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H o p e C o l l e g e • H o l l a n d , Michigan • A n i n d e p e n d e n t n o n p r o f i t p u b l i c a t i o n • S e r v i n g the H o p e College C o m m u n i t y for I I 0 years

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C r i s p e l l blaze sparks policy change CARRIE XEMMANX campusbeat editor

It all started in a downstairs bedroom on July 12, 1996. with one candle and a few seconds' neglect. Flame enveloped the bed, burst the windows, and crept up the side of the house and roof. By the time firefighters arrived on the scene, the s m o k e was so thick that they could not enter, and could do nothing to save Crispell cottage. But the results reach be-

yond the immediate. Students returning to Hope this year will find more than just the empty hole that once was Crispell —they will feel the effects of the blaze in the form of a beefed-up fire policy banning all candles from campus residences and strong warnings to take fire safety seriously. The new rule is actually a change in the Housing Terms and Conditions, meaning that infractions will be handled administratively rather than judicially, as are policy infrac-

that go beyond modified birthday celebrations. Some raise concerns about the future of such long-standing traditions as Nykerk and sorority candlelight ceremonies, or the Take Back the Night march. " T h e a d m i n i s t r a t i o n and t h e policy is more concerned with overall s a f e t y t h a n a b o u t u s , " s a i d K i e r s t e n K r a u s e ' 9 7 , O d d Year Nykerk Song Coach. "And that's more important. T h e Crispell fire was just tragic. We are a smaller

tions. S t u d e n t s receive a verbal warning from their R D on the first offense, a $25 fine on the second, and a third will bring charges of failure to comply with a college official and a policy write-up. " O u r h o p e is to i n c r e a s e f i r e safety," said Derek Emerson. Director of Housing and Judicial Affairs. "Actually, there are many colleges that don't allow candles, and were surprised that we did." H o w e v e r , f o r s o m e H o p e students. the policy change has effects

Eng. Dept. recruits h e a v y h i t t i n g prof. Intermission,

more CRISPELL on 2

O u t in full f o r c e •

p a g e 6.

N e w Public Safety foot patrols meant

protect

students,

to

not 'catch them.'

CARRIE T E N N A N T campusbeat e d i t o r

C/T spins W e b throughout campus. Infocus, p a g e 3.

Orientation *96 jazzes it up for class of DiffVent folks. Spotlight, p a g e 5.

As a result of a student survey conducted last spring, Public Safety has increased manpower and visibility for the '96' 9 7 school year. According to that survey, the students' main concern and request was that Public Safety be more visible. Departmental additions include two full-time officers and a West Campus shuttle van pickup every half-hour during regular Shuttle Van hours. "1 would challenge anyone to find another college this size that has a bigger or better Public Safety Department," said Duane Terpstra, Director of Public Safety. "We found out in our survey that students wanted to get to know who we are," Terpstra said. To fulfill that goal, the daytime patrol officer will now be walking through campus buildings on a regular basis. "At first, people think that something is wrong, that w e ' r e trying to catch them. It isn't anything like that," Terpstra said. "One of the ways to find out what students want is by talking to people, by developing those kind of relationships." Terpstra also plans on giving presentations to groups in cottages or residence halls to promote safety awareness, give basic safety tips, or address any concerns residents may have. "Incidents and situations get exaggerated something fierce in a short period of time, and I want to give students the correct information," Terpstra said. For example, he cited some students' panic of Holland gang activity. " S o m e people think there are gangs on every street corner, and that's just not true. W e ' v e never dealt with a gang problem on campus at all," he said. However, Terpstra also emphasized that one of the duties of Public Safety is to monitor off-campus incidents of which students should be aware. Starting this Tuesday, the Shuttle Van will be picking up students from Van Wylen library every half-hour, 6 p.m. to 2 a.m., and circulating around campus. This van will serve Anchor photo b y Z a c h J o h n s o n Van Wylen, Van Zoeren, Vander Werf, Peale, Voorhees, SERVICE W I T H A SMILE: Debbie Paterik ('99) was one

more SAFETY on 2

of over 100 Orientation Assistants, lending their muscle on move-in day.

H a w o r t h set t o t r a n s f o r m Hope's c a m p u s CARRIE T E N MANX campusbeat editor

Charred cottage s n u f f s c a n d l e burning on campus. Campusbeat, p a g e 2.

Soccer teams k i c k i t before seoson start. Sports, p a g e 8.

The last physical barrier to the completion of the Haworth center disappeared as Welmers Cottage inched down College Avenue last summer, and the shell of the huge complex contrasts sharply with the cottages that once lined the street. But then, Haworth was always i n t e n d e d to c h a n g e t h e f a c e of Hope's campus. "For at least a dozen years, we have had plans to make that side of c a m p u s m o r e c o l l e g i a t e , " said P r e s i d e n t John J a c o b s o n . " O u r long-range goal,even b e f o r e we had a clear idea of a conference center, was to unify the block by t r a n s f o r m i n g it into a collegiate area." F u t u r e p l a n s to c o m p l e t e the transformation include removal of Yntema Cottage and the garage that stands next to the old Welmers site. The project will be finished off with the addition of landscaping and shrubs off College Avenue around the Admissions House. Construction on the complex was

delayed by the exceptionally cold weather last spring, pushing the opening of the H a w o r t h C e n t e r back from Nov. 1, 1996 to Jan. I, 1997. Cook Residence Hall is still scheduled to open in May of 1997. Besides hosting summer conferences, the Haworth'Center will provide additional student housing and will also serve as an overflow dining facility during peak P h e l p s hours. "The Center will ease some pressure on the entire College community," Jacobson said. "One of the things we want to do is to have the dining hall open for students during the most c r o w d e d h o u r s in Phelps, and certainly on special occasions such as parents' weekends and Homecoming." The opening of the Cook Residence Hall, according to Jacobson, will be accompanied by the elimination of student housing in the Centennial Park Apartments. "Centennial Park has been very useful to us, but it is just not up to Hope standards," Jacobson said. "The Cook Residence Hall would make up for the 90 students cur-

/AncA?or p h o t o b y Z a c h J o h n s o n

O N T H E RISE: The shell of the Haworth Center looms over the northern edge of campus. It is set to open Jan. 1. rently housed at Centennial Park and make room for 90 additional students." T h e r e are no c u r r e n t p l a n s to build additional residence hall facilities, according to Jacobson, because the enrollment cap will stabilize growth. Although no decision has been made, the administration has dis-

cussed making some dining areas available for community use. " O n e or more of the dining facilities might conceivably be opened to the Holland community. It's an idea that has been talked a b o u t , " Jacobson said. "It would also be a good place to hold wedding receptions for graduates and friends of Hope College."


