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them state in their first words that-it is to hear about rejigion that they have come. As knowledge of the language increases, these discourses over the study desk give the keenest pleasure to the missionary. Acquaintances first met in the country often call when they come to the metropolis, for such Kagoshima is to this region. They are treated as hospitably as possible, the purpose being to increase and intensify all impressions for good pre­ viously received, and still more to accustom them to relations to those who represent the gospel. . Kagoshima.—The religious community in Kagoshima is growing, as is shown especially by the increased number of those who belong to the Bible Readers’ Union. There are, however, quite a number in the city who, in spite of having maintained active Christian relations before coming here, do not now show their colors; but the church visible will always have many such. In our own church there have been many things for which to be thankful. There has been faithful Bible study on the part of some, and earnest inquiries have not been wanting. There has been faithfulness under trying circumstances, and renewed evidence has been brought forth to show that persecution tends rather to strengthen faith. The evangelist in charge was ordained to the ministry in the spring. One young man has been brought by him to believe on the Saviour, and there are three others regularly study­ ing the Bible with him. About fifteen is the number of attendants on our worship, but at the evening meetings especially there are always some stand­ ing outside and listening. Some of these covert hearers come regularly. There have been four children gathering in the Sunday school, and a dozen more in that held at the ragged school, There are five out-stations connected with°the Kagoshima station. At three of these places new workers have come this year. The first of these is Miakonojo.—This place was vacant and in a bad way, but Mr. Shiraishi, one of our best workers went there in the spring. He is faithful and ener­ getic; studying in the morning, calling in the afternoon. There are seven people there at present who are investigating the scriptures under his lead. He also works regularly at places out in the country. • . Shibushi.—The worker at Shibushi is the same as last year. This is a hard field, but things seem to be looking up. The evangelist is in better spirits, and reports several inquirers, and two have asked for baptism. Ibusuki.—Dr. Miyake, who was traveling the Ibusuki circuit, left in the spring, to labor in a leper hospital of the Church Missionary Society. His place was supplied by a graduate of the Seminary, who, while living in Kagoshima, and assisting the missionary in various ways, visits this field every month. He also goes across the bay to Tarumizu. He thus visits four different places, calling in about thirty homes. There are no regu­ lar inquirers in this field yet, but the welcome that the preacher and his teachings receive is quite remarkable. The attitude of the people is dis­ tinctly cordial. , . Hitoyoshi.—Mr. Yoshiwa was transferred to Nagasaki, and Mr. Tamura, whom the Presbyterians had been obliged to give up on account of lack of funds, came to Hitoyoshi with his young wife in the early summer. He is a

Profile for Hope College Library

066 board of foreign missions rca 1898  

066 board of foreign missions rca 1898