08-27-2008

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H O P E COLLEGE • H O L L A N D , M I C H I G A N

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A U G U S T 2 7 . 2 0 0 8 • S I N C E 1887

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Hope's Class of 2012 'Explores the Possibilities' Anchor S t a f f I t s late August, and across the country college classes are beginning. Freshmen have spent their o p e n h o u s e m o n e y o n d o r m decorations, parents have counseled their s t u d e n t s o n the i m p o r t a n c e of focusing on academics and many s t u d e n t s are getting acquainted with their n e w school t h r o u g h f r e s h m e n orientation. Hope's orientation spans four days during which the s t u d e n t s have a chance to learn the ins and outs of the c a m p u s before the upperclassmen arrive. But not all orientation p r o g r a m s are created equal. An article printed on Aug. 17 in the Lansing State Journal reported that Michigan State University's administration plans to shorten their f r e s h m a n orientation, k n o w n as W e l c o m e

Week, for the fall of 2009. At s o m e schools, the need for a weekend d u r i n g which students c a n register a n d buy books has b e c o m e obsolete. MSU's Senior Associate Provost June Youatt was q u o t e d as saying, "So m u c h of what the s t u d e n t s do, they d o online." Back-to-school parties have also b e c o m e points of concern. At many state universities the pre-semester scene is crowded with under-age drinking and vandalism. Police r e p o r t s sky rocket. This t r e n d has school administrations asking if a week dedicated to n a m e - g a m e s before classes is w o r t h t h e trouble. Are f r e s h m a n benefiting from their orientation experience, or are they spending their time needlessly?

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PHOTO BY ANN GREEN

P L A Y F A I R G I V E S F I R S T - Y E A R S T U D E N T S A H A N D . A w e l c o m e line b r i n g s t h e c l a s s of

2 0 1 2 into t h e Hope community. SEE 2 0 1 2 ,

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Campus mourns professor's death Homeless at Hope? Amy Soukup CAMPUS NEWS EDITOR

As H o p e College s t u d e n t s and faculty r e t u r n to c a m p u s this fall to s t a r t t h e new school year, o n e familiar face is missing. Professor John Q u i n n of t h e classics d e p a r t m e n t died June 19 after he collapsed near c a m p u s d u r i n g a r u n . H e had b e e n r u n n i n g to t r a i n for a race in Atlanta he p l a n n e d to participate in with his cousins. Q u i n n was a beloved m e m b e r of t h e H o p e c o m m u n i t y since he began teaching in 1995. H e t a u g h t Latin, along with t h e languages of Greek a n d Coptic (Egyptian). Q u i n n h a d a passion for teaching and strove to make t h e subject material e n t e r t a i n i n g a n d f u n for his students. "I r e m e m b e r h i m e n t e r i n g on the first day of Latin my f r e s h m a n year, full of energy and e x c i t e m e n t . H e was ready to p o u r his passion a n d love of classics o n t o a full class of u n s u s p e c t i n g students," said Tera Hasbargen ('08). "Anyone w h o had o n e of his classes would agree that his quirky personality a n d teaching style are not to be forgotten," said Christine C o r b i n ('07). "He h a d a great sense of h u m o r a n d m a d e every step of learning t h e classics f u n ,

DR. JOHN QUINN

t h o u g h , I'll a d m i t , he could be a pretty d e m a n d i n g teacher...I'll never forget h o w m u c h f u n we h a d going over to his house, r e a d i n g hilarious plays a n d eating his fantastic h o m e m a d e deserts," said Clayton O r r ('08). "He was a w o n d e r f u l teacher," said Professor of H istory Janis Gibbs. "He was always r e d o i n g his classes so they would be better t h e next time." Q u i n n also s p e n t m u c h of his t i m e translating ancient texts. In s p r i n g 2008 he w o r k e d o n t h e translation of t h e works of Juan Latino with Professor H e n r y G a t e s Jr. of H a r v a r d University a n d Professor M i r a Seo of t h e University of Michigan. Q u i n n was not only a professor a n d translator b u t also a m a n of very wide-ranging interests. H e was a g o u r m e t chef, an avid movie-watcher

W H A T ' S INSIDE

(especially classic movies) a n d an expert gardener among other things. " M o s t of John's f r i e n d s w e r e very aware of h o w m u c h he loved to garden. H e o n c e m a d e t h e trek to Nashville, T e n n e s s e e simply to find t h e right kind of s o u t h e r n magnolia tree. The first t i m e t h e tree b l o o m e d was t h e week that he died. He told f r i e n d s a b o u t it, so they k n o w he got to see it," said library staff m e m b e r Priscilla Atkins. "He was just s u c h a kind man. Everybody liked him. I never h e a r d h i m say anything bad a b o u t anyone," said Karen Barber-Gibson, secretary of t h e D e p a r t m e n t of M o d e r n a n d Classical Languages. "He was a p e r s o n w h o gave a lot of himself to o t h e r people... he had a real conviction t h a t we're all in this together. We're a c o m m u n i t y . W e need to take care of e a c h other," said Gibbs. "I a m s a d d e n e d t o t h i n k of H o p e College w i t h o u t Dr. Q u i n n . I h o p e that his m e m o r y can live o n t h r o u g h t h e s t u d e n t s he t a u g h t a n d t h r o u g h the c o n t i n u a t i o n of classics at H o p e College," said Hasbargen. The H o p e c o m m u n i t y a n d a nyone w h o wishes to celebrate Q u i n n ' s life are invited to a m e m o r i a l service Sept. 7 at 3 p.m. in D i m n e n t C h a p e l with a r e c e p t i o n in t h e a t r i u m of t h e science building.

Emily West CAMPUS N E W S EDITOR

The class of 2012 brings over 800 new, first-year s t u d e n t s to c a m p u s , a n d t h e H o p e College Office of Residential Life a n d H o u s i n g h a s h a d to o v e r c o m e what Assistant Dean of S t u d e n t s a n d Director of Residential Life a n d H o u s i n g John Jobson described as "a g o o d p r o b l e m to have to work through." The summer 2008 Presidential U p d a t e n o t e d 2,950 applications for the 800 available f r e s h m a n spots. According to G a r r e t t Knoth of the H o p e Admissions Office, as of Aug. 18, t h e r e are 813 first-year students attending H o p e this year. Final enrollment was expected to top 3,100 for the fifth year, said a H o p e press release. Jobson attributes the increased need for h o u s i n g to the consecutively large i n c o m i n g classes, t h e smaller n u m b e r of s t u d e n t s studying abroad and t h e larger n u m b e r of senior s t u d e n t s c h o o s i n g to live o n - c a m p u s . Jobson said that H o p e has leased o n e of the six Fairbanks T o w n h o u s e s on 16th Street and two extra cottages for a s h o r t t e r m . H e also r e f e r e n c e d a longer t e r m