^Anchor

Campus Beat

Double the money Many Hope students were in for a pleasant surprise last w e e k e n d , m o v i n g into their n o w h o m e s to find cottages refurbished with n e w paint, f u r n i t u r e , c a r p e t i n g , linol e u m , and a p p l i a n c e s . S u m m e r renovations totaled $407,000. Of that $407,000. an estimated $87,000 went into cosmetic repair of cottages, roughly double the expenditure of last summer. The remainder was spent moving Welmers Cottage and remodeling Stryker Cottage, f o r m e r l y " C o o p e r Street Pier." and Yonkersma (Arcadian) Cottage. Some of the repairs w e r e to cottages that sustained moving d a m ages in the summer of 1995 and had not been repaired last s u m m e r . H o w e v e r , s o m e s u g g e s t that s o m e of the c o t t a g e m a i n t e n a n c e problems are a result of poor treatment by students, and that student initiative in cleaning and upkeep is an important factor in the long-run living conditions there. "I really stress that students need to take care of the house. It's like renting a house f r o m the college. Leaving a messy, dirty house is not

an o p t i o n , " said Shelly Spencer, Cottage R D . " T h e Arcadian Cottage. for example, was absolutely trashed. There were spindles ripped out of the banisters, the door was destroyed, and their I guessed their c a r p e t to be 35 y e a r s old w h e n t h e y ' d only had it for three years." "There is a lot of traffic in and out of my house too, with meetings, RAs and RDs. but that doesn't mean it has to be trash e d . M y carpet w o n ' t age 35 years in three." P h y s i c a l Plant r e c e i v e d k u d o s f r o m many for their summer efforts. "I have never seen so m a n y improvements in one summer," said Derek Emerson. Director of Housing and J u d i c i a l A f f a i r s . " J e r r y R a d e m a k e r (Associate Director of the Physical Plant) just kepi finding more things to do in cottages." "Last year, our carpet was so old that parts of it w e r e c o m p l e t e l y worn away, but now w e have excellent, b r a n d - n e w c a r p e t i n g , n e w grass behind the house, and a repaved driveway," said A n n Barry 4 98, RA of the Deutches Haus. T h e decision to make such extensive cottage repairs w a s made as a result of a student survey conducted last spring. C o t t a g e residents expressed concerns that their houses

w e r e not being well maintained. R a d e m a k e r then went h o u s e - t o house, compiling and prioritizing with each R A a list of maintenance improvement needs and listening to student complaints. "That had never been done before," Spencer said. " [ R a d e m a k e r ] really took the initiative in meeting with every cottage R A and going to every house. He really listened to people's gripes." T h e w o r k , h o w e v e r , is by no means finished. " U n f o r t u n a t e l y , the i m p r o v e ments did not affect our cottage," said Olivia Welch ('97). "We had requested painting on the outside of our house, but Physical Plant decided they didn't have e n o u g h money to do it." More improvements will follow next summer. "It's a process, and obviously one that costs a lot of money. T h i n g s like this have to be d o n e in installments," Emerson said. " W e just tried to hit the [cottages] with the most n e e d , " R a d e m a k e r said. "There are a couple that are really in need of s o m e m o r e work, and w e will be d o i n g a lot more i m p r o v e m e n t s next s u m m e r . We just took a big bite out of it."

Pull rallies t o rock campus Rallies to d r u m up recruits f o r this y e a r ' s Pull will kick off today and tomorrow on campus. T h e Pull, a 99-year tradition at Hope College, is a three-hour tugo f - w a r between the freshman and s o p h o m o r e classes that stretches across the Black River each September. T h e Pull is contested b e t w e e n Odd Year and Even Year, which refers to the graduation years of the participants and their coaches, w h o are m e m b e r s of the j u n i o r and senior classes. T h e high-intensity event features former participants recounting their experiences with the Pull.

PR p h o t o

U P IM S M O K E : Firefighters scramble to extinguish a fire in Crispell Cottage last July. A lighted candle started the blaze, which destroyed the cottage. It was later razed. I

group, and w e h a v e to fit in with what the policy is." However, she e m p h a s i z e d that the 60-year tradition would not just go u p in smoke. " W e will do something [with candles] because it is tradition. Perhaps the girls can fill the glasses with c a n d y and just hand out the candles outside that night." N o proposal has so far been submitted to the administration or the Nykerk C o m m i t t e e . T h e policy will not affect H o p e administrative or o f f i c e buildings, w h e r e c a n d l e s could possibly be stored for traditional ceremonies. "[The policy] is a c h a n g e , and that's always hard to work with at first," Emerson said. "But it does not have to end these traditions." Hope Dirctor of Health and Safety Jerry Gunnick urges preventative caution to avoid fires. Gunnick inspects cottages and residence halls periodically to look for fire, health, and safety hazards. If hazards remain unchanged, G u n n i c k can execute a write-up. " I ' m not doing that to punish students," Gunnick said. " I ' m doing thai to be safe." G u n n i c k stresses the importance of developing a fire escape plan for every cottage, and ensuring that e s c a p e routes are available, especially from the second floor.

H o w not to torch your house •Don't silence those smoke detectors - U s e a fan to blow away steam -Call Public Safety to relocate detectors

•Keep attics and furrtace rooms clear -Items stashed in these areas can ignite fires

•Leave the grill at home -Both charcoal and gas grills are prohibited

•Avoid "spider webs" of electrical cords - D o n ' t route wires across doorways -"Piggybacked" cords can spark fires

•Don't cover wires with carpet or tape -Faulty insulation could ignite coverings

•Allow for escape routes -Contain room overflow that blocks halls or stairs

•Use caution while cooking - D o n ' t leave lighted stoves and ovens unattended

Sophomores will p o w w o w today at 7 p.m. in Winants Auditorium (Graves Hall). ' 9 9 Pull coaches are seniors Ross Vrieze, Jeff Holwerda, Bill Dreyer, and Zach Johnson. The Morale team is h e a d e d by seniors D a n o Hop, Kim Eckert, and Stacy Longstreet. Interested frosh will gather tom o r r o w at 7 p.m., also in Winants Auditorium (Graves Hall). T h e ' 0 0 Pull team is led by juniors A n d y Sill, Andy Wright. Dan C a p p s . D a n S h e l l e y , and D a v e Schrier. Moralers are coached by juniors Megan Gaither, Lara Plewka. and Cori Freudenburg.

Residents c o m b a t cottage isolation CARRIE T E N N A N T cam pus beat editor

Along with the crush of R A s that flooded c a m p u s last w e e k were six Residential Life staffers with n e w titles: Cottage Coordinators. T h i s will be the first year that the 6 0 cottages will be divided into six " n e i g h b o r h o o d s , " each of wihich has an assigned Cottage Coordinator to act as an intermediary between the RD, Shelly Spencer, and the individual RAs. " T h e position w a s c r e a t e d because of the growing numbers, the enormity of the cottage p r o g r a m , " said Julie Goebel, Director of Residential Life. "The Cottage Coordinators will divide u p supervisory responsibilities for the cottages," Spencer said. "I w o u l d be overwhelmed with the s u p e r v i s i o n of 6 0 - p l u s R A s and over 4 0 0 residents. This way, I can

SAFETY f r o m

CRISPELL f r o m

I 996

campus briefs

Hope spends twice the bucks on overdue cottage repairs CARRIE X E N N A N X cam pus beat e d i t o r

