of the congregations in the W es te rn Circle has been brought u p to 91 by last year’s gains. T h e figure for the Eastern Circle is 82, for the Northern Circle 73, and for the Southern just under 50. T h e Circle in winning 1,077 converts has m a d e a gain of 22.3 per cent, over last year. Its share of ithe gain in total Christian c o m m u n i t y for the whole Mission is 64.4 per/cent. T h e Eastern Circle stands next to the W es te rn Circle in its growth. T h e total Christian c o m m u n i t y has increased by 430. This m a k e s an increase' of 8.76 per cent. V e r y special


efforts were m a d e to present a large n u m b e r of converts at P on na i H a r ve st Festival for baptism. A very large proportion of those w h o were baptized this year ait'festivals were from the Eastern Circle. In the s a m e w a y the pastorates of Ran i ­ pettai and Y e h a m u r organized their campaign w o r k not o n the idea of O n e W e e k of Evangelism, but on the thought of w o r k ­ ing for the full year. W o r k has been begun in six n e w villages. W e rejoice in the accession of these. E astern C ircle. O n e of the outstanding features of the C a m p a i g n w o r k in the Eastern Circle w a s the so-called rural C a m p a i g n in the tow n of Ranipettai, in which the effort w a s m a d e to especially reach the middle class Hindus. This w a s carried out under the enthu­ siastic leadership of Mrs. Honegger. Preparatory-meetings were held for several months to interest ithe people a nd establish friendly relationships with them. T h e whole t o w n w a s dividea into wards. E a c h w a r d w as placed in the charge of a special band of workers w h o were to get acquainted with the people, keep t h e m informed of all the meetings, and strive to bring the m to meetings. A fund w a s raised to meet the expenses of the C a m p a i g n to which all the Christians contributed liberally. A spacious pandal w a s erected for the final meetings and every effort w a s m a d e ito secure success. Rev. F. Kingsbury gave the closing address of the C a m p a i g n with great power, w h e n Christ w a s directly presented to the people and they were urged to accept H i m as their Saviour. T h e meetings were remarkably welt attended. A very deep impression w a s evidently made. There have been inquiries. B u t none have yet confessed Christ. T h e C a m p a i g n w a s a fine piece of w o r k carefully planned a n d ’ carried out. , . In the Southern Circle adverse conditions have m a d e the w o r k difficult. T h e terrible cyclone of N o v e m b e r breached m a n y tanks, destroyed or d a m a g e d most of the houses, killed over 1,500 people, ithousands of sheep and cattle, and greatly i mp ov ­ erished the inhabitants; the ground nut crop brought a low price; clothing has greatly increased in price; the people have


had a very hard struggle to live. It has been difficult to m a i n ­ tain schools, a n d the w o r k has suffered, but w o r k has been done, a n d s o m e results have been achieved. T h r e e n e w villages wer e received, 87 joined the C h u r c h o n Confession; 242 w e r e b a p ­ tized, of w h o m 78 w e r e adults; 345 n o w adherents w e r e received, but the net increase of the Christian C o m m u n i t y w a s only 85. This is partly due to the fact that t wo villages with 118 people in the T indivanam pastorate wer e dropped, as they had proven unsatisfactory. This loss m a d e the net gain for the year only 3 per cent. B ut the real gain is about 7 per cent. In T indivanam meetings were held during the w e e k of evangelism. So u t h e r n C ircle. ’ T h e Southern Circle carefully considered the advisability of m a k i n g an attempt to win a definite n u m b e r for Christ this coming year. T h e Committee to which the matter w a s entrusted suggested 500. T h e matter w a s then taken u p a nd prayerfully considered for an entire day. T h e report as finally adopted in­ cludes not the figure 500, but 1,000. There are m a n y doubting Thomases, but if all enter into the w o r k with boldness and faith in ithe presence of the H o l y Spirit, the task can be accomplished. N o r t h e r n C ircle. T h e C a m p a i g n in the Northern Circle looked at f r o m the standpoint of statistics alone would s e e m to have been a rather dismal failure, for the share it has h a d in the General a dvance recorded this year is very small indeed. Forty-seven c o m m u n i ­ cants were received on confession of their faith; 30 n e w families are recorded. There were 54 baptisms, 16 of w h o m were adults. Fifty-six non-baptized adherents Were received during the year. T h e gain in total Christian c o m m u n i t y w a s 30, m ak in g a total of 1,536. These statistics are not encouraging. In ithis year of advance the Northern Circle share is just under 2 % . T h e Circle C h a i r m a n refuses to be discouraged and feels that the year has been of great importance for the C a m p a i g n in preparing the w a y for a vigorous advance in the n e w year. T h e


Cha ir ma n states: '.'A glance at the surface of things is far f r o m encouraging. B ut w e hasten to disclaim such a condition. T h e net results are poor owing to losses from natural causes and it would not be fair to conclude that things were at a standstill. B ut even w h e n all is said that can be said, it m u s t be admitted that progress this past year has fallen below that of the previous years a nd below our expectations. In explanation of this con­ dition it m a y be pointed out, in the first place, that the year has been devoted m o r e to a preparation for evangelism than to the Evangelism itself. T o spread the idea and spirit of the C a m p a i g n in all our scattered villages has taken m u c h of our time and efforts. B u t w e are highly satisfied with the m a n n e r in which the C a m p a i g n has been placed before the people and begin to see results accumulating even now. “W e note, as the most m a r k e d gain m a d e this year, the increasing m o m e n t u m which the C a m p a i g n is acquiring. W e began this by sending a deputation of our m os t enthusiastic and experienced m e n to visit every village. Volunteers for special w o r k were called for and the responses were encouraging. O n one occasion w h e n all raised 'their hands promising to enlist in this service a warning w a s given that no promise should be •m a d e without intention to keep them. A simple old villager replied: ‘Sir, though I were to lose everything and all-my family and friends and the Mission forsake me, yet I w ou ld have to do this w o r k for m y God.’ “T h e monthly meetings of the helpers were also conducted in a n e w m a n n e r so as to provide a time for special Bible study a nd a carefully prepared address each month. Classes for the helpers have been running for several m onths and in every vil­ lage and t o w n C hu rc h practically every Christian is enrolled for special study in this course. In addition to this, a Personal ^ W o r k e r s B a n d has been organized in the Madanapalle Church consisting only of those w h o are actually working with the definite individuals. “W i t h great deliberation and with a magnificent act of faith the Circle has placed before its Churches a goal of 1.000 converts to be gained in the c oming year. T h e w o r k wias begun at once and this ideal is being constantly kept before the people. Its


apparent impossibility has been our inspiration as w e realize that w e can only gain this end by faith a nd prayer.” S o far the B oa rd report has been taken u p with the E v a n ­ gelistic C a m p a i g n and its bearing on our success and on our failures. E ducational W

ork.

A situdy of the Table pf the Educational w o r k under the Indian C h u r c h B oa rd s hows that there are 4 higher and 175 lower elementary schools, one less than last year, with 5,693 pupils, an increase of 106. T h e Christian pupils have increased by 249 while non-Christians have declined by 198. W e have n o w 1,592 Christians a nd 3,501 non-Christians. O u r total income f r o m grants a nd fees is Rs. 12,896, an increase of Rs. 1,119. A small beginning has been m a d e in starting Credit C o ­ operative Societies in our Mission. Three villages have been carefully surveyed a nd for one, Y e h a m u r , the application for registration and grant with the endorsement of the G o v e r n m e n t Official has been sent in. W e trust that the s a m e m a y soon be done for a few other villages. In concluding this report, w e w ou ld once again thank G o d for the success H e has granted us. “H e has done great things for us, whereof w e are glad.” W e rejoice even m o r e in the prospect of an even greater forward m o v e m e n t during the year the first fruits of which w e have already harvested. In conclu­ sion the B oard C h a ir ma n says: ‘T believe that under the guidance of the H o l y Spirit m a k e an adv an ce of four thousand this year. I a m t em pt ed to say five thousand. Will not the B o a r d set the a i m for the year? If w e are ready to p a y the price I G o d will give us this a n d even more.”

w e can sorely this as believe

T h e w o r k referred to in the several stations is chiefly that connected with the Institutions as the Evangelistic w o r k of the Mission has been reported on by the Indian C hurch Board.


TINDIVANAM.

T h e R e v . a n d M rs. W . T. S cudder — I. C. B. W o r k , Crane Elementary School, Dispensary, T w o H i n d u Girls’ Schools, and Zenana W o r k . D r .C. F. S tube — H i g h School and Hostel for Christian Boys. E duc atio n . In the m o n t h of April there occurred an event which w e feared w o u l d produce dangerous opposition to our educational w o r k in Tindivanam. F o r s o m e years a n u m b e r of our H i n d u people in town, w h o w e r e maintaining a complete Elementary school, have' been asking the Theosophists to take over the school and place it under their Educational Trust. O n l y after one of the merchants h ad m a d e over a considerable s u m of m o n e y a n d property to the school did the Theosophists consider the request a nd assume charge. A t the opening of the school in June they planned to have a grand function. Mrs. Besant w a s to come. There w as to be a procession gotten u p in the grandest colors a nd the school w a s to ope n with a blast of trumpets. H a d this really occurred, the natural tendency w o u l d have been for m a n y of the boys to leave the C r a n e a n d L o w e r classes of the H i g h school, a n d join the H i n d u school. Mrs. B esant a n d t w o of her lieutenants w e r e interned b y the orders of the G o v e r n m e n t during the vacation months. T h e excitement attending the internment, the agitation w h i c h followed, and. later the exulta­ tion resulting over her release s e e m e d to hav e eclipsed all their plans. W e hav e m e t with less opposition this year than a n y heretofore; for w h i c h w e are thankful. O n e would naturally believe that because this H i n d u school w as brought under the control of the Theosophists that Tindi­ v a n a m would have b e c o m e a hot bed for the H o m e Rule agitaition. Several meetings were held in the town,''the H o m e Rule flag flown, temples lighted, but as to having any, effect upon our schools or arousing the student population, w e have seen nothing.


Dr. C. F. Stube, after having spent a little m o r e than a year as Principal of the H i g h School left for A m e ri ca in the middle of April. T h e w a r m t h of the farewell reception given h i m by the staff and students testified of their appreciation of his w o r k with them. H

igh

Sc h o o l .

‘

This institution has continued to maintain its usefulness a nd efficiency in the community. T h e results of the G ov er nm en t examination compared favorably with those throughout the Presidency. T h e grants received fro m the G o v e r n m e n t have been considerably larger. E v e n in spite of the hard times the strength of the school is greater a n d the i n c o m e better than last year. T h e great need of this school is a n e w building. H i g h Schools are springing u p in m a n y centers and unless w e are able to erect a suitable building for the laboratory and H i g h School classes w e will be left faV behind, students going to other institutions. This object has been placed before the B o a r d for a n u m b e r of years, but to date w e have received n o w o r d of cheer or assurance that the need will be met. C r a n e E l e m e n t a r y Sc h o o l . This school located in the center of the tow n has had a very successful year. T h e n u m b e r of students mostly non-Christian has been about the same, but the quality of the w o r k done by the staff has been of a very m u c h higher standard. This school keeps us in very close touch with the t o w n ’s people and w e confidently believe that streams of influences for g o o d are going out into m a n y a h o m e . T h e S u n d a y School conducted in this building is one of ithe most successful. A t the A nn ua l S unday School Anniversary the students secured the banner for the best exercises, w i n n i n g it a w a y fro m the S u n d a y School, c o m p o s e d entirely of Christian students. C hristian H

ostel for

B oys .

T h e n u m b e r of Boarders is about 100. In June m a n y of the older boys left us for other institutions while at the reopening


w e had a flood of newcomers. Dr. Stube gave the boys con­ siderable personal attention in tutoring which w e have not been able to continue. The- private tutoring w o r k by teachers is maintained with good results. O n Easter 18 boys, after having been carefully instructea by Dr. Stube and the Pastor, joined the C hu rc h on confession of their faith for which w e render praise to God. M a n y of the boys have rendered earnest assistance in the Evangelistic and S u n d a y School work. . W

o m e n ’s

W

ork.

A mi ds t agitations in India, a n d in spite of the war, our Mission w o r k has been carried on without detriment of any kind. T h e friendliness of the patients w h o have been helped in the dispensary is on th'e increase and this spirit is as necessary for the progress of our w o r k as a calm' atmosphere is claimed to be necessary for the adjustment of the political situation. ' T h e H i n d u Girls’ School has had a prosperous year. Their part in the A n n u a l S u n d a y School Rally w a s carried out most creditably. Their singing at the regular sessions of the S u n d a y School w a s well don e and, b y giving t h e m a variety of songs to learn, w e feel that there are absorbing truths w h i c h will stick. T h e T a m i l D e p a r t m e n t of the school has five teachers, all Christians. T h e strength remains about the same. T he W

andiwash

Sc h o o l .

*

'

W i t h 75 on the rolls under the charge of the Pastor, Rev. J. Solomon, the headmaster and the staff have done excellent work. A very successful prize-giving w a s held w h e n the girls sang and acted in a very attractive way, m u c h to the delight of the parents and townspeople. . D ispensary .

.

Although the treatments in the Dispensary did- not quite c o m e u p to last year’s record, one dozen of those w h o came, were f r o m distant places, an average of thirteen miles, which not only proves that the Dispensary is meeting a necessity, but that


it affords a n opportunity for spreading the Gospel in places w here there m a y not be any other w a y of reaching people. W e are slowly getting m o r e in-patients to stay in the Dispensary, but it is lonely for the m unless they have relatives w h o can remain with t h e m especially at night, as the nurse lives in her o w n home. O u r ideal is a dispensary with quarters upstairs for nurse and nearer to town. T h e 'Bible W o m a n w h o is always present in the •treatment room, talks- informally with the patients— gives them tracts w h e n they can read. O n e morning the head constable sat for an hour outside the' door reading. H e seems to be particu­ larly interested in our institutions. O n e S u n d a y evening he w a s at one of the S u n d a y Schools. Another time he c a m e and sat a m o n g the helpers at one of their meetings o n the Veranda. There are -two Bible W o m e n working in the town, one of w h o m gives half her time to teaching Bible to the Telugu pupils in the Girls’ School as both the teachers in the Telugu depart­ m e n t are'Hindus. A weekly prayer circle of the Dispensary workers with the Bible W o m e n is held to ask for G o d ’s blessing in the w o r k of the dispensary a nd the B i b l e w o m a n in the zenanas. O n e goes as far as he can in reaching the Soul of the patient, ithen, w e feel that w e m u s t give place to workings of the H o l y Spirit. F o r instance, there is a patient w h o has bought our little boo k of h y m n s and sings the m while working around her h o m e — her husband fells m e she is “m y child.” If I went further what would banish m y child f r o m her h o m e m o r e quickly than an open confession? Y o u can understand our need of wisdom. T h u s w e always need your prayers. ’

ARNI.

This Station has been without a married Missionary and wife over t w o years, but ithe w o r k has been ably carried by Miss M . Rottschaefer, w h o left on furlough early in the year. Since that time Rev. E. C. Scudder has had the charge of the station work, although his permanent residence is in Ranipettai. T h e traveling back and forward has been done, not in a motor car which would cover the distance in a little m o r e than an hour, but in a “mule jutka” of uncertain speed.


T h e most important institution under his charge apart from the three H i n d u Girls’ Schools, t w o in Arni a nd one in Polur, 20 miles away, is the B o y s ’ Elementary School for Christian lads with its boarding department where there are 90 boys in attend­ ance. T h e students w h o are incapable of English education are sent here where the larger part of their training is in the Vernacular. After passing through this school they will be qualified with further training for teachers in the villages. This school is filling a m o s t important place in the Mission plan a n d is w o r t h y of every encouragement. This station should have a full time Missionary w h o would not only be entrusted with outside Evangelistc work, but especally with the care of 'the 90 boys in w h o m are wonderful possi­ bilities. ' , Possibly the spirit of opposition to Mission institutions en­ gendered by the H o m e Rule agitators has been as keenly felt in s o m e of the H i n d u Girls’ Schools as any wh er e else. Influences have been brought to bear especially upo n the parents not to send their girls to Mission schools. F o r s o m e time the rivalry has been especially keen in Arni w here m u c h effort has been put forth to undermine our educational work. M r . Scudder w a s c o m ­ pelled to "expend a considerable s u m of m o n e y on prizes in order to keep the girls h ap py a nd to discourage the desire of seeking admittance in the other schools. M r . Scudder reports that the schools are in good condition, thus indicating the faithful and earnest w o r k put forth by the staff. Arnipalayam has 110 pupils on its roll; Kosapalayam, 120, and Polur, 125. Ze n a n a W

ork.

.

T h e six Bible W o m e n hav e been under the charge of Miss E. W.. Conklin, w h o m a k e s frequent visits to the place. She goes to the h o m e s with the Bible W o m e n besides encouraging and guiding t h e m in conference and prayer meetings. T h e distance between Arni a nd Chittoor is not so very great, but the railway connections are unsatisfactory.' T h e n with a ride of seven miles in the country jutka, m u c h of one’s valuable time is practically lost, but as stated above no other satisfactory arrangement could he m a d e than to have Miss Conklin with Mrs. Beattie in Chittoor.


RANIPETTAI. R ev . a n d M rs . E. C. S cudder — Eastern Circle, I. C. B. M i s s J. C. S cudder ^— Lace Class. M i s s A. B. V a n D o re n — Girls’ Secondary Boarding School and Z enana W o r k . D r . a n d M rs. B. W . R oy — General Hospital. M rs. H e n r y HoNEGGER^-Four Hindu Girls’ Schools and Zenana Work. _ R anipettai H ospital . O w i n g to the outbreak of plague in the towns about Rani­ pettai and especially in Arcot situated o n the main road, m a n y people fro m beyond were timid a nd hesitated to c o m e to the. Hospital for treatment. F o r this reason the n u m b e r of out­ patients w a s reduced for a n u m b e r of m on th s by 50 per cent. T h e second cause of the decrease w a s the non-receipt of the spare parts for the motor car. Because of this, the touring w as stopped for six m onths which, not only f r o m the medical but f r o m the evangelistic point of view, is very important. Although w e m a y not be able to affect m a n y cures while touring the fact that the people have an opportunity of getting acquainted with the doctor helps dispel the exaggerated stories the natives spread about the white m a n ’s desire to cut the m up'into pieces, and induces t h e m to c o m e for treatment where they hear the Gospel preached daily. " Early in the year Dr. Taylor, w h o 1started out so promis­ ingly, had to resign, a n d six m on th s later he died f r o m Kalazar." Brought u p in a Christian home, his father being a minister, he possessed m a n y of the traits one would like to find in all Indian Christians. A s an example of his willingness he gave a voluntary demonstration of ana to my at the Girls’ H i g h School one day w h e n h e h ad a fever of 103°. Financially this has been one of the mos t successful years in the history of the Hospital. Local receipts have been large. T h e m o n e y has c o m e principally fro m the inpatients for operative work. T h e private r oo ms have been full nearly all the time.


T h e hospital neither stocks, sells, nor encourages the use of patent medicines or nostrums. T h e native doctors live b y h u m ­ bugging the people, and there is enough fraud in India without distributing nerve tonics, strength builders, or blood purifiers. Several patients have run a w a y before they were fit to be dis­ charged. It w a s probably due to the restlessness found in these people such as is found in children. This is apt to happen a m o n g the free patients w h o do not appreciate the value of the treat­ men t because they are of such low intelligence that they cannot be m a d e to understand the necessity for further treatment. It is very discouraging and disappointing after one has spent a long time in applying a plaster cast to a fractured leg, to find the patient missing on the following morning. O n e w o m a n w h o had had a radical operation for a cancer ran a w a y as soon as she could travel. A y o u n g Christian boy, w h o had passed through rather a serious operation and b a d just begun to s h o w signs of recovery, w a s r e m ov ed by his father to his h o m e forty miles a w a y in a springless o x cart and, surprising to say, he lived! • Obstetrical w o r k has occupied m u c h attention. Several inv provements have been m a d e on the building. O n one occasion the w a r d w a s visited by m a n y because of the advent of triplets all of w h o m , strange to say, survived. T h e y were far. from w e l c o m e as the m other had not only five other children, but had been deserted by her husband. A n u m b e r of M u h a m m a d a n w o m e n , w h o are 'usually very strict about having their faces seen by strange men, c a m e to the hospital a nd were treated by Dr. Roy. W h o can say that the East, with all its superstitions and useless customs, will not s uc cu mb to Wes te rn civilization! Aside 'from the Christianizing) influence the g o o d Hvrought in this department alone would be sufficient reason for maintaining the hospital. T w o Bible W o m e n and a Catechist have preached the Gospel faithfully and earnestly throughout the year. Miss V a n D o r e n writes: “T h e year just closing has been one of changes and perplexities, and yet one in which w e can thanlk G o d for real progress achieved. W i t h the opening of a Fourth F o r m iri June, the need for t w o A merican teachers on the staff b e c a m e imperative, and Miss Charlotte W y c k o f f w a s appointed to that position. O u r disappointment w a s great w h e n


she w a s prevented from coming to us on account of her m other’s health. W e were most fortunate in finding a substitute in Miss Edith Hacker, of Travancore, w h o served as Vice-Principal for t w o m o n t h s and a half. H e r services in every departmernt of the school life were invaluable, and her departure to assist in her mother’s work, w a s m u c h regretted. “T h e next interval of six weeks w a s filled by a Syrian Chris­ tian student of the W o m e n ’s Christian College, Madras. H e r influence a n d example were also mos t wholesome. “W e had expected Miss C. Durick to c o m e to us w h e n re­ lieved of her duties in the Schell Hospital. B u t her broken health m a d e that impossible, when, in N ov em be r, I too w a s laid aside. Miss H a c k e r again c a m e to the rescue, and together with Mrs. Honegger, w h o gave u p s o m e of her o w n work, is carrying o n the school w o r k to the end of the year. “T h e additions a nd alterations to our buildings are almost completed. W e have a line of n e w kitchen and store-rooms and an “open-air” dining-room over which w e hope to have a roof w h e n funds permit. T h e r oo ms in the vacated'building have been remodelled into a Teachers’ Dormitory. A sick r o o m has been added and additional bath-rooms have m a d e the prob­ lems of cleanliness easier. A tiny .prayer r o o m affords a place to which any girl w h o wants a quiet time for prayer and Bible study m a y retire. Miss H a c k e r writes of dedication of this room, w h e n the girls after the S u n d a y afternoon C. E. meeting marched out singing “ Sweet H o u r of Prayer” a n d held a single service of consecration in the n e w room. “B y utilizing special gifts from America doubled b y G o v e r n ­ m e n t grant w e have been enabled to purchase a small nucleus of H i g h School equipment. In spite of difficulties of w a r condi-' tions w e have got together e nough simple Science apparatus to offer elementary courses in Physics and Chemistry. W e also rejoice in a small library of books for the use of teachers and students and have been m u c h gratified by the w a y in which it has been appreciated, especially by the students. T o induce our Indian students to read merely for the love of reading is a great achievement.


“T h e Fourth F or m, which is still our highest class, has con­ sisted of ten students, a nd of this our first H i g h School class, w e have been proud. W e are grateful that they have been worthy both in quality of school work, a nd in growth in Christian char- ‘ acter, to set the tone of those w h o shall c o m e after. . “O u r n e w little Kindergarten has transformed our uninter­ esting Infant class into an ideal spot w he re the babies play and learn without k n o w i n g it. T h e play spirit has begun to per­ meate the whole school. A recent visitor on tour through Mission stations, remarked that nowhere else in India had he seen girls really playing with the western v i m a nd abandon.” H

indu

G irls’ S c h o o l s :R anipet ,W

allajah a n d

K averipauk.

Mrs. H o n e g g e r writes of encouraging progress in these schools. In the recent prize distribution interesting p r o g r a m m e s were gone through which s h o w e d careful training. T h e Ranipet School, still crowded into an inadequate building, is developing n e w lines of work. T h e teaching of English is an additional attraction. Since the Evangelistic C a m p a i g n s o m e of the parents of the children w h o attend this school are becoming uneasy be­ cause too m u c h religious instruction is being given. . In the Wallajah School earnest and faithful w o r k has been done and the conservative people of the place are beginning to appreciate the benefits of education. Ze n a n a W

ork.

'

Opposition to our Mission School still continues at Kaveri­ pauk, but because of the energy of the teachers, w e are enabled to maintain our position. T h e influences for goo d exerted by the school and the zenana w o r k are undoubtedly far reaching. S u n ­ day schools are regularly carried o n in each of the above schools. W e have gained a fresh interest and impulse by coming into closer touch with the w o r k of our Christian w o m e n , and con­ fidence in the p o w e r of the Gospel over the lives of the Indian w o m e n has been strengthened. D uring the Evangelistic C a m ­ paign special lectures were arranged for H i n d u w o m e n ; these have been helpful in widening the vision of w o m e n ’s sphere of


usefulness in the world. O u r aim has been to s h o w these H i n d u w o m e n something of the beauty of the Saviour’s Life. T h e four Bible w o m e n w h o w o r k in a n d a ro un d Ranipettai are not able to emter all the open doors. It is interesting to note the influence of the education w o r k in the zenanas. M a n y of the younger mothers were former pupils of our H i n d u Girls’ Schools. S o m e would like to confess Christ openly. Often w e must seek and encourage an earnest seeker to a quiet adherence to the Christ life looking to the H o l y Spirit for guidance. Results are slow in appearing in zenana work. It is a w o r k of uplifting and en­ lightening until ignorance and superstition are abolished. L ace C lass— R anipet . Miss J. C. Scudder, speaking of the Lace Class, says:— W e cannot report any increase in the n u m b e r of pupils as w e have as m a n y as w e can accommodate. This year has been unevent­ ful a nd the health of the pupils good. Three pupils in the Elementary and one in the Intermediate class were sent to M a d r a s for examination. T h e y say they did well, but the re­ sults to date have not been announced. T h e t w o teachers have done excellent work. W e have great cause for thankfulness that five girls openly confessed Christ and b ec am e m e m b e r s of the Church, also that all the older girls took an active interest in' the campaign work, visiting the houses in the t o w n working for the evangelization of their H i n d u sisters. Several of the older pupils teach in the S u n d a y schools.

VELLORE. R ev .a n d M rs.L. R. S cudder — Cha ir ma n Indian School B oard and Western Circle, Theological Seminary, Zenana W o r k . M i s s A. E. H a n c o c k — Z enana W o r k , H i n d u Girls’ Schools; Mr. T. Harris, B.A., Lt, Manager. M rs. S. W . S cudder , M r . Ida S. S cud der , M iss D. H. H o u g h t o n — M a r y Taber Schell Hospital. M i s s G. D odd — Mission Treasurer. R ev . a n d M rs. L. H e k h u i s — Voorhees College.


T heological S e m i n a r y . T h e Theological Seminary this year has taken a long for­ w a r d step, says Rev. L. R. Scudder. S o far as n um be rs under instruction are concerned this is one of the record years. W e '' n o w have thirty-four m e n and three w o m e n as students. T h e Junior class of eleven is m a d e u p of m e n of better qualifica­ tion, most of w h o m have appeared for the School final examination. Consequently s o m e of the class w o r k will be conduoted in English. F o r the first time also in several years w e have had three classes for the regular courses and a L a y or Bible class of eight. This has m ea nt heavy w o r k for.the staff, especially as I have not been able to take m o r e than seven periods a week. In the senior class of four, three passed creditably and •were given their diplomas. O n e w h o fell below the pass m a r k w as informed that he w ou ld have to pass in those subjects in which he failed to secure the fixed m i n i m u m before he would be given his diploma. O f the nine students of the Middle class seven were promoted, and t w o w h o were found unequal to the task of completing their course, were dropped. O f the Junior class . of nine all but one wer e promoted, and he w a s dropped. It w a s also decided to start a L a y class for students below the Higher Elementary Grade. This w e are m a k i n g a Bible study course for one year. T h e eight students will receive an elementary course in Theology in Christian evidences, and in the religions of India. Special efforts have been m a d e to develop the spiritual life of the students and to a w a k e n in the m an earnest longing to win m e n for Christ. All lessons were laid aside for one day and staff and students spent the whole day in studying the Evangelistic ideal and striving through prayer to catch Christ’s spirit in w o r k ­ ing for men. T h e students immediately afterwards divided themselves into three bands under the lead of the m e m b e r s of the staff and have been trying to learn h o w to d o effective per­ sonal work. E a c h band has taken a village in which to w o r k a n d are hoping before the close of the year to have the jov of winning s o m e to openly accept Christ. W e have found that there


is nothing that so stimulates our spiritual lives as this effort to bring individual m e n a n d w o m e n to Christ. It is interesting to note that five m e n and t w o w o m e n stu足 dents are f r o m other Missions. This I think is the largest n u m 足 ber that w e have h ad at any one time from other Missions. T h e Australian Presbyterian Mission has sent t wo a n d the United Free C hurch of Scotland Mission, the L o n d o n Mission, and Danish Lutheran Mission one each. W e rejoice in this exten足 sion of influence of the Seminary beyond the bounds of the Arcot Mission. F r o m this brief review of the w o r k of the Seminary it will be seen that this w o r k year is notable for three things: 1. A large increase in the n u m b e r of students. 2. T h e admission of a strong class of better educated men. 3. T h e admission of a larger n u m b e r front other Missions. It only remains to record that the General S y n o d of the R e f o r m e d C hu rc h in A m e r i c a has on the nomination of the Arcot Mission elected the acting Principal Rev. L. R. Scudder to be Principal a n d Synod, Professor of Theology. V oorhees C ollege . This, the largest a nd most important educational institution connected with the Mission, has witnessed a n u m b e r of changes in its staff. T h e health of the principal, F. M . Potter, Esq., w a s not robust e no ug h to stand the climate. U n d e r the orders of the doctors he and his family left for A me ri ca early in the year. His departure w a s deeply regretted by the Mission, the College staff a n d students. This w a s m a d e all the keener because but little hope could be held out for his return. M r . M a s o n Olcott, connected with the College staff, w h o had c o m e out for a short period also left for America. H e had w o n the affections of the student bod y w h o s h o w e d their esteem by tending to h i m an impressive and hearty farewell reception, wishing for his early return to India. Rev. L. Hekhius, w h o reached the Mission only s o m e three m o n t h s before a n d w h o had been set apart for L a n g u a g e study with the object of taking u p Evangelistic work, w a s asked to


assume the office of Principal, not an easy task for a y o u n g m a n w h o had been so short a time in India. T h e Mission with the approval of the B o a r d took a most i m ­ portant step b y entrusting larger responsibilities to an Indian Christian of approved worth a nd ability— a m a n w h o s e scholastic abilities have been recognized b y Government, M r . V. P. Adisheshaih, M . A. L. T. H e has been appointed the Vice Principal of the College, a position w e are confident he will fill with energy a n d ability. W e quote the following w o r d s f r o m M r . H e k h i u s ’ report: W e have great reason to be thankful for the unity and good will that has m a r k e d the year’s w o r k both on the part of the staff and of the studentry. A m i d these times w h e n there has been m u c h political agitation in m a n y institutions a n d troubles have broken out, the students of Voorhees College have s h o w n their loyalty to the g o o d n a m e of the institution a n d have given their attention to the tasks in hand. T h e m e m b e r s of the staff are earnestly co-operating in the w o r k of the institution and the results last year in the public examination c om pa re favorably with those of preceding years the average of passes both in the H i g h School and in the Intermediate examinations being above the average of the Presidency. W i t h the .opening of the year in June w e found our accommodations overcrowded with a total of 1,098 students. W e are anxiously awaiting the comple­ tion of the C o b b M emorial Hall as that will relieve the strain of 1 crowding and enable us to do better w o r k in the college as well as in the lower classes. T h e w o r k o n this building has been s o m e w h a t delayed because of lack of railway traffic facilities and w a r conditions. W e expect to have everything in readiness for a public opening of the Hall early in June, 1918. T h e Provident F u n d for teachers, tvhich w a s introduced in January, has proven a boon to the m e m b e r s of the staff, and the ready response on the part of the persons taking advantage of its benefits reveals that it is satisfying a long felt want. It has m a d e for m o r e conscientious w o r k and has established a closer bond between the institution and the individual instructors. O n e of the most interesting features’of the year has been the Scripture classes, where the students, though obliged to study


INDIAN C H I L D R E N IN F R O N T O F O N E O F T H E M U N I C I P A L S C H O O L S O F V E L L O R E


IN T H E G R O U N D S OF S C H E L L H O S P I T A L

Miss D ukick, D r. Pollard, M

rs. Jo h n

Scudder, D r. Ida Scudder

A V E L L O R E STREET S C E N E


the Bible, take a very lively interest in .questions of personal relation to Christ a nd to H i s teachings. Scarcely an hour, passes without earnest inquiry relative to s o m e phase of Christ’s teach­ ing a nd its relation to every-day life. W hi le there have not been open decisions for Christ, w e k n o w that these boys cannot think a n d study about His life and then g o a w a y untouched. W e have icndeavored to lift up Christ, claiming his promise of “D r a w ­ ing unto Himself.” A n d frequently questions which the stu­ dents refrain from asking before their classmates they bring to their instructors in private interviews. O n e of the teachers has a class of boys w hose a v o w e d purpose is to k n o w m o r e of Christ and w h o meet each w e e k outside the school hours. Several of the instructors likewise are taking an interest in the Bible read­ ing and w e pray that the spirit of G o d m a y touch their hearts a nd claim t h e m for His own. C hristian H ostel . Apart from. 22 students in the H i n d u Hostel, there are n o w 74 students living together here. Their health and spirit have been good. T h e classroom w o r k done by t h e m has been a slight improvement over last year. Several of the boys have taken part in the evangelistic w o r k in neighboring villages; besides m a n y have volunteered their service as teachers in the night school which is being conducted by the College students for the benefit of tow n lads w h o are employed during the day. Sc h e l l H

ospital .