S p o r t s — Flying D u t c h hit E u r o p e a n c o u r t s

Features— Hope for the homesick

NATIONAL

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SPORTS

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lease that was established with the a p a r t m e n t s above Cleo's Bridal a n d Gift Shop o n 9 t h Street. W h e n referring to the overall quality of t h e Cleo's A p a r t m e n t s a n d the Fairbanks T o w n h o u s e leases, Jobson said, "The s t u d e n t s are going to love them." In addition to these new leases, Jobson said that H o p e has created t e m p o r a r y h o u s i n g by converting the Dykstra Hall exercise r o o m , the s e c o n d a n d third floor study r o o m s in Kollen Hall, the lounge in Van Vleck Hall a n d the guest r o o m in D u r f e e Hall into residence rooms. John Telfer ('12) was given h o u s i n g in t h e s e c o n d floor study r o o m in Kollen. "I love it...it's roomier," Telfer said. After Telfer t u r n e d in his h o u s i n g i n f o r m a t i o n late, as did several o t h e r students, he was placed in t e m p o r a r y housing. "I was just glad to have housing," Telfer said. N o w that Telfer has moved into t h e study r o o m , he d o e s not w a n t to switch. "I am going to keep this if I can," Telfer said. Jobson contradicted c a m p u s r u m o r s of s t u d e n t s w h o might be left w i t h o u t c a m p u s housing and said, "Everybody has a bed."

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CAMPUS

THE ANCHOR

AUGUST 2 7 . 2 0 0 8 QUICK AND PAINLESS(LEFHOrlentation assistants w a s t e no t i m e w h e n unpacking freshmen's cars. Parents watch, awes t r u c k . (Beiow) Freshman g e t aquainted at t h e Playfair.

Wm

P H O T O S BY A N N G R E E N

2012 conquers campus •

ORIENTATION,

from page 1

F r e s h m e n opinions a b o u t H o p e s orientation this year varied widely. M a n y s t u d e n t s expressed relief at having an o p p o r t u n i t y t o settle in before the rest of c a m p u s . "It was really great t o s p e n d time here w i t h o u t looking stupid in f r o n t of the u p p e r c l a s s m e n . I got t o k n o w the c a m p u s a n d o t h e r freshman," said Rebekah Taylor (12). Having a c a m p u s full of f r e s h m e n a n d O A leaders, w h o are there voluntarily to help n e w students, gives t h e o r i e n t a t i o n a t m o s p h e r e a hospitable feel. "Everyone is so friendly," said John Telfer ('12), " N o b o d y t h i n k s you're weird if you just go up t o t h e m and i n t r o d u c e yourself." Erin VanDellen (12) expressed an appreciation for

the sheer quanitity of g a m e s the O A leaders provided. "I'm impressed with all t h e g a m e s they c a m e up with," VanDellen said. O t h e r s t u d e n t s felt that the orientation routine w a s u n c o m f o r t a b l e . "I didn't really like orientation. W e played s o m e g a m e s a n d talked a b o u t stuff, b u t I didn't really feel like we n e e d e d the icebreaker games," said Poon. Several s t u d e n t s especially felt that t h e alcohol discussion w a s unnecessary. "They shoved the alcohol talk d o w n o u r throats," said Taylor. For m o s t students, Playfair s e e m e d t o b e o n e of t h e most memorable orientation experiences. "It kind of felt like speed dating," said Laura Hobson. "Playfair was probably m y favorite part," said Sara P r i d m o r e

T H I S W E E K AT H O P E Friday Aug. 2 9 Mentalist Chris Carter

(12). (12) Ryan Greene acknowledged both the drawbacks a n d the benefits of the famously loud m e e t - a n d - g r e e t . "Playfair gives you c o m m o n ground. Even if you don't r e m e m b e r s o m e o n e , you can b e like, ' R e m e m b e r how awkward that was?"' said Greene. Regardless of t h e criticism or the i n h e r e n t social strangeness, m o s t of the f r e s h m e n interviewed were grateful for s o m e kind of i n t r o d u c t i o n to the college experience. Tyler D e p k e ('09), a n d O A leader, said, " C o m i n g in as a f r e s h m a n , there's a lot of anxiety. As a m e m b e r of t h e orientation staff, it's c o m f o r t i n g to know you can resolve s o m e of t h o s e anxieties that w e all experience."

Knickerbocker Theatre 8 p.m.

Opening of "Shell Games: The Work of Ken Little'' De Pree Art Center

Saturday Time to Serve

Aug. 3 0

Volunteer Services sends voiunteers Into the community. 10 a.m.-3 p.m.

Meet the Dutchmen Football Scrimmage. Municipal Standium 10 a.m.

Sunday Aug. 3 1 The Gathering: "The beginning" (John 1:1) Dlmnent Chapel 8 p.m.

Were you the kid who got in trouble in Sunday School f o r asking too many

K O I ' L COLL.l.GI

C O N C B U

S f l l l l S P R ! SI N T S

HORSE AND THE SEA W ' S G

R O B

questions?

K E N A G Y

C o m e join the rest of us! W e d n e s d a y s , S e p t e m b e r 17 Through N o v e m b e r s 6-8 pm

Grace Episcopal Church

S/Vi I ' K1 MY, A l K .US r 30 I N < C* K N1C K I; R LK K K t R 111 i MI F

H'RI / w RI H M o r i . ! D

555 Michigan Ave.

8 PM

Holland, M l 49423 C a l l f o r m o r e i n f o r m a t i o n o r lo register 616-396-7459

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AUGUST 2 7 . 2 0 0 8

NATIONAL

THE ANCHOR

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Democratic Convention gets underway in Denver

Irish 'no' vote raises questions for EU future

Alex Quick STAFF

Sam Ogles NATIONAL N E W S EDITOR

The European Union, an idea first set forth in 1952, has progressed rapidly in recent years as an e c o n o m i c a n d political power. The latest step in f u r t h e r Euwere m o r e Irish skeptics t h a n r o p e a n integration, the Treaty optimists. of Lisbon signed in 2007, would At a s p e e c h in Berlin o n July f u r t h e r centralize political and 10, f o r m e r Italian Prime Minisjudicial power in the EU a n d ter Giuliano A m a t o outlined the would i m p l e m e n t r e f o r m s m e a n t r e a s o n s for f u r t h e r E u r o p e a n to streamline EU f u n c t i o n s . In integration a n d h o p e s for t h e order t o be i m p l e m e n t e d , h o w f u t u r e . In response . EU's ful l d ever, the treaty n e e d s t o b e adto a r g u m e n t s that o p t e d by every m e m b e r state te tC \ ^ Europeans are of t h e EU. O n June 12, Irelooking t o their land, a m e m b e r of the EU, own governvoted a r e s o u n d i n g Mno.w m e n t s (and thus All 27 m e m b e r states d o n o t n e e d a of t h e EU n e e d e d t o exstronger EU), A m w'" A \ st a m i n e the n e w treaty a n d ato declared on the give a u n a n i m o u s s t a m p of a p contrary. proval. M o s t m e m b e r states "People think that Europe p u s h e d the treaty t h r o u g h their should tackle terrorism, the e n parliaments, b u t Ireland's conv i r o n m e n t , research, defense, stitution required a r e f e r e n d u m , foreign affairs, immigration, and a popular vote. A n d w h e n eleccrime," A m a t o said. tion day came, it w a s clear there

