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FIFTY-NINTH* ANNUAL REPORT OF THE

Board of Foreign Missions OF THE

REFORMED CHURCH IN AMERICA, PRESENTED TO THE

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ASBURY PARK, N. J., JUNE, 1891.

P R I N T E D

N E W Y O R K : F OR T H E B OA RD ,

26 R eade Street . 1891.

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ACTION OF T H E G E N E R A L SYNOD. T h e following resolutions, r e c o m m e n d e d by the C o m ­ mittee on Foreign Missions, were unanimously adopted J u n e 9,1891:

Resolved, 1. T h a t devout thanks are due A lmighty G o d for this year of prosperity, foi< hearts to give and the m e a n s to be given, for the spared lives and activities of our breth­ ren at the front, and the Divine blessing u p o n their labors. 2. T h a t the generosity of H o n . N. F. Graves in sustain­ ing a missionary lectureship at the fountain head of influence, the seat of our Eastern Institutions, be again appreciatively recognized. 3. Tha t a general missionary Conference in behalf of both the Boards be held at som e convenient place in the a u t u m n in the East, and, if practicable, others in the West, a n d that a committee be appointed by this Synod, to consist of the Secretaries of the Boards together with two ministers and an elder, to m a k e all arrangements for the same. 4. T h a t the first S u n d a y of N o v e m b e r be set apart as a day of special prayer a n d conference u p o n our Foreign work, its needs a nd its relation to the prosperity of the C h u r c h at home, that pastors be urged to preach u p o n the subject, a nd that all our churches be affectionately requested to m a k e a vigorous effort toward the extinction of the debt. 5. T h a t the call for $115,000 this year for Foreign M i s ­ sions be approved, and the s a m e apportioned to the Classes and churches. 6. T h a t success in this endeavor depends, first of all, u p o n the enthusiasm of the pastors and u p o n the systematic, organized, rather than spasmodic, efforts of the churches.

F O R M OF BEQUEST. “ I give unto the B oard of Foreign Missions of the Reformed C h u r c h in America, dollars to be applied for the maintenance’ a n d support of the Foreign Missions of said Church.”

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FIFTY-NINTH ANNUAL REPORT OP THE

Board of Foreign Missions OF THE

.

REFORMED CHURCH IN AMERICA, '

AND

THIRTY-FOURTH OF SEPARATE ACTION, WITH THE

Treasurer’s Tabular aid Snuar; Report of Receipts. '

FOE THE TEAE ENDING APEIL 30th, 1891.

N E W Y O R K : P R I N T E D F O R T H E BOA RD , 26 R eade Stbeet .


HOSFORD & SONS. S tationers

and

P rinters.

se OEOAR ST.. N. V.


REPORT.

T h e Board of Foreign Missions respectfully presents to the General S ynod of the Reformed C hurch in America, its fiftyninth annual Report, and of its separate a nd independent action the thirty-fourth. T h e statements and figures it con­ tains are such as to challenge the most careful a nd prayerful consideration of the Synod. . W e gratefully acknowledge at the outset the continued " confidence a nd liberality of the Church, and the Providen­ tial care with which the Board itself and-all the missionaries a nd missions have been attended. T h e most serious cause of apprehension, occasioned by the alarming illness of the Rev. W . W . Scudder, D. D., Professor in the Theological S e m i ­ nary, in the Arcot Mission, has been relieved by later tidings of a m o r e encouraging nature, though it m a y be long before he is able to resume his duties in the Seminary. W e also recognize with devout thanksgiving the continued blessing w h i c h has, the past year, rested on the labors of our missionaries, in s o m e instances in a m a r k e d degree. ■ STATE OF THE MISSION’S. C h i n a .— T h e A m o y Mission has been seriously depleted in strength during the entire year by the absence in this country, for reasons of health, of nearly half its working force. It is indeed cause for gratitude that the wor k should not only not have suffered, but, bn the contrary, s h o w u n m i s ­ takable signs of progress. ’ . •A n e w church— to be k n o w n as the C h u r c h of Thian-san— has been organized by the Tai-hoey, consisting of the breth­ ren at Thian-po, Soa-sia a nd Leng-soa, formerly connected with the C h u r c h of Hong-san. Rev. Tiongsu-li, recently engaged as a missionary a m o n g the Hakkas, has been called as pastor of the n e w church. T h e n u m b e r of churches is, therefore, nine, all of which are provided with pastors! T h e


commu ni ca nt s n u m b e r 899, of w h o m eighty-six: were received during the year, on confession of their faith in Jesus Christ. T h e net gain in the m em be rs hi p is forty-four. A t one station, Tong-an, thirteen have been added to the m e m b e r ­ ship and sixty to the congregation. A t another, Poa-a, the n e w church building, costing about 81,500, of which the m e m b e r s contributed over 8300 in m o n e y and labor, and ac­ c o m m o d a t i n g 150 people, is crowded every Sunday. Between forty and fifty catechumens are there reported as under in­ struction a nd on probation for admission to the church. T w o n e w stations or regular preaching places have been opened during the year. T h e contributions of the churches were 82,900, a gain of nearly fourteen per cent. All these are signs of encouragement and progress. In educational work, the n u m b e r of parochial schools continues the same, eight, with 110 scholars. T h e girls’ boarding schools at A m o y a nd Sio-ke report forty-three p u ­ pils, the former having twenty-nine and the latter fourteen. T h e Charlotte W . Duryee W o m a n ’s H o m e has had thirty in attendance, the largest n u m b e r in any single year. Since its establishment, 114 w o m e n have availed themselves of the benefits of this useful training school; T h e absence from the field, during a large part of the year, of Mrs. a nd thei Misses T a l m a g e has thrown a vast a m o u n t of labor on Mrs. Kip, in connection with these schools, which, however, she has been enabled faithfully to perform. T h e usual visiting. tours a m o n g the w o m e n of the villages have, of necessity, been in­ termitted, but the early return of the Misses Talmage, together with the accession of two other y o u n g ladies re­ cently appointed, will add n e w strength a nd encouragement to this most important branch of mission work. T h e Middle school, for boys, rejoices in the acquisition of a fund of 85,868, for the purchase of g ro un d and the erection of suitable buildings, chiefly through the liberality of a n u m ­ ber of individuals in the C h u r c h and in response to the per­ sonal appeals of Mr. Pitcher. T h e desire of years is thus, in great measure, realized. A most eligible site has been secured at a cost of about 83,800 gold. O w i n g to a great a nd unexpected rise in the price of land on the Island of K o longsu, where all our mission buildings are located, the s u m obtained is not sufficient, after the purchase of the ground, to >


complete the building on a proper scale, and the Mission asks for $>2,000 or 83,000 more. It is earnestly hoped that friends of theworkwill.be willing to provide this additional sum. B y agreement, the English Presbyterian brethren undertake to m a k e similar provision for the Theological school, the two schools being under the joint care and conduct of the two missions, thus working in h a r m o n y together. O n these schools the missions rely for a supply of trained preachers and teachers, an indispensable condition of successful missionary labors everywhere. T h e “ Neerbosch Hospital,” at Sio-ke, has had a year of m a r k e d prosperity. T w o additions have been m a d e to the original building', the first of a verandah and two rooms for students; the second of an O p i u m Refuge. T h e peculiar condition and treatment of the victims of this pernicious drug require that they be separated from other patients. It is a gratifying indication of the favor with which this form of effort meets, that the m ea ns for these extensions should have been almost entirely provided by the natives themselves, the local M an da ri n having manifested the greatest interest in and furnished the funds for the Refuge. T h e interest felt in this institution by Christians in the Netherlands, also, has again been liberally manifested by a donation of 8340 through Mr. J. Van't Lindenhout, of Neerbosch. Other con­ siderable s u m s were likewise contributed, which were lost through the unfortunate failure of the former treasurer. T h r o u g h the kind interest of Mr. V a n ’t Lindenhout this experience is not likely to be repeated. 'As an evangelizing agency, the Mission declare this institution to be “ second to none in importance.” T h e wards for in-patients are nearly always full, from seventy to eighty out-patients c o m e for treatment on the proper days, and all are brought under the sound and influence of the gospel. • In d i a .— T h e Arcot Mission reports are s o m e w h a t defec­

tive at the time of writing, but e nough is k n o w n from those portions received to indicate a year of unusual prosperity. Progress is witnessed all along the line. T h e n u m b e r of stations is still the same, eight; but six n e w out-stations are reported, m a k i n g 104 in all. T h e c o m m u n i c a n t m em be rs hi p of the twenty-three churches is 1,777, which shows a net in-


■crease of 107., Thirteen n e w Tillages have been received under Christiari’,instruction, with the prospect of as*many m o r e being:received during the coming, year. ' In fact, still m o r e might have been received had'the 'men and m e a n s suf­ ficed. It is distressing to think that the Board has been c o m ­ pelled .to deny any increase in the appropriations to this important branch of the Mission’s labors.. • , . . . T h e schools of various grades all appear to be in a flourish-' ing4 condition..-. T h e n u m b e r of, scholars. in( the ill. dayschools (a gain of six schools), is 3,964, an increase of 398 over last year’s report. T h e total of adherents is 6,02ti, a gain of 530. T w o n e w pastors,.also, have been ordained ■duringjthe year, and it is expected that two .more.will be in September next. .Even fro m the defective statistics at hand, it is possible to speak of evangelistic w o r k to an extent which is specially- gratifying, the four stations of Arcot, M a d a n apalle, T in di va na m and Vellore reporting the proclamation of the Gospel in the hearing of the multitude, at 11,394 places, 22,673 times, a n d to audiences n u m b e r i n g in the aggregate 709,985. Ten s of thousands have visited the different reading-rooms and-there c o m e under the influence of the Gospel, as have also the 5,066 patients treated in the ^ Hospital at Ranipet. Surely the L o r d ’s people should pray earnestly,,in view of such facts as these, for the abundant out-pouring of, the H o l y Spirit to water and m a k e fruitful the seed of the W o r d thus widely sown. W h y should not still greater imgatherings be given in answer-to the prayer of faith?- , . • •• Special features abound- in this very encouraging report which are calculated to strengthen our faith and stimulate our zeal, and will well repay a study .of the station, reports herewith presented. A m o n g t h e m m a y be noted the fact that the C hu rc h at Arcot is supporting a missionary of its own, with the appropriate n a m e of “ Paul.’’ T h e good w o r k of the K i n g ’s Daughters, at Vellore, a nd that of the Y. P.”S.' C. E., at Madanapalle, are indications, in the sam e line, of n e w and- increased activity on the part of the; native Chris­ tians which-is full of promise for the future: ■ • •' The. Mission has, also, in the good providence of God, been able, to rejoice in the removal of a heavy.cloud which,-, for a time, pyershadowed it. Rev: W . W - Scudder, D. D., Pro-


lessor in the ’Theological Seminary, fro m overwork, was brought very low at the beginning of the year. F or s o m e days it appeared that his service in India, if not on- earth, was finished, a nd but faint hopes were entertained-of his re­ covery. A s a last resort he was sent to the Pulney Hills, where he speedily began to recover in a most wonderful m a n ­ ner. It is n o w hoped that he m a y be'able'to resume his ;dutiesVat least in' part, during the c o m i n g year. O w i n g to his illness he was temporarily relieved fro m duty in connection with the Seminary a nd Dr. Chamberlain t e m ­ porarily assigned to that position by the Mission, with the approval of the Board of Superintendents. It is felt, no doubt, rightly, that Dr. Scudder has thus been given back to life a nd usefulness in answer to the prayers of m a n y in India a nd this country.

Ja p a x .— T w o events of m o r e than ordinary importance have m a r k e d the year in J ap an — one of a political a nd the other of a religious character. T h e former, the assembling of the First National Diet, realizes the promise of the E m ­ peror and the hopes of the people, and forms.an epoch in the history of that remarkable nation. W h e n the small propor­ tion of Christians to the whole population of the E m p i r e is» borne in m i n d (about 30,000 to thirty-eight or forty millions), it is a surprising thing that thirteen out of 300 m e m b e r s of the Diet should be Christian men, one of w h o m was selected for the President of the lower H o u s e a nd another for C h a i r m a n of the C om mi tt ee of the Whole. S u c h facts are eloquent in their testimony to the influence of Christianity a nd the char­ acter of the native Christians. T h e second event referred to was the adoption, in D e c e m ­ ber, 1890, by the S yn od of the C h u r c h of Christ in Japan, formerly k n o w n as the United Church, of a new, or revised. Constitution and Confession of Faith. A n account of the steps which led to the present result, together with the C o n ­ fession finally adopted, f r o m the Fourteenth Report of the Council of Missions co-operating with the C h u r c h of Christ in Japan, is. herewith presented for the information of Synod. While it would, perhaps, be too m u c h to expect that so brief a formula will' bo satisfactory to all m in ds in this country, yet it is to be r em em be re d that it is the result of


long, earnest a nd sometimes heated discussion, not only, but also of m u c h earnest prayer for divine guidance. W h e n at­ tained, it was hailed with emotions and expressions of devout thankfulness, the entire Synod uniting in prayer a nd thanksgiving. T h e S y n o d of the Church of Christ m e t in the City of T o k y o o n D e ­ cember 3d. T h e session continued for a fortnight. It is c o m m o n l y agreed that the meeting will rank in importance with the one first held for the founding of the Church. T h e principal business w a s the con­ sideration of the Report of the Committee on the Revision of the C o n ­ stitution of the Church. T h e question of the revision of the Constitution h a d been before the Ch u r c h for a considerable time. S o m e six years a g o a committee w a s appointed to take the matter in h a n d ; but u p o n the opening of negotia­ tions with a view to organic union with the Congregational churches, the committee w a s released fr o m further service. W h e n , however, it b e c a m e apparent that the negotiations for union with the Congregationalists w o u l d prove fruitless, the Synod'(in M a y , 1889) appointed a n e w committee to resume the w o r k of the former committee. O n Ju n e 2d, 1890, the n e w committee published its w o r k -in Japanese and English, a n d distributed it throughout the Church. Six m o n t h s later (on D e c e m b e r 3d) the S y n o d assembled to take final action in the matter. “ T h e d o c u m e n t presented b y the Committee is divided into four parts, viz : Constitution, Canons, Articles of Faith a n d Appendix. T h e Constitution contains the fundamental principles of the Presbyterial system, a n d can be a m e n d e d only b y a carefully guarded process. T h e Canons are laws based u p o n these principles, a n d can be a m e n d e d b y a two-thirds vote of the S y n o d after d u e notice. T h e A p p e n d i x con­ tains forms of procedure, not binding, but added as helps to orderly administration. This distribution of matter w a s adopted as conducive to simplicity, clearness, flexibility, a n d a d u e distinction between things essential and things expedient. This part of the d o c u m e n t w a s adopted with various a m e n d m e n t s of minor importance ; but no change w a s m a d e affecting the integrity of the Preshyterial system. “ In presenting the d o c u m e n t to the S y n o d the committee o n revision m a d e the following statement regarding the Articles of Faith: ‘There is a wide-spread conviction that the Confessions of Faith prepared for the needs of the C h u r c h in E u r o p e in the seventeenth century are not perfectly adapted to its needs throughout the world at the close of the nineteenth century. T h e question of creed revision is therefore agitat­ ing the Presbyterian C h u r c h in England, Scotland and America. B u t the Church of Christ in J a p a n not only shares the need of revision c o m m o n to churches in Christian lands. It requires a statement of doc­ trine especially suited to its o w n environment; a n d the preparation of such a Confession of Faith is a w o r k not to be forgotten in the future. B u t from such a w o r k the Committee shrinks, agreeing that the best


service within its p o w e r is the selection fr o m a m o n g the various existing revisions of one that on the whole m a y c o m m e n d itself to the j u d g m e n t of the Church. After careful consideration it w a s finally decided to r e c o m m e n d the Articles n o w before the Presbyterian C h u r c h of E n g l a n d for adoption. Doubtless m a n y will be of the opinion that there are points in w h i c h these Articles m i ght be changed for the better. B u t the changes c o m m e n d i n g themselves to one will not c o m m e n d t h e m ­ selves to all; and, therefore, the committee unanimously agreed to present t h e m to the S y n o d without alteration.’ “ B u t before the S y n o d convened it w a s clear that there w a s a g r o w ­ ing feeling in favor of substituting the Apostles’ Creed for the English Articles ; and early in the session a motion to that effect w a s introduced. N o doubt the national spirit n o w dominant influenced the m inds of s o m e against the English Articles as being the w o r k of a foreign church. That, however, is b y no m e a n s the w hole explanation of the movement. T h e Standards of Doctrine adopted w h e n the United C h u r c h w a s organ­ ized were the Canons of the S y n o d of Dort, the Westminster Confession of Faith; the Shorter Catechism a n d the Heidelberg Catechism. F r o m the beginning there w a s a strong feeling that these documents do not form the right Confession for a C h u r c h in Japan. H o wever, out of deference to the j u d g m e n t of a majority of missionaries, they were adopted ; though at that time the Canons of the S y n o d of Dort, a n d the Westminster Confession were not accessible to a n y w h o could not read English. T h e C h u r c h w a s organized in October, 1877. In October 1880 these t w o documents were for the first time published in Japanese. A g a i n they were objected to ; a n d Mr. Ibuka gave notice that he w o u l d introduce a motion six m o n t h s later (as provided in the Constitution) to erase from the Constitution the w o rds ‘ the Canons of the S y n o d of Dort and the Westminster Confession of Faith.’ A t the meeting of the S y n o d held in April, 1881, this resolution w a s introduced. It is to be observed that the offering of this resolution w a s in effect a propo­ sition on the part of Mr. I b u k a a n d others to m a k e the t w o Catechisms the Confession of Faith of the Church. B u t in the j u d g m e n t of a majority of the missionaries it w a s advisable to retain the Canons of the S y n o d of Dort and the Westminster Confession. A n d again the point w a s yielded. “ T h u s the desire for the Apostles’ Creed h a d its roots in the past— in the old conviction that the needs of the C h u r c h in J a p a n should be the determining element in the adoption of a Confession for the Ch u r c h in Japan. T h e ar g u m e n t as n o w put is this: T h e C h u r c h of the Nicene age adopted the Nicene Creed. T h e churches of the Reformation adopted the Confessions of the Reformation. T h e Presbyterian Ch u r c h of E n g l a n d has just adopted the English Articles. T h e Presbyterian C h u r c h of America is n o w revising the Westminster Confession. T h e Church of Christ in Japan should follow these examples. It should adopt the Confession w h i c h its circumstances demand. “ S u c h being the case, w h a t are the characteristics necessary to a .


Confession to be adopted b y a C h u r c h of Christ in Japan at this era in its history ? r (1.) It should be simple and brief. M e n are constantly asking, w h a t are the doctrines of your church ? T h e y will not read a long d o c u m e n t in reply. (2.) It should be a Confession about w h ich the whole C h u r c h will rally— a Confession for pastor and people alike. This does not m e a n that the k n o w l e d g e of the pastor regarding the contents of the Confes­ sion should be no broader and no deeper than that of the children of his church. B u t all belong to one C h u r c h ; and there should be one C o n ­ fession— one banner for all. (3.) Su c h a Confession should be irenic. T h e C h u r c h in J a p a n is face to face with Buddhism, Confucianism, Agnosticism, Rationalism and radical Unitarianism. Its Confession of Faith should proclaim the whole difference between these things and Christ. It should set forth the great truths of historical Christianity. B u t it should not be a symbol of division a m o n g those w h o love a n d worship one L o r d Jesus Christ. T h e Apostles’ Creed meets all these conditions. It is simple! it is a Creed for all; and it is the Confession of the Universal C h u r c h . . “ In reply to this arg u m e n t for the adoption of the Apostles’ Creed and the Apostles’ Creed alone, the following w a s u r g e d : Admitting that a church should adopt a Confession suited to its needs, a n d a d ­ mitting also that very m u c h can be said in favor of the Apostles’ Creed, it still remains true that the Apostles’ Creed alone will not m e e t all the requirements of the case. There are doctrines of transcendent import­ ance for J a p a n to-day w hich are contained in the Apostles’ Creed only b y implication. T h e atonement, justification b y faith, sanctification, the w o r k of the H o l y Spirit and its necessity, the inspiration and supremacy of the Scriptures, are all of t h e m doctrines w'hich should be not only believed but proclaimed b y the Ohurch of Christ in Japan. M o r e than this, experience has s h o w n that it is possible to read into the Apostles’ Creed an unhistorical Unitarian interpretation. “ These points were presented with great clearness; and the S y n o d w a s satisfied that the Apostles’ Creed alone w o u l d not suffice. It w a s evident that a supplementary statement w a s needed. T h e suggestion w a s m a d e that it be in the form of an introduction to the Apostles Creed. Du r i n g the recess the following Confession w a s prepared; and on presentation to the Synod, it w a s adopted unanimously. It should be remarked, in passing, that the sacraments appear in the Constitution and Canons. “ C O N F E S S I O N O F FAITH.

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“ T h e L o r d Jesus Christ, w h o m w e worship as God, the only be­ gotten S o n of God, for us m e n and for our salvation w a s m a d e M a n and suffered. H e offered u p a perfect sacrifice for sin ; and all w h o are one with H i m b y faith are pardoned and accounted righteous ; a n d faith in H i m , working b y love, purifies the heart. “ T h e H o l y Ghost, who, with the Father and Son, is worshipped a n d glorified, reveals Jesus Christ to the soul, a n d without His grace man,


being dead in sin, cannot enter the k i n g d o m of God. B y H i m the Prophets and Apostles and holy m e n of old were inspired; and He, speaking in the Scriptures of the Old and JS e w Testaments, is the su­ p r e m e and infallible judge in all things pertaining unto faith and living. ‘‘ F r o m these H o l y Scriptures' the ancient Church of Christ d r e w its Confession ; a n d we, holding the faith once delivered to the saints, join in that Confession with praise a n d thanksgiving: “ I believe in God, the Father Almighty, M a k e r of H e a v e n and Earth. '“A n d in Jesus Christ, His only Son, O u r L o r d ; w h o w a s conceived b y the H o l y Ghost, born of the Virgin M a r y ; suffered under Pontius Pilate, w a s cfucifiecl, dead a n d buried ; H e decended into H a d e s ; tbe third day H e rose from the d e a d ; H e ascended into Heaven, and sitteth at the right hand-of .God, the Father A l m i g h t y ;• from thence H e shall c o m e to judge the quick and the dead. , “ I believe in the H o l y G h o s t ; the H o l y Catholic Chu r c h ; the c o m ­ m u n i o n of saints; the forgiveness of sins; the resurrection of the b o d y ; a n d the life everlasting. A men . ‘‘Another important action of the S y n o d w a s the change in the n a m e of the Church. This w a s accomplished b y dropping the w o r d ‘ United.’ T h e United Church of Christ in Japan becomes thus the Church of Christ in Japan. T h e United C h u r c h w a s originally formed b y the union of a Presbytery belonging to the General Ass e m b l y of the A merican Pres­ byterian C h u r c h (North); of w o r k connected with the Mission of the United Presbyterian Church, of Scotland, and of the first Protestan C h u r c h organized in Japan. T h e bo d y last n a m e d bore the title of the Church of Christ in Jwpan, a n d w a s the fruit of the labors of mission­ aries connected with the R e f o r m e d (Dutch) Church, and the American Presbyterian C h u r c h (North). T h e w o r d United w a s adopted to set forth the fact of union. T h e Japanese w o r d e m ployed to render the w o r d ‘United ’ has never been satisfactory, a n d no satisfactory substi­ tute has ever been suggested. This fact, together with a lasting affec­ tion for the old name, is the explanation of this action of the Synod. M a y the Church of Christ in Japan w a l k worthily of itssn a m e . ”

N o apology is offered, or is believed to be needed, for the length of these extracts. T h e Ref or me d C h u r c h has been too intimately associated with every step in the progress of this rising Church, fro m its very inception, and has con­ tributed too m u c h through its devoted missionaries a nd by its gifts and prayers, to be indifferent to this last and most important development. • T h e sam e causes which were mentioned last year have oper­ ated to retard the growth of the C h u r c h during the year n o w under review. To. these, also, are to be added the diversion of interest occasioned by the election and assembling of the


Diet, the failure of the rice crop and consequent scarcity of food, with the great poverty of the people. “ T h e rice famine pressed heavily not only on the very poor, but u p o n the middle classes as well. This tended to reduce schools, volunteer workers and contributions, and affected the atti­ tude of listeners to the Gospel.” Beside all these, there have been great religious distractions, caused by the presence and activity of Unitarians, Uuiversalists and P l y m o u t h brethren, who, entering in. have troubled the flock and unsettled the minds of many. T h a t under all these disturbing influences the O h u r c h should have so encouraging a report to present, is matter of devout thanksgiving. T h e additions by adult baptism were 1,077, and the total adult m em be rs hi p is n o w 9,314, a net gain of 360. There were also 153 infant baptisms. T h e n u m b e r of churches is seventy-one, an increase of three ; of ordained ministers forty-five, an increase of six; with ninetyone unordained preachers a nd helpers, including fifty licen­ tiates. O n e hundred S un da y schools are reported, with 7,000 scholars. T h e native contributions were, yen 16,658.09, or about 814,500 U. S. gold. T h e North Japan Mission is m u c h m o r e intimately associ­ ated with other missions and the native Church, in both e d u ­ cational a nd evangelistic work, than the Mission in the South. M u c h of the evangelistic wor k is under the care of the Evangelistic Com mi tt ee of the T o k y o -Presbyteries and the Domestic Board of Missions.o T o the treasury of the latter the Mission contributes one-fourth of the funds at its disposal, and m e m b e r s of the Mission act on the C om mi tt ee and share in the oversight of the work. Mr. Ballagh, h o w ­ ever, is largely engaged in w o r k of this character, and has s o m e eighteen or twenty out-stations or preaching places under his care. A t Morioka, with its t wo out-stations, Mr. Miller reports nine baptisms. A n interesting w o r k is carried on there, and also near Tokyo, in the prisons, under the direction of Messrs. Miller and Ballagh. • T h e Meiji Gakuin, or Christian College, at Tokyo, is the leading educational institution of the C h u r c h of Christ. There were during the year 188 students, of w h o m twentynine were in the Theological department; T h e class which graduated from this department n u m b e r e d nineteen, and was


the largest in its history. All of these y o u n g m e n were at once put to w o r k in the field, and thus a considerable expan­ sion of evangelistic work secured. Ferris Seminary continues its good work, although the n u m b e r of pupils is not increased by mor e than one. Of the 104 reported, forty-eight are Christian girls. T w o of the scholars, with the experienced and highly valued matron, died during the year. T h e teachers and scholars still m a n i ­ fest a delightful activity in Christian labors outside of the school. Seven Sunday-schools are sustained by them, in which about twenty of the older pupils are engaged. W i t h one exception, the expense of these schools is borne by the ‘' K i n g ’s Daughters.” Largely through Miss D e y o ’s efforts, the various circles of this beautiful order have n o w been united in a general society. T h e South Japan Mission has had a year of mingled trial a nd encouragement.’ Several of its m e m b e r s suffered m u c h from sickness, Mr. Demarest’s labors were withdrawn, and for a part of the year the Sturges Seminary was left entirely to Miss Irvine, while Mr. Peeke has had charge of the Steele Memorial. In September, however. Miss L a n t e r m a n was able to join the Mission, which was also enabled to secure the services of Mr. Ohgimi. T h e health of the sick was greatly benefitted by a temporary absence. O n the field, also, there were signs of unusual faithfulness and efiBciency on the part of several of the preachers, a nd places that h ad long lain dor­ m a n t showed signs of awakening to n e w life. This depart­ m e n t of labor is n o w in the efficient hands of Mr. Oltmans. Negotiations are in progress by which it is h o p e d the co-oper­ ation of the O saka Mission of the Presbyterian C hu rc h (North) will be secured for both the educational and evange­ listic work of this large and needy field. > Three churches, Nagasaki, K a g o s h i m a and Matsura, are connected with this Mission, having 210 adult members. Twenty-seven adults were baptized during the year. There are also nineteen out-stations or preaching places unddr the care of the Mission. W o r k was carried on by the students of Steele Memorial at six places during the s u m m e r vacation, most of t h e m in the vicinity of Nagasaki. This work, though of necessity temporary in its nature, benefits the students


and opens the w a y for m o r e permanent labors, and is thus of indisputable value. • •■ _ T h e condition of the Sturges Seminary is one of the speci­ ally encouraging.features of the year. While other schools of a similar character have h ad to deplore the loss of pupils, the n u m b e r of boarders in Sturges mor e than doubled, being thirty-four at last accounts. Miss L a n t e r m a n was added to the teaching force in October, and the wor k of the school has proceeded with high hope and great encouragment. M u c h interest has been manifested in the wor k of the Y o u n g W o m e n ’s Christian Association. In the Steele Memorial, two students were graduated from the Theological department a nd are now. occupying stations in the field. There are ten students in that department at present. Three were also graduated from the Academical department, which n o w n u m b e r s fifty-three, a m u c h smaller n u m b e r than last year, but the falling off has been entirely in the preparatory classes. T h e w o r k of the year has m et with som e discouragements, from the prevalence of sickness, the slow return of the scholars a nd the withdrawal of Mr. Oltmans for the evangelistic w o r k of the Mission. B u t en­ couragements also were found, and the Mission is satisfied that the m o v e m e n t of the year has been forward. WANTS OF THE MISSIONS.

T h a t all the Missions need help is always true, and is likely to be, so long as the w o r k continues to gro w as it has done. T h r o u g h the kind intervention of the proprietors of the Christian Intelligencer, to which the B oa rd is greatly in­ debted for this and other services, their present and pressing needs have been -recently presented to the C h u r c h in the columns of that paper, in a series of letters from the field. Provision is m a d e in the appropriations for the c o m i n g year for the satisfaction of a part of these wants. A brief s u m ­ m a r y of w h a t yet remains to be done in order to meet t h e m will not be improper or unimportant here. F o r the A m o y Mission, then, is needed another lady, w h o should be a physician, having her residence and a dispensary on Kolongsu, and a hospital for w o m e n in A m o y . Should Mr. Rapalje be unable to return to the field, as n o w seems


likely, another missionary will also be needed to fill the vacancy thus occasioned. A n addition of funds is also de­ sired for the Middle School building and other important uses, to the a m o u n t of at least $5,000. ' T h e Arcot Mission puts in its claim for six or seven more missionaries to occupy important stations, care for the rapidly growing wor k a m o n g the villages, and relieve those w h o are already in the field from the crushing burden of labors which rests u p o n t h e m and under which two of t h e m have recently succumbed. T h e y also ask for several unmarried ladies to assist those n o w engaged in school work which is m u c h too great for them. F or the North J apan Mission three missionaries are asked for, with three or four single ladies to engage in labors a m o n g the w o m e n . S u c h labors have been prosecuted under great difficulties by the ladies connected with the Ferris Seminary, with encouraging success, and an almost boundless field awaits n e w comers. Perhaps the most imperative call of all is for a missionary for the South J ap an Mission, to assist Mr. Oltmans in evan­ gelistic work. T h e S yn od directed the Board, two years ago, to send such a man , but the state of the treasury has never permitted it to be done. It is an encouragement to meet this call, that the Mission give the assurance that, should the Presbyterian brethren unite with ours in the working of this field, as is hoped, this provision will be suffi-. cient, save as vacancies m a y arise, needing to be filled. T h e y also ask for a single lady to w o r k a m o n g the w o m e n . ' T o s u m u p :â&#x20AC;&#x201D; These appeals call for ten, and possibly eleven ordained missionaries a n d ten single ladies, one of t h e m a physician. A n d it should be carefully noted that they are all the result, not of enlargement of the field or u n d u e expansion in it, but of the healthy development and gracious growth of the wor k hitherto prosecuted and blessed of God. FURTHER STEPS T OWARD UNION.

In connection with the Missionary Conference, held at .Shanghai, in May, 1890, a proposition was m a d e to unite all the different branches of the Presbyterian and Reformed Churches in China in a single national Church. H o w e v e r


desirable such a union might be on general grounds, yet, in view of the great differences in dialect which are found in som e of the provinces, it was felt by our brethren at A m o y to be impracticable at present. T h e y have, however, entered heartily into the proposition to institute such a union a m o n g the Churches a n d Missions in South China, comprising the Presbyterian C h u r c h (North) at Canton ; the Presbyterian C h u r c h of Canada, in F o r m o s a j the English Presbyterian C h u r c h at A m o y and SvVatow, and our o w n A m o y Mission. S o m e such basis as the following is proposed : ’ “ 1. Th a t the united church to be formed shall be a Native Church, entirely independent of the H o m e churches represented b y the Missions in China. “ 2. T h a t foreign missionaries shall retain their full connection with the churches at H o m e , and shall be subject in all respects to the discip­ line of their courts. “ 3. T h a t those foreign missionaries w h o have been ordained to the ministry or the eldership shall have seats as assessory m e m b e r s in the Native C h u r c h courts, having the full right of deliberating and voting ; but, that, while provision be m a d e for duly safeguarding the rights of the Native Church, such missionaries shall not be subject to the dis­ cipline of its courts. ‘•4. T h a t the adoption of doctrinal standards be reserved for the mature consideration of the united church, doctrinal unity being in the m e antime secured b y , the h a r m o n y of the present standards of the several churches concerned.”