,

Early in 1917 w e had the pleasure in the M a r y Taber Schell hospital of having a visit fro m the deputation of ladies fro m America a nd were refreshed a n d cheered by their stay with us. Their enthusiasm in the work, their encouragement and help m a d e a splendid start for the n e w year, but, best of all, they left Aliss D o d d with us to become a m e m b e r of Schell staff as Treasurer. • There have been various changes in our staff during this year. Dr. H. Pollard left us in M a r c h to open u p a n e w w o r k in the L o n d o n Mission and w e rejoice with her in the success


which is attending her in her efforts in the E ro de Hospital, where the need for a doctor w a s great. Mrs. Mac Do na ld , a graduate of the M a d r a s Medical School, w h o has lived in Vellore for s o m e years, c a m e to help us in May. 1 •.Miss Catherine Durick remained with us until Miss H o u g h ­ ton’s return, w h e n she, amidst m a n y regrets, left those w h o had b ecome w a r m l y attached to her. 'October w a s indeed a happy month, for it brought back to our midst Miss H o u g h t o n and Miss Hancock,- and it did one’s heart goo d to see the w a r m t h and love of the w e l c o m e given to both. Miss H o u g h t o n took a special course while at h o m e in hospital administration a n d has c o m e back full of n e w ideas. T h e w o r k has been steadily increasing. W e have had 128 m o r e in-patients than last year, 3,432 m o r e out-patients, and over 500 m o r e operations, of which 294 were major. T h e in­ c o m e from fees, o n which w e depend very largely for the run­ ning expenses of the hospital, has also increased by nearly Rs. 3,000. W e have been trying to impress upo n the people the necessity of helping us with the upkeep of the institution. T h e dispensary is always a busy place, often thronged espe­ cially with M u h a m m a d a n w o m e n w h o fill the waiting hall: w o m e n whose lives are so shut in that coming to the hosoital on s o m e pretext of sickness is a real outing and recreation. M a n y return to their villages ready and glad to wel co me the preaching bands of w o m e n w h o are constantly going out to tell others of the Master’s love. It is in the w ar ds that we, of course, get into closer touch with the w o m e n . T h e Bible w o m e n and nurses alike have spent m u c h m o r e time with the patients talking with t h e m about Christ, and m a n y a w o m a n has left the hospital with the consciousness of the love of the Master. Several, especially those of the higher castes, have bold us that thev longed to be baptized, but their h o m e s and children held them. O n e B r a h a m a n w o m a n left us filled with the determination of winning her hus­ band to Christ so that they might c o m e together. She m a d e a significant remark: “Y o u mus t m a k e w a r m friends of the people ' if y ou wan t to win the m to Christ.” T h e non-Christian w o m e n are showing m u c h m o r e confidence in us. .


G u d i y a t t a m D ispensary . During the early m onths of the year w e were fortunate in having Miss Backiam, a graduate of Ludhiana, in charge of the Gudiyattam Dispensary, which lies 23 miles west of Vellore, but, unfortunately, she has had to give u p the work, and for a time Dr. Ida Scudder had to close the dispensary, excepting her weekly visit. S he is hoping to place another apothecary later there. T h e Roadside Dispensaries have been very satisfactory dur­ ing this year, and this w o r k grows m o r e interesting all the time. Dr. Ida Scudder a nd Miss D o d d m a k e a weekly trip on W e d n e s ­ day, accompanied by t w o nurses a n d Mrs. Cornelius, our Vellore pastor’s wife. Mrs. Cornelius speaks Tamil a n d Telugu well and she preaches to the people while w e are treating the sick. It is wonderful to watch her surrounded by forty or fifty, a nd sometimes more, men, w o m e n a nd children eagerly listening to" tihe Gospel message. T h e singing attracts the people; also the children have learned verses and s o m e can sing a verse of a h y m n . A s soon as Mrs. Cornelius has finished the lesson and has answered the m a n y questions asked, she goes quietly to one side and has m a n y a quiet heart to heart talk with individuals. Surely ere long w e will see a great awakening on that roadside, the fruits of these messages fro m G o d ’s word. T h e r e are m a n y touching incidents in the roadside work. O n e d a y w e s a w a w o m a n leading three m e n across the fields, a n d w h e n they arrived w e s a w at a glance they w e r e all h o p e ­ lessly blind. It w a s hard indeed to.tell t h e m this, because s o m e o n e told t h e m that a doctor c a m e in a m o t o r w h o could give t h e m sight a n d they h a d w a l k e d for miles a n d miles to get there in time. “A r e y o u sure y o u can d o nothing? W e have very little m o n e y ; w e are very poor, but w e will give all w e have if y o u will only help us,” said one. It w a s so hard to repeat again— “I can d o nothing”— a n d to see the sad helplessness settle d o w n o n these faces as they turned a w a y saying, “W e c a m e so far, but she can d o nothing.” T h e thing that has brought m o s t joy to us during the past year has been the Bible class for the English-speaking


w o m e n of our congregation. W e took u p the study of Acts early in the year a n d felt w e m u s t begin a n d w o r k as the Apostles of old w o r k e d a n d therefore w e organized into bands, a n d have been going into m a n y of the surrounding villages preaching a n d teaching. W e have rejoiced to see the spiritual growth a m o n g the' w o m e n and the enthusiasm of the nurses is infectious. Mis s Durick writes of the N u r s i n g D e p a r t m e n t of the Schell Hospital: During the year, w e received five girls as probationers. T h e y m a d e a splendid class, as all speak E n g ­ lish quite well. O n e in the senior class passed her final e x a m ­ ination successfully. W e received, too, a married w o m a n w h o wishes to study nursing so she will be able to take better care of her children. S h e is so quiet a n d such a faithful w o r k e r that she will have a good influence upon the younger girls. It is 2 joy to see signs of spiritual growth a m o n g the nurses and to k n o w that s o m e have a real concern for the spiritual welfare of their patients. . T h e nurses have taken a keen interest in the Evangelistic C a m p a i g n . Before this began, several b a n d s w e r e f o r m e d of the m e m b e r s of Dr. I. S. Sc'udder’s.Bible class. T o each b a n d w a s assigned a village. E v e r y w e e k each b a n d visited its village a nd held meetings. Reports w e r e given at the Bible class. S o m e m e t with opposition, a n d special prayer w a s m a d e for them. It w a s inspiring, to hear of the ans we rs to our prayers. W h e n the C a m p a i g n began, these b an ds w e r e ready to d o their part. T h e m e m b e r s prepared lessons w h i c h they taught in the villages. S o m e did remarkably well. It w a s not possible for all the nurses to be in these bands, but w e w e r e glad all w a n t e d to serve a n d asked to be allowed to help, if only for one day. W e hop e this interest will continue to g r o w a n d that every one of the nurses will b e c o m e an ardent w o r k e r in the cause of our L o r d a n d Master. •H ind u G irls’ S chools . , M r. T h o m a s Harris of V o o rh ee s College has h ad the charge of the three H i n d u Girls’ Schools a nd he reports t h u s :


T h e Girls’ Schools A r a s a m a r a m , Circarmundi a n d Vellapadi completed another year of useful work. T h e r e have been very f e w changes in the staff. T h e strength of the schools is: A r a s a m a r a m , 170; Circarmundi, 173, a n d Velappadi, 100. G o v e r n m e n t increased its ordinary grant appreciably this year. Velappadi earned also a special grant of Rs. 115 for furniture. A t the beginning of the year almost all the mistresses attended the Kindergarten Training Class held for them at Ranipet b y Mis s Cornelia W y c ko ff . This short training has been of s o m e help to them. B u t a m o r e extended a n d sys­ tematic training in this line of w o r k is very desirable for i m ­ proving ,the m e t h o d of teaching in all our Girls’ Schools. It is a great pity that the H i n d u girls w h o are so eager to learn d o not remain long in school. T h e y are snatched a w a y b y their parents at the m o s t profitable part of their course. T i m e alone can c ha ng e this injurious practice. It is only a year since gardening w a s started in all the schools. T h e girls take m u c h delight in the work. A r a s a ­ m a r a m a n d Circarmundi can boast of flourishing gardens. Velappadi is m u c h handicapped in this line of w o r k b y having n o space for a garden. In spite of this d r a w b a c k it has m a d e a brave attempt to convert its backyard into a small garden. T h e s e gardens, are expected to hav e great influence u p o n the moral character of the children o n account of the pure delight they afford a n d the love of nature they create in the y o u n g minds. Ze n a n a W

ork,

Mrs. L. R. Scudder, w h o has h ad the charge of the Biblew o m e n ’s w o r k writes: Bible w o m e n ’s w o r k has been carried o n in a n d about Vellore during 1917 b y all w o m e n w h o have access to over 400 houses. Their m o n t h l y reports tell of inter­ esting conversations with the w o m e n in their h o m e s a n d in m o s t sections, of a decided spirit not only of tolerance but of o pen-mindedness a n d inquiry. Following u p the Evangelistic C a m p a i g n w o r k of last year these B i b l e w o m e n have been teaching a selected line of


lessons fro m the O l d a n d N e w Testaments, Christian lyrics, a n d short, simple prayers in a n increasing n u m b e r of homes. T h e y have comforted those w h o have been in trouble, a n d m i n ­ istered to the sick a n d dying; six of the latter hav e expressed their belief in Christ. S o m e of the w o m e n read the Bible for themselves a n d d o not worship idols. O t h e r d o not observe their festive days a n d ceremonies. In addition to their w o r k in the t o w n of Vellore the B i b l e w o m e n g o every w e e k to the neighboring villages a n d preach to the P a n c h a m a s a n d caste people of the 30 villages in w h i c h w e have been w o r k i n g ; w e have been obliged to give 16 villages to the special Evangelistic b an ds of the Vellore Church. T h e villagers hear us gladly; w e are securing their confidence a n d friendship. KATPADI. T h e R ev .a n d M rs.B. R ottschaefer — T h e Industrial School, Building Operations, and Hostel. T h e w o r k of the Katpadi station centers a ro un d the I nd us ­ trial School. T h e school itself has enjoyed the busiest year of its history a n d today has w o r k ahead for the next six months. T h e Industrial School has prospered, says M r. Rotts­ chaefer, especially in the w o o d w o r k i n g a n d blacksmith depart­ ments. In the. latter w e were kept very busy by m aking in addition to regular work, eleven large steel trusses for the C o b b Memorial. W h e n w e consider that w e hav e n o up-todate appliance for rapid a n d g o o d work, all of w h i c h has to be don e b y hand, w e feel that satisfactory w o r k has been accomplished. T w o boys w e r e sent u p for the G o v e r n m e n t technical examination. Last year o ne passed first class. In the blacksmithing d epartment there is a m p l e scope for devel­ opment, a n d w e h o p e that w e m a y receive e n c o u r a g e m e n t to enable us to equip this d epartment properly for better a n d m o r e efficient work. T w o of our pupils left school to join the a r m y a n d m o r e w e r e encouraged to d o so, but did not care to leave. T h e first


roller top desk w a s successfully made. W e believe that the time is near w h e n it will n o longer be necessary for our B o a r d to p a y ocean freight for articles of furniture to be shipped to India. T o m e e t the increasing d e m a n d s of the cabinet car­ pentry department w e w e r e forced to enlarge the school. It w a s f ound impossible to continue w o r k i n g with the primitive m e t h o d of sawing timber, so a sawmill w a s installed. W i t h a grant-in-aid f r o m G o v e r n m e n t a n d the generosity of a friend w e hav e been enabled to put in this m u c h needed i m p r o v e ­ ment. W e hav e a d d e d about 2,500 square feet of covered area a n d about ten times that m u c h of enclosed area. All our m a c hi ne s are running for the first time since the school’s removal f r o m Arni. A dry kiln for properly seasoning timber is being fitted up. T h e r e is n o w space e n o u g h to allow for a healthy g r o w t h of the school along present lines. O u r hop e for the future is a course of agriculture run in connection with a demonstration farm a n d in introducing a better s ystem of weaving, a m o n g our Christian community. T h e hostel, though smaller than usual, connected with the school has had a n uneventful year. T h e health of the boy s has been g o o d a n d a healthy Christian a tm os ph er e prevails. M o s t of the boys “did their bit” during the w e e k of E v a n g e l i s m in trying to m a k e others acquainted with the Saviour. O u r night school has continued to instruct the boys in the rudimentary branches of knowledge. ■ CHITTOOR. M rs. J. A. B eattie— Girls’ Higher Elementary Boarding School and N o r m a l Training School for Mistresses. . M i s s E. W . C o n k l i n — Z en an a W o r k a nd H i n d u Girls’ Schools. Mrs. Beattie writes of the Boarding a nd N o r m a l Training School-w o r k at Chittoor: Shut doors, silent schoolrooms and a very quiet c o m p o u n d give evidence that our schools are closed for the Christmas holidays. It is a great relief to have the girls under the care of their friends for a while, for, even though everything is going smoothly, one has always a sense of responsi-


bility until the holidays begin. ■ A few days ago the Boarding School girls, with bright faces, all ready to start for the station, c a m e to the veranda to say salaam before they-went. “A r e you glad to go h o m e ? I asked. T h e response w a s a very hearty “yes.” Will you be glad to return to school after the holidays are over? “ Yes,” they quickly replied. A n d I believe they spoke sincerely. I think they are all quite glad to c o m e back to school w h e n the holidays end. T h e size of our boarding school family is limited by our accommodations. W i t h 83 pupils and seven teachers in the hostel, w e have been full this year. These seven y o u n g girl teachers include those w h o are employed in the H i n d u Girls’ School and the C hurch School. T h e health of the school has been excellent. ' O u r girls again h a d a share in the Evangelistic Campaign. Every evening they divided into groups and prayed for G o d ’s blessing on the seed that had been s o w n during the day, and for all w h o had been sowing. NIo r m a l T raining S c h o o l

and

M

odel

Sc h o o l .

T h e enlargement of the Training School building has m a d e s o m e changes necessary. A s the building will be unfit for occupa­ tion while the alterations are going on, the Mission decided not to admit a junior training class this year, as there will be no r o o m for t w o classes. F r o m July there has been only the senior class of ten students. T h e class which graduated in M a r c h recovered their record a n d again gained 100 per cent, pass in the G ov er nm en t examination. Since July the w o r k has been carried on single handed. ■ O n e of our students gained a second prize fro m L a d y Pentland, the wife of the Governor, for w o r k sent to an exhibition held recently in Madras. Exhibits were asked from all the training schools in the Presidency. In the M o d e l School there are 65 pupils. A b o u t 30 of that n u m b e r are boarders. T h e remainder c o m e f r o m our nearest Christian village. T h e Inspectress of Schools at her visit in July again emphasized the necessity for a trained kindergartner for the Training School, and hinted that G o v e r n m e n t recogni­ tion might be withdrawn unless the recommendation of G o v e r n ­ m e n t were complied with.


PALMANER. M i s s J. C. S cudder — H i n d u Girls’Schools and Zenana W o r k . M i s s E. B r o w n — Assistant.

Miss J. C. Scudder writes: T here has c o m e a change a m o n g the H i n d u s of Palmaner. Formerly they tolerated us, but kept aloof and had little to do with us. N o w they listen with interest. N o t only do they s e e m to be pleased w h e n w e visit their homes, but they also invite us to return. ■ F o r the first time Palmaner has been visited b y a famous Indian Christian singer, w h o truly is a gifted m a n and sings the Gospel message with no uncertain sound. H e sang for the w o m e n in the H i n d u Girls’ School and dre w a remarkably large audience of H i n d u w o m e n . W e trust m u c h good has been done a nd that a great blessing will follow. O n e w o m a n has been baptized a n d another has joined the church. a H

indu

G irls’ S c ho ols .

»

This school has had a sad history during 1917, o wi ng to the loss of the headmaster a n d the failure to find a satisfactory substitute until September. Plague closed the school for three months, later cholera and smallpox reduced the attendance. A satisfactory headmaster w a s found, one w h o has been trained in a model school, and w e are hoping he will m a k e a model school out of this one. ' T h e E l e m e n t a r y Sc h o o l . Formerly connected with the Indian C hu rc h Board, w as transferred to m y charge in February. It labored under the difficulty of an incompetent headmaster for three-quarters of the year, w h e n w e finally secured another m a n to fill that posi­ tion. T h e school is well equipped with apparatus and with the n e w teacher w e trust will take a forward step. There are n o w about 80 pupils. T h e y did fairly well in the G o v e r n m e n t e x a m ­ ination a n d very well at the Bible examination.


W

W

eaving

ork.

T h e weaving department 'has been working steadily. There are at present six workers. T h e various steps of instruction are, weaving towels, cloth, bed sheets, checks, and sarees.' O n e boy is in the first stage, t wo have risen to the third, and t w o w e a v e very good, strong sarees. T h e sixth weaver is a recent convert w h o has just c o m m e n c e d to do piece work. H e has a wife and child. Ze n a n a W

ork.

Miss B r o w n has continued her w o r k in the Zenanas this year. T w o B i b l e w o m e n w e r e under her direction for the first four m onths of the year. A s plague w a s prevalent in April, the people were ordered to leave their homes, and so the visit to the Zena'nas h a d to be temporarily discontinued. In M a y one of the B ib le wo me n h a d to give up, as her husband w a s trans­ ferred to another station. T h e other B i b l e w o m a n with Miss B r o w n has carried o n the w o r k a nd the seed has been faithfully sown. W

o m e n ’s

M

eetings .

These meetings have been well attended. T h e w o m e n are largely illiterate a nd have had hardly any advantages along edu­ cational lines, but they are happy Christians. T h e y did good w o r k during campaign w e e k and are keeping it u p by going out o n e .day of each w e e k to carry the Gospel message to others. •

v

MADANAPALLE.

T h e R ev . a n d M rs. J. H . W a r n s h u i s — Girls’ Incomplete Secondary Boarding School, Northern Circle, I. C. B., a nd T w o H i n d u Girls’ Schools. M rs. G. G n a n a m a n i — Assistant Missionary a n d Work.

Zenana ■


M r .Jo h n D. M u y s k e n s — H i g h School and Hostel for Chris­ tian Boys. This station seriously feels the loss of Miss J. V. TeWinke.l a nd Miss H . W . Drury, w h o s e places have not been filled. T h e return of Dr. L. H . Hart, which has been looked for with eager expectations, is still pending. She is in charge of the U n i o n Tuberculosis Sanatarium, kept there because the G ov er nm en t edict forbids her successor, w h o is in England, to travel by sea. In speaking of the great stress of w o r k last year, Rev. J. H. W ar ns hu is says: “W h e n I speak of the stress of the last year, I have m y m i n d on the steady and persistent w o r k that goes on f r o m day to day. O f the campaign w o r k in the t o w n a nd vil­ lages, w e live in an atmosphere of hope. T h e issue seems at han d in the near future. O l d institutions are being undermined and India’s artificial social system and its mas s of superstition, though it still preserves an intact appearance, is nevertheless doomed. Old rites and customs are passing away, both in town a n d villages. I have in m i n d a f e w individuals, one a Bra hm in , one a Reddi, w h o told m e they were secret Christians; another, a merchant w h o w a s showing m e through one of theif festivals, laughed at'the rites a n d said: ‘O f course it is all nonsense.’ And. so here a n d there, bit b y bit, Christianity’s hold o n India is Strengthening and our responsibilities increasing, for with every tearing d o w n there m u s t be a building up, else black ruin will swallow up .these people and m a k e their state worse than before. There have been m a n y distractions. It is in this respect that w e feel most discouraged. It is not o verwork that w e can c o m ­ plain of, but too m u c h variety. W e are able to hold u p only the matters that force themselves u p o n us. N o sooner do w e m a k e progress in o ne respect than w e are compelled to drop it and turn to something else. M o n e y a nd workers are spread out too thinly. W e m u s t eiither shorten our line or have mora adequate means. W e cannot bring ourselves to the former, and our plea is that w e m a y be granted the latter. There is a m a g ­ nificent w o r k and magnificent opportunities. O u r only excuse in persisting in t h e m is that the d ay is b o u n d to c o m e w h e n the C hu rc h both in India and A me ri ca will hear the call that goes u p fro m the thousands groping toward the light.


H

ope

H

igh

Sc h o o l .

Early in the year the students of H o p e College, Holland, Mich., decided to assume the support of the Principal J. D. M u y s k e n s , Esq., of the H i g h School. T h e department of education u p o n request f r o m h i m recognized the school u nder the n e w n am e. H e values greatly the n e w relationship w h i c h links the H i g h School n o w entering o n a n e w phase of use­ fulness a n d service to an institution at h o m e k n o w n for its Christian a tm os ph er e a n d Missionary zeal. N e v e r have the prospects for the school s e e m e d as bright as they do now . O w i n g to continued disloyal teachings a n d dangerous doctrines the D e p a r t m e n t of Public Instruc­ tion has decided to w i t h d r a w recognition f r o m the rival institu­ tion, the Theosophical School, fro m the 1st of January, after w h i c h this will be the only affiliated H i g h School in the town. In the H i g h School department especially, the g r o w t h has already been phenomenal, a n d n o w with, the n e w conditions the time has c o m e w h e n admissions can be restricted to only those w h o are w o r t h y of the opportunity. This will tend' / to higher efficiency. D u r i n g the year, athletics, literary w o r k a n d dramatics hav e received a n e w impulse. Student activities are greater a n d m o r e varied than ever. Plans are under w a y for opening an H o n o r s Clu b for those w h o not only are the best scholars but also take the largest share in outside activities. F o r the fourth year in succession the Shield for the district sports w a s w o n b y the school. In the hostel the spirit has been splendid. T h e y o u n g m a n w h o a s s u m e d the superintendentship, one of the first graduates of the H i g h School, has infused a n e w spirit of Christian service w h i c h it does o ne g o o d to see. T h e boys are taking a larger share in the actual m a n a g e m e n t of the hostel. T h e y have organized a volunteer Christian B a n d w h i c h has already d o n e s o m e noble work. “It w a s m y pleas­ ure,” M r. M u y s k e n s says, “to a c c o m p a n y five of the large boys to a T e l u g u Students’ C a m p at Vellore, w h e r e w e all received


a n e w inspiration a n d a clearer vision of Christ’s claim on the lives of the Christian y o u n g m e n of India for Christian service. G irls’ B oarding S c h o o l . Mrs. W a r n s h u i s writes: T h e M a d an ap al le Girls’ Boa rd in g School c a m e under m y m a n a g e m e n t w h e n Mis s D r u r y left ^for A m e r i c a in M a y . T h a n k s to her diligent efforts a strong staff of teachers h a d been secured a n d it is probable that w e have never before been so well off in this respect. Great credit reflects u p o n the former headmaster, M r. Ezekiel B e d ­ ford, w h o has rejoined us this year, for the conduct of the school is- almost entirely in his hands. It is not for the classroom w o r k that w e are anxious, difficult as it is to keep this u p to the standard, but it is in. the hostel that the almost total absence of responsible feminine m a n a g e m e n t is felt. Certain it is that the tone of the school a n d its p o w e r as a Christian force have greatly suffered in the absence of Mis s Drury. T h e Mad an ap al le H i n d u Girls’ School has likewise de­ p e n d e d u p o n the h eadmaster m o r e than its m a n a g e r for its wants. V ay a l p a d H

indu

G irls’ S c h o o l .

■ Mrs. G n a n a m a n i writes: Since Mis s D r u r y left India, I h ave h a d charge of this school. T h e headmaster is w o r k i n g very hard for the i m p r o v e m e n t of the school. In spite of opposition a n d rival schools, this school is really doing well. T h e o s o p h y is trying to get a foothold there, but o w i n g to the kindly feeling existing b e t w e e n the Missionaries a n d the Reddies our school has not suffered m u c h . V a y a l p a d Z e n a n a w o r k has also been under Mrs. G n a n a m a n i ’s care, w h o tells the story of the year’s work. T h e Bible­ w o m a n is doing g o o d w o r k a m o n g the w o m e n . S h e has taught t h e m a g o o d m a n y lyrics a n d Bible stories. S h e is also w o r k i n g a m o n g the higher class of townspeople. In connec­ tion with this, it will-be interesting to k n o w that recently


a n A nt i - B r a h m i n C o m m i t t e e has been started, b y w h i c h the m e m b e r s bind themselves to interdine regardless of caste or creed. This sounds very hopeful, does it not? Ze n a n a W

ork.

T h e C h u r c h expects about 300 converts this year, a n d w e have been thinking deeply as to h o w m u c h the B i b l e w o m e n can d o to help on this work. Instead of scattering our energies* w e are trying to concentrate a n d to get m o r e in touch with those w o m e n w h o really s e e m interested in the Gospel. O n c e or twice a w e e k w e all join together a n d visit villages nearby so that w h e n time for the regular campaiign comes, the people’s hearts m a y be prepared. In going to thebe H i n d u a n d M u h a m m a d a n houses o ne cannot help noticing the dif­ ference Christianity m a k e s in the lives of the people; for example, the utter misery a n d despair of the w o m e n w h o have lost their hus ba nd s or children. T h e y cannot look b e y o n d the grave, while, thank God, w e Christians can. Also their h o m e life is m a d e miserable, because a m a n can be disloyal a n d untrue to his wife a n d n o o n e w o u l d consider it in the least w rong. T h e stories w e often hear f r o m the w o m e n m a k e our hearts ache a n d w e long for the d a y w h e n India will be Christ’s. ' PUNGANUR. R ev . a n d M rs . J. H . W arn s h u i s in charge. • M rs. G. G n a n a m a n i — ;Hindu Girls’ Schools, M u h a m m a d a n Girls’ School a n d Z en an a W o r k . M rs. Jo h n H . W a r n s h u i s — General Interests a n d M a r y Isabel Allen Dispensary. Mrs. G n a n a m a n i has charge of the w o r k for w o m e n a n d children. T h e r e is only o ne B i b l e w o m a n w o r k i n g at P u n g a nur, a n d she is doing g o o d work. I have not h a d m u c h opportunity of going into the h o m e s with her, as m y visits to P u n g a n u r have to be m o r e or less hurried.


H

indu

G irls’ S c h o o l .

P l a g u e a n d cholera hav e both visited P u n g a n u r this past year. This necessitated closing the school for s o m e time, consequently our school did not d o as well as usual in the annual inspection. P o o r Parvathi, the headmistress, actually shed tears because the school never fared so badly before. T h e teachers h a d been w o r k i n g very hard a n d in their leisure time they h ad been doing things for the i m p r o v e m e n t of the school. T h e Inspectress w a s particularly pleased with s o m e charts a n d m a p s one of the teachers h a d drawn. In connection with this school S u n d a y classes are held. ■ . M

uhammadan

G irls’ S c h o o l .

T h e Inspectress w a s greatly pleased with this school a n d said that it w a s the best in her Circle. All credit is d ue to the only Christian trained teacher there. Because of her g o o d work, she has been m a d e headmistress, as the former headmaster, a M u h a m m a d a n , is too old to d o m u c h work. S o m e of the oldest girls have left school a n d m a n y of t h e m hav e married. T h e oldest students at present are not m o r e than twelve. T h e s e little girls are very clever a n d quick to catch a n d retain ideas. It is a great pleasure to teach them. M

ary

L ott L yles H

ospital .

Mrs. W a r n s h u i s says that it is not a n easy matter to write a report for M a r y Lott Lyles Hospital. T h e little institution has been struggling against odds ever since its beginning s o m e four years ago, a n d w e w o n d e r if the d a y will ever c o m e w h e n it can boast of a full-time doctor as its head again. F o r the first six m o n t h s of the past year Mrs. W it ne y, M.B., formerly of the L o n d o n Mission, w a s in charge, a n d for the first three m o n t h s of that time she w a s assisted b y Mis s J. V . T e W i n k e l w h o s e furlough fell d u e in M ar ch . Mrs. W i t n e y kindly stayed on during the hot season that I m i g h t have a chance of a holiday before taking on the responsibility of the w o r k in July since w h i c h time I. have been assisted b y


an Anglo-Indian apothecary w h o

has superintended the dis­

pensary an d the out work, calling m e

in consultation w h e n

she felt it necessary.

In n u m b e r s w e stand m u c h as w e did last year. W e c an­ not claim a n y great step forward, but w e are glad w e have been able to hold our own. I have not been able to give anything like m y full attention to hospital work, because of there being a Girls’ School to oversee, a dispensary in P u n ­ g a n u r to m a n a g e , a n d a thousand a n d o ne things to d o in the station, but the sick a n d the n e e d y hav e not been turned a w a y from our doors, a n d n o w with a prospect of the help of a nursing superintendent once again our hearts are filled with hop e that 1918 will be a better year than 1917. O u r nursing staff has been depleted for various reasons, but w e have "intentionally kept our n u m b e r s l o w until such time as w e could feel sure of help in the training of them. W e have three seniors graduating, w e hope, in M ar ch , all of t h e m girls w h o m w e are proud to send forth as the product of our hospital. India needs such Christian w o m e n to care for their sick. Christian services have been held twice daily in the h os­ pital in the wards. S o m e of the nurses spend their leisure time on S u n d a y afternoons in teaching the children in. the S u n d a y school. .


NORTH JAPAN MISSIONARIES NATIVE GOT

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STATIONS

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MfYAKOi

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NAKT

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;

MAP

KIUSHIU Miselon StatJous and Out Stations umloiiined.


.

J A P A N MISSION.

F ounded in 1859 . Organized into North and South 1889; Re-united January 1st, 1917 Missionaries.— T o k y o : Mrs. M. N. Wyckoff, Rev. A. Oilmans, D.D., Rev. D. C. ,Ruigh, Mr. W. E. Hoffsommer, Rev. H. V. E. Stegeman. y o k o h a m a : Miss Julia Moulton, Miss Jennie M. Kuyper, Miss Janet Oilmans, Rev. J. H. Ballagh, D.D., Rev. E. S. Booth, D.D. M o r i o k a : Rev. W. G. Hoekje. A o m o r i : Miss M. Leila Winn. N a g a s a k i : Miss Sar- M. Couch, Mr. Anthony Walvoord. K a g o s h i m a : Rev. S. W. Ryder. S a g a : Miss H. E. Hospers. Oita: Rev. Albertus Pieters. S h i m o n o s e k i : Miss Jeane Noordhoff, Miss Evelyn Oilmans. K u r u m e : Rev. David Van Strien, Rev. Alex. Van Bronkhorst. F u k u o k a : Miss H. M. Lansing. Associate Missionaries. — Mrs. A. Oilmans, Mrs. A. Pieters, Mrs. D. C. Ruigh, Mrs. A. Walvoord, Mrs. W. E. Hoffsommer, Mrs. W. G. Hoekje, Mrs. David Van Strien, Mrs. S. W. Ryder, Mrs. Alex. Van Bronkhorst, Mra. H. V. E. Stegeman. I n America. — Miss .Jennie A. Pieters, Miss May Demarest, Dr. and Mrs. H. V. S. Peeke, Rev. Hubert Kuyper, Rev. and Mrs. L- J. Shafer. Non-commissioned Associate Missionary. — N a g a s a k i : Miss Minnie Taylor. . •

S U M M A R Y O F E D U C A T I O N A L STATISTICAL REPORTS* _____________ F O R T H E Y E A R 1917. '

5 14

(Middle Dept.) ...