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G R A P H I C S EDITOR G I N A H O L D E R

A m a t o argued that in order t o fulfill this wish of the people, t h e EU n e e d s the changes included in the Treaty of Lisbon. " W e need s o m e organizational i m p r o v e m e n t s here. W e n e e d t h e Treaty of Lisbon." But the Irish n o vote certainly proves there are those u n c o m fortable with the idea of a m o r e p o w e r f u l and centralized Europe. Those o p p o s e d to such a f u t u r e argue t h a t Europe is too diverse, its p e o p l e too different . to give a c o m m o n direction on such issues as foreign policy, civil liberties a n d defense. But A m a t o said, "People are m o r e satisfied w i t h the EU t h a n their o w n national governments... W h e n people say, 'no,' SEE E U ,

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WRtTER

It is big, it is popular, and it h a p p e n s once every f o u r years. It is not the Olympics, it is the D e m o c r a t i c National Convention, and it is h a p p e n i n g this week in Denver. T h e convention, which feat u r e s senior federal and state officials and delegates f r o m the D e m o c r a t i c Party a n d its affiliates, m e e t s every election year to discuss policy and issues facing t h e party and t o formally a n n o u n c e the party's presidential a n d vice presidential candidates. Usually conventions are n o n controversial events. Speeches are given by veteran party m e m bers a n d rising party stars w h i c h attract s o m e attention, a n d t h e party's n o m i n a t i o n is little m o r e t h a n symbolic, as the results are k n o w n m o n t h s in advance. But this convention is different; it has b e e n s h r o u d e d in s u s p e n s e since t h e primaries. The first controversy arose in primary season w h e n the prim a r y results f r o m the states of

Michigan and Florida were ruled by the national c o m m i t t e e null and void because the states held their primaries ahead of schedule, breaking tradition. The party at first s t r i p p e d the states of their delegates - m e a n ing d e m o c r a t s in Michigan and Florida would have n o say at the c o n v e n t i o n - b u t as of Sunday, August 17, restored their right t o sit in Denver. T h e second b o u t of suspense c a m e d u r i n g the primaries as well, w h e n Sen. Barack O b a m a and Sen. Hillary Clinton were battling state by state. There w a s s o m e fear that the n o m i n a t i o n would n o t be decided until the convention itself, s o m e t h i n g that has n o t h a p p e n e d since 1952 w h e n the convention n o m i n a t e d Adlai Stevenson t o r u n against Eisenhower. Clinton did eventually step aside in June, allaying the fears that t h e r e would b e a divided party at the convention. But it is unclear w h e t h e r unity will be reached. Although t h e r e is only o n e candidate remaining, SEE D N C ,

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PERSPECTIVES

Why the Olympics helped China and hurt the rest of us S a m Ogles NATIONAL N E W S EDITOR

The Olympics are a long a n d glorious tradition. At least, m a n y w o u l d argue so. But the controversies leading up t o the start of the 2008 Beijing G a m e s m i g h t lead u s t o believe otherwise. And even if we're n o t ready t o d e n o u n c e the O l y m pics altogether, w e can begin t o glimpse t h e t r u t h u n d e r the veil of C h i n a and the International Olympic C o m m i t t e e : t h a t the Olympics d o m o r e h a r m t h a n good. W h e n the 2008 S u m m e r G a m e s were awarded t o C h i n a in 2001, the I O C a n d Chinese officials b o t h p r o m i s e d r e f o r m s . It w a s a n n o u n c e d that issues of h u m a n rights would be addressed, f r e e d o m of t h e press would b e granted a n d C h i n a would o p e n up. Instead, live coverage f r o m Tia n a n m e n Square w a s prohibited, beggars a n d migrant workers were r e m o v e d f r o m Beijing streets and political dissidents were jailed. Even after video footage surfaced earlier this year of C h i n e s e police dragging citizens f r o m their h o m e s and beating t h e m , the international c o m m u n i t y s e e m e d powerless t o d o m o r e t h a n cond e m n s u c h behavior. The p r o b l e m with actually holding C h i n a accountable is, of course, political in nature. A boycott would strain p o litical tensions b e t w e e n C h i n a a n d the United States. A n o t h e r p r o b l e m lies with business. The Olympics are extremely profitable a n d it is clear that a M c D o n -

ald's s p o n s o r s h i p is a b o u t p r o m o t i n g business o p p o r t u n i t i e s m o r e t h a n international unity. There is a reason N B C w o u l d pay the I O C $894 million for t h e exclusive right t o b r o a d c a s t the Beijing g a m e s in the US. F u r t h e r m o r e , countries argue over their share of Olympic revenues whenever the g a m e s occur precisely because t h e r e is too m u c h m o n e y t o b e m a d e n o t to. T h e illusion of p r o m o t i n g international peace and a h u m a n rights agenda (the original intent of the Olympics) is f u r ther d i m i n i s h e d w h e n o n e considers the past troubles of t h e I O C itself, including m a n y instances of bribery and c o r r u p tion. Perhaps the best illustration for the s h o r t c o m i n g s of the I O C is its m e m b e r ship. Past presidents and b o a r d m e m b e r s include convicted criminals a n d fascists. The c u r r e n t I O C b o a r d also includes Francis Nyangweso, the f o r m e r miliUry c o m m a n d e r - i n - c h i e f u n der U g a n d a n dictator Idi A m i n . Nevertheless the organization rem a i n s o n e that claims t o p r o m o t e peace a n d h u m a n rights.