A u g u s t 28,

I

G r a v e s , and D i m n e n t C h a p e l . Another van will be available on call as in the past to service the other areas of campus. If the n e w west c a m p u s shuttle is successful, plans are to expand the service second semester to include a similar East C a m p u s shuttle departing f r o m the DeWitt Center every half hour. With the extra m a n p o w e r , there will be an officer patrolling c a m p u s during the day, and office r s r a t h e r than s t u d e n t s will be manning the information center 7 days a week f r o m 3 p.m. to 1 a.m. When Ray Gutknecht, Director of Public Safety, retired earlier this year, Terpstra w a s promoted f r o m the A s s i s t a n t D i r e c t o r p o s i t i o n . This position was cut f r o m the payroll and the two n e w officer positions were created. T h e department will not employ student officers as in p r e v i o u s years. Public S a f e t y also traded its old vehicles for two new Intrepids to patrol the c a m p u s area, according to their regular replacement schedule.

k n o w w h a t ' s g o i n g on in all the neighborhoods." T h e n e w C o t t a g e Coordinators will also fill a need for more c o m m u n i t y d e v e l o p m e n t in cottages. "Before, even though cottage prog r a m m i n g was done, it w a s n ' t serving all of the needs," Spencer said. " T h e r e could be two cottages next d o o r to each other and the residents would not even k n o w each others' names. Hopefully,that will be alleviated this year with the neighborh o o d s . R e s i d e n t s will k n o w and help each other." T h i s g o a l w i l l be a c h i e v e d through close contact between Cottage Coordinators and R A s at the neighborhood level. " W e h o p e to r e a l l y b r i n g the neighborhood together,and to make it more residential. We will be planning more events together to unite the n e i g h b o r h o o d s , " said Jackie C h a p m a n '96, Cottage Coordinator.

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A u g u s t 28,

Anchor

I 996

In Focus

NeUcope. Hope College 1 1 a ,1 <&• | ^ > : | a B»;fc • ". l ftom* , 0 ^ j PrWt \) fWJ Stc*. location |Mlj> //www.Kof* t&j/ VTul'j | Vtal'i Cool | HiMtook J Htk Stardt jtorroloryj Softw*r* } n

C A L L ME C R A Z Y . . .

Dave Clausen

ISj MB

About Hope Admissions Academics

Without a Net I was driving home in early August when 1 heard it. I listened as the broadcaster said America Online (AOL) had crashed. The world's biggest online company fell Aug. 7 for 19 hours, leaving AOL's 6 million customers in utter darkness and despondency. Chat rooms and home pages on A O L went black worldwide leaving Net surfers grounded and probably closing out their entire schedule for the next 19 hours. I cracked a smile at the news. My skepticism of the Internet was affirmed by the computer disaster. To me, it was an apocalyptic o m e n of the system's eventual doom. Are users getting tangled in their own net? The fact is Internet is slowly but surely being pushed to the point of overload. With weak security, an overwhelming amount of traffic, and a steadily growing population of users, the Net is closing in on itself. Now, I know what the techies out there are saying: "All of the problems can be solved with some upgrades to the system and regulation of traffic." Sure, more software, more hardware, more fiber optics. But the more systems they install, the greater the proliferation of users, and supply will never exceed demand. Perhaps I just have a fatalistic view of computing in society, but a worldwide

computer system which consumes so much data and traffic will only grow more complicated and congested than the ability of the technicians that control it. This means people will consistently place their trust and time in a system that is doomed to failure. The next thing you know the system on which half the world depends for its information will crash on a cataclysmic level, sending the global community into confusion. Maybe that's a little farfetched, but I sincerely believe there is inherent danger in depending on an information system that is already showing signs of its demise. Relying on the Internet's system breeds introverted shutins who sit in front of their computers all day instead of getting out and pretending that they are actually members of society. Businessweek documented the story of an Internet junkie who, after spending five hours searching for data on the Net, got in his car and drove to the library, where he found the data on microfilm in less than an hour. Bottom line; we need to take a serious look into what extent we are submerging our lives into thelntemet and just how healthy this relationship is. T h e dangers of an Internet-based faith are real. We would be a lot belter off avoiding the snare of the Net entirely.

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W E B B I N G O U T : Hope College s WWW page is visited by over 300people

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S u r f i n g i n t o 2000 CIT sweeps campus with massive technology upgrades including an increase in fiber op- monitor. T h e R C C is responsible for tics to transfer data around campus and more efficient hardware to get dealing with technical p r o b l e m s Summer, the vacation season, it there faster. while the lab monitor is more of a 4t a time to wind down from the trials Hope College can really have lab maintainance person. of the rest of the year. But summer bragging rights that we have a comResponding to the growth in at the department of Computing and puter lab in every residence hall." use of the World Wide Web system, Information Technology (CIT) was said Carl H e i d e m a n , Director of C I T p u r c h a s e d a p o w e r f u l n e w anything but a vacation. Shortly CIT. "Very f e w colleges can say computer to act as a W W W server after the end of the last school year, that." and e x p a n d e d c a m p u s access to C I T set to work revamping Hope's In addition to the new labs, every lab. computer system following two se- CIT expanded the size of the labs Students who have their own mesters of breakdowns and general in D y k s t r a , K o l l e n , and P h e l p s computers and want to surf the Net from their rooms can now access it student frustration. halls. Much of the past school year All in all there is a total of 190 through the ConnectHope system. was punctuated by cries of protest computers available in non-depart- This gives them access to Hope's for improvements on Hope's net- mental areas and 20 more to be in- network as well as the Internet. w o r k w h e n p a p e r s and p r o j e c t s stalled in the library before the secC o n n e c t H o p e is used in two w a y s : e i t h e r as C o n n e c t H o p e were lost forever as computers froze ond semester. or c r a s h e d , o n c e for over e i g h t To deal with last year's prob- Ethernet, a direct, high-speed conhours. System errors inundated an lems with Hope's file server, the n e c t i o n to the c a m p u s n e t w o r k a l r e a d y b a c k l o g g e d and u n d e r - system with the habit of swallow- a v a i l a b l e in D u r f e e , G i l m o r e , staffed CIT with repair requests. ing students' work without warning, P h e l p s , a n d V o o r h e e s ; or as To combat the computer crisis, C I T replaced the t w o c o m p u t e r s C o n n e c t H o p e PPP, w h i c h is a in January the Board of Trustees ap- controlling it with three n e w ones, slower, m o - d e m connection to the n e t w o r k available to proved the allocation of f u n d s to w h i c h h a v e t h e start the Campus Technology Fund. necessary capacall on and off-campus This called for $100 to be set aside ity to handle the students. Previously imposfrom each student's tuition to be increased student Hope College can used by CIT to "provide an excel- u s a g e that oversible, students can really have bragging now access the W W W lent technology value for the stu- whelmed the prerights that we have a f r o m t h e i r r o o m s dents' money," according to CIT's vious file server. lab in S u m m e r Technology Campaign rethrough ConnectHope. " W e ' v e computer R e a l i z i n g that port. done a number of every residence hall. m a n y H o p e students CIT's plan began in earnest in things so that as Very few colleges get their n e w s about May, taking on six fronts of im- things grow, we'll the outside world by provement: the World Wide Web, a h a v e e x c e s s c a - can say that. —Carl Heideman c a m p u s - w i d e info system called pacity to h a n d l e reading the headlines KnowHope, computer labs, faculty/ i t , " Heideman Director of CIT in the newspaper dispensers in Phelps, CIT staff computing, a service for Hope said. developed the camstudents with personal computers A newer, called ConnectHope, Hope's phone faster VAX system was also in- p u s - w i d e i n f o r m a t i o n s y s t e m system, and campus network infra- stalled to provide for the growing KnowHope. This provides information to structure. usage of the World Wide Web and i n t e r e s t e d s t u d e n t s on n a t i o n a l Working through the summer Internet. to ensure changes would be in place Staffing needs led CIT to hire news, Hope news v local weather, to take on the fall onslaught of com- o n e n e w f u l l t i m e w o r k e r and food service menus, campus schedputer users, CIT created six new change the role of its student em- ules, Ride Exchange, Hope sports. Where of Hope. Marketplace and computer labs, providing each resi- ployees. dence hall with its o w n lab and Their roles are now broken up electronic mail and phone directom a d e v a r i o u s u p g r a d e s to into two types: the residential com- ries. " W e ' r e hoping that it's a way strengthen the system as a whole. puting consultant (RCC) and the lab for students to be a little more in touch with the world," Heideman said. C I T will s p e n d the c o m i n g CIT upgrades systems, brings world to Hope w e e k s k e e p i n g an e y e on t h e c h a n g e s that t h e y ' v e just imple•New locations form labs on campus mented. There will be problems but •CosmoAVyckoff Hall •College East Apts "complications are always inevi•Lichty Hall -Van VIeck Hall t a b l e , " said R e b e c c a Van D y k e , •Voorhees Hall Project Coordinator at CIT. "Technologies are never one hundred per•More terminals for your buck cent reliable." •Increased number of computers in Dykstra, Kolleii. & Phelps While it may take some time to get the bugs out of the system. •Making the WWW more available Heideman is confident in its stabil•76 new Pentiums in Lubbers, VanWylen, Kollen, & Phelps ity for the coming year. "The first week may be touch •A different Apple a day and go." he said. "We feel real com•With 30 Macintoshes In VanWylen, Van Zoeren, & Peale students can take a bite out of a different Apple each day for a month. fortable that w e ' r e going to have things ready this year." DAVE CLAUSEN infocus editor