9

(College Dept.) ... Totals ..........

4 2

1 5

9

5

13 25 12

7'A

60

Ferris Tozan fMeiji fBaiko tMeiii fMeiji

Seminary .............. Gakuin ................ Gakuin (Theological Dept.)' Jo Gakuin.............. Gakuin (College Dept.). ... Gakuin (College Dept.)...

Totals

49

94

200

237

11

4

1

16

715 1.001

Teachers and Officers

No. of Students

Fees $6,256,001 7,647.001

35

2

1,561.30) 6,700.82 239.501

#The usual station report was omitted this year.

79

"45

No. of

14 202 12 75

Japanese

3 11

................... ...... | jg2

13

73!>|86 110.>\

Money Expended

32 115

fUnion ^2 Share.

Ven per mo

Total

8

8 21

109 82 95

< CJ

> 259 31 257 60 382 4 26 63

8

School S.S. N A M E OF SCHOOL

j

|

34 23 17 185 18 39 45 280

15 19

5 14

Non-Chr.

5

Chr.

3

9'A

7

Non-Chr.

•r 5 t V H

Student Mem­ bers

Ass't Pupils

Day Boarders Students

4 'A

5 39

Non-Chr.

Chr.

Chr. Ferris Seminary .... Tozan Gakuin .... fMeiji Gakuin.... '... (Theo. Dept.) .... fBaiko Jo Gakuin....

Non-Chr.

N A M E OF SCHOOL

Students

Women

Y.W.C.A.

Teachers Men

$22.404.621

Gifts

1,200.00 $ 1.200.00

From Mission Appropri­ ation $6,396.00 9,332.16 5.638.00 3.500.00 3.022.00 3.500.00

$.M 388 16


R E P O R T F O R 1917 A s all countries in the w orld hav e been c hanging o n account of the world war, so has Japan. H o w e v e r m u c h or little J a p a n has taken part in the conflict, she has been able to raise herself in' a n eco no mi c w a y to a position of quite c o m m a n d i n g influence. ' It is even said that she is c hanging f r o m a ’debtor nation to a creditor nation. This increase of wealth has- not been evenly distributed a n d the n e w l y rich as well as the crushed poor have b e c o m e problems of great social seriousness. It is, moreover, the opinion of a large g r o u p of thinking m e n that J a p a n is failing to realize the issues involved in the war, or if they are.being realized they are not being m a d e the m o v i n g force of a n y righteous m o v e m e n t such as w e believe w e are e n g a g e d in iri prosecuting the war. It is pro b ­ able that the blessings that the people of the U nited States will derive in' a social a n d m oral w a y fro m the w a r will not be realized b y the people of Japan. General satisfaction w a s expressed in all circles u p o n the completion of the Ishii-Lansing papers. O t h e r c om missions to America, educational a n d political, have returned a n d their reports have m a d e a' better setting in the m i n d s of the J a p ­ anese for appeals of A m e r i c a n missionaries to get a respect­ ful hearing. . Co -operative M

o v e m e n t s oe t h e

M

ission.

T h e co-operation with the Presbyterian Mission in the Meiji G a k u i n in T o k y o a n d the Sturges S e m i n a r y in S h i m o n o ­ seki has continued as usual. Likewise w e have m e t for dis­ cussion with the Presbyterian a n d R e f o r m e d bodies in the Council of Missions, a n d with practically all the other m i s ­ sionary bodies in the Council of Federated Missions. O u r regular contributions hav e been m a d e to the Tsukiji School for Foreign Children in T o k y o , the Christian Literature Society


a n d the W o m a n ’s Christian University, w h i c h is expected to o p e n its doors in April of 1918. • D u r i n g the year the complete translation of' the N e w T e s t a m e n t in a revised f o r m has been published. A l t h o u g h this revised version has m e t with s o m e criticism, yet there s e e m s to be a unanimity of opinion that it has m a n y points of superior merit to the o ne that has been in use so far, a n d that the appeal of the Bible will be stronger a n d will cover a wider range because of it. . “ ' F irst Y ear

of t h e

R e-united M

ission.

T h e missionaries o n the field, as well as the C h u r c h at h o m e , will have* to get used to considering J a p a n as one field instead of two, arid of speaking of the Mission as one Mission, with o ne Council determining affairs in reference to the w h o l e country that w e occupy. W e are still separated into a northern a n d southern part as far as our w o r k is c o n ­ cerned— the southern part concentrated in the Island of K y u s h u , a n d the northern part about the cities of T o k y o a n d Yokohama. T h e southern is largely evangelistic, a n d the northern is chiefly educational.

EVANGELISTIC W O R K

P reaching

the

W

'

ord .

In K y u s h u our Mission joined with wor ke rs of other .denominations in special evangelistic services held u nder the auspices of Evangelist K a n a m o r i . In Saga, w e united three nights with the Lut he ra n Church, w h i c h shares the S a g a P r e ­ fecture w o r k with us. Mee ti ng s w e r e prepared for b y generous giving a n d sjjecial prayer a n d advertising a n d personal work, a n d the audiences w h i c h M r . K a n a m o r i faced with his m e s s a g e of the essentials of the Christian Gospel in the largest theatre of the city w e r e unprecedented. S o w a s the n u m b e r of deci­ sions recorded. Seventy of t h e m b e c a m e our share of the fruits. M o s t of these hav e s h o w n little tendency to ripen. O n e per­


son has m a d e definite application for baptism, a half dozen s h o w m o r e or less zeal in attending meetings a n d continuing study, a n d perhaps a score s h o w s o m e remaining interest in the church a n d its teachings. A t K aratsu the mee ti ng in the theatre netted sixty-eight decisions; of these several w e r e a m o n g the fourteen w h o m a d e confession of their faith during the year, thirteen of w h o m w e r e baptized. F o r the first m o n t h after the meetings in Oita the regular church meetings s h o w e d a gain of f r o m fifty to o ne h u n d r e d per cent.; but those w h o h a d been interested through M r . K a n a m o r i ’s meetings g r a d u ­ ally fell off, a n d b y the e nd of the year it w a s exceptional to find o ne of t h e m still attending church, unless he h a d been already in touch with the church before the K a n a m o r i m o v e ­ m e n t took' place. Y e t in all of the a bo ve places follow-up w o r k w a s conducted earnestly. Preaching w o r k has been d o n e in m a n y w a y s a n d has m e t with varying success. M r . V a n Strien a n d M r. V a n Bronkhorst have stood in the street the past fall, w h e r e it is usually c r o w d e d a n d b y han di ng out tracts a n d inviting the passers-by to enter have m a n a g e d to fairly fill the c o m ­ paratively r o o m y preaching place. In addition, as the weather does not always permit this work, a s o n g service just before the evening evangelistic s e r m o n has been attractive to a n u m ­ ber of y o u n g people. In Y a n a g a w a , o ne of the out-stations f r o m K u r u m e , w h e n M r . K a n a m o r i carried o n work, the prin­ cipal of the M id dl e School forbade his students attending the meetings; but with a c h a n g e c a m e a c ha ng e in the attitude of the school t o w a r d Christianity. In a small village called Mizota, near K u r u m e , w o r k centers about a physician w h o has not yet been baptized, but w h o s e e m s to be very m u c h interested. Shimabara, the scene of the last stand of the Christians over three h u n d r e d years ago, a n d for that reason considered a n exceptionally hard place in w h i c h to work, has the record of the K u r u m e station for the n u m b e r of baptisms, the n u m b e r reported being five. A t K a s h i m a , the teachers a n d principal of the Middle School are very friendly to the missionary, a n d o n each visit


JAPAN MISSION

,

89

of his have invited h i m to speak, in English, to a large g ro up of boys. Proper interpretation is provided, a n d n o limita­ tion of subject is even hinted at. Imari (please r e m e m b e r w h e n y o u handle you r blue a nd white fine Imari china) does not respond to public preaching services, h o w e v e r organized. M r . K o s e a n d his wife are doing almost as m u c h b y their presence in the city as in a n y other way . A t first they were* not w e l c o m e d ; efforts w e r e m a d e b y neighbors to h a v e their landlord cancel his lease. F e w n ew sp ap er s are read in the city, a n d B u d d h i s m claims large contributions f r o m the sho p people. It m i g h t be g o o d to try the influence of a little quiet b o o k s h o p a n d reading-room, o p e n to all at stated hours daily, u nder the charge of the evangelist. A t Tashiro, Rev. F u k u n a g a has continued to labor faith­ fully a m o n g the S akurajima volcano refugees in this isolated m o u n t a i n o u s region. If m e a s u r e d b y baptized converts, his w o r k s h o w s n o results this year, but if m e a s u r e d b y the influence his persevering Christian ministrations m u s t hav e u p o n these poor a n d ignorant people, w e k n o w that his w o r k ^is successful. A s these people get their farms cleared of w o o d a n d construct m o r e suitable dwellings and, in general, b e c o m e m o r e prosperous in material things, the intellectual a n d spirit­ ual outlook is also sure to broaden as their prejudices vanish a n d the seed s o w n patiently during these first years of struggle a n d privation to get a n e w start will produce a harvest. W

o m a n ’s

W

ork.

A m o n g the y o u n g e r w o m e n Mrs. V a n Strien a n d Mrs. V a n Bronkhorst are carrying o n singing w o r k with m o s t inter­ esting results. O n e of the singing classes is c o m p o s e d of girls of the girls’ high school of K u r u m e . M e e t i n g at the h o m e of Mrs. V a n Strien twice a n d s o m e t i m e s three times a w e e k the girls prepared for a n d sang at a Christmas service the cantata entitled, “T h e Birth of Christ in Song,” c o m p o s e d b y Mrs. Mennegar. F or a short time it looked as if the efforts exerted w e r e at least temporarily in vain for the D e a n of the girls’ dormitory refused to allow the girls to attend, a n d the reasons


given w e r e three: first, the girls in the dormitory san g while doing their domestic work, a n d Christian songs proceeding fro m the dormitory of a public school proved embarrassing to the D e a n ; second, to a girl w h o h a d s o m e ambitions of m a r ­ riage singing while doing w o r k about the house m i g h t prove detrimental to her hopes; third, the fact that s o m e of the girls w e r e being influenced t ow ar d Christian thinking w a s already s h o w n b y a composition w h i c h very m u c h disturbed the equanimity of the composition teacher, w h o h a p pe ns to be a zealous Shintoist. After s o m e consultation, it w a s concluded that n o longer a n y interference w o u l d take place o n the part of the school authorities if the girls received permission f r o m their parents, but n o longer w o u l d the girls be permitted to sing while w o r k i n g about the dormitory. A t K a g o s h i m a the w o m a n ’s w o r k of the city consists chiefly of a semi-monthly meeting of w o m e n at the missionary residence for a Bible address a n d a social time, a n d about a d ozen w o m e n being taught the Bible in w e e k l y lessons, indiv­ idually or in small groups, at their homes. D u r i n g the year over three h u n dr ed a n d fifty calls have been m a d e o n women'*' at their homes. M o n t h l y evangelistic meetings are also held at a factory in the suburbs of the city w h e r e about seventy girls with their m a t r o n hav e assembled for the singing of h y m n s a n d an evangelistic address. A t A o m o r i Mis s W i n n visits three hospitals a n d is always w e l c o m e d b y the doctors a n d the nurses. Recently t w o patients sent her cards requesting her to c o m e a n d tell, t h e m about the Bible a n d Jesus Christ. ■ M i s s H o s p e r s found a splendid opening for w o r k a m o n g the students of the Girls’ H i g h School, a n d has m e t fully sixty of t h e m twice a m onth. A t Sesebo the Japanese w o r k e r has o pe ne d her h o m e to sailors w h o seek a. place to stop over night, a n d tries to m a k e this count evangelistically. B u t her chief w o r k remains call­ ing a n d teaching in the h o m e s of the officers connected with this naval port, w h o s e wives are frequently left alone for w e e k s at a time, a n d w h o w e l c o m e her visits.


B ible C lasses. ' Bible class w o r k m a y be distinguished f r o m S u n d a y School w o r k chiefly b y the fact that the students in Bible classes are usually those of high school age or above. N early all of the missionaries hav e o ne of these, either in Japanese or in E n g ­ lish. Mrs. W y c k o f f has h a d three with an average attend­ ance of about nine. M r . V a n Bronkhorst conducted one in the Post-office a n d o ne in the S u n d a y school, these averag­ ing about t e n ; besides this both M r . a n d Mrs. V a n Bronkhorst taught a little in the Y o u n g M e n ’s Christian Association. A remarkable class has been started b y M r . V a n Bronkhorst in Y a n a g a w a a m o n g the M id dl e School students, with an average attendance the last t w o m o n t h s of the year of over eighty-five. After the Bible lesson, singing is taught, a n d if they are not reached through the English Bible s o m e of the m m a y tie reached a n d touched b y the singing of the h y m n s in Japanese. It will at least present an opening for later work. Until recently it w a s impossible to enter this school, but n o w it looks very encouraging. A m o r e difficult situation s e e m s to be encountered b y M r. V a n Strien in K u r u m e , w h e r e the English Bible class is c o m ­ posed of ten boys, all of w h o m are natives of K u r u m e , but only one of w h o m s e e m s to take a n y serious interest in the meetings .at the church. B u t at Y a n a g a w a he received an invitation to teach English Bible to the teachers of the school. In the Bible class is o ne Christian w h o has h a d A m e r i c a n training, the principal, w h o is a graduate of the T o k y o H i g h e r N o r m a l School, a n d s e e m s to be very sympathetic t ow ar d the Christian teaching a n d also very m u c h interested in the Bible; o ne Buddhist priest, w h o is a graduate of the Imperial U n i v e r ­ sity in T o k y o , a n d w h o h ad read m a n y anti-Christian b oo ks but h a d never read the Bible nor a n y Christian literature; a n d several others w h o s e e m to be very m u c h interested in the teaching of the Bible itself as well as in the English. A t S a g a the class for girls has been encouraging. T h e average w e e k l y attendance for the year has been fourteen.


One-girl of this class has been baptized a n d several others are awaiting baptism. M i s s W i n n has a f ew night classes with y o u n g m e n , but she teaches only those w h o will g o to church, a n d this, of course, keeps her classes small. O n e splendid y o u n g m a n has about decided to enter the ministry after he has finished the M iddle S c h o o l ; he is very promising a n d s e e m s to h a v e a future before him. M i s s W i n n a lways holds out the high call­ ing of the ministry to a n y promising y o u n g m a n she teaches. M r. H o e k j e m a k e s sure that the students w h o c o m e to h i m get the m e a n i n g too, for in every case he gives a lesson in the Bible in Japanese; one of the groups consists of recent graduates of the M iddle Schools chiefly, a n d the other of students of the prefectural n or ma l school, a n d all of t h e m have attended voluntarily s o m e of the church services, or a class for singing Gospel h y m n s on S aturday evenings. M i s s H o s p e r s has an unusually large Bible class of girls, fine ones, at Takeo. ■ O n e of the m o s t important pieces of w o r k d o n e b y Mrs. Pieters has been the holding of a teachers’ m e e ti ng in the Oita Church, at w h i c h the lessons for the following S u n d a y are carefully g o n e over. T h e establishment of such a n or ma l class has been repeatedly undertaken, but without success, a n d the fact that it is n o w well established u nd er her leader­ ship constitutes o ne of the notable triumphs in Oita during the year. S u n d a y Sc h o o l s . T o get a complete vie w of the S u n d a y School work, ref­ erence should also be m a d e to that d o n e in connection with Educational Institutions. Mrs. W y c k o f f s e e m s to be having her difficulties in start­ ing u p S u n d a y School w o r k in T ok yo . In M a t s u m o t o she h ad h a d eleven with an average attendance of about fifty-five; in T o k y o the priest told the children of the N o. 1 S u n d a y School that they m u s t not g o to her, but that they m u s t c o m e to him, for he w o u l d ope n a S u n d a y School at the s a m e hou r in the


temple just a bo ve a n d teach t h e m writing. T h a t school w a s o pe ne d a n d her attendance dropped fro m 22 to 8. M o r e ­ over, o ne of the teachers of the elementary school heard of Mrs. W y c k o f f ’s school a n d she, too, told the children that they m u s t not g o there, promising to o p e n a S u n d a y School in her o w n h ouse w h e r e they w o u l d have a g o o d time. Mrs. W y c k o f f fears she m u s t use the English bait, a n d c h a n g e the n a m e of the school; at the e nd of the year she h a d t w o schools r u n ­ ning, having averaged 36 in attendance. M i s s L a n s i n g w a s fortunate in starting her w o r k off with a n attendance of 120. A t F u k u s h i m a , a t o w n noted for its shrines, opposition has been of such nature that the e v a n ­ gelist u nd er M r . V a n Strien has found it expedient to m a k e a t em po ra ry cessation of S u n d a y School activities; but not far a w a y another evangelist has been able to hold 35 children in the face of m o s t primitive heathenism. . A t K a g o s h i m a the T u e s d a y S u n d a y School is held in a private house in the poorest part of the city, a n d the children are very difficult to m a n a g e — it is the m o s t discouraging part of the Bible W o m a n ’s work. A s long as the older people of the c o m m u n i t y s e e m to appreciate the w or ke rs having it there a n d claim that their children are better b e h av ed because of it, the w o r k s e e m s to be w o r t h while; the average here has been 38; in the T h u r s d a y S u n d a y School it has been 90. T h e S u n d a y “S u n d a y School” h ad an average w e e k l y attend­ ance of 108 throughout the year; a kind of club has been f o r m e d of the boys of the oldest class, w h i c h has' resulted in m a k i n g t h e m better acquainted with o n e another a n d in fostering a fine class spirit. A n u m b e r of stereopticon lectures with slides s h o w i n g scenes f r o m the life of Christ a n d t e m p e r ­ ance subjects have been given throughout the year. A n occa­ sion of m u c h interest to all the children'of the S u n d a y Schools w a s the Field Day . A b o u t 2 60 took part in the events. T w o S u n d a y Schools w e r e kept u p b y Mis s C o u c h ’s helper during M i s s C o u c h ’s absence, but the attendance w a s less than the previous year. M i s s W i n n has six neighborhood schools a nd gives the Gospel to about 400 children weekly.


T h e Arita S u n d a y School w a s the climax for disorder, but has b e c o m e better, n o w that Mis s H o s p e r s a n d her helper hav e taken charge. T h e r e are about 60 regular attendants now , but it is still a S u n d a y School in the raw. • W i t h the help she has Mrs. Pieters conducts four S u n d a y Schools for w h i c h she is wholly responsible, while she is very 1 active also in the o n e in the Oita church. All of these enter­ prises w e r e in a flourishing condition at the e n d of the year. A t U s u k i the place is c r o w d e d every S u n d a y ; parents b e g to have their children taken in, a request with w h i c h it is often difficult to comply, simply because every inch of floor space is already taken. A t Sayeki the attendance decreased f r o m 117 in 1916 to 13 in 1917, d u e to the removal of the former preacher at the e nd of 1916 a n d to the fact that the place h a d n o resident evangelist for the greater part of last year. In n o other f o r m of Christian w o r k is the personal element so important, a n d its reasonable continuity is essential to success. T h e total attendance record of Oita is 438. C o m p a r i s o n with the statistics of a year a g o s h o w s a decrease in attendance in s o m e places. This is d u e in part ■to the adoption of a n e w rule b y the Mission, according to w h i c h the figures for the “n u m b e r of S u n d a y School scholars.” are to be based u p o n the actual average attendance a n d not on the enrollment, or o n the highest average for a n y o ne m onth, as hitherto. A t the e nd of J a n ua ry a well-attended, enthusiastic, a n d in every w a y successful S u n d a y School Tea ch er s ’ Institute'was held at Oita, in conjunction with the Methodist a n d Episcopal churches. N o doubt the effect o n the quality of the teaching w o r k d o n e during the year w a s excellent, even t h o u g h the figures reported do not indicate a n y resulting prosperity. N e w s p a p e r W o r k a n d Results. T h e w o r k w h i c h M r . Pieters started a f e w years a g o in the w a y of advertising iri the n ew sp ap er s the essentials of Christian truth has developed into a correspondence course


JAPAN MISSION

95

and- into branch societies. C oncerning these M r . Pieters re­ ports as follows: ' “T h e w o r k of n e w s p a p e r evangelization has been carried o n along the s a m e general lines as hitherto. It is attracting m o r e a n d m o r e attention f r o m students of missionary methods, a n d t w o or three other enterprises, modelled u p o n the s a m e 'basis, have already been started in different parts of the Empire. Others are in contemplation. “T h e n u m b e r of applications for literature is considerably smaller than in 1916, being 961 to 1,351 in that year, but it is larger than in 1915. T h e b o o k sales s h o w a n increase, reaching m o r e than t w o h u n d r e d a n d fifty yen. Including the literature given free of charge, the total a m o u n t of litera­ ture distributed a n d sold in our Oita K e n w o r k during 1917 is Y e n 916.77. • “T h e reading club has continued its g o o d work, a n d the a m o u n t of fees paid in b y m e m b e r s for the privilege of b o r r o w ­ ing a n d reading Christian books w a s Y e n 107, as against Y e n 87 the previous year, although the n u m b e r of books sent out o n request w a s only 779, to 910 in 1916.” T h e C orrespondence C our se . .

.

T h e establishment of a s ystem of correspondence instruc­ tion in Christian truth is an important item of the year’s work. S u c h w o r k w a s don e m o r e or less in previous years, but it w a s not until the year under review that it w a s fully organized a n d proceeded in a systematic a n d satisfactory man ne r. T h e m e t h o d is this: Persons desiring to be baptized sign a f o r m of application, binding themselves faithfully to take wha te ve r course of instruction is laid d o w n for them. T h e r e u p o n they receive a c o p y of a catechism a n d the first f e w w e e k s of the printed lessons in the Correspondence Course. This requires t h e m to m e m o r i z e a portion of the catechism daily a n d to look u p the indicated Scripture references. In cases of special difficulty explanatory notes are added. A t the end of each w e e k the student sends in a ns we rs to certain examination


t

questions, w h i c h are corrected, graded, a n d returned to him, with further w o r k to be done. T h e entire course requires honest w o r k for t w e n t y to thirty minutes every d a y for sev­ enteen weeks. Thirty-four students registered in this course during the. year, of w h o m o ne left the country w h e n only half through, ten graduated, eleven withdrew, a n d the rest w e r e pursuing' their studies at the end of the’year. M o s t of the students are candidates for baptism, but t w o or three cases have occurred of earnest Christian m e n a n d w o m e n .becoming interested a n d registering themselves as students in this course in order to get a clearer a n d m o r e systematic k n o w l e d g e of Christian truth. T h e catechism used is entitled, “A Cat ec hi sm for C an di ­ dates for Baptism.” T h e original w a s a liftle catechism for children, published at R i c h m o n d , Virginia, in 1840, translated into Japanese in the early days of our-Mission a n d found very useful. It w a s thoroughly revised, a n d about o ne third n e w matter w a s added. It w a s published b y the Keiseisha Publish­ ing C o m p a n y , in T o k y o . T h e c o m p a n y has printed three edi­ tions of one thousand copies each, a n d has sold 2,450 copies during the year. ' S u c h insistence u p o n thorough preparation for baptism has, of course, h ad the effect of reducing the n u m b e r reported as received u p o n confession of faith. T h e missionary in charge received during the year twenty-one formal applications for baptism, but only eleven of these- applicants w e r e baptized. B r a n c h Society W

ork.

T h e report of this Station for 1916 stated that a beginning h a d been m a d e with a very important n e w departure in the f o r m of little groups of people supplied with literature w h i c h enables t h e m to hold regular church services without the pres­ ence of a minister. T h e year b e g a n with t w o societies of this kind: o ne at Mori,- in K u s u County, a n d the other at Inukai, in O h n o County. T h e third society w a s organized o n S e p t e m b e r 27th,


at Takada, in Nishi K unizaki County, a n d the fourth o n O c t o ­ ber 14th, at Miyato, in Naoiri County. T h u s four of the twelve counties in this prefecture are n o w supplied with our societies. T h e B r a n c h at M i y a t o has not prospered, o w i n g to the early removal of the m o s t earnest m e m b e r , the extreme age of the leader (79), a n d the scattered condition of the m e m b e r ­ ship. Nevertheless, there w e r e t w o baptisms during the year a m o n g the people of that group, a n d at the close of the year three others, candidates for baptism, w e r e taking the Corre­ spondence Course. F r o m Oct ob er 14th, w h e n the B r a n c h w a s organized, until the e n d of the year, they held nine meetings, with an average attendance of three a n d two-thirds. T h e B r a n c h at T a k a d a has a very different constituency, containing several old (and cold!) Christians. This society reports nine meetings held fro m S e p t e m b e r 27th to the close of the year, with a n average attendance of seven. This place is m o r e accessible than Miyato, a n d hence this B r a n c h has been frequently visited b y the itinerating evangelist. T h e w o r k is small, a n d s o m e of the elements are unpromising, but the place is an important one, a n d o n the whole, the pros­ pects here are good. T h e B r a n c h at Inukai has not d o n e well. Until the middle of M a r c h the average attendance w a s eight, but after that it fell to three, the said three being invariably the leader, his wife, a n d o ne other faithful m e m b e r . These, however, kept u p the meetings with admirable perseverance, a n d the record s h o w s fifty meetings held during the year, so that they missed but t w o Sundays. This place is also easily reached fro m Oita b y rail, a n d hence has enjoyed m o r e help. In the latter part of the year a - S u n d a y school w a s estab­ lished at Inukai under the supervision of Mrs. Pieters, a n d the pastor of the Oita C h u r c h has undertaken to visit the place twice a m on th , so-that it is n o w a n out-post, of Oita Church. A s this d^>es not supply a S u n d a y service, however, the m e e t ­ ings o n that d a y b y the aid of the B r a n c h Society organization are kept up. T h r e e persons w e r e baptized in connection with this w o r k in D ec em be r.


>. T h e B r a n c h at M o r i has h a d an admirable record, a n d goes , far to prove the complete success of the m e t h o d as such, w h e r e earnest a n d faithful people undertake to use it., T h e place . is so remote fro m Oita a n d the m e a n s of c o m m u n i c a t i o n are so imperfect that visits b y missionaries or evangelists can year, missing four Sundays, with an average attendance of take place only occasionally. Five such visits are recorded during the year. This society held 48 meetings during the eight. T h r e e persons w e r e baptized here. It has s e e m e d w o r t h while to p a y so m u c h attention to the matter of these B r a n c h Societies because this m e t h o d contains the possibility of a partial solution of the p r o bl em of supplying isolated c o m mu ni ti es with the regular preach­ ' ing of the Gospel. Hitherto the only way- in w h i c h w o r k could be b e g u n in a place w a s b y the residence there of an evangelist, or, at least, b y regular visits f r o m such a worker, but it w o u l d be evidently impossible to supply the entire • country with such visits. In the a bo ve places excellent results hav e been obtained without these helps. T h e baptisms re­ ported fro m these little groups stand in h a p p y contrast to the record of s o m e places w h e r e w e hav e h a d resident e v a n ­ gelists for years, such as Hiji, Usa, a n d Sayeki. In these places it has often h a p p e n e d that a year has passed, s om et im es t w o or three years have passed, without a single conversion. In addition to the places thus organized, the w e e k l y ser­ m o n s are used also in a f ew other places b y Christian m e n in their o w n homes, inviting the m e m b e r s of their families a n d their neighbors to join them. T h e m o s t remarkable case of this kind is in K a g o s h i m a Prefecture, in a n island county called O h s h i m a . F r o m this place w e hav e reports of three meetings during D e c e m b e r , with an average attendance of eighteen. Altogether, .the reports of this kind of w o r k s h o w that o n the average the aggregate n u m b e r of persons attending S u n d a y service with the aid of these sermons, w h o w o u l d otherwise have no opportunity of enjoying church privileges, is u p w a r d s of thirty-five each L o r d ’s Day . This is a larger


n u m b e r than assemble in the ordinary S u n d a y m o r n i n g serv­ ice in the m o s t prosperous of our Oita K e n congregations. O ther W

ork

U sing

the

P rinted P a g e .

M r . Hoekje, b y m e a n s of brief advertisements inserted in three papers for ten times in each during M a r c h or M a y , got into touch with a bo ve t w o h u n d r e d people w h o indicated, their desire to study Christianity. A n effort w a s m a d e to introduce all of t h e m to the nearest evangelist, a n d a few of t h e m are attending services regularly. M a n y are too far f r o m churches to do that, a n d others are e n g a g e d in o cc up a ­ tions w h i c h allow t h e m n o leisure. M r. R y d e r has kept in touch with his inquirers b y corre­ spo nd en ce a n d especially b y sending regularly every m o n t h about o ne h u n d r e d copies of the little m o n t h l y Christian paper, the “Truthseeker,” w h i c h he has published especially for this country work. A special Christmas edition for the chil­ dren w a s printed a n d a c o p y given to each of the children in his S u n d a y School work, as well as to the adults. “A n additional feature of our w or k, ” he says, “has been the opening of an evangelistic office in the b u s y part of the city. In connection with this office there is a Christian reading-room o p e n to the public a n d a loan library of Chris­ tian books. F r o m this office tracts are sent to country p e o ­ ple a n d here conferences are held with people w h o are often reluctant to c o m e to o n e ’s house. If funds w e r e available for advertising in the city papers w h i c h hav e a large circulation a m o n g the country people of this prefecture, doubtless a large following of inquirers w o u l d soon result. T h e readingr o o m is well patronized a n d several have expressed their appreciation of it. Christians bring friends w h o m they wis h to interest in Christianity, a n d b y giving t h e m suitable tracts or lending t h e m books f r o m the loan library, their interest is aroused. People passing along the street stop a n d read the tracts, c h a n g e d f r o m time to time, w h i c h are displayed in a glass sign a n d c o m e in a n d find s o m e t h i n g to interest them. A list of the books in the loan library is circulated1a m o n g


the country people, a n d they, too, b o r r o w books, paying a small m o n t h l y fee towards postage, etc.” M i s s C o u c h a n d M i s s T o m e g a w a during their stay in America, w e r e able to keep u p the publication of their little m o n t h l y paper b y sending manuscript for it. It w a s a great pleasure to thus keep in touch with those they w e r e trying, to help back in Japan. T h e contributions f r o m Japanese for the t w o m o n t h s after their return a m o u n t e d to m o r e than for the previous ten m o n t h s of the year. GENERAL CONDITION OF THE

CHURCHES.

, W e have n o real churches as yet, for the C h u r c h of Christ in Japan, the Japanese b o d y with w h o m w e w o r k a n d t ow ar d w h i c h our efforts tend, will not allow a n y congregation to be organized* as a “c hurch” until it is entirely self-supporting, but w e call our provisional organizations “churches” for the lack of a better term. In Oita station the best thing to report for 1917 is that forty-six persons w e r e received during the year on confession of faith, the largest n u m b e r hitherto received in a single year being thirty-three. The- t(Dtal enrolled m e m b e r s h i p has risen fro m 196 at the close of 1916 to 232, but very r emarkably the n u m b e r reported for “resident m e m b e r s ” is precisely the s a m e as the year before. This is d u e in part to removals, a n d in part to the increasing influence of the n e w s p a p e r evangeliza­ tion work, as a result of w h i c h p°eople b e c o m e Christians a n d receive baptism even in places r emote f r o m the churches. S u c h converts are registered as m e m b e r s of the nearest church, but that m a y be m a n y miles a way. F o r the s a m e reason the church attendance s h o w s but a six per cent, in­ crease. O f the seven churches, t w o m a y be called in g o o d condition, o ne fair, a n d the others poor, if not lamentable. T h e favorable s h o w i n g in Oita is due, under the blessing of God, to the comparatively large n u m b e r of Mission workers a n d superior e q u i p m e n t concentrated there. It is encourag­ ing to find that such concentration of effort is not in vain.