China's gains The greatest h a r m of the Olympics, however, is the international attention and legitimacy gained by t h e h o s t country. The I O C repeatedly m a k e s the mistake of granting this prize t o

i

countries that are principally o p p o s e d t o its s u p p o s e d mission - t o c o m m u n i s t C h i n a in 2008, the military g o v e r n m e n t of S. Korea in 1988, the totalitarian Soviet U n i o n in 1980, t h e o n e - p a r t y state of Mexico in 1968 and the n o t o r i o u s Nazi regime in 1936. The G a m e s allow the h o s t c o u n t r y to project their b e s t self-image to the international c o m m u n i t y t h r o u g h the only venue that attracts the attention of n o t only g o v e r n m e n t s , b u t of average world citizens. H a r m o n y was a t h e m e of the o p e n i n g Beijing ceremonies a n d strikes an ironic tone considering China's breakaway m o v e m e n t s in Tibet a n d Taiwan, its oppression of its own people and its energy a g r e e m e n t s with Sudan and B u r m a (one may recall the brutal o p p r e s s i o n of t h e Buddhist m o n k s ' protests by t h e Burm e s e military last year). C h i n a has also spent an estimated $40 billion o n t h e O l y m p i c s - a figure that far surpasses any expected

C h i n e s e income f r o m the games. This may cause o n e to ask, "Why?" The answer is given by China's eagerness to be seen as the greatest n e w power in the world, o n e that c a n say of its O l y m pic medal d o m i n a t i o n (despite having less total medals t h a n the US), "it is secured". T h e p h r a s e is definite and final, a n d it seems to describe China's f u t u r e as m u c h as its Olympic p e r f o r m a n c e . C h i n a h o p e s to be, in a word, impressive. A n d it is a p o w e r that wishes to symbolically p o r t r a y its massive e c o n o m i c (and t h u s political) g r o w t h by a n n o u n c i n g on the world's biggest stage that China has arrived. W o r s t of all a b o u t the G a m e s is that m a n y believe in the ideals of t h e O l y m pics w i t h o u t acknowledging t h e O l y m pics in practice. The public would like to see c o n d e m n a t i o n of oppressive governm e n t s without denying their citizens t h e O l y m p i c experience. But the t w o c a n n o t be separated. A n d by maintaining this illusion of world unity a n d a setting aside of differences, we e m p o w e r the very forces, we c o n d e m n the other year and 49 weeks that the Olympics are n o t taking place. If we would be bold e n o u g h t o acknowledge the Olympics in practice, w e m i g h t actually deserve the universal peace and h u m a n rights b a n n e r w e so proudly wave.

G R A P H I C BY G I N A H O L D E R A N D CORY W A R N E R


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T H F ANCHOR

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ARTS

AUGUST 2 7 , 2 0 0 8

THIS WEEK IN ART Thursday Usher In!

August 2 8

Music Dept. opening convocation 1 1 a.m. in Wichers

Friday August 2 9 Exhibition Opening Work of Ken Littie 5 p.m. in Depree Art Center

Christopher Carter Mind games 8 : 3 0 p.m. at the Knick

Saturday August 3 0 Horse in the Sea and guest Chicago band to play 8 p.m. at the Knick $ 5

Monday September 1 Ry Cuming to perform PHOTO BY A N N GREEN

H O G H E E L S — A tower of pink and red heels mixed with assorted leather goods work to serve as the body of a pig.

Los Angeles vocalist/guitarist 4:30 p.m. in the Pine Grove

PHOTO BY A N N GREEN

N O W S H O E I N G / S U N D R Y M A T E R I A L S AT P L A Y - Ken Little utilizes an assortment of textiles to create animals and other pieces, Including clothing and body parts.

IN BRIEF

INTERESTED IN MUSIC?

DePree exhibits Little's 'Shell Games' Karie Luldens ASSISTANT PRODUCTION M A N A G E R

The week before classes started, the lights were dark in the D e P r e e Art Gallery a n d the wall that normally b e a r s the n a m e of the latest exhibition w a s as white as a fresh canvas. Like the rest of Hope's c a m p u s , whose sidewalks are lined with construction markers and grass seedlings, t h e art building showed signs of h a r d w o r k a n d a new beginning. The year has yet t o be painted. But pressing an eye u p t o t h e shadowy glass of the gallery window revealed that the u p c o m i n g s h o w was nearly ready t o m a k e its d e b u t . Artist Ken Little will b e present Friday, Aug. 29 for the o p e n i n g r e c e p t i o n of "Shell Games", an exhibition of his sculpture. "Shell G a m e s " includes pieces exemplifying several different genres of Little s sculpture. The m o s t striking may be t h e oversize body p a r t s m a d e of $1 bills carefully pasted over lightweight steel f r a m e s . The questions provoked by m o n e y p a p e r i n g a hollow head, an e m p t y business

suit, and an e n o r m o u s finger entitled "Bird" are impossible to ignore. "This is where Little's work gets into p o p culture," said Professor A n n e Heath, gallery director. "His pieces c o m b i n e f u n and biting satire at the s a m e time. I think s t u d e n t s will really enjoy the h u m o r in it." Little has served as professor of art at t h e University of Texas San A n t o n i o for t h e past 20 years. Since earning his MFA f r o m the University of U t a h in 1972, his work has b e e n s h o w n in over 35 o n e - p e r s o n exhibitions across the country. He has explored a variety of media, beginning with c e r a m i c s and then shifting t o w a r d s b r o n z e casting and m u l t i m e d i a sculpture i n c o r p o r a t i n g f o u n d objects. O t h e r sculptures in t h e show include large animal f o r m s s h a p e d by c o n g l o m e r a t i o n s of shoes, belts a n d other c o m m o n items. There is also a series of small m e t a l pieces whose size and z o o m o r p h i c f o r m s echo t h e spiritual talismans f o u n d in a variety of traditional

Holland to see Little's work. cultures a r o u n d t h e word, H e a t h "Shell G a m e s " will be t h e first explained. of f o u r exhibitions t o b e hosted "Ken is c r a f t and designby the DePree A r t C e n t e r oriented, so h e likes the way this fall semester. During the things look in and of themselves, m o n t h of October, "Pow W o w b u t he's also interested in Texan Portraits" by Douglas Elbiner folklore," H e a t h said. "These will showcase 22 relate to Native ! = = = = = 1 p h o t o g r a p h s taken A m e r i c a n talismans at the A m e r i c a n f r o m the west, a s well "(Little's) Indian Heritage Pow as C h i n e s e b r o n z e pieces combine W o w of Michigan pieces a n d their ritual State University. aspects. And they're fun and biting These will be beautiful in their satire at the followed by the simplicity, just cast same time!' satirical drawings f r o m b r o n z e with and sculptures of Professor different patinas on world r e n o w n e d them." Anne Heath political cartoonist The faculty of t h e = Pat Oliphant. The D e P r e e A r t Gallery - = s e m e s t e r concludes knew that they with the competitive Student w a n t e d t o exhibit a sculptor's Juried Show, in which any work this year in c o n n e c t i o n w i t h interested s t u d e n t s may submit t h e 21st International Sculpture artwork to b e critiqued and Conference, which is being held selected for display by a guest this year at the Frederik Meijer artist or curator. G a r d e n s and Sculpture Park in For m o r e i n f o r m a t i o n on t h e G r a n d Rapids. The C o n f e r e n c e D e P r e e Art C e n t e r please visit will take place the w e e k e n d of O c t . w w w .hope.edu/academic/art/ 2 - 4 , and it is h o p e d that m a n y GALLERY/events of the artists and a r t enthusiasts w h o are d r a w n t o t h e area for the event will also m a k e their way to