Moving on up


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our voice.

Anchor

A WORD

' A different kind of college* Creating a slogan is tricky. You w a n t the right a m o u n t of flair, so people d o n ' t forget it. You need it to roll off the tongue, so people will say it. It's got to be catchy, without s o u n d i n g cheesy. So hats off to the f o l k s at orientation, w h o in aping the Saturn C a r C o m p a n y slogan f o r Orientation ' 9 6 hit the nail right on the head. Hope is "a different kind of c o l l e g e . " While the Orientation directors sacrificed s u m m e r sleep to m a k e the frosh feel w e l c o m e , those at Public Safety were creating new foot patrols to increase officer visibility following student requests. T h e y h a s h e d it out into the wee hours to figure a n e w w a y to let students feel safer. T h e y could have c o n t i n u e d with last y e a r ' s m e t h o d s , and the Class of 2 0 0 0 w o u l d still have c o m e . But they wanted to m a k e things better. B e c a u s e H o p e is a different kind of college. Jerry R a d e m a k e r at Physical Plant t r a n s f o r m e d his role as assistant director into a quasi-building inspector. H e

FROM

August THE

This is where the Editor-in-Chief gets the chance sermonize, where she says "This is your newspaper, so please, give us feedback! Send us letters to the editor! Don't just tell your roommate, tell us!" But I w o n ' t insult your intelligence that way. Of course you know you must speak up to be heard. Of course you need to tell us how w e ' r e doing so we can do it better. Of course you, a literate college type, can hardly prevent your civic urges f r o m interfering with your study time and making you a weekly contributor to the Opinion page. So these are bases I don't need to cover. But what The Anchor staff will cover this year is you. W e ' r e a fresh crop of staffers with enthusiasm to spare.

2.8,

1996

EDITOR...

We want to give you the scoop â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the c o m p l e t e s c o o p â&#x20AC;&#x201D; be it about the latest in athletics on the Sports page or campus crime in the Campus section, to student profiles in Spotlight or different church reviews in the Religion section. Each section is out to make your student existence an informed one. Did I just say Religion section? Why, yes, I did. This year. The Anchor will boast a new weekly section d e v o t e d to r e l i g i o u s life at Hope College. Look to it to hear everything from what's up in the Keppel House to profiles of students who celebrate Ramadan. T h e section will be about Hope, all of Hope, and we look forward to shaping it into a campus favorite. The faces on staff and a new section aren't all that's new here. Meet Tim Boudreau, an assistant professor of Communication who

Jodi M c F a r l a n d j u s t h i g h t a i l e d it up h e r e f r o m Southern Illinios University. He's wrapping up his doctorate in Journalism from there this year. This is his first advising position, so we promise to break him in gently. The Anchor hits the stands in time for dinner each Wednesday. We're located in bins throughout campus, including Phelps Dining Hall and the DeWitt Center. We pledge to bring you all of what's up, why it's up,how it got up and who put it up. So pick us up, and make us a regular part of your Wednesday routine.

visited cottage a f t e r c o t t a g e f o l l o w i n g student c o n c e r n that the residences w e r e s o m e t i m e s neglected. H e saw to the installation of carpet, linoleum, appliances. Of the 61 C o l l e g e - o w n e d cottages, 4 1 saw s u m m e r i m p r o v e m e n t s . Students would still h a v e lived in r u n - d o w n cottages w i t h o u t the u p g r a d e s . But R a d e m a k e r a n d c o m p a n y w a n t e d to m a k e things better. B e c a u s e H o p e is a different kind of college. Living in a cottage or a p a r t m e n t can be liberating and alienating. Free f r o m residence hall hassles, students can stretch out into their o w n living rooms, their o w n kitchens. Still, many feel cut off f r o m the c a m p u s c o m m u n i t y . To i n c r e a s e c o n n e c t e d n e s s . S t u d e n t D e v e l o p m e n t created C o t t a g e C o o r d i n a t o r s , w h o will work to create a sense of c o m m u n i t y within their " n e i g h b o r h o o d s . " The students w h o felt cut off w o u l d p r o b a b l y h a v e s t a y e d in t h e i r h o u s i n g . T h e C o l l e g e d i d n ' t h a v e to p r o m o t e these n e i g h b o r h o o d s . But they w a n t e d to m a k e living in those places better. B e c a u s e H o p e is a d i f f e r e n t kind of college. W h a t other school has a c a d e m i c p l a n n e r s with s p a c e s f o r p r o f s ' p h o n e n u m b e r s ? W h e r e is another school that's willing to s p e n d

$ 8 7 , 0 0 0 in o n e s u m m e r u p g r a d i n g

student living quarters without the p r o m p t i n g of a student r e v o l t ? K u d o s to a n i n s t i t u t i o n t h a t h a s s h o w n its c o m m i t m e n t to m a k i n g things better.

>Anc/7or photo by Zach Johnson

R I G H T B A C K A T " Y A : The Anchor staff, from left: top row, Dave Schrier, Becky Hollenbeck, Michelle Piel, Arin Neucks, Amy-Lynn Halverson, Matt Morgan; middle row, Carrie Tennant, Jodi McFarland, Kim Powell, Dave Clausen, Glyn Williams; bottom row, Zach Johnson. Not pictured: Matt Sterenberg.