A very encouraging fact in the year’s record is that the Mission has been able to p a y off twenty-five h u n d r e d y e n on the Oita church property, leaving only a trifle over four hun dr ed y e n to be paid. W h e n this is d o n e w e shall be in full own er sh ip of a very desirable property, the first to be acquired in Oita Prefecture. T h e s a m e need exists elsewhere, a n d it is our duty in this report.to call attention as every year hitherto, to this as o ne of the great heeds of the hour. T h e total contributions for the year in Oita Prefecture, in our work, passed nine h u n d r e d y e n for the first time. T h e aver­ age increase per year in this respect for the last five or six years has been one h un dr ed yen, w h i c h supplies us with courage to hop e that w e are after all m a k i n g solid, if slow progress. T h e a m o u n t contributed b y the churches a m o u n t s n o w to about fifteen per cent, of the entire cost of the local church work. • M r . V a n Strien has h ad the privilege of baptizing several since he w e n t d o w n South. O n e of those is a blind teacher in the School for the Blind, a n d he s h o w s his n e w l y found joy b y bringing a n u m b e r of his blind students to the services with him. T h e church at Sasebo passed during the year from the care of the Mission to the ranks of the churches called self­ supporting. T h e r e w e r e thirteen baptisms in Sasebo before the organization of the church, a n d these m a y therefore be counted in the statistics for the year as direct fruit of the w o r k of the Mission. In connection with the c hu rc h ’s advance t ow ar d self-support, an a rr an g e m e n t w a s m a d e with their pastor for the carrying o n of evangelistic w o r k in the neigh­ boring islands, for w h i c h he is to receive fro m the Mission a suitable fee. This a r r an ge me nt has been continued since the organization of the church, with the .consent of its officers, w h o grant their pastor the necessary time to e ng ag e in this work. This church is paying its pastor thirty-eight yen, w h i c h is the s a m e as he h ad been getting fro m the Mission.


F arewell

to t h e

N o r t h e r n F ields.

M r. H o e k j e writes f r o m M o r i o k a : “T h e evangelistic w o r k of the Mission in Iwate a n d A o m o r i prefectures c a m e f r o m January 1st, 1918, under the care of the J a p a n Mission of the R e f o r m e d C h u r c h in the U nited States. This Mission has, like our o w n , long been o ne of the Missions co-operating with the C h u r c h of Christ in J apan. It has developed a strong educational w o r k at Sendai, m i d w a y b e t w e e n T o k y o a n d A om or i, including schools for girls, boys, students in theology, a n d Bible W o m e n . A b o u t this city as a center, with its graduates as workers, it has organized an e xp an di ng eva n ­ gelistic work. A n o t h e r era of expansion for this w o r k is n o w at hand. . “W h e n , our Missions in J a p a n w e r e united, w e looked forVvard to developing intensively our evangelistic field in K y u s h u . W e expected to retain o u r other fields, at least until w e found others willing to receive them, a n d able to give t h e m at least as g o o d care as they h a d enjoyed with us. K n o w i n g , however, of our sister Mission’s h o p e for expansion of territory, negotiations w e r e entered u p o n early in the year, looking forward to the transfer of our northernmost fields to her hands. Discussion a n d conference gradually s h o w e d that this w a s the direction in w h i c h the best interests of both Missions led; a n d ere long the B oa rd s w e r e petitioned for approval of the plan. Their approval of the terms, of transfer c a m e during the s u m m e r , with the stipulation that the actual trans­ fer should have effect from Jan ua ry 1st, 1918. “A m o n g the conditions of transfer were, the remaining o n the field of the evangelists in our e m p l o y ; the gift of the properties used b y the churches to the receiving M i s s i o n ; the purchase b y the B o a r d of the receiving Mission of the m i s ­ sionary residences in M o r i o k a a n d A o m o r i ; the promise of the receiving Mission to keep a m a l e missionary in the e v a n ­ gelistic wtirk of this' field; a n d the promise of the transferring Mission to loan a fully equipped missionary for the- over­ sight of the w o r k for t w o full years, in order to allow the


receiving B o a r d to secure the reinforcement needed. T h e receiving B o a r d o n its part gladly undertakes to finance the w o r k in the field f r o m J an ua ry 1st. “ M r. K u y p e r w a s in charge of this district until his depar­ ture o n furlough in October. Fro m. th at time M r . H o e k j e w a s placed in charge, continuing to reside in Saga, however, until the beginning of the n e w year, w h i c h coincides with the begin­ ning of the n e w relations of the field. Since the missionary in charge has not been resident o n the field during the year, except that he enjoyed an- itinerary of ten days in S e p t e m ­ ber, it is not possible to give a detailed report of the c o n ­ ditions in the various outstations. H o w e v e r , there have with­ out exception been baptisms; a n d t h o u g h the usual special meetings w e r e impossible in m o s t of the places, the regular services a n d S u n d a y schools have been faithfully conducted b y the evangelists in charge. Iw a t e P refecture -M orioka S tation . “ Ichinoseki has enjoyed another year under the devoted leadership of Rev. a n d Mrs. S. Sato. A n interesting feature is the holding of four prosperous S u n d a y School meetings for children on w e e k d a y s in t o w n s a n d villages near at hand. In this w o r k M r. K u r o k a w a , a recent graduate of the Meiji Gakuin, assisted during the s u m m e r . T h e w o r k has continued to receive the g o o d will of teachers in the schools, a n d to attract students. “ M iy ak o, also o n the Pacific, can n o w be reached in one day, during the s u m m e r a n d fall months, b y automobile f r o m Morioka. M r . Sasaki has in his isolation held the usual serv­ ices, a n d h a d two. flourishing w e e k l y meetings for children, besides occasional meetings for children a n d adults in other places. “H i z u m e has, at the close of the year, once m o r e b e c o m e a n outpost of the M o r i o k a pastor. D u r i n g the early m o n t h s of the year, M r. Ishikawa served here. Aud ie nc es w e r e small. F o r the fall months, M r . ' K u r o k a w a served the place, holding three w e e k l y meetings for the children in as m a n y places.


H e also prepared o ne y o u n g w o m a n for baptism. U p o n his entering the barracks, the field w a s looked after, f r o m Morioka, with children’s meeting every week, a n d preaching twice a m on th . G o o d audiences w e r e reported. “ Pastor Ito has spent his ninth year at Morioka. T h e church progresses little b y little t oward self-support. It is encouraging to see the large n u m b e r of m e n , y o u n g a n d older, w h o assemble in the S u n d a y m o r n i n g congregation. M i s s U en o, w h o assists in the excellent S u n d a y School, with five other teachers, holds three other meetings for children regularly as well. “M r . Igarashi has been able to hold the fort in conserva­ tive, disapproving Fukuoka.' H e visits Ichinohe a n d Kintaichi regularly, a n d finds Christians a n d inquirers in each place, w h o need e n c o u r a g e m e n t a n d reminders of G o d ’s grace. It is gratifying to hav e in this t o w n a rented preaching place in a location that helps'to call attention to the fact that Christianity has c o m e to stay. A omori P refecture -Aomo ri S tation . “Hirosaki is a Methodist stronghold in the north, but being a city a n d a military a n d educational center, offers an interesting field to other denominations as well. M r . Y a m a ­ m o t o h a d an excellent foothold, a n d a n u m b e r of interesting inquirers. Since his departure, iMr. O w a 'malkes w e e k l y visits f r o m A o m or i, a n d reports audiences of sixteen or eigh­ teen, with a resident m e m b e r s h i p of three or four. “T h e r e is nothing to discourage in the conditions or prospects of these fields. M r . K u y p e r is to be congratulated not only u p o n the statesmanlike m a n n e r in w h i c h he b e g a n to w o r k out his plans for the occupation of the territory, but also for the loyalty to the Mission w h i c h he w a s able to inspire in the workers associated with him. T h e r e are rich opportu­ nities for service here, for the missionary a n d the Japanese w o r k e r w h o are willing to w o r k hard, pray through, stay b y the stuff, a n d endure physical hardship if .need d e m a n d


for the G ospel’s sake. T h e story of our Mission’s relations to these fields has not been o ne of failure, except as to occu­ pation of the land. M a y it be the privilege of the succeed­ ing Mission to enter m o r e completely into possession of the opportunities a n d gathering of the fruit.” M i s s W i n n ’s w o r k in this field has already been' noted elsewhere in this report. Farewell

to t h e

S h i n s h u F ield.

T h e Shinshu field has been transferred to the C h u r c h of Christ in Japan. . Dr. O l t m a n s reports regarding the w o r k : “T h e w o r k at N a g a n o w a s considerably h a m p e r e d b y the dissatisfaction „ of a n u m b e r of church people with the evangelist in charge. T h e party spirit w a s aroused a n d ran high, so that s o m e m e m b e r s even left the church. It w a s d e e m e d best to detach the evangelist f r o m the place a n d as the Mission h a d no other place for h i m he w a s asked to resign, w h i c h he did in the a u t u m n . Since then the church has been without a pastor. “K a m i S u w a has continued in charge of evangelist Nishiy a m a , a n d has well maintained itself in the dififerent branches of work. M r. N i s h i y a m a has g o n e with the w o r k into the service of the D o m e s t i c B o a r d of Missions of the C h u r c h of Christ in Japan. • “ It is sincerely h o p e d that the giving u p of so m u c h of our w o r k here in N o r t h J ap an in order to concentrate our evangelistic efforts in K y u s h u m a y truly prove a wise step a n d for the g o o d of the w o r k of the K i n g d o m in J ap an as a whole, but the giving u p is not d o n e without a sigh.” Dr. Ballagh writes: “M y report m a y be condensed into a f ew sentences. Chiefly prayer, correspondence a n d solicitude for the spiritual welfare of professed believers, a n d for the success of the evangelistic workers. T h e agitations caused b y the transference of t w o of our oldest a n d m o s t a d v an ce d fields to other caretakers has been a trying experiment to both the missionaries a n d workers e n g a g e d therein.”


Izu F ield. T h e Izu field, apart fro m the cities of T o k y o a n d Y o k o ­ h a m a , is the only evangelistic field left iri the northern part of Japan. Dr. O l t m a n s says of the w o r k in I z u : 'Tn K a s h i w a k u b o M r . Kurihara has remained in charge of the w o r k a n d has labored with his a cc us to me d zeal, not­ withstanding his physical drawbacks. A s a lways he has been scrupulous in the discharge of his duties, but the visible results have been meagre. T h e continuance of the w o r k under such limitations is a serious question for consideration. “A t Mishima. the church has h a d the continued serv­ ices of the Rev. Inagaki, n o w perhaps the oldest Protestant pastor in active service in Japan, i. e., as far as years of serv­ ice is concerned. H e has fully earned honorable retirement with a pension, but as yet the Mission has n o provision for that sort of thing, t h o u g h w e are h oping to get it soon: “A t G o t e m b a the Rev. S o n o b e has continued to d o g o o d w o r k both in the t o w n itself a n d in the surrounding district, both at the regular church a n d at the evangelistic hall near the railroad. T h e latter is especially used for tens of thou­ sands of pilgrims w h o climb Fuji m o u n t a i n in the m o n t h s of July a n d Aug us t. ” EDUCATIONAL W O R K S t u d e n t S upport . T h e entire matter of Student Support is administered, u nd er the n e w rules, b y a single standing committee." Besides supporting students in each of our four schools, the Mission has during the year extended support to nine others, study­ ing in five schools. T w o of these w e r e looking forward to the' ministry, a n d taking a shorter coursfe, for special reasons, than the Meiji G a k u i n provides in its regular courses; four w e r e being trained for service as Bible W o m e n ; a n d three w e r e in training for service as teachers in our schools. In its teacher training the Mission insists o n contracts providing for the r e p a y m e n t within a few years of all scholarship s u m s


IH E C A M P U S O F MEIJI GAKUIN, W H I C H C E L E B R A T E D THIS Y E A R ITS FORTIETH A N N I V E R S A R Y



received, even if w o r k i n g in our o w n schools. D u r i n g the year o ne y o u n g m a n w h o h a d received such training entered u p o n his duties in Steele A c a d e m y , a n d has given excellent satisfaction. T w o of the y o u n g w o m e n also completed their courses, a n d are doing splendid w o r k as Bible W o m e n . F r o m the assisted pupils at Ferris S e m i n a r y a n d Sturges S e m i n a r y the Mission secures m a n y of its assistants in the w o r k for w o m e n a n d children con du ct ed b y its lady mission­ aries. T h e r e w e r e four or five such cases during the year. Assistance to girls in;schools of this grade is not only with the preparation of wor ke rs in view, however. Rather, since even in J ap an of today y o u n g w o m e n are given far less o p p o r ­ tunity for education than y o u n g - m e n receive, the effort has been to contribute something, b y selection of w o r t h y candi­ dates, to the cause of w o m e n ’s education, a n d the develop­ m e n t of a n intelligent Christian w o m a n h o o d for the sake of a strong Christian church. O u r share in this has been thirty girls in Ferris a n d thirteen in Sturges during the year T h e r e are n o supported students in the M iddle D e p a r t ­ m e n t of the Meiji Gakuin, a n d only four in Steele A c a d e m y , one of w h o m is preparing himself for the ministry, a n d wished first to complete his M id dl e School course. W e expect hence­ forth to limit student support in Steele to those special cases of y o u n g m e n , seriously intending to enter the ministry; w h o are unable to complete the last year or t w o of this grade of~study without assistance. • Nineteen students in the higher a n d Theological depart­ m e n t s of the Meiji G a k u i n received support during the year as students for the ministry. T w o w e r e graduated in June, o ne of w h o m is in service as an evangelist in K y u s h u , a n d the- other of w h o m has b e g u n a t w o years’ ter m of military service. T w o others c o m m i t t e d so serious moral indiscre­ tions during the year that they w e r e asked to discontinue their studies. S u c h cases are disappointing^ but they s h o w also the great need of s y m p a t h y a n d prayer for these y o u n g m e n , preparing themselves for Christian service, surrounded b y temptations, a n d b o u n d b y social conditions w h i c h d o not


further t h e m in their purpose. A n o t h e r of another school, left us at the close of the h a d lost faith in the conservative theology Creed. J ap an has temptations intellectual as

our students, in year because he of the Apostles well as physical.

F erris S e m i n a r y . Dr. B o o t h writes: “A n absence of a year a n d a half from the scenes of o n e ’s n or ma l activities puts one out of touch with the rapid m o v i n g of things Japanese, for in Galileo’s / historic phrase, ‘T h e w or ld does m o v e , ’ even in the Orient. T h e furlough-existence followed in the h o m e l a n d has, u n ­ doubtedly, recuperative a n d recreational advantages for the tired schoolmaster, a n d he returns to the old routine life with r e n e w e d zeal a n d hopeful courage to attack again the unsolved problems of his vocation. H i s horizon has been broadened b y contact a n d fellowship with leaders of Christian w o r k in the h o m e land, the inspirational value of w h i c h cannot be overrated, a n d he is m a d e to feel, that after all he is at least a ‘c o g ’ in the wonderful, divinely appointed m e c h a n i s m w h i c h has for its purpose the uplifting of man ki nd , a n d that the efficiency of its w o r k i n g depends, relatively u p o n h o w he functions at the place w h e r e he is put. “Returning to J ap an o n the 6th d a y of N o v e m b e r , 1917, without the com pa ni on sh ip of her, w h o had, heretofore, always a c c o m p a n i e d me, a n d .who, for nearly t w o score years h a d been m y inspiration, m y faithful co-worker, m y joy a nd comfort, m y feelings can be better imagined than described. H o w e v e r , the m e m b e r s of the Mission, old friends a n d ac­ quaintances proved to be m o s t kind a n d considerate a n d in m a n y w a y s helpful. Especially the wid e circle of Japanese, w h o k n e w a n d loved M r s / B o o t h , has m a d e it evident to m e that they sincerely share with m e the great s orrow that has entered into m y . life, a n d I a m truly grateful for the h u m a n s y m p a t h y that has been so kindly bes to we d u p o n me. “A n expression of deep appreciation is d ue M i s s K u y p e r a n d her associates, w h o have h a d to shoulder the extra burden


in our absence, a n d have carried o n the w o r k here so success­ fully. T h e loyalty, fidelity, a n d earnestness of the m e m b e r s of the Japanese staff, have been all that could be desired. “T h e W o r k of the School: T h e apparent interest of the pupils is in a degree satisfactory., In a school, however, as in a living organism, there is a lways r o o m for i m p r o v e m e n t a n d growth, a n d our w a t c h w o r d is F O R W A R D to the attain­ m e n t of the best things in all departments of our endeavor. A b o v e all w e long for the a w a k e n i n g of a keener sense of the spiritual life in ourselves, our associates a n d in our pupils, that shall bring forth, in abundance, the fruits of the Spirit.” M i s s K u y p e r , w h o acted as principal during the absence of Dr. Booth, reports the following: “T h e year in Ferris Seminary, while uneventful a n d with but little besides the regular routine w o r k to report, has been o v e r s h a d o w e d b y the s orrow that has c o m e to us in the passing a w a y of Mrs. Booth. T h e W e l c o m e meeting, for w h i c h already early a n d eager preparations h a d been m ad e, gav e place to a M e m o r i a l Meeting. F r o m m e m b e r s of the Alumnae, teachers a n d pupils w e r e brought the m o s t tender tributes of love a n d respect as testimonials to the life of faithful a n d loving service Mrs. B o o t h h ad for thirty-six years devoted to Ferris S e m ­ inary. “Dr. B o o t h ’s return a n d r e s u m i n g his w o r k in N o v e m b e r w a s a matter of great satisfaction to all. M i s s Hayashi, re­ turning f r o m her year’s visit in America, found a m o s t hearty w e l c o m e awaiting her. “W i t h the exception of the science teacher, all the teach­ ers are Christians. ' “T h e school year closed in M a r c h ; four w e r e graduated from the H i g h e r Course, three of w h o m , being supported pupils, b e c a m e assistants to missionaries in evangelistic work. T h r e e graduating f r o m the English N o r m a l Course, entered the H i g h e r Course in April. Seventeen graduated f r o m the G r a m m a r Course. “T h e school year o pe ne d in April with seventy n e w pupils, bringing the enrollment u p to 255, a n increase of 23 over the


preceding year. This increase in attendance has h a d a pro­ portionately favorable effect u p o n the i nc om e of the school in increasing the a m o u n t of tuition fees. “T h e advance in prices of food supplies, fuel a n d Idbor has m a d e -a raise in the price of board necessary; a further raise will soon hav e to be added. This, however, has not caused us the loss of a single dormitory pupil. “T h e r e has been a n admirable spirit in the dormitory life. This w a s especially seen in the sense of responsibility felt b y the older girls w h i c h led t h e m to hold m o n t h l y meetings, of their o w n initiative, for consultation as to w a y s a n d mea.ns of m a k i n g the dormitory a n ideal h o m e for all. T h e y adopted s o m e excellent rules for their o w n conduct. “ In October the m o s t severe t y p h o o n experienced in m a n y years struck the east coast of J a p a n a n d with its great­ est fury the T o k y o - Y o k o h a m a region, a n d with the tidal w a v e a c c o m p a n y i n g it did m u c h d a m a g e everywhere. O n the school c o m p o u n d , too, trees, fences a n d roofs suffered consider­ able d a m ag e. After m u c h delay, d ue to scarcity of labor, all w a s repaired. T h e painting of the buildings n o w g oi ng o n a n d soon to -be finished is giving the school a m u c h i m p r o v e d appearance. “Eight neighborhood S u n d a y schools hav e been carried on, with an average attendance of 240. T h e s e children m e t to­ gether for the Christmas celebration in o ur school chapel on D e c e m b e r 22nd. A p r o g r a m given b y the children a n d a talk b y o n e of the teachers led u p to .what w a s for the children the climax of interest— the distribution of oranges a n d pres­ ents a n d of special rewards for those w h o h a d been faithful in attendance throughout the year. T h e entire cost of the fruit a n d gifts w a s covered b y voluntary contributions fro m pupils a n d teachers in the school. “ In N o v e m b e r , the girls gav e a little concert in the School, to w h i c h n o o ne f r o m outside w a s invited, a n d at w h i c h a collection w a s taken u p for the S u n d a y School Christ­ m a s expenses a n d for city charity work. A s the S u n d a y School expenses w e r e largely m e t fro m personal gifts a m o n g


the girls, there r emained t w e n t y y e n for charity work. W i t h this rice tickets w e r e b o u g h t w h i c h the girls distributed to­ gether with tracts a m o n g s o m e of the m o s t destitute in the city. “T h e leading Japanese n e w s p a p e r in the city, following its usual c u s t o m of doing s om et hi ng special for the poor of the city at N e w Y e a r ’s time a n d asking schoolgirls to assist, this year g a v e material for 300 children’s k i m o n o s ; these w e r e all m a d e b y the schoolgirls of the city, our girls m a k i n g thirty of them. “O n e evening a w e e k has'been devoted b y the domitory pupils to w a r relief w o r k — s o m e rolling bandages, others s e w ­ ing or knitting. This has totalled considerable w o r k a c c o m ­ plished. “T h e s u m m e r conference of the Y o u n g W o m e n ’s Chris­ tian Association m e t in t w o sections last s u m m e r ; one at K o b e a n d the other at Sendai, at both of w h i c h our branch h a d a total representation of nine. All gav e enthusiastic reports of the help a n d inspiration the meetings h a d been to them. “ D u r i n g the year nine have received baptism a n d several others have expressed their decision to be Christians but have been hindered for various reasons fro m m a k i n g public c o n ­ fession of their faith.” Mis s Moulton, our m us ic teacher, writes: “ D u r i n g the past year the pupils in m y Bible, .composition, a n d reading classes have s h o w n m u c h interest in their studies. T h e m us ic pupils, of w h o m there are forty, have, for the m o s t part, d o n e faithful work, a n d consequently are m a k i n g g o o d pro g ­ ress. “A t the beginning of the school year their voices w e r e nat­ urally untrained a n d not particularly musical, but with patience a n d perseverance on the part of their teachers w o n d e r s w e r e w r o u g h t o n the n e w pupils a n d m u c h to their delight they w e r e able to join in the choruses at the Christmas exercises. “O u r S u n d a y School has an average attendance of thirtyfive, four of w h o m professed their faith in Christ a n d w e r e baptized the S u n d a y before Christmas. Six of the pupils w e r e presented with medals b y the Japanese S u n d a y School


^

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p ^

Association for regular attendance. In the appeals for help that c a m e to the S u n d a y School at Christmas time, they, with o ne accord, responded gladly a n d sei]t a contribution of fifteen y e n f r o m their w e e k l y collections taken during the year.” M i s s Jeannette O l t m a n s writes: “ I hav e been pleased to note a great i m p r o v e m e n t in the application of several of m y pupils in their class w o r k a n d in others, through personal conversations, a spiritual enthusiasm a n d a desire to live daily an humble, helpful, Christian life. . “T h e senior class, graduating last spring, h a d four m e m bers. O f these girls, t w o are n o w in evangelistic w o r k ; the third, a girl w h o has always been excellent in class work, has been kept in school as one of the teachers; a n d the fourth returned to the school this fall in the capacity of personal teacher for M i s s Kuypter a n d myself. “T h e three n o r m a l course graduates of last spring have returned a n d are enrolled as, regular m e m b e r s of the M iddle Class in the H i g h e r Department. T h e class to graduate from the regular d epartment this spring has a m e m b e r s h i p of nine­ teen girls. It is a class w h o s e record has been good, several of its m e m b e r s having d o n e specially praiseworthy work. T h e class, as a whole, has been m a r k e d b y a spirit of earnest attention to its lessons a n d an endeavor to i mp ro ve all English branches. . “ Last spring I b e g a n visiting neighborhood S u n d a y Schools with s o m e of the«schoolgirls. T h e children w h o c o m e to these schools are of the poorer class, little ragamuffins, with babies o n their backs a n d small brothers a n d sisters followning in their wake. T h e y are rather unruly, but sing the h y m n s with enthusiasm a n d listen to the Bible stories with apparent attention, as s o m e a n s w e r the questions put to t h e m intel­ ligently. M a y these small beginnings have big results!” S turges S e m i n a r y .

.

M i s s Noordhoff, our senior missionary at Sturges, reports the following: “ O u r school has enjoyed a' year of blessing

o

\


a n d g r o w t h b y the grace of God. T h e n u m b e r of students has increased to 185 in the past year a n d about 33 per cent, of these are Christians. T h o u g h this is the actual enrollment the average attendance is m u c h smaller, as there are a large n u m b e r of Sewing, Cooking, a n d M u s i c pupils w h o d o not attend regularly. T h e s e are the ones w h o are hard to reach, hence our percentage of Christians is greatly reduced. All the teachers in the school are Christians, except one. “All the foreign ladies teach in the S u n d a y School held in the school chapel. A s there is a large class of Sturges students a n d a f e w also f r o m the G o v e r n m e n t school, Mis s N oo rd ho ff has taken a class in the church S u n d a y School. T h e r e are three street S u n d a y Schools under the supervision of the missionaries, a n d in these a n d in the church S u n d a y School fourteen students of the school are teaching regularly. T h e street S u n d a y Schools average about 130. ’ “W e hav e been called u p o n to m o u r n the loss of o n e of our pupils. S h e w a s baptized in the Spring a n d m a d e a beautiful confession of faith both b y w o r d of m o u t h a n d b y the life of faith a n d patience she s h o w e d during the m o n t h s she spent o n her sick bed, a n d her classmates a n d friends will not easily forget w h a t belief- in o u r L o r d a n d Saviour did for their friend. ‘T h o u g h dead she still speaketh’ to t h e m as to her family. . “T h e Christian E n d e a v o r Society continues to be' the strong Christianizing factor in the school, giving the girls practical evidences of w h a t the L o r d has d o n e for its m e m ­ bers. A year a g o they f o r m e d a w o r k society with the object of earning s o m e m o n e y to help the church in this city, a n d last fall at the dedication services they w e r e able to give Y e n 150.00 t ow ar d the n e w building. A t the Christmas giv­ ing service, they gav e another Y e n 25.00 for the.same purpose, m a k i n g a very neat little s u m for such a small society to raise in such a short time. „ ' “T h e Christmas service this year took the f o r m of the W h i t e Christmas. After the pageant a n d the other exercises of the program, the girls brought forward their free-will offer-


114

FOREIGN

m i s s i o n s

ings a n d w e w e r e surprised to find that the totM s u m of all gifts w a s Y e n 115.67 or about $58.00. T h e s e were, all gifts offered freely as classes or individuals for different purposes, such as the w o r k of the B o a r d of D o m e s t i c Missions, w o r k a m o n g lepers, the poor of this city, a n d the o r p h a n asylum. T h e offering of the audience w e n t to the w o m e n a n d children in war-stricken countries. It has only been these past t w o years that our principal has h a d the courage to ask the audience to take part in giving s om et hi ng to those more, unfortunate than themselves, such as the Belgians a n d A rm en ia ns , a n d perhaps rightly so, as the large proportion of the audience w e r e not Christians a n d s o m e of t h e m w e r e present for the first time at a Christian gathering, but w h e n w e think that this year w e as a school w e r e able to give to the L o r d for various lines of w o r k the above s u m s certainly w e hav e a right to be thankful to G o d for H i s grace in teaching these people h o w to give. . “A n o t h e r interesting meeting held at Sturges this year w a s the observance of L u t h e r ’s anniversary. This w a s in charge of the fifth-year class a n d they certainly did well, each one in turn giving a short talk o n s o m e phase of his life a n d work. This class studies Bible history in its course in Bible a n d they s h o w e d that they understood well w h a t L uther h a d d o n e for the world. Especially sweet w a s the singing of L u t h e r ’s Cradle S o n g as a solo b y o ne of the girls at the close of her talk o n the h o m e life of Luther. “W e close the year with thankful hearts to H i m w h o has helped us in the difficulties that c a m e to us, a n d pray for further strength to g o on, asking the prayers of all those w h o love the Lor d and His w o r k that w e m a y go on to greater a n d better results in H i s work. “A s in former years I hav e h a d the pleasure of conferring with the school girls in their requests for material with which to do s u m m e r work, such as S u n d a y Schools in their h o m e towns. T h e responses hav e been as usual, s o m e w e r e dis­ appointed, s o m e w e r e rejoiced at the o utcome. O n e of the girls w h o w a s m o s t discouraged at her first effort a year a go


c a m e bac k a n d said that the B uddhist schools w h i c h h a d o pp os ed her so m u c h the year before that she h a d to give u p w e r e all closed this year a n d that her pupils c a m e back a n d she h a d a flourishing. S u n d a y School of about' thirty-five every w e e k . A n o t h e r w h o held hers in the Buddhist temple yard the year before c a m e back h a p p y because so m a n y of the s a m e children returned to her school to hear m o r e of the Gospel. N o t only that, but her father w h o h a d been a drinking m a n h a d stopped his w i n e a n d w a s trying to c o n ­ vert his old cronies to the s a m e thing. U p o n being asked w h e th er h e r 'father h a d ever s po ke n of receiving baptism, she said, ‘Yes, but it is a g o o d m a n y miles to a t o w n w h e r e there is a w o r k e r or a n evangelist, so he has not yet g o n e to a n y church.’ T h e seed is s o w n in m a n y places but n o o ne is there to reap. ‘H o w shall they hear?’ “T h u s w e hav e a n u m b e r of things to be thankful for this year a n d w e g o o n gladly into the n e w year, k n o w i n g that H e w h o helped us to the e n d of our tasks this year a n d all former years will again help a n d bless. W e sincerely ask the prayers of all the church at h o m e u p o n this w o r k a n d these w or ke rs that w e m a y g o o n to greater things for the Lord.” Mis s E v e l y n O l t m a n s reports: “ I find the school has a splendid religious a tm os ph er e — the girls s e e m always willing a n d glad to lead a n d take part in a n y of the meetings. E v e r y M o n d a y the- Y o u n g W o m e n ’s Christian Association has its meeting. T h e attendance is voluntary. A b o u t two-thirds of the pupils are m e m b e r s , a n d all others are urged tovattend. O n T h u r s d a y m o r n i n g is the w e e k l y school prayer meeting, led b y the teachers a n d the girls. This m e e ti ng all the pupils are urged to attend, w h i c h they generally do. O n S u n d a y m o r n i n g the girls in the dormitory, about sixty in all, m e e t for S u n d a y School services in the chapel. T h e classes are. all taught b y the m a t r o n in the dormitory a n d the foreign teachers. M y class is the third year a n d these girls I teach in Japanese. T h e fourth a n d fifth year pupils are taught in English. O n S u n d a y m o r n i n g is the regular


church service, to w h i c h the girls m a r c h in a body. T h e girls are often asked to sing a h y m n during the service, a n d their sweet, y o u n g voices are always a pleasure to listen to. “ S u n d a y evenings the dormitory girls m e e t in o n e of the large class r o o m s for a quiet service. T h e s e meetings are led b y the foreign teachers, w h o take turn about. A n d once a m o n t h w e have a missionary topic, w h i c h the girls always s e e m to enjoy very m u c h . “ Miss Noordhoff a n d I each have a street S u n d a y School w h i c h is held S u n d a y afternoons. T h e girls d o the teaching, arid w e simply supervise a n d see that order is maintained, a n d things run smoothly. B o t h street S u n d a y Schools m e t at the school o n the 2 2 n d of D e c e m b e r for their Christmas program. T h e children took part in songs a n d speeches, a n d a talk w a s given b y o ne of our lady teachers— the one w h o so ably translated ‘Pollyanna’ into Japanese. T h e n inex­ pensive toys a n d cakes w e r e given each child.” Steele A c a d e m y .

'

Steele A c a d e m y reports a very successful year. T h e r e are three private schools in the city, a n d keen competition, but all the students that could be a c c o m m o d a t e d w e r e obtained, a n d during the m o n t h of April the enrollment reached 386, w h i c h w a s the highest enrollment in the histoty of the school. T h e last year m a r k e d the completion of the second dormitory at a cost of about Y e n 6,000, w h i c h w a s collected during Mr. W a l v o o r d ’s furlough in 1912. A n o t h e r i m p r o v e m e n t of the year w a s the tearing d o w n a n d erection o n another site of the exercise shed. This m a k e s r o o m for a tennis court, w h i c h has been greatly needed b y the boys. T h e spiritual life of the A c a d e m y is in a healthy condition, 14 boys having united with the church last year. T h e r e has also been a g r o w i n g interest in the S u n d a y School, with an increased attendance, the enrollment having reached 137.


JAPAN MISSION M

eiji

117

Gakuin.