Concert benefits Parkinson's research Brla Berger A S S I S T A N T A R T S ED I T O R

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H o p e College s t u d e n t s are well k n o w n for their charitable d o n a t i o n s , events and volunteer organizations. O n Sept. 11, H o p e s t u d e n t s are extending their n o t e w o r t h y activism by hosting a c o n c e r t benefitting Parkinson's disease at the Knickerbocker Theatre. Parkinson's disease, a progressive neurological disorder brought t o t h e public eye by Michael J. Fox, c a n b e treated with surgery a n d medication. N e w e r research, however, is desperately n e e d e d for accurate d e t e c t i o n and t r e a t m e n t . There is n o c u r e and n o k n o w n prevention for Parkinson's dis-

ease, a h a r s h reality for t h e estimated 5 million p e o p l e living with Parkinson's worldwide. The symptoms of Parkinson's disease can include tremors, weakness of the muscles, inflexibility and partial or complete loss of facial expression. While the disease is not directly fatal, affected persons suffer from an increased mortality rate due to complications from the disease. Parkinson's disease is often used synonymously with Parkinsons syndrome. Alpha Phi O m e g a N u Beta Chapter, Hope's c o - e d service fraternity, a n d the H o p e College D e m o c r a t s are organizing a c o n c e r t for Parkinson's research featuring A n d r e w Ripp. Ripp is a Chicago native w h o recently finished a s u m m e r tour t h r o u g h t h e

Midwest. H i s genre is classical singer-song writer style infused with old-school jazz a n d soul. This c o m e s as n o surprise considering Ripp's inspirations which include Otis Redding, Bob Dylan and Hank Williams. T h e Travis Kingma Band, a jazz a n d alternative rock H o p e favorite, will also b e playing as the o p e n i n g act. P r o c e e d s will benefit Team Fox, Michael J. Fox's Parkinson's f u n d r a i s i n g p r o g r a m . The c o n c e r t is corporately s p o n s o r e d by t h e H a w o r t h I n n and C o n f e r e n c e Center. A n d r e w Ripp can b e h e a r d at myspace.com/andrewripp. For m o r e concert information, email a p o @ h o p e . e d u .

The Music D e p a r t m e n t is looking t o m e e t and chat with those s t u d e n t s interested in t h e many o p p o r t u n i t i e s in music at H o p e College. P e r f o r m a n c e p r o s p e c t s available to students include: Choirs, Bands, O r chestras, Jazz Ensembles, and C h a m b e r G r o u p s . Ensembles can b e taken either for credit or for zero credit. If interested, stop by the Nykerk Music Building this week a n d sign u p for a very low stress audition or email coyle@hope.edu for m o r e i n f o r m a t i o n . Private lessons are also available in all areas.

HORSE IN THE SEA TO PERFORM H o r s e In The Sea will b e p e r f o r m i n g with special guest Rob Kenagy at H o p e College at t h e Knickerbocker Theatre o n Saturday, Aug. 30, at 8 p.m. This show will kick off t h e fall H o p e College C o n c e r t Series a n d will b e free for H o p e College students, faculty a n d staff. Tickets for the show will cost $5 for m e m b e r s of t h e general public. Horse In T h e Sea w a s developed as a c o n c e p t project a n d played its first show o n the eve of 2007. The group's d e b u t album, "I O r d e r the Sun t o Shine O n Everyone," w a s released on Nov. 23, 2007, t o a packed crowd at Schubas Tavern in Chicago. Highlights on the critically praised album, range f r o m the playful s u m m e r of love s h i m m y of "I Can't Talk t o Girls" t o the moodier keyboard-driven balladry of the title track. Rob Kenagy, a f o r m e r H o p e student, will b e p e r f o r m i n g as a part of the H o p e College C o n c e r t Series for the first time, b u t has o f t e n played shows at Lemonjello's as well as other venues a r o u n d Holland. Tickets are available n o w at the H o p e College Ticket Office in the m a i n lobby of the DeVos Fieldhouse, o p e n weekdays f r o m 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and can b e called at (616) 395-7890. Any remaining tickets will b e sold at the door.


THE ANCHOR

AUGUST 2 7 , 2 0 0 8

There's Hope for the homesick Tips for finding your anchor while you're adjusting to life at Hope

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6 TheAnchor

VOICES

AUGUST 2 7 . 2 0 0 8

Change for tradition's sake Ashley DeVecht & Katie B e n n e t t

Objects closer than they appear Humidity is rampant, Coldstone is packed, and the dumpsters are full of empty mini-fridge boxes. This is the first week of school. By the time this issue hits stands, freshmen will have had their first day of classes, returning students will have remembered how to sleep through the train whistle, and at least 50 games of Frisbeegolf, some of them shirtless, will have cycled through the campus. The year feels so new and squeaky clean that it's easy to forget how old this tradition actually is.

artist, was an Anchor staff reporter in 1994 and covered recitals, jazz bands, and DePree art exhibits. He later became the Arts Editor in 1995. The Anchor has seen Hope College through an entire spectrum of news — both of epic and local proportions. We look through The Anchor archives with wonder at how different the world was for Hope students and can't help but be in awe of the paper's great tradition. We can only guess what the 2008-2009 school year will bring for Hope College. But like Anchor staff before us, we hope to bring you both campus-wide and nation-wide news from a perspective no other news source can: yours.

his position, but the black man must be outstanding." In that same issue Bruce Martin reported that security at the dining hall was up due to theft of food (some things are timeless), and Pantsville USA, located in downtown Holland, advertised a new trend in men's fashion: plaid bell bottoms (other things are definitely not timeless). O n March 11, 1982 The Anchor covered a new field of scientific research— embryology, or the study of an organism's changes from the fertilization of the ovum until birth. Rhienhold Hutz, an M S U grad student, gave a lecture regarding the embryology of primates. During the lecture he discussed an experiment he was working on, the only of its kind at the time, which sought to develop a ' l e s t tube" squirrel, monkey, and hamster. This was the beginning of what we now know as the ' t e s t tube baby." Sufjan Stevens, now a prominent Indie

The very first weekly issue of The Anchor was published nearly 100 years ago on Nov. 11, 1914. In the past century The Anchor has reported on some of the most important historical events, pop culture phenomenon, and Hope College controversies. In the Nov. 7th issue of 1969, The Anchor covered Richard Nixon's nationally televised speech, during which he relayed his plan to, over time, replace American troops in Vietnam with South Vietnamese forces. Support across America was overwhelming. In the Oct. 25 issue of the 1973 volume, in the wake of the civil rights movement, Tom O'Brien reported the need for more black admissions recruiters at Hope. The head of the Black Coalition, Ed Sanders, marked the difficulty African American professors were bound to encounter in the early '70s. Sanders said, "The white professor can be average and still maintain

Ashley and Katie would like to thank the Anchor alumni who have gone before them. For your passion and guidance, forever indebted

they are

to you.