H o p e is a d i f f e r e n t kind of college.

meet the press editor-in-chief Jodi Mc Far laud o p e r a t i o n s m a n a g e r Arin Neucks campusbeat editor spotlight e d i t o r infocus e d i t o r intermission e d i t o r sports e d i t o r production editor photo editors copy e d i t o r business m g r . / a d r e p page d e s i g n e r ad designer faculty advisor

Carrie Tennant Kim Powell Dave Clausen Matt Morgan Glyn Williams Amy-Lynn Halverson Josh Neucks Zach Johnson Matt Sterenberg Michelle Piel Dave Schrier Rebecca Hollenbeck Tim Boudreau

The Anchor is a p r o d u c t o f s t u d e n t e f f o r t a n d is f u n d e d t h r o u g h t h e H o p e College Student Congress Appropriations C o m m i t t e e . Letters to the editor are e n c o u r a g e d , t h o u g h d u e t o s p a c e l i m i t a t i o n s the Anchor r e s e r v e s t h e r i g h t t o e d i t . T h e o p i n i o n s a d d r e s s e d in t h e e d i t o r i a l a r e s o l e l y t h o s e of t h e e d i t o r - i n chief. S t o r i e s f r o m t h e H o p e C o l l e g e N e w s S e r v i c e a r e a p r o d u c t of t h e P u b l i c R e l a t i o n s O f f i c e . O n e - y e a r s u b s c r i p t i o n s t o the Anchor a r e a v a i l a b l e f o r $ 1 1 . W e r e s e r v e t h e right t o a c c e p t o r reject any advertising.

the

Anchor.

51

W.i

Food f o r t h e soul. Join The Anchor staff on Wednesday and Sunday nights at 7 p.m. for some food, folk, and fun. Everyone is welcome. Come as you are.


A u e u s t 28, I 996

the

Anchor

Spotlight

A D i f f e r e n t Kind O f Class Latest crop of frosh takes Hope into next century S p i r i t e d O A ' s provide

i l

first link t o c a m p u s life b e g i n s w i t h l e a r n i n g to f a c i l i t a t e KIM P O W E L L

d i s c u s s i o n with a g r o u p of strang-

spotlight e d i t o r

ers and e n d s with O A ' s t h e m s e l v e s B e i n g an on the orienlalion staff

p r a c t i c e tying and u n t y i n g the hu-

requires m o r e than d o n n i n g m a t c h -

m a n knot. O n e of the m o s t d i f f i c u l t tasks is

ing tees and shorts. A n d w h i l e O A ' s are n o t o r i o u s for t e a c h i n g n e w students icebreakers like "skin the

l e a r n i n g to be sensitive t o diversity and respect the fact that students are

s n a k e " and 4 4 the h u m a n k n o t , " there

c o m i n g f r o m different b a c k g r o u n d s

is m o r e to b e i n g an O A than s u m -

w i t h d i f f e r e n t ideas, a c c o r d i n g t o

mer c a m p g a m e s . OA's are the first contact n e w stu-

O A Erin T r o x t e l ( ' 9 9 ) .

d e n t s h a v e on c a m p u s .

" S o m e o n e in a g r o u p m a y say a c o m m e n t that s o m e o n e else in the

" A s soon as y o u k n o w s o m e b o d y you f e e l t i e d t o t h e p l a c e , " s a i d

g r o u p f i n d s o f f e n s i v e w i t h o u t real-

A n n e B a k k e r - G j a s . Director of Stu-

n e e d s to b e a c c e p t i n g of diversity." Every O A has a d i f f e r e n t reason

dent Activities. D a y s can be long for an O A , e s pecially w h e n not e v e r y o n e ap-

i z i n g it," B o v e n k e r k said. " T h e O A

for v o l u n t e e r i n g their t i m e to the

preciates their e f f o r t s .

cause. B o v e n k e r k r e m e m b e r s his first

" I t ' s not an e a s y j o b . A lot o f people think the activities a r e stu-

m o m e n t s on c a m p u s . "I r e m e m b e r it b e i n g 9 5 d e g r e e s

pid," said Steve B o v e n k e r k ( ' 9 7 ) ,

a n d trying to m o v e e v e r y t h i n g in,"

Orientation C o - D i r e c t o r .

said B o v e n k e r k . " W h e n you are a n e w student a n d all the O A ' s are

W h i l e s o m e of the g a m e s get a thumbs down from students, nobody complains w h e n OA's help m o v e all the n e w students in, points out Jen G r i e m e ( ' 9 7 ) , O r i e n t a t i o n

a difference." B o v e n k e r k felt cut o f f f r o m c a m -

many and the perks of m o v i n g in

best w a y to integrate b a c k into the

early quickly w e a r o f f . T h e satisfaction of w e l c o m i n g a n o t h e r class

H o p e c o m m u n i t y w a s to s p e n d the s u m m e r p r e p a r i n g to w e l c o m e the

to H o p e is w h a t m a d e it w o r t h all the hard w o r k , O A ' s s a i d . T h e 1 2 3 - m e m b e r orientation staff

c l a s s of 2 0 0 0 . O A team Jennifer LaBell ('99) and Troxtel signed u p b e c a u s e they

went through an intensive week-

h a d s uch a g o o d O A e x p e r i e n c e

long training p r o g r a m that kept h e m

themselves.

b u s y f r o m s u n u p till s u n d o w n . T h e p r o g r a m is d e s i g n e d t o t e a c h

" T h a t ' s w h e r e w e m e t a n d bec a m e f r i e n d s , " LaBell said. "I d i d n ' t

OA's h o w to h e l p n e w s t u d e n t s in-

k n o w a n y o n e and she d i d n ' t k n o w

tegrate and feel at h o m e at

a n y o n e . If it h a d n ' t b e e n f o r orientation I p r o b a b l y n e v e r w o u l d h a v e m e t her." For Kate H o r j u s ( ' 9 9 ) a n d

program

^

B e t t e r catch ' e m There are 270 new men this fall* while first-year women dominate the campus with 412 JP

p u s a f t e r s p e n d i n g last spring part i c i p a t i n g in a n o f f - c a m p u s i n t e r n s h i p p r o g r a m . H e thought the

i

Fresh Factoids WaSm m

there to h e l p m o v e you in it m a k e s

Co-Director. T h e h o u r s of p r e p a r a t i o n w e r e

Hope. T h e

Anchor photo by Zach Johnson

BIG G U L P : Rob Doering ('97) douses his fellow OA Kevin Edlefson ('98) while onlookers Josh Schicker ('99), Mike Thelen ('98), and Julie Patout ('98) take a break from moving freshwomen into Gilmore HalL

S t e p h a n i e G e b h a r d t ( ' 9 9 ) it

r-

is a m a t t e r of pride. " W e l i k e H o p e so m u c h

t h e h e a r t is: are from

H o m e is w 75% of first! The Grea

S m a r t e r t h a n t h e average bear; incoming students CAUGHT RED H A N D ED: A freshman (above) paints his hand, outside the DeWitt Center, making ready to add his mark to the giant canvas of hand and foot prints that was displayed in the Pine Grove. Sunday. OA's (below) lend a hand, unloading the worldly posessions of a thankful frosh in front of Cosmopolitan HalL

students

t h a t w e w a n t t o s h o w (the freshmen)

l, l

"! . 1 .

everything,"

H o i j u s said. Elizabeth Davidson ('99) claims its a great w a y to m e e t n e w people, both f r e s h m a n and f e l l o w O A ' s . N o t a n y o n e c a n b e an O A . T h e q u a l i f i c a t i o n s are few, b u t specific. " Y o u m u s t be k n o w l -

SINNER & SAINT: Sarah Richards ('98) and Kate Reed ('98) beg for the mercy of the Orientation gods at OA Olympics.