T h e following account of the Fortieth Anniversary a p ­ peared in the ‘J aP a n ^Evangelist’ for D e c e m b e r , 1917: “ O n N o v e m b e r third, F o u n d e r ’s D a y of Meiji Gakuin, the institu­ tion celebrated its fortieth anniversary. Strictly speaking, Meiji Gakuin, as such, is only thirty-one years old, for it w a s in 1886. that the present organization w a s accomplished b y the m e r g i n g of t w o older institutions. T h e s e w e r e the U n i o n Theological School, formerly located in Tsukiji, T o k y o , a n d founded in 1877, a n d the T o k y o U n i o n College, founded in 1883, a n d also located in Tsukiji. T h e T o k y o U n i o n Col­ lege w a s itself a n institution f or me d b y the m e r g i n g of t w o schools. T h e s e w e r e a school founded b y M r . Jno. Ballagh in 1875 a n d ‘located at first in Y o k o h a m a a n d later in T o k y o , a n d the S e n Shi G a k k o founded b y Dr. Wyckofif in Y o k o h a m a in 1881. It should also be said that while the U n i o n T h e o ­ logical School, w h i c h has b e c o m e the Theological D ep ar t ­ m e n t of Meiji Gakuin, w a s not founded as such until 1877, the first b o d y of students that entered this institution h a d been receiving instruction in classes field in the h o m e of Dr. S. R. B r o w n ever since 1872. In fact, these classes t h o u g h not organized as a school, w e r e to all intents a n d purposes a real school having three or four regular teachers. J u d g e d b y the results they w e r e m o r e productive than m a n y regular schools of today, for they h a d enrolled such m e n as Drs. U e m u r a a n d I bu ka a n d a n u m b e r of nobles w h o later m a d e their n a m e s as leading statesmen of the Meiji era. T h u s in a very real sense Meiji G a k u i n Fortieth Anniversary should have been called the Forty-fifth Anniversary. T h e forenoon w a s taken u p with a c e r e m o n y held in the chapel a n d w h i c h w a s attended b y a g oodly n u m b e r of friends a n d representatives fro m the G o v e r n m e n t , Christian institutions a n d other Christian bodies. N e a r the close of the p r o g r a m a special recognition w a s extended to eight m e n w h o h a d served the institution fifteen years or more. T h e s e w e r e M r . J o h n Ballagh, Dr. W m . Imbrie,' Dr. Ibuka, M r.


Landis, M r . K u m a n o , M r . Kasai, M r . O k a m i , a n d M r . Miyachi: O f these M r. Ballagh h a d served the longest, having been' connected with the institution f r o m its beginning a n d having been the founder of one of the schools that w e r e m e r g e d w h e n Meiji G a k u i n w a s organized o n its present basis. “A t n o o n luncheon w a s served to the guests, a n d early in the afternoon b e g a n an interesting p r o g r a m of field sports w h i c h continued until sunset a n d w h i c h w a s attended b y over 2,000 visitors. In the evening a n A l u m n i banquet w a s held at the Shiba Sanentei at w h i c h about eighty w e r e present. A t this .meeting plans w e r e laid w h i c h look towards a m o r e effective co-operation b e t w e e n the alumni a n d the school authorities for the extension of the usefulness of the Meiji Gakuin.” ( • < ' T h e M id dl e D e p a r t m e n t (corresponding roughly to the "•High School in the U nited States) has.had the largest attend­ ance in its history, the n u m b e r reaching 473. T h e College Department, w h i c h has largely been a preparatory school for the Theological Seminary, has a d d e d this year an English N o r m a l Course. T h e w o r k pf the S e m i n a r y has been w e a k ­ ened b y the loss b y sickness of o n e of the regular instructors w h o has fallen a victim, as so m a n y of our trained m e n do, to the dread disease of tuberculosis. O n e of the students died during the year, but his life o n his sick b ed w a s of such strength that the w h o l e family are n o w earnest students of Christianity a n d the m o t h e r has already bee n baptized. T h e father of one of the students w h o h a d died sent in Y e n 300.00 in m e m o r y of his son. A neighbor has given in m e m o r y of ' his former wife the s u m of Y e n 2,000.00 to be used for athletic purposes. A n encouraging activity in musical lines has been aroused b y an enthusiastic teacher, a n d the College a n d S e m i n a r y students h av e given t w o very creditable public performances, assisted b y outside talent. T h e y filled the chapel both times with paid admissions. T h e flood caused b y the t y p h o o n a nd tidal w a v e of N o v e m b e r caused so m u c h distress in the' out­ skirts of T o k y o that our College a n d S e m i n a r y students w e r e


dismissed f r o m classes to help in- the relief work. This w a s a c k n o w l e d g e d b y a h a n d s o m e certificate of appreciation w h i c h reads as follows: T o the Student B o d y of Meiji G ak ui n: In N o v e m b e r , 1917, y o u graciously a n d without stint helped in relief w o r k m a d e necessary b y the t y p h o o n a n d rain, a n d in grateful recognition of this w e present y o u with this parchment. â– . Signed a n d Sealed b y the G o v e r n o r of T o k y o Fu. T h e impression the writer has gotten in compiling this report a n d in m ee ti ng m a n y of the m e n a n d w o m e n w h o have written the .different sections of it is o ne of encourage­ ment. T h e intensive w o r k being started, a n d w h i c h is well u nder w a y in K y u s h u , promises to bring to fruition the hopes of the w or ke rs in concentrating there o n the evangelistic work. In the schools m o r e intensive w o r k is being d o n e likewise, a n d m o r e thought is being put into the solution of the educa­ tional a n d spiritual problems facing the workers. T h e church in A m e r i c a m a y feel confident that their w or ke rs in J ap an are using every dollar given t h e m a n d every ounce of energy in the m o s t careful a n d prayerful w a y , for as A m e r i c a n citizens -and citizens of the K i n g d o m of G o d they realize with those in the h o m e land the great struggles that are going, o n in the w orld today.' .


* V\

H

ARABIA

N

A


T H E A R A B I A N MISSION. F ounded

1889. Incorporated 1894. A dopted by R. C. A. 1894.

Missionaries. — B a s r a h : Rev. James Cantine, Rev. J . E. Moerdyk, Miss C. B. Kellien. Bahrein: Rev. D. Dykstra, Rev. G. J. Pennings, Dr. P. W. Harrison, Rev. H. A. Bilkert, Miss J. A. Scardefield, Miss M. C. Van Pelt. M a s k a t and M a t r a h : Rev. G. D. Van Peursem, Miss Fanny Button, Dr. Sarah L. Hosmon. K u w e i t : Dr. C. S. G. Mylrea, Rev. E. E. Calverley, Miss G. Shafheklin. ' i Associate Missionaries.— Mrs. James Cantine, Mrs. D. Dykstra, Mrs. C. S. G. Mylrea, Mrs. E. E. Galverley, Mrs. P. W. Harrison, Mrs. G. D. Van Peursem, 'Mrs. H. A. Bilkert. I n Cairo, Egypt. — Rev. and Mrs. S. M. Zwemer. I n A m erica.— Rev. and Mrs. F. J . Barny, Rev. and Mrs. J. Van Ess.

R E P O R T O F T H E A R A B I A N MISSION F O R T H E . Y E A R E N D I N G N O V E M B E R 1, 1917. ■It has been a year of war. A c a m p a i g n w h i c h has lasted for three years a n d has e n g a g e d hun dr ed s of thousands of m e n , is only n o w being driven to a successful conclusion. All of Arabia is being profoundly changed, but M es op o t a m i a , the seat of actual hostilities, has been utterly transformed. T h e external transformation is startling enough. O n e s e e m s to be exploring a n e w country w h i c h is a curious mixture of elements frctai India, E ngland, a n d Arabia. T h e internal transformation is m o r e important, a n d to those w h o hav e eyes to see, even m o r e remarkable. M e n w a l k nearly as fast in Busrah, as in America. T h e r e is a restless energy, a break­ ing a w a y f r o m old a n d time-honored habits, a willingness to accept the new, that is quite a revolution in itself. T h e r e are other results less happy. A spirit of c om me rc ia li sm fills the atmosphere. T h e grip of Islam o n m e n ’s hearts is paralyzed in the face of it, a n d the s a m e m u s t be said of Oriental Chris­ tianity. T h e r e is a thirst for a m u s e m e n t a n d luxury quite foreign to the spirit of the East, w h i c h in its intensity could hardly be surpassed in N e w Y o r k Uself. M e n n o longer rec-


ognize the b on ds of religion, a n d it is not surprising that i m ­ morality flourishes. ■ / Unfortunately this shattering impact of the W e s t u p o n the Eakt, is b o u n d to be n o t em po ra ry thing. S o m e of the m o r e glaring excesses incident to the period of transition will doubtless disappear within a few years, but if h u m a n j u d g m e n t can be trusted at all, w e m u s t recognize that there has been a fundamental a n d p e r m a n e n t c hange in the characteij of our task. In the future w e will n o longer w o r k in a social order w h i c h is •purely Arabic. T h e w o r k is to be complicated, a n d the difficulties increased b y a conflict of Eastern a n d W e s t e r n ideals in things religious, political a n d economic. M e s o p o t a m i a doubtless will be the m o s t c o m ­ pletely transformed, but unquestionably the w h o l e of Arabia will be profoundly affected. S o m e surprising results are already evident. T h e A r a b is m o r e tolerant than before. This result so contrary to w h a t w a s anticipated, s e e m s to be d u e to t w o things. In the first place his interest in the next w orld is fading, a n d as it fades his reasons for intolerance disappear. In the second place, the w a r has s h o w n h i m that after all, so-called Christians a n d M o s l e m s are m u c h alike-. M o h a m m e d a n intolerance is due, in n o small degree, to an uncomfortable conviction d o w n in the b o t t o m of his heart, that in Christ h e faces a better prophet a n d in Christianity a better faith, than his o w n . T h e present w a r has m a d e h i m believe that the differences he has seen are •only superficial; that fundamentally m e n are m u c h alike n o matter w h a t their religion m a y be. B o t h w h a t he has heard f r o m E u r o p e a n d w h a t he has seen at h o m e , hav e g o n e far to convince h i m that all religions are equally futile a n d equally powerless, in the face of the passions a nd the selfishness of men . . A n o t h e r c hange of great significance is the definite a b a n ­ d o n m e n t of all political aspirations. T h e d r e a m s of PanI slamism have died hard, but they are dead. T h e c a m p a i g n in M e s o p o t a m i a with the t r e m e n d o u s forces involved, the h e a v y guns, the aeroplanes, wireless apparatus, etc., have


s h o w n the A r a b that his wildest d r e a m s of military operations are m e r e child’s play. A s one A r a b said with a touch of Oriental exaggeration, “W e c a m e d o w n fro m B a g d a d to B a s ­ rah. In the river steamer touched steamer, a n d o n shore tent touched tent, for the w h o l e distance.” W h a t the A r a b desires n o w is the protection of a Eur op ea n Power, and most of t h e m prefer'England to a n y other. A painful result of the w a r a n d all that the w a r has brought, has been the collapse of the Protestant Christians. T h e s e m e n c o m e f r o m the Protestant Christian c o m m u n i t y of the M a r d i n district in Turkey, a n d in B u s r a h .quite a little church of this type has g r o w n up. This Protestant c o m m u ­ nity is the result of missionary w o r k of the A m e r i c a n Board. Originally a m o s t corrupt Oriental church, it has been quite transformed, a n d m e n f r o m it have carried a very large part of the b ur de n of our Evangelistic w o r k in Arabia. T h e w o r k of Bible distribution especially has bee n largely in their hands. ' T h e extraordinary temptations of these days have proved too m u c h for them, a n d hardly a m a n is unaffected. Helpers n o w e m p l o y e d are d e m a n d i n g large increases in their salaries if they are to r emain in their present positions. M a n y have left already. T h e Protestant C h u r c h of B u s r a h has almost disappeared. After the w a r there will probably be a partial recovery, but with their o w n country u nd er a just a n d stable g o v e r n m e n t it is doubtful if m a n y will w a n t to w o r k in Arabia. O u r hospital w o r k is being largely carried o n with M o s l e m helpers, a n d increasing use is being m a d e of m e n a n d w o m e n f r o m India. S o m e f e w of the M a r d i n m e n are still with us. F o r the future w e are trusting that H e w h o s e w o r k it is, will supply w h a t is needed a n d guide us in its use. T o all the other (difficulties of the w o r k m u s t be a d d e d the shortage of workers, especially of Doctors. W e h a v e only t w o m e n doctors left, a n d of our t w o w o m e n doctors, o ne goes h o m e o n furlough this spring. T h e situation is so serious that the Mission passed the following resolution. . “ Resolved that w e reiterate to the B o a r d of Trustees the


]24

-

FOREIGN MISSIONS

'

great need of Arabia for medical m e n a n d w o m e n . Our. finest hospital is standing e m p t y a n d unused, a n d opportunities that are the a n s w e r to the prayers of thirty years, .we are powerless to meet.” ' H o w e v e r , in spite of w a r s a n d r u m o r s of wars, of multi­ plied temptations, a n d increased difficulties, G o d has seen fit to s h o w H i s p o w e r in Arabia as never before in the Mission’s history. T h e prayers of m a n y years are being a n s w e r e d in the opening of the inland country .to the Gospel. This p r o g ­ ress centers, as m i g h t be expected, a ro un d the medical work. E v e r y w h e r e the ministrations of the doctor are softening hard hearts, a n d m a k i n g friends. E v e r y w h e r e the v o l u m e of m e d ­ ical w o r k is increasing a n d patients f r o m far a w a y taking back reports that o pe n n e w doors. Dr. H o s m o n reports fro m M u s c a t that in spite of unsettled conditions in O m a n the w o m e n continue to c o m e fro m those districts, although in smaller numbers. In K u w e i t -the n u m b e r of patients is in­ creasing steadily. In both M u s c a t a n d K u w e i t approximately 1,500 n e w w o m e n have been seen a n d treated, while in each place the total treatments hav e a m o u n t e d to about 5,000. Dr. M y l r e a in K u w e i t has treated '2,789 m e n a n d h a d a total of 5,693 treatments, an increase over last year of 30 per cent. In Bahrein the n u m b e r s w e r e larger still. T h e significance of these figures is not simply in the a m o u n t of physical suffering w h i c h has been alleviated. F o r m a n y years it has been the h o p e a n d the prayer of those w h o have the evangelization of Arabia on, their hearts, that b y m e a n s of this ministry of kindness, the great u nt ou ch ed inte­ rior country m i g h t be opened, a n d G o d is beginning to give us the answer. Dr. Harrison w a s invited to R i a d h for a stay of t we nt y days, this past S u m m e r , a n d reports a m o s t interesting a n d satisfactory time, with ejvery prospect for fur­ ther a n d m o r e extended trips. R i a d h is m o r e than the capital of Central Arabia. In a real sense, it is the capital of the w h o l e empire of Islam, a n d perhaps the m o s t important city strategically in the entire peninsula. E v e n o n this first trip, it w a s possible to ope n the clinics with a brief prayer service.


H a s s a will probably send a similar invitation in the near future. Kuttar has already don e so. Kateef a n d D a r e e n w e r e visited during the year a n d w e r e as cordial as ever. It looks as if the long struggle for a foothold in the interior is to be crowned, b y G o d ’s power, with success. Obviously this will call for a large increase in our forces, in the near future. Central Arabia cannot be occupied a n d held without m e n , a n d especially medical m e n . T h e long, difficult, tedious task of establishing the Gospel in that bar­ ren desert country can hardly be d o n e b y a n y o n e else. N o t m a n y posts can be found as hard a n d as unattractive. T h e country is a weary, barren, sun-baked wilderness, a n d the hearts of its people are f ormed after the s a m e pattern. T h e strength a n d the hardness a n d the barrenness of the desert s e e m to have entered into their lives. T h e pleasant things of this w or ld they k n o w little about. Their hopes for political p o w e r they hav e been compelled to abandon, but their spirit is as p ro ud a n d their devotion to their o w n faith as intense as ever. T h e increased tolerance of the M e s o p o t a m i a n A r a b finds n o echo in their hearts. T h e first w o r d s s poken to the missionary doctor as he entered that city w e r e not the c u s t o m ­ ary “P eace be upon, you,’\bu t “D o y o u testify that there is no G o d but G o d ? ” T h e s e m e n are the real b a c kb on e of Islam. Els ew he re Eastern superstition or W e s t e r n science m a y rule m e n ’s hearts, but here m e n give undivided allegiance to the M o s l e m G o d in his solitary a n d o v e r w h e l m i n g omnipotence. T h e great ideas w h i c h give Islam its p o w e r have their fountain-head in Central Arabia, a n d the opportunity of taking Christ to m e n such as these is a privilege G o d gives to few. T h e r e are not m a n y posts as important. T h e c a m p a i g n for the M o s ­ l e m heart, f r o m the Philippine Islands to Russia, a n d from C h i n a to W e s t Africa, will be affected b y it. G o d is opening the country to the Gospel, a n d H e is using the Mission to dissipate the fogs of ignorance, a n d to melt the hard stony prejudice w h i c h bars the progress of H is truth like a concrete wall. T h e schools organized b y the


„ Mission in all of its stations a n d carried -by .prayer a n d sacri.fice through years of opposition a n d hatred, are at last c o m i n g into their- o w n . T h e B u s r a h School for boys enrolled one h u n d r e d last year. This year it begins with a n enrollment of o ne h u n d r e d a n d thirty. T h e Girls’ School has a n enroll­ m e n t of nearly fifty. A. visit to those schools is e n o u g h to take the pes si mi sm out of anybody. Their reputation has travelled hun dr ed s of miles, a n d is a reinforcement to har d ­ -pressed missionaries to the very limits of our field. E v e r y pupil studies the Bible, a n d gets a vie w of Christ’s teaching, a n d of Christian character, w h i c h m u s t m a k e his w h o l e out­ look different, a n d help m a k e h i m a w o r t h y builder of the Social O r d e r that is to be in this land. T h e school is already contributing to the general educa­ tional situation. M r . V a n E s s has published an Arabic G r a m ­ mar, a n d M r . M o e r d y k has revised a text for beginners in English. T h e w h o l e t r e m e n d o u s p r o b l e m of education in M e s o p o t a m i a is being grappled with, a n d o ne of the m a j o r functions of our school is the furnishing of teachers for elementary schools throughout the country. 1 T h e s a m e thirst for education is beginning to be felt in the other stations. T h e school in Bahrein starts the n e w year with t w o teachers instead of one, a n d with a b ud ge t m o r e than doubled. T h e r e are t w o schools besides our o w n in Bahrein, a n d the situation while exceedingly difficult, is full, of p r o m ­ ise. T h e attendance this year approached thirty, a n d there is every reason to expect a m u c h larger attendance n o w that a Persian teacher is possible. T h e r e is also a d e m a n d for education from outlying districts such as D a r e e n a n d Kateef. T h e School in K u w e i t reached twenty-three in attendance a n d in the face of determined a n d long-continued opposition w a s reduced to ten. It still flourishes. T h e M u s c a t School has h a d a successful year. . Altogether w e can rejoice that at last a thirst for truth a n d a d v a n c e m e n t is beginning to appear. It is w e a k as yet, a n d has in it m u c h that is u n w o r t h y a n d undesirable, but it m e a n s progress a n d constitutes a great opportunity for us.


TYPICAL B E D O U I N

MUSCAT


T H E O L D R E G I M E IN M E S O P O T A M I A

A PRIMITIVE BRIDGE AT A M A R A


A long, w e a r y road is ahead, a n d it will require m e n a n d m o n e y a n d hard w o r k a n d patience to m e e t the situation, but w e can afford to thank G o d a n d take courage that even in Arabia the m a r c h for better things has begun. . , A b o v e all, w e thank G o d that H e is d r a w i n g m e n to H i m ­ self. T h e r e are perhaps three stages, in the progress of the M o h a m m e d a n heart t o w a r d Christ. W h e n m e n listen to the Gospel with respect a n d interest, instead of insults a nd revil­ ing, w e recognize that the first stage has been passed. W h e n m e n c o m e to hear the Gospel voluntarily a n d often with great effort, w e have gained the second stage, a n d w h e n m e n per­ sonally study a n d seek, they are approaching Christ h i m ­ self. In all of our stations w e have passed the time of revil­ ing a n d insult. In hospitals w e hear of sincere a n d respect­ ful interest. Mrs. Calverley writes f r o m K u w e i t that not a w o r d of opposition to the Gospel m e s s a g e w a s heard during the year. M r . M o e r d y k tells of Bible lessons being willingly accepted in the school in Busrah. Dr. H o s m o n reports real interest o n the part of her patients in Muscat. E v e n a deter­ m i n e d a n d long-continued anti-Christian c a m p a i g n o n the part of the religious leaders in K u w e i t w a s without serious effect o n the work. It apparently e vo ke d little or n o popular response. E v e r y w h e r e w e have reached the stage of respect­ ful interest. A l m o s t e ve ry wh er e in our field the attendance of M o s l e m s at the Arabic services is increasing. T h e K u w e i t services are o ne of the brightest spots o n the w h o l e Mission horizon. T h r o u g h o u t the year the attendance has been a bo ve fifty a n d often approaching or even exceeding o ne hundred. S u c h in­ terest is a n e w thing in our Mission history, a n d its significance is incerased w h e n w e r e m e m b e r that this attendance remained practically unaffected b y a bitter a n d long-continued c a m p a i g n against the w h o l e Mission a n d all its activities. N o w h e r e else hav e the audiences reached such a figure, but in Bahrein, a n d in Muscat, the interest has been exceedingly good. O n l y in B u s r a h hav e w e failed to see this advance, a n d that perhaps because of the unfortunate location of the chapel.


Bible sales during the year h av e been large. In Busrah, s w h e r e the soldiers b o u g h t m a n y , over 3,000 w e r e sold. K u w e i t reports a sale of nearly nine hundred. Bahrein, because of h crippled force, sold only 473. Especially encouraging reports c o m e f r o m the Bible shops of A m a r a a n d Nasarieh, w h e r e there has been a large a m o u n t of direct personal w o r k both with the A r a b s a n d in connection with the Y. M . C. A., also with the British forces. O u r s u p r e m e object is to bring Christ to m e n , a n d to bring m e n to Christ. W e m a y hav e to w o r k a n d pray for .the opening of closed doors, a n d m u c h of o ur-effort m a y be spent in r e m o v i n g obstacles, but missionaries w o r k in Arabia as elsewhere, for the o ne object of w i n n i n g m e n . It is because w e see Christ d r a w i n g m e n a n d w o m e n to himself, that hard­ ships are trifles, a n d difficulties privileges. H i s w o r k in m e n ’s hearts has been especially evident a m o n g the w o m e n of Bahrein, a n d a m o n g the m e n of Kuweit. M a k ki eh , the one baptized A r a b w o m a n in Bahrein, has continued to g r o w in Grace. H e r testimony is sincere in season a n d out of reason, a n d is being m u c h used. S h e is less persecuted than f o r m ­ erly. Besides M a k k i e h there are three other w o m e n , all apparently sincere in their faith, t h o u g h n o n e of t h e m has been baptized as yet. T h e s e w o m e n are passing through deep waters. T h e fires of evil desire in their o w n hearts, a n d forces of evil outside, conspire to drag t h e m back. T h e y are “s om et im es u p a n ’ s om et im es d o w n . ” O n e of t h e m especially has been such a care as to nearly w e a r Mrs. D yk fs ra out. B u t through it all Christ’s- strength has been sufficient for them. T h e y need the prayer of every m a n , a n d every w o m a n w h o longs for the c o m i n g of the K i n g d o m in Arabia, for as w e a k ' a n d as ignorant, a n d as imperfect as they are, the h on or of Christ’s name, a n d the establishment of H i s church d e p e n d o n them. . T h e r e are three y o u n g m e n in K u w e i t of w h o m m u c h the s a m e is to be said. All the forces of the w or ld a n d the flesh a n d the devil, are against these m e n , in that bigoted a n d fanatical city. T h e y face difficulties that it is impossible for


us to understand, m u c h less to carry' for them. Their very lives are far f r o m safe, but G o d w h o has cared for t h e m thus far, can bring t h e m out into a clear Christian experience, a n d consecrated Christian service. T h e year behind us has been o ne of blessing. M a y the o n e before us be o n e of faith. W e never faced such difficulties, nor such opportunities. H u m a n reinforcements of prayer a n d m e n never s e e m e d so necessary, although all h u m a n resources never before have been so obviously a n d so utterly inadequate. “A n d w h o is sufficient for these things? O u r sufficiency is from God, w h o also has m a d e us sufficient.�


GENERAL

SUMMARY,

1917-1918

8 237 6 3 8 16

4 48 8 5 12 12

Stations occupied ................. Out-stations and Preaching Places.... Missionaries, men, ordained ........ Missionaries, men, not ordained ..... Associate Missionaries, married women.. Missionaries, unmarried women....... Native ordained ministers .......... Other native helpers, men........... Native helpers, women.............. Churches ....................... Communicants ... _.............. Received on Confession, 1916........ Boarding Schools, Boys* ............ Scholars ....... ................ Boarding Schools, Girls* ............ Scholars ........................ Theological Schools .............. Theological Students ..............

105* ' 66*

366 221

2,229 136* 5* 573*

3,593 366 9 493

603* 1*

364

11 78 12 2 11 13 ID 25 15 30 1,290 158 i%t 635 l%t 353

. '

4 ■3 10 4 11 5 24 9 2 1 23

45* 3 86 226 63 3,439 8,605 8 209 224 10,348 11 10 36,801 84,630 7,229t $36,425* Rs.11,310 Y.25,683 Rs 1630 $543 $3,770 $12,842 $18,212* 3 285 19* 1,286*

Sunday Schools ..............

Scholars ........................ Day Schools..................... Scholars ....................... . Hospitals and Dispensaries......... Patients Treated .... ............ . Native Contributions, Silver........ . Native Contributions, U. S. Gold.....

27 366 36 14 42 46 45 520 311 64 7,114 660 16% 1,724 11% 1,320 83 318 12,392 236 11,858 25 128,660 $35,367

* The figures of 1916-17. t Hope and Wilhelmina Hospitals open only six months. X Union institutions.

C O M P A R A T I V E S U M M A R Y , 1858-1918 Jl858

Out-stations and Preaching Places... Missionaries, married women ... Missionaries, unmarried women ...

6 2 8 6 1 22 7 297

6 87 Native Contributions ...........

1868 „ 10 18 14 12 4 76 2 13 816 2 55 1 46 7 17 413 1 15,507 $1,134

1878

1888

1898

1908

1918

27 29 23 11 11 366 268 241 123 49 50 41 36 28 16 42 33 31 21 14 46 33 20 9 7 45 37 30 26 ‘ 6 367 520 211 173 86 311 146 41 47 10 64 42 47 47 31 7,114 1,563 4,559 - 5,564 5,282 9 10 i 7 16% 1,004 1,724 517 308 40 uya 11 10 3 5 766 300 450 1,320 97 80 83 61 32 19 236 106 201 195 44 8,245 11,858 1,341 2,612 6,059 4 8 25 1 18,046 107,571 128,660 9,673 $1,500 $8,325 $10,758 $24,500 $35,367


T A B U L A R V I E W OP RECEIPTS :

’: a

CLASSES AND CHURCHES.

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(U

W

M

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3

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CLASSIS O F A L B A N Y

Albany, Sixth ....... Bethlehem, First ..... Berne, Second ....... Clarksville ......... Delmar, Unionville .... Jerusalem ........... Knox ............. New Baltimore ...... Onesquethaw ....... Union, Feura Bush ....

W. M.

65 70 43 6 11

OtO 1*1 1195 58

50 00

80 50 65 00

14 74

00 94 40 00 81

23 32 30 00

37 51 6 00 25 00

23 25 2 76

21 60 20 60 2 50

4 97

10 25

2 66

30 00 5 00

11 00 27 96 i6 30 77 29

3 00 29 75 10 00

2019 2038 57 5 00 105 15 00 ' 133 116 71 , 6 3 50 15 9 00 25 ' 17 52 155 11 1 00 26 8 29

2-75

Union .......

Totals ..........

136 30

8 00 2355 33

25 74

66 26 24 00 32 94 36 00 31 30 57 76 00

56 32 38 89 2 50

5 00 10 00

20'00 10 00 26 54

219 81

4935 97

26 54 2190 79

3o

H

i

Albany, First

........ 1000 00 Albany, Madison Ave.... 727 68 Albany, Third ....... 42 50 Albany, Fourth ...... 100 00

<

CLASSIS O F B E R G E N 281 31 10 179 8

50 99 95 93 00

30 00 10 00

125 78 15 200

00 50 00 00

82 66 10 00

7 50 18 74

106 87 58 70 20 00

81 68 44 58

47 22 12 56 67 25

00 00 00 50 RQ 00

15 114 15 21

00 65 76 95

"s 66

Hackensack, Italian ....

Hasbrouck Heights .... Highwood ..........

18 58

16 20

W. M.

40 97 57 00

Union .......

Totals ..........

888 57

208 70

18 58

816 25

45 00 7

06

"36 20

234 88

2203 18


s

E '3 CLASSES

■s'S

A N D

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A OT

CHURCHES.

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CLASSIS O F S O U T H BERGEN Jersey City, Bergen.... Bayonne^ First ...... Jersey City, First Van Vorst ..... °...... Jersey City, Park .... Bayonne, Fifth St..... Hudson City, Second .. Jersey City, Lafayette.. Jersey City, Greenville. . Bayonne, Third ...... Jersey City, First Ger. Evang.............. St. John’s Ger. Evang... Jersey City, Faith .... W . M. Union ........ Totals .......

529 54 158 00

29 73 30 00

180 22

43 06

256 86

34 93

243 70 24 80 5 00

59 6i

217 94

20 00

66 00 73 22 13 00 119 03

838 99 319 00

52 00

348 13 421 25 357 39 5

10 50 25 00

3 85

61 78 45 00

35 00 15 00

'is'is 5 00

9 40 105 36 16 32

58 20

.| 1456 32

197 33

23 85

*ii 93

670 27

25 00

3 70

1 50

201 64

5 • 9 175 16

00 40 49 32

2574 41

CLASSIS O F CASCADES Big Timber, Hope .... Lynden ............. Monarch ............ Alderson, Alta, N e w Hol­ land .............. North Y a k i m a ........ Oak Harbor ......... San Francisco, Cal.... Totals

112 29 13 50 12 52 95 00 53 36

20

5 119 29 13 50

7 00

50 00

286 *67

20 00

35 00 24 00 17 00

20 00

79 70

10 00

14 78

1 50

12 52 220 00 92 14 17 00

34 78

479 65

143 00

150 00

793 00

30 00 50 00

59 00

208 33

14 40 96 36 60 55 5

196 394 367 564 556 105 15 67 438

CLASSIS O F C H I C A G O Chicago, First ... Chicago, Westside Immanuel ......... Danforth ........ DeMott ..... .... Morrison, Ebenezer Englewood, First .. Fulton, First .... Fulton, Second .... Chicago, Gano ... Indianapolis ..... Lafayette ........ Lansing ......... Mt. Greenwood .... Newton, Ziori .... Roseland. First South Holland .... Spring Valley, Ustick Symmit ........... Wichert ........... W. M. Union ..... Totals

490 00 38 15 182 275 103 399 380

20 10 21

245 13 54 444 1033 34

20

81 *00 22 39 132 88 51 ,54 67 50

20 00 10 86

4 45 372 255 7 19

18 00

00 00 20 00

10 00 6 75

10 00

44 75

10 70 10

25 30 48 64 30 115

16 1400 215

50

52 15

20 11 10

51 3833 05| 1176 41

78 35 77 30

856 4 5 |

08 45 77 96 76 80

10 20

2338 13

88 20 20

86

180 2246 1619 71 70 113 65

35 71 73 36 80 00 27 30 50 37 32 41 30 75 89 00

8248 79


Total.

Arabian Mission.

Special.

W o m a n ’s Board.

Young People’s Societies.

Sunday Schools.

CHURCHES.

Churches and Societies.

CLASSES A N D

CL A S S I S O F D A K O T A Aurora ....:......... Castlewood .......... Charles Mix ......... Corsica ............. Grand View, Armour .,. Harrison ............ Hull, American ...... Lake View .......... Litchville ............ Maurice, American ... Monroe, Sandham Meml. North Marion ....... Orange City, American.. Springfield ........... Tyndall .............. Twin Brooks......... W. M. Union ........