From the inside out Maggie Almdale

Summer dreamin' I feel as if I ' m not actually here. Not 3t school, I mean. Or rather, I feel as if I shouldn't be here—not yet. Perhaps it's the fact that summer was only two and a half very short months and flew by entirely too quickly for my liking. Why does summer have a way of doing that to a person? It's completely unfair. Summer should be those months that sit.

completely swamped and utterly disgusted with myself or classes or life in general, I can remember the days of summer. I will remember the quiet, still moments, the smiles I had, the glimpses of beauty around me, and all good things I have been given. As the song g o e s . . . "Summertime...and the livin' is e a s y . . . " Yes, the summer days were f a n t a s t i c better than fantastic. But looking forward, I ' m thinking the days ahead will be shining all the brighter.

heaven-on-earth. Neebish sits on the St. Mary's River, just downbound along the channel from the Soo Locks, at Sault Ste. Marie. And here's the awesome part: I got paid to take a boat ride aboard a 67-foot vessel through the Soo L'ocld a n d l n t o Canada EVERY DAY. Granted, I also had to narrate a two-hour trip, haul the lines on the boat (ropes and such) and act friendly even when I wasn't particularly feeling too chipper. All-inall, I couldn't have asked for more. And aside from the-fact that I lived alone, on an island, in a big house (with mice!) for over two months, I had the time of my life. I'm anticipating a very busy schedule this semester (as likely you, reader, may be too); but I know that in those moments I feel

warm and languidly, resting in our minds as a time of rest, relaxation, and recuperation. We should not only be soaking in all the moments, milking them for all their worth, but we should remember those moments as the shining, golden days of summer. And so as I ' m writing these words, I am, in fact, recalling to my mind my happy days of summer: even as my head is starting to hurt (from lack of sleep, and possibly the stress of scheduling and rescheduling classes,) I am dreaming of m y rather perfect summer. O n June 3, just four days after completing my May term science course, 1 drove eight hours north to the upper peninsula of Michigan, to a pristine little place 1 call Neebish Island— it's my dreamland, really, my tiny spot of

Maggie hopes you start your school year off right by thoroughly enjoying yourfirst week of classes. Feeling stressed out? Go ahead!

Treat yourself

to a Lemonjello's

fee or bubble tea smoothie!

EU future unclear after vote • EU, from page 3 V O T E ernments." As for the Irish voters w h o essentially vetoed the treaty w h e n all o t h e r g o v e r n m e n t s p r o m i s e d ratification, A m a t o told the c r o w d in Berlin, " W e all k n o w we're n o t s u p p o s e d to p u t pressure o n the Irish. W e m u s t leave t h e m their t i m e . . . a n d h o p e that f u r t h e r ratification will give t h e m a positive feeling to reconsider." But as t i m e progresses, n o n e of t h e fears of the Irish s e e m t o have b e e n neutralized. M a n y were afraid that giving u p m o r e p o w e r t o the EU would result in an o v e r t u r n i n g of Ireland's strict a b o r t i o n laws along with other lack of consideration for the small republic's 6 million citizens (compared t o 500 million total in the EU). Along with Ireland, the United K i n g d o m and Poland are both k n o w n t o have p o p u l a t i o n s o p p o s e d t o the idea of an integrated Europe. In fact, even pro-EU g o v e r n m e n t s such as French Presid e n t Nicolas Sarkozy's couldn't pass similar treaties t h r o u g h p o p ular votes (and later succeeded by voting in parliament instead). A n d with neither a new treaty being d r a f t e d nor a revote conside r e d for Ireland, t h e f u t u r e of the EU s e e m s uncertain.

N O

O N

Disclaimer: The Anchor is a product of student effort and is funded through the Hope College Student Activities Fund. The opinions expressed on the Voices page are solely those of the author and do not represent the views of The Anchor. One-year subscriptions to The Anchor are available for $ 4 0 . The Anchor reserves the right to accept or reject any advertising.

4

Volunteers needed!!! Say Yes to Sunday Volunteer Rally @ N e w Holland Brewing Co. 66 E. 8TH St. Wed. Sept. 3, 7:00 pm The Say Yes to Sunday Committee needs volunteers to pass the counlywide campaign to repeal the ban on Sunday beer & wine sales. Event planning, marketing, finance, and industry communication will be the focus. Please go to www.sayycstosunday.com for more info. T H E N C O M E TO T H E RALLY. S N A C K S WILL B E P R O V I D E D . Have some fun. Build your resume. Help make history.

I!!!ANCHOR. Our Mission: The Anchor strives to communicate campus events throughout Hope College and the Holland community. We hope to amplify awareness and promote dialogue through fair, objective Journalism and a vibrant Voices section.

N O V E M B E R

2 0 0 8 F A L L SEMESTER STAFF

Alex Quick

Katie B e n n e t t

EDITOR-is-CUIEF

Bria B e r g e r

Ashley DeVecht

EDITOR-IS-CHIEP

James Ralston

STORTS

CO-EDITOR

BUSINESS

MANAGER

Chris Lewis

SPORTS

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BUSINESS

ASSISTANT

Emily West

CAMWS

NMS

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CAWIIS

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ASSISTANT

BritUny Adams

FEATURES

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Maggie Almdale

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ARTS

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Kathy Nathan Ann Green Gina H o l d e r Cory Warner

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Matt Oosterhouse

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VOICES

AUGUST 2 7 , 2 0 0 8

THE ANCHOR

7

Indifferent Karma E'k

1

#

Anderson

The brick that broke the camel's back Kwame Kilpatrick was recently sent to jail for violating the agreement of his bond, bringing new meaning to the phrase "the straw that broke the camel's back." This final straw, the latest in his tumultuous and often mind-boggling tenure as mayor of Detroit looks pedestrian when compared to some of his other indiscretions. But the extent of his dossier is not what should amaze. Rather the fact that a man whose record includes infidelity, conspiracy and

perjury has lasted since being elected to the position in 2002. Kilpatrick must be proud that the people of Detroit have invested so much trust in him that after having an affair via text messages, using city funds to lease a Lincoln and using his influence to help dismiss a case against a preacher who solicited a prostitute, he had to be physically jailed before Detroiters said "Enough." For some reference points, we can compare Kilpatrick to some other famed politicians to see how he measures up. Of the elected officials who got a little promiscuous during their terms. Bill Clinton certainly rivals the mistakes made by Kilpatrick. His lies to a grand jury, later explained by one of the most memorable and possibly the weakest defenses E V E R (what is the definition of the word "is"?) are more than comparable to Kilpatrick's licentious behavior.