•in i ^ .

r;

e

m k

Al

edgeable about Hope, enthusiastic a b o u t H o p e , and l o v e

> \

.i'

k

!

H o p e , " B o v e n k e r k said.

1

WELCOME BACK HOPE T h e Pillar C R C Congregation i n v i t e s all H o p e S t u d e n t s t o a t t e n d S u n d a y services at 9:30 a.m. or 6:00 p.m. a t t h e c o r n e r of 10th S t r e e t a n d C o l l e g e . Please stop by to e n j o y the fellowship and meet new friends

Welcome Back Hope Students!

W h a t makes you a different kind of class? FREE 32oz. SOFT DRINK w i t h t h e p u r c h a s e of t e n r e g u l a r l y priced soft drinks. SNACK BAR

i %

j

Offer not g o o d with soft drinks purchased with a Munchie Meal.

—-i

"Hopefully we can meet the challenges everyone puts on us. Bob Dole and everyone says we are going down hill. / hope we can change that." —Leslie Merriman ( '99)

"Because we are coming into a new century, it gives us a special privilege. We can set the standard." —Dave Fleming ('99)

1

"We'll be the first class to have to put a '2' in front of all our checks." —Paul Vanderlaan ('99)

We have Soft Drink just

Punch

like you wanted!

Cards

^

-


(teA n c h o r

Intermission

A u g u s t 28,

ming writer

English D e p t . ropes in up-a ,4 I like teaching undergra for several periodicals and is currently f e a t u r e d in the m a g a z i n e ates," Benedict said, "I like Hope because it truly George. He has written numerous book is a teaching institution." Raised without telereviews, and has collaborated with a friend on a musical adaptation of v i s i o n , B e n e d i c t b e g a n reading for entertainment as the novel The Scarier Letter. This semester he will teach two a child. "Luckily my parents fiction writing w o r k s h o p s w h i l e many books," finishing his second novel. Benedict o w n e d 44 would like to add a new writing Benedict said, so I developed course for the spring semester: play a love for reading at a very early and screen writing for feature and age." An early love of reading led short film, but the class will also be to an early love of words, so^ relevant for television writing. Benedict became interested in upon arrival at Princeton, he enfilm when a British film-making rolled in fiction writing workc o m p a n y purchased the rights to shops. With exposure to Dogs of God. A f t e r being introduced to the business and witness- a n d d i r e c t i o n f r o m ing the film making process first s u c c e s s f u l w r i t e r s hand, he plans to begin work on l i k e J o y c e C a r o l Oates, he discovsome screenplays. \ T h e f r e e d o m he has to e r e d the ap\ pursue the things he greatly proachability of I enjoys factored heavily in his p u b l i s h e d a u - j • decision to c o m e to teach at thors and realHo e ized writer P real "1 feel remarkably fortu- a r e nate for a school like Hope to people, not a l l o w m e t o d o t h e t w o just people things I love — write who "live on the and teach." Benedict 10 0 t h e n j o y s teach- floor of some building in ing young w r i t e r s b e - Manhattan." cause he was His senior an u n d e r - thesis, a collection graduate him- of short stories entitled self when he Town Smokes w a s i m m e d i a t e l y decided to published. A f t e r grad school, he began make writing his o w n call- teaching at numerous colleges and universities including O b e r l a n d ,

MAT T MORGAM intermission editor

Pinckney B e n e d i c t sits in a bare-shelved office preparing syllabi, surrounded by paper-strewn desks. His new j o b at Hope has kept him hopelessly busy and unable to move anything but the necessities into his new office. Benedict, the latest recruit into the English department, comes highly respected. "1 was involved in the search c o m m i t t e e that b r o u g h t him in," said Rueben Ellis, H o p e English professor. " H e is one of the most recognized and promising y o u n g w r i t e r s today. We are very i m p r e s s e d , and are h a p p y to h a v e him." Since his g r a d u a t i o n f r o m Princeton in '86, the highly regarded writer and teacher has published two collections of, short stories, n o v e l , article'

K-VAMWYK staff reporter

0

Exhibition "Figure 4: Alumni Invitational" is the genesis of the Art Department's most recently established program. The plan is designed to host a series of periodic g r o u p s h o w s f e a t u r i n g a diverse group of the department's alumni. U p c o m i n g exhibits are intended to demonstrate alumni work and p r o v i d e t h e p u b l i c w i t h a chance for more in-depth analysis of the artists craft. Based on submitted slides, four

T

A R T SUPPLIES W H E T H E R Y O U ARE A BEGINNER OR AN ACCOMPLISHED ARTIST...

MAKE US YOUR ART AND DRAFTING SUPPLY SOURCE

ARCHIVAL QUALITY M O U N T I N G MATERIALS LARGE PAPER ASSORTMENT DRAWING MATERIALSDRAFTING FURNITURE ART DEPARTMENT1.

0 7

V " E LARGEST SELECTION SCHOOL SUPPLIES IN HOLLAND!

I

of Henry Thoreau

trip to hell." —New York Times Book Review

m

West Virginia University, Princeton and D a v i d s o n College while continuing writing. During this period, he published his second c o l l e c t i o n of s h o r t s t o r i e s . The Wrecking Yard, and wrote book rev i e w s f o r such h i g h l y r e g a r d e d newspapers as the Chicago Tribune, Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, and the Boston Globe.

artists were selected for their works' attributes, compatibility, and degree of excellence. The artists, spanning an average of three d e c a d e s and hailing from four different states, will converge to inititate this tradition beginning Monday, Aug 26 and continuing on through Sunday, Sept 29. Esther Luttikhuizen ( ' 7 3 ) is from Seattle, Washington; Lisa Rietveld ('83) is from Saint Paul, Minnesotta; Laurene Warren ('89) is from Grand Rapids; and Laura Wyss ('91) is from New York City. T h e artists have d i f f e r e d in their professional and educational

The Social Activities Committee Presents: Comedian

rimrmu mn 4i««c*r »i« un inifiAttMr

Showing:

Christopher Titus

Fri. & Sat. at; 7pm, 9:30pm, nil imi i

mm®

This Friday Night Kletz 8;30pm

MIDNIGHT

Concessions: $.50 (Pop, popcorn, & candy)

Admission: $2

M

...lhc) h a s a v e r y q u i c k d e l i v e r y and p h y s i c a l

act thai a v e r y y o u n g R o b i n W i l l i a m s m i g h t have had...and was just as g o o d " - K a n s a s C i t y Star

|

s ^"Y\ook. ^WJelcowx-cs

^

lope

C_^ollege

J

OF

Since 1900

OFFICE OUTFITTERS 109 Rlv«r Avanuf. Holland, Ml 49423 (616) 396-2341 • F M (616) 396-2166

the lyrical

on a metaphysical field

ITEMS

INCLUDING FRAMING & MATTING

Not valid on sale n w c h a n d i s e , previous purchases, with other otfers. Only at our River Avenue Store. Expires 9/30/96

H

exactitude

Sun at 3 p m

OFF

"

beauty...with

Executiue Decision

• ACRYLICS

"

writes in a vein of rare, wild

S A C Silver S c r e e n S e r i e s Presents

• WATERCOLORS

"A stunning novel...Benedict

Along with new course opp o r t u n i t i e s , B e n e d i c t b r i n g s the knowledge and vitality of a productive writer. He is also well-versed in the workings of the writting business and the production process. Just as Oates was inspirational and able to guide Benedict into a successful career while he was in school, Benedict will complement the rest of the English staff and beinspirational in aiding aspiring writers.