89 78 50 5 50 231

00 93 42 00 00 00

35 00 10 27 3 25

7 15 5 7 28

. 15 00 25 00 15 00

55 32 58 87 113 60 98 14 1660-91 321 91 12 00

156 40 5 00 ‘ 7 00

00 00 00 00 30

2 55 5 00

100 00 15 00 26- 00

5 33 9 25 143

00 25 11 00 20

300 05

120 89

25 00

108 01 40 03

3125 15

285 41

55 00

582 00

26 68

112 24 51 66

137 50 . 72 14 3 95 144 93 166 73

452 22

124 00 96 20 68 67 25 00 57 00 440 70 22 55 7 00 60 32 63 87 385 77 158 91 1838' 41 563 25 12 00 3 95 698 88 40 03 4666 51

CL A S S I S O F GERMANIA Bethany ............. Bethel .............. Chancellor .......... Cromwell Center ..... Davis ............... Delaware ............ Dempster............. Herman .... ........ . Hope ............... Lennox, Second ..... Logan .............. Monroe, S. D ......... North Sibley ........ Salem— Little Rock ... Scotland ............ Strasburg, N. D ....... Totals ...........

10 00 5 37 60 35

00 00 00 00

82 7 5 200 10 40 18 88 29 52

15 12 00 00 00 00 19 00 90 92

2 17 15 4 29 833 Decatur ............. 15 Detroit .............. 217 East Paris .......... 8 Fremont ............. 104 Grand Haven, hirst .... 268 Grand Rapids, Third ... 1420 Grand Rapids, Fourth ... 84

10 00

59 71

40 00

82 00

851 99

9 28 5 10 21 33

17 00

12 75 18 31

5 00 10 00

.10 00

14 06

10 00 12 00

16 60

10 00

29 05

670 28

20 00

\

C LASSIS O F G R A N D RIVER Ada ................ Atwood ............. Beverly Mission ..... Brand Mission, S. D. .. Byron Center ........

5 66

10 00 5 00 57 00 60 00 50 00 10 00 106 21 7 12 5 00 212 00 36 60 40 00 18 19 137 05 29 90 67*92

20 00

50 44 14 00 25 25 00 59 21 53 00 00 00

75 00 217 62 .. 53 3 60 307 197 170

44 00 t

36 12 84 18 35 00 24 7 00 00 ......

17 69 6 37

33 50 00 50

28 135 144 85

35 00 38 00

24 00 19 00 100 00

72 141 7 70

54 05 00 00

■5 92 42 111

25 97 50 00

11 52 54 4 194 1305 28 378 11 ° 198 862 1830 550

78 29 78 00 12 42 00 45 33 97 15 12 00


v

z

A

W

CHURCHES. A

* •o

■Q s,

CLASSIS O F G R A N D RIVER (Continued) Grand Rapids, Fifth ... Grand Rapids, Sixth ... Grand Rapids, Seventh Grand Rapids, Eighth . Grand Rapids, Ninth .. Grandville .......... Allendale, Mich..... ' Grant .... ......... Kalamazoo, First*.... Kalamazoo, Third .... Kalamazoo, Fourth .... Falmouth ........... Lament ............. Moddersville ........ Fruitport M. Fest.... Muskegon, First .... Muskegon, Third .... N e w Era ........... Plainfield .......... Portage ............ Rehoboth, Lucas..... South Barnard ...... Spring Lake ........ Twin Lakes ......... Gr: Rapids M. Fest... W . M. U n i o n ........ Allegan Mission ..... Totals

8 s

m o

730 00

100 00 75 31 27 180 25 49

00 00 80 72 72 22

213 26 14 20

58 00 10 35

•6

Young Peogl

CLASSES A N D

s *8 S"1

20

rt 1 is

15 25 7 5

00 00 50 00

11 67 s s ’oo

20 00

£

m

407

130 190 75 139

1

o m

9 00

i <

&

182 13 70 25 18 44

42 33 00 00 00 35

8 127 15 25

30 32 00 00

32 50

100 00 • 75 00 131 59 1 60 7 00

100 6 63 32 33

111 12

115 53 57 75 98 35

29 12 00 59

20 00 30 00 14 00

1468 148 357 428 298 532 25 70 154 313 94 14

20

66 57 18

1

115 37

65 00

25 00 45 00

14 00| 15 00

5 00

6 00 8 00

11 00 20 00

28 32 14 961 60 00

10 00 '97 48 47 50

50 00

30 00

23 00 23 00

51 24 97

8 00 5070 28 2522 22

209 17

1274 75

62 16 17 28

90 00 12 99

520 69

1232 91

40 00

603 37 5 60 11 23

17 67 79 75 80 08 72 79 32 58

00 10

35

91 282 35 156 34 143 42 33 374 98

68 53 8

10830 02

CLASSIS O F G R E E N E Athens ....... Catskill ....... Coxsackie, First . Coxsackie, Second Kiskatom ..... Leeds ......... W . M. Union. .. . Totals

40 00 6 85

29 04 109 98

10 00 5 00

14 25 193 27

16 85

5 00

23 50 47 57 14 23 15

10 00

00 50 00 00 60 00 00

5 00

232 10

40 00

635 20

75 700 91 183 14 42 15

00 72 64 21 60 25 00

1122 42

CLASSIS O F HOLLAND .Beaverdam ..... 81 90 Cleveland, First .. 254 83 Cleveland, Calvary 24 91 Dunningville ... .. 45 12 East Overisel ..... Ebenezer ..... 40 53 61 13 Graafschap.... Hamilton ..... 105 04 11 95 Harlem ........ 239 67 Holland, first .. Holland, Third .. 825 001 Holland, Fourth . 103 30 Hudsonville ... ........ |....... |

25 05

5 00 11 37 62 70

68 58 iio’oo

23 11 36 07 60 33 T25

5 290 480 58 8

66 70 22 51 88 61

20 00

40 95

15 00

92 50

13 00 130 0C 6 75

70 50 219 82 39 12

145 13 6 60 528 941 82 001 81 82] .... I

141 00 128 00

I

111 79 447 46 81 161 61 482 24 1283 1865 289 8

95 95 53 02 19 81 13 67 25 33 33 87 61


Total.

Arabian Mission.

Special.

Woman's Board.

Young People's Societies.

Sunday Schools.

CHURCHES.

Churches and Societies.

CLASSES A N D

1 CLASSIS O F HOLLAND (Continued)

4*n no * nn iifi no 70S 01

Zeeland, Second...... Colonial M. Fest,

52 00 170 86 729 32

203 16 63 250 63 87 128 246 408

00 00 18 50 47 01 22

7 10 15 7

50 00 60 50

4 00 25 00

113 76 12 72 184 32 15 69 140 197

02 50 00 00 89 00 00 00 00 81

21 25 143 85 162 96 705 00 39 09 610 00 230 00

187 07 53 96

1534 18 1109 00 2461 72

12533 32

24 97 4587 52 2606 55

234 35

11 25 2 95 15 97

2 50

43 38 50 96 50 77 42 47 87 35

37 07 28 99

150 00 Totals ...........

59 00 65 00 230 00

797 597 24 423 1860 141 136 312 1231 1820

C L ASSIS O F H U D S O N 23 38 105 60 i? 309 87 in 91 iss in

6 00

18 52 50 00

10 00

30 84 21 00

25 00 5 30

17 60 126 50

32 70

147 4 16 35

nn 76 05 nn 00 no 7?

34 83 50 25 in 47

1021 09

145 72

31 71

127 112 37 30

85 50 65 00

10 00

15 10 5 83

00 00 00 09

2 00

2 50 23 35

421 09

12 00

224 42

20 00

20 00 3 21

5 00

9 39 78 00

408 53

194 23 149 35 12 385 136 10 176 531 21 9

31 96 07 00 00 60 56 00 13 84 19 39

1685 05

C L ASS I S O F ILLINOIS Bethany, 2nd Roseland..

722 25 203 25 7

15 00 45 00 00

Spring Lake, 111.......

25 25 73 83

Totals ...........

1081 68

00 57 00 00 00

46 66 35 00 5 00

32 50 10 55 â– 2

00 00 00 00 00

3 75 1 00 27 02 86 66

1027 262 306 120 19 15 13 35 207

66 07 10 00 00 00 75 75 29

180 77

2006 62

50 00 10 00 103 00

963 127 434 1560 352 267 30 109

\

CL A S S I S O F I O W A

Churchville, Pipestone .. Clara City ...........

89 39 50 10 10

674 61 291 836 207 220 15 85

78 00 06 61 65 00 00 00

164 13 25 00 588 47 66 75 15 00 4 64

74 31 40 85 50 12 5

40 00 00 00 00 00 00

50 00 28 20 10 20

12 04 05 00

31 00 06 08 52 04 05 64


Total.

Arabian Mission.

Special.

W o m a n ’s Board.

Young People’s Societies.

CHURCHES.

Sunday Schools.

Churches and Societies.

CLASSES A N D

CLASSIS O F I O W A (Continued) Free Grace, Middleburg.. Holland, Neb.......... Hull, First...........

Maurice, First........

Orange City, First....

Sheldon

.............

Sioux Center, First .... Sioux Center, Cent.....

20 85 35 585 185 1810 94

42 00 00 25 00 84 29

8 60 239 12 6 1253 1139 89 29 13 38 75 17 14

97 70 82 50 62 76 69 00 50 40 80 77 77 05

15 50 80 00 1782 364 11 106 3

95 42 15 00 an

25 14 50 140 220 178 52 10

71 14 00 73 00 10 25 95

20 00 128 36 230 358 25 132

00 65 00 00

21 00 15 00 10 00 2 59

34 00 75 00 23 84

100 00 5 54 65 17

100 140 198 25 85 43 23 5 35 115

00 00 50 00 00 00 66 00 00 00

15 157 55 56 15 110 55 11 10 9

00 85 99 00 00 00 00 58 00 05

* 20 00

15 00

95 00 5 75

227 85 50 00

20 00

208 25 225 00

40 00

40 00

10 50

25 00

10 00

266 50

14 95 99 372 50 25

27 05 50 90 00 00

4 9 29 20 3 16 135 730 70 96 13 97 43 8 12

00 75 61 00 25 31 00 59 07 93 88 , 95 80 00 32

4 75 10 00 190 00 160 97

36 30 132 75 256 14 56 92 4 20 2896 48

40 02 Totals ........... 10768 07 2968 94 ■

216 43

2202 05

677 47 | 5589 58

5 00

36 39

5 00

40 19 50 38 00 94 13 61 72 31 18 75 93 76 12 06 43 28 75 57 89 54 05 25 00 75 30 80 53

242 3 •35 4 2896 40

92 80 50 20 48 02

22422 54

.

CL-'SStS n r KINGSTON 114 00 11 34 47 1.11 ? 7.

27 00 55 =14 nn sn

6 19 15 22

83 37 00 50

8 30 6 00

593 47 1 si i as 3 98

Totals

60 294 345 1297 495 2108 192 38 23 145 547 15 22 1708 2677 240 314 42 346 174 42 101 9 20 220 5 233 2561 1056

| 969 66|

63 70|

19 30|

50 24 60 130 2

00 50 50 63 50

16 66 75 1 11 16 18 3

86 53 00 00 50 22 00 00

512 631

13 00 23 00 42 70 5 45 10 2

00 00 00 50 ‘

6 60

| 152 80|

160 6 93 81 159 304 4 7 87 670 79 2 11 26 18 3

39 83 64 80 55 87 50 50 86 00 03 82 50 80 00 00

1718 09


Arabian Mission.

Special.

Woman's Board.

Young People's Societies.

Sunday Schools.

CHURCHES.

Churches and Societies.

CLASSES A N D

5 i

N O R T H CLASSIS O F L O N G ISLAND Jamaica, First ...... Newtown, Elmhurst ... Oyster Bay ......... North Hempstead .... Williamsburgh ...... Astoria, First ....... Flushing ........... Brooklyn, Kept St.... So. Bushwick ....... Astoria, Second ..... Queens ............. Ger. Evang. St. Petri .. Sayville ............ Locust Valley ...... College Point ....... Long Island City .... Steinway ........... N e w Hyde P a r k ..... Sunnyside .......... Winfield ............ W. M. Union........ Totals

1 »

„ *13 4ft

50 00 12 so

Oft 37 5ft 3ft ftft 129 51 2ftft ftft 47 33 5 ftft

65 71 ft ftft S3 03 1ft ftft 15 ftfi

36 00

480 60 20 25 115 23 65 10 105

12 00

40 00 00 00 50 00 60 00 00

22 50 32 32 1200 00 6 5 15 5 13

139 62 2 75

68 72 26 50

11 50 48 00

8 12

42 00 00 00 20

30 00 363 22

36 00

80 50

00 00 25 83 60

20 46 00 65 75 09 72 53 92

10 00 2 00. 10 00 30 00

31 78

11 35 2 ftft 1ft ftft 1296 48

1055 72 45 85 163 184 1465 14 260 18 241 27 39 62 339 90

1406 66|

1147 72

4250 08

S O U T H C LA S S I S O F L O N G ISLAND Brooklyn, First ....... Flatbush, First ...... Grace .............. N e w Utrecht ........ Gravesend, First..... Flatlands ........... Forest P a r k ......... So. Brooklyn ........ Brooklyn, Twelfth St... Brooklyn, Bethany... Church on Heights... N e w Brooklyn ...... Canarsie ............ Ocean Hill .......... Edgewood .......... Ridgewood ......... . Greenwood Heights .. .. Bay Ridge .......... W o o d l a w n ........... W . M. Union........ Totals .........

100

625

709 1721 306 70 40

200

100 16 94 685 30

10 12 100 5 22

133 94 49 .40 75 34 80

20 88 32 00 00 00 00

128 00 15 00

170 85 302

66 10

10 00

107 95 65 320

10 00

5 00 3 37 30 00

15 00 35 00

645 00

12 00 2 50

26 41

10 00

40 5 53 125 93 43

80 25 4130 42

532 81

10 00 2419 321

49 10 351 00 187 50

40 00 104 00 76 70

35 00

10 00 15 75

853 924 1892 529 470 196 50 337 145 254 1685 30

00 94 51 60 68 59

00 00 69 63' 35

00 22 00

41 26 150 00

10 00

86 211 133 43

90 05 87 10

66 001

909 62l

8068 17

50 00 40 00

39 119 30 3 25

145 1018 399 68 155

Cr a s s t s o r MICHIGAN Hamilton, American .. Grand Rapids, Bethany Kalamazoo, Bethany .. Grand Rapids, Bethel . Grand Rapids, Calvary

10 001

40 00|

50 07

16 444 70 5

49 00 00 75 00

51 34 20 75 07


Arabian Mission.

100 57 40 213

00 00 00 75 77*S on

102 33 265 186

131 50 48 62

152 00

^7 81

Total.

Special. 00 54 50 00 92

W o m a n ’s Board.

Young People’s Societies.

Sunday Schools.

CHURCHES.

Churches and Societies.

CLASSES A N D

CLASSIS O F MICHIGAN (Continued) Grand Rapids, Grace ... Grand Haven, Second .. Grand Rapids, First .... Grand Rapids, Zion ...

Muskegon', Second *.... Kalamazoo, North Park.. Holland, Trinity .....

165 137 187 1080 872 20 700 70 15 49 67 51 73 50

00 45 69 85 28 75 00 00 00 72 35 80 00 00

140 00 28 07 58 60

59 76 45 55 198

111 77 25 00 29 95 170 25

57 69 00 00

25 00 .7 00

121 34 40 4

93 50 00 00

00 54 15 69

60 00 50 00 78 83

15 55 51 51 65 00

75 31 67! nn 77 05 63 00

nn 24 96

4178 49

20 1^14 2n.3 13 291 256 405 102

78 90

3 nn 33 03

1578 48

9164 75

3 00 Totals ...........

566 00 332 60 596 94

957 47

67 00

1376 73

1006 58

CLASSIS O F MONMOUTH 41 25 20 125 27

73 5 00 72 o 7 00 36 00 132 93 00 9 00 5 55 23 00 2 00 11 37 12 00

2 50

W . M. Union......... 286 18

161 48

2 50|

88 29 75 145 18 13 35 24 15 16

f>f>

50 20 00 00 00 00 47 00 99

18 8^ 77 1* 10 00 7 15 4n nn

18 33 7n nn 42 99 16 99

460 82

194 25

55 01 101-75

14 32 6 75

1105 23

CLASSIS O F MONTGOMERY

Lodi ................

39 36 4 55 2

30 42 00 00 00

25 40

46 46 47 40 13 68 78 6 26 50 4

00 81 69 00 00 13 47 39 55 00 50

18 43 10 00

39 12

13 00 23 18 6 22 15 46

5 00

30 00 8 62 54 93 6 10 75 88

15 25 00 50 00 00 30 40

28 38 8 72

46 00 75 50

10 00

5 35 Naumburg

...........

■ 10 00

20 10 10 15

00 00 00 00

134 144 4 129 2 8 146 120 151 74 23 194 175 6 78 150 4 5 10

03 92 00 12 00 13 68 81 19 00 00 99 59 39 77 96 50 35 00


C L ASSI S O F MONTGOMERY (Continued)

i • 19 18 12 50 35 00 6 08 50 00 8 50 119 58

1 i

1 20 15 00 15 00

15 00

825 10

182 01

20 00

61 18 100 00 11 54 3 58 100 00 1480 06 12 00 570 73 31 63 44 93 4 16 7 34 25 30 185 00 67 14 4 12 5 00

7 22

i j i i 15 00 21 00 47 21 149 00 15 00 12 50 46 00 43 00 19 00

1 i 1 i

Total.

Arabian Mission.

Special.

Woman's Board.

Young People's Societies.

Sunday Schools.

CHURCHES.

Churches and * Societies.

CLASSES A N D

1 1 1

i 1 80 5 00 in nn 14 00 6 00 1SQ

in7R Q?1 _

f)7\

qr

12 50 61 00 54 49 isq nn 80 00 21 00 179 58 36 00 43 00 19 00 2266 00

CL A S S I S O F N E W A R K

Totals ...........

•8 69 n 75 6 00 15 00 46 05 8 23

2713 71| 102 94

18 59 60 00 20 00 20 00 36 95 1633 32 345 00 20 00 6 25 5 00 14 23 622 70 57 00 89 00 50 86 106 00 14 23|3090 67

23 00 20 00

3 35

50 00 15 00 2 00 36 05 14 37 45 00 700 00 35 00 17 91

3 35

958 33

109 99 180 00 20 00 11 54 32 27 186 95 3140 13 20 00 951 78 54 98 80 55 55 21 15 57 707 23 757 00 309 00 135 91 4 12 5 00 106 00 6883 23

CLASSIS O F N E W BRUNSWICK

192 00 Belle Mead, N. J., Pleas-

N e w wBrunswick, Second .

Highland Park........

453 21 34 22 49 59 28 56 800 00 57 2$ 17 13 367 68 270 62 12 00

120 00 50 00 15 84 14 52 89 80 8 52 30 00 10 00

100 00 108 30 161 30 33 00 166 15 110 00 30 3C 34 68 46 67 610 29 68 10

10 00

53 25 39 41 12 00 10 00 125 00 5 32 10 00 15 00

412 00 50 00 630 60 249 45 94 59 204 71 1134 80 92 90 61 81 422 87 •925 91 90 10


r '5

'5 ■d

*3 CLASSES A N D

S n ot

.

CHURCHES.

OJJI

J3

o £

a

•O

3 5

'

« 'a OT

cf 3

o W .a rt

i Special.

m*

ja

O £

>

■3 ‘

H

i

CLASSIS O F N E W BRUNSWICK (Continued) Rocky Hill .......... Spotswood .......... Perth Amboy, St. Paul.. W. M. Union........

30 10 25 00 3 00

13 00 4 00

21 00 20 00

5 00

10 00 3 00

42 35

Totals

2340 39|

355 68J...... | 1552 14

8800 22 481 24

160 78 35 00, 39 00

179 55 39 67 56 75

25 00 75 00 75 00

I

I

I

69 10 59 00

6 00

42 35

10 00

287 981

4546 19

CLASSIS O F N E W YORK N e w York Collegiate. Thirty-fourth St.... Knox Memorial.... Vermilye Chapel.... Fort Washington ... . Harlem, Lenox Ave. . Elmendorf Chapel ... Port Richmond, S. I. Fordham Manor .... Sixty-Eighth St. Ger.. Manor Chapel ..... Zion, Ger. Evang... West F a r m s ....... Mott Haven ...... Melrose, German .... Fourth, German .... Brighton Heights .... Union Highbridge ... Grace ............ Hamilton Grange ... . Anderson Memorial . Comforter Bethany Memorial .. Mariner’s Harbor ... McKee, K y ........ Columbian Memorial Vermilye Memorial . Clove Valley Chapel.

40 13 30 17 92 5

464 00

116 36 15

50 00

1526 76 40 00

10 00 15 00

110

7 00

40 00

70 49 158 63

’ei o ’oo

87 96 40 00 25 7

32 55

20

20 00 21*88 20 00

761 97 75 123 34 72 115

I

10 00 8310

40 00 50 00

17 5 25 00 7 63 13 00

10

11 00

42 160

35 88 25 00 52 80

142 08 5 7 50 20

40 50 00 19

7 32 3 25

89 50 5 00

25 00 5 00 5 00

115 63 »9493 37

490 00| 2623 58

10 00

10 68 3 50

10 00

Totals ........... (11039 30

652 43

46 00 29 00 63 55 24 75 75 00 39 00 97 13 00 00 54 69 00 88 23 94 50 19 00 68 50

10 00

I

1

CLASSIS O F O R A N G E I Cuddybackville ....... 1 Port Jervis, Deerpark. .. . Ellenville ...... . i Woodbourne ......... Grahamsville ......... Wurtsboro, Mamakating.. Montgomery ......... Newburgh. American .... N e w Hurley ......... N e w Prospect........ Shawangunk ......... Unionville ...........

19272 191 566 70 110 884 302 329 63 65 60 70 24 164 13 91 811 346 150 317 40 79 279 40 5 35 18

12 70 ...... ...... 218 59 50 00 305 57 10 00 24 00 10 00 47 50 187 50 258 04 50 00 4 50 47 50 11 00 23 92 24 92 7 50

*

1 ...... 1 50 00 33 18

14 100 20 65 35

00 00 00 50 00

24414 31

1ft ftft

rt? Sft 82 otf 15 00 7 Sft

12 338 358 35 10 47 264 494 78 104 67 7

70 59 75 00 00 50 00 54 50 42 42 50


Total.

Arabian Mission.

Special.

Woman's Board.

Young People's Societies.

Sunday Schools.

CHURCHES.

Churches and Societies.

CLASSES A N D

C L ASSIS O F O R A N G E (Continued) Walden .............. Wallkill ............. Walpack, Lower ...... Warwarsing .......... Port Jervis, West End. .. W. M. Union......... Totals ...........

60 28

20 00 5 50

5 00 8 00

Hoboken, Ger. Evang. .. . Jersey City, Cent. Ave... West Hoboken, First.'...

30 00 107 00

585 00 i

6 00 5 00 17 00

1241 02

146 50 1

CL A S S I S O F PALISADES | • 1 N e w Durham, Grove....

20 00

l

5 66 .......

24 50| • 482 68 j i......

1

615 207 5 11 18 17

00 28 50 00 00 00

798 00| l

2692 70

100 00

1060 77

: 750 6 40 20 7 15 187 800

00 00 00 00 59 00 11 00

150 00 30 00 60 00 3 00 32 63

12 36 10 44 10 75

■167 70 1993 40

60 77

140 00

125 651.... . . ...... i

35 00

50 00 00 50 00 82

10 00

478 82

70 77

2 20 24 25 60 15

27 00 95 00 00 60

6 00

245 80 9 50 280 845 104 193 75

00 00 86 50 69 00 50 30 82

282 82

2951 44

191 00

2596 155 29 259 45

00 40 77 17 00

18 103 34 96 25 9 306 206 1078 847 660 125 30 257 54 142 915 45 22 266

37 20 36 58 00 62 86 86 95 42 60 73 00 82 00 12 10 03 63 01

CL A S S I S O F PARAMUS 800 00 48 26

Passaic, First Holland. .. .

Warwick .............

200 00 21 99

211 16 20 00 ‘ 15 6 18 11 80 00 29 36 60 07 36 10 15 00 9 62 87 101 44 50 99 00 125 700 00 700 00 535 20 43 16 2 10 00 20 60 98 82 15 00 63 44 205 00 60 45 03 5 11 63 61 11 50 23 00 229 35 1

10 00

00 00 37 00

1405 75 23 11 5

00 15 77 00 00

32 01

6 00 5 on 5 00

12 20 5 00

51 00 51 00 00 10 00 00 00 00 00

64 60

1 86

104 51 25 97 115 30

66 00 00 95 40 47

89 34 72 120

00 00 35 10

6 154 95 2 93

00 90 88 00 83

110 00

13 5 118 49 10

25 00 95 47 00

10 5 6 530

00 00 33 00

50 00

6 00

2 00

120 88

42 71

430 49

•2 00


CLASSIS O F PARAMUS (Continued) West N e w Hempstead... Wortendyke, First Holl.. W.

M.

Arabian Mission.

Special.

3

.

15 00 13 48

12 44 20 57

• 4 24 14 00

Union.........

Totals ...........

Woman's Board.

Young People's Societies.

Sunday Schools.

Churches and Societies.

CLASSES AND CHURCHES.

4243 13

861 32

00 50 00 73

11 00

27 00 73 22 57 71

11 861 2763 89j 192 011 1010 7l'|

9082 92

C L A S S I S .OF P A S S A I C Boonton ............. Fairfield ........... .. Little Falls, First..... Little Falls, Second.... Paterson, People’s Park.. Pompton .............

W.

M.

16 2 135 51 45 50 69 147 13 47 800 650 42 10

70 30 05 00 00 00 79 78 13 78 00 00 00 00

[

7 50 33 02

4 96

10 00

9* nn

52 00

44 56

22 00

ii nn m nn

13 00

33 65 4 67

98 15

30 36

9.1 12

19 22

11 00 15 40 655 00

25 nn

inn nn

100 00 168 00

10 00

Union......... 297 10

19 63

Killduff ............. Otley ............... Pella,' First .......... Pella^ Third

.........

Sully ___............

973 70

.

CLASSIS O F P E L L A 6 116 37 3 41 5 25 200 775

23 83 00 50 15 10 31 71 00

250 00 32 55 6 40

775 00

in on

16 on

295 on

100 00

17 92

24 52 111 50 18 75 10 00

7 78 5 16

50 00

19 4 12 52 64 5 100 30 12

20 00 50 14 73 00 00 35 07

3 00

25 00

361 21

3832 17

3 25 60 152

00 00 00 00

n n

65

5 00 45 80 12 nn n n

nn

6 00

5n 22 41 5 60 1.1 60 60 74 4 42 1017

16 75 5n 15 90 81 85 71

66 4 00

815 00 20 00

17 50

5n on 11 95

17 25 100 00

25 nn

16 50

ii no

94 85 15 72 125 on

99 59 394 09

28 00 2070 27

69 30

592 38

5052 14

'

CLASSIS O F PHILADELPHIA

Philadelphia, First ....

61 26 11 40 00

17 ni

398 32 1898 10

96 65 172 2 96 24 82 1555

.

76 18

W . M. Union......... Totals ...........

77 on

25 00 75 00

17 01

2080 53

59

64 00

10 00 26 00

Totals ...........

269

134 109 88 23

91 69 75 98

35 62 5 00

5 32 72 45

92 50 50 50

41 80 29 04

142 57

212 05


Philadelphia Fifth ....

83 72 42 12 6 45 46 10 138

40 00 00 00 80 00 20

741 45

83 9 7 .2

73 60 56 00

27 70

171 21

50 00 . 5 20 3 5

65 00 50 00

34 15

CL A S S I S O F P L E A S A N T PRAIRIE

Totals ...........

Total.

1 1

C LASSIS O V PHILADELPHIA (Continued) Philadelphia, Fourth ... .

Arabian Mission.

Special.

Woman's Board.

Young People's Societies.

Sunday Schools.

CHURCHES.

Churches and Societies.

CLASSES A N D

19 00 5 00 16 00 25 44 10 97

4 00

00 20 00 00

15 60 10 00 50 00

422 621...... • i I

293 01

53 50 00 00 00 00 85 00 30 25 38 19 00 00

28 152 265 195 90 50 119

41 21 00 25 00 00 20

46 15 18 37

2239 07

229 70

5 00 42 00

15 00

6 00 5 00 9 00 IS 00 17 55 4 00

10 15 15 17 5 5 30

00 00 00 00 60 00 00

12 00 234 92

2952 80

80 40 13 29

928 65 92 17 114 65

5 00

8 00

10 00

50 00

40 00

20 00

25 00

5 00

20 58

5 00

85 00 22 11

5 74 16 00

20 00 10 00 10 00

233 11

6 00

1662 44

106 53 189 50 71 00 85 00 104 60 45 00 179 40 52 00 28 30 357 65 87 38 292 19 7 00 173 00 3 00 64 22 152 21 396’ 15 241 47 106 00 70 00 141 20

60 40

3 00 5 23

5 00

45 60 96 00 65 00 60 20 20 00

1

91 117 50 63 90 25 131 30 28 237 87 207 7 173

217 9 68 19 31 65 118 69 198 97

CLASSIS O F POUGHKEEPSIE Fishfcill

.............

Fishkill-on-Hudson

239 51 94 86 55

42 38 65 84 00

60 00

548 27 20 25 126

9 30 40 00

83 50 00 65 20

10 00 12 00

1.11 70

233 20

(Bea-

Millbrook .......... .

189 44 12 10 86 86

25 00 5 83

27 00

886 IS

127 44

17 93 33 00 12 00 55 00

70 46 Totals ...........

86 00

140 13|

27 00|

934 18j......

12 On

125 46 115 69|

/

2103 15


Total.

Arabian Mission.

Special.

W o m a n ’s Board.

I

Young People’s 1 Societies.

1 li | Sunday Schools.

CHURCHES.

Churches and (■ Societies. '

CLASSES A N D

i i

CLASSIS O F R A R I T A N

i 311 39 160 123 15 50

7.1

85 99 09 21 86

66 00 57 75 4 =in 6 37 835 89

45 28 26 28 20 5

21 45 37 66 00 00

16 19 44 5 33 6

00 65 38 20 85 37

115 61 125 74 12 129 206 21 18 65

5 00

13 35

69 14 101 35

50 79 35 57 75 95 57 00 00 00

25 52 643 34 6 00 20 50 IS 00

10 50 254 13

279 14

18 35

1095 111......

CLASSIS O F RENSSELAER

I 12 120 39 7 42

no 00 00 51 80

50 00 75 27

28 40 61 00 44, 74 66 63

5 31

930 88

15 00 150 00 10 10

85 50 46 76 69 00

35 00 5 00

13 2S

22 81 30 19 5 00

3 5 31 3 11

50 00 50 00 84

5 46 20 2

00 78 65 00

2 50 1 43

9 45 De Forestville (Blooming

18 50

Totals ........... J 520 98]

180 41

3159 37

43 125 131 60 121 2 135 497 132 2 36 32 5 10

90 00 50 56 27 00 50 61 65 00 06 69 00 88

13 15 18 50

13 15

W. M. Union.........

48 09 46 59 96 33 91 35 65 63 20 85 74 13

f

••

2 00 30 00 219 07 27 90

541 149 414 261 47 211 849 50 109 187 20 48 12 254

55 15J

478 53J.

I

I

133 20)

1368 27

CLASSIS O F ROCHESTER Clymer, Abbe .... Newark, Arcadia Brighton ...... Buffalo ....... ClymerhiU .... East Williamson . Marion, First ... Marion, Second .. Ontario ....... Palmyra #...... Pultneyville ... Rochester, First .

140 00 64 17

35 00

38 93

*5 66

20 21

12 00

684 40 65

6 00

10 00 88 80 98 23 25 69 38 67 56 183

50 17 28

135 00 15 34 54 44

60 00 71 39 32 00 75 00 107 00

5 00

10 00

20 25 32 28

200 00 15 33 10 15 19 34 52 37 3

20 32 50 66 50

50 01

10 00

560 47 163 30 173 816 177 255 94 92 218 338

00 67 56

00 03 55 50 50

20 50 54 65


CLASSES A N D CHURCHES.

C LASSI S 01' ROCHESTER (Continued) Rochester, Second 255 26 Sodus ........ 25 72 Tyre ......... Williamson -.............., 36 00 Cl. of Rochester M. 150 001 W. M. Union......... ...... Totals ...........

1307

991

CLASSIS O F SARATOGA Buskirks .... :....... Fort Miller .......... Greenwich ........... Northumberland (Bacon Hill) ..............