* I ' ^ A t the meeting of tbe Tai-hoey, kheld in M a r c h of the present year, delegates from the S w a t o w Tai-hoey were present. T h e y brought proposals for union which were favorably received, and a committee was appointed to confer with one from their o w n body. It was also resolved to c o m ­ municate with Canton on the same business. A s is well k nown, union has long been a practically accomplished fact at A m o y , a nd the present proposals do but look to the exten­ sion of that which already prevails. In this view it has m e t the cordial approval of the Board, of which the Mission has been assured. So far as the Board is advised, no further steps toward union have yet been taken in India, though the subject is receiving needed and careful discussion in India and a m o n g the h o m e churches. In cases such as these, delay is better than u n d u e haste. ’


PROPOSED N E W

MISSIONS.

In January last the Board received a proposition from re­ sponsible parties of k n o w n liberality in N e w Y o r k city, agree­ ing to furnish the generous s u m of 85,000 on condition a nd for the purpose of establishing a Mission of the R eformed C h u r c h in Korea. In view of the great needs of the w o r k already in hand, and the fact that the offer was accompanied by no pledges for the future maintenance of such a Mission w h e n once established, the Board felt itself reluctantly c o m ­ pelled to decline the generous proposition. Thus, for a second time, has the opportunity presented itself of helping to carry the Gospel to that interesting country and been declined. A request was received from the Dai Kwai, or Synod of the C h u r c h of Christ in Japan, praying the Board to send missionaries to H a k od at e and Sapporo, in the island of Yezo. or the Hokkaido. A s this would have been virtually the es­ tablishment of a n e w Mission, this request was also declined. MEMBERS A N D OPEICERS OF THE BOARD.

Rev. W . H. Clark resigned his m em be rs hi p in the Board early in the year. Rev. J. H . Whitehead, of the Classis of Paramus, was elected to fill the vacancy thus occasioned. , N o other changes have occurred. T h e m e m b e r s appointed by the General Synod, in June, 1890, were duly elected m e m b e r s of the corporation at the meeting next following the adjournment of Synod. T h e term of office of the follow­ ing m e m b e r s expires with this session of the Synod: Rev. “ “ “

A. P. V a n Gieson, D.D, C. L. Wells, D.D., M. H . Hutton, D.D., W . R. Davis, D.D.,

Rev. J. F. Riggs, Mr. D. Jackson Stewaid. H o n . N. F. Graves, Mr. Jas. A. Seward.

AGENCIES EMPLOYED.

B u t one Synodical Conference was held during the j'ear_ that of the Particular S yn od of Albany, at Saugerties, N. Y. In the other Synods it was determined to hold special mis­ sionary sessions in connection with their regular meetings in the spring. T h e results of this method, so far as k n o w n at


the time of writing this report, do not appear to be satisfac­ tory. It is believed, however, that the time has fully c o m e w h e n another General Conference should be held, with as large an attendance as possible, and representing the whole Reformed Church. T h e w o r k grows and presses. Present means are inadequate— the indebtedness of- the Board has assumed alarming proportions. T o remove this and provide adequately for the work, if it is still to be carried on, the in­ terest of the whole C hurch needs to be aroused a nd stimu­ lated anew. T h e first General Conference, held in 1881, was followed by most signal benefits, and, doubtless, contributed m u c h to the great growth apparent in the intervening years. It is believed that similar results m a y be hoped for from a n ­ other such Conference under authority and direction of the Synod. 1 Frequent visits to the churches have been m a d e and faith­ ful labors performed by Dr. Verbeck and Mr. Demurest from Japan, Mr. V a n D y c k and Mr.-Rapalje fro m China and Mr. Conkling from India, during the whole or parts of the year. A large n u m b e r of congregations have thus been able to c o m e face to face with the missionaries, and hear from their o w n lips of the wonderful works of God. Misses M. E. and K. M. Talmage, also, and Miss M. L. W i n n have rendered valu­ able service, chiefly a m o n g the ladies of the Church. “ T h e Sketch of the Japan Mission,” by Dr. A m e r m a n , has „ been translated into D u t c h by Mr. Albertus Pieters and issued from the press. Also the following leaflets in English: “ History of a Zenana Teacher,” by Miss Julia C. Scudder ; ‘■ ' W o m a n in China,” by Miss M . E. T a l m a g e ; and “ A S un da y in China,” by Mrs. Fagg. O n the suggestion of a former missionary of the Board, n o w a pastor in this country, T h e Foreign Missionary Prayer League of the Reformed C h u r c h was organized late in the year 1899. 'Two leaflets have been issued in, connection with it: " T h e Foreign Missionary Prayer League,” stating the purpose of the League, and “ Definite Prayer,” by the Rev. Peter Stryker, D. D. T h e purpose of the simple organiza­ tion, “ T o unite G o d ’s people in abundant and prevailing prayer” in behalf of this important branch of Christian w o r k , c o m m e n d s it to the sympathy of all w h o are interested in its promotion. T h o u g h the n u m b e r of m e m b e r s has


hardly equalled expectations, yet it is gratifying to note that its influence has been already widely extended, reaching to other churches a nd distant lands. T h e subject it emphasizes is, of all others pertaining to this work, the most important. A circular letter was sent to pastors in December, lb90, stating the condition of the treasury at that time, the great need of funds, a n d asking for special aid. T h e response, though generous in som e quarters, by no m ea ns equalled that of the previous year. Mission boxes, barrels, pails and jugs have been issued to the n u m b e r of 1,751. T h e entire n u m b e r sent out by'the Board from the beginuing is 22,680. MISSIONARY LECTURESHIP.

T h e generous provision m a d e by H o n . N. F. Graves for a Missionary Lectureship at the Theological Seminary in N e w Brunswick has been continued. T h e lectures for this year were delivered by the Rev. A r t h u r ! 1. Pierson, D.D., to large a nd deeply interested audiences. F or the next year’s course „ the services of Rev. A. J. Gordon, D.D., of Boston, have been secured. THE W O M A N ’S BOARD.

It is always a pleasure to speak of the service rendered by this admirable and efficient auxiliary. In 1881 the cost of the w o r k carried on by the Board for girls and w o m e n , exclu­ sive of the salaries of the ladies conducting it, was estimated to be about 85,500, and for this a m o u n t the W o m a n ’s Board then m a d e itself responsible. T h e cost of the same w o r k has since risen to about $8,500, while the salaries of the u n m a r ­ ried ladies a m o u n t to $8,750 more. M o r e than e n o u g h to provide for all is n o w annually received from the treasury of the W o m a n ’s Board. Its contributions to the treasury of this Board for the year just closed were $18,396.80. Its re­ ceipts for the sam e period were $19,413.90, and the total a m o u n t from the beginning $209,931. Twenty-six- Auxiliaries, with fourteen Y o u n g Ladies’ S o ­ cieties a nd Mission B a n d s were organized during the year, m a k i n g the entire n u m b e r of such societies and bands n o w in connection with the Board 327. It is m u c h to be desired


that such a society m a y soon be found in every church in the denomination. Wherever they exist, interest in the wor k of missions increases. MOVEMENTS OF MISSIONARIES. '

T h e Rev. G. F. Verbeck, D.D., with the approval of the Board, spent several m o n t h s during the s u m m e r of 1890 in the Netherlands. H e was everywhere cordially welcomed, addressed large audiences in m a n y places, and offerings m a d e at' these meetings, a mo un ti ng to m o r e than $400, were for­ w arded to the Board after his return. In January, 1891, he returned to Japan. O n account of the seriously impaired health of Mrs. Pitcher, Rev. P. W . Pitcher returned to this country bringing his family. D uring his short stay of a few months, he gave h i m ­ self to the w o r k of securing the funds needed for a building for the Middle School at A m o y . T h e a m o u n t obtained has ' reached the s u m of $5,868.49. Mr. Pitcher returned to C hina in October, without his family. Rev. D. Rapalje was compelled to leave the field in China by the failure of Mrs. Rapalje’s health, to the great regret of the Board, the Mission and themselves. T h e question of the possibility of his return to China is not yet decided. For a like reason and with similar regrets, Rev. N. H. Demarest was obliged to relinquish the service of the C hu rc h in Japan, and in December, 1890, was dismissed from his connection with the Board to assume the pastorate of a church at home. • Misses M. E. a nd K . M . Talmage, after taking a year of well-earned rest at home, will probably return to China in the latter part of this year. ' Miss M. Leila W i n n , of the Ferris Seminar}', returned to this country on furlough in the s u m m e r of 1890. She expects to resume her w o r k in J a p a n in the c oming fall. REINFORCEMENTS.

B u t three additions have been m a d e to the force in the field during the year. Mr. H e n r y J. Scudder was sent to the Arcot Mission, India, in response to an earnest special appeal of that Mission, to assume charge of the Arcot A cademy.


T h e school was placed in his hands in October, and he has entered on his work with zeal. Miss Ida S. Scudder was appointed to the sam e Mission, to assist in school work at Tindivanam, and proceeded to the field with her brother, H. J. Scudder. T h e removal of Miss B r o k a w to Y o k o h a m a caused a vacancy in the Sturges Seminary at Nagasaki, which was filled by the appointment and sending out of Miss Carrie B. Lanterman, of Oxford, N. J. S he was gladly welcomed and entered heartily on her wor k in October, 1890. APPOINTMENTS.

Mr. Albertus Pieters, of the Western Theological S e m i ­ nary, has been appointed to the Steele Memorial School at Nagasaki, a nd will proceed thither, it is hoped, during the c o m i n g s u m me r. This appointment was rendered absolutely necessary by the withdrawal of Mr. Demarest from the M is­ sion and of Mr. Oltmans from the school in, order to take u p the evangelistic work thus left without a superintendent. Miss E m m a J. Kollen, a teacher in the Northwestern Classical A c a d e m y , was also appointed to the South J apan Mission, to which she expects to go as Mrs. Pieters. Miss Nellie Zwemer, of Middleburgh, Iowa, a n d Miss Elizabeth M . Cappon, of Holland, Mich., have been c o m m i s ­ sioned to the A m o y Mission, to assist in school w o r k and the visitation of heathen w o m e n , in connection with the stations at A m o y and Sio-ke. Mr. L. B. Chamberlain, of the N e w Brunswick Theological Seminary, has been appointed to the Arcot Mission, where his services are greatly needed. H e expects to leave for the field in July. Miss M a r y E. Anable,of N e w Brunswick, has been appointed to the Arcot Mission, where she expects to labor as the wife of Rev. William I. Chamberlain. FINANCES.

T h e most difficult part of this report has n o w been reached. Y e t it is not without its o w n great encouragements. Receipts.— T h e total receipts into the treasury from all sources, exclusive of interest on the Arcot Theological S e m i ­


nary E un d, a m o un te d to $116,265.44. This is inclusive of the special gifts for the A m o y Middle School, which, as has been stated, a m o u n t e d to $5,868.49. Excluding this, the receipts fro m the usual sources were $110,396.95, of w hi ch the churches contributed $46,980.40; the S unday schools, $11,776.87; individuals, through churches, $15,307.17 ; individuals, not through churches, $7,567.80; from mis­ cellaneous sources (including $11,073.32 in gross s u m s fro m the W o m a n ’s Board and $250 from the A merican Bible Society) were received $15,009.61 ; and from legacies, $13,­ 755.10. O f the last amount, fro m legacies, an addition was m a d e to the Security F u n d of $12,000, at a cost of $12,840. T h e whole a m o u n t applicable to the appropriations was about $96,500. It is worthy of note that the entire receipts are only $824.69 less than those of last year, w h e n they reached the largest s u m for the general w o r k k n o w n in the history of the Board. Nothing has been added to the principal of the Theological Seminary F u n d of the Arcot Mission, which re­ mains $49,575.06, as at the last report.

Expenditures.— There has been expended during the year the total a m o u n t of $129,626.17. This has been distrib­ uted as follows : F or the A m o y Mission (including the Middle School funds), $28,128.31; for the Arcot Mission, $36,204.41; for the N o r t h »Japan Mission, $29,072.76 ;, for the South J ap an Mission, $14,963.21 ; for additions to the Security F und, $12,840 ; and for h o m e expenses, $8,417.48. T h e h o m e expenses include : F o r salaries, $3,595.15 ; for rent of office, $632.52; for traveling, in visiting the churches, by missionaries and the Corresponding Secretary, $592.65 ; for printing A n n u a l Reports, $512 ; other printing, as tracts, leaflets and circulars, $257.25 ; mite boxes, barrels, pails and jugs, $176.61; for deficiency on the Mission Field, $146.72 ; for postage, $178; a nd for interest on loans, $1,910.15. T h e debt to be carried over to the c o m i n g year is $30,000, which is $13,500 m o r e than last year. T h e balance in the treasury is $2,165.85. Appropriations.— T h e appropriations for the current year have caused the Board great anxiety. T o meet the estimates of the Missions,fill vacancies a nd furnish only a small portion of the help needed in addition, required the s u m of $125,000.


T h e s e were the figures presented to the Board by its Finance C om mi tt ee as the result of a careful survey of the whole ground. N o t hi ng was included which did not seem to be de­ m a n d e d by the best interest of the several Missions, nothing for enlargement of the field in any direction. T h e expecta­ tion of so large a sum, however, seemed impossible, a nd the Executive C om mi tt ee were directed to reduce t h e m to a s u m not exceeding SI 15,000. A s finally reported and adopted they are as follows : F or the A m o y Mission. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 824,309 s: u Arcot “ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32,685 u North Japan Mission. . . . . . . . . . 31,769 “ “ South “ “ . . . . . . . . . . 15,335 2,000 “ Interest on L o a n s ....'.. . . . . . . . . . . “ Other H o m e E xpenses. . . . . . . . . . . 6,282 Total. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8112,38o T o these have since been added, in small a m o u n t s to the various Missions, a total of 82,550, m a k i n g the entire appro­ priations 8114,930, or, almost the precise s u m to which they were limited by the Board. T h e circumstances were such as to m a k e it impossible to refuse these additional amounts, and others, not considerable, m a y be expected. It is impossible to avoid t h e m in a wor k like this, from the very nature of the case. ' NO REASON FOR DISCOURAGEMENT.

Q

T h e present status m a y seem discouraging. It is not so in fact. A careful study of the figures above given will show that the year has been, on the whole, even in financial m a t ­ ters, as successful as could be reasonably expected. While the debt is nominally increased by 813,500, the increase is m o r e apparent than real. T w o important objects, of p e r m a ­ nent value, have been secured, the cost of which, if applied on the appropriations, would have mor e than m e t the e xpen­ ditures of the year. These are the Middle School at A m o y a nd the addition of 812,000 to the Security Fund. ' T h e proposition to add unspecified legacies to this fund, until it should reach the s u m of 880,000, m e t the approval of the last General Synod. It is believed, also, that it c o m ­ m e n d s itself to all the judicious friends of the Board. It is by


m e a n s of this fund that the work is carried on during a large part of the year. Without it, that w o r k must c o m e to an end. T n e s u m that was sufficient for the purpose ten years ago is altogether insufficient now. So long as this .state of things continues it will be necessary for friends of the Board to interpose their personal credit to supply its deficiencies. It is in every w a y better that the fund should be large enough to meet all the probable d e m a n d s upon it. It n o w amounts to $53,000, and from information in the possession of the Board, other considerable additions to it are likely to be m a d e during the c o m i n g year. Should the present exigency m o v e individuals within the C hurch to enlarge this fund by timely gifts for this purpose, the end in view will the sooner be reached. T h e a m o u n t just added will be a great advan足 tage during the c om in g slimmer. It is also to be observed that if the churches had m et the apportionments of the year there would have been little or n o deficiency. O f this they have fallen about $19,000 short. A GREAT W O R K BEFORE US.

F r o m a survey of the Missions and their wants, and a re足 view of the necessary expenditures of the last year, it is evident that w e have a great w o r k on our hands. T h e Board feels constrained to state its conviction that the Missions cannot be carried on, as n o w constituted, for a less s u m than $ 1 15,000cyearly, and this a m o u n t ought, for the present at least, to be realized from gifts alone. This can be done if the present apportionments are m e t by the churches, the average receipts from outside gifts and miscellaneous sources being for five years, $10,600, and for last year $11,500. This fact the C h u r c h should look carefully in the face. A n d it is to be r em em be re d that this enlarged d e m a n d does not arise from any adoption of n e w missions, (which have been resolutely declined, however desirable their adoption m a y have appeared) nor from any forced expansion of those ^already under our care. It is simply the result of success and the blessing of God, in the work to which w e have intelligently put our hands. W e have prayed that they might grow, and they have grown, not in a forced but in a healthy manner, not all they might, but all that w e have


allowed t h e m to by the provision w e have m a d e for them. Tha t w e have m a d e large and generous provision, relatively to our strength, is true and heartily acknowledged. B u t the sam e m e n are at the front, the sam e or like opportuni­ ties are before them, and the sam e gracious influences are still descending from above u p o n the fields they cultivate. W e cannot, therefore, expect the growth to cease nor the d e m a n d it m a k e s upo n us. T h e two things m u s t and will go hand in hand. W e ought not to wish it otherwise. SET THE STANDARD FORWARD.

T o meet and provide for this growth will require still larger a mo un ts of willing offerings. Seven years ago, at G r a n d Rapids, the Synod, in a spirit of large faith and look­ ing forward, planted the standard at 8100,000. Tha t limit w e have reached and passed. It can be a standard no longer, except for retreat. T o the Board it would seem that the time has fully c o m e to set it forward at least to 8125,000. J ud gi ng from experience, w e shall not attain to it till it be­ comes absolutely needed. Manifestly, this would be a great undertaking for us. A n d as manifestly, it m a y be viewed in two opposite ways ; as a great burden, and so the source of great discouragement, or, as a great privilege, a “ grace given,” to be so greatly used in preaching a m o n g m e n the unsearchable riches of Christ. T h e n it will b ecome to us a great inspiration of gratitude, love and duty. NO OTHER COURSE OPEN.

T h e Board is the creature of the Synod, the agent and servant of the Church. A s such it sustains a two-fold rela­ tion a nd responsibility, first to the Church, a n d second to the Missions and the cause they represent. In promoting, within reasonable limits and with the exercise of necessary caution, the interests of the latter, it has believed itself to be best serving the former. If its view of wha t should have been done, or of wha t should n o w be done, is erroneous, it is at all times open to the correction and restraint of the Synod, and is also at all times ready.to yield its j u d gm en t and even surrender its trust, if it shall be judged to have


exceeded the proper bounds of its stewardship. Y e t it can足 not repress the conviction that, to whatever c o m p a n y of Christian m e n the C h u r c h shall confide it, they could not c o m e into frequent and direct contact wilh the w o r k nor long be brought into direct and confidential communication with the noble band of workers, listen to their recitals of successes a nd opportunities and their appeals for aid, feel the pressure of constantly increasing need and opportunity and receive the applications of qualified and devoted m e n and w o m e n for the service which calls for them, and adopt any other course than that which it has pursued., F or itself, a nd till otherwise instructed, the Board can see but one course still to be maintained. It is to go resolutely forward as the Lord shall lead and His people provide the m e a n s ; not seeking to be rid of a burden, not so regarding the pressure of the w o r k ; but seeking to prove ourselves worthily re足 sponsive to the calls which G o d in His providence brings to our ears, and to the great blessings already bestowed u p o n us in this service ; grateful also to H i m for the high privilege of being so highly and largely used in it. N o r are w e ready to believe that the C h u r c h is otherwise minded, if w e m a y judge from the temper of that portion of it with which the Board is brought most closely and fre足 quently in contact. W H A T IS HEEDED.

. W h a t the C h u r c h will do it m u s t itself decide. W h a t is chiefly needed is that the spirit which animates a portion should fill and m o v e the entire church. This m u s t be the gift of God, and to this end the first requisite is a return to prayer. T h e Board would suggest, therefore, as a helpful stimulus, that the Synod earnestly r e c o m m e n d to the several churches to set apart the first S un da y in N o v e m b e r next (the 1st) as a day of special prayer for a nd instruction concerning our o w n Missions and the w o r k of Missions in general. Tha t it be also r e c o m m e n d e d that, wherever possible, one or m o r e special meetings be held during the succeeding w e e k with reference to this object; or, if this be not possible, that the usual weekly services be. devoted to its consideration, and that special offerings be m a d e in all our churches at this time


for the advancement of the work. If the entire C hu rc h could be thus brought to simultaneous prayer and effort in this direction m u c h good mus t result. A s has been so often set forth in these reports, the object to be aimed at, and which w e ought never to rest satisfied without attaining, is that every m e m b e r of every church a nd Sunday-school be brought in s o m e way into hearty s ympathy and effective co-operation in the work of giving the Gospel to the nations according to their ability. T o this important subject the Board is giving increased thought and attention, and it is well worthy— does it not d e m a n d ?— the most care­ ful consideration of the Synod and the churches. conclusion.

'

It was the saying of our blessed Lord Himself : " Y e can discern the face of the sky, but can ye not discern the signs of the times ?” It was the saying of Rev. Dr. Rufus Anderson, so long the distinguished Secretary of the A m e ri ca n Board, that “ T h e C h u r c h is always slow to recognize the call of G o d in His providence to m o v e forward.” W e m u s t be slow a nd blind, indeed, if w e cannot discern the signs of the times in which w e live, nor recognize His call, louder than ever before, to a forward m o v e m e n t such as the world has never seen. A m o n g all the m a n y signs that foretoken such a m ov em en t, two of the greatest significance have m a r k e d the year just closed. In May, 1890, there assembled in Shanghai, China, a C o n ­ ference of Protestant Missionaries, representing 1,285 Chris­ tian workers in that Empire, of w h o m 432 were in atten­ dance. F r o m this Conference there issued an appeal— earnest, solemn a nd well-reasoned— to Christian churches throughout the world for 1,000 missionaries to be sent to China within the next five years. In all the heathen world the conditions are substantially the same, and from all quar­ ters c o m e similar appeals for help— help for the heathen per­ ishing in their ignorance a nd blindness, help for the laborers overburdened, help for the Lord against the mighty. O n the other hand, there m e t in the City of Cleveland, Ohio, in M a r c h of this year, a Convention of m o r e than 500 student volunteers for missionary service, representing 159


institutions of learning in this country and Canada, and a great body of 6,200 students who, like themselves, had signed the volunteers’ pledge: “ W e are willing and,desirous, G o d permitting, to b ecome foreign missionaries.” M o r e than 300 of t h e m are already in the field. In increasing n u m be rs they are sure to c o m e before the churches in succeeding years, saying, Here we are, send u s ! W e would go far hence unto the gentiles.” Suc h signs as these, and m a n y others m ight be given, ought surely to give us a clearer comprehension of G o d ’s great and rapidly unfolding plans for the evangelization of this lost world, confirm our faith in His promises a n d fire our zeal to do what in us lies, far m o r e than w e have attempted yet, to hasten that glorious con su mm at io n to which all things are tending and for which the whole creation waits. App ro ve d and adopted by the Board, N e w York, M a y 20, 1891. H E N R Y N. C O B B ,

Corresponding Secretary.


T H E A M O Y MISSION. FOUNDED 1842. Missionaries.— "Revs.

J. V. N. Talmage, D.D., Daniel Rapalje, L. W . Kip, D.D., A. S. V a n Dyck, P. VV. Pitcher, J. G. Fagg. Medical Missionary.— J. A. Otte/M.D. Assistant Missionaries.— Mrs. Talmage, Mrs. Kip, Miss M. E. Talmage, Miss K. M. Talmage, Mrs. Rapalje. Mrs. Pitcher, Mrs. V a n Dyck, Mrs. Otte, Mrs. Fagg. Native Pastors.— Rovs. U n g Ho-Seng, 1st C h u r c h of A m o y ; Ti-Peng, tfd C h u r c h of A m o y ; lap Han-Chiong, of the Church of Sio-Ke: C h n o a Thian-Khit, of the C h u r c h of Chiang Chiu ; L i m Khiok, of the Ch u r c h of Chioh-be ; Li Ki-Che, of the Chur c h of O - K a n g ; lu Ho-Sui, of the C h u r c h of H o n g Sau ; L i m Chi-Seng, of the Chur c h of Tong-an ; Tiong Su-Li, of the Church of Thian-sau. Native Helpers.— 18. Regular Preaching Places.— 23, and one ( “ T h e Douglas Memorial C h u r c h “ on Kolongsu) shared by the two Missions.

Theological Students.— 3. Teachers.— 9.

...

Total. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

855 86 80 75 35 10 899 50 59 71 $2,900 1 16 18 2 19 2,429 888 79 26 23 29 4 939 60 58 73

Eng. Pres Mission. . . .

18 15 17 5

* Adults baptized.

Total Contributions.

2 11 14 4

CHURCHES.

Suspended.

92 140 62 101 65 140 62 193

T he A moy T ai-Hoey .

Infants baptized.

Received on Certificate.

M e m b e r s at close of year.

Received on Confession.

First, A m o y . . . . . . . . . Second, A m o y ...... Chioh-be . . . . . . . . . . . O - K a n g (a). . . . . . . . . H o n g - S a n (b). . . . . . . . Chiang-Chiu (c). . . . . . T o n g - A n (d). . . . . . . . . Sio-ke (e). . . . . . . . . . . Thian-San (}). . . . . . . .

1890.

Dismissed. Died. Excommunicated.

M e m b e r s at beginning of year.

• || || ||

Schools.— Middle, 1, under the care of the t w o Missions ; total pupils, 20: con­ nected with our Churches, 10. W o m a n ’s, “ T h e Charlotte W . Duryee H o m e , * ’ pupils, 30 : Girls’ Schools, 2. pupils, 43 ; Parochial Schools, 8, pupils, 110.

2 2 i 88 10 3 2 3 3 2 141 7 3 7 3 1 73 9 10 11 100 5 2 3 4 9 4 2 59 6 5 1 69 2 88 5 2 18 4 1 3 2 75 2 14 13 7 2 209 6 7 17 8 3 2 66 63

$298 622 255 260 281 223 279 452 230

Total T a i - H o e y . . . . . . 1762 165 106 98 65 14 1856 112 117 144 $5,345 • (a) tf>) station (c)

id) (e) teng. (f)

C o m p o s e d of t w o congregations ; Kang-tau a n d Kio-tau. C o m p o s e d of two congregations ; Te-soa a n d Ang-tung-tau, a n d one out; Te-tau. H a s one out-station ; Chhoa-poa. H a s two out-stations; Poa-tau-chhi a n d Ko-soa. H a s six out-stations; Ixim-sin, Poa-a, Toa-Khe, Soa-pi, E-che a n d To-loH a s t w o out-stations; Soa-sia, Leng-soa.

*


Rev. J o h n G-. F a g g writes, for the Mission : T h e d a y of China’s redemption does not hasten. It is still a land of darkness and the s h a d o w of death. Clouds of densest superstition brood over her broad valleys a n d skirt every mountain slope. B u t the daystar from on high has d a w n e d on ancient Sinim. T h e people that sit in darkness are seeing a great light. T h e streaks of light shimmering on the horizon are shooting higher a n d in­ tensifying in brightness with every succeeding year. So w e w a t c h and wait, a n d work, a n d pray for the co m i n g of the all-illuminating day. It devolves u p o n us to indicate briefly w h a t the A m o y Mission, as a light-bearing agency, has accomplished during the year 1890. T h e candles of the L o r d have been lighted on a three-branched candle-stick, the Evangelistic, Educational and Medical. EVANGELISM.

.

.In the prosecution of our evangelistic w o r k a variety of agencies and m e t hods are employed. There is the regular preaching of the Gospel from Sabbath to Sabbath in nine organized churches and fourteen outstations. T h e regular S u n d a y services are four. T h e first service is at nine in the morning, at which nearly every m e m b e r of the congregation recites a verse of Scripture. A booklet of Scripture texts and corre­ sponding passages for reading is prepared every year for this special purpose. A t the end of every three m o n t h s the congregation reviews the texts for the past twelve weeks. T h e regular preaching service follows at 10 a .m . In the afternoon a mo r e informal service of inquiry and prayer is held. A t Sio-Khe the afternoon meeting is a Sundayschool session, w hich the whole congregation attends. T h e evening gathering is for prayer and praise. A t A m o y , every T u e s d a y afternoon is devoted to street preaching. T h e foreign missionaries, the native pastors of the four churches, L o n d o n and Reformed, a n d the theo­ logical students of both seminaries join in this work. ' In the country a m o n tldy preachers’ meeting is held. T h e preachers me e t at one of the threp or four larger towns ip the district. O n e ses­ sion is devoted to the discussion of s o m e doctrinal or practical theme, and the t w o succeeding days are devoted to preaching in the surround­ ing villages. A c o m p a n y of hearers is gathered in the 'shade of a strawstack or under a wide-spreading banyan, or even under the eaves of an ancestral temple. A t these meetings the elders and deacons of the church at w h ich w e are tarrying and of adjoining churches frequently join us in testifying to the Gospel a m o n g their fellow-villagers and friends. . B y this instrumentality thousands are brought under the hearing of the truth every year. H u n d r e d s of w o m e n and children will perhaps never hear the Gospel in a n y other way. T h e n nearly all the chapels and churches connected with our Mission are usually open every afternoon for preaching or conversing with the heathen.


ITEMS O F SPECIAL INTEREST.

U p o n appeal to Classis and favorable decision, the brethren at Thianpo, Soa-sia and Leng-soa have united in the organization of a n e w church, henceforth to be.called Thian-san. T h e y called Tiong-Su-li, w h o w a s re­ cently engaged in Missionary w o r k a m o n g the border H a k k a s at Toa-Ke. U n d e r the energetic ministrations of their newly-elected pastor, the church at Tong-an has been greatly quickened and strengthened. Thirteen have been added to the membership, and the congregation has g r o w n b y the addition of sixty n e w adherents. T h e church-edifice b y m e a n s of a private bequest to the Mission, is being renovated to the a m o u n t of $900. It is h o ped that with enlarged and superior a c c o m m o ­ dations an era of steady prosperity m a y open before this n e w organiza­ tion. T h e Poa-a people are occupying their n e w church-building, costing u p w a r d s of $1,500, a n d to w h i c h .they contributed over $300 in m o n e y and labor. T h e building acc o m m o d a t e s 150 people a n d is crowded every Sunday. There are between forty and fifty catechumens on pro­ bation and under instruction for admission to the Church. A m a n is given at least a probation of a year, before he is admitted to the Church. If the signs of a changed life are not clearly manifest w e w a n t t w o or three, sometimes five or six years, until the fruit plainly evidences the virtue of the tree. If w e were less careful in the admission of m e m b e r s w e m ight report large accessions every year. B u t w e should reap cor­ responding disappointment a n d sorrow in the case of m a n y a stony gr o u n d hearer w h o flourishes only for a season. . A n e w church building is in process of erection at Soa-sia. A s soon as it is finished, w e expect to have t w o preachers exerting themselves heartily on behalf of the large t o w n a n d village population of that prosperous valley. Dr. Otte also expects to open a dispensary there in a m o n t h or two. . , ■ T w o n e w stations have been opened during the year, Ko-soa and Te-tau, the former connected with the Tong-an church, the latter with H o n g san. Hai-teng, the station connected jjjith Chioh-be, has been abandoned after three years of apparently fruitless sowing. M o s t of the stations already occupied are at strategic points wh e n c e n u m e r o u s towns and villages can be reached. So, with a diminished foreign missionary staff and a very moderately a u g m e n t e d native staff, w e have felt it the better part of w i s d o m to concentrate our energies o n gr o u n d already partially ploughed, instead of carrying our ploughs a n d turning u p a f e w furrows on s o m e n e w territory, only to see it, ere long, w ee d - g r o w n a n d waste. EDUCATION.