However, Clinton's discretions were allegedly carried out with low-level employees while Kilpatrick, always one to "go big or go home," allegedly had his affair with his own chief of staff. Kilpatrick has also had trouble distinguishing what money is his and what money belongs to the city. He allegedly took money from city funds on a number of occasions for things like a new car, vacations, and a gift for his wife. Maybe he could take a hint from Pennsylvania state senator Gerald LaValle, who is currently under investigation for paying his wife nearly $50,000 from state grants to non-profit organizations. 1 guess LaValle didn't think the N P O s would miss it since they weren't making a profit in the first place. LaValle has smartly decided to not seek another term and retire after this year. After watching the city of Detroit

Myths, tricks, and train wrecks Erika English

$

Recipe f o r . . . With all of our advanced technology, someone should publish a perfect recipe for a relationship. And while the personality tests of dating websites, and the psychoanalysis of your local therapist may get you closer to understanding yourself, and therefore understanding what you want in another person, it's amazing how something that you expect to taste so sweet can have a horrible aftertaste. What if w e all came with our own set of nutrition facts? Could some F D A stamp warn you of a low-quality date? Or should the process of trial and error be left alone as it makes us stronger? In the first few weeks of every college year, Hope College is a snow-globe. With the first shake of Orientation, everyone flies around in search of a place to land, and someone to land there with. They defy barriers which would have ordinarily divided some, in favor of having someone to sit with in the cafeteria or make plans with on a Saturday night. But the truth is many of these instant coffee relationships just grow cold with time. It's only natural, but how is it that what can be so good for awhile can just fall flat a few months later? Do we change that much? Or do we just more clearly understand how what makes us unique reacts with another person? And while w e ' r e mourning the loss of what could have been, can we ever change our recipe? Years ago, they used to classify people with certain personality types as being dominated by different secretions in their blood. Someone who was cranky would be linked to having a higher level of some organ-related substance in their system.

Erika English is a senior at Hope College. She is known for her to-die-for baked goods, but herfavorite recipe at the moment isfor banana pancakes.

Letter Guidelines; The Anchor welcomes letters from anyone within the college and related communities. The staff reserves the right to edit due to space constraints, personal attacks or other editorial considerations. A representative sample will be taken. No anonymous letters will be printed unless discussed with Editor-in-Chief. Please limit letters to 5 0 0 words. Mail letters to The Anchor c/o Hope College, drop them off a t the Anchor office (located in the Martha Miller Center) or e-mail us at anchor@hope.edu by Monday at 5 p.m. to appear in Wednesday's issue.

Eric Anderson encourages you not to take anything

too seriously, especially this

column.

Democratic Convention • DNC, from page 3

Today, we type ourselves in millions of other ways whether it's under the sign of the Chinese Zodiac or as a devoted follower of a television show. On the online social network of Facebook, users can click on one of the topics they have listed under their "Interests" and instantly be connected to thousands of other people w h o feel just the same way. We are told from birth to rise to adversity and "show them what you're made of." But perhaps the key ingredient in all of this is not some need to know w h p we are, or even to find if we are compatible with someone else, but rather a desperate need not to feel alone. We want the unspeakable bond with another person that acknowledges that whatever we are made of is good, and not only good but extraordinary because the other person can appreciate just who we are. H o w life-changing can a simple phrase such as "I know what you m e a n " be to another person? While the elements of our personalities may be written down on some biological recipe card somewhere, the same card that dictates your love for '80s music, distaste for the color green and anyone named Kevin, it seems there can never be a way to account for life experience. Perhaps it is not what we think we are, but what we do and who we surround ourselves with that really define us. Stopping for a moment in the middle of the snowstorm of these first few weeks, we find meaning in that our lives are whole when others are involved. So when we find ourselves bemoaning how science cannot land us the perfect housemate or relationship, we have the amazing ability to look to the person beside us and know that whatever we are, it is our friends that make our world.

endure these indignities for the past six years, we can only hope that Kilpatrick has the common sense to resign before the situation becomes worthy of a movie deal. If there is anything positive to take from this situation, it's that Freman Hendrix must feel justified. Hendrix was Kilpatrick's opponent during Detroit's 2005 mayoral race. Although garnering endorsements from the Detroit News and Free Press as well as beating Kilpatrick in the primary 45% to Kilpatrick's 34%, Hendrix was defeated by the incumbent on Election Day, receiving only 47% of the vote to Kilpatrick's 53%. After this recent incident, I think Mr. Hendrix would be fully justified if he abandoned all notions of modesty and gave a big "I TOLD Y O U S O " to all of those who voted against him.

m a n y in the party are still loyal t o Sen. Clinton and are n o t sure h o w O b a m a will fare. M a n y were looking t o w a r d s the V P c a n d i d a t e as a source for p a r t y unity, and it is still u n s u r e how O b a m a s choice in Delaware Sen. Joe Biden will play out.

S o m e are also hoping that s p e e c h e s by the Clintons and A1 G o r e will aid in bringing t h e Clinton and O b a m a c a m p s together. There is also t h e possibility that such speakers will divide the p a r t y even more. The next few days will b e days that could change t h e D e m o c r a t i c Party for years to come, a n d t h a t is s o m e t h i n g that can only b e said a b o u t a few conventions.

G R EAT I L K I O R M A N C R S E R I E S

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TAYLOU 2 DANCE SEPT. 4 AND 5,7:30PM HOPE COLLEGE KNIOCEHBOCKER. THEATRE "The performance would have been impressive enough...but the dancers' aplomb and artistry were even more remarkable." The New York Times

Tickets: 616-395-7890 • www.hope.edu/gps

Advertising Policies; All advertising is subject to the rates, conditions, standards, terms and policies stated in The Anchor's advertisement brochure. Any advertising placed on behalf of an advertising agency or other representative of the advertiser is the responsibility of the advertised and the advertiser shall be held liable for p a y m e n t r The Anchor will make continuous efforts to avoid wrong insertions, omissions and typographical errors. However, if such mistakes occur, this newspaper may cancel its charges for the portion of the ad If. in the publisher's reasonable judgment, the ad has been rendered valueless by the mistake.

Advertisement Deadlines; All ad and classified requests must be submitted by 5 p.m. Monday, prior to Wednesday distribution. Contact Information: To submit an ad or a classified, or to request a brochure or other information, contact our Ads Representative at anchorads@hope.edu. To contact our office, call our office at (616) 395-7877 on weekdays between 10:00 a.m. and 4 : 3 0 p.m.