69 00 26 30

10 00;

97 90|

83 82

45 00 80 00

13 19

127 00 684 40

83 00 1381 821...... J 537 041

00 00 00 58 20 86

5 00 5 00

17 17 65 5 19 66

01 75 00 00 00 50

5 00

1 95 5 00 6 80 19 93

80 58 20 00 10 00 5.00

Wynantskill .......... W. M. Union......... Schaghticoke ......... 10 00

2 00 20 00

200 00

46 67 22 15 45 90

412 69

98 08 00 49 00 00

3994 25

i

l 5 20 130 14 1 173

436 33 114 165 150 127

205 00

55 68

34 62 395 19 22 240

01 75 00 58 15 36

51 28 .146 20 10 5

67 95 41 00 00 00

1035 88

C L ASSIS O F SCHENECTADY Altamont ............ Vischer’s Ferry ......

39 9 9 21

94 02 00 36

Lisha’s Kill .......... Niskayuna ........... Princetown .......... Rotterdam, First...... Rotterdam, Second....

86 00 7 92 25 00

18 00 3 78

Schenectady, Second ....

92 42 160 00 217 58

12 00 59 25 40 18

7 50

.

71 21 70 42 58 117 44 106 19 245 190 316

nn 00 00 00 ‘in 00 59 85 76 50 11

118 08 16 63

74 17 52 20

8 00

598 55

Hope Chapel S. S...... Woodlawn

...........

Totals ........... |

45 00 165 00 10 23

3 00

888 47

136 21

5 00

12 50| 1599 11|

1 00|

126 68|

2763 97


'

C/3

o m m

i? •a

3

1

5

1 O ss

1 ><

1

Total.

S .a

a ’£ 09 s

•o

Special.

CHURCHES.

M

lople’s Societies.

and Societies.

CLASSES A N D

8? *3

U <

CLASSIS O F SCHOHARIE Berne ................ West B e r n e .......... Cobleskill ............ Grand Gorge ......... Howes Cave, Second

26 7 42 2 21

00 00 08 75 28

... 7 31

Schoharie ............ Sharon ..............

40 25

10 00

19 29

11 69

9 23 39 17 5 10

17 09

50 00 39 28 00 00

37 20 18 83

25 00

262 35

25 00

7 31

174 41

28 38 8 00

,5 00

. 7 35

21 00 9 30 9 25

5 00

15 00 L------58 78

76 -.7 73 2 21 19 48 75 82 5 87 18 10

25 00 06 75 28 50 00 60 68 00 20 83 70

527 85

CLASSIS O F U L S T E R

7 35

5 00 2 00 2 65

4 ?3 Roxbury, Jay Gould M e m ­ orial .............. Katsbaan............. Kingston, First ...... Saucerties ........... Shokan ............. West Hurley.........

24 91 27 80 163 27 10 80 18 7 15

00 00 00 00 00

401 08

22 99 176 18 15 00 8 04

45 00

7 31

20 00

6 00 •

77 35

17 .90

66 17 18 6

73 30 60 88

47 38 384 36 18 180 24

90* 35 45 80 04 95 00

16 00 2 84

1 OC 2 84 .

346 55

22 96

865 84

CLASSIS O F WESTCHESTER 65 49 Elmsford, Greenburg---

Yonkers, Mile Square---

125 00 n 60 141*37

io no 36 65

130 70 500 62

25 20 ...... 18 64

164 60 Hawthorne, Unionville ..

Totals ..........

14 00

8 27 75 08 | 1308

34

190 88 1.....

3 123 30 23

75 81 0( ...... 00 .....

115 4 184 192 11 199 94 21 106 20

00 0( 00 3( 10 30 50 0C 00 63

| 1499

64

6 85 ...... ...... ...... ...... ..... ...... ...... ......

433 3 20 3

76 00 0( 0(

21 12 27 23 7 67 5 2 22 15

60 0( 26

85 5( 7( 0( 4( 0( 63

6’ 85 | 664 7C |

974 126 175 39 20 321 31 367 735 18 431 158 31 203 36

25 81 00 60 00 37 00 16 41 60 60 60 67 08 26

3670 41


Total.

Arabian Mission.

.. ’ Special.

Woman's Board.

Young People's Societies.

Sunday Schools.

CHURCHES.

Churches and Societies.

CLASSES A N D

! C LASS I S O F ‘ WISCONSIN Alto ................

Waupun

.............

Totals ...........

590 71 181 87 .17 on 130 00 386 00 8 47 90 75 326 58 279 37 73 04 117 81 25 50 36 82 117 68 80 00 65 50 17 80 85 10 261 38 11 20 90 00 5 22 337 49 181 29 132 42 ...... 2970 43

123 87 10 00 in on 10 00 15 60

216 10 19A no 84 98 109 40 118 25 210 77

82 00 7! on 25 35

on 00 55 75 00 30

91 79

141 17 i | 41 19 1 1 698 57 209 47j 1351 83 20 00

700 88 119 5 11* 85 53 9 111 32

00 15 00 80 95 48 40 55 35 00

46 00 14 in 24 16 5 00

114 35

197 19 29 43 ...... | 1632 76

1894 55 451 15 62.5 11 14 27 67.1 28 477 89 299 76 111 2? 519 03 192 6n 85 10 199 17 25 in 114 16 5 22 882 14 161 85 41 19 6977 41


Schenectady

.........

Ulster .............. Totals

7$

27 10 98 99 69 47 35 08

Totals

Totals PARTICULAR SYNOD OF N E W YORK Hudson ............. Kingston ............. No. Cl. of Long Island.. So. Cl. of Long Island.. N e w York .......... ^ Orange .............. Poughkeepsie ......... Westchester ..........

3C 85 01 41 40 00 21 00 35

7002 72 1448 53

PARTICULAR SYNOD OF CHICAGO 286 67 Cascades ............. Chicago .............. 3833 05 Dakota .............. 3125 15 28 Germania ........... . 5070 28 Grand River.......... 4587 52 Holland ............. 1081 68 Illinois .............. Iowa ............... 10768 07 49 4178 Michigan ............ 1898 10 Pella ............... 2239 07 Pleasant Prairie ...... Wisconsin ........... 2970 43

PARTICULAR SYNOD OF N E W BRUNSWICK Bergen .............. So. Cl. of Bergen...... Monmouth ........... Newark .............. N e w Brunswick ...... Palisades . . ......... Paramus ............ Passaic .............. Philadelphia .......... Raritan ..............

136 16 182 180 684 10 136 25 77

57 1176 285 <;q 2522 2606 421 2968 957 394 229 698

00 41 41 71 22 55 09 94 47 09 70 57

2355 232 1078 478 1381 352 12 50 1599 174 7 31 346 17 90

8 5 •20 55 83

0C 00 00 15 00

33 10 92 53 82 51 11 41 55

208 86 7999 28

20 00 44 75 55 00 209 234 12 216 67 28 10 209

17 35 00 43 00 00 00 47

79 856 582 40 1274 1534 224 2202 1376 2070 233 1351

219 25 74 40 00 .635 159 133 537 55 205 00 126 1 00 58 22

Total.

W o m a n ’s Board.

PARTICULAR SYNOD OF ALBANY 2190 193 825 520 1307 412 888 262 401

Arabian Mission.

CLASSES

Special.

OF Young People’s Societies.

CHURCHES.

Sunday Schools.

CLASSES A N D

‘Churches and Societies.

RECEIPTS

81 20| 97 20 04 68 68 78 96

271 74 1949 32

1 50 70 45 166 73 00 00 75 520 69 18 1109 00 86 66 42 677 47 05 73 1006 58 27 69 30 11 6 00 114 35 83

34 2338 452 82 1232 2461 180 5589 1578 592 234 1632

78 13 22 00 91 72 77 58 48 38 92 76

40708 79 12377 16 1106 17 11825 49 3758 28 16410 65

888 1456 286 2713 2340 1993 4243 2080 741 835

57 32 18 71 39 40 13 53 45 89

208 197 161 102 355 125 861 297 171 279

70 33 48 94 68 63 32 10 21 14

17579 57 2760 53

1021 969 1296 4130 11039 1241 886 1308

09 66 48 42 30 02 15 34

145 63 363 532 652 146 140 190

72 70 22 81 43 50 13 88

18 23 2 14 11 19 34 18

816 58 670 85 50 460 23 3090 1552 478 86 2763 973 63 15 422 35 1095

25 27 82 67 14 82 89 70 62 11

143 15 12324 29

31 19 36 10 115 24 27

71 . 408 53 512 63 30 00 1147 72 00 2419 32 63 9493 37 so .482 68 934 18 00 1499 64

264 14|16898 07|

36 20 25 00 3 10 70 192 100

35 00 77 01 00

234 201 194 958 287 282 1010 361 293 930

88 64 25 33 98 82 71 21 01 88

437 33 ■4755 71

78 152 1406 909 66 00 490 00 2623 798 115 6 85 .664

00, 80 66 62 58 00 69 70

562 85| 6749 05|

4935 1122 2266 1368 3994 1035 2763 527 865

97 42 00 27 25 88 97 85 84

18880 45-

. 479 8248 4666 ’ 851 10830 12533 2006 22422 9164 5052 2952 6977

65: 79­ 51 99­

02 32: 62: 54­ 75 14­ 80. 41

86186 54-

2203 2574 1105 6883 4546 2951 9082 3832 1662 3159

18. 41 23 . 23 19­ 44­ 92 17 44­ 37

38000 58.

1685 .1718 4250 8068 24414 2692 2103 3670

05 09­ 08 17 31 70­ 15 41

Totals ....

121892 46| 2235 39|

Grand Totals.

187183 54|l882r61| 172212149047 13| 5030 20129864 73| 191669 53,

48601 96­


F R O M INDIVIDUALS -NO T T H R O U G H C H U R C H E 3 "A Friend” ............. $1,000 30 “A Friend” ........... . “A Friend from Cleveland1'. 25 “A Friend of Missions” ... 500 “A member, First Ref. Ch., 25 Rochester, N. Y.” ... Bahler, Rev. P. G ..... 5 Bakker, Mr. and Mrs. D.... 25 Basman, J. W ........ 2 Bekkens, Anthony ........ 2 Beltman, John .......... 2 Bennett, Frank .......... 2 Bogardus, Rev. Francis M... 12 Bolks, Miss Josephine.... 5 Boom, E ............. 5 Bruin, D. K .......... 10 Bungerz, K ........... 2 Carpenter, George W., Jr... 20 “Cash” ... ;............ 10 “Cash” ................ 5 “Cash” ................ 5 “Cash, March 31st” ... 200 Chicago Missionary Committee 75 7 Chrestensen, Rev. D. H ... Cleveland, George, Estate of 188 Cleveland, O., Christian Ref. (West Side) ........... 30 Cobb, Miss E. P ...... 20 Colby, Dr. W . W ........ ' 10 Cooper, Mrs. D ....... 8 Craig, Rev. Horace P .. 18 Cuff, William .......... 65 Dangremond, Rev. G ... 5 DeHeidenwereld Fund ... 98 DeHoogh, D. J........ 5 Deiseroth, Henry M ... 5 DeKleine Family Syndicate. 300 DeVries, Mr. and Mrs. C., Jr................. 50 DeYoung, J........... 5 “D. S. M.” ............. 35 Dumont, Mrs. E. A .... 100 “E. G. R.” ............. 25 Einga, M. Ulle .......... 10 “Family at Alto, Wis.”.... 350 150 Fisher, Miss A. V. W ..... Fortmann, Albert..... 30 Francis, Rev. L ....... 50 5 Frederick, Charles F ... Friend ................. ■ 10 “Friend, First Ref. Ch., . Rochester, N. Y.” ... 50

oo 00 00 00 00

00 00 00 50

00 00 50 00 00

00 00 00 00 00 00

00 00 00 24

00 00 00 00 00 00 00

11 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00' 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

Friend of Missions....... 100 00 10 00 Friend of the Cause...... “ From W . ” ............ 100 00 Glastonbury, Conn., First Ch. of Christ, S. S......... 19 75 Gubb, Francis ........... 5 00 Gulick, Rev. George W .... * 5 00 Harrington, Miss L. V .... 10 00 Harris, S. G ............. 25 00 Heibuit, W. D ........... 5 00 Hoagland, Mrs. H. W .... 2 00 Hoffman, John D ......... 1 00 Holden, G. E ............ 2 00 Holland, Mich., Hope College 350 00 Hollebrands, W n i ......... 10 00 Hollman, E d w ............ 10 00 800 00 H o m e Folks Syndicate.... Hoven, John ............ 12 50 Hunter, Mrs. H. E ....... 2 00 Iben, R ................ 5 00 In Memory of Rev. J. M. Van B u r e n ..... v..... 25 00 In Memory of W ......... 100 00 In Memory of W m . Walvoord 250 00 Jansen, Frank ............ 1 00 Keith, James D ....... '... 125 00 “Kingston, N. Y.”....... 100 00 Kooiker, G. J........ 35 00 21 25 Kroodsma, Rev. Robert... Labagh, Miss M. B ....... 10 00 Labaw, Rev. George W .... 5 00 Lake, Miss Agnes N ...... 60 00 Lansing, Sidney 0 ........ 20 00 Legters, J. J. and C ..... 210 00 Lehwerzer, F ............. 10 00 “L. T. J.” -.............. 300 00 MacNair, Rev. W ......... 19 10 MacNair, W . L ........... 1 00 1 00 Madsen, Peter, Jr. ........ Manton, Elsie, Estate of.... 20 00 Mason, Rev. A. D e W ..... 25 00 “Member of Alto, Wis.” .... 350 00 Meury, Mrs. S ........... 2 00 Millspaugh, Mr. and Mrs. M. B .... ■..... \ ........ 7 00 5 00 Monroe, Mjss M. L ....... Monthaan, Miss Sarah.... 5 00 Mulford, Rev. H. D. B .. . 25 00 , 20 00 Murray, Mrs. David...... Myers, Rev. Henry V. S... 25 00 N e w Brunswick, Theo. Sem. Stud.................. 51 50


e

-

Newburgh, N. Y., Associated Ch.................... Nies, Miss Hattie........ Noeekel, Miss Maria...... Obbink, Dirk J........... Oggel, Dr. H. D .......... Olcott, Alfred V. S ....... Olcott, Charles T ......... Olcott,.Mrs. E. E ......... Olcott, Mason ........... Olmsted, Miss C. J....... Pietenpol, Rev. and Mrs. H. J..................... Porter, Miss Ina D ....... Post, Mr. and Mrs. W m __ Rapelje, Daniel ......... Read, Rev. Edw. G ....... Redeker, J. H ............ Reynhoudt, Hubert ...... Richardson, Miss Mabel J... Riemstra, J.............. Rietveld, Fred ........... Roorde, Gerrit 1.......... Rosedale, Mrs. S. E ...... Sanford, George 'A........ Schenck, M. Van Buren.... Schenck, Rev. F. S..... :. Schermer, Mrs. T ......... Schroder, H. E ........... Schoep, G. H ............ Shutts, Mrs. W ........... Sioux Center, la., L. V. Circle................ Smart, John G ........... Smeyers, George ......... Smies, D. .............. Sprik, C ................. Stager, H. J............ : Stillwell, John L .......... Strabbing, H. D ..........

32 ■2 .50 22 20 75 75 50 75

00 54 00 50 00 00 00 00 00 50

10 2 10 15 10 5 5 20 1 100 5 10 10 5 20 200 5 500 5

00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 50 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

35 10 150 10 50 3 10 1

00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

Student of Princeton, N. J.. 5 00 Swart, D ................ 1 00 Tennyson, W . E .......... 25.00 TeWinkel, Miss J. V ...... 54 16 Thacher, R a y ............ 3 00 Toussaint, Mrs. Simon...... 50 00 7,500 00 T w o Old Friends........ “Unknown Friend’* ...... 415 25 Van Boven, H a r r y ....... 2 00 Van Bruggen, W m . ..... 10 00 Van Erden Re-union..... 5 00 Vande Braak, E. V ....... 18 50 Vande Kamp, J........... 5 00 Van Keulen, W. J. G ..... 10 00 Van Koekel, W m ......... 5 00 Vanderbilt, Hiram ....... 5 00 Vander Hart, W .......... 10 00 Vander Molen; Mr. and Mrs. R ..................... 9 00 Vande Roovaart, J. F .... 25 00 Van Thoff, W m . M ...... 5 00 Van W y k Missionary Syndi^ cate .................. 375 00 Varick, Miss Margaret L ... 5 00 Vedder, Arthur G......... 49 00 Veenendaal, Henry ...... 10 00 Voorhees, M. V. D ....... 5 00 Voss, John .............. 10 00 ' Vrooman, S. B ...... 10 00 Walvoord, Mrs. W m ..... 25 00 Warner, George K ......... 1 00 Western Theol. Sem. Students 43 87 5 00 Wever, Henry .......... Williams, Miss K. L ...... 3 00 Wohlfarth, Miss Amelia.... 1 00 Woodman, M. A .......... 2 00 2 00 Woodruff, Mrs. W. A .... Zwiers, G ................ 10 00 W . B. F. M ............ 15,335 78 $32,546 05

l

T H E B O A R D O F F O R E I G N MISSIONS, R.C.A. LEGACIES Thomas Edwards ..\........ Elizabeth Van Schaik Winthrop Hiley Merselis ......... ?.... Caroline Brundage .......... John L e m m e n e s ............. Catharine Van Deusen ...... K. Schaddelee .... ‘ ......... George W . Carpenter, Jr...... James Lane ............... Roelof J. De Ring.......... Hendrikus Hofs ..........

00 2,500 00 2,977 10

$23,670

100 00 13,367 369 17 400

79 86 50 00

100 00 25 00 300 00 $43,827 25


RECEIPTS O F T H E B O A R D SINCE 1857, IN PERIODS O F . FIVE YEARS, W I T H T O T A L S A N D AVERAGES, Years.

Becelpts.

Total. 1858-1802. 1863 ...... 1864 ...... 1865 ...... 1866 ...... 1867 ... .

842,257 36 35,391 18 82,038 22 55,783 75 •63,030 89

1868 1869 1870 1871 1872

...... ...... ...... .... . ......

53,472 81,410 57,342 71,125 65,173

91 38 94 52 26

1 873 1874 1875 1876 1877

...... ..... . ...... .. . ......

83,948 55,352 54,249 64,342 58,152

61 95 95 91 53

1878 ...... 1879 ...... 1880 ...... 1881........... '. 1882............

69,085 58,443 63,185 92,984 58,184

87 49 71 32 71

1883 1884 1885 1886 1887

...... ...... ...... ...... ......

65,284 76,955 88,131 86,386 88,787

58 23 04 55 02

1888 1889 1890 1891 1892

...... ...... ...... ...... ......

7109,946 93,142 117,090 116,265 112,163

11 24 14 45 59

• 136,688 1893 ..... . 1894 ....... 106,571 1895 .......... :......... 1111,288 1890............ 154,139 1897 ...... 111,111

10 48 00 42 89

1898 1899.. 1900 1901 1902

...... ...... ...... ...... ......

124,301 126,838 147,213 173,204 167,911

18 36 78 12 73

1903 1904 1905 1906 1907

...... ..... . ...... ...... ......

158,894 142,474 150,239 174,464 179,232

94 79 94 74 60

1908.. 1909.. 1910 1911 1912..

..:... ...... ...... ...... ......

197,468 205,372 207,404 282,231 284,269

26 64 59 86 36

1913 ...... 1914 ...... 1 915 ...... 1910............ 1917 .....

Totals for Five Years.

255,838 47 321,942 58 300.752 51 309,419 S0| 302.453 02|

Average for Five Years.

$134,055 49

$26,811 10

278,501 40

55,700 28

$28,899-18

328,525 01

65,705 00

10,004 72

316,046 65

63,209 37

341,884 10

68,376 82

5,167 45

403,544 42

80,708 88

12,332 06

548,607 53

109,721 50

29,012 62

619,798 89

123,958 77

14,238 27

736,469 17

147,893 89

23,934 12

805,307 01

161,061 40

13467 51

1,176,746 71

235,349 34

74,287 94

• I 1,490,406 441

1918

.....

Decrease.

Increase.

$2,495 63

I 29S.0S7 291

I 37,202 05|

325,292 0S|

•In addition $56,500 were given by Mr. W a r r e n A c k e r m a n to remove the debt resting on the Board. tin addition $45,335.00 were given for the E n d o w m e n t of the Theological S e m i ­ nary in the Arcot Mission, through the efforts of Rev. .Jacob Chamberlain, D.D. t F r o m 1895. receipts of the Arabian Mission are included. T h e total a m o u n t re­ ceived since 1857, for all Missions, is $7,011,020.20.


T H E B O A R D O F F O R E I G N MISSIONS, R.C.A. S T A T E M E N T OF R E V E N U E A N D E X P E N D I T U R E S F O R T H E Y E A R M A Y 1, 1917, T O A P R I L 30, 1918 E X H I B I T “A ” Revenue

Collections .................................. $184,523 20 One Day’s Income............................ 9;593 28 Legacies— net .................... >........... 43,827 25 Special Fund for N e w Missionaries’ Expenses....t. 12,070 00 Income available for the Board from Invested Funds: Security Fund ......................... $2,999 11 John Neefus Educational Fund........... 319 00 Isaac Brodhead Fund...,................ 52 50 P. I. and M. K. Neefus Fund ......... 258 75 General Funds .................... 4,243 03 7,872 39 Income from Funds held in Trust by Board of Direction... 579 93 Gifts for Specific Purposes— Exhibit “C ” .......... . 14,237 15 Sale of North Japan Mission Buildings................ 1,000 00 Total Revenue

$273,703 20 Expenditures.

Mission Work: A m o y .... $49,635 20 Arcot .... 78,292 45 Japan .... 76,551 33 . . --------- $204,478 98 Preliminary Expenses of N e w Missionaries 1,558 15 Expenditures on account of Specific Gifts— Exhibit “C ” ..................... 15,034 48 $221,071 61 General Expenditures: Expenses in re Conditional Gifts....... $ * 125.00 Discount and Interest................. 2,037 88 Legacy Expense ..................... 500.00 Mission Conference ................ 26100 Unsettled Shipping Expense............ 725 30 Anglo-American Communities Committee.. 200 00 3,849 18 H o m e Expenditures: Rent and Care of Office............... Salaries ............................ Account Books and Stationery.......... Stenographers and Typewriters......... Postage, Telegraph and Cables.......... Office Furniture and Repairs........... Auditing ........ Incidentals ........................ Books Purchased ..................... Publishing Annual Report.............. Pamphlets and Leaflets........ Illustrating Literature ................ “Mission Field” ........ Telephone .......................... “The Christian Intelligencer” .......... Circulars and Miscellaneous Printing.... Travel Among Churches............... Travel of Classical Missionary Agents.... Expenses of District Secretary .... Department of Missionary Education....

• $

1,377 71 10,525 65 365 05 2,125 14 942 86 574 84 100 00 213 04 29 28 638 34 1,233 17 149 22 1,247 84 236 31 214 25 250 22 852 84 69 65 298 39 326 25 $ 21,770 05

Total Expenditures

$246,690 84

Excess of Revenue over Expenditures for year

$ 27,012 36


Sale of North Japan Mission Buildings— reserved...... $ 1,000 00 Less: # _ » Excess of Remittances of Special Gifts over Re* ceipts for year— Exhibit “C ” ............... 797 33 F ---------

202 67

Balance for the year credited to Surplus Account....

$ 26,809 69

Surplus A c c o u n t

Balance (Deficit) M a y 1, 1917— per last Report.................... Surplus of Revenue for the year (as above)....................... Balance (Deficit) April 30, 1918— Exhibit “B ” .......

$ 29,395 84 26,809 69 $

2,586 15

S T A T E M E N T O F ASSETS A N D LIABILITIES A P R I L 30, 1918 E X H I B I T “B M Assets

Cash for General Purposes............ '......................... $ 10,267 05 Securities and Special Deposits— Schedule No. 1: Railroad Bonds ............... ’................. $ 83,859 19 Stocks ........................ 6,837 50 Bonds and Mortgages............................ 220,652 10 U. S. Liberty Bonds............................. 2,500 00 Real Estate— No. 236 West 62dStreet, N e w York City. 17,177 22 3,873 14 Union Trust Company— TrustAccount............... Promissory Note ....... 100 00 $334,999 15 32,228 37 --------Advances to Missions for Ma y and June, 1918...................... Amount due from Rev. John R. Duffield........................... Deferred Charges: * Excess of Payments to Annuitants over Income from Investment of , “Conditional Gifts” .............. •..................... Cash for special purposes.........................

Total Assets ....................................... Excess of Liabilities over Assets— Exhibit “A ”....................

367,227 52 9,390 45 828 72 946 71 $388,660 45 2,586 15 $391,246 60

Liabilities

Funds— Schedule No. 2: Trust Funds .................... ;.... Conditional Gifts ...................... Temporary Funds .................... Security Funds ................. . ■... Missionary’s Special Deposit .................. Moneys received for special transmission....... Moneys received for Japan College— Not transmitted Ex*appropriation Gifts not remitted........ .'.... Borrowed from A m o y Mission.................. Missionary’s Salary ........................... Sale of North Japan Mission Buildings (Reserved). Income on Funds— To be remitted............... Deferred Credits: . Reserve of Rents received held for accrued expenses

$244,233 29,611 8,241 65,153

52 79 10 83 $347,240 24

100 00 75 80 20,487 27 5,568 44 13,889 13 789 02

1,000 00 575 36 1,521 34, $391,246 60


T H E B O A R D O F F O R E I G N M I S S I O N S , R.C.A. STATEMENT

'

OF RECEIPTS A N D DISBURSEMENTS O F D E S I G N A T E D GIFTS

FOR THE

YEAR

'

ENDED

A P R I L 30, 1918

E X H I B I T “C ”

Receipts

Gifts Ex-appropriation,'General: Specific Work (at discretion of Board);........................ $ Salary of Missionary....................... .............. ;t-.... Newspaper Evangelization in North Japan.......................... Newspaper Advertising in South Japan............................ Rebuilding Stations in India.................................... Additional Buildings for Steele Academy.......................... Netherlands Committee for Wilhelmina Hospital, A m o y .............. China Education Fund............................. ............ Tong A n School............. #...... ........................... A m o y Hospital ........................'...................... hrom the W o m a n ’s Board for various purposes.................... Total Receipts— Exhibit “A ”.............................. Disbursements

200 00 1,475 00 100 00 2,192 31 722 7g 1,010 00 310 00 ‘ 12 00 10151 2 383 92 5,729 63

$ 14,237 15

*

Gifts Ex-Appropriation, General:

1

Salary of Missionary ............................... Salary of Missionary................................ Newspaper Evangelization in North Japan............. Newspaper Advertising in South Japan................ Rebuilding Stations in India.......................... Additional Buildings for Steele Academy............... Netherlands Committee for Wilhelmina Hospital, Amoy... A m o y Hospital ..................................... For various purposes— from W o m a n ’s Board............

^

Total Disbursements ......................... Included in M a y and June Remittances................

$ 16,989 22 1,954 74

939 qq 1,475 00 100 00 2,192 31 1,794 82 1,010 00 310 00 3,397 46 5,729 63

'

Net Disbursements for the* year..........................

15,034 48

Excess of Gifts remitted over Receipts— Exhibit “A ” ........ Balance unremitted— M a y 1, 1917........................... '....

$

797 33 6,365 77

Balance unremitted— April 30, 1918.......................

$

5,558 44

ft .

/


FINANCIAL

STATEMENTS

155

T H E B O A R D O F F O R E I G N MISSIONS, R.C.A. LIST O F SECURITIES E X H I B I T “B ” S C H E D U L E NO. 1 A P R I L 30, 1918 Railroad Bonds: ' 29 Illinois Central 1st Mtg. 3j4s.................. 6 Lehigh Valley Ry. 1st4 ^ s .................... 12 West Shore 1st 4s....... ..................... 6 Central R. R. of N. J.Gen. 5s.................. 1 N. Y. C. & H. R. R. R- Gen. 4s................ 14 Reading Gen. 4s............................. 3 Manhattan Ry. Con. 4s................... ,•*■•■ 10 So. Pacific Ref. 4s........................... 5 So. Pacific 1st Ref. 4s........................

' $29,000 00 6,000 00 12,000 00 6,000 00 1,000 00 13,915 44 3,000 00 8,437 50 4,506 25

Stocks: ^ v 25 Shares U. S. Steel Pfd........................ 50 Shares Morris & Essex .......................

$ 2,762 50 4,075 00 I ----------

Bonds and Mortgages: 87 Ludlow Street, N e w York City................ $23,000 00 292 East 7th Street, N e w York City................ 22,000 00 333 East 152d Street, N e w York City.............. 4,500 00 69 West 10th Street, N e w York City.............. 676 10 531 West ^144th Street, N e w York City...... ^ ..... 11,500 00 340 Hart Street, Brooklyn, N. Y .................. 3,750 00 Brindon Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y .............. 4,000 00 1445 Minford Place, N e w York City............... 14,000 00 Western Mortgages ......................... 2,226 00 76th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y . ................. 4,250 00 14th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y ............. ,....5,500 00 54th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y ................... 7#750 00 176th Street, N e w York City.................. 29,500 00 East 165th Street, N e w York City.............. 20,500 00 West 136th Street, N e w York City............. 7,500 00 West 152d Street, N e w York City.............. 45,000 00 Fifth Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y ................ 11,500 00 Eighth Street, Brooklyn, N. Y ................ 3,500 00 Liberty Loan 4s......... ............................ Liberty Loan 4}4s...................................

$ 2,150 00 350 00

Real Estate: 236 West 62d Street, N e w York City Union Trust Company— Trust Account.. Promissory Note ................... Cash to Be Invested: In Bank of Metropolis.......................... In Hackensack National Bank..................... Total Investment and Cash— Exhibit “B 1 Total Funds— Schedule No. 2 ........ Total General Income Invested.....'....

r

$ 83,859 19

6,837 50

220,652 10 2,500 00 17,177 22 3,873 14

100 00 $31,228 37 1,000.00

32,228 37 $367,227 52


T H E B O A R D O F F O R E I G N MISSIONS, R.C.A. •S T A T E M E N T O F T R U S T A N D SECURITY F U N D S A P R I L 30, 1918

0

E X H I B I T “B" ^ , S C H E D U L E NO. 2 Endowment Funds: E. R. Voorhees College....... ...... ............ Arcot Industrial School.......................... A m o y Hospital ...................... ........... Ranipettai Hospital: I. Brodhead ......................... Mrs. J. W . Broadhead ............... M. Schaddelee ... *.................. Scudder Memorial ....................

$12,890 83 20,076 44 2,709 58 $35,676 85

$ 1,000 00 1,308 54 785 00 10,885 87

Ministerial Education in India: G. B. Walbridge Fund....... . Christiana Jansen Fund ...... ' Joseph Scudder Fund ........ . William R. Gordon Fund.....

13,979 41 $ 49,656 26 $

5,000 00 12,555 36 2,000 00 2,000 00

21,555 36

Ministerial Education in Japan: John Neefus Fund . . . ....... .

9,379 86

Support of Native Pastors in India: C. L. Wells Memorial.........

15,316 54

Support of Native Preachers in India: P. I. and Mary Neefus Fund...., Held in Trust for Others: Susan Y. Lansing Fund for W o m a n ’s Board....... Susan Y. Lansing Fund for'"Arabian Mission........ J. Penfold Fund for W o m e n ’s Board..............

$ 5,000 00 2,500 00 5,000 00

General Funds: A. J. Shaefer Fund............................. Alida Van Schaick Fund.......................... A. C. Van Raalte Fund.......... ............... In Memoriam Fund *........................... Garret N. Hopper Fund.......................... John S. .Lyles Fund............................. Permanent Fund ............................... Cornelia M. Wallace Fund........................ J. H. Oerter Memorial Fund .................... Madison Avenue Reformed Church................ E. Diehl Memorial Fund..........................

$ 194 25 30,000 00 3,000 00 - 500 00 1,500 00 50,000 00 14,550 00 100 00 936 16 15,000 00 2,000 00

18,045 09

12,500 00

117,780 41 Total Trust Funds...... Conditional Gifts: Semelink Family Mission Fund K. Schaddelee ............. Dirk J. Obbink............. Mary C. Van Brunt........ Mr. and Mrs. J. Visser...... D. J. De Bey.............. Miss Mary Voorhees ....... Peter Cortelyou- ............ A. B. Churchman ........... ”

$244,233 52 $16,000 00 111 79 500 00 7.000 00 500 00 1.000 00 1,000 00

2.500 00 1,000 00

---------Temporary Funds: Blauvelt Memorial Hospital ... Cornelis Punt Memorial— China A m o y Diamond Jubilee Fund.'. Security Funds ................ Total Funds— Exhibit “B 1

*

29,61179

$ 2,000 00 2,099 25 4,141 85 -------.........