A r t exhibit to expose the human body

• • • •

I 996

' W J c off«r o vorlakv ot raosovvoW* S t o p Iw owel for yov«r»«lf! CZAcro** frov^.' r "7k« HCvvlclc«rbock>«r ot *7^V Sfck ^3k.

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choices since graduation f r o m Hope, but all have dedicatedly persisted in furnishing their personal vision and d e v e l o p m e n t in both their art production and exhibition. This will be evident as the artists illustrate their personal interpretations of the human form. "Figure 4 " deals mainly with the theme of human structure and composition, either directly or circuitously, figuratively or in a verbatim manner. Luttikhuizen's installation piece probes into abstract concepts of image and identity by p r o j e c t i n g s l i d e s of doll p a r t s . R e i t v e l d ' s p a i n t i n g s d e p i c t and summon forth the analogy of childhood. Warren's sculptures manifest a more subtle and elusive reference to the h u m a n f o r m , w h i l e Wyss paints embellished human interior structures which are projected onto a h u m a n body and methodically photographed. The public is invited to stretch any of their premeditated and myopic illusions about the human figure. Exhibition "Figure 4 " will be held at the De Pree Art Center, located at the comer of 12th street and Columbia Avenue. The gallery will be open Monday-Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., with additional hours beginning in September. Please call 395-7500 for more information. All are beckoned to attend the reception for the artist on Friday, September 6, f r o m 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Admission is free.


A u g u s t 28,

the

I 996

Anchor

Z

strictly^ classified

End of Summer Specials

To the Z o o , t h a n k s for the lovin' the c o u p l e o n c a n y o n : 1 m i s s y o u and s u p p o r t . I'm lookin' f o r w a r d and love you m u c h . N o w o r d f r o m Texas. L i f e m o v e s on. C h e c k email. • t o my wall of f a m e . the f l o w e r girl millet m a n : i'm c o u n t i n the d a y s . b o m b e r : a n o t h e r year, a n o t h e r paIt's E l k s e a s o n , B a b y . . . A n d I ' m per. C o m e p o p in here, you k n o w goin' huntin' this w e e k e n d . Cariwho. bou. M a d a m e M e d i l l : W e f i n i s h e d before sunrise b u t it w a s n ' t the s a m e without y o u r . - the s t a f f e r s

One Month Unlimited

$34.95 . G o o d T h r u 10/1 3e C o l l e g e O n l y ( m u s t s h o w I.D.)

H e y F o r e h a n d : T h e lights w e r e out, a n d I thought n o o n e w a s h o m e but 1 h e a r d g i g g l e s . O h yes, I h e a r d giggles.

ma: one issue d o w n , t w o k i n d n e y s to go. red beard

I don't k n o w . . . still. But that's O . K .

Hours: 8:00 a.m. 10:00 p.m.

Seven Days A Week from Pan-Hellenic

Board

v

^

Current Packages 20 Visits - $46.00 15 Visits - $38.00 10 Visits - $25.00

—#12

B r o o k s L a n e : I'm h e r e and m i s s ing you, love y o u r lost kid

M o n k e y s an* ugly, s p a n k t h e m .

joker: I'm l o o k i n g to m a k e peace, you know where I am. -the sassy one

T h e r e is a n e w c r o p this year and f r o m Blue they all fled. W h e r e did • they go. T h e y all flock to Red.

t h e c o t t a g e : I love living in the circus with ya'll. You rock. X O Big Sis

A N K - Y o u r o c k this paper. N i c e w o r k . -Full of m o t h e r l y pride.

'99 Pull

M y sister in M a i n e , Can't wait to see the ring. Miss you tons. T r e e Lover.

d o w n 14th: you gals r o c k ! Stay strong and b e a u t i f u l ! the ed

• • | | | I

Get T h e Best Tan Possible!

•Tell her you think she's cute. -Say hi t o your cluster. • D r o p your puller a line. •Thank your moraler. •Make fun of your roomate. •Root for your fave sports team.

Tonight a t 7 p.m W i n a n t s Aud. Graves Hall

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i?

the

Sports

Anchor

A u g u s t 28,

I 996

Spikers set for M I A A c o m p e t i t i o n CAPTAIN ENFUEGO

GLYN W I L L I A M S sports editor

Glyn Williams

A very p r o d u c t i v e 2 5 - 1 0 ( 9 - 3 ) r e c o r d last s e a s o n w a s n o t g o o d

Winning is everything ...right?

leyball t e a m to lead the l e a g u e and it m i g h t not be again this year.

that slates q u i t e s i m p l y e v e r y thing that is w r o n g with sports

where we were. T h e s e k i d s are stars, heroes,

these d a y s . It states: "You d o n ' t win silver, you lose g o l d . " W i n it

G o d s for all the b u d d i n g g y m n a s t s . T h e y visit the C a n c e r

all or don't e v e n play the g a m e .

w a r d at the local h o s p i t a l s a n d m a k e the chi l dren s m i l e and

D o not e x p e c t the very c o m p e t e n t and very attractive

f o r g e t w h e r e they are. T h e y beat

Hannah Storm to show your highlights u n l e s s y o u w i n . If y o u

the c r a p o u t of their o p p o n e n t s '

get the b r o n z e , you m i g h t a s well go h o m e with s o m e R C C o l a ,

no, w r o n g sport). W h e r e do they h a v e to g o

your Hot ' N ' N o w h a m b u r g e r ,

f r o m here? B a c k h o m e to a

and w a l l o w in loserville. It is c o m p l e t e l y b o g u s , m a n .

" n o r m a l " life o f t a k i n g o u t the

k n e e c a p s with lead p i p e s (wait,

four losses all year long. L o s i n g t w o

ing letter w i n n e r s in C h r i s t i e E d i n g ( ' 9 8 ) , Jean K e g e r r e i s ( ' 9 8 ) , A b b y

T h e D u t c h lost t w o A l l - M I A A first t e a m players, and will return

( ' 9 7 ) , and K u r i a Van W i e r e n ( ' 9 8 ) .

year as they w e r e last, but by the

T h i s y e a r ' s t e a m c o n s i s t s of m ai nl y f r e s h m e n and s o p h o m o r e s ,

s a m e token, so c o u l d H o p e . C a l v i n C o l l e g e w o n ' t g o into the

two All-MIAA second teamers,

night a s eas i l y as the rest of the M I A A might hope; they finished

E m i l y B a k k e r ( ' 9 7 ) and Becky S c h m i d t ( ' 9 8 ) and Elizabeth de H a a n ('98), w h o recieved AllM I A A honorable mention. Bakker

Nienhuis ('98), Jenny Petscher

quite p o s s i b l y be just a s g o o d this

and thus the future for Hope C o l l e g e ' s volleyball t e a m is bright. T h e D u t c h start their season this

last y e a r tied with H o p e at s e c o n d

w e e k e n d in the Christian C o l l e g e s

in the l e a g u e (9-3).