'

Theological Seminary.— T h e instruction at the Theological Seminary has been given b y Rev. W . M c G r e g o r and Dr. Kip. Eighteen students have been in attendance. T h e building at present occupied is proving


inadequate and unsatisfactory. It w a s at first h o p e d that a site for a U n i o n Theological Hall and Middle School, m i g h t be secured. B u t K o longsu Island is very small a n d nearly all the best sites have been already pre-empted b y foreign merchants, consuls a n d Chinese gentle­ m e n of wealth a n d leisure. H e n c e it has been thought most expedient to erect separate buildings on separate and smaller sites. O u r Mission is to secure a site and erect the middle school. T h e English Pres­ byterians are to find a site and build a Theological Hall. F u n d s for a n e w building are nearly all available and the Presbyterian brethren are on the outlook for a suitable site. '. T h e annual examination of all the preachers and evangelists of the three missions w a s held during last September. Seventy-five m e n were examined. This is a kind of post-graduate course b y which the m e n are carried through a course of Bible study for five or six years after they leave the Theological Seminary. It is of especial value to those w h o were m a d e evangelists on towards middle life and had c o m ­ paratively little preparatory training. Middle School.— T w e n t y boys a n d y o u n g m e n have been in attendance this year. Du r i n g Mr. Pitcher’s furlough to the United States Mr. F a g g took charge of the school. O u r hearts were greatly gladdened b y Mr. Pitcher’s success in raising u p w a r d s of $5,000 during his brief visit to the h o m e land. N o sooner did w e learn of the generous subscriptions than w e began to cast about for an available site. N o t far from the T a l m a g e Manse, on the sa m e ridge w e have succeeded in securing a beautiful and prominent site. W e felt justified in paying a goodly s u m for the place, since there could be no question as to its being the best for the purpose on the island. T h e buildings on it are old and rather dilapidated. B y a few hundred dollars repairing they can be m a d e t e m ­ porarily habitable, however. I n a s m u c h as our Mission alone is to build the Middle School, and the English Presbyterians, the Theological Hall, the funds raised will not be adequate for the erection of such buildings as are desirable and necessary for a most important department of our work. O w i n g to the disturbance in the monetary world w e have not realized as m u c h in silver for the gold pledged at h o m e as w e had hoped. W e earnestly appeal fo#$3,000 or $4,000 more, that our Middle School m a y be put o n a substantial footing and be prepared to enter a career of enlarged usefulness proportionate to g r o w i n g and varied needs. Parochial Eight parochial schools have been sustained, at­ tended b y 110 pupils. O u r d a y schools are a great improv e m e n t on the ordinary heathen schools. T h e y are cleaner and brighter. There is better order. There are reminders of a Western civilization, such as clocks, wall-rolls, maps, blackboards, pictures. There is greater variety in studies. W h i l e w e teach Confucius and Mencius, w e do not stop with them. T h e Bible holds a prominent place. Arithmetic, Geogra­ p h y a n d R o m a n i z e d Colloquial are a part of every school curriculum. Women’s School.— T h e “ Charlotte W . Du r y e e School for W o m e n ” has been m o r e largely patronized this year than ever. Thirty w o m e n have shared the advantages of the school for a longer or shorter time, studying the R o m a n i z e d Colloquial and pursuing Bible study. ’


Since its opening, 144 w o m e n have enjoyed the privileges the school offers. ‘ OirU School*.— T h e Mission sustains t w o girls’ schools— one at A m o y , one at Sio-khe. T h e school at A m o y reports thirty girls in attendance during the first half of the year, a n d twenty during the latter half. T h e departure of the Misses T a l m a g e on h o m e leave w a s very m u c h regretted b y all. Mrs. K i p has, however, taken u p their w o r k and finds herself m o r e than occupied superintending the W o m a n ’s School, the Girls’School and the evangelistic w o r k a m o n g the w o m e n . T h e Sio-khe school reports fourteen pupils in attendance. This school has enjoyed the joint supervision and instruction of Mrs. Otte a n d Mrs. Fagg. T h e native teacher, w h o is also matron, is proving a faithful a n d increas­ ingly useful assistant. A t the recent examination of the Sio-khe girls in Chinese character, a little girl six years old recited the entire Scriptural Trimetrical Classic of 900 characters without a single mistake. T h e girls’ schools are quite a liberal education to the children. F r o m the universal choas a n d abounding filth of their h o m e s they c o m e to school w h ere order a n d cleanliness are taught and exemplified. T h e y learn e n o u g h Chinese characters to read the Gospels, perhaps, the whole N e w Testament. T h e y learn the R o m a n i z e d Colloquial, w h i c h puts the whole Scriptures a n d a variety of thirty-one publications and the M o n t h l y Ch u r c h Magazine, at their c o m m a n d . MEDICAL WORK.

T h e g r o w i n g appreciation of the hospital is evidenced b y t w o recent extensions. ■ Last year a veranda and t w o students’ rooms were added to the Hospital building. B y this extension the w ards and consulting r o o m were also considerably enlarged. A n o p i u m refuge is n o w in process of erection. T h e m o n e y for both the veranda extension and the o p i u m refuge, amounting to $350, w a s chiefly contributed b y the Chinese. T h e local mandarins have given generously and have in other w a y s s h o w n a hearty interest in the welfare of the hospital. A m o n g other donations, t w o deserve special mention. 1. T h e gift of a plaster of Paris manikin, valued at $300, b y Dr. Kip. T h e manikin is the manufacture of a distinguished Paris physician. It is a piece of mo s t ingenious and careful workmanship, and will be very serviceable both to Dr. Otte and his students. 2. T h e gift of a very fine microscope, valued at $25, b y a native physician at Chiang-chiu, w h o s e son Dr. Otte treated during a very serious illness. T h e n u m b e r of in-patients has increased during the past six months, so that the w a rds are generally pretty well filled. O n the out-patients’ days (Tuesday and Friday of every week), from 70 to 80 patients c o m e for consultation a n d medicine. T h e “ Neerbosch Hospital ” at Sio-khe is an evangelizing agency second to none in importance. A preaching service is held on every out-patient’s d a y at nine in the morning. All w h o wish to consult the physician are expected to attend. N o patients are examined a n d no medicine dis­ pensed until after this service. After the regular preaching service,


-while the patients are waiting their turn to enter the consulting-room they are approached individually and in a kind, familiar w a y s h o w n the duty and privilege of worshipping the true God. In-patients have the m o n o t o n y of the long day broken u p b y being taught h y m n s and por­ tions of the Scriptures. T h e entire h y m n - b o o k of fifty-nine h y m n s will sometimes be m e m o rized b y a patient tarrying several months. PERSONAL.

Early in 1888 the Mission w a s reinforced b y the arrival of Dr. and Mrs. Otte a n d Mr. Fagg. Since then there has been but one accession o to the Mission staff, Mrs. F a g g joining in N o v e m b e r , 1889. In 1888 w e n u m b e r e d fifteen members, thirteen on the field. B u t our b o w did not long abide in its strength. In July, 1889, Dr. and Mrs. T a l m a g e were compelled to e m b a r k for the United States o w i n g to Dr. T a l m a g e ’s m u c h enfeebled condition. Mr. and Mrs. V a n D y c k took ship in D e ­ cember, 1889. Mr. and Mrs. Pitcher set sail in April, 1890. Mr. and Mrs. Rapalje a n d family, and the Misses T a l m a g e were ticketed for h o m e in'May of the sa m e year. D u r i n g the greater part of 1890 the field w a s held b y three missionaries and their wives. Mr. Pitcher returned to A m o y , D e c e m b e r 2d, of last year. This gives us just half our con­ stituency in China, the other half in the States. NEEDS.

O u r immediately pressing needs have already been presented to the Board. W e b e g leave to re-emphasize them. W e need one m o r e missionary w h o shall devote himself chiefly to evangelistic w o r k a m o n g the churches. Fields w h i c h will bear abundance of cultivation, and in the light of the promises of God, prophesy rich harvests, wait for the culture of his skillful hand. W e need a consecrated a n d efficient layman, with a g o o d normal training and well-versed in the sciences, to take u p the w o r k of our Middle School and lay the foundations for a broader and deeper w o r k on behalf of our boys and y o u n g men. W e need t w o ladies w h o shall give themselves to the education and evangelism of the w o m e n and girls. M a y G o d speedily raise u p these workers a n d enable the Board to send t h e m on their way. A s to the quality of the workers needed w e can think of no m o r e pertinent description than those w ords of the lamented Dr. W . F. Stevenson, long convener of, the Irish Presby­ terian B o ard of Foreign Missions. Said he : “ Better starve the mission b y w a n t of men, than send out a n y but the best."


THE

ARGOT

MISSION, INDIA. o

O R G A N I Z E D I N 1854. T h e Mission occupies:

The North Arcot District.— Area, 5,017 square miles; population,

1,787,134 b y last

census.

The South Arcot District.— 4,070 square miles; population, 1,301,846. T h e force engaged consists of— • Missionaries.— Revs. W . W . Scudder, D.D., Palmanair; J. W . Scudder, M.D., D.D., Vellore; J. Chamberlain, M.D., D.D., Madanapalle; Jo h n Scudder, M.D., Tindivanam; Win. I. Chamberlain, Madanapalle; Lewis R. Scudder, M.D., Palmanair; E. C. Scudder, Jr., ^4rnt ; Mr. H. J. Scudder, Arcot. Assistant Missionaries.— Mrs. W . W . Scudder, Mrs. J. W . Scudder, Mrs.-J. C h a m ­ berlain, Mrs. J o h n Scudder, Mrs. L. R. Scudder, Mrs. E. C. Scudder, Jr., Miss Julia C. Scudder, Miss M. K. Scudder a n d Miss Ida S. Scudder. In America.— Rev. a n d Mrs. J. W . Conklin. Native Pastors.— Hevs. Moses Nathaniel, Onanodiam; A b r a h a m William, Kattupadi; Paul Bailey, Orattur; Isaac Lazar, Kandiputtur; J o h n Peter, Kolapakam; A b r a m Muni, Yehamur. Native .dssietonto.— Catechists, 20; Assistant Catechists, 20; Anglo-Vernacular Schoolmasters, 53 ; Theological Teachers, 2; Readers a n d Schoolmasters, 85; School­ mistresses a n d Z e n a n a Teachers, 36; Colporteurs, 14; F e m a l e Bible Readers, 17; Z e n a n a W o m e n , 4. Total, 251. 1890. Contributions of Congregations, 1890.

Loss or Gain.

Totals of Congregations in 1890.

Girls.

Totals.

N u m b e r of Schools. |

Totals of CbngreKations in 1889.

-

II

Catechumens.

Children of Catechumens. 1

Boys.

||

'

II

FOR

Scholars.

|

Baptized Children.

C o m m u n i c a n t s in 1890.

1 Baptized adults not Communicants.

C o m m u n i c a n t s in 1889.

Families.

No. of Out-Stations. I

STATIONS.

||

STATISTICAL T A B L E

R. A. p. A r c o t .... Arni.... Chittoor.. Coonoor. Madanapalle__ Tindivau a m ___ Vellore.

19 257 180 233 186 280 210 184 22 441 389 830 857 1075 +218 144 1 2 15 152 209 216 70 278 56 73 12 301 189 490 604 693 + 89 1 41 46 46 30 49 8 4 3 95 185 280 127 137 + 10 53 3 9 62 72 92 14 100 1 2 2 64 32 96 180 209 -j- 29 16 163 128 133 78 168 172 131 18 424 255 679 532 682 +150 26 323 451 461 133 546 132 141 27 493 126 619 1429 1413 — 27 593 584 596 91 583 250 286 27 556 414 970 1769 1819 +

323

5

9

1ft 347 50 500

5 3

5 4

Totals__ 104 1591 1670 1777 552 2009 820 821 111 2374 1590 3964 5498 6028 +530

Girls'1Boarding Schools^ 2.— Madanapalle, Boys'1 Boarding Schools, 5.— Palmanair

34* scholars; Vellore, 66. Total, 99. (Theological Seminary), 17 students; Arcot, 60; A m i , 60; Madanapalle, 40; Tindivanam, 35. Total, 212. Hindu (Caste) Girls' Schools, 13.— Arcot (4), 320; A m i (1), 95; Chlttpor (I), 150; Coonoor(l),40; Madanapalle (3), 161;* Tindivanam (1), 51; Vellore (2), 239. * Last years’ report.

Total, 1056.


G E N E R A L VIEW. P R E PARED

B Y

REV.

J. \V. C O N K L I N .

T h e w o r k of the Arcot Mission, as set forth in the reports that are at h a n d for 1890, has g r o w n richly in organization, variety and fruitful­ ness. It is safe to say that never before has it been so well equipped to advance in all directions. T h e chief lack is in the n u m b e r of mis­ sionaries. Eacl) one on the field has far m o r e compuhory labor than fell to the share of an individual twenty or even ten years ago. W h a t is called the pioneer stage of mission w o r k is toilsome and has. m a n y hardships. B u t its irresistible d e m a n d s are not so n u m e r o u s or’ constant as those in the church organizing and training stage. F r o m the missionary in w h o s e field w a s witnessed the largest in-gathering of converts from paganism last year, no detailed report has yet come,, because he has not had time to write it. T h e w o r k of the Arcot A c a d e m y has so filled the hands of its n e w principal that his annual s u m m a r y is also lacking. B u t the returns, that have c o m e are very full of encouragement a n d call for a heartysong of thanksgiving. THE

MISSIONARY FORCE.

O n e m a n and one w o m a n arrived on the field last year. Mr. H . J . Scudder w a s put in immediate charge of the Arcot A c a d e m y , and Miss. Ida Scudder w a s stationed with her parents at Tindivanam, to learn. Tamil and assist in school work. Their advent w a s a delight and they have taken s o m e of the load from the over-weighted ones. T h e force received a h eavy b l o w in the complete prostration of Dr. William Scudder in January. His labors in the Theological Seminary h a d overtaxed his strength, and the hopes of his recovery were for a. time very dim. B u t a change to the Pu l n e y Hills has resulted in his. partial restoration, though he is not yet able to return to his w'ork. NATIVE

PASTORATE.

In this department there has been a m a r k e d and cheering advance. T h e aim is to have all the churches ministered to b y ordained m e n of > their o w n race, but its attainment has been long delayed. There are now, however, six, just double the n u m b e r of the previous year, a n d the “ hands of the presbytery” will probably be laid u p o n three more: wo r t h y men, all over forty years of age, during the present year. T R A I N I N G SCHOOLS.

There is one of these at every station occupied b y missionaries, and. at Madanapalle there are two. All are boarding schools, and their one. object is to m a k e out of boys and girls m e n and w o m e n fitted for Gospel work. Du r i n g the past year 99 girls were under such training in Vellore and.


Madanapalle, and 212 boys in Tindivanam, Arni, Arcot, Madanapalle and Palmanair. T h e t w o first mentioned boys’ schools are feeders to the third, the A c a d e m y , and that with the one at Madanapalle, furnish candidates for the last, the Theological Seminary. T h e Report of the Board of Superintendenlg ofthe Theological Seminary gives the total n u m b e r of students as seventeen. O f these five were in the catechists’ class. O f those pursuing the regular course of four years, seven were in the third year or upper middle class, t w o in the second or lower middle, a n d three in the third or junior. T h e examinations, held in December, were all sustained and the students promoted. This year, therefore, sees the first senior class, a n d at its close the first m e n will be regularly graduated. T h e founding of the Seminary m a r k e d an era in our Mission history, the graduation of the first class will m a r k a n ­ other. Rev. Dr. Chamberlain is acting as Professor of Theology, in the absence of the regular incumbent. * In the absence of a report from the Arcot Academy, not m u c h can be stated. T h e fact that, it has a principal all to itself m a r k s a red letter d a y in its annals. T h e n e w location of the school, just out of Ranipet, in c o m m o d i o u s buildings, with extensive grounds, is a delightful change. Mr. Scudder has a small b u n g a l o w on the premises, and the teachers are also quartered there. T h e influences a n d surroundings are con­ ducive to the development of m e n strong in “ body, soul and spirit.” T h e Boys’Boarding-sclwol at Arni presents another promising c o n s u m ­ mation. T h e primary department of the A c a d e m y a n d the Industrial School have been wedded. M a n u a l labor a n d study occupy the boys ‘‘share a n d share alike ” for the first t w o or three years after they enter. T h e y can be carefully sifted and only the most capable in study trans­ ferred to the A c a d e m y , in preparation for teaching and preaching. Lines of w o r k are d r a w n so closely in India that a brain-worker is usually a s h a m e d to use his hands. This system ought to deal a b l o w at so u n w o r t h y a feeling. T h e boys not qualified for the A c a d e m y m a y finish their trade educa­ tion a n d g o out as skilled w o r k m e n , being fitted also to teach night schools, a n d in other w a y s to enlighten their m o r e ignorant neighbors. Classes in rug-weaving, tailoring, carpentry and printing are carried on at present. S o m e creditable specimens of w o r k from the n e w press ha v e been received in N e w York. Greetings to the “ Ame r i c a n Arcot Mission Press, Arni.” The Female Seminaries at Vellore a n d Madanapalle s h o w the usual g o o d examination results, and report a healthful n u m b e r of marital unions with mission teachers. T h e y are the Mt. Holyokes of the Arcot field. D A T SCHOOLS.

These n u m b e r 104, of w h i c h thirteen are schools for H i n d u girls. M o s t of the others are village schools, w h ere the sexes are co-educated. Besides their intellectual advantages, all have likewise those of S u n d a y


schools, neld six days in the week! T h e reading books are permeated with Christian truth a n d the Bible lesson is an unfailing feature. WORK

AMONG

THE

WOMEN.

T h e lady missionaries are not n u m e r o u s e n o u g h to carry on Zenana w o r k very extensively. O n e sent out specially for that purpose might train a class of native .w o m e n and reach m a n y more H i n d u homes. In the city of M a d u r a our sister mission has usually four single ladies, one of w h o m is a doctor. B u t our Arcot sisters, each one of w h o m has a boarding-school and one or m o r e H i n d u girls’ schools to supervise, are entering the open doors as they can snatch opportunities, and inspiring the educated native Christians to follow their examples. P R E A C H I N G TO T HOSE OUTSIDE T H E CHURCHES.

This branch; of w o r k is c o m m o n l y termed evangelistic; but that seems to imply that other forms have s o m e other aim. T h e missionary seeks to m a k e every department evangelistic. Preaching to the people at the great feasts and in cities and villages in all parts of the field, has been carried on' with great vigor, judging fr o m the numerical returns. T w o stations are unreported, but estimat­ ing their w o r k b y previous years it is probable that m o r e than 800,000 H i n d u s a n d M a h o m e t a n s heard the “ wonderful w o r d s of life” fr o m the living preachers of our field last year. O n e hearing m a y not result in m u c h impression, but the religion of Jesus is holily advertised, and further k n o w l e d g e is often sought for. Competition b y H i n d u preachers and tract societies usually results in larger audiences a n d the purchase of m o r e Gospel portions. STA T I S T I C S O F P R E A C H I N G T O T H E H E A T H E N .

.

,

Heading r o o m visitors.

Tracts, etc., distributed.

Times.

Are'ot

Places.

STATIONS.

Hearers..

1

'

1,164 138 3,570 5,605 917

1.721 906 5.740 6,960 7,346

32,990 17,751 156,290 804,849 198,105

8,387 4.000 9,223

13,624 4.860 19,927

11,394

22,673

709,985

16,610

88,411

GOSPEL HEALING.

Dr. L. It. Scudder reports that he has been “ patiently, hopefully and joyfully ” laboring through the hospital at Ranipet. Five thousand and sixty-six patients have been treated for fleshly ills, a n d told of h i m “ w h o forgiveth all our iniquities, w h o healeth all our diseases and redeemeth our life from destruction.”


FRUITS.

.

There are ten n e w n a m e s on the roll of village congregations, and three old ones have been dropped, m a k i n g a gain of seven; 194 m o r e families are Christian than in 1889 ; the communicants have increased b y 107 ; the n u m b e r of boys in schools is greater b y 238, and of girls b y 152. There are 530 m o r e men, w o m e n and children w h o “ profess a n d call themselves Christians.” These figures should provoke a loud hallelujah, hut they s h o w only a part of the harvest. This sort of talk is, I k n o w , c o m m o n in Mission reports, hut it is especially true for India. T h e people are so timid and caste, rules are so rigorous that the n u m b e r of secret believers m a y safely be judged large. If confessing Christ m e a n t as m u c h worldly loss here as there, our church rolls w o u l d he m u c h shorter, a n d there are multitudes there of all classes, especially the higher, w h o w o u l d not long hesitate to sin­ cerely repeat the Apostles’ creed were they transferred to our shores. THE

STATION R E P O R T S F O L L O W I N G .

'

D o not fail to look t h e m through. T h e y m e a n m u c h to the writers. T h e y record the results of m a n y lonely, weary, hot days of toil. B e ­ t w een the lines I can read of m a n } ’ perplexities a n d discouragements, as well as triumphs arid reapers’,songs.' L o o k for the account of the w o m e n ’s prayer meeting at Arcot. M a n y of those w o m e n cannot read a w o r d a n d are too old to learn. See h o w the primary school in Chittoor has been growing, a n d per­ haps m a y bring one of its teachers to Jesus. Notice h o w well the Hea d m a s t e r of the Madanapalle hoys’ school uses latin, and w h a t a n ­ ticipations are cherished of t w o n e w native pastors and a proper church building in that station. T r y to appreciate the joy of the Tin d i v a n a m father and mother in wel­ c o m i n g t w o of their six children to their h o m e and work. • . M a k e acquaintance with that old m a n who, in Vellore, left his kingly idolatrous caste, and at the risk of his life b e c a m e a “ king and priest unto G o d . ” S T A T I O N ‘R E P O R T S . ARCOT. Rev. L. R. Scudder, M. A., M.D., Missionary; Mrs. L. R. Scudder, Assistant Mis­ sionary ; H. J. Scudder, B. A., Principal of Arcot Academy. Native Assistants.— Ot. P a r a m a n a n d a m , Assistant Catechist; T. Benjamin, P. Arivanandam, Readers; Sathiavasagam, Sigamoney, A. Isaac, T. Isaiah, S. Aaron, School Masters; Christiana, Bible-woman; Anna, Athithai, M a n o m o n e y , Rebecca,

School Mistresses; Paul,

Abraham,

Colporteurs.

T h e departure at the beginning of the year of Rev. J. W . Conklin laid on our shoulders the care of the Arcot station. It includes the care of. C h u r c h and S u n d a y school with three H i n d u girls’ schools, four primary schools, one night school, a n d oversight of the villages in w h ich three


schools are carried on, together with the evangelization of neighboring villages. • ' T h e w o r k has m a d e a slight advance all along the line. This year the International S u n d a y school lessons have been introduced into the C h u r c h S u n d a y school, in all but the infant classes, thus infusing a systematic and progressive study of G o d ’s word. T h e infant classes are co m p o s e d largely of heathen children, m a n y of w h o m also attend our primary school. These children thus besides the daily biblical teaching, are brought u p to attend G o d ’s house o n Sunday, and are taught the Catechism a n d Bible stories. T h e S u n d a y school has also been kept u p in Wallajak as usual, with the aid of several A c a d e m y students w h o volunteered for this work. It is attended entirely b y caste boys. T h e y are carefully instructed in Bible and Catechism. A t the end of each m o n t h those w h o have at­ tended regularly and learned their lessons well are rewarded with Scripture cards or small illustrated religious tracts. These are very highly prized b y the children. In the C h u r c h w e are able to report a slight gain in membership. Fifteen were dismissed to other churches. While in the place w e received eleven b n confession, a n d eleven by letter, giving in a net gain of seven. O f the eleven admitted on con­ fession of their faith ten were from the Arcot A c a d e m y . T w o adults were received b y baptism from heathenism. T h e y were an old soldier a n d his wife. H e h a d retired on a pension and, w a s living in the neighboring village of Kara. T r u e to his soldierly instinct he began to fight for his n e w captain, and strive to bring his relations to Christ. B u t he has been laid aside fr o m w o r k b y a stroke of paralysis. A very interesting and encouraging feature of C h u r c h life w a s the formation of a Missionary society, and the determination to support a missionary of their own. T h e y selected as their missionary a colporteur n a m e d Paul, and for six mo n t h s of the year they have supported h i m as their representation to preach the Gospel and distribute the printed word. A monthly missionary meeting has been held, at w hich a report is given b y their missionary of the w o r k done, a n d various missionary topics discussed. In this w a y the Gospel has been preached b y the C h u r c h to m a n y far b e y o n d its boundaries. B u t that is not all ; for the influence of the w o r k has been felt b y the m e m b e r s of the Church, in a deeper sense of responsibility for the salvation of their fellow countrymen, a n d a great zeal in preaching the Gospel. N o r have their efforts been void of results. Seven families in the t o w n of Malmsharam, about three miles away, have given u p idolatry and publicly enrolled themselves as Christians. T h e y have asked for a school and a Christian helper. A s soon as the people of the place heard of their action a severe persecution broke out against them. T h e y were denied the use of the village servants, w o r k w a s taken f r o m them, abuse a n d indignities of all sorts were heaped on them, violence w a s used against some, and efforts have been m a d e by fraud a n d violence to t a k e a w a y the property of several1families. There has been a deep laid plot a m o n g the M o h a m m e d a n s , w h o constitute the


m o s t n u m e r o u s and wealthy class there, to prevent over-establishing our w o r k in that place. A n d so far they have prevented our securing a house or land for building. T h e Christians have stood firm in the midst of all this. A n d b y the Grace of G o d it is our ho p e soon to have a flourishing w o r k in that place. In the village of Averakara, a family has been received b y baptism from heathenism, and joined to the M a n i a m p e t Church. T h e latter church had run d o w n to a very l o w ebb ; but a better spirit is beginning to s h o w itself, and w e hope to see better results there in the year to come. There have been signs of a w a k i n g in several other villages in this neigh­ borhood, but in t h e m w e can only report hopes of a harvest in the future. D u r i n g the year the helpers connected with the Arcot station have preached the Gospel in 1,164 places, 1,721 times, to people aggre­ gating 32,990. T h e y also distributed 3,387 leaflets. Gnti.s’ S C H O O L S .

Last year there were three girls’ schools in connection with this station in the towns of Arcot, Wallajah and Kavaripak. These have been car­ ried on as usual, and another school has been added to the list in Ranipet. A native had been carrying on a school for girls in the latter place under great difficulty. H e found it a heavier burden than lie could carry, so w a s very glad to give it over to us. W h e n taken over in M a y there w e r e only twenty girls in attendance. ' There w a s s o m e opposition expressed to our introducing the Bible a n d Catechism, a n d w e were advised to wait till the school w a s thoroughly established, but w re announced that the Bible and Cate­ chism w o u l d be introduced as regular studies from the very beginning, and the school, instead of decreasing, has rapidly g r o w n from twenty scholars to a roll of sixty-seven, and an average daily attendance of over fifty. . T h e school at Wallajah has decreased in number. T h e opposition to a Christian school is very great, and w e have also been unfortunate in our teachers. T h e schools at Kavaripak a n d Arcot have about held their o w n and have attained fair results. T h e n u m b e r of children enrolled during the year has been about 320, while the average attend­ ance w a s 260. , T h e influence of their w o r k can only be measured b y those w h o have seen the ignorance, superstition a n d bigotry of the w o m e n of India, and felt their bitter and unyielding opposition to religious and social reforms. T h e enlightenment of the w o m e n of India will remove one of the most powerful influences opposed to Christianity. B u t the results of this w o r k are not all future. M a n y houses are opened to Christian influ­ ences through these children. Zenana w o r k opens u p most readily w h ere our schools are conducted.

ZENANA WORK

Zenana w o r k has been carried on this year in Wallajapett only. O u r Bible w o m a n has wo r k e d there throughout the year, and reports


tweuty-five houses opened to her visit. A m o n g these have been several M o h a m m e d a n houses. T h e w o r k has .been h a m p e r e d b y the fact that she could give only a part of her time to house-to-house visitation. H e r mornings were e mployed in teaching sewing in the girls’ school. Only a few of the twenty-five houses were opened to Mrs. Scudder. T h e y were visited and encouraged in their work. A w o m a n ’s prayer meeting has been conducted weekly, a n d has been well attended b y our Christian w o m e n . Besides this, an attempt has been m a d e to b e c o m e better acquainted with the w o m e n , a n d to try and train t h e m into an evangelistic agency. T h e y c o m e weekly to the bungalow, w h ere they are interested with g a m e s or employed in pasting or writing Scripture verses on picture cards sent out from America. T e a a n d bread arc served, and before the w o m e n . go a w a y they are taught a Bible story. This they are expected to repeat to heathen w o m e n during the week. Only a small beginning has been m a d e ; but w e hope that in time a society of K i n g ’s Daughters m a y g r o w out of this work.

MEDICAI. WORK. L. R. S., in charge of Hospital: Rajagopaul, Hospital Assistant; N a y a g a m Pil­ lary, Compounder; Elizabeth, Midwife ; S. T h o m a s , Preacher.

T h e hospital has been under the charge of the Mission during the w h ole year, a n d the w o r k carried on as of old. T h e only d e m a n d o n Mission resources m a d e b y this institution in the time of the medical missionary. All the funds for medicines, diet, salaries and contingent charges, are furnished b y G o v e r n m e n t ; and w e hereby express our thanks to the G o v e r n m e n t for their liberality. Mr. S. T h o m a s has been faithful in preaching the W o r d to all the patients as they assembled every morning ; and thousands have had the W o r d of Life brought h o m e to their hearts b y printed w o r d as well as loving appeal. W e are not able.to report a n y tangible religious results directly traceable to the medical work. B u t while such results are not seen, it is not a necessary inference that the medical w o r k is a failure. Impression on m i n d and heart cannot he weighed ; influences cannot be measured accurately. H o w far truth has been implanted and conscience a w a k e n e d can only be k n o w n b y H i m w h o k n o w e t h w h a t is in the heart of man. H e can w e igh and measure a n d m a k e effective. W e can w o r k on patiently, hopefully, joyfully, in the assurance that all that is done in. His n a m e will receive His blessing. This w o r k has given the oppor­ tunity of speaking a w o r d to m a n y an attentive e a r ; to drop the seed into m a n y a softened heart. It gives the missionary a standing and influence in the c o m m u n i t y to be gained in no other way, w h i c h can be used unreservedly for the advancement of the Master’s K i n g d o m . D u r i n g the year a total of 5,066 patients have been treated, 380 of t h e m as in-patients ; 71 have been treated in the lying-in hospital; 22 major operations have been performed, a n d 286 minor operations. These statistics interpreted m e a n pain relieved, hope found, health re­ stored and lives given back, and also, in a f e w cases, the last w e a r y hours


of life m a d e as easy and comfortable as possible. N o r can w e refrain fr o m expressing the hope that the results of this w o r k m a y be recorded above in burdened souls lightened, sin-sick souls relieved, souls dead in sin a w a k e n e d to newness of life and the valley of the s h a d o w trans­ formed into the gate of Paradise.

CHITTOOR. Rev. William I. Chamberlain, M . A., ’ Missionary. Native Assistants.— Jacob Raji, Catechist; Daniel A b r a h a m , Reader; P. Gnanapragasam, A. Yanob, Y. Asirvadam, A n d r e w Stephen, School Masters; M a r t h a Dayavai, Bible Women ; Asinath, School Mistress; R. Joe, Colportenr.

CHURCH AND CONGREGATION. T h e missionary in charge of this station, exclusive of its villages, has h a d comparatively little participation in the actual w o r k of the Church, f r o m the very nature of the case. M o n thly visits of supervision a n d in­ spection have been m a d e ; but m u c h of the credit for the regular and progressive maintenance of the w o r k is d u e to the activity a n d j u d g ­ m e n t of the station catechists. T h e congregation, w hich has the a d ­ vantages of a spacious a n d attractive house of worship, and the regular Sabbath ministrations of one of the best graduates of the First Cate­ chist Class of our n e w Theological. Seminary, has g r o w n s o m e w h a t in strength a n d activity. A n u m b e r of adult baptisms have taken place, a n d the sacraments have been regularly administered b y the Pastor. There are t w o S u n d a y schools in connection with the Church, regularly organized and maintained b y the teachers, w h o bear in m i n d their re­ sponsibility. A w o m e n ’s prayer meeting is also held weekly. T h e contributions of the congregation have appreciably increased. T w o villages near Chittoor, under the influence of Christian school masters, w h o have opened schools u p o n their o w n responsibility, have taken all the steps necessary to their recognition as Christian villages under in­ struction ; but the lack of m e n and m e a n s has deprived us of the pleas­ ure of receiving them.

SCHOOLS. There are n o w nearly three hundred children under daily instruction in the three schools of the station. T h e H i n d u girls’ school, under the care of Mr. and Mrs. Conklin, b e c a m e so well established that it has maintained its position without m u c h difficulty. T h e headmaster of the school at its best period has again been placed in charge of its 150 girls, and a sixth standard with t w o bright pupils has been opened. T h e station primary school, b y a change in the headmastership and the addition of a H i n d u teacher to its staff, has increased from twentyfive to a hundred in numbers, and the results of the government in­ spection were satisfactory. T h e first assistant has been long favorably disposed towards Christianity, a n d n o w proposes to be baptized at the first opportunity .


T h e station'is apparently in a g o o d condition to be m a d e the center of a m o r e active and aggressive w o r k for the extension of its borders, under the leadership of resident missionary, w h o s e speedy arrival the people of the station a n d mission are anxiously awaiting. ’

MADANAPALLE. Rev. Jacob Chamberlain, M . D., D. D., Rev. William I. Chamberlain, M. A.,

Mis­

sionaries. Mrs. Jacob Chamberlain, Boys' Boarding Department and Bible Woman. Miss M. K. Scudder, Girls' School and Zenana Work. Native Assistants.— Elisha W o o d , Catechist; T i m o t h y Neal, Reader; Daniel Souri, Reading Room Agent; M a r y Tiruvengad Iyer, Esther Jula, Zenana Women; Christiana, Charlotte, Bible Women.

Out-Stations.— P. Souri. J o h n Souri, Catechists; J. Chinnappa, S a m u e l Seth, M. Zaccheus, J a m e s Neal, Elijah John, Assistant Catechists; Carrie. Salomi, G n a n a Soundari, Tabitha, School Mistresses ; S. K a m r a y y a , A b r a h a m Sahib, Readers; A n t h o n y Eleazar, Colporteur; William Barnabas, Y o k o b Royal, N. Jonah, School Masters; Rebecca Souri, Maria Rayal, Susanna, Chinthamani, A n n a Moses, Bible Women. Madanapalle Boys' Middle School.— E. J.

Stephens, Head Master; S. Narasimhayya, P. Timothy, I V. Samuel, P a p a y y a Sastri, P. P u n g a Pau, D. Subbayya. Madanapalle Girls' Middle School.— Joseph John, Head Master; M a r y Papanay a g a m , Head Mistress; .Esther Jula, Milka Zaccheus, Charlotte. Punganur High School.— B. V e n k a t r a m a Aiyer, B.A., Head Master; Lazarus Marian, Bible Teacher; K. R a m a Rau, M. Sashagiri Rau, S. N a r a y a n a Rau, D. R. Vennatraman a y y a , M. N u p p u Rau, A. Garudappo, B. R a m a c h a n d r a Rau, Chinnanna, R. Raghereendra Rau.

Vayalpad Middle School.— L. D. Asirvatham, Head Master; S a m u e l Bible Teacher; K. Kailasayya, P. P u n g a Rau, P. M u n l s w a m i Na y u d u , C.

Francis, Sethura-

may y a , T. Narasayya, G. Subba.Rau.

CHURCH CONGREGATION. ‘ It is a pleasure to be able to report a continued gr o w t h in our m e m ­ bership, notwithstanding the frequent removals of our catechists and necessary changes in our teaching staff. Du r i n g the year the C h u r c h has a d ded to itself, b y accessions from without and expansion from within, thirty-one families, five communicants, seventy-nine baptized non-communicants, seventy-six catechumens, a n d 184 adherents, while the contributions of the congregation have increased b y nearly Rs. 50. T h e total strength of the churches is n o w 682. A n occasion for pro­ found gratitude on the one h a n d and substantial assurance on tbe other is afforded, when, at a time in which the forces opposed to Christianity are still active, after their recent resuscitation, w e are able to report progress so m a r k e d and of so decided a nature in the various divisions of our Church. This is another evidence of the truth of the oft-repeated remark, that progress on the missionary field is greater than that on the h o m e field, as it is naturally expected to be from the nature and superiority of the opportunities of the former. . T h e various activities of the Ch u r c h have been in m o r e or less suc­ cessful operation throughout the year. In addition to: the printed cards containing the topics and leaders of our weekly congregational prayer meetings, prepared b y a Committee of Consistory, a printed p r o g r a m m e


of general Ch u r c h items a n d w o r k is n o w in use. U p o n this appear the n a m e s of the officers of the C h u r c h and its various organizations, the weekly services a n d the six benevolent a n d Congregational Funds, toward w hich contributions are made. There are at present eleven Church and religious engagements weekly. In addition to the regular Sabbath services and S u n d a y schools, the Y. P. S. C. E. prayer meeting is held on M o n d a y ; bazar preaching on T u e s d a y ; lectures to educated H i n d u s in the preaching room, W e d n e s d a y ; neighborhood prayer meeting, T h u r s d a y ; Congregational prayer meeting, F r i d a y ; a n d on Saturday the w o m e n ’s prayer meeting, S u n d a y school teacher’s me e t ­ ing and the singing class. These constitute a series of activities as n u ­ mer o u s and diverse as the strength and adaptability of an ordinary Christian congregation will allow. T h e Christian c o m m u n i t y of the station and its villages has o u t g r o w n the accommodations of our h u m b l e little C h u r c h building, and, indeed, the possibilities of a single organization. Plans are, therefore, being '• formed for its better accommodation and organization. Negotiations for a choice piece of land in the town, advantageously located for our purposes, are approaching completion, a n d with a small building fund, w h i c h has been accumulating for several years in anticipation of the present necessity, w e are looking forward to the c o m i n g semi-annual Mission meeting, to convene in Madanapalle, as a suitable a n d most a p ­ propriate occasion on w h i c h to lay the corner stone of a n e w Ch u r c h edifice m o r e commensurate with the demands, a n d m o r e wo r t h y of the strength of the local congregation. U p o n this occasion also the Mission has decided to ordain to the m i n ­ istry the t w o senior catechists of this station, Messrs. P. and J o h n Souri, w h o have each spent m o r e than a quarter of a century of faithful service in the proclamation of the Gospel in this district. T h e former is called to minister to the local congregation, the latter, as his associate, to the care of the outlying congregations in the villages, a m o n g which w e are hoping to organize a C h u r c h in the course of a year. T h e Y. P. S. C. E. has confirmed itself and justified its existence b y the regular maintenance of its branch of the C h u r c h work. B y m e a n s of this society, and the S u n d a y schools of the t o w n and adjacent vil­ lages for purely heathen children, the boys a n d girls of our Christian schools have been given a b undant opportunity for the exercise of their Christian zeal a n d enthusiasm. SCHOOLS.

Mr. E. J. Stephens writes,: Boys’ Boarding-School.— T h e primary, not to say exclusive, object of this small institution is not so m u c h to impart ‘‘secular instruction ” in its popular sense, as to train a n d otherwise fit its pupils for a purely consistent Christian life of usefulness in the world. M u c h importance is, therefore, attached to the character and other qualifications of the teachers on the moral side. T h e raison d’etre of such an institution


becomes very plain, in view of the crying w a n t of the d a y for moral in­ struction ; that is, secular education on such lines as shall subserve its higher a n d better counterpart— free moral education ; for ‘* sound in­ tellectual culture,” says an educationist of no m e a n authority, “ is in brotherhood with the best moral culture, and accuracy, the prose of truth.” T h e school closed for the year 1889 with but the fifth standard for its highest class. It, however, re-opened in 1890 with the seventh standard — the Middle School class. This raising of the standard has led to the strengthening of tbe teaching staff with t w o additional masters. T h e n e w headmaster is a Christian H. A. of considerable experience, since w h o s e appointment, the government assistant inspector of schools considers the school to have “ considerably improved.” H e is also de­ clared to have, b y the sa m e authority, “ intelligent and impressive teaching powers.” T h e first assistant is'a Christian (matriculate, w h o comes to the school with the record of intelligent and1 successful w o r k done in connection with his former appointment. H e has since .been transferred to the headmastership of the Ya y a l p a d Middle School. W h a t w a s at best but an apology for a library hitherto, has during the year been m a d e a library and consulting room, in a substantial th o u g h limited sense, a n d a n u m b e r of journals a n d periodicals of a religio-secular character have also been supplied. A go o d c o m plement of gymnastic apparatus has been finished— procured from the Mission Industrial School at Arni. T h e m a k e a n d material are indeed excellent. Besides the exercise in gymnastics, the boys, a n d not infrequently the teachers, join hands at cricket. T h u s the great dictum, meus Sana in corpyreano, is not lost u p o n our school, a n d our boys— the future Chris­ tian pedagogues a n d preachers— are being prepared literally to “ w a r with the flesh ” if need be. F o r the first time since the organization of the institution a f e w boys were sent u p to the University Middle School Examination, w h e n our success w a s nothing short of cent, per cent. N o r have; the other classes done less creditably at the annual government inspector’s examina­ tion ; his remark being “ satisfactory ” on the general subjects of study, a n d “ g o o d ” with reference to the “ discipline, tone, etc.” T h e report of the committee which conducted the Scripture examina­ tion is appended hereto, to speak for itself with reference to the devo­ tion of attention to, and the efficiency of instruction in the Scriptures. T h e average n u m b e r on the rolls has been forty, a n d the daily attend­ ance thirty-three, or eighty-three per cent. This is hardly satisfactory for a purely boarding-school. B u t for the influenza, which broke out in the station in an epidemic form last year, the attendance w o u l d have been far better.

BOYS’BOARDING-SCHOOL, MADANAPALLE.— REPORT ON iBIBLE EXAMINA TIONS. T h e committee congratulate teachers a n d scholars on the outcome of the examinations, w h ich w a s in each class most creditable.


T h e u p per fourth and lower fourth were examined in the First B o o k of Samuel, and the first and second Epistles to Timothy, and recited memoriter Ps. C X X X Y I and Matt. Y. and also d r e w each a plan of the “ Tabernacle of the Congregation ” and a m a p of Palestine f r o m m e m o r y . This examination w a s entirely in English a n d evinced an excellent knowl e d g e of English as well as of the Scriptures, the m a r k s of the t w o highest being, respectively, 85 and 93 out of a possible

100.

T h e third, second a n d first classes, w e r e examined in the B o o k of Genesis and the Gospel of Mark, with 'memoriter recitations of Psalms I and CL, and J o h n X I V . These examinations were in Telugu, and so even and so nearly perfect were the majority of the boys that it w a s necessary to prolong the examination for s o m e time before the first place could be assigned, a n d then t w o c a m e out of the examination with practically perfect marks, and three others only a small fraction below them. T h e next t w o lower classes, viz.: the first and second standards, were examined in Old Testament stories and the whole of the first catechism. T h e fact that three of the boys w o n 77, 87 a n d 94 out of a possible 100, s h ows the thoroughness of their training. In the infant standard, in the first'catechism, while nearly all did well, t w o gained, respectively, 83 a n d 88 out of 100, a n d well rounded off one of the best; examinations w e have ever attended. T h e committee were impressed b y the tone of assurance with w h ich each class answered the questions asked, as though tliey k n e w that they h a d mastered the subjects a n d feared no reasonable questions that could be asked on them.-

The Pwnganur High School.— Du r i n g the year a fifth class has been a d ded to this school, a n d the services of a graduate of the M a d r a s Christian College, Mr. V a n k a t r a m a Aiyer, B. A., has been secured as headmaster. U n d e r his administration the scholarship and discipline of the school improved, and good progress in general w a s made. A t the recent middle school examination, of the ten boys w h o appeared f r o m the school, t w o passed in the first class, three in the second and one in the third— results very creditable, indeed, in view of the fact that the general presidency average is not often above 30 per cent. T h e other classes acquitted themselves even m o r e creditably at the government inspector's examination in December. T h e strength of the school is 168. T h e fourth upper and fifth classes underwent a written examination in their Scripture lessons in December, a n d at the s a m e time the other classes were examined orally b y Dr. Chamberlain, w h o s e report is here presented: „ “ T h e examination s h o w e d diligent study on the part of the pupils and diligent teaching on the part of the teachers. “ T h e fifth class underwent a written examination on the Gospel of Mark, in English. W h ile the average gained by the class w a s only 471


out of a possible 100, s o m e of the pupils did m u c h better, the highest gaining 74£, a n d nearly all s h o w e d a fair knowl e d g e of the Gospel. “ T h e upper fourth class had a written examination on the Old Testa­ m e n t stories, in English. T h e average of their m a r k s w a s higher, be­ ing 51 out of 100. T h e highest m a r k gained being 73. “ T h e lower fourth a n d third classes were orally examined in the Gospel of Matthew, in Telugu. These classes did not d o as well, on the average, as the sa m e classes did last year, but this m a y be in part o w i n g to a change in the Bible teachers about the middle of the year. While s o m e of the pupils were lamentably deficient, others did remarkably w e l l ; the best b o y in the lower fourth gaining 87^ out of a possible 100, and the best b o y in tbe third class gaining 81. “ T h e second class w a s examined in Bible stories, a n d did better on the average than the higher classes, but were m o r e even in their m a r k s ; the best t w o boys co m i n g out with each 125 out of a possible 160, or 78 out of 100. “ T h e first class did better still, though the ground covered w a s not so large, the average of the class, being 159 out of a possible 180, or 88J out of 100, and the best three boys winning, respectively, 170, 175 and 177 out of 180, or 94J, 97 and 98i out of 100. . “ R e m e m b e r i n g that it is not yet t w o years since any of these boys began their studies in the Bible, the result m u s t be very cheering to the m a n a g e r and the teachers. A ma s s of Biblical History and Precept is finding an entrance into their minds* that will not soon be forgotten. T h e y will, to say the least, be the nobler a n d better m e n for it.” r

The Vayalpad Middle School.— T h e oversight of this school during the greater part of the last year w a s a pleasure. T h e people of V ayalpad se e m to appreciate the advantages offered b y it, and the administration of the present headmaster, Mr. Asirvadam Ross, a Christian matriculate, has been careful a n d added materially to the efficiency of the school. T h e strength is eighty-three.

Primary Schools.— There are eight of these schools in our Christian villages, a n d mo s t of t h e m are maintained with considerable difficulty a n d irregularity.. T h e people are poor a n d need the services of their children to watch the cattle (and care for the babes). This difficulty is attempted to be m e t by night schools. H owever, t w o of these schools deserve special mention. T h a t at Kurabalakota, the future railroad station of Madanapalle, containing about sixty bright H i n d u lads, and the other in Madanapalle with about eighty boys in attendance. Bo t h of these schools have been passed over to the Mission recently— the latter the oldest and strongest Pial school sof _the t o w n and finely located on a hill, the site of the old fort in the heart of the town. T h e building a n d land are in use free of rent or cost to the Mission. T h e total n u m b e r of schools in connection with this station has remained the same, eighteen, while the n u m b e r of boys in attendance has increased b y seventy-seven, and girls b y thirteen, m a k i n g a total of nearly 100.


Beading Booms.— A n e w reading r o o m has been opened this year in Punganur, called into existence b y the opportunity afforded b y the offer on the part of the R a j a h a n d officials of the place of a regular monthly subscription to its maintenance, a n d b y the necessity w h i c h always exists in a large t o w n for the establishment of s o m e central in­ stitution of Christian influence. There have been 3,624 visitors to this reading room. T h e reading r o o m at Madanapalle continues to be visited frequently b y the Hindus, a n d is often in requisition b y t h e m for the purpose of public meetings of the nature of anniversaries and lectures. W i t h the exception of a f e w mo n t h s in the beginning of the year, the W e d n e s d a y evening lectures to the educated H i n d u s of the post, in the vernacular, with occasional English variations, have been maintained. Mr. McConaughy, the General Secretary of the Y. M . C. A. of Madras, favored us in Ju n e with a very interesting lecture u p o n Russia, with especial reference to its churches and religious observances. A b o u t 10,000 people have availed themselves of the privileges of this reading room, while the sales of .tracts and school books has a m o u n t e d to nearly Rs. 500. The Beading Boom at Vayalpad has h a d the disadvantage of. an u n ­ favorable location during the past year, and, therefore, not so m u c h can be said of its usefulness. How e v e r , the best adapted building in the town, centrally located, has n o w been secured after m o n t h s of effort, a n d w e look forward to a similar usefulness a n d influence from it in the future. B y a strange coincidence, th o u g h not without considerable effort in each locality, the three reading r o oms of Madanapalle, P u n g a n u r and Vay a l p a d are located in each t o w n directly opposite the post office, in oriental, as in occidental, cities the general gathering-place of the people. W e have spared no efforts to secure these favorable circumstances for t h e m -, for w e thoroughly believe, after s o m e e x ­ perience, in the usefulness and success of reading rooms. Evangelistic Work— In this branch of missionary work; each mission finds its highest justification and each missionary his greatest encourage­ ment. This station has been no exception to this rule. W h i l e especial attention has been given to establishing in the faith n e w villages, and reclaiming a f e w old ones f r o m a state of indifference, the preaching of the w o r d in pqrely unevangelized regions has not been neglected : for, in fact, each tour a m o n g Christian villages involves m o r e or less preach­ ing in heathen centers. In addition to monthly visits to Chittoor, temporarily under our care, eleven tours have been m a d e a m o n g our Christian villages and eight a m o n g heathen villages. O n e instance fr o m each will suffice as illustrations of these subdivisions of evangelistic work. Wayanurapalle, or Angallu, is a village about six miles northwest of Madanapalle in w hich w c have had a few adherents for several years. T h e supervising catechist of that g roup of villages has spared no effort, especially of late, to induce all the people to be baptized and b e


received into fuller fellowship with Christianity. W e have frequently held Sabbath morn i n g services with them. A t last all difficulties were overcome and on a S u n d a y morning in D e c e m b e r w e baptized every man, w o m a n a n d child of the village. T h e occasion w a s enlivened b y a " ba b y organ,” often brought into use in the villages, a n d the little church beautified with an abundance of flowers ; a memor a b l e day to the villagers and one of rejoicing to us all, and to the angels in heaven, m a y w e not believe ? O n the s a m e day w e w e n t to Timmareddipalle, a village almost entirely fallen away, on account of enemies within the fold, a n d sealed its reclamation b y the baptism of seven adults a n d infants. O u r annual visit to the great festival at P u n g a n u r w a s accomplished under still m o r e favorable circumstances than hitherto. A strong force of fifteen native assistants, d r a w n from Vellore, Palmanair and M a d a n ­ apalle, w a s organized and divided into t w o parties, with Rev. A b r a h a m William at the head of one, a n d the “ Junior Apostle to the Telugus,” with his bicycle and “ b a b y o r g a n ” at the head of the other. O u r ad ­ vent w a s anticipated and heralded b y the re-organization of the local branch of the H i n d u Tract Society a n d the publication of tracts and pamphlets, entitled “ Advice to Missionaries,” “ O n e H u n d r e d T h o u s a n d Contradictions of the Bible,” “ W a s Jesus Insane ?” etc. In anticipation of trouble, the local police authorities were requested to temporarily establish the Ma d r a s rule, calling u p o n “ rival preaching parties” to remain forty yards apart while carrying on this work. A s an alternative the police inspector suggested that w e select four or five places to which w e w o u l d confine ourselves in preaching. T h o u g h given the first choice in the selection w e declined the suggestion and simply d e m a n d e d protection in case of disturbance in our lawful and peaceful avocation. It was, however, understood between the President of the H i n d u Tract Society and the President of the “ American Party,” that w e w o u l d observe the forty yards rule. A n d in justice to the former it m u s t be said that the distance rule w a s fairly well observed. For three days the claims of Christianity and H i n d u i s m were pro­ claimed through every lane and street of the town. T h e H i n d u party usually closely followed ours, and endeavored to remove the “ evil i m ­ pression” made. .The bicycle always collected a go o d crowd, and the “ ba b y organ ” quieted it, while the m a gic lantern at night d r e w large n u m b e r s of people together in the courtyard of the pala'ce, the B a j a h ’s ba n d playing in the intervals. A n a m u s i n g incident m a y here be m e n ­ tioned. O u r Hindu.friends thought something m u s t be done in the w a y of a counter attraction to our bicycle and “ b a b y organ.” There­ u p o n they procured a n accordion, the player perched u p o n a wall, and w h e n w e c o m m e n c e d our “ one finger exercises,” over which our music teacher exercised so m u c h patience in former days, the accordion bel­ lowed forth with great enthusiasm. , O n a certain evening w h e n a great c r o w d w a s gathered at the place announced for m a gic lantern exhibition, previous to our arrival,emissaries of the H i n d u Tract. Society h a d gone a m o n g the people a n d spread false


reports of alterations in our plans, with a view of dispersing the crowd. U p o n our arrival w e called u p o n the Rajah's band, w h i c h w e had sub­ sidized for the time of our stay, to m a r c h u p and d o w n the street and finally halt before the large white screen, u p o n which w e immediately threw our most attractive pictures. T h u s began an illustrative lecture of t w o hours on Christ and the Gospel, before an audience estimated at 3,000. Ps. 76:10. D u r i n g the year w e have opened w o r k of a permanent nature in five n e w villages and re-opened in a sixth. O u r corps of Bible w o m e n , eight in number, has been active in visit­ ing 879 places, 1,634 times, and talking with 23,846 people. T h e s u m m a r y of our Evangelistic W o r k is as follows: Places 3,570 ; times, 5,740 ; audiences, 156,290. TINDIVANAM.

Rev. J o h n Scudder, M. D., Missionary. Mrs. J o h n Scudder. Miss Ida S. Scudder. S. A. Sebastian, Catechist and Head Master, Middle School; S a m s o n Samuel, Assistant Catechist; Asirvadan, Reader and Teacher, Middle School: Z. Isaac, Teacher, Hindu Girls' School; Catherine, Sewing Mistress;Non-Christian Teachers, Boys' Schools, 7, Girls' School, 1 ; Mrs. Caroline Sawyer, Bible W o m a n ; C. R. Chinnappen, Colporteur, Tract Society ; Paranjoti, Colporteur, Madras Bible Society. At Ou£-S2a£ions.— Rev. Paul Bailey, Rev. J o h n Peter, Native Pastors ; P r a k a s a m Malliappen, A. Daniel, Catechists; Yesadian Israel, Christian Daniel, A. Joseph, J o h n Matthew, Assistant Catechists; T. Shadrach, C. Jacob, J o h n David, Francis Jacob, C. Ephraim, Moses Joshua, B. John, C. lyakan, J. I. David, M. S a m ­ son, A. Masillamini, Kanakarayan, Readers: P. Daniel, P. Malliappen, S. Jacob, K. Zachariah, A. Silas, S. V e d a m a n i k a m , Teachers; Shadrach Simon, Jeremiah, Colporteurs; Mary, Asenath, Diavai, Joanna, Annal, Schoolmistresses; P o n n a m mal, Martha, Bible Women. *

Rev. J o h n Scudder writes: O u r hearts have been filled with joy b y being permitted to w e l come t w o of our children back to India after a separation of nearly eight years. T h e y landed in Ma d r a s 20th September, having been sent out b y our Board to engage in Mission work. O u r son, H . J. Scudder, Esq., takes charge of the A c a d e m y in Arcot, and our daughter, Miss Ida S. Scudder, has been appointed to aid her mother in the care of the schools in this Station. W e desire to express our thankfulness to our kind Heavenly Father and to our B oard for the great joy w hich has filled our hearts. I have very little of special interest to report. It has been a year of steady, persistent work, but w e have not been permitted to reap m u c h of a harvest. A f e w families have joined us from heathenism, hut their n u m b e r s were m o r e than counterbalanced b y removals from the field, so that the n u m b e r of adherents is sixteen less than last year. T h e c o m ­ municants n u m b e r m o r e ; eighteen have been received on confession of their faith and twenty-six b y certificate; twenty-two have .been dismissed to other churches ; eight have been suspended for disorderly conduct a n d immorality, and five have died, leaving the present n u m b e r


461, this being ten m o r e than the last account; thirty-eight infants and t w o adults have been baptized. T h o u g h there has not been m u c h growth in numbers, I trust the churches have g r o w n in spirituality. T h e gifts of the people a m o u n t to Rs. 347-5-5. O f this s u m Rs. 171­ 8-0 w a s given for the support of the ministry. T h e a m o u n t contributed is less b y Rs. 29-1-4 than last year, as the people are feeling very poor. T h e rains have failed in m a n y parts of the district for the past t w o years, a n d the Christians, together with others, have suffered an entire or par­ tial failure of their crops. S o m e of t h e m have barely m a n a g e d to exist, while others have gone elsewhere for work. W h a t they have given has been from their poverty. T h e helpers have continued to contribute for the support of a col­ porteur. A n e w person w a s found for the work, and he has been e m ­ ployed b y t h e m since the 1st June. J o h n Peter, a m e m b e r of the catechist’s class, which left the Theolog­ ical Seminary in 1889, w a s called b y the churches of Varikkal a n d Kola p a k a m to be their pastor. T h e call w a s presented to the Classis, and w a s approved b y t h e m and accepted b y the candidate, and the 16th January, 1891, w a s appointed for his examination. H a v i n g passed a creditable one he w a s ordained to the Gospel Ministry 18th January, a n d installed as pastor of the above-mentioned churches 1st February. Formerly these churches were under the care of Pastor Paul Bailey, w h o gladly passes t h e m over to his successor, as he has still three churches with their villages to look after.

SCHOOLS. Middle School.— T h e year closed with seventy-seven scholars. S o m e of the classes have been small, as pupils have been led to attend other schools in the place, w h e r e they are received on lower fees than the government requires. A class of twelve we n t u p for the examination held in M a y , of w h o m five passed in the second and t w o in the third class, and another class of eight w e n t u p for the examination held in December, of w h o m five passed. T h e teachers have been diligent a n d faithful in their duties. Fees to the a m o u n t of Rs. 465-14-6 have been collected. T h e grant for 1889 a m o u n t e d to Rs. 458-0-9. T h e annual examination took place in December. T h e returns w h i c h have just come, inform us that with one exception, every b o y w h o w a s presented passed. This is certainly gratifying a n d very creditable to the teachers. Feeder School.— There were forty-six scholars at the close'of the year. Fees to the a m o u n t of Rs. 51-13-0, a n d a grant of Rs. 49-8-0 have been received. T h e school is doing fairly well. Hindu Girls’School.— The attendance has been about the s a m e as last year, there being fifty-one n a m e s o n the roll at the end of December. T h e children have m a d e fair progress m their studies, but the'grant, Rs. 78-4-0, allotted to the school is m u c h smaller than last year.


Preparandi School.— Thirty-four boarders have been present during the year. W e are pleased to report that all have conducted t h e m s e h es well, a n d almost all have m a d e c o m m e n d a b l e progress in their studies. T h e last three mentioned schools have been under the care and m a n ­ a g e m e n t of Mrs. Scudder, w h o has devoted a g o o d part of her time and strength to them. She has been aided in this w o r k for the last three m o n t h s b y Miss Scudder, w h o will in future devote most of her time to the H i n d u Girls’ School, and to teaching English to the Preparandi boys. . Village Schools.— There, are twenty-four of these, attended b y 445 scholars, viz.: 370 boys and seventy-five girls. T h e y are kept u p with great difficulty. All of these scholars are capable of earning their o w n living,, and their parents, w h o are very poor, feel it a great hardship to support t h e m while attending school. In s o m e places night schools have been started in order to instruct those w h o cannot be spared from w o r k during the day. S o m e of the teachers are almost discouraged a n d feel aggrieved because classes which do not contain three scholars are cut off from grants. O n e year grants were allowed for all w h o passed, as this w a s considered “ a b a c k w a r d district,” but it has been promoted and is no longer so considered. W h y , I d o not k n o w , as I see no very material advance in its condition. The Reading itoom.— This has been open throughout the year. W e were compelled to change our quarters, and as the present building is not in as favorable a situation, the visitors have decreased. Still 4,860 persons have availed themselves of the advantages offered them. Besides native and English newspapers a n d periodicals, w h i c h are free to all, books and tracts are kept for sale. T h e sales are as follows: school books, 506 ; religious books and tracts, 99 ; total a m o u n t of sales Rs. 81-14-7. T h e colporteurs a n d others have also sold books and tracts amoun t i n g to Rs. 48.

'

EVANGELISTIC WORK.

This w o r k has not been neglected. All have engaged in it m o r e or less. T h e helpers are continually visiting the villages near their stations, a n d at times g o out in companies to visit the regions beyond. T h e y have attended the festivals held in Canjipuram, Milam, Malayanur and Trinomally. Rev. Dr. J. W . Scudder a n d myself, with a f e w helpers from other fields, were with t h e m at the last place, w h ere w e m e t with the most persistent opposition for a f e w days. Still w e were able to m a k e k n o w n the truth to a goodly n u m b e r of the people. Statistics of all the w o r k have been kept, from w h i c h w e learn that the Gospel has been m a d e k n o w n 6,960 times, in 5,605 places, to 304,849 persons, and about 4,000 handbills circulated. A n u m b e r of bible -women have also been at w o r k m a k i n g k n o w n the glad tidings to the w o m e n , but their statistics are not included in the above figures. • ®


54

REPORT

ON

Rev. Paul Bailey, Pastor of the C hu rc h of Orattur, writes : I render thanks to the Lo r d of Life w h o has spared m e — w h o for a time h a d n o hope of living m u c h longer — to write this report of the w o r k H e has permitted m e to do for the glory of His name. I w a s afflicted at the beginning of the year with a large carbuncle on m y back, w h i c h caused m e m u c h suffering and greatly reduced m y strength. For this I w e n t to the hospital in T i n d i v a n a m for treatment. T h o u g h m y strength has not been fully restored. I have visited the seventeen villages under m y charge and administered the L o r d ’s Supper four times in each of the principal places. Seventeen persons were admitted to the C h u r c h on confession of their-faith, and twenty five in­ fants were baptized. • _ Three families, consisting of'seven souls, in Kirvenganthur, a village four miles from Orattur, have by the grace of G o d left the darkness of heathenism and c o m e to the true light of Christianity. T h e y have re­ peatedly asked m e to send s o m e one to their village to instruct t h e m in the Divine truths. F o r the time being I have directed t h e m to attend C h u r c h in Athanus, w hich is near their village. This they have been doing every Sabbatb. I trust the Lord will soon send t h e m a teacher. I have little of interest to report about tbe villages ; matters are very m u c h as they were last year. B u t I m u s t not fail to mention the action of the people in Narusinganur. These people arc Shanars, a n d climb P a l m y r a trees for their living. T h e y love Christianity and are of a generous disposition ; they are very zealous for Christ, and orderly in their walk. S o m e of t h e m are educated e n o u g h to conduct Divine serv­ ice for themselves w h enever the catechist is compelled to be away. Du r i n g one of m y visits they all requested m e to build t h e m a brick church, in place of the m u d a n d thatched building they n o w have. In reply, I told t h e m if each family w o u l d give R s 4 and t w o P a l m y r a trees towards it, I w o u l d do m y best to aid them. Immediately a y o u n g 1 m a n of generous spirit arose and with a b e a m i n g countenance said, “ Send the catechist with me, and I will give the trees n o w ; ” and he took the catechist with him, and pointed out the ones he w a s ready to give, saying that they m ight cut t h e m immediately. T h e rest of the members, incited b y his example, did the same. I trust that G o d will lead s o m e one w h o reads this to send t h e m s o m e money, so that w e m a y soon have a good church building in this place. K i n d friends in America have sent m e a large bell for the Orattur Church, but. there is no tower for it. I have done m y best to collect m o n e y for one. T h u s far I have received about Rs. 100. I need about Rs. 300 more. M a y the Lord kindly put it into the heart of s o m e one to send m e the needed funds. In N o v e m b e r , I, in c o m p a n y with Rev. Drs. J. W . a n d J o h n S c u d ­ der, Rev. A b r a h a m William and twenty-two helpers, visited Trinomally during the feast held there. W e m e t with m u c h opposition. F o r t w o days s o m e evil-minded persons tried to prevent us from preaching the Gospel. W h e n e v e r w e c o m m e n c e d to preach, they w o u l d c o m e into the audience and appealing to their S w a m y , continued to cry out,


“ Govindu, Govindu, G o v i n d u !” in hopes they could m a k e it impossible for the people to h e a r ; but w e were not driyen away, a n d were able to preach to m a n y persons. ' 9

VET.T.OKE.

Rev. J. W . Scudder, M.D., D.D., Missionary. Mrs. J. W . Shudder, Female Seminary. Miss J. C. Scudder, Hindu Girls' School. Teaching Staffof Female Seminary.— D. Devadasan. Head Master; Joseph Packianadan, Second Teacher; Joseph Alexander, Third Teacher; Jacob Lazarus, Fourth Teacher; A. G. G n a n a m o n y , Fifth Teacher; Mrs. A. White, Matron. Native Assistants.— A.. Masillnmony, P. Jaganadan, V. T h o m a s , Isaac Henry, Catechists; David Muni, Assistant Catechist; A p p o w , Colporteur; Gnanatipam,

Bible W o m a n ; Paramai,

Jivamony, Zenana Teachers. ' Oai-Stations.— Rev. A b r a h a m William, Rev. Isaac Lazar, Native Pastors; Mrs. A. William. Bible Reader; Z. B a s h y a m , Israel A ndrew, H. P. Joseph, J o h n A b r a ­ h a m , Catechists : M. Joshua, S. Treadwell, Sallie Davids, Assistant Catechists; D. Vareed. David Lazarus, David Daniel, N. Gideon,*T. Samuel, B. Absalom, Readets and School Masters: J o h n Moses! Z. T h o m a s , J e b a m o n y , M. P a r a m a n a n d a m , Xavier Lazar, A. Simon, I. Samuel, School Masters; Lizzie A b r a h a m , M a r y A ndrew,

School Mistresses; Shadrach, Colporteur. • Chittoor Ont-Stalions.— Zachariah A ppavu, Assistant Catechist; Isaac Aaron, Reader and School Master; Isaac Savariappan, J. Samuel, School Masters; Elisi, School Mistress ; Alexander. Colporteur. V E L L O R E C H U R C H A N D CONGREGATION.

During the year twelve persons were added to the church, eight on confession of faith and four b y certificate. Five c o m m u nicants died, and twelve were dismissed to other churches. T h e n u m b e r of m e m b e r s o n the roll at the close of 1890, w a s 111. Eight infants a n d one adult received baptism ; and eight marriages were solemnized. T h e congre­ gation n u m b e r s in all 250. Three S u n d a y schools have been kept u p ; one in the church, another in the F e m a l e Seminary building, a n d the third in a school-house. T h e last is attended b y a goodly n u m b e r of Carasian children and besides these, w h a t m a y be called i m p r o m p t u S u n d a y schools have been held regularly in the streets of Vellore for heathen pupils. T h e aggregate gathering at these w a s 4,758, larger b y 1,541 than that of the previous year. T h e spiritual history of the adult w h o received baptism is of excep­ tional interest. H e is of the K ’shattriya, or kingly caste. This caste is said b y m e n to have sprung from the ar m s of the creator, and is accounted second only to that of the Brahmin, w h i c h e m e r g e d from the head of the Deity. His n a m e is R a m a r a g u . H e is about fifty years old, a n d has a wife m u c h y o u nger than himself. A m e m b e r of a wellto-do family of wholesale cloth merchants, he had nothing to gain and everything to lose b y changing his faith. His conversion w a s remark­ able as will appear fr o m w h a t follows. O n a S u n d a y in the early part of the year he sought shelter in a rain storm under a tree close by, near our church in Vellore. T h e voice of the preacher fell on his ear. H e listened a n d w a s impressed. Du r i n g several succeeding months, he c a m e from Sabbath to Sabbath to the s a m e spot, and heard the Gospel, but


never once did he step past inside of the church. N e a r the end of March, he c a m e to m y house, told m e the facts related: above and asked for baptism. U p to this <ime he had held no personal communication of any sort with a n y Christian, foreign or native. O n m y expressing reluctance to c o m p l y with his request, until I could have further evi­ dence of his k n o w ledge a n d sincerity, he s h o w e d great disappointment, a n d urged m e to receive h i m without delay. I pointed out that expul­ sion from his family and caste, as well as bitter persecution, w o u l d surely follow the step he contemplated. H e replied that he had fully counted the cost, and c o m e w h a t might, his resolution w a s taken. “ I believe in Jesus,” he said, and love him, and I wish to be baptized in his n a me.” After a good deal of persuasion, he consented to wait and place himself under instruction for a time. This had to be conducted with extreme secrecy, lest his relatives, discovering his intentions, should use m e a n s and possible violence to frustrate them. A s he expressed it, “ M y caste are a fierce caste,'and hereditarily accustomed to the use of the sword. Should they learn m y purpose, a knife m a y be plunged into m y breast.” In July, on m y return to Vellore, after several mo n t h s of absence, he immediately visited me- and renew ed his urgent request to be baptized. H e said, “ I cannot endure the suspense ; m y friends already suspect m y design, m y head is torn b y contending emotions, m y health is giving a w a y under the strain, I must be baptized.” I could refuse no longer. T o avoid complications, it was- arranged that he should g o to Palmanair and receive the rite there during our Mission meeting. Accordingly I had the joy of baptizing h i m in that place, on the l'7th of August. His tears mingled with the sacrament water poured u p o n his head, a n d immediately afterwards he sat d o wn, with b e a m i n g face, at the table of the Lord. H e had previously cut off his thread, r e m o v e d the tuft from his head, a n d eaten with our native as­ sistants ; thus thoroughly renouncing caste and severing himseif irre­ vocably from his heathen connections. It was, of course, inexpedient, not to say hazardous, for h i m to return at present to Vellore; so he w e n t to Madanapalle and is still there. His wife, all ignorant of his purpose, accompanied h i m to Palmanair. O n seeing w h a t he had done, she w a s at first recalcitrant, a n d attempted once or twice to flee back to Vellore. He, however, succeeded in overcoming her opposition, and she has since been baptized in Madanapalle. I hear that both of t h e m are in full and h a p p y association with our Christians there. ‘‘ T h e w i n d bloweth w h ere it listeth, a n d thou hearest the sound thereof, but canst not tell w h e n c e it cometh, and whither it goeth ; so is everyone that is born of the Spirit.” • T h e contributions of the C h u r c h in 1890 were Rs. 285-14-8. F E M A L E SEMINARY.

"

Mrs. Scudder, w h o has charge of this institution, writes: “ W e have h a d an attendance throughout the year of from sixty to sixty-five scholars. T h e annual government examination w a s held in the latter part of July, with the following result. In the sixth standard


nine appeared and all passed. In the fifth standard ten appeared a n d all passed. In the fourth standard ten appeared a n d eight passed. In the third standard twenty-two appeared and eighteen passed. A s usual, the grant earned considerably exceeded the s u m the government w a s willing to p a y us. T e n girls appeared on'December 1st for the Middle School public examination. T h e results are not k n o w n at present. Another scholar appeared on D e c e m b e r 22d for examination in school method, w h ich if successfully passed will entitle her to a teacher’s certificate. T h e staff of teachers remains the s a m e as last year. O n M a r c h 21stfive girls were married to y o u n g m e n from the academy. In September one of the older girls, w h o h a d been at h o m e for s o m e time, w a s married to a catechist; and in N o v e m b e r still another b e c a m e the wife of a normal school graduate. Mo s t of these y o u n g wives assist their husbands in school or village work. Six m e m b e r s of the Seminary have united with the C h u r c h during the year.o E x c e p t during the t w o m o n t h s of vacation, the S u n d a y school taught in the Seminary b y the elder girls has been kept u p without interruption throughout the year. T h e s a m e m a y be said of the Friday evening prayer meeting conducted entirely b y the girls themselves. Almost all of the pupils w h o are c o m m unicants have regularly attended the weekly female prayer meetings held in the house of the missionary. T w o bands of K i n g ’s Daughters have been formed in the school, chiefly through the instrumentality of our g o o d matron, Mrs. White, w h o writes in regard to t h e m as follows: “ Other bands of juvenile ‘ K i n g ’s D a u g h t e r s ’ will be pleased to learn that there exists at present t w o bands of these daughters at the F e m a l e Seminary at Vellore, namely, the ‘ Helpful T e n ’ a m o n g the older girls, a n d the ‘Truthful Circle,’ consisting of twenty members, a m o n g the younger children. Alt h o u g h the influence exerted b y t h e m extends over only a limited range, still the example has a salutary effect on the other girls. Also each m e m b e r feels her o w n responsi­ bility, and it is to be h oped that b y these m e a n s all m a y be taught to live and act ‘ In His N a m e . ’ T h e prayers of all the m e m b e r s of other societies are earnestly solicited.”

BIBLE WOMEN. T h e old Bible reader, w h o has been with us so m a n y years, still performs her w o r k faithfully, helping the distressed, comforting the aged, and ministering to the sick. H e r record for the year is as follows: In fifty-five Christian houses she m a d e 452 visits, and spoke1with 1,112 w o m e n ; in 362 heathen houses she m e t and conversed with 1,205 persons; besides the above, she has talked with 2,841 females in various places. T h e faithfulness of our old reader is evident from this report. W e be lieve that her efforts are not in vain, but are blessed to m a n y Christians as well as heathens.


HINDU GIRLS* SCHOOLS. Miss Scudder writes: ‘ T h e A r a s a m a r a m and Circar M a n d y Street Schools. These schools are continuing the go o d w o r k they did last year. T h e n u m b e r of pupils has varied as it always does, but w e can report a slight increase in each school o n the n u m b e r s last given. T h e n u m b e r on the roll of the Arasa­ m a r a m School is 117, with a n average attendance of ninety-three. In the Circar M a n d y the n u m b e r on the roll is 122, with an average attendance of seventy-six. T h e G o v e r n m e n t examination took place at the end of July, with a fairly good result. Mo s t of the teachers have done their w o r k well, and w e w o u l d especially c o m m e n d the Headmaster of A r a s a m a r a m school for his untiring, faithful service of seventeen years’ duration. Mr. Isaac Henry, the Bible teacher in both schools, does an efficient w o r k a n d is never happier than w h e n he has a class of girls a n d is e x ­ p ounding to t h e m the beautiful stories of the Bible. A t the prize-giving a n u m b e r of the English ladies of the station graced the occasion with their presence. Mrs. M c L e o d , the Sub-Col­ lector’s wife, kindly presented and distributed the prizes. T h e fathers and brothers of the pupils always attended the exercises at such times ; and as the little girls promptly answer object-lesson questions, or as the older girls w o r k their s u m s and exhibit their slates, neatly covered with figures, it is a pleasure to watch t h e m a n d see the pride they take in their daughter’s and sister’s attainments. T h e y also listen attentively to the singing of the Christian lyrics b y s o m e of the scholars. Several friends in America have sent the children bright-colored a d ­ vertisements and Christmas cards. A large n u m b e r of t h e m are used monthly. E v e r y child that keeps her hair c o m b e d a n d tidy at least fif­ teen days of the m o n t h is entitled to a card. A goodly n u m b e r of chil­ dren earn the reward each month. W e shall be glad to receive such cards from any, w h o have an over-abundance of them. T w o days a week, one in each school, are devoted to a review of the Bible lessons a n d Catechism. W e have m a n y little proofs that the truths taught the children has had its effect on them, a n d also on their friends at home. O n e of the girls, a child about eight years old, we n t u p to an idol that had been set u p in the house on a feast day and kicked it over, saying that it w a s no g o o d at all, but only an image of clay. T h e people in the house turned to the mother and said “ D o y o u see the result of your child’s learning in school?” Y e t the mother her­ self repeated this story to us, c o m m e n d i n g the action,'of the child, and saying she w a s a wise little one, “ T h e entrance of T h y W o r d giveth light; it giveth understanding to the simple.”

ZENANA WORK.

This w o r k does not advance as fast as w e desire, nor, indeed, as it should, in such a large t o w n as this, containing 40,000 inhabitants. Twenty-eight different houses were visited during the year b y the t w o teachers employed, but with fewexceptions, they are not the sa m e as those


w e had last year. S o m e houses are visited every d a y b y the teachers, others every alternate day. T h e pupils are instructed in secular studies, sewing a n d fancy work. W h e n the lessons are finished, the teacher gathers as m a n y w o m e n of the household as she can, and either reads to t h e m herself from the Bible or s o m e religious book, or she persuades the i.upil to read aloud to the others. T h e household usually consists of m o r e than onejamily, as the parents, grand-parents a n d married sons all live together in the s a m e house. However, quite a n u m b e r of w o m e n can be collected at times, a n d thus the Gospel light is shed u p o n m a n y darkened hearts. T h e result of the reading is frequently a talk on religious subjects. M a n y of the w o m e n w e visit are ignorant. L o n g years of neglect a n d a monotonous round of trivial duties have m a d e their untrained minds dull and apathetic, and yet the message of salvation w e bring is always kindly listened to, and w e k n o w the L o r d has p o w e r to m a k e the seed g r o w even in uncultivated ground. A w o m a n w h o has been under our instruction about t w o years, says she has resolved to leave her h o m e and b e c o m e a Christian. She w a s taught w h e n a girl b y s o m e b o d y in Bangalore. H a v i n g tasted s o m e of the sweetness of Christianity she longs for more. She says she will try and induce her h u s b a n d to b e c o m e a Christian also, but in case of failure she will leave h i m a n d c o m e to us, bringing her only child, a girl of about eight years, with her. Mrs. Isaac Henry, herself a convert fr o m heathenism, has often talked with a n d encouraged her. T h e former is still engaged in her voluntary service for the Lord.

OUT-STATIONS. In reference to these I have but little to report. In M a r c h last Mr. Isaac Lazar, a faithful Catechist of m a n y years experience, w a s ordained to the Gospel Ministry a n d installed as pastor of the churches of Kandiputtur a n d Sekadu, this relieved m e of their'pastoral supervision. Rev. A b r a h a m William has h a d spiritual charge of the church of Kottapatte in addition to his o w n church of Katpadi. These native brethren will themselves submit reports of the condition and prospects of their several churches. M y o w n w o r k in the out-stations is n o w con­ fined mainly to a general supervision of their congregations a n d schools. I visit t h e m as frequently as other duties will allow. In m y inspections last year, I discovered nothing out of the c o m m o n run. I m a y say, however, that I generally found matters in fair order; and felt, on the whole, encouraged b y m y visits. W h i l e no phenomenal progress is perceptible fr o m year to year, these village Christians and schools assuredly s h o w a m a r k e d advance on their condition of twelve years ago, w h e n they c a m e under m y charge. T o inspect t h e m then w a s a painful a n d disheartening task. T h e y h a d but just emerged fr o m a terrible famine. E v e r y b o d y and everything looked gaunt and woebegone. T h e schools were m o r e farcical than effective. Poverty-stricken m e n and w o m e n were languid ° a n d averse to exertionâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; physical or spiritual. N o w affairs we a r a


different aspect. N o t but that there is abundant r o o m for improve­ ment. T h e greater part of the people are still poor, very poor, and have to struggle hard' even for existence. T h e schools, too, w o u l d not pass muster as first-class institutions either here or at home. N o n e the less it. is a great satisfaction to see our village Christians m o r e tolerably well fed a n d clothed ; to find that several of the schools have fourth standard classes, and to observe the instruction in t h e m is notably m o r e effective and productive than it w a s in those g l o o m y years of the past. W e cannot help hoping that the worst stage is overâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; the stage of hard and apparently profitless w o r k â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and that fr o m the vantage ground already gained m o r e favorable results will be m o r e rapidly achieved. Du r i n g the year eighty-seven persons joined us from heathenism, a n d the n a m e s of thirty-seven were struck off the list as unsatisfactory persons. This s h ows a net gain of fifty-two adherents.

THE READING ROOM. This has been open six days in each w e e k throughout the year. T h e total n u m b e r of visitors w a s 19,927, showing an increase of 1,433 above that of the previous year. T h e average daily attendance w a s sixty-three. All these have h a d access to various kinds of literature, secular and religious, a n d all have h a d the Gospel read to them. N o w and again w e see evidence of go o d effected. A y o u n g Brahmin, w h o is a frequent visitor to the room, has applied to m e for baptism ; but the case is too recent to be recorded as a success. It proves, however, that the agency is effectual in a w a k i n g thought, and at times, a desire for better things. W e are persuaded that the r o o m is doing a good, if a silent work, in m a n y hearts.

.

EVANGELISTIC WORK.

T h e following are the statistics of tho-daily preaching here and at the out-stations: ' In and about Vellore, 2,177 addresses in 364 places, to 28,002 persons. In and about the out-stations of Vellore, 4,856 addresses, in 552 places, to 90,096 persons. In a n d about the out-stations of Chittoor, temporarily under m y care, 906 addresses, in 138 places, to 17,751 persons. Including the reading r o o m audiences, the Gospel has, during the year, been preached 8,252 times, in 1,055 places, to audiences aggregating 215,856 persons. T h e n u m b e r of books and tracts distributed w a s 9,222.


\


C H U R C H OF C H R I S T IN JAPAN. Statistical T able, 1890. d PRESBYTERIES

Baptisms during the 3 ear.

Membership, October, 1890.

18

AND

S

as

CHURCHES.

So O

1

3

s

n o

g

£ S

1 3 g

£

■3 o H

342 28 162 22 106 4r 106 2L 11 7 71 2c 27 11 21 { 76 44 87 34 4C 3C 157 106 27 32 22 14 82 11 32 6 10 2

650 374 28S 318 4C 187 99 7( 187 246 15C 467 95 74 194 67 40

!

I I S Yen.

D ai Ichi, To k y o : Kaigan, Y o k o h a m a . Shinsakae, Tokyo... OU U U J ' U S X l l ' V l U J , X U K U U t U U

688 35( 287 29^ 4(

i

Sukiyabashi, T o k y o .... Shiuagawa. ** .... Kojitnachi, .... Sakura, S h i m o s a ....... Nakabaslii, T o k y o ...... Daimachi. “ .•..... Mishima, I z u ........... Kujukuri, K a z u s a ...... Shiba, T o k y o .......... Akasaka, “ .......... Motodaiku-cho. Tokyo... Yokosuka, S a g a m i . .... Murakami. Echigo...... Hota, B o s h u ........... *Sakurada, T o k y o ...... Meiji Gakuin “ ....... A k u w a ................

aos

66 41 1*1 4‘i 3 i r ( 16 11 1 26 a

5 5

£ 9C 7(1 i 177 4 252 146 471 2 10C 2 73 1 167 45 41 IS 43 102 “ 84 "18 88 20 1

s

71 280 19( 17 136 44 190 c !<! 6 85 » . 61 1C 4( 2C 67 11 125 1 74 26 204 6 35 4 37 46 101 26 27 28 102 21 89 3°

i 44

s

412

11 19

1

466 1815 1428

i 5

7 1 “3

1

3 8

1 2

2 1

1 "a 1

101 66

1

1,785.256 616.783 615.870 586.366 262.543 347.374 66.700 153. 455.953 330.991 77.930 583.387 719.950 74.910 280.286 41.352 23.350 279,735 107.805 13.

371'4

D ai N i, Tokyo : Ueda, Shinshu... Omori, S h i m o s a . Asakusa, Tokyo. Ushigome, “ . Ryogoku, “ . Kongo, “ . W a d o , Boshu. Ktriu, Joshu. Shitaya, T o k y o ... Nihon-bashi, “ .... Adachi. “ .... H o n jo, “ . ... Utsunomiya, Yashu. Meisei, T o k y o ...... Bancho, “ ..... Kasuga, Shinshu__ H i k oma, Y a s h u ... Isezaki, G u m m a ... F u k agawa, T o k y o ... Takata, Echigo.... Ashikaga. Joshu I w a m u r a d a ....... Total.

85 29 138 447 188 186 103 90 187 211 58 75 93 193 194 40 32 25

3 5 26 13 10 2 3 6 6 2 3

6 3

6

16 36

11 7

3 44 38 ,3 24 11 63 34 29 158 182 13 93 69 10 90 66 o 56 30 3 40 30 6 114 76 6 72 67 2 19 17 3 32 23 6 40 37 16 81 84 36 129 113 26 6 18 9 11 39 11 22 14

58

29

2432 155

7 o 15 49 33 18 19 22 “ 31 14 8 19 40 1

6

0

89 29 112 " 2 389 3 195 3 174 1 105 92 1 195 1 170 50 63 96 205 2 243 32 33 42

1 1 1 1 1 5

1 1

131.803 92.166 321.720 407.350 328.925 301.405 159.685 159.637 4M.618 50.500 42.285 145.880 127.326 309.698 384.997 38.721 .83. • 70.737 196,400 3.500 20.040

29

9 164 1248 982 303 2533 13 12

C hinzei : Nagasaki, Hizen...... Y a u a g a w a , C M k u g o ... Akamagaseki, Nagato.. Kagoshima, S a t s u m a .. Yamaguchi, S u w o .... Toyoura, N a g a t o ..... Hiroshima. Aki....... Matsu-ura, Hi z e n ..... U n a t t a c h e d .......... Total.

236 146 48 40 155 47 129 38 32

18 10 13 2 15 4 28 7 4

871

101

* United with Shiba, Tokyo.

2

1 12 2

i

20 10 13 3 27 6 28 8 4

96 48 40 13 58 23 88 15 18

62 46 11 11 69 20 66 13 18

46 47 6 15 38 12 2 16

18 119 399 316 182

204 141 57 39 165 55 156 44 36

2 2

2

248.650 193.820 79.450 15.410 222.290 83.460 234.552 65.140 30.250

897

7 23

1,123*!o 22

3 14

3 2 2


C H R I S T

JAPAN.

|

|

Licentiates.

Out-stations.

Contributions for all purposes.

Total.

Women.

Membership October, 1890.

Children.

Children.

Baptisms during the year.

Adults.

AND CHURCHES.

Total Membership, October, 1889.

PRESBYTERIES

IN

1890.— Continued.

Men.

OF

Statistical, T a b l k ,

Total.

C H U R C H

N aniwa :

Tonomachi, K a n a z a w a ___

Dai Ni, '

.... .....

Nagoya. Owari (2d)......

Yen. 410.375 334.281 525.457 626.274 178.360 93.056 30.678 6.300 239.750 111.580 194.245 15.017 7.500 98.464 63.944 63.732

156 144 278 582 169 52 63 67 129 50 108 23 41 74 24 89 60

Total...............

2059 276

72 348 1093 872 335 2300

9 13

2,599.013

M iyagi: 661 120 89 76 37 121 Estimated...........

.

1134 133

133 812 349

6 1167 10 18

_

1,786.182

Su m m a r y : Dai Ichi, T o k y o ......... Dai Ni, ** ........ Chinzei............... * N a n i w a ................ Miyagi..................

3698 2482 871 2059 1134

412 155 101 276 133

54 9 18 72

466 164 119 348 133

1815 1248 399 1093 812

1428 982 316 872 349

471 303 182 335 6

3714 11 25 2533 13 12 897 7 23 2300 9 13 1167 10 18

7,372.541 3,777.388 1,123.022 2,599.018 1,786.132

Total ............... 10194 1077 153 1230 5367 3947 1297 10611 50 91 16,658.096


T H E N O R T H J A P A N MISSION. O R G A N I Z E D 1859.

Missionaries.— Revs. Guido F. Verbeck, D.D., J a m e s H. Ballagh, E. Rothesay Miller, J a m e s L. A m e r m a n , D.D., E u g e n e S. Booth, H o w a r d Harris an d Prof. M. N. Wyckoff.

Assistant Missionaries— Miti. Verbeck,

Mrs. Ballagh, Mrs. Miller, Mrs. A m e r ­

m a n , Mrs. Booth. Mrs. Harris. Mrs. Wyckoff, Miss M. Leila Winn, Miss A n n a deF. T h o m p s o n . Miss M a r y Deyo, Miss Julia Moulton an d Miss M a r y E. Brokaw.

T h e greater part of the w o r k of the Mission is carried on conjointly with the other missions immediately interested in the C h u r c h of Christ. T h e following [together with the Statistical Table] is extracted f r o m the Fourteenth Report of the Council of the Co-operating Missions. “ T h e history of missions in J apan has hitherto been one of almost uninterrupted success. T h e barriers seemed crumbling a n d all o b ­ stacles to be vanishing away. M e n b e c a m e confident of the speedy completion of the work, and set the date in the near future w h e n all J a p a n w o u l d be evangelized and w e could pass on to help in China. “ B u t it w a s not likely that the e n e m y w o u l d yield Japan without a struggle, and the history of the past year is one of larger difficulties and smaller progress. S o m e reports tell of encouragements, and speak with enthusiasm. Others tell of stifling apathy or active opposition. There is no record of a n y great outpouring of the H o l y Spirit. There is no s t i m n g record of great achievements. Y e t there has been progress and but for the wonderful successes in the past it w o u l d be called good progress. “ S o m e of the causes of this difference it is easy to see. T h e rice famine pressed heavily not only on the very poor, but u p o n the middle classes as well. This tended to reduce schools, volunteer workers a n d contributions, a n d affected the attitude of listeners to the Gospel. A g a i n the carrying into effect the n e w Constitution, political meetings, elections, the excitement over treaty revision, the near approach of the opening of J a p a n ’s first Parliament— all these things were calculated to fill m e n ’s m inds with thoughts of this .world only, a n d to alienate m a n y of t h e m fr o m foreigners to a certain degree. O n the one h a n d the Buddhists eagerly seized the anti-foreign feeling, a n d 1carefully fanned it through the press and lecture meetings in every possible way, saying that Christianity w a s essentially disloyal. O n the other h a n d there were those w h o encouraged patriotism to throw off the yo k e of ortho­ doxy, take a m o r e liberal view of truth, unite the good in all religions, and m a k e a n e w faith, a Japanese Christianity, adapted to the peculiar


needs of their o w n people. T o c r o w n all, the P l y m o u t h Brethren came, denouncing the corruption of the churches a n d the hireling ministry, and saying, ‘ C o m e to us ; w e alone are pure.’ A s a con­ sequence, s o m e w e n t over to t h e m ; others, without leaving the Church, cooled in zeal, b e coming rationalistic in belief and worldly in life. T h e great w o n d e r is that so f e w fell a w a y a n d that such a great n u m b e r stood firm. This is one of the encouragements of the year. T h e believers w h o stand firm now, or w h o shall be baptized hereafter, will be tried, reliable Christians, able to give a reason for the fajth that is in them. T h e great need for the C h u r c h in J a p a n now, m o r e than increase in number, is to develop the character of the Christians already enrolled, so that they will practically carry out in daily life the prin­ ciples they profess, and that the n a m e of Christian will be a s y n o n y m for all that is honest, noble and, pure. T o this end they need thorough instruction and grounding in the truths of the Bible, a n d the trans­ forming p o w e r of the H o l y Spirit that they m a y live according to those truths.. A b o v e all things, at present, the great need of both teachers a n d taught is the out-pouring of the H o l y Spirit. “ T H E C H O R C H O F C H R I S T IN J A P A N .

“ T h e statistical table ap p e n d e d to this report s h ows the n u m b e r added to the C h u r c h b y baptism to be 1,230 ; 208 less than the n u m b e r reported a year ago. T h e adult m e m b e r s n u m b e r 9,314 ; the net gain is 360. This small net gain is the result of a very general revision of the rolls of church members. T h e n u m b e r of churches is seventy-one, an increase of three. F o u r n e w churches have been organized and t w o churches in the First T o k y o C h u k w a i (Presbytery) have been united. T h e ordained ministers n u m b e r forty-five, a ga'in of five. T h e licentiates n u m b e r fifty, a gain of three. T h e contributions for all purposes are Y e n 16,658.09, including about Y e n 120 per m o n t h for the Missionary B o a r d of the Church. T h e whole a m o u n t is about Y e n 1,400 less than that reported last year.” • EVANGELISTIC

WORK.

Tokyo.— “ In the capital city, where our churches and m e m b e r s are most numerous, the state of the w o r k is, perhaps, m o r e unfavorable than an y w h e r e else. T h e hindrances mentioned in the former part of this report, political excitement, poverty, heresy, defection of m e m b e r s — any weakening cause felt a n y w h e r e in the country— operates with increased force in the capital. ‘1T h e results are seen in a loss of interest in spiritual things, worldly living, poverty-stricken churches and churches disturbed b y faction and schism. H o wever, w e believe that even in such a state of affairs the Lord has yet m a n y thousands w h o have not b o w e d the knee to Baal. ‘O n the other hand,’ the T o k y o report continues, ‘it is a joy to receive most gratifying reports fr o m the workers sent from T o k y o throughout the provinces. It is abundantly evident that evangelistic w o r k in these


sections is full of promise. Another thing not to be forgotten is the occupation of a large n u m b e r of n e w places. This w a s rendered possi­ ble b y the graduation f r o m the Theological School of an exceptionally large and go o d class. In choosing places, special care w a s taken to select such as are likely to be important centers, andlsuch as will tend to complete the lines of the Church of Christ.’ T h e list of places occu­ pied extends fr o m Chiba o n the east coast, a n d fr o m Tokyo, north to Sapporo a n d west to Niigata.” T h e above work, w h ich is mostly under the care of the Evangelistic Commi t t e e of the First a n d Second Presbyteries, of T o k y o , and under the Domestic B o ard of Missions of the C h u r c h of Christ, is aided to the extent of one-fourth of its funds f r o m the Treasury,of the Mission. M e m b e r s of the Mission act on the committee a n d share in the direction a n d oversight of the work. T h e Mission regrets that n o full report of the Domestic B o ard or Evangelistic C o m m i t t e e has been furnished. T h e churches of W a d o Mura, Shitaya a n d Kojimachi have been aided finan­ cially, either in carrying o n evangelistic w o r k or in erecting and m a i n ­ taining church buildings b y funds from the Mission. These churches, in c o m m o n with others in the capital, have shared in the ministrations of the m e m b e r s of the Mission. Mr. a n d Mrs. Harris and Mrs. Wyckoff, since her return, have rendered efficient service to the Meiji Jo-Gakko, a large, independent, Christian girls’ school, in both their w e e k d a y a n d Sabbath school serv­ ices. T h e Weekly Evangelist is in part sustained in c o m m o n with the aid of the Presbyterian Mission in East Japan. O w i n g to the absence of Rev. G. F. Verbeck, D. D., the remaining evangelistic w o r k of this station has been almost exclusively under the care of Rev. Jas. H . Ballagh, of Y o k o h a m a , for the year 1890. Mr. Ballagh reports: “ T h e absence of Mrs. Ballagh in A m e r i c a for five m o n t h s requiring m o r e than usual attention to domestic affairs, and the prevalence of cholera in mo s t parts of the field, y o u r missionary w a s prevented fr o m visiting the northern a n d southern extremities of his field the past year. T h e w o r k in each of these sections has not been neglected, however. T h e Rev. R. E. McAlpine, of the Southern Presbyterian Mission, re­ siding at N a g oya, has personally supervised the w o r k of our evangelist, Mr. K a t o Torahiko, a n d administered baptism a n d the L o r d ’s Su p p e r at M i z u n o a n d Seto. T h e w o r k has been reported to be of a very encouraging nature, es­ pecially at the latter place. Preaching services have been very largely attended, at times thronged. A considerable n u m b e r of baptisms have taken place; it seems time they should be getting a pastor. T h e y w o u l d at present be unable to d o m u c h toward his support; but, as the place is noted for its porcelain manufacture, it m a y safely be predicted that the church will soon b e c o m e self-supporting. A t both these places the believers have small, but neat chapels. Mr. K a t o has done a large a m o u n t of evangelistic w o r k in this neighborhood, a n d has also, several


times, visited T s u g u m u r a , a remote a n d inaccessible place far u p in the mountains, w h ere a single family of believers is found, a n d also several enquirers m a k e it necessary to look after the place. A school teacher, once an elder in the Hotta C h u r c h in Boshiu, spent t w o m o n t h s there this s u m m e r , doing very faithfuul service.

Shinshiu.— T h e w o r k here has been under the care of Rev. Ishiwara Yasutaro, the traveling evangelist of the Domestic B o ard of Missions. A s this B o ard receives largely fr o m the Presbyterian and R e f o r m e d C h u r c h Missions, he seeks to look after the w o r k of these Missions as well. H e visited all our stations in Shinshiu several times this year, holding services, administering baptism and the L o r d ’s Supper. ’ A t Iwamurada a church w a s organized last a u t umn, including nearly all the believers in Komoro as well, a place about ten miles distant.* Du r i n g the s u m m e r students labored at Ueda and Kasuga. In vil­ lages contiguous to the latter place s o m e n e w enquirers have been found. A t Ueda several zealous brethren, including a former helper of ours, have been led a w a y b y the efforts of the P l y m o u t h brethren A foreign “ P l y m o u t h Brother” visited there and urged a m a n to be b a p ­ tized w h o w a s not prepared for it. This has rather d a m p e n e d Christian zeal at that place. . Mr. P u r u s a w a Kuiji, our tried helper in Shinshiu, w h o s e entire sal­ ary a n d a part of his traveling expenses are borne b y the Mission has given s o m e service to the church at Kasuga for a f e w m o n t h s past. This church is not in a flourishing condition, having no pastor, a n d several of its best believers are student for the ministry in Saikyo or Tokyo, a n d Mr. P u r u s a w a is likely to be sent to Selomura in the hope that he will b e c o m e their pastor. « Efafo.— T h e church at this place has received about two-thirds sup­ port of its pastor^Rev. Ishiwara Ryo, for the past year. There has been s o m e progress, but nothing marked. A graduate of the last class has just been sent to this church. ' ' , __ N e w stations have been opened, a n d n e w m e n have been located in Shinshiu since J u n e last. O n e w a s located at Matmrmto, a large t o w n in Southern Shinshiu. Mr. H a r s a w a and Mr. Hiroshima have labored there. T h e w o r k has grown. Several baptisms have taken place. T h e Methodists have w o r k there also. A n d the C h u r c h of Christ in Japan has been a go o d incentive to zeal a n d diligence. . , A t one or t w o points south of M a t s u m o t o the native Board has ho p e ­ ful work.

Nagano.— Mr. Tsuki, a late graduate, has been located here. Other Missions have w o r k e d there, but so far our representative seems to have the greatest measure of success. It is a place f a m o u s for its great Buddhist temple Zenkoji. Pilgrims visit it f r o m all parts of Japan, counting it one of the mo s t meritorious things in their lives. This city * Mr/ Yanagizawa, a recent Theological graduate, has b e c o m e the pastor of this


being on the line of railroad from T o k y o to the west coast m a k e s it both important a n d easy of access. All these stations were visited during the s u m m e r b y Rev. Mr. Inagaki, at the expense of the Mission, a n d in the a u t u m n Rev. H a r a z a w a K i d o w a s sent on a similar visitation with good results.

Shizuoka.— This large city is situated o n the Tokaido Railroad, 120 miles south of Y o k o h a m a . T h e Canadian Methodists have a wellestablished w o r k here, with a go o d c o m p a n y of foreign laborers en­ g a ged in school work. It having been thought desirable b y the native brethren that the C h u r c h of Christ should have w o r k here, Mr. Hikaru, a graduate of the last Theological class, w a s stationed here, in June, A t first his w a y seemed blocked, but he soon found several earnest en­ quirers a m o n g the prison officials, a n d recently several baptisms have taken place, including m e m b e r s of his o w n family. A visit w a s m a d e to this place in c o m p a n y with Rev. Mr. Ito, of Mishima, in the autumn. Mr. Hikaru unites with the Methodist brethren in lecture meetings and all general services. T h e y even propose to sell h i m their old church, w h i c h is desirably situated, as they are preparing to erect a fine build­ ing in one of the mo s t conspicuous places of the' city. This t o w n is remarkably free from Buddhist persecution. T h e chief temple of the place is a Shinto shrine. Hotta and These places are situated in the province of A w a or Boshiu, the southern peninsula of Chibaken, east of the B a y of Yeddo. It is a small province, about fifty miles long a n d twenty wide ; and is, practically, left to our mission to evangelize. Episcopalians a n d Romanists have labored at several places, but apparently have aban­ doned the field, not fr o m our faithful occupancy so, m u c h as fr o m its apparent sterility. T h e w o r k w a s b e g u n here four or five years ago, resulting in bringing into the C h u r c h several good m e n and workers, a m o n g w h o m w a s Mr. S a k u m a Kichitaro, the prison evangelist at Chiba. T h e believers at Hotta and Narabayashi, a, place ten miles dis­ tant, were organized into a church, w hich has been without pastor or stated supply until this year. A Theological graduate, Mr. O k a y a m a , spent one year at these places; but as his labors did not seem to benefit the Church, he w a s allowed to remove to Hbjo, a larger a n d m o r e i m ­ portant town, and open fresh work. A s a result, Rev. A. Segawa, while on a visit to his wife’s relatives at this place, baptized t w o w o m e n . There are several enquirers as, well. Mr. O k a y a m a w a s taken ill in December, and died of typhoid fever, on the 8th of January, 1891. Messrs. Kurihara a n d H a r a z a w a were sent to visit him, the latter w a s with h i m w h e n he died. •. Afaroftas/as/ri.— There were four accessions here this year, the parents of Mr. S a k u m a a n d the Rev. Mr. Kurihara. Mr. Yoshioka, the first worker in that field, has returned to our connection, a n d the mission is favorable to his trying work,there afresh. A foreign worker, p e r m a ­ nently located in this field, w o u l d be a great help, as, indeed, such are in' any part of the country.


Yokosuka.— In the autu m n , Eev. Mr. Kurihara w a s ordained pastor over this church ; before that the foreign missionary administered the ordinances. It is to be regretted that the native Bible w o m a n , w h o for s o m e time has been efficient in Christian w o r k in this section, has been obliged, on account of failing health, to go to her h o m e in Tosa, where she has been useful, though there is little hope'of her recovery. A t the towns of Hatmwa and Misaki, sixteen to twenty miles south of Y o k o ­ suka, a n u m b e r of persons have been baptized. M o s t of these were families of the Tsurugizaki a n d Joka-shima light-house keepers. During the s u m m e r and a u t u m n a helper w a s sustained there at private ex­ pense, n o w they support one a m o n g themselves. . Totsuka. — This town, situated on the Tokaido Railroad, twelve miles from Y o k o h a m a , has a n u m b e r of believers connected with the JCaigan Church, Y o k o h a m a . O n e of them, Mr. Y amanoi, built a chapel costing $254, at his o w n expense. A licentiate lives in it and conducts regular services a n d S u n d a y school. ' Akuwa is a' place five miles distant from Totsuka, w h e r e a C h u r c h w a s organized in the autu m n , with sixty members. All this section has been repeatedly visited b y the missionary. . Ootemba, Nakayama and Koyama. — T h r o u g h the labors of an elderly licentiate and his wife, the w o r k in these places has been mo r e than usually encouraging. There have been several baptisms, and Sabbath schools s e e m fairly successful. M u c h foreign labor w a s ex ­ pe n d e d at these points during the s u m m e r b y gentlemen and ladies stopping here for their vacation. T h e effect is apparent in all that sec­ tion of country ; an increasing respect for Christianity, a n d a readiness to listen to its teachings. T h e R o m a n Catholics have established a leper hospital at K o y a m a ; a n d one of our converts having b e c o m e a physician in it, has changed his faith; but w e regard it as a bid for support rather than a change from conviction of truth. Mishima.— T h e Mission pays two-thirds of the pastor’s salary; but he has the supervision of a large field, visiting Hakone, Yamarmk/i and Kashmakuho, w h ere there are companies of believers. Several i m por­ tant accessions have been m a d e to this church during the year, but the older believers a n d office bearers have b e c o m e less interested in spiritual matters and m o r e absorbed in secular affairs. Several have c o m e to grief in their business pursuits, w h i c h has m a d e another of their n u m ­ ber, Mr. Hanajima, all the more, zealous, as he thinks it very necessary for the reputation of Christianity, that its believers should strive to prosper. T h e girls’ school is independent of the Mission, a n d is under the care of the pastor and Miss Lizzie Ballagh. Yokohama.— T h e Mission has opened a n e w preaching place in the suburbs of this rapidly growing city in a district called Ota. G r o u n d has been rented, a building, formerly used as an English parochial school, bought, removed and re-erected u p o n it, m a k i n g a very suitable


chapel, at a cost of $250. T h e funds for this w o r k were taken1 from the receipts of the K a i g a n C h u r c h property. A S u n d a y school has already, been gathered of seventy children. N o w , that a suitable laborer offers, it will be opened for regular preaching services1;

'

' MORIOKA

i'

STATION.

Rev. E. R. Miller writes : There has been m u c h to encourage us in our w o r k in Morioka during the year, and there h ave been discouraging circumstances. T h e great d r a w b a c k has been the loss of m e m b e r s b y removal to other places. A t the end of the year there were thirty-three n a m e s o n (the roll, but only fourteen of these live in Morioka ; nine have been.baptized during the year, t w o w o m e n and seven m e n ; a n d one w o m a n has died. Five have been dismissed-by letter to other churches. , < . . ’ Besides these believers w h o have been baptized in Morioka, there are nineteen other persons, m e m b e r s of the Itchi K y o k w a i , w h o are living here. S o that, were a church organized here, there w o u l d be flfty-twO' persons on the roll. i ■ Mr. and Mrs. Hayashi, w h o h a d been with us fr o m the very first, left at the end of M a r c h for the t o w n of M o m b e t s u , in the island of Tezo, w here Mr. Hayashi took charge of the church after being ordained b y the Chukwai. I w a s appointed b y the C h u k w a i on the committee of installation, and as neither of the other m e m b e r s could attend, I left Morioka at the end of October a n d held the installation service in the M o m b e t s u church o n the second of, N o v e m b e r , having stopped at the t o w n of F u k u o k a to visit s o m e believers a n d see if there w a s an open­ ing for work. . W h e n Mr. Hayashi w e n t to M o m b e t s u the C h u r c h there requested the Mission to help t h e m in paying their pastor’s salary, but as the Ger­ m a n R e f o r m e d Mission h a d been carrying on evangelistic w o r k in that' neighborhood a n d wished to continue it the matter w a s left in their hands. T o w a r d s the end of the year, however, the G e r m a n R e f o r m e d Mission desired us to take over the w o r k at M o m b e t s u , w h i c h w e ha v e done, so that Mr. Hayashi’s n a m e appears again o n our books since November. , A t the end of April w e were obliged to leave the preaching place hitherto occupied in Dchimaru, the center of Morioka, a n d for six m o n t h s occupy a place which, th o u g h convenient for the most of the believers, w a s not well situated for outsiders generally. In October w e m o v e d to a large a n d convenient house in K a w ara, Koji, w h i c h is both central and at the s a m e time retired. N e a r the beginning of M a y , |Mr. Uchida, a graduate f r o m .the T h e o ­ logical Seminary, c a m e to take charge of the w o r k at H a n a m a k i ; after his c o m i n g the w o r k improved ; but it is a difficult place w h e r e are workers fr o m both the Greek a n d R o m i s h Churches. Mr. Uchida h a d to return to his h o m e at Y o n e z a w a for about t w o m o n t h s on account of sickness, but in spite of all the discouragements, since the opening of


the n e w year, Mr. M i u r a has baptized five believers and received another on examination from the Greek Church. In J u n e a n e w preaching place w a s opened in K a w a r a Cho, near the end of the t o w n towards Tokyo. T h e service is held S u n d a y even­ ings, and during the w a r m weather the standing audience w a s s o m e ­ times quite large, but with the cold weather it has decreased. Tracts are distributed after the service. This w o r k w a s placed under the special care of Mr. Hayasaka, but since he left at the end of the year the w o r k m a y be given up. Mr. H a y a s a k a w a s for a while in the T h e o ­ logical Seminary at Sendai. • W o r k w a s b e g u n in the prison at the end of August. A Buddhist priest h a d been e m p l o y e d there as teacher and religious instructor, but the prisoners h a d b e c o m e tired of h i m and comparatively f e w attended his services. T h e y further desired to hear something of Christianity. S o m e w e e k s after application h a d been m a d e for permission to preach in the prison, I s a w b y the papers that the n e w regulations for prisons were to go into effect, a n d Mr. M i ura a n d myself m a d e another appli­ cation, w h i c h w a s immediately granted, from w h i c h time preaching serv­ ices have been held every S u n d a y afternoon. T h e old priest w a s a w a y at the time w e b e gan to hold our services, and during his absence the attendance w a s very large, reaching over 300. B u t in October a n e w priest c a m e to take his place, w h o w a s greatly surprised at the course things had taken. H e has w o r k e d hard ever since to pre­ vent the prisoners from hearing our preaching, meeting all n e w c o m e r s a n d m a k i n g t h e m promise to have nothing to do with Christianity, and if afterwards a n y one changed his m i n d a n d wished to c o m e the priest prevented h i m fr o m doing so. A s the priest w a s always in attendance a n d exercised a semi-official authority, and as s o m e of the under officials sided with h i m indirectly, a great m a n y were kept a w a y f r o m attending the meetings for s o m e months. But, as m i g h t have been.expected, his zeal defeated itself, for since religion is n o w free b y the Constitution,' his endeavors to keep those a w a y f r o m hearing our preaching w h o wished to be present, soon b e c a m e manifested and w a s stopped. A n absurd tract w h i c h he wrote a n d h a d printed, w h i c h w a s intended to m a k e fun of the account of the fall in Genesis, w a s forbidden to be cir­ culated a m o n g the prisoners, a n d even s o m e of those w h o were before favorable to h i m b e c a m e disgusted at his w a y s of working. In conse­ quence of all this the original twenty-five w h o declared that they w o u l d have nothing to d o with his teachings, have g r o w n to sixty or one h u n ­ dred, a n d there is every prospect of the n u m b e r still increasing. There are a f e w Christians a m o n g the employees of the prison, a n d through t h e m w e have been always able to distribute tracts to a n y w h o w o u l d take them. W e hope n o w that the interest will gradually spread and that w e shall be able to influence m a n y for good. T h e w o m e n ’s meetings are s o m e w h a t smaller than last year, but are kept u p with interest. T h e weekly meeting is still held at our house o n T h u r s d a y afternoon, a n d Mrs. Miller has the w o m a n ’s Bible class immediately after the morn i n g service on the Sabbath. There is also


a class for w o m e n and girls in the S u n d a y school. A benevolent society has been formed, mostly of y o u n g girls, w h ich meets every Saturday m o r ning at our house to knit a n d s e w articles w hich they sell and expect to use the m o n e y to help poor people. T h e y p a y a trifle every w e e k into the funds of the society, b y w h ich materials are bought. T h e m e m b e r s are not all Christians. T h e S u n d a y school is still flourishing, th o u g h the attendance is not so large as at first. T h e average attendance for the year w a s thirtyeight. W e h a d a m i d s u m m e r picnic in July and a delightful Christmas celebration, w h e n prizes were given for the recitation of the Golden Texts for the year and for the most punctual attendance. T h e singing, of w h i c h there w a s a large share, w a s remarkably well done for a co u n ­ try congregation. Both old a n d y o u n g folks are fond of singing, and attend regularly the practice classes at the- S u n d a y school, and before the weekly prayer meeting. This last year w e have been studying the International S u n d a y School Lessons, a n d since the helps are not very full as yet in Japan, I have a meeting of the teachers on Friday evening to go over the lesson for the next Sunday. T o this Bible lesson so m e f e w others attend w h o d o not c o m e to the regular services. . T h e m o n t h l y union prayer meeting is held alternately at our o w n and the Methodist preaching place. T h e Baptists have dropped out. T h e Y. M . C. A. is still kept up, but has not m u c h life in it. '

e d u c a t i o n a l

w o r k

.

Meiji Gakuin.— “ T h e report fr o m the Meiji Gakuin, the chief male school of the Church, is pleasing in several particulars. In the T h e o ­ logical department of this institution, the largest and mo s t promising class in its history, a class of nineteen w a s graduated last April.., This class, as mentioned above, w a s put into the field immediately, m a k i n g it possible to extend the lines and enlarge the evangelistic w o r k to a gratifying extent. T h e w o r k of the institution has been enlarged b y re-opening the Japanese Theological department with severer require­ ments for admission than before. Nineteen m e n successfully passed the examination and have entered the junior class. In J u n e the n e w and c o m m o d i o u s Theological Hall w a s completed a n d dedicated. T h e Council w o u l d record its gratitude to Mr. Williams for his gift toward the building— also to the Japanese C h u r c h for its contributions. Eev. C. K. Imbrie, D.D., of U. 8. A., presented to the library 700 valuable volumes. Grants of books have been also received from the R e f o r m e d C h u r c h a n d Am e r i c a n Presbyterian Missions. F o r these gifts the Council joins with the Directors in expressing hearty thanks. In the school for lay preachers the w o r k has been m o r e carefully defined and distinguished f r o m the Japanese Theological department, a n d n e w students are required to be self-supporting, though a f e w scholarships will, it is hoped, be established. F e w e r students than last year are in attendance. It is h o p e d that elders and other laymen, w h o desire a s o m e ­ w h a t thorough systematic training, will avail themselves of its privileges, “ T h e courses of study have been changed, both in the preparatory


a n d academic departments, so as to conform to the curriculum of government schools of the s a m e grade, thus fitting a full graduate to enter immediately into the Imperial University. A vice-president has been elected a n d the discipline of the institution placed in his hands. Matters outside of the recitation r o o m are placed, with regulations, in the hands of Japanese m e m b e r s of the faculty. T h e libraries of the t w o departments have been combined and placed in the n e w hall, w h ere a reading r o o m also has been opened. In addition to the prescribed religious services, an English service is provided, and open to all. This institution has h a d its o w n troubles induced b y the prevalent decided reaction against schools under foreign and religious influence. It has also elevated its curriculum a n d lengthened its course of study. B u t in spite of these facts, while other similar schools have h a d a decided decrease in numbers, this has practically held its own, w h i c h is cause for gratulation a n d encouragement.” • Ferris Seminary.— T h e total n u m b e r of pupils enrolled during the year has been 120. T h e present n u m b e r in attendance is 104, distrib­ uted in the several departments a n d classes as follows :

Class. A c a d e m i c Dept. P Senior. . . . . . . . . . . . G r a m m a r Dept. “ A ” . . . '.. . . . . . . . . “ B ” ............. “ C ” .. . . . . . . . . . . . . “ D ” ............. Preparatory Dept. 2d Y e a r . . . . . . . . . . . 1st Y e a r . . . . . . . . . . . Shoga k k u . ' 1st Y e a r . . . . .■..... Kindergarten. 1st Ye a r . . . . . . . . . . .

No. op C hris­ B aptized P upils. A ssisted. tians. T his Y ear

4 1

1

4 1

10 15 18 23

8 6 8 1

10 11 11 6

8 11

2

2 3

26

48

1

9 5 104

-

1

A l t h o u g h the n u m b e r of pupils is t w o in excess of that reported last year, there is an actual decrease of twelve in the higher classes. T h e w o r k of the year 1890 has been for the most part satisfactory. B o t h pupils and teachers have s h o w n increasing interest in their various respective departments. B o t h foreign a n d Japanese teachers have h a d all they could do, and in s o m e cases mo r e w a s necessarily d e m a n d e d of t h e m than could be performed with satisfactory thoroughness, still m u c h comfort is derived from the thought, “ it m ight have been worse.” ’ T h e early part of the year found Miss M . Leila W i n n very ill with malarial fever, but the Heavenly Father mercifully spared her life a n d


has permitted her to represent the school with excellent success to its m a n y friends in America. Miss M a r y E..Brokaw, w h o w a s transferred from the Jonathan Sturges Seminary, Nagasaki, c a m e in good time to take Miss W i n n ’s w o r k from the place she h a d been compelled to drop it. Besides her w o r k in school, Miss B r o k a w continued Miss W i n n ’s Sat­ urday w o r k at Tokomika, and also her S u n d a y school in connection with the embroidery factory .in Fukutomi Oho, Yokohama. Within the year there have been three conversions a m o n g the pupils of this school. T h e average attendance n u m b e r e d forty-six. But, unfortunately, o w i n g to reverses, d u e to the condition of trade, this factory w a s abandoned. A school w a s continued in the s a m e place until the close of the year, b u t was. c o m p o s e d latterly, for the m o s t part, of children gathered from the streets. . , , O n Saturdays, since discontinuing her visits to Yokosuka, Miss Brokilw has a class of w o m e n meet her at the chapel in Totmka, a village distant fr o m here about a half hour’s ride. O f this w o r k she reports : “ There has been sowing without reaping thus far, but w e trust there will be a harvest s o m e time.” This, together with a daily Bible class here a n d a weekly meeting with the Ferris Seminary S u n d a y school teachers, completes, in brief, the b u s y life Miss B r o k a w has h a d a m o n g us.' H e r conscientious pursuit of duty cannot fail to bear excellent ■fruit. Miss A n n a deF. T h o m p s o n has h a d the responsibility of English in­ struction in the preparatory department, arid also in “ D ” class, a field w h e r e patience is a cardinal virtue, a n d there is no doubt that in her case it is having its perfect work. Since September Miss T h o m p s o n has been going to Yokosuka, on Saturdays, to give music lessons to a n u m b e r of pupils connected with the school w h i c h Miss N a m i H a m a g u c h i , a late graduate of the g r a m ­ m a r department, has opened for naval officers’ daughters. S h e also attends the prayer meeting of the ladies held at the chapel every week. Ladies w h o are not Christians attend this meeting, a n d one has recently asked for baptism. . . Miss M a r y D e y o has all the English instruction in “ C ” class together with certain branches in “ B ” class a n d the academic department. She teaches f r o m twenty-five to twenty-eight hours in the week, and finds her pupils “ very diligent and interested in their work.” S h e gives instruction and direction in calisthenics a n d physical training, w h i c h has been one of the m o s t satisfactory features in the w o r k of the school for the past year. ■ Concerning the S u n d a y school w o r k undertaken b y the Society of K i n g ’s Daughters of the Ferris Seminary, Miss Deyo, w h o has the. over­ sight of it, reports: “ Du r i n g the last winter, spring and early autumn, our t w o mission S u n d a y schools, conducted b y m e m b e r s of the K i n g ’s Daughters Society of the Seminary and held in the school-houses in the native town, were continued with an average attendance of twenty-five. O f these I h a d the supervision, going alternately to each. F o r a while


w e were granted the privilege of giving a half hour lecture or story about Christianity in these schools o n Saturday mornings, and this seemed an excellent opportunity, for w e then secured the presence of all the pupils, m o r e than a hundred. B u t I think, perhaps, w e were too zealous, for, after about three months, the principal refused to let us c o m e a n y more, saying that the other teachers of the school objected, and, finally, w e were requested to stop one of the ’S u n d a y schools, as the d a y school w a s losing patrons because Christianity w a s being taught there on Sundays. T h e other S u n d a y school w a s r e m o v e d f r o m the school w h ere w e h a d always held it to a n e w chapel in the neighbor­ hood, a n d Mrs. Ballagh has charge of it. T h e objection to Christianity is still very strong, e n o u g h to effect the popularity of those k n o w n to favor it; and principals of schools, even th o u g h Christians, are unwilling or unable to give us direct assistance in S u n d a y school work. W e visited every school w h ere w e thought there w a s a possibility of getting a room, but were refused in every instance.” • T h e music department continues to give excellent promise of superior attainments under the efficient and conscientious labors of Miss Julia Moulton. She reports the following: “ There are at present twenty-one organ a n d six piano pupils. T h e vocal classes are perceptibly pro­ gressing. “ It is quite encouraging to note that their .musical ear is b e coming m o r e sensitive a n d correct. T h e girls in the highest class are, s o m e ofthem, capable of taking u p an easy piece of music at sight, sustaining t w o parts with considerable accuracy as to time and tune. W e are be­ c o m i n g m o r e and m o r e pleased with the Tonic Sol F a system. T h e various methods it employs, such as ear exercises, m e m o r y exercises, h a n d signs, etc., serve to m a k e it highly interesting even to those possessed of very little musical taste.” T h e specimens of freehand drawing a n d Japanese p e n manship ex­ hibited at the close of the school year and in the class r o oms at other times, have done both instructor and pupils great credit. Mr. Shigeru Hayashi has given excellent satisfaction in these branches for eight years past. A n incident occurred a f e w w e e k s ago w h ich might be mentioned, illustrating the practical utility of his instruction in drawing. T h e principal h a d been asked to deliver a lecture u p o n A s t r o n o m y before the Y o k o h a m a Literary Society, a n d having n o chart of the heavens he asked a m e m b e r of the senior class (Astronomy is one of their subjects) to d r a w a m a p of the heavens as they w o u l d appear in the latitude of Y o k o h a m a at ten o’clock on the evening of the lecture. A m a p four feet in diameter w a s produced, which, for accuracy a n d excellence of execution, brought forth the praise of all w h o s a w it. It is gratifying to record that the t w o pupils comprising the last graduating class have both been retained as teachers. T h e y have proved themselves not only able to teach, but able also to c o m m a n d the respect of the undergraduates. There are n o w four graduates' on the teaching staff.


T w o of our pupils and Mrs. K a t a y a m a , w h o so long a n d faithfully served the school as matron, have died. Several of the pupils have been very ill a n d thus prevented f r o m continuing their studies. Others have been detained at h o m e because of sickness, in s o m e cases death, in the family. O w i n g largely to the persevering efforts of Miss Deyo, the K i n g ’s Daughters of J a pan have united and formed a general society. It is believed that, if the society spreads, it will not only stimulate personal piety a n d Christian activity, but also tend to bring about a unity of feeling between Christian w o m e n of all classes a n d denominations. Seven S u n d a y schools have been under the direction of the teachers and pupils, aggregating an attendance of 250 scholars. O n e of these schools is in the Chinese quarter a n d is attended b y Chinese lads. Another is in the village of Hodogaya. A b o u t twenty of the older pupils are engaged in this work. T h e expenses of these schools, except­ ing the one in the Chinese quarter, are borne b y the K i n g ’s Daughters Society. T h e foreign correspondence of the pupils has b e c o m e a very interest­ ing feature in our school life. T a k i n g the “ scholarships” a n d the “ residences” together, nearly all the pupils in the g r a m m a r department have a foreign correspondent, a n d it is especially gratifying to us that the kind friends in A m e rica have, in most cases, thought it worth while 'to reply to their letters. T h e interest manifested o n the arrival of an A m erican mail is delightful to see ; a n d the fortunate girl w h o receives a letter is envied b y all her classmates. If the friends in America k n e w w h a t time, care a n d pains are put u p o n these little letters, or could see the pleasure a reply gives, no one w o u l d fail to acknowledge them. T h e older pupils a n d graduates have been successfully e n g aged in translating and adapting articles from the current Christian periodicals that c o m e under their observation for the Christian press in Japan. Just here an incident m a y be related that will, doubtless, be of interest to,our readers. A certain periodical in T o k y o invited the critics to select ten of the best stories produced within the year for its commendation. Eight we r e found having the required merits. Concerning one of w h i c h one of the critics remarked, that it w a s at least t w o degrees superior, in point of merit, to a n y of the others, and ought not to be disparaged because it w a s the w o r k of a w o m a n . T h e friends of Ferris Seminary, a n d especially those of Mrs. Iwamoto, our first graduate, will be pleased to hear that she has w o n such high e n c o m i u m for herself. She is h o w b u s y translating that m o d e r n classic “ Little Lprd Fauntleroy.” In this w a y is a pure and elevating literature being prepared in Japan. i PUBLICATION.

A revised translation of the Heidelberg Catechism has been prepared b y Rev. Mr. Miller, and is n o w in press, a n d w e have joined with s o m e of the other missions in bringing out a n e w edition of the H y m n B o o k


of the Japanese Church, o n w h i c h Dr. Verbeck and others have ex­ pended a large a m o u n t of labor. • T h e A m erican Tract Society’s Committee for East J a pan has seen its w o r k increasing year b y year. There is n o w a larger appreciation than ever before of the tract as an aid to Christian work. F r o m small begin­ nings, a f e w years ago, the catalogue of its publications has g r o w n until it embraces thirty-one books a n d fifty-four tracts. D u r i n g the past year it has published nine books (eight of t h e m new) in 7,898 vol­ umes, and 58 editions of tracts 5,000 each. T h e sales have been smaller than last year. T h e b o o k trade has suffered generally throughout the empire on account of the widespread destruction of property b y flood, fire and storm. T h e entire circulation b y sale and donation has been 4,152 books, a n d 257,646 tracts. In pages the circulation of tracts has been over t w o and a quarter millions. All this w o r k has passed through the hands of Rev. J a m e s L. A m e r m a n , D.D., Tokyo. ' Mrs. Miller continues to edit the “ Yorokobi no Otozure” (Glad Tidingi) w h i c h has a g o o d circulation. NOTABLE

EVENTS

OF

THE

TEAR.

O f notable events, or characteristics of the w o r k generallyjn Japan, the past year, t w o or three things deserve to be specified. JVrs<.— T h e n u m b e r of deaths, especially a m o n g aged w o m e n . In the M i s h i m a district m a y be mentioned, Mrs. H a n a j i m a and Mrs. Saito Ichibe, and in Y o k o h a m a a daughter of the latter; Mrs. Katay a m a , Mrs. K u m a n o (mother of an elder in the K a i g a n Church), and, also, on the 28th of January, 1891, Mrs. Inagaki Kaji, grandmother of Rev. Mr. Inagaki, at the age of 85, a n d a believer fifteen years. Mrs. Inagaki’s Christian life and faith were mo s t beautiful and exemplary, a n d her devotion to the public worship of G o d mo s t marked. Probably mo r e than one h u n dred persons have passed fr o m our c o m m u n i o n alone to glory the past year. Second.— W h i l e n u m b e r s have not been added to the m e m b e r s h i p of the churches, still a m a r k e d feature of the year has been church erection. Besides the t w o unpretentious structures mentioned above. Dr. H e pburn, ~ of the Presbyterian Mission, is erecting a fine brick church for the Sumiyoshicho congregation, or Second Ch u r c h of Christ, at Y o k o h a m a . Other denominations are erecting, or are about to erect, most substantial a n d costly edifices. Dr. Eby, of the Canadian Methodist Mission, has completed his Central Tabernacle in the City of Tokyo, and Bishop Williams, of the A. P. E. Mission, his present to the Mission of a $20,000 cathedral in Tsukiji, Tokyo. T h e Third event claiming our attention above all material structures is the progress m a d e in w h a t has been called, hitherto, the United C h u r c h of Christ in the Revised Constitution a n d n e w Confession of Faith adopted b y the last Daikai, or the Sixth General A s s e m b l y of the United Church, held in T o k y o fr o m the 3d to the 16th of December,


1890. T h e assembly well represented all parts of the church. M o s t of the older a n d 1eading ministers were present. T h e Foreign Missions co-operating "with this b o d y were well represented. T h e retiring moderator preached on the “ Importance of the H o l y Spirit.” In the evening of the first day, at a meeting of addresses a n d prayers, a re­ markable manifestation of the H o l y Spirit’s presence took place, filling all hearts with lively expectation of a great blessing a n d of a possible revival. T h e salutary influence of His presence w a s manifest in the days that followed, while the b o d y w a s engaged in exciting and earnest debates. ■

i i


T H E S O U T H J A P A N MISSION. E S T A B L I S H E D 1859:

O R G A N I Z E D 1889.

Missionaries.— Revs. H e n r y Stout a n d Albert Oltmans. Teacher in Steele Memorial School.— Mr. H. V. S. Peeke. Assistant Missionaries.— Mrs. Stout, Mrs. Oltmans, Miss R..L.

Irvine a n d Miss C.

B. Lanterman.

H a d this Report been d r a w n u p at the end of the half year, instead of in December, its coloring w o u l d have been far different. It w o u l d have been decidedly blue ; but as it is the prospect has brightened on every hand, a n d every one is filled with the highest hopes. . ' Since the beginning of the year Rev. a n d Mrs. Demarest have re­ turned to America, a n d Miss B r o k a w has been transferred to the N orth J a p a n Mission. Ho w e v e r , our depleted force w a s a u g m e n t e d in Octo­ ber b y the arrival of Miss Lanterman, and w e are also rejoicing that Mr. Pieters has been appointed to join us in 1891. It h a d long been a matter of regret to the Mission that Mr. O h g i m i w a s no longer in the service of the C h u r c h w h i c h educated .him, a n d w a s in fact in secular employ, yet, although previous efforts h a d not m e t with success, w e at last succeeded in securing his services. H e en­ tered the e m p l o y of the Mission the first of N o v e m b e r . After Mr. D e marest’s departure, at the request of the Mission, Mr. O l t m a n s w a s permitted to bring his energies to bear on the evangelistic work, a n d the boys’ school w a s put temporarily in charge of Mr. Peeke. W e have suffered m u c h f r o m sickness during the year. First c a m e that of Mrs. Demarest, necessitating their return to America. In F e b ­ ruary Mrs. Stout w a s attacked b y w h a t proved to be a long and danger­ ous illness, w h i c h left her so w e a k e n e d as to oblige her sojourn at .Chifoo, China, for s o m e months. A t the close of the s u m m e r M r s Olt­ m a n s w a s so enervated as to require a change, so the m o n t h of October w a s spent in a trip to Y o k o h a m a . T h e cholera did not affect the M i s ­ sion or its adherents directly, tho u g h m a n y of our pupils have suffered f r o m the influenza. T h e schools are both doing well, giving us n o gr o u n d for complaint, except that w e desire a w a r m e r a n d farther reaching Christian feeling; still w e are b y n o m e a n s experiencing w h a t w o u l d be called a dearth. W e feel especially encouraged b y the m a n n e r in w h i c h Sturges S e m i ­ nary has increased in n u m b e r s since the beginning of the year. O n the field, too, w e see evidence of unusual faithfulness a n d effi­ ciency on the part of several of our preachers, a n d several places that ha v e laid d o r m a n t for s o m e time s e e m a w a k e n i n g into n e w life.


O f course, there have been disappointments. M e n w h o m w e sup­ posed pure gold have proved to he of m u c h m o r e c o m m o n m a k e up, while others have exhibited unmistakable evidence of baser metal.. It has pained us to have m e m b e r s of our corps r e m o v e d permanently or temporarily. It is discouraging, too, to be very, very anxious to put a preacher in a t o w n and not be able in a n y w a y to find a m a n w h o can be spared for the work. Y e t in spite of imperfection, in m e n and i m ­ perfection in m e a n s and methods, the g o o d w n r k goes on, and G o d in His goodness lets us see and k n o w that it m o v e s forward. , W e regret that so far all efforts toward union w o r k in this island with the Presbyterians have been abortive, though the future m a y reveal brighter prospects of w h a t a combined w rork on the part of these t w o supporters of the United C h u r c h m a y be able to do towards giving the Gospel to the hundreds of thousands in Kiushiu, for w h o s e salvation they are in greater or less measure responsible. There is no doubt m u c h anti-foreign feeling in Japan, but the full force of it has not reached Kiushiu yet, a n d w e hope w e m a y miss a great deal of it as it is expressed in other parts. • ' T h e last rice crop: w a s unusually abundant, a n d w e hope that, as on this account the times b e c o m e better, a n d as interest in politics d e ­ creases, Christian agitation m a y find a m o r e open field." .

STURGES

SEMINARY.

T h e closing year has been m a r k e d with s o m e success for Sturges S e m i ­ nary. A slow and sure advance has been made, both in n u m b e r s a n d average attendance, a n d the year closes with thirty n a m e s on the roll. O f this number, five are c o m m u n i c a n t and five baptized m e m b e r s of the Church. Three other Christian girls w h o were in the school last spring, on account of severe illness, were not able to return at the be­ ginning of the present school year. Another w a s married, thus m a k i n g the n u m b e r of Christians smaller than last year. ’ S o m e change w a s m a d e in the teaching force, Miss B r o k a w w a s trans­ ferred to Ferris Seminary in February, and the school w a s left in charge of Miss Irvine, a n d remained under her supervision until October, w h e n Miss L a n t e r m a n arrived on the field. Since then, responsibilities have been shared. T o me e t the growing d e m a n d of the people, m o r e J a p ­ anese and Chinese studies were added to the curriculum, a n d a m o r e efficient teacher for this department w a s engaged, also a competent teacher to give instruction in drawing-. After Miss B r o k a w ’s departure from the school, Miss T a w a Yoshioka, a graduate fr o m 1the English de­ partment of the girls’ school in Y o k o h a m a , under the direction of the W o m a n ’s U n i o n Missionary Society, assisted the girls in music, and taught t w o English classes till the end of the school year in June. Miss Irvine has given her full time to the school; Miss L a n t e r m a n arrived at the school on the 4th of October, a n d reports: “ I b e g a n teaching i m ­ mediately, taking charge of four English classes and the music pupils. In connection with this, I have devoted one hour each day to the study of the language. After continuing in this w a y for t w o months, I found


it necessary to have m o r e time for the language ; so the services of Miss Yoshioka have been secured again to assist in the music. There are nine girls w h o are taking instrumental lessons, seven o n the organ and t w o on the piano, a n d all have vocal lessons.” Rev. Mr. Ohgimi, since entering the Mission, has taught a class in the Heidelberg Catechism and the advanced Bible class. Several of the Christian w o m e n of the C h u r c h have joined these classes, and it is h o ped that .others m a y be led to follow their example. Mrs. Hirate, the genial and well loved matron, has done very efficient work. Besides a supervision of the boarding department she has taught a Bible class a n d instructed the girls in Japanese sewing and etiquette. T h e w o r k of the Y o u n g W o m a n ’s Christian Association has h a d satis­ factory results. M o n e y , Bibles a n d catechisms were sent to s o m e of the poor in different parts of the island. ■ W e are grateful to G o d for the success of the past year, and c o m ­ mit ourselves to H i m for the w a y that is still before us.

STEELE M E M O R I A L

SCHOOL.

T h e past year has brought with it m a n y changes in our school; s o m e that have caused us regret, others that have given us great pleasure, a n d still others that cause us grave apprehension. O f the seven teachers connected with the institution in January last, five remain. Mr. Oltmans w a s transferred to the evangelistic w o r k in June, a n d another teacher, a Japanese, w h o h a d been with us for over three years a n d from w h o m w e expected far better things, w a s discharged o n account of immorality. Mr. O h g i m i joined us in N o v e m b e r , and since the beginning of the fall term, Mr. Hirayama, a graduate of last year and son of the pastor of the Nagasaki Church, has been n u m b e r e d with the teaching corps. Mr. Stout also has assisted in the teaching since October. W e have waited expectantly for the m a n to take the place m a d e vacant b y Mr. Oltmans’ change of labor, but w e have waited in vain. Since July the institution has been in charge of Mr. Peeke. There have been several things during the year with w h i c h to contend; the cholera epidemic w h i c h compelled us to prolong the s u m m e r vaca­ tion till the first of October; the slowness with w h i c h the pupils returned on account of fear of this disease ; and in the last t w o w e eks of the year, the influenza, fr o m w h i c h w e suffered in c o m m o n with all schools, though to a less degree. W e m i g h t a d d to this category the necessity of m a k i n g temporary and, consequently, unsatisfactory arrangements, in view of the delay incident u p o n the appointment of Mr. Oltmans’ successor. A m o n g the encouragements w e m a y enumerate the following: In J u n e w e graduated fr o m the academic department a class of three y o u n g m e n w h o h a d been with us about four years. A l though the total n u m b e r s are smaller than last year the n u m b e r s in the Theolog­ ical and academic departments are larger than ever, the decrease being


entirely confined to the lowest t w o classes, w h i c h comprise the prepara­ tory department. It is possible to confine the attention of the students to fewer subjects in a mo r e thorough manner. T h e deportment of the students has given little ground for complaint. ' T w o more, were graduated f r o m the Theological department in June. T h e y are n o w occupying stations on the field, a n d have immediately taken rank a m o n g the most useful of the native workers. There are at present ten m e n in the Theological classes, four of w h o m were sent here for instruction b y the Presbyterian Mission at Asoka. T w o m e n are able to pursue certain branches in English. T h e instruction in this d e ­ partment is in the hands of Revs. Stout, S e g a w a a n d Ohgimi. It is a matter of disappointment to us that none of the class w h i c h graduated fr o m the academic department remained to study theology. T h e s u m m e r w o r k of the Christian y o u n g m e n w a s this year mo r e sat­ isfactory than ever before, the m a i n reasons being that they were given independent w o r k to do and were under the immediate superintendence of Mr. Oltmans. T h e question of Mission schools in J a p a n is far f r o m solution, yet w e are satisfied that our m o v e m e n t for the year has been forward. T h a t the continual ingress a n d egress of students complained of in former years has greatly decreased is s h o w n b y the fact that, while in 1888 at least 106 n e w pupils entered during the year, affecting the aver­ age attendance but little, in the last year there have been but thirty-two entrances, while the average attendance has decreased but fifteen or sixteen. W e gain great satisfaction from the fact that the Bible is taught to all the students o n four days each week, while, o n the fifth, they unite in a prayer-meeting ; and, again, because one-fourth 'of our students are studying for the ministry. O f the sixty-three students on the roll, s o m e forty-six are boarders. T h e n u m b e r of Christians is small, smaller than ever before, yet w e believe that there are m a n y w h o s e hearts are in a state of unrest and dissatisfaction at their unsaved ,condition. Three students have been baptized during the year. T h e following table will give an idea of the distribution and character of the students:

Class.

No. of Stu­ dents en­ Christians Baptized during the Year. rolled.

Theological D e p a r t m e n t .... ' 10 4th Year Class. . . . . . . . . 4 5 3d “ “ .......... 2d “ “ .......... ' 9 1st “ “ .......... 11 11 A. Preparatory Class. . . . . 13 B. “ “ .......

10 3 1

63

22

Totals. . . . . . . . .

5

1

3 1 )Left during 1 f the year.

3


EVANGELISTIC

WORK.

'

L o o k e d at fr o m the point of statistics, the Evangelistic w o r k has not m u c h to show. Sharing in.the general falling off of added m e m b ership in the entire United Church, w e h a d the additional misfortune to be obliged to leave the oversight of the field nearly wholly to the preachers in charge of the different stations. This w a s o w i n g chiefly to the de­ parture of Mr. Demarest to America. Nevertheless, very good and faithful w o r k has been done in most of the stations. D u r i n g the latter part of the year an unusual interest in Christianity has manifested itself in several places, the results of w h i c h have already b e g u n to be realized in a n u m b e r of baptisms, but too late in the year for insertion in the annual statistics. A still larger n u m b e r of candidates are n o w ready to unite openly with the Church. T w o n e w stations have been added to the list during the year, each one occupied, since July b y a graduate from our Theological school.

Miyakonojo.— This n e w station is n o w the extreme southern point of our field. H a v i n g been w o r k e d for s o m e time as an out-station from Kagoshima, it has been placed under the care of Mr. Hogi, one of the recent graduates. T h o u g h the n u m b e r of Christians in the place is still very small, it is considered a good centre for work, and w e earnestly hope that it m a y soon prove to be such. B u d d h i s m is strong in M i y a ­ konojo, a n d not a little opposition, though quiet in manner, is being manifested. „ A n out-station, Shibushi, about fifteen miles from Miyakonojo, has been taken u p b y Mr. Hogi, w h o goes there twice a month. There is one Christian family residing at Shibushi w h o are very helpful to the opening u p of the work. Large audiences gather to hear the preaching, and quite an interest seems to be developing itself. Kagoshima.— V e r y little of special interest has occurred here during the year. M i y akonojo having received its o w n ma n , the preacher at Kogashima, Mr. A w a y a , has been able to do m o r e for Taneyama and Kawanabe, t w o out-stations. In the latter place there are a n u m b e r of m e n and w o m e n that study the Bible regularly, though the need of a leader is very m u c h felt. T h e interest in this place w a s first developed b y the w o r k of one of our Theological students during last s u m m e r ’s vacation. Kurume.— D u r i n g the year Mr. T o m e g a w a w a s taken from K u r u m e a n d placed at Kokiura on the straits of Shimonoseki, while Mr. H e m m i , a graduate of the Theological school last year, w a s placed in charge of K u r u m e . T h e w o r k is in a very g o o d condition, especially the status of the Christians themselves. There are at present m a n y enquiries, and four w h o are waiting to be baptized at the earliest opportunity. A n encouraging S u n d a y school is carried on, a n d the other meetings are re­ ported as well attended. T h e Christians are at present m a k i n g efforts b y regular contributions to obtain a church building in the near future. Three out-stations are regularly w o r k e d b y Mr. H e m m i . Besides our


o w n w o r k there are Methodists, Greeks a n d R o m a n Catholics laboring at K u r u m e . There are several reasons w h y the K u r u m e w o r k o u ght to be strengthened b y our mission. T h e importance of K u r u m e as a for­ eign mission station is b e coming very evident.

Saga.— Mr. K a w a s a k i is still in charge at this place, and has w o r k e d as faithfully as ever. His efforts have continually been seconded and strengthened b y Mr. Bradbury, teacher at the Saga high school. It is a great delight to us, as it will no doubt be to those specially interested in the w o r k in Saga, that the tide of indifference has apparently turned. A m a r k e d interest has been manifested, w h ich has gladdened the heart of the preacher. Several y o u n g m e n have c o m e out strong on the side of Christ a n d Christianity, and are waiting to be baptized. Mr. Br a d ­ bu r y expresses hiinself as confident that the “ favorable time ” for Saga has come. W e w a t c h with m u c h hope a n d prayer the beginning of the so m u c h longed-for change at Saga. T w o out-stations, Agi a n d Kashi10a,belong to this field. T h e y receive regular visits fr o m Mr. Kawasaki, a n d in both places a m a r k e d interest in Christianity ,has lately been de­ veloped. ■ Sasebo.— This place, the naval station of Kiushiu, has received the continued labors of Mr. Shiraishi, a Theological student in course of preparation. N o special interest h a d m a r k e d the w o r k until very re­ cently, when, especially the Christians themselves have w a k e d u p to an added sense of their religious duties a n d moral responsibilities. F o u r candidates are reported as ready for baptism. ' Karatsu.— The most telling work, so far as w e can see, has been done b y the C h u r c h of Matsura, at Karatsu, in charge of Mr. Kurihara. T h e C h u r c h has n o w forty-three members, several of w h o m were b a p ­ tized the latter part of this year, and there are again ten candidates pre­ paring for baptism.. T h e attendance u p o n C h u r c h services has been very good throughout. O n e m e m b e r of this Chu r c h entered the T h e o ­ logical school at Nagasaki this year. In connection with Karatsu are three out-stations, w h ich receive the regular attentions of Mr. Kurihara. There seems to be a delightful union of heart and h a n d a m o n g the C h u r c h members. Nakalsu.— Mr. Saka, w h o had been in charge of the N a k a t s u w o r k for t w o years, c a m e back to Nagasaki to finish his Theological course. In his place Mr. Y o s h i d o m e took u p the worki T h e audiences at the preaching place are fairly large, and though the n u m b e r of Christians resident in the place is small, the outlook is not discouraging. There are a n u m b e r of enquirers and s o m e candidates. Usagun.— This is the other n e w station added to our field during the year. Mr. Munakata, w h o graduated at Nagasaki last June, occupies it. T h e place h a d been w o r k e d for s o m e time as an out-station f r o m Nakatsu, and Mr. M u n a k a t a himself, while still in the Seminary, had given s o m e time to it during vacations. T h e w o r k has been encourag­


ing f r o m the beginning. Usagun, which properly is the district of Usa, consists of a circuit of villages. T h r o u g h o u t several of these the Christians are found. This m a k e s the w o r k specially laborious, and an additional worker ought to be placed on the field, but w h ere to get the m a n is the great question. There is r o o m for several strong churches in this district which is occupied only b y our Mission.

Nagasaki.— O n e of the t w o preaching places in the native citi’ w a s given u p during the year, on account of the removal of Mr. H e m m i , to K u r u m e . T h e other place, occupied b y Mr. Hirayama, is still held, a n d w o r k continues to be carried on there. Mr. Hirayama, having been ordained and installed as pastor of the Nagasaki Church, gives part of his time to the pastorate a n d the rest of it to the w o r k in the native city. W e cannot say that m u c h advance has been m a d e a m o n g the people of Nagasaki itself. O u r hopes in this respect are still unrealized, nevertheless, w e do not cease to hope. T h e attendance at the meetings in our U m a g a s a k i Chapel is good. T h o u g h it is largely m a d e u p of students from the t w o schools, others, in greater or less numbers, c o m e in and listen. B y .Miss B r o k a w ’s re­ m o v a l to Y o k o h a m a , and the transfer of Mr. Oltmans to the evangelistic work, the teaching in the S u n d a y school has passed entirely into the hands of the native Christians. Mr. Stout continues to be responsible for the S u n d a y evening service, while the pastor as a rule conducts the m o r ning service. Mr. S e g a w a and Mr. Ohgimi, however, take a share in the preaching. T h e Theological students are also occasionally called u p o n to preach. Mr. P eeke has continued his S u n d a y school w o r k i ll the native city throughout the year, with the help of one of the students. T h e attend­ ance has averaged about thirty. Until July, Miss Irvine carried on her S u n d a y school at one of the preaching places, aided b y Mr. H e m m i a n d Mr. Saito, the assistant principal of Sturges Seminary. Summer Work.— This is carried on b y our students during the s u m ­ m e r vacation. Last s u m m e r six points, mostly in the vicinity of N a g a ­ saki, were occupied b y them. T h o u g h generally of too temporary a nature to expect m u c h tangible result, w e believe it to be at once go o d training for our students and possible openings for future work. This latter has proved to be the case, specially at Shimabara, a city of about 30,000 inhabitants, m a d e fam o u s in history b y the fact that the standard of defence w a s first raised b y the Japanese Christians near this place. O n this and other accounts it has been considered a specially difficult field, and hitherto n o Protestant w o r k of a n y permanence h a d been carried on. B u t b y the labors of Mr. K a m i m u r a , one of the Theological students, an interesting beginning w a s m a d e last s u m m e r . T w o stu­ dents of Steele Memorial School, natives of Shimabara, and s o m e w h a t interested in Christianity, b e c a m e a great help to the work. A t present these t w o and several others are candidates for baptism. Large audi­ ences gather to hear preaching, a n d m u c h interest is manifested. Regular visits to the place continue to be m a d e b y Mr. K a m i m u r a , a n d


it is our earnest desire to nurture tins w o r k into something permanent, b y the blessing of the Lord. A t the close of our evangelistic report, w e call special attention to the evident signs of encouragement at several points of the field. T h e great need is m o r e well trained natives. W e could locate several of t h e m at once, could they b e had, in fields already waiting. W h e n c e can w e expect them, if at all ? F r o m no other source than from our school in Nagasaki. Experience strongly forces us to this conclusion. W i t h the expectation of passing the w o r k m o r e and m o r e into the hands of the native Christians, w e feel the urgent need of their being thoroughly trained for this work. Further, w e w o u l d emphasize the desirability of a foreign Bible w o m a n for the w o r k in Kiushiu. In this w e are behind most of the Missions laboring in Japan. Cannot the B o a r d m a k e u p this sad lack, at once, for it is ten times better now, than to put it off one or t w o years hence ? W e earnestly pray the L o r d of the harvest to send us laborers, just such as w e need, into this part of His harvest field.


G E N E R A L S U M M A R Y , 1890-91.

N orth South C hina. India. Japan . Japan . Total

Stations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Out-stations, etc. . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Missionaries, ordained... . . . . . 6 Missionaries, unordained...... 1 Assistant Missionaries, married... 7 Assistant Missionaries, single... 2 Native, ordained Ministers^_ _ _ _ _ 9 Other native helpers, m a l e . . . . . 18 Other native helpers, female__ Churches.................. 9 899 Communicants.............. Received on Confession. . . . . . . . 86 1 Seminaries, m a l e . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Pupils.................... 2 Seminaries, female. . . . . . . . . . . 43 Pupils.................... 1 Theological Schools. . . . . . . . . . 6 Theological students. . . . . . . . . 8 D a y Schools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 Scholars. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Hospitals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4,317 Patients treated. . . . . . . . . . . . . Native contributions. . . . . . . . . $2,900 * Estimated.

8 104 8 1 7 3 6

3 *20 6 1 7 5 *16

3,964

15 166 22 4 23 12 33 218 63 53 5,214 489 8 328 6 276 4 43 119 4,074

194 57 23 1,777 107 5 *212 2 99 1 17

6 *18 *2,328 *269 1 *53 ,1 104 1 *10

X

2

111

i

19 2 1 2 2 2 6 3 210 27 1 53 1 30 1 10

5,066 9,383 *$700 *$3,752 $296 $7,648


TABULAR VIEW OF RECEIPTS. T h e first four co l u m n s contain all s u m s received directly into the Treasury of the Board, those c o m i n g through the W o m a n ’s Board forming a part of the amo u n t s in the third column. Other donations to the W o m a n ’s Board, etc., are added, to m a k e the fifth column, thus including everything given for Foreign Missions.

CLASSES A N D CHURCHES.

From From From Churches S.Schools Individ’ls

Total.

Gr a n d Total.

Claseis of Albany. First, A l b a n y ............ Madison Avenue, Albany.. Third, Alban y . .. . ...... Fourth. Albany.......... Holland, Albany ......... First, Bethlehem........ Second, Bet hlehem...... Second, B e r n e .......... K n o x ......... ......... Clarksville............. C o e y m a n s ............. O n e s q u e t h a w ........... Jerusalem............ N e w Sa l e m ........... Union......... .......... N e w Baltimore...... . Westerlo. ...... ........

$792 09 1,134 99 35

$80 525 3

$110 7 95 48 50

" 18 50 33

'60 63

6 18 5 78 95 2 50 3 16

.

35 8 50 8

52 03

346 06 65 12 15 261 51

60 28 40

09 81,037 84 99 1,864 99 ' 28 95 42 95 50 83 50 44 75 63 123 63

6 18 5 78 95 2 50 3 16

14 83 10 78 95 2 50 13 16

114 93

144 93 8

567 77 115 11 87

973 83 208 52 26 408 51

1,125 48 208 52 26 456 51

7

69 61 30 333 66 20

69 61 30 338 66 20 '

30 65 4 12

74 41 4 12

-

32 90

S872 1,769 3 42 83 27 101

30

Classis of Bergen. First, H a c k e n s a c k .... Schraalenburgh...... English Neighborhood. N e w D u r h a m ......... First, H o b o k e n — .... Park, Jersey City..... North B e r g e n ........ Second, Hackensack. G e r m a n Evangelical, Hob o k e n . Third, H a c k e n s a c k ..... ;*.;. Closter Palisades......... ........... Guttenberg.......... ........ Central Avenue, Jersey City... Cherry Hill.................. Spring Valley............... W e s t w o o d ....... ....... ....

62 61 30 138 25 20

60

135 41

19 32 4 12

11 33

17 12 05 6 69 116 20

9 04 11 17

60

20 30

14 21

26 43 6 130

04 52 69 41

26 43 6 130

04 52 69 41

421 186 265 106 25 935 106 39

15 87 28

598 186 877 131 25 1,072 242 39

66 87 53

South OlassisofBergen. Bergen .................. First, B a y o n n e ........... W a y n e Street, Jersey City. Bergen Point............ Second, H u d s o n City..... Lafayette................ Greenville............... Free, Jersey City.......... Third, B a y o n n e ........... South Bergen............ . First G e r m a n Evan^, Jersey St. J o h n ’s G e r m a n Evan., J.

298 50 68 106 12 452 78 21

15 67 25 06

40 75 10 97 56 28 58 8 91

3 386 10 12 22

20 81 5 15

123 96 87 121 61

2c 56 58 97

33 03 5 15 .

25 29 25 97

94 67 5 15


CLASSES A N D CHURCHES.

From From From Churches S.Schools Individ'ls 0

Total.

Grand Total.

Olassis of Dakota. Am., Oran g e City......... Centreville............... Charles M i x ............. G r a n d V i e w .............. Harrison ................. H o p e .................... Hull.............. ...... I m m a n u e l ............... First. L e n n o x ............ Second, L e n n o x .......... Third, L e n n o x ............ S a l e m .................... S a n d h a m ................ Sioux Falls............... Turner................... V a n Raalte.............. Willow L a k e s ............

36 42 2 5 18 5 2 7

27 50

58 92

70 02 42 75 03 15

4 75

8 15 11 50 18 50

63

50

4 46 4

2 . 5 60 10 2 7

70 . 02 50 03 15

53 92 2 5 60 10 2 7

70 02 50 03 15

8 15

8 15

12 63 18 50

12 63 18 50

4 46 4

4 46 4

Olassis ofGrand Elver. A t w o o d .............. Coopersville.......... Detroit.............. F r e m o n t __ :.......... First, G r a n d H a v e n ... Second, G r a n d H a v e n .. Second, G r a n d Rapids. Third, Gr a n d Rapids... Fourth G r a n d Rapids.. Fifth, G r a n d Rapids.... Grandville............ First. K a l a m a z o o ..... Third, K a l a m a z o o .... M u s k e g o n ............ Oakdale P a r k ......... L u c a s ................ South H a v e n ......... Spring L a k e .......... T w i n Lakes........... Vogel Centre....... .

5 5 64 5 52

10

18 05 10 25 1 84 35 94 78 65 54

82 25

160 01

29 82 13 32

65 31 27 92

36 13 237 77 10 60 10 114 13 44 6

80 51 32

3 25 30 '60 115 15 39 76 50 75 50 120

5 5 21 10 91 74 387 187 151 189 10 264 13 324 6

64 82 80 84 51 49 50 10 50 82 26

95 13 41 24

5 21 21 10 121 74 467 250 164 189 10 264 16 324 6

64 82 80 84 51 49 50 10 50 82 26

108 38 41 24

Olassis of-Greene. First, Ath e n s ............ Second, Athens.......... Catskill.................. First, Coxsackie..... .... Second, Coxsackie........ Kiska t o m ................ Leeds ...................

100 400 48 248 20 20

35 67 01 16

135

135

76 11 ,22 50 45 73

57 51

26 50 3

19

534 70 293 46 23

29 51 89 50 19

630 72 434 46 23

29 01 89 50 19

28 26 12 2 â&#x20AC;˘ 19 10 50 8 100 108 90 8 67 422

50 50 15 95 55 93

28 26 12 2 27 10 50 8 100 108 90 8 67 422

50 50 15 95 55 93

Olassisof Holland. B e a v e r d a m ...... First Cleveland.... Second Cleveland.. East Overisel.... Ebenezer........ F v n a a r t .......... Graafschap....... H a m ilton ......... First Holland..... Third Holland.... J a m e s t o w n ....... J a m e s t o w n Centre. North Holland.... Overisel..........

3 50 8 2 10 10 50 8 38 23 17

00 95 55 93 48 33 33 88

25 118 15

25 26 50 4 15 9

61 84 ' 56 8 28 147

93 97 80

15 42

16 78

i4 156 72

48 26 30 10 16 65

48 26 30 10 16 65


CLASSES A N D CHURCHES.

'rom From From ' urches S.Schools Individ’ls

Total.

Grand Total.

7 11 6 198 729 221

7 11 6 198 817 824

90 18

20 32 99 22 44 52 88

15 62

329 276 36 38 49 787 112 34 207 76

02 18 93 72

10 68 136 55 197

ClassisofHolland. (CONTINUED.) Rotterdam, K a n s a s ....... South Blendon........... Three O a k s . ............. Vriesland.. ............. Zeeland................. First a n d Third Holland__

a

7 11 6 57 290 29

90 18 55

81 319 48

60 j 120 1 191 42

89 85 73 31

146 17 50

90

90 18 55 48 32

55 48 41

Classis of Hudson. First, Claverack.......... Second, Claverack........ Gallatin.................. G e r m a n t o w n ............. G r e enport ............... H u d s o n .................. Linlithgo................ Livingston at Linlithgo... U p p e r R e d H o o k ......... W e s t C o p a k e .............

93 142 36 14 13 397 79 26 76 55

85 66 99 60 44 77 70 75 10

19 17 21 52

10 29 *29 52 58

50 30 . 12 72

8 52 65 3 81 30

2 32 70

10 270 33 18 8 111 23

829 238 86 16 23 737 112 34 207 76

20 45 99 92 44 77 88

15 62

Classis of Illinois. B e t h a n y ...................... Bethel....................... Bushnell................. ... Fairview...................... H a v a n a ....... ............... Irving P a r k ................... M a n i t o ....................... Norris ..................... .. N o r w o o d P a r k .............. .. O t l e y ........................ First, Pekin ................. Second, Pekin................. Second, Pella................. Rari t a n .................... . Spring L a k e ..................

5 11 6 5 90

6

80 31 83 77

|

2 73

2 50 20 15

187° 40

10 68 126 55 165

02 13 93 72

18 78

13 73

11 8 50 142 90 60 15

11 8 50 249 90 60 15

88 23 40 17 10

83 23 40 17 10

28 40

2ft 49

Classis of Iowa. A l t o n ........ B e l m o n d ..... B o y d e n ...... Churchville .... Free G r a c e ... H o s pers ...... Hull.......... L e M a r s ...... Luctor, Kansas. M a u r i c e ...... M o n r o e ...... Muscatine.... N e w k i r k ...... O r a n g e City.... Parkersburgh.. First, Pella — Third, Pella.... Prinsburg.... R a m s a y ...... Sioux Centre.. W a s h i n g t o n ...

51 55 40 12 90

28 82

4 86

4 20

28 40 18 22 6 50 5 39 93 5' 4 17 33 78 90 45 14? ai 28 80 11 68 98 32 35 45

1 10 7 5 71 131 32

10 29 88 70 50

85 127 60

23 15

8

14 6 5 50 12 9 178 337 77 207 28

22 50

14 22 fi Kft

03 29 71 60 50 81 30

• 50 03 12 29 9 195 92 337 60 77 50 207 81 2.ft sn

11 68 129 47 35 45

11 6ft 129 47 35 45


CLASSES A N D CHURCHES.

From., From From Churches S.Schools Individ'ls

Grand Total.

Total. 'v

Classis of Kingston. Guilford’

.

.........

20 64 02

44 84

91 57

20 201 33

20 268 33

5 50 89 06

50 48

13

5 50 153 14

5 50 153 14

46 11 145 61 40

20 9 20 66 86 16 75

68 20 20 216 64 56 75

93 20 20 335 62 56 75

9 08

9 08

Krumville...................

4 17

9 08

North Classis of L. Island. 111 19 30 53 67 2 06 First. Astoria

..............

South* Bushwick .............

Germ. Ev., Brooklyn...........

79 71 59 64 265 99

23 80 20 22 17

Locust Valley................ 108 13 62

18 58 si 34 30 19 85 60 87 16 80

203 150 27 41 265 50 38 122 35

22 69 79

36 23

24 38 117 59 6 96 16 50 80 14 84

io o

Germ. Ev. J a m a i c a ...........

332 225 163 43 336 149 158 405 35 20 49 141 20 29 26 188 28

99 70 85 55 56 87 02 38 39 13 50 46

25

377 08 225 163 70 43 85 365 38 193 56 186 87 405 02 40 20 49 38 192 58 20 9!9 13 26 50 188 28 46 25

South Classis of L. Island. 265 8 998 50 201 64 37 204 58 71 40

85 69 48 42 85 10 03 50 61

160 86 95 80 25

243 50 80 100 143 120 200 45 200

22 65 1,726 25 N e w Brooklyn..............

5 30

20

10

3 25 30

265 8 1,242 80 461 294 237 404 58 141 240 22 1,726

85 19 48 37 85 10 03 50 61 65 25

35 33 25 • 30 10

10

265 8 1,406 80 621 301 315 404 58 141 240 27 1,910

85 19 98 30 85 10 03 50 61 65 25

85 101 25 30 10

ClassisofMichigan. 10 G r a n d R a p i d s ................

31 95

10 11

20 11

45 56 11

50

81 95

81 95


*

CLASSES A N D CflUBCHES.

From From From i Churches S.Schools Individ’ls

Potal.

Grand Total.

Classis of Michigan. (c o n t i n u e d .) H o p e . ................... Second, K a l a m a z o o ........ M a c o n .................... South B e n d .......... ...... South, M a c o n .............

114 85 48 28

152 46 66 84

38 11 18 61

5 50

5 50 ‘ 3

3

177 09 142 84 5 50 3

ClassisofMonmouth. First. Freehold.. H o l m d e l ....... Spotswood..... Middletown.... Second, Freehold K e y p o r t ....... L o n * Branch .. . Colt's N e c k ..... Highlands...... A s b u r y Park.....

8 93

64 64 54 47

80 86

68 24 201 25

35 87

73 57 143 58

73 57 196

68 24 237 12 10 29 16 4 11 40 72

68 287 *10 24 46 4 52

86 72 80 58

116 01 30 58

2 08 67

2 08 67

2 08 77

33 138 51

33 198 51

33 198 51

18 111 52 23

46 51 56 70

88 111 51 52 56 23 70

42 25

81 28

10

10

12 73 2 73

22 73 8 23

8 25

10 26 18

1 19 01

3 11 21 71

24 22 18 11 40

ClassisofMontgomery. A m s t e r d a m ........ ....... Auriesville................. Canajoharie...... ........ . Canastota............. .... Chittenango......... . Cicero.................... C o l u m b i a .................. Crahesville................. C u r r y t o w n .......... ...... E p h r a t a h .................. Florida............. ...... F o n d a ...... ............ .. Fort H e r k i m e r ............ Fort Plain................. Fultonville................. Glen....................... H a g a m a n ’s Mills.......... H e n derson ......... ........ H e r k i m e r .................. M a n h e i m .................. M a p l e t o w n ................ M o h a w k ................... N a u m b u r g ................. N e w B r e m e n .............. O w a s c o .................. .. O w a s c o Outlet....... ...... Point R o c k .............. St. Johnsville.............. Sprakers................... Stone A r a b i a .............. Syracuse.................... Thous a n d Isles............. Utica...................... W e s t L e y d e n ..............

42 10 30 56

18 55 52 17

46 76 56 70

29 07

44 62

46 75

*’6 13 18

12 73 2 73 15 25 11 343 84 123

19 51 67 99 26 27

14 97 355 V 1 45 30

10 20

30 25 11 698 90 153 10

16 51 67 99 71 27 20

30 25 11 698 122 276 10

16 51 67 99 71 77 20

335 120 15 202 20 ,650 4 619 10

12 18

876 120 15 202 20 3,039 4 794 10

52 18

ClassisofNewark. Belleville................ First, N e w a r k ............ Irvington..... ........... Second, N e w a r k .......... Franklin................. North, N e w a r k ........... West, N e w a r k ............ Clinton A v e n u e .... ...... Trinity, N e w a r k ..........

119 108 7 62 15 ' 2,400

25 18

126 50

12 8

61 56

481 25

10

89 37 105 05 77 50 4 108 50

35 4 44 172 50

66

75

66 06 56 i


CLASSES A N D CHURCHES.

From From From Jhurches S.Schools Individ’ls

Total.

Grand Total.

•51 46 25 1,239 291 5

20 05 80 93 14

51 46 25 1,267 303 5

500 485 70 116 35 635 17 36 7 167 165

03 14 51 17

Classis of Newark. (c o n t i n u e d .) . Linden................... . W o o d s i d e ....... ‘........ Stone H o u s e Plains........ O r a n g e .................. Trinity, Plainfield..... . Germ a n , Plainfield....... .

42 28 13 982 223 2

70 05 30 35 07

211 391 70 97 25 325 12 86 7 37 69

65 56 51 86

8 50 18 12 50 150 73 58 07

1

106 85 10 2

20 05 80 48 14

Classis of New Brunswick. First, N e w Brunswick ......... Six-Mile R u n .................. Hillsborough................. Middlebush....... T ......... Griggstown................... Second, N e w Brunswick....... B o u n d B r o o k ................. Third. N e w Brunswick ........ East Millstone................ Metuc h e n ..................... S u y d a m Stre e t .............. Highland P a r k ...............

167

121 88 93 58

18 81 10 310

56 24 34 50 21

5 40 47 50 41

82 50 55 30

96 24 34 50 51

567 03 ,557 16 90 51 130 17 57 75 722 60 17 96 36 24 7 84 211 50 190 51

ClassisofNew York. Collegiate.......... ....... B e Witt Chapel............. K n o x Memorial............ Collegiate, H a r l e m ......... South ..................... M a n o r C h a p e l .............. Port R i c h m o n d ............. » Bloomingdale....... ....... Madison A v e n u e ............ Thirty-fourth Street........ G e r m a n Evangelical Mission. H u g u e n o t s ................ St. Paul’s. Mott H a v e n .... \ High Bridge .............. Fourth G e r m a n ............. Prospect Hill.............. Holland.................... A v e n u e B ............. !.... Brighton Heights........... Union, Sixth A v e n u e ....... G e r man, Norfolk Street.. .. Kreischerville............. Yorkville.................. G r a c e ..................... Hamilton G r a n g e ..........

9,506 39 52 749 1,013 144 20 937 99 150 8

22

24 53 27 21 06 94 63

256 64 200 90 360

894 73 100

50 92 11 25 50

10 395 100 10

58

81 30 85 29

5 09 51 72 30

40 54 08 13 76 130 5 83 58

10,656 239 215 1,109 1,113 50 246

88 53 27 21 17

11,742 239 215 1,365 1,238 50 320

68 53 77 21 17

20

20

1,332 91 224 63

1,632 94 299 87

210 3 79 116 137 30

210 58 50 39 01

40 64 08 200 76 130 5

3 79 205 137 30 4 40 159 200 130 5

118 53

160 53

1

50 25 05 15*

50 30 30 15

iiS 68 35

25 315 92 170 70 84 86

25 376 42 216 45

4 66 5

4 66 5

603 14 276 66 102 79

603 14 331 66 102 79

57 50 80

10 187

85

58 50 14 01 92 21 76

ClassisofOrange. Berea ........................ B l oomingburgh ............... Callicoon.................... Claraville..................... Cuddebackville............... Deerpark .................... Etlenville..................... Fallsburgh.................. Grahamsville................. K e r h o n k s o n .................. M a m a k a t i n g ................. Minnisink..................... M o n t g o m e r y ................. N e w b u r g h ................... N e w Hur l e y ..................

50 24 05 15 5 125 24 60 70 79 86

20 75 75 5

4 66

538 14 183 19 102 79

10 99

65 132 48 ........

101 30


CLASSES A N D CHURCHES.

From From From Churches S.Schools Individ'ls

Classis of Orange. (CONTINUED.) N e w Prospect............ S h a w a n g u n k ............. Unionville............... W a l d e n .................. Walkill Valley............ Walpack, U p p e r ...... .... Walpack, L o w e r .......... W a w a r s i n g .............

Grand Total.

Total.

■ '3? 98 14 85 221 77 37 75 10

1

8 25 20

15

87 98 23 10

37 98 24 10

256 77 37 75 10

* 268 17 37 75 17 12

ClassisofFaramus. A c q u a c k a n o n c k ............. Broadway, Paterson......... Centreville................. Clarkstown................. First Holland, Paterson.... ; Holland, Lodi.............. Holland, Passaic ........... Holland, W b r t e n d y k e ....... North, Passaic.............. N y a c k ...................... Paramus. i.................. Pascack ................. Pierniont................... R a m a p o .......... ,........ R a m s e y s .................... R i d g e w o o d ................. Saddle River................ Second, Lodi .............. Second. T o t o w a ............. Spring Valley.............. T a p p a n ......... ........... W a r w i c k .................. . W e s t N e w H e m p s t e a d ...... .

419 116 6 100 18 9 9 162 178 85 14 68 20

04 25

200 25 5 7 3 25

79

43 50

18

25 65 52 04

27 76 14 10 103 09 42 43 268 87 39 13

53 >8 14 45

09 13 78 22

270 14 67

40 112 2 63 ,

20 3 56 05 10 54 23 12

75 20 21 32 54

893 204 14 107 21 9 53

889 155 11 107 21 9 53

' 85

202 343 103 28 115 20

25 74 65 78 89

202 647 103 47 145 59

25 49 65 41 89 21

47 17 10 178 118 31 876 62

76

72 17 10 178 174 81 401 62

76

04 50 29

09 48 32 87 25

06 35 04 50 29

09 65 32 50 25

ClassisofPassaic. Boardville............... B o o n t o n ................ Fairfield................ Franklin Fu r n a c e ........ Little Falls............. Montville .............. Sixth Paterson, Holland... P o m p t o n Plains......... P o m p t o n ............... P o n d s ................... Preakness............... Riverside, Paterson...... First, T o t o w a ........... Union, Paterson......... W y c k o f f ................

28 16 25 42 66

5 09 15 11 04 20 26

55 100 32 5 39 19 19 50 10

39 92 93 06 77 45

17 99 47 .. 3 14 5 34 77 86

118 11 85 6 33

2 25

33 40 11 62 26 72 317 117 9 48 25 96 50 12

25

55 20 170 147 186 201 44 40 19 30 46

48

04 66

97 92 93 53 11 81 25

33 74 25 62 26 72 317 117 9 98 25 140 50 28

25

70 47 170 219 286 201 60 40 19 30 56

48 40 97 £6 66 41 08 50 96

34 66 97 92 93 53 11 81 25

ClassisofPhiladelphia. North a n d South, Ham p t o n . . .. Harlingen............ •..... Neshanic ................ First, Philadelphia.......... Second, Philadelphia........ Fourth, Philadelphia........ B l a w e n b u r g .............. .. Stanton.................... Clover Hill..... ............ Third, Philadelphia.......... R o c k y Hill..................

15 20 86 97 141 201 44 28 11

97 11 41 41 08 71 5C

46 56

2088

19 60

54 50 40

30 5

11 79 8 46 80

97 11 41 41 08 50 96 56

56


CLASSES A N D CHURCHES.

From From From Churches S.Schools Individ’ls

Total.

Grand Total.

ClassisofPhiladelphia. (c o n t i n u e d .) Fifth, Philadelphia........... Addisville .................. Three Bridges............... First and Second, Philadelphia.

50 87 30

17 14

60 45 25 12

110 149 44 25 12

110 149 44 25 157 18

.ClassisofPoughkeepsie. First, Poughkeepsie.......... Second. Poughkeepsie........ Fishkill. H o p ewell ......... N e w H a c k e n s a c k ... H y d e P a r k ........ Fishkill-on-Hudson. Rhinebeck......... G l e n h a m ... ..... Cold Spring....... Millbrook..........

899 54

145 322 92

210 22

79 03 42 49 106 99 35 162 10 120 54 18 66 37 50 57 26

1,079 54 533 14 68 49 148 99 35 192 10 193 54 23 37 50 113 70

1,239 44 600 39 177 66 202 54 148 99 35 247 10 199 54 23 37 50 141 58

227 36 83 31 142 60 63 48 9 62 108 246 14 31 73 57 03 135 06 43 33 44 70 27 06 5 3 94

330 21 187 16 142 60 63 48 44 62 210 346 14 31 73 57 03 246 43 43 33 74 70 27 06 5 3 94

35

25 72 4 42 234 11 90 48 3 75 64 57 1,162 86 73 78 7 50 141 25 90 106 93

25 72 4 42 320 11 163 48 3 75 64 57 1,162 86 98 78 7 50 141 25 90 124 26

5

61 80 21 15 65 37

61 80 21 15 65 37 120 2 63 74 83 85 50 87 73 18 50 321 33

31 63

110 66

26 42 28

30 45 4 34

11 44

45

Classisof Raritan. First, Raritan........ t....... Readington........... ,....... Bedminster................. *. L e b a n o n ...................... R o c k a w a y .................... North B r a n c h ................. Second. Raritan.............. Peapack ..................... Branch ville................... Third, Raritan................ Pottersville .................. H i g h Bridge.................. Aunandale ................... Fourth. Raritan, G e r m a n ...... Y. P. S. C. E., 1st & 2d, Raritan.

164 80 32 81 142 60 17 03 9 62 56 69 186 58 23 73 57 03 88 84 26 79 41 05

62 56 50 50 35 32 29 64 59 56 8 46 22 8 46 3 65 27 06

2i ’67

8 08

3 94

Classisof Rensselaer. Bath-on-Hudson........... Blooming Grove ........... E m m a n u e l , Castleton.... . C h a t h a m .................. First, G h e n t ............... Second, G h e n t ............. Gre e n b u s h ................. ICinderhook................ N a s s a u .................... N e w Conc o r d .............. S c h o d a c k .................. Schodack L a n d i n g ......... Stuyvesant................ Stuyvesant Falls...........

13 10 128 88 57 97 3 75 43 11 834 18 37 09 7 50 79 04 30 71 93

12 62 4 42 105 23 32 51 293 68

21 46 35 36 69

62 21 , 60

ClassisofRochester. A b b e Chur c h ............. Arcadia.................. Clymer Hill............... East Williamson.......... Buffalo............... t.... F a r m e r Village............ .Lodi............. ; . M a r i o n ................... Pultneyville................ First, Rochester..... .....

24 64 11 15 35 50 26 98 2 63 23 18 36 57

37 16 . 10 24 87 52 35 17 13 37 73 .

40 67

120

31 80

2 63 23 18 85 50 37 78 18 50 304 38

11 50

127 33

155

22


CLASSES A N D CHURCHES.

From From From Churches S.Schools Individ'U

Total.

Grand Total.

ClassisofRochester. (c o n t i n u e d .) Second, Rochester.......... P a l m y r a ................... T y r e ......................

43 93 7 48 4 74

45 21

10 84

99 14 7 48 22 58

109 14 7 48 22 58

Classis of Saratoga. Boght........... Buskirks........ Cohoes.......... Fort Miller...... Gansevoort..... Northumberland. Rensselaer...... iratoga.... Sarat< haghticoke. Union Village..... W e s t Troy, North. W e s t Troy, South... Wynantskill ....

50 60 15

41 60 15

10 50 80 15 30

89 10 9 50 34 25 231 61 23 34 59

9 25 33 65

367 12 163 20

120 20

10 2 50 83 65

15 41

89 10 19 50 46 848 91 23 50

150 79 19 50 133 65 848 91 23 60

487 32 163 20 81 08 34 36 24 5 46 74 176 15

663 32 163 20 81 08 40 93 35 50 5 46 74 209 15

Classis of Schenectady. First, Schenectady.. ‘ ctadj Second, Schenectady. First, Glenvllle... Second, Glenville... First, Rotterdam... Second, Rotterdam. Helderberg....... N i s kayuna ........ Lisha’s Kill....... Amity. Princetown. Altamont...

18 36 24 15 39 127 15 13 73

■" 26 08 16,

*55 " 5 31 35

49 -i6 95

20

20 5 65

24 68 20 e 5 65

56 46 20

5 65

Classis of Schoharie. B e a v e r d a m ... .... Be r n e .............. Breakabin.......... Central B r i d g e ..... Cobleskill.......... E m i n e n c e .......... Gallupville........ . Gilboa............. Lawyersville....... Middleburg........ Moresville ........ North Blenheim..... Prattsville......... Schoharie....... Schoharie Mountain. Sharon. South Gilboa ............ W o m e n ’s Missionary Union.

18 15 14 31 11 64

8 51 15 19 31 11 64

25 18 86 40

25 48 86 40

8

8 18 15 4 31 5 33

6 31

11 22

7 64 40

10 50 20

35 18 9 85

10 50

10 50

95 18 9 85

95 18 9 85 23

8

8

5

Classis ofUlster. Blue Mountain. Caatsban...... E s o p u s ........ Flatbush..... Kingston..... Port E w e n . . ... Plattekill...... R o x b u r y ..... .

6 201 25 12 24 25 274 28 37 52 17 25 89

81 7 38 27 75 75

6

30 153 62

6 282 25 49 38 52 502 90 43 52 17 25 89

12 75 392 58 96 75 72 616 03 53 52 17 28 70


CLASSES A N D CHURCHES.

From From From Churches S.Schools Individ'ls

Total.

Grand Total.

ClassisofUlster. (CONTINUED.) Saugerties.............. S h a n d a k e n ............. S h o k a n ................. Stewartville............ W e s t Hurley............. W o o d s t o c k .............. W i l t w y c k ...............

.83 58

88

171 58

229 5 5

7 25 9 04

61 86

7 25

7 25

70 90

70 90

16 73 19 05 335 04

16 73 19 05 335 04

4 29

4 29

366 19 192 50 201 65 99 50 10 16 50 342 11

416 19 202 50 281 65 124 50 10 16 50 382 11

307 78 60 28 157 93 210 15 40 34 25 385 35 17 250 28 204 55 73 68 274 37 17 48 19 415 90 29 35 5 8 88 399 50 38 07

359 33 60 28 262 93 310 15 40 34 25 385 35 17 250 28 206 86 73 68 274 37 17 48 19 415 90 29 35 5 8 88 404 50 38 07

Classis of Westchester. Bronxville................... Cortlandtown............... . F o r d h a m .................... G r e enburgh ................. . Greenville................... Hastings.................... Melrose...................... Mt. V e r n o n .................. Peekskill............ ........ First, Ta r r y t o w n ............. Second, T a r r y t o w n ........... Unionville................... W e s t F a r m s ................. Y o n k e r s .....................

16 73 19 05 27 04

808

4 29

6 115 68 18 156 65 44 10 16 50 65 68

102 40 4 5C 40 52 50

148 11 175 5 3

100

176 43

50 49 *5

108 80 5

Classis ofWisconsin. A l t o ......................... Baileyville ................... B e t h l e h e m ................... Cedar Grove ................. Chicago....... .............. . D a n forth ..................... Ebenezer..................... E n g l e w o o d ................... Forreston..................... Franklin...................... Fulton........................ Gibbsville.................... Greenleafton................. Holland, N e b ................. Lafayette................. . Lansing...................... M i l waukee.................... Oostburgh.................... Pella, N e b .................... Peoria........................ K o s e l a n d ......:............. Second, Roseland............. S h e boygan Falls.............. Silver Cr e e k ................. Greenbush.................... South H o l l a n d ............... W a u p u n ...... ...............

148 49 50 28 26 43 34 25 53 35 14 128 72 66 68 53 68 80 02 13 98 40 10 85

106 50 210 15 40

l25

m

155

3 51 56 89 13 20 60 17 48 150

70 98 79 134 35

6 167 50 19 5

8 88 284 50 88 07 237 10 105 - 15 03

11 50 25'â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;

18 65

267 25

267 25

85

190 40 03

190 40 03


F R O M INDIVIDUALS, N O T T H R O U G H CHUR C H E S . Ralph Voorhees............S M S O Rev. F. N. Zabriskfe, D.D. ... 5 “ S. A. B u m s t e a d ....... 10 “ N. F. C h a p m a n ........ 40 “ W m . B r u s h ............ 25 “ W . H. Steele, D.D ..... 572 “ S . W . Mills, D . D ........ 15 “ L. W . Kip, D . D . ........ 40 “ J. Kni-skern .......... 5 " J. E. Bernart.......... 10 “ W . H Gleason, D . D .... 20 “ “

J. V. N. Talmage, D . D — E. R. Atwater, Christmas B o x ................. R. D e u k k e r ............ J. N. Ja n s e n ...........

100

“ J. W . Conklin......... “ G o y n Talmage, D . D .... " D. Rapalje............. “ W . B. D a r r a c h ......... “ M. V. Schoonmaker,D.D. “ J. M. W a g n e r ........ Prof. J-B. N y k e r k ..........

10 10 30 5 10 10 5

" “ “

10 5 25

In M e m o r i a m , S. C .......... 50 T w o Brothers ............. 1,000 A Free Will Offering......... 1,000 D. T. L e n n o n ............... 10 A. R ....................... *0* A. Fem a l e Friend....... *... 10 A Friend, “ L." ...............30 C. C. Ferris, Orange, N. J ... 3 “ Passaic” .................. 5 Extra-Dime-a*Day.......... 18 10 Miss E m m a Searle........... 5 A Friend................... 50 For n e w Teacher, A m o y .... 50 A Friend, Toledo. O ......... 100 G. Duthler................. 1 Four Ladies.............— 40 . A N e w Year Gift............ 5 C. Clement, Hudson, M i c h — 2 35 A Friend of Little Children... 25 O n e w h o lores Children.... . 100 H. D e K r u i g .......... 35 Dr. T. G. Huizinga........... 35 J. S., India......... 25 A former Domestic Missionary 5 Jessie Hazenberg, So. Africa.. 5 C. S. V. H .................. L. P. C., Vassar College..... T. W . Mintenburg...........

5 1 10

J. J. J a n e w a y . .............. Mrs. S. B. Menifee........... “ J. V a n Santvoord...... “ S. M. L a n s i n g .......... “ K a t e V . D. Searle...... “ M. D. W . Peltz......... “ L. B. H a l s e y ........... “ N. H. Dosker.... ....... “ Rebecca H a m m o n d .... “ M. E. Scott............ “ J.C. S m o c k . ........... “ C. R. V. R o m o n d t ...... “ Yo u r s for J a p a n ” ......... A Friend in Michigan......,-..

$50 30 5 15 5 20 . 45 5 17 65 9 100 10 50 50

S. V. N.,N. B................ 25 “ Sunshine” ... ............ 6 60 Fo r H. J. Scudder's salary__ 100 “ • Rev. E. C. Scudder, Jr’s ' Salary............... 300 C. D.t P e n n Y a n n , N. Y ...... 5 D e y o Sisters, Kingston, N. Y. 5 L. S. R. H ...... ............ 1 Hillside..................... 5 5 H., Holland, Mich............ S. H. Williams.............. 100 S. L. C .........:........... 15 Fo r silver deficiency........ 8 45 Fo r debt.................... 102 89 W m . Williams .... .......... 1 Peter F a g g ’s Family B o x . .... 2 Family Mission Box, E. R. A. 53 Privilege.......,........... 20 F. R. M ...... 30 Miss A. Ma b i e . . .;........... 3 Susan R. Zabriskie.......... 10 Extra-cent-a-dayi E. Orange, 4 26 N e w Jersey........ Extra-cent-a-day,.A. M. V. Z . . 1 25 Miss T h o m p s o n . . ............ 50 J o h n M c K a y , G r a n d Rapids... 4 25 A Friend, Newark, N. J ..... 200 A Volunteer ..... 10 “ W a s h i n g t o n ” ............. 10 A Northfield Student........ 10 Chas. S. W a r d .............. 20 A F r i e n d ......... 1,000 A Friend of Missions........ 100 A Friend of Foreign Missions 200 F o r Catechist, India........ 90


From Miscellaneous Sources. F r o m the W o m a n ’s B o a r d ............................................ $11,073 82 F o r Tracts........................................................... 3 8 For Mite B o x e s ................................. For Freight.......................................................... 4 8 39 For Individual Missionaries...................... A m e r i c a n Bible Society, for Arcot Mission............................ C a s h ........................................ Passage m o n e y returned............................................. Interest on B o n d s .................................................... F r o m the Netherlands............................................... ; C u s t o m H o u s e duties refunded....................................... Board Domestic Missons, Conference Expenses.................. ...... Missionary Hens, G r a n d Rapids....................................... Bright H o p e Missionary Band, Plainville, N. J ......................... Missionary Class, Greylock Mills, M a s s ................................. Mission Band, Miss Baldwin’s School, East Orange, N. J ............... Desert P a l m Mission Band, Convent Station, N. J ........ ............. Invalids’ Circle K. D., Madison, W i s ................................... Students’Missionary Committee, N e w Brunswick, N. J ................ Ladies’Particular Synod, Albany, N. Y ............................... Missionary Society, N e w Centre, N. J ................................. S. S. Presbyterian Church, Pine Plains, N. Y .......................... S. S. Christian R e f o r m e d Church, Drehthe, M i c h .......... ............ '

Total...............................................

.

335 250 38 10 253 1^535 773 99 3 5 20 12 15 100 3 68 240 55 30 35

98 20 05 50 11

50 56

$15,009 61

From Legacies.

Maria V a n Buskirk................................................... T h o m a s T. Bryce, Tarrytown, N. Y ................................... Robert Gaston, Somerville, N. J ................... *................ Catharine Davis, Somerville, N. J ..................................... K. Broen, Kalamazoo, M i c h ................ •......................... J o h n Smock, Millstone, N. J .................................. .......

$547 50 250 12,000 100 10 847 60

Total................................................ $13,755 10

Income of Theological Seminary Fund, Arcot Mission. ■

FROM MAY

1, 1890, T O

APRIL

30, 1891.

Y n t e m a Scholarship.............................

$140

Maurice E. Viele, Interest on Note........ ..................................ig F r a n k A. Ferris, Second Church, H a r l e m .............. .......... . 250 50 Bible School, Second Church, H a r l e m ............. .................... Erskine Scholarship................................................. 100 Interest on Bonds, Stock, & c ..........................................

2,096 86


For the A m o y Middle School— Special. First, Poughkeepsie, N. Y., Individuals......................... ....... First, Poughkeepsie, N. Y., S u n d a y school....... ...................... S a m u e l Sloan, N e w Y o r k City......................................... R. B. Ferris, N e w Y o r k City............."............................. Mrs. I. J. Greenwood, N e w Y o r k City... ......................... .... Rev. H. D. B. M ulford............................................. . W m . L. Brower, N e w Y o r k City....................................... Rev. S. M. Jackson, N e w Y o r k City__ ,................................ W m . H. Wright, N e w Y o r k City................................ ...... Rhinebeck, N. Y., Individuals................................... ..... Rhinebeck, N. Y., S u n d a y school................................... . R. N. Perlee, N e w Y o r k City.. .................. . .................. A Friend, Twenty-ninth street Church, N e w Y o r k City . ................ Second, Poughkeepsie, N. Y., Individuals.... ............. .......... First, Somerville, N. J .............................................. . Second, Somerville, N. J ................... ...... ..................... First, Kingston, N. Y., Individuals................... .......... ...... First, Claverack, N. Y ............... ...... *.............. . Second, Cla'verack, N. Y ...................................... . .... Second, Claverack, N. Y., K i n g ’s Sons a n d Daughters........... ....... Hudson, N. Y., Individuals......................... . .............. St. Paul’s, Mott H a v e n ................... ...... ..................... Warwick, N. Y., Individuals........................................... U p p e r R e d Hook, N. Y . ........................ ....................... Hopewell, N. Y., Individuals.......................................'... N e w burgh, N. Y., Individuals......................................... Miss E. D Sumner, Albany, N. Y ...................................... Miss J. O. V a n Schaick, Albany, N. Y .......................... :...... E. P. Platt, Poughkeepsie, N. Y . .................. Miss L u s k ................................................. Rev. T. W . Chambers, D. D ................. J o h n S. Bussing................ Rev. W . S. C r a n m e r ................................................... J a m e s Platt............................ •............... ...... ...... Robert Schel l ................................................ Mrs. Robert Schell.................................................... Mrs. S. A. S a n d h a m ............ S. S., Hudson, N. Y ................................................... J o h n U n d e r w o o d »fe C o .. ..... .......................... ............. K i n g ’s Daughters, Peapack, N. J. .............. ....................... Church of Westwood, N. J., Individuals.... ............... ............ A Friend............................................................. A L a d y in Forty-eighth street C h u r c h ................................. Ladies’ Society, Madison avenue Church, Albany, N. Y ................. Mrs. F. S. McKinstry.... . .. ........................... ......... H. D. Smith, P ompton, N. J ............................ ............... A T h a n k Offering .. ..... ... ........ .............. ................. Interest ....................................................

8131 25 50 100 . 100 100 20 25 25 1 1,067 20 10 5 50 43 ( 22 60 75 58 33 50 25 137 50 33 96 29 20 12 250 500 25 5 100 100 10 10 25 50 500 59 42 700 27 86 2 5 50 50 1,000 20

553


RECEIPTS B Y CLASSES. i

CLASSES O F S Y N O D OP N e w York.

From From From Churches S.Schools Individâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Is

Total ..................

$936 34 433,77 891 40 3,771 78 13,180 42 1,460 98 1,769*33 488 69

$276 208 543 427 1,295 209 106 299

17 13 71 85 56 24 07 40

29,939 64

3,366 13

$595 108 943 1,091 1,866 374 660 815

Total.

Grand Total.

91 $1,806 42 $1,943 34 74 750 64 961 62 29 2,579 51 2,378 40 50 5,291 13 5,957 56 50 16,342 48 18,199 82 16 2,044 38 2,258 72 26 2,535 66 3,052 74 54 1,608 56 1,816 56

6.455 90

32,754 67

36,769 89

Albany.

Gre e n e ...................... Rensselaer * ..............

.

2,158 887 1,183 1,306 351 538 728 125 698

11 03 79 55 13 05 95 39 06

7,927 06

279 179 165 570 361 58 222 53 258

11 31 59 67 08 31 23 95 99

2,149 20

' 689 87 420 128 157 105 117 100 271

50 01 45 15 18 15 62

2,076 06

3,126 1,103 1,769 2,005 869 701 1,068 279 1,228

72 38 76 37 39 51 18 34 67

12,152,32

3,513 1,341 2,175 2,206 948 920 1,347 362 1,602

37 88 15 70 04 85 03 34 06

14,417 42

N e w Brunswick.

Philadelphia..................

Total...................

1,113 1,121 444 4,495 1,283 1,712 428 830 852

73 94 79 32 93

868 752 11 517 672 609 235 235 69

07 70 25 29 76 62 44 06 01

34 05 57

329 265 150 623 279 581 255 193 306

56 05 48 22 71 14 69 81 78

12,282 67

2,985

44

3,971 20

70 551 852 135 812 88 1,235

13 91 77 98 14 67 44

5 645 558 318 285 71 1,013

2,311 2,139 606 5,635 2,236 2,902 919 1,258 1,228

36 69 52 83 40 76 47 92 36

19,239 31

2,554 2.788 761 6,260 2,588 3,455 1,077 1,645 1,813

77 49 72 65 77 71 77 50 48

22,966 81

Chicago.

128 682 719 207 669 181 1,235

53 10 63 54 29 08 17

3,893 34

G r a n d Total, 1890 .......

25 64 36 56 86 09

203 1,879 2,130 662 1,267 340 3,483

91 65 76 08 29 75 70

203 2,097 2,329 811 1,289 466 3,747

91 90 85 08 50 94 56

3,247 04

2,897 76

9,968 14

10,946 74

46,980 40

11,776 87

15,307 17

74,064 44

85,110 84

54,762 28

12,385 10

17,601 65

84,749 03

94,262 63


CLASSICAL A P P O R T I O N M E N T S A N D CONTRIBUTIONS. •o

S . Gain

CLASSES.

8

< Albany ...... Bergen.. .... South Bergen... Dakota...... Grand River... Greene..... \. Holland...... Hudson...... Illinois..... ... Iowa........ . Kingston..... North Long Island South Long Island, Michigan..... Monmouth.... . Montgomery... Newark...... New Brunswick ..., New York..... Orange........ Paramus..... Passaic...... . Philadelphia... Poughkeepsie. ... Raritan...... Rensselaer.... , Rochester..... Saratoga... .... Schenectady... . Schoharie..... Ulster....... Westchester.... Wisconsin.....

Total

Loss

1890-91. 1890-91.

$5,500 2.750 3.000 300 2,500 1.750 2,550 2,200 1.000 1,300 1,350 3,400 8,000 700 1,200

. .

. . * . . . . .

. . . .

. . . *

$3,513 37 2,554 77 2,788 49 203 91 2,097 90 1,341 88 2,329 85 1,943 34 811 08 1,289 50 961 62 2,589 51 5,957 56 466 94 761 72 8,100 2,175 15 7,000 6,280 65 3,850 2,588 77 18,000 ’18,199 82 3,500 2,258 72 4,700 3,455 71 1,500 1,077 77 2,500 1,645 50 3,500 3,052 74 8,000 1,813 43 3,000 2,206 70 1,100 948 04 1,000 920 85 2,000 1,347 03 500 362 84 2,500 1,602 06 2,800 1,816 56 3,700 3,747 56

$4,441 63 2,380 89 3,215 70 195 92 2,361 29 1,485 19 2,186 95 1,919 65 &31 74 1,169 02 1,057 60 2,835 68 6,766 46 319 37 984 84 2,333 96 7,576 90 2,890 07 21,135 52 2,558 53 3,765 06 1,175 41 2,253 06 3,143 92 2,149 75 2,388 66 971 24 •731 74 1,293 79 367 26 1,648 09 1,775 42 3,952 32

$104,750 885,110 84 $94,262 63

173 88

$928 26 427 21

**7*99 263 39 143 31 142*90 23 69

i20 48

20 66 95 98 246 17 608 90

147 57 223 12 158 81 1,296 25 301 30 2,935 70 299 81 309 35 97 64 607 56 91 18 336 32 181 96 23 20 189 11 53 24 4 92 46 03 41 14 204 76 8900

$10,051 79

N e t loss, 1890-91 .............. $9,151 79 ♦Exceeded apportionment.


TREASURER’S ANNUAL REPORT. The Board of Foreign Missions ofReformed Church in America in account with J O H N M. FERRIS, Treasurer. Dr.

April 30th, 1891.

A R C O T MISSION.

T o cash paid drafts, etc. . . . . . . . . . $32,412 97 “ on account of Mission. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,791 44 AMOY

T o cash paid drafts, etc. . . . . . . . . . . . . “ on account of Mission. . . . . . . . . “ for School F u n d . . . . . . . . . . . . . N O R T H J A P A N MISSION.

T o cash paid drafts, etc. . . . . . . . . . . . . “ on account of Mission. . . . . . . . . .

$36,204 41

MISSION.

13,850 83 8,408 99 5.868 49

28,128 31

'

20,402 62 8,670 14

29,072 76

S O U T H J A P A N MISSION.

T o cash paid drafts, etc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12,652 18 “ " O n account of Mission. . . . •... 2,311 03 “ B a n k s on account of. L o a n s . . . . . 22,000 00 “ Interest on L o a n s . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,910 15 “ A c c o u n t of general security F und. “ Rev. J. M . Ferris, Treasurer, on account. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 295 15 “ Rev. H. N. Cobb, Secretary, salary. 2,700 00 600 00 “ Bookkeeper, salary. . . . . . . . . . . “ Re n t of Office. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 632 52 “ Traveling expenses. . . . . . . . . . . 592,65 “ Postage, H o m e a n d Foreign.... 126 76 769 25 ‘‘ Printing A n n u a l Report, etc.... “ Heating and Care of R o o m s .... 101 00 “ Books, Magazines and Papers.... 43 32 “ Mite Boxes, Barrels a n d Pails.... 176 61 323 35 “ Incidental expenses. . . . . . . . . . . 146 72 “ Deficiency, “ Mission Field” . . . . J -------Balance o n account. . . . . . . . . . .

14,963 21 23,910 15 12,840 00

6,507 33 2,165 85 $153,792 02

E. & O. E., April 30th, 1890.

Or.

'‘

B y balance as per statement to date..-....... ' April 30th, 1891. • B y cash received from churches, etc. . . . . . . . $46,980 40 “ “ S u n d a y schools, etc. . . . 11,776 87 “ “ Indiv’dls thr’g h churches 15,307 17 “ “ “ not “ “ 7,567 80 “ “ Miscellaneous sources... 15,009 61 “ “ Legacies. . . . . . . . . . . . 13,755 10 “ “ A m o y School F u n d ... 5,868 49 borrowed from B a n k

$2,026 58

116,265 44 35,500 00 $153,792 02

E x a m i n e d a n d c o m p a r e d with the vouchers a n d found correct. J A M E S A. W I L L I A M S O N , .’ J O S E P H C. P O O L . N e w Y ork , M a y 19th, 1891. . N. B.— O f the receipts above reported f r o m miscellaneous sources, $11,073.32, a n d of the others, 87,323.48, m a k i n g a total of $18,396.80, we r e received f r o m Mrs. Peter Donald, Treasurer of the W o m a n ’s Board of Foreign Missions. N e w Y ork ,April 30th, 1891. J O H N M. F E R R I S , Treasurer.


T heological S eminary

in India .

E N D O W M E N T FUND. PAID

IN

P rofessobshifs :

T h e General S y n o d ’s ..:.. . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,155 34 T h e Collegiate C h u r c h . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13,109 83 - - - - - - - - $31,365 06 Scholarships, C h u r c h :

C h u r c h of H u d s o n . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,000 Collegiate Church, H a r l e m . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,001 First Church, A l b a n y . . . . . . . . 400 Madison A v e n u e Church, A l b a n y _ _ _ _ _ 1,933 First and Fair St. Churches, Kingston.... 783 Clinton A v e n u e Church, N e w a r k . . . . . . . 1,305 Flatbush C h u r c h . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,000 --------

' 10,310

S c h o l a r s h i p s , In d i v i d u a l :

Joel T. S i m p s o n . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3,000 1,000 ■ , A Missionary Friend’s half. . . . . . . . . . . T h e Family Semelink half... . . . . . . . . 1,000 Ormiston Memorial. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,000 S. T a l m a g e Ma t h e r . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,000 G r e e n w o o d . . . . . . . . . . . . . . '__ : .... 3,000 Donald M emorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,000 3,000 Katharine A. Rockwell... . . . . . . . . . . . . In His N a m e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 3,000 Gamaliel G. S m i t h . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,000 - - - - - - - - 18,000 Total E n d o w m e n t paid in. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $49,575 06 Subscriptions and Scholarships unpaid ..... 7,533 33 Total E n d o w m e n t F u n d . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

$57,098 38

T h e Arcot Seminary F u n d remains at $49,575.06— the a m o u n t re­ ported a year ago. During the twelve mon t h s just closed $3,648.86 have been remitted to the Arcot Mission, of which $300 represent dona­ tions a n d $3,348.86 interest received on the invested fund. N o change has been m a d e in the character of the securities held. J O H N M. FERRIS, Treasurer.


RECEIPTS OF THE BOARD SINCE 1857, IN PERIODS OF FIVE YEARS, W I T H TOTALS A N D AVERAGE. YEARS.

RECEIPTS.

1858... 1859... 1860... 1861... 1862....

.. $16,076 87 .. 25,034 61 .. 30,181 58 .. 34,159 26 .. 28,603 17

1863 .. 1864... 1865... 1866... 1867...

.. 42,257 .. 35,391 .. 82,038 .. 55,783 .. *63,030

1868 .. 1869... 1870... 1871... 1872...

.. .. .. .. ..

53,472 91 81,41038 57,342 94 71,125 52 65,173 26

1873... 1874... 1875... 1876... 1877...

.. .-. .. .. ..

83,948 55,352 54,249 64,342 58,152

61 95 95 91 53

1878... 1879.... 1880... 1881... 1882...

.. .. .. .. ..

69,085 58,443 63,185 92,984 58,184

87 49 71 32 71

1883... .. 1884... .. 1885... .. 1886... .. 1887... .. 1888 .. 1889... 1890... 1891...

TOTALS FOR 5