8,241 10 65,15383 $347,240 24


May

17,

1918.

Howell S. Bennet, Esq., Treasurer, The Board of Foreign Missions, R. C. A., N e w York City. Dear Sir: W e have completed the audit of the books, records and accounts of your office for the fiscal year ended April 30, 1918, which we submit, together with a letter embodying some comments, and the following statements:

exhibit

I

“A ”

S TATEMENT OF R E V E N U E A N D EXPENDITURES— F O R T H E Y E A R E N D E D A P R I L 30, 1918.

“B ” •

S T A T E M E N T OF ASSETS A N D A P R I L 30, 1918.

'

LIABILITIES— •

Sch e d u l e

No. 1— Statement showing Investments and H o w Distributed. No. 2— Statement of Trust and Security Funds. "C" ’

S T A T E M E N T O F RECEIPTS A N D D I S B U R S E M E N T S OF D E S I G N A T E D GIFTS— F O R T H E YEAR ENDED A P R I L 30, 1918. ■

All revenue for the year as indicated by the books was properly accounted for. Expenditures were made by duly executed checks and the canceled checks returned by the bank were examined by us. The balance of cash on hand at April 30, 1918, was verified by actual count, and confirmations received from the various depositories. Schedule No. 1 is a list of the Securities. Those which were in the Treasurer’s hands and the safe deposit box were examined by us and such a%' were in the pos­ session of the Bank of Manhattan Company were confirmed by the Bank. As to the Mortgages, they are shown on this Schedule at their face value, although the Board is mortgagee in possession of the property 1445 Minford Place, and its value can only be determined when realized through sale. During the past year the Board did not remit to the A m o y Mission all the appro­ priations made for its use. In lieu thereof the Mission was allowed to expend some moneys in its possession. The amount so borrowed is $13,889.13, which is shown as a liability. The fluctuations in exchange rates will probably make, it necessary to remit approximately $14,000 in order to settle the amount claimed by the Mission. ,

Respectfully yours,

LOOMIS, S U F F E R N & FERNA L D , Certified Public Accountants.

Board of Foreign Misssions, Reformed Church in America, 25 East 22nd Street, N e w York City. .

■ . . *

Gentlemen: W e have examined the Bonds and Securities of the Board as noted in the Balance Sheet of May 1st, 1918, and set forth particularly in the Board's ledger, and find that they are correct. W e report that the Par Value of the Stocks and Bonds is............... $93,500.00 Their Value on our Books.......................... 93,196.70 Market Value May 1, 1918.......................... 79,958.00 By reason of war conditions quotations for bonds are more or less nominal, few sales being made, and the prices do not adequately express values. The mortgages are in hand and necessary adjustment requiring attention in the hands of Counsel for settlement. Yours truly, • . ‘ W . E D W . F O STER, Chairman Finance Committee. N e w York, May 15, 1918.


A R A B I A N MISSION RECEIPTS M A Y 2, 1917, to M A Y 2, 1918

As far as possible these amounts have been placed to the credit of the churches in the “Tabular View of Receipts. F O R M I S S I O N A R I E S ’1 SALA R I E S :

. $700 600 1,400 ' 528 575

Alto, Wis.................................... . Brooklyn, N. Y., On-the-Heights ................. •Chicago', III., First Roseland...................... ‘ Holland, Mich., First ........................... Walden, N. Y .................................. •Flushing, N. Y ................................. Kalamazoo, Mich., Second ....................... Catskill, N. Y .................................. N. Y. C. Lenox Ave............................ N. Y. C. St. Nicholas Collegiate........... ;...... Overisel, Mich.................................. Orange City, la., First ......................... Pella, la., Second ........... ...... ............. Plainfield, N. J., Trinity .................... 1 In Memoriam ................................. t •Sioux County Churches, la........... ............ Ridgewood, N. J., First ......................... Somerville, N. J., Second ....................... Clymer, N. Y., Abbe ........................... Friend .......................................

00 00 00 94 00

1,200 00

500 557 600 ' 500 660 700 600 700 900 2,896 500 633

00 37 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 48 00 34

200 00

350 00

S Y N D ICATES N O T I N C L U D E D ABOVE: Brooklyn, N. Y., First Flatbush ................................ Catskill, N. Y ................................................ Claverack, N. Y., First .... Little Neck, L. L, Harmony Circle, K. D .......................... Grand Rapids, Mich., Bethany ;........................... Maskat Bible Shop ....................................... High Falls, N. Y., Clove ..................................... Holland, Mich., Third ...... Holland, Neb................................................. Jamaica, N. Y.,.First ......................................... N e w Brunswick, N. J., Second .......... !..................... N e w Brunswick, N. J., Theol. Sem.Class of ’97............... N. Y. C., West End Collegiate.................................. North Holland, ^Uch................................... Oradell, N. J., ............ Philadelphia, Pa., First ...................................... Raritan, N. J., Third.......................................... ' Other Syndicates ............................................

5 61 15 10 2 35 10 39 100 2 110 3 65 152 53 18 20 797

00 00 00 00 00 00 25 00 00 00 00 00 00 96 00 00 50 20

$16,800 04 * Churches supporting two missionaries.


M I S C E L L A N E O U S GIFTS “A. C.” ......... ....... 10 00 “A Member, First Ref. Ch.ti Rochester, N. Y.M ...... 25 00 Ashley, Miss Susan....... 1 00 Bahler, Rev. P. G. M .... 2 50 45 00 Baker, Mrs. Dirk......... Baldwin, Mrs. A. H ...... 5 00 Bennink, H. H. ......... 50 00 Brower, Miss Christine... 1 10 Bussing, Miss Sarah A ... 10 00 Campbell, Miss Carrie M.... 5 00 10 00 “Cash" ................. Chicago, 111., Irving Park ^ Pres. S. S ............. 15 00 Chicago, 111., Moody Ch... 170 00 Chicago Missionary Commit­ tee .................. 30 00 Cobb, Miss E. P .......... 10 00 De Heidenwereld Fund... 85 00 Dubbink, Miss Jennie.... 5 00 “Friend’* ............... 5 q0 “Friend, First Ref. Ch., 30 00 Rochester, N. Y.'*...... Friend of Missions....... 500 00 Friesema, H a r r y ......... 50 00 Friesema, John ....... 50 00 5 00 Gulick, Rev. George W .... Haig, Mrs. C. A ......... 23 75 Hasbrouck, Miss M. L. B... 5 00 Hills Brothers .......... 250 00 Hyde, Mrs. E. Francis.... 50 00 In Memory of C. B. T ... 50 00 In Memory of William Walvoord ................ 100 00 Ireland, H. G ............ 3 Ou Jenny, Mrs. A ........... 7 00 MacNair, Rev. Wilmar... 10 00 Markley, Mrs. E.......... 1 00 Mason, Rev. A. D e W ..... 50 00

Mason, Dr. L. D .... . Miller, Miss Katherine... Moody Bible Institute..... Moody Church, Y. W. B. C.. Mouw, Peter ............ Mulder, Dr. C. D., and fam­ ily .................. Newark Bible Class...... Oakdale, Pa., First Presby­ terian ................ Rees, Miss G. L ...... «■... Rice, Miss Laura W a d e .... Rockwell, Miss Alice..... Rossiter, Mrs. M. F ...... Smies, D ............'.... Smith, Miss Kate........ Smock, Mrs. J. C ......... Stager, H. J............. Strong, Rev. W m . V. D --Terry, Mrs. Wilson....... Thoms, Mrs. M. D. P ..... • Toussaint, Mrs. Simon.... T w o Friends ............ T w o Friends per Miss E. Hobart............... T w o Old Friends......... Vandervelde, Miss Susie.... Van Houten, Miss J. F..C. . Van Roekel, Geurt ...... Vroom, A. H .......... Walvoord, Mrs. W m ...... Watson, Mrs. W. L ....... Weber, Edw. R .......... Western Theol. Sem. Stu­ dents ................ Woodbridge, Mrs. S. M .... W o m a n ’s Board .........

50 2 25 25 1

00 43 00 00 00

20 00 99 75 32 1 2 1 1 10 1 800 1 5 1 20 35 200

00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

1 500 20 10 250 10 10 25 3

00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00

14 63 50 00 309 07 $4,205 23

LEGACIES Eliza C. Winslow................................................ K. Schaddelee ..................................................

$377 37 17 50 $394 87


T H E A R A B I A N MISSION STATEMENT OF R E V E N U E A N D EXPENDITURES FOR T H E

YEAR

ENDED

A P R I L 30, 1918

EXHIBIT "A” Revenue

Collections: , Salaries ................................. $15,222 89 Syndicates ..................................... 1,508 91 “One Day’s Income” ........................... 3,021 89 Miscellaneous .................................. 19,063 57 Income from Trust Fund held by Board of Foreign Missions.......... Income from Trust Fund held by Board of Direction................ Income from Security Fund....... .... ......................... Bahrien Hospital Endowment Fund Income........................ Busrah Hospital Endowment Fund Income........................ Legacies ..................................................... Gifts for Specific Purposes: University of Michigan— Students* Christian Association $ 197 85 Dr. Van Vlack ............................. Hospital Work in Arabia ........................ 200 00

$38,817 26 125 00 71 50 277 50 231 95 90 90 394 87

397 85 Total Revenue ....................

$40,406 83

/

E x p e n ditures

Remittances to Arabia for Regular W o r k ... Individual Accounts of Missionaries........ Special Salaries ... ....... .............

$25,066 94 13,227 91 1,741 63' $40,036 48 „

Specific Work— Designated Gifts: Salary and Expenses of Dr. Van Vlack.. H o m e Expenses: Discount and Interest................. Rent and Care of Office.............. Salaries ............................ Account Books and Stationery......... Salary of Stenographers and Supplies... Postage, Telegrams and Cables......... Office Furniture and Repairs........... Incidentals .......................... Books purchased ..................... Christian Intelligencer ............... Audit .............................. Telephone .......................... Publishing Annual Report.............. Pamphlets and Leaflets ............... Illustrating Literature ................ “Mission Field” ..................... “Neglected Arabia” .................. Circulars and Miscellaneous Printing.... Mission Conferences and Reports....... Expenses District Secretary ........... Classical Missionary Agent ............ Missionary Education ........ \ ....... Shipping Expenses ................... Travel A mong Churches ..............

197 85 --------

. $40,234 33

$

262 25 203 56 1,602 64 • 55 01 ’ 349 07 152 92 93 24 65 75 3 58 • 35 75 30 00 51 51 95 36 187 20 28 67 186 42 530 50 40 60 39 00 53 53 ■ 10 40 48 75 . 741 11 566 45 -------5,433 27

Total Expenditures .....................................

45,667 60

Excess of Expenditures over Revenue......................

$ 5,260 77

Add: Specific Gifts received not remitted..................... ...... Deficit for the year— to Surplus Account

$

200 00

$ 5,460 77


SURPLUS ACCOUNT

Ba,a^^.a^cJ9o£l^c’« u^ppiropriated'now*transferred*foVcuV-

$ 5,020 67

2,100 00 $ 7,120 6 5,460 77

Adjusted Surplus ............... Deficit for the year— as above.............

$ 1,659 90

Balance, April 30, 1918— Exhibit ‘ B'V

S T A T E M E N T OF ASSETS A N D LIABILITIES A P R I L 30, 1918 .

EXHIBIT

“B ”

Assets

$ 1,548 20 8,400 00 50 00 7,000 00 5,293 84

Cash ................................... Kailroad Bonds ..... ................... U. S. Liberty Bonds ( 4 % )............... Bonds and Mortgages..•■. ...... . ■ ..... Remittances to Arabia for May and June...*

$22,292 04 Liabilities

$ 250 00 7.000 00

Medical Work Fund....... Bahrein Hospital Endowment Busrah Hospital Endowment Security Fund ........... Abbie J. Bell Fund....... Busrah School Fund ....

2.000 00 5,392 00

200 00 5, 428 14 $20,270 14 362 00 1,659 90

Gifts unremitted .... Surplus— Exhibit “A 1

$22,292 04 May,17, 1918. Howell S. Bennet, Esq., Treasurer, The Arabian Mission, N e w York City. BXHIBII STATEMENT o f r e v e n u e a n d expenditures— “A ” S T A F O R T H E Y E A R E N D E D A P R I L 30, 1918. S T A T E M E N T O F A S S E T S A N D LIABILITIES A P R I L 30, 1918. The revenue was properly accountcd for a,j^cl^ e ^ „ kUS W e ;i:frteivyedt cUrrnPaT'oyn eo?the balance at the close of the year from

at April 30, 1918. ’

Respectfully yours, L OOMIS S FERNA LD, J^UUiViio, o U F F E R N & Public Accountants.

John Bingham, Eben E. Olcott, p Finance Committee.

as % x t i z m s s t e xtr« c ass--""r

Approved;


MISSIONARIES OF T H E B O A R D ___ _ ( T h e following' list contains the n a m e s of Missionaries n o w connected with their various Missions, whether in the field or at h o m e expecting to return, with their addresses, and also those under appointment. Letter postage to all lands here named, five cents for the first ounce, three cents for each additional ounce or fraction. ■ Postage o n the printed matter, one cent for each t wo ounces, or fraction. ■

A M O Y

MISSION

1

O n l y Address— A m o y , China. w e n t out Mrs. Leonard W . K i p . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1865 Miss Katharine M . T a l m a g e . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1874 Miss M a r y E. T a l m a g e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1874 Miss Nellie Z w e m e r . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1891 Miss Margaret C. Morrison . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1892 Miss Lily N. D u r y e e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1894 Rev. A. Livingston Warnshuis, D.D., Shanghai. . . . . . . . . .1900 Mrs. A n n a D. Warnshuis, Shanghai . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1900 Rev. H a r r y P. Boot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1903 Mrs. A n n a H . Boot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1908' Rev. F r a n k Eckerson . . . . 1903 Rev. H e n r y J. Voskuil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . '....1907 Mrs. M a r y W . Voskuil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1908 Rev. H e n r y P. D e P r e e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1907 Mrs. Kate E. D e P r e e . . . . . . . . . . . . . ; . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1907 Miss Katharine R. Green . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1907 Rev. Steward D a y .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (1908-1914) 1916 Mrs. Rachel S. D a y . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (1908-1914) 191.6 J o h n H . Snoke, M . D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1908 Mrs. M a r y E. S. S no ke .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1908 Miss L e o n a V a n d e r Linden . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1909 Mr. H e r m a n R e n s k e r s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1910 Miss Bessie M . O g s b u r y - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1910


E d w a r d J. Strick, M . D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1911 Mrs. Edith M . S t r i c k . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1911 Miss M a u d e Norling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1912 Miss Willemina M u r m a n . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1913 Miss E d n a K. B e e k m a n . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1914 T a e k e Bosch, M . D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1915 Mrs. Margaret B. B o s c h . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1915 M r . Fred J. W eersing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1915 Mrs. Bata B. Wee rs in g . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1915 Miss Edith C. Boynton ... .•. . . . 1915 Rev. L y m a n A. Talmaai . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1916 Mrs. Ros e E. T a l m a n . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1916 Rev. H . Michael Veenschoten . . . . . . . . . . •. . . . . . . . . . 1917 Mrs. Stella G. Veenschoten . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1917 Rev. H e n r y P o p p e n . . . . . . . . . . 1918 Mrs. Dorothy T. P o p p e n ✓. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1918 Rev. H a r v e y I. Todd, under a p p o i n t m e n t . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1918 Mr. Irwin J. Lubbers, under a p p o i n t m e n t . . . . . . . . . . 1917

ARCOT

MISSION

General Address— M a d r a s Presidency, India. . Mrs. John Scudder, Vellore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ,..... 1861 Miss Julia C. Scudder, Ranipettai". . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....1879 Rev. Exekiel C. Scudder, Renipettai. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1882 Mrs. M a b e l J. Scudder, Ranipettai. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1889 Rev. Lewis R. Scudder, M.D., Vellore .... '. . . . . . . . . 1888 Mrs. Ethel T. Scudder, Vellore .. .•. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1888 Mrs. J a m e s A.. Beattie, Chittoor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1893 Miss Louisa H. Hart, M.D., M a d a n a p a l l e . . . . . . . . . . . . 1895 M r. William H . Farrar, Katpadi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1897 Mrs. Elizabeth W . Farrar, Katpadi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1897 Rev. Walter T. Scudder, T indivanam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1899 Mrs. Ellen B. Scudder, M.D., Tin di va na m . . . . . . . . . . . 1899 Miss Ida S. Scudder, M.D., V e l l o r e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1899 Miss Annie E. Hancock, V e l l o r e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1899 Miss Alice B. V a n Doren, Ranipettai . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1903


Miss Henrietta W y n k o o p ' Drury, N e w Brunswick, N. J... 1906 Miss Delia M . Houghton, Vellore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1908 Rev. Bernard Rottschaefer, Holland, M i c h . . . . . . . . . . . 1909 Mrs. Bernice M . Rottschaefer, Holland, M i c h . . . . . . . . . . 1910 Miss Margaret Rottschaefer, Holland, M i c h . . . . . . . . . . 1909 Miss Sarella TeWinkel, Chittoor .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1909 Miss Josephine V. TeWinkel, M a d a n a p a l l e . . . . . . . . . . . 1909 Bert W . Roy, M.D., 25 East 22nd St., N e w Y o r k . . . . . . . 1909 Mrs. Nellie M . Roy, 25 East 22nd St., N e w Y o r k . . . . . . . 1909 Mrs. H e n r y Honegger, Ranipettai . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1910 Rev. John H . Warnshuis, M a d a n a p a l l e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1913 Mrs.-Lilian C. Warnshuis, M.D., Madanapalle ..'. . . . . . . 1913 Miss Charlotte C. Wyckoff, Ranipettai . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1915 M r . Joh n D. Muyskens, Madanapalle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1915 Miss Elisabeth W . Conklin, 25 East 22nd St., N e w York. .1915 Rev. Lambertus Hekhuis, Vellore .v. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1916 Mrs. Jennie J. Hekhuis, Vellore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1916 Rev. Herbert E. .Van Vranken, Chittoor-. . . . . . . . . . . ...1917 Mrs. Nellie S. V a n Vranken, Chi tt oo r. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1917 Rev. John C. V a n W y k , Madanapalle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1917 Mrs. Amelia M . V a n W y k , M a d a n a p a l l e . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1917 Miss Wilhelmina Noordyk, Madanapalle . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1917 M r . Cornelius R. Wierenga, T i n d i v a n a m . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1917 M r. E. Paul M c L e a n , u nd er -a pp oi nt me nt . . . . . . . . . . . . 1918 Miss Clara M . Coburn, under a p p o i n t m e n t . . . . . . . . . . . . 1918 Miss M a u d e S. Scudder, under appointment . . . . . . . . . 1918 * < i JAPAN MISSION General Address— Japan. • Rev. J a m e s H . Ballagh, D.D., Y o k o h a m a . . . . . . . . . . 1861 Rev. E u g e n e S. Booth, D.D., 178 Bluff, Y o k o h a m a . . . . . 1879 Mrs. M . N. Wyckoff, T o k y o . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1881 Miss M . Leila W i n n , Aomori, Iwate K e n . . . . . . . . . . . . 1882 Rev. Albert Oilmans, D.D., Meiji Gakuin, T o k y o . . . . . . 1886 Mrs. Alice V. Oltmans, Meiji Gakuin, T o k y o . , . . . . . . . . 1886 Miss Julia Moulton, 178 Bluff, Y o k o h a m a . . . . . . . . . ..1889 Pev. Albertus Pieters, Oita . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1891


Mrs. Miss. Rev. Mrs. Miss

E m m a T. Pieters, O i t a . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sara M . Couch, Nagasaki . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H a r m a n V. S. Peeke, D.D., S a g a .... (1889-1892) 1893 Vesta O. Peeke, S a g e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . *?' Harriet M . Lansing, F u k u o k a . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 ° ^ R e v D . C . Ruigh, 25 East 22nd St, N e w Y o r k . . . . . . . . . 1901 . Mrs. Christine C. Ruigh, 25 East 22nd St., N e w York... .1904 Miss Jennie A. Pieters, Shimonoseki . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Miss- Jennie M . Kuyper, 178 Bluff, Y o k o h a m a . . . . . . . t .1905 M r. Anthony-Walvoord, Nagasaki . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1905 Mrs. Edith Walvoord, Nagasaki . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1905 M r . Walter E. Hoffsommer, Meiji Gakuin, T o k y o .. .'.1907 Mrs..Grace P. Hoffsommer, Meiji Gakuin, T o k y o ... 1907 Rev. Willis G. Hoekje, M o r i o k a . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1907 Mrs. Annie N. Hoekje, M o r io ka . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191Rev. H ubert Kuyper, O r a n g e City, la. . . . . . . . . . . . . i q i i Miss Jeane Noordhoff, Shimonoseki , .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1911 Rev. David V a n Strien, K u r u m e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19j2 Rev. L u m a n J. Shafer, N a g a s a k i . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1912 Mrs. A m y K. Shafer, N a g a s a k i . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1912 Miss M a y B. Demarest, Y o k o h a m a . . . . . . . . . . . . '■. . . . 1912 Rev. Stephen W . Ryder, K a g o s h i m a . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1913 Mrs. R e b a C. Ryder, K a g o s h i m a . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1914 Miss Evelyn F. Oltmans, Shimonoseki . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1914 Miss Janet Oltmans, 178 Bluff, Y o k o h a m a .. . . . . . . . . . . 1914 Rev.,Alex. V a n Bronkhorst, K u r u m e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1916 Mrs.'Helena de M . V a n Bronkhorst, K u r u m e . . . . . . . . . 191o Rev. H e n r y V. E. Stegeman, L a n g u a g e Study, T o k y o . .. .1917 Mrs. Gertrude H . Stegeman, L a n gu ag e Study, T o k y o . ... 1917 Miss A n n a M . Fleming, under appointment . . . . . . . . . . 1918 '

ARABIAN

MISSION

General Address— V ia B o m b a y . Rev. J a m e s Cantine, D.D., Basrah, Persian Gulf. Mrs. Elizabeth G. Cantine, Basrah, Persian Gulf


Rev. Samuel M . Z w e m e r , D.D., Cairo, Egypt . . . . . . . . . 1890 Mrs. A m y W . Z w e m e r , Cairo, E g y p t . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1896 Rev. Fred J. Barny, Basrah, Persian G u l f . . . . . . . . . . . . 1897 Mrs. Margaret R. Barny, Basrah, Persian G u l f . . . . . . . rl898 Rev. J am es E. Moerdyk, Basrah, Persian Gulf . . . . . . . . 1900 Rev. John V a n Ess, Basrah, Persian Gulf . . . . . . . . . . . 1902 Mrs. Dorothy F. V a n Ess, Basrah, Persian G u l f . . . . . . . . 1909 Miss Jennie A. Scardefield, Bahrein, Persian G u l f . . . . . . 1903 Miss F a n n y Button, Maskat, Arabia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1904 Rev. Dirk Dykstra, Bahrein, Persian G u l f . . . . . . . . . . . . 1906 Mrs. Minnie W . Dykstra, Bahrein, Persian G u l f . . . . . . . 1907 C. Stanley G. Mylrea, M.D., Kuweit, Persian G u l f . . . . . . 1906 Mrs. Bessie L o n d o n Mylrea, Kuweit, Persian G u l f . . . . . . 1906 Rev. Gerrit J. Pennings, Bahrein, Persian G u l f . . . . . . . . 1908 Rev. E d w i n E. Calverley, Kuweit, Persian Gulf . . . . . . . 1909 Mrs. Eleanor J. Calverly, M.D., Kuweit, Persian Gulf.... 1909 Paul W . Harrison, M.D., Bahrein, Persian G u l f . . . . . . . . 1909 Mrs. Regina R. Harrison, Bahrein, Persian G u l f . . . . . . 1916 Rev. Gerrit D. V a n Peursem, Bahrein, Persian G u l f.... 1910 Mrs. Josephine E. V a n Peursem, Bahrein, Persian Gulf... 1910 Miss Sarah L. H o s m o n , M.D., 25 East 22nd St., N e w York. 1911 Miss Gertrud Schafheitlinj Canning, N o v a Scotia. . . . . . . 1912 Miss Charlotte B. Kellien, Basrah, Persian G u l f . . . . . . . 1915 Rev. H e n r y A. Bilkert, L a n gu ag e Study, Bahrein, P. G...1917 Mrs. A n n a M . Bilkert, L a n g u a g e Study, Bahrein, P. G . ...1917 Miss M a r y C. V a n Pelt, L a n gu ag e Study, Bahrein, P. G . . .1917 Mrs. Sharon J. T h o m s , under appointment... (1906-1913) 1918 Dr. Louis P. D a m e , M.D., under appointment. . . . . . . . . .1918 Miss Elizabeth Purdie, under appointment . . . . . . . . . . . 1918


INDEX Educational Work: Amoy, xii-xiv, 5-15, 20-22, 32-35. Arabia, xxx, 126. Arcot, xvii, 53-82. Japan, xxiv, 106-119. Amoy Commemoration & Fagg Memorial Evangelistic Work: * Fund, ix. Amoy, xii, 3, 16, 23, 28-32. Amoy District, Arabia, xxv iii, 124. Ang-Tng Primary dcnooi, oo. Arcot, xvi, 38, 46-53. Arabian Mission: condensed report ot, japan, xxi, 87. xxvi-xxxiii. Expenditures: Report, 121*129. Of Board, 1 52. Financial Statements, 158-161. Of Arabian Mission, 160. ' Appointments, new, xli. Arcot: Churches, xvii. F. Condensed report of, xv*xx. * Report, 36-82. . . Ferris Seminary, xxiv, 108. Arcot Theological Seminary, xvu, 64. Financial Goal, xl. a Athletics, xiii, 9. Financial Report, xliii. Financial Statements, 130-161. Foreign Missions Sunday, xxxiv. Funds, Trust & Security, 156. Basrah Educational Fund, ix. ’ • G. Bible Classes, xxii, 12, 66, 67, 91. Gifts: Bible Sales in Arabia, xxxu, 128. Of Churches, vii.. Bible Women, xix, 17, 19, 57, 58, 80. Individual, 149. . Board of Foreign Missions: Members of, Girls' Schools: xlii. .. Amoy, xiv, 11, 21, 2 5. Report of, iii-xlviit. Arabia, 126. Boys' Schools: Amoy, 15, 21, 25, 29, 33. Arcot, xix, 58, 62, 75, 79, 81. Arcot, 55, 58, 65-67, 72, 77. Japan. 107-116. Arabia, 126. Gudiyattam Dispensary, 69. Japan, 107, 116-119. Branch Society Work, xxiii, 96. H. Hindu Girls* Schools, xix, 62, 70, 75, 79, 81. u ome Department, xxxiii. " Chiang;-chiu Boys* School, 21. Home Secretary, iv.^ Chiang-chiu District, 17. Report of. xxxiii. • Chiang-chiu Girls’ School, 21. Hope High School, India, xviii, 78. Chiang-chiu Kindergarten, 22. Hope Hospital, xv, 15. Children’s Home, Amoy, 13. Hospitals: Christian Hostels, 55, 67* Hope Hosnital, xv, 15. ^ Christian Endeavor, 113. Lansing Memorial, xxxix. Churches, American: ^ Mary Isabel Allen, 40. ■ ' Contributions of, vii.# Mary Lott Lvles. 40. 81. Per capita giving, viii. Mary Tabor Schell, xviii, 67. Church, Native: Neerbosch, 26. Arabia, xxviii, 127. Panipettai, 59. ’ China, xi. 3, 4, 5, 17, 23, 29-32. Wilhelmina, xv, 15. ' India, xvii, 45, 47-52. Japan, xxii, 87, 100. Church of Christ, Japan, 100. Indian Church Board, xvii, xx,- 47-53. Classical Agents, xxxix. Colporteurs, 31. . . , Committee on Education, Joint, xxxviJ.

Advertising in Japan, Newspaper, 94. Amoy: Churches, xi, xii. Condensed report of, x-xv.

Committee. Western District, xxxviii. Japan: Condensed report of, xx-xxvi. Condifions in Arabia since War. 121-129. Report of, 85*119. . ., Correspondence Course, Japan. 95-100. Joint Committee on Education, xxxvi-xxxvti. Crane Elementary School, Arcot, 55. D.

Deputation, xv, xl, 42. Dispensaries, 56, 69. ... District Committee, Western, xxxvm.

^ace Class, 63.4 . >ansing Memorial Hospital, xxix. legacies, vii, 150. literature, xxxiv, 95, 96, 99. ^ivingstone Easter School, 33.

0


Reuniting of Japan Missions, 102, 105. Revenue and Expenditure: statement of, Madanapalle Girls' School, 79. ‘ 152. Maps; . A m o y Mission, 1, ' s. Arabian Mission, 120. Arcot, 36. Securities, list of, 155. Kiushiu, 84. Service Flag, v. North Japan, 83. Shafer, Rev. L. J., iv. Mary Isabel Allen Hospital, 40. Sio-khe Boys* School, 25. ' Mary Lott Lyles Hospital, 40, 81. Sio-khe District, 23. * Mary Tabor Schell Hospital, xviii, 67. Sio-khe Girls* School, 25. Medical Work: . Special News Bulletin, xxxiv. A m o y Mission, xv; 15-16, 26. Statistics: ' ! Arabian Mission, 124. Comparative Summary, 130. fArcot Mission, xviii, 56, 69. General Summary, 130. Meiji Gakuin, xxv, 107, 117. Of Churches, xi, xii, xvii, xxii, 47, 49, Miller, Rev. E. W., retirement of, iv. 51. ^ Mission Fests, xxxix. Of Distribution of Literature, xxii, Mission Fields, Special Opportunities in: xxxti 95 96 99 Arabia, x, xlvii, Of Medical’Work, xv, xviii,.xxix,- 124, China, ix, xlvit. Of Educational Work, xii-xv, xvii, India, x, xlvii. xviii, xxiv, 126. * ^ Japan, ix, xlvii. Steele Academy, xxiv, 107, 116. e Mjssjons at Work, x-xxxiii. Sturgis Seminary, xxiv. 112. , Missionaries: Movements of. xii. Sunday-Schools, 23, 92-94, 97, 110-111, Names of, 1, 36, 85, 121, 162-166. New, xli. Sunday School Teachers’ Institute, 94. Number, xli. O n Furioush, xli, 41. Returning, 42. . T. “Mission Field." The, xxxv. Talmage College, China, 6, 10. Muhammadan Girls* School, $1. Tindivanam High School, 55. Tong-an Boys* School, 32. Tong-an District. 27. Neerbosch Hospital, 26. Tong-an Girls' School, 34. “Nefflected Arabia," xxxv. Travelogues, Missionary, xxxvi. Newspaper work in Japan, 94, 111. Typhoon, xi, 110, 118. Normal Training School, Chittoor, 74.

O. One Day’s Income Fund, vii, xxxiii, x

P. Parish Letters, xxxv. Particular Synod of Chicago, xxxviii. Politics: Amoy, xi, 27. ' Arabia, 122. . Arcot, xvi, 43*46. Japan, 86. .

U. '

Union Theological College. China. 5-6, Union Tuberculosis Sanitarium, 40.

V. Vayalpad Hindu Girls’ School, 79. Voorhees College, xviii, 65. . W.

Wandiwash School, 56. Ranipettai Girls* School, 62. Wilhelmina Hospital, xv, 15. Ranipettai Hospital, 59. Woman*s Board, receipts of, xlvi. Receipts: of the Board, vii, xliii, 151. W o m e n ’s Work: Of the Board since 1857, comparative Amoy, xv. 12, 23, 25, 34. table, 151. Arabia, 126. Of the Arabian Mission, 158. Arcot, 56, 76. O n the Field, 1, 36, 85. Japan, 89, *107. Tables by Classes and Churches, 131-147. Tables by Classes and Synods, 148. From Individuals, 149. Legacies. 150. Y. M. C. A., 10, 85. , Receints and Expenditures of Board: Y. W. C. A., 6, 85, 111. Statement of. xliv. xlv, 152-154. Arabian Mission, xlv. Recommendations of the Board, xlvi-xlviii. Zenana Work, xix, 58, 62, 71, 76, 8(7.