T o u r n a m e n t at C a l v i n C o l l e g e and their first h o m e m a t c h will be

w a s v o t e d to the G r e a t L a k e s all-

T h e K n i g h t s will return f o u r All-

region t e a m and S c h m i d t w a s v o t e d

M I A A m e m b e r s , t w o of w h o m are

a g a i n s t Albion o n Sept. 5.

sitting right t h e r e next t o the all k n o w i n g , all p o w e r f u l , Yannie s q u e J o h n T e s h ? It's kind of

s a y s a lot in m y b o o k of life. L o m b a r d i said, " W i n n i n g i s n ' t

sad, really. It f u l l y m a k e s y o u look back

e v e r y t h i n g b u t w a n t i n g to win

at y o u r life a n d think a b o u t h o w

is." T h a t ' s g o o d stuff, h o m b r e .

little you h a v e d o n e with it

The often misquoted Vince

Gymnastics was moderately

c o m p a r e d to these y o u n g e n s . In

d e p r e s s i n g for m e t o w a t c h this year b e c a u s e it really m a k e s you

the f u t u r e , in o u r minds, w h e n we think a b o u t S t r u g , M o c e a n u ,

ask y o u r s e l f w h a t y o u ' v e d o n e

a n d the other child g y m n a s t s the

with y o u r life. Kerri Strug is,

m e n t a l picture will b e of a kid.

like, 18, and she is a n O l y m p i c gold medalist. D o m i n i q u e

All of t h e m with college,

M o c e a n u is r o u g h l y 12 years old

p e r h a p s high s c h o o l , still a h e a d of them. A t this t i m e in their

and she is on top of the w o r l d .

lives they d o n o w r o n g . Kids.

W h a t w e r e we d o i n g at age 12?

W h a t ' s the m a t t e r with kids

W a t c h i n g the Dukes

t o d a y ? W h y c a n ' t they be like

of Hazard,

Anchor

w e w e r e , i n f e r i o r in e v e r y w a y ?

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24. T h e Dutch have five other return-

w h a t at a g e 3 2 ? A c o m m e n t a t o r

finished s e c o n d or third y o u are still c o o l e r than Elvis, and that

ae

against t h e m will b e h o m e o n Sept.

M I A A last s e a s o n w i t h a p e r f e c t l e a g u e record (12-0) and only had

trash, e a t i n g C o r n Flakes, a n d p r a c t i c i n g their c u r s i v e ? T h e n

T h e r e w a s a g a g g l e of athletes at the O l y m p i c s this y e a r a n d if y o u

$

j u n i o r s this year. H o p e ' s first g a m e

K a l a m a z o o College won the

senior A l l - M I A A m e m b e r s a n d returning two, K - Z o o could could

e n o u g h for the H o p e C o l l e g e vol-

p l a y i n g D o n k e y K o n g , that's

Nike has a c o m m e r c i a l o u t

m o s t i m p r o v e d p l a y e r last s e a s o n .

f

rowing

anj|im

medex & cybex f o m e n t ,

c

Winb

goalie position is u p in the air be-

will return six A l l - M I A A players,

GLYN W I L L I A M S sports editor

cause w e h a v e s o m e g o o d f r e s h m e n on the t e a m a n d n o t h i n g is set in

only one of w h i c h w e r e o n the sec-

B o t h soccer t e a m s h a v e an uphill battle this season, as e a c h graduated very key players, and the rest of the

stone." T h e p r o b a b l e stars of this y e a r ' s t e a m are last s e a s o n ' s M I A A M V P

l e a g u e will p r o v i d e s o m e m i g h t y

and third t e a m A l l - A m e r i c a n J o h n

w h o m a d e the s e c o n d t e a m . Lindsay W i l l i a m s ( ' 9 9 ) recieved an hon-

stiff c o m p e t i t i o n .

Conlon

('97), first team All-

o r a b l e m e n t i o n o n the A l l - M I A A

t r e d m i l l S

A l l - M I A A t e a m , T i n a Gill ( ' 9 9 ) ,

T h e m e n ' s t e a m is a t t e m p t i n g to

M I A A e r Geoff R o d o c k e r ( ' 9 7 ) , and second team All-MIAA m e m b e r

team. T h i s c o u l d be part of a rebuild-

t o r y to t h r e e - p e a t as t h e M I A A

C h r i s R i k e r ( ' 9 8 ) . R o d o c k e r led the

ing year, as the Flying D u t c h have

c h a m p i o n , but the lack of a n e x p e -

league in goals scored with 11. " A l m a (12-4, 9 - 3 ) will be very

only t w o seniors on the squad,

season. Departed

ers

ond team. H o p e only had o n e m e m b e r of the

b e c o m e the first t e a m in M I A A his-

h i n d e r their h o p e s for a s u c c e s s f u l

just 1 mile from campus s f a , r

Soccer preps for long season in the sun

r i e n c e d g o a l k e e p e r will p o s s i b l y

g

by Z a c h J o h n s o n

pUoXo

G RE AX DEFEMSE:/! Hope football player attempts to catch the ball while being grabbed from behind in practice. The Flying Dutchmen play their first game on Saturday, Sept. 7, against Valparaiso. Look for a preview of the season in next week's Anchor.

g o o d this y e a r , " D o m b r o w s k i said. " T h e y should h a v e m a d e the tour-

Tracy Phelps ('97) and Leah M c A l p i n e ( ' 9 7 ) . P h e l p s is close to b e c o m i n g the all-time leading ca-

goalkeeper Aaron

n a m e n t last year b u t they b l e w their

A n g e l i ( ' 9 6 ) w a s c o n s i d e r e d one of

last g a m e against C a l v i n (9-9-1, 5 -

r e e r g o a l - s c o r e r in H o p e C o l l e g e history. S h e has 30, while the record

the best g o a l k e e p e r s ever t o grace H o p e ' s c a m p u s . His 56 saves a n d l 1

6-1). All they had to d o w a s win o r

is 3 2 . P h e l p s a l r e a d y o w n s t h e r e c o r d for c a r e e r assists a n d total

g o a l s a l l o w e d w a s g o o d e n o u g h to

tie, a n d they lost." H o p e ' s w o m e n ' s soccer t e a m will

p l a c e h i m o n t h e first t e a m All-

h a v e t o h u r d l e o v e r Calvin in order

M I A A and the N S C A A / U m b r o Di-

t o w i n t h e M I A A this y e a r . T h e

vision III third t e a m A l l - A m e r i c a

Knights w o n the l e a g u e last s e a s o n with a n u n d e f e a t e d overall r e c o r d

last s e a s o n . " W e l l , w e l o s t a lot o f g o o d

ing s c o r e r and assist-maker, w h o is

D o m b r o w s k i ('98) said. "The

a s o p h o m o r e this year. Also, C a l v i n

fullback

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08-28-1996