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SPORTS

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Hope's international dream team

IN BRIEF

VOLLEYBALL

Hope College women's basketball takes on competition in Europe James Ralston

The H o p e College volleyball t e a m will enter the season ranked 23rd in the nation in Division III. T h e rankings were d e t e r m i n e d by the A m e r i c a n Volleyball C o a c h e s Association for the CBS College Sports Network. H o p e is c o m i n g off of a 24-9 season a n d a second place finish in the M I A A . Key r e t u r n ers include first t e a m All-MIAA h o n o r e e N o r a Slenk ('09), seco n d t e a m All-MIAA h o n o r e e A n d r e a Helminiak ('10) and M I A A f r e s h m a n player of the year Kara Vande G u c h t e ('11).

SPORTS EorroR

T h e H o p e College women's basketball t e a m hit the c o u r t s in Europe over the s u m m e r a n d c a m e back with lifelong m e m o r i e s a n d a w i n n i n g record. Fifteen m e m b e r s of t h e t e a m m a d e the trip to G e r m a n y and the N e t h e r l a n d s w h e r e they played five g a m e s against area club t e a m s a n d c a m e back w i t h a 4 - 1 record. The experience s t a r t e d off with a g a m e against host t e a m Hofheim/Langen, Germany, w h e r e they were h a n d e d their only defeat 71-76. Despite the t o u g h start, the t e a m w e n t o n to win their remaining games. "Playing these g a m e s helped the girls gain confidence," Lindsay Lange ('08) said. " W e can hold o u r o w n anywhere, even with different rules a n d t o u g h international competition." Lange was o n e of t h r e e 2008 graduates w h o were along on the trip. The graduates t o o k advantage of the o p p o r t u n i t y t o play o n Hope's t e a m o n e last time and c a m e back with positive s e n t i m e n t s c o n c e r n i n g the team's f u t u r e . "The t h r e e of us were all on the b e n c h at o n e point, and we looked o u t at the girls on the court and were just a m a z e d by the skills they were showing," Lange said. "This will be a very g o o d year for the team." Despite the positive outlook a b o u t the f u t u r e of the program, the graduates also had to face the fact that this was their last

FOOTBALL

PHOTO COURTESY H O P E COLLEGE P R

F L O O R S C R A M B L E - Lindsay Lange ('08) dives to get the ball In a game during the women's basketball team's trip to Europe. H o p e College experience. "It was t o u g h w h e n t h e trip w a s over and realizing that o u r time with the t e a m was over," Lange said. "But the experience w a s incredible and w e are really excited for the potential that this year's t e a m has." C o u r t n e y Knox ('09) saw the trip as an o p p o r t u n i t y for t e a m g r o w t h in a setting that forced t h e m to work together. "We used the experience n o t only as a way to w o r k on o u r skills b u t also grow t o g e t h e r as a team," Knox said. O n top of the g a m e s played, the t e a m also got to experience

sight seeing as well as a h o m e stay experience while in Germany. "The h o m e stay was u n i q u e because you got to experience living in a h o m e and really being a part of the culture," Knox said. "Simple things such as conversation m a d e us have t o work h a r d to break d o w n cultural b a r r i e r s " The t e a m finished their g a m e s with a rematch against Hofheim/Langen, Germany. The g a m e was close o n c e again, and the D u t c h were able t o pull o u t a victory 75-70. "Having a couple of weeks t o play together a n d s o m e g a m e s

Squad cheers to success James Ralston S P O R T S EDITOR

W i t h s o m e of the top cheer t e a m s in the nation in attendance, the H o p e College cheerleading t e a m held their own and showed great p r o m i s e at the Universal C h e e r l e a d i n g Association c a m p in Milwaukee, Wis. T h e c a m p consisted of instructional time as well as competitive e l e m e n t s which helped the young team p r e p a r e for the u p c o m i n g cheer seasons. "Our s q u a d is very young with six freshmen," M a r k Haskin ('09) said. "So the c a m p was a good i n t r o d u c t i o n for the n e w c o m e r s t o college level cheer and the differences f r o m high school." The experience helped the t e a m in many ways as the c a m p w o r k e d with t h e m o n n e w c h e e r s and stunts. "The p u r p o s e of the c a m p for the t e a m was t o work on skills and new cheers," Laura A d a m s ('09) said. "It also gave us the o p p o r t u n i t y t o grow closer as a team, especially with the newcomers." In o r d e r t o accomplish their goals, the c a m p had experienced cheerleaders and coaches on h a n d to assist the squads. "Each squad had a staff

m e m b e r f r o m the c a m p to help t e a c h things and critique," H a s k i n said. "It really helped our team become stronger and m a d e individuals w o r k o n their o w n f o r m as well." O n t o p of the instructional aspect the c a m p also involved a competitive aspect. The t e a m e a r n e d a second place finish in competitive and third place in sideline in a c o m p e t i t i o n against Division II and Division III schools. " I t s exciting t o see and

c o m p e t e with the o t h e r top squads," A d a m s said. "In Division III we don't see m a n y s t r o n g skilled teams, so the c a m p keeps u s f r o m getting complacent." Haskin agreed, citing the tough c o m p e t i t i o n as a s t r o n g benefit of the experience. "As a Division III school it was really cool t o see w h a t the best s q u a d s in the nation look like," Haskin said. "It really gives u s s o m e t h i n g t o shoot for, and t h e cool t h i n g w a s we could actually hang w i t h them."

u n d e r o u r belt helped us t o be m o r e prepared for o u r second g a m e against them," Lange said. "Also, w e had a m u c h better idea of how t o guard t h e m a n d had m o r e experience with international rules." A f t e r the trip h a d concluded, Lange, a multiple All-American in track as well a s a m e m b e r of the 2006 National C h a m p i o n women's basketball team s u m m e d u p the experience. "The trip was definitely o n e of the best experiences of m y t i m e at Hope," Lange said. "We will b e sharing these m e m o r i e s for years and years."

Hope College's men and w o m e n ' s tennis team have been honored for their academic excellence during the 2007-2008 school year. Both teams received All-Academic honors from the Intercollegiate Tennis Association for having a minimum cumulative CPA of 3.2.

First home games for fall sports M E N ' S SOCCER

Friday Aug. 29 vs. Aquinas College Buys Athletic Fields 4 p.m. CROSS COUNTRY

Saturday Aug. 30 Vanderbilt Invitational Ridgepoint Church 10:30 a.m. W O M E N ' S GOLF

Saturday Aug. 30 vs. Calvin College and Cornerstone University Macatawa Legends 10:00 a.m.

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Sports at Home

HOPE COLLEGE

V I C T O R Y — The Hope cheerleading team practices lifts outside of the Dow Center.

The annual Meet the Dutchmen football scrimmage will be held this Saturday Aug. 30 at 10:00 a.m. The public is welcome and admission is free. The team enters the 2008 season favored to repeal as MIAA champions. The Dutchmen finished with a 6-4 record and were MIAA co-champions with Olivet College in 2007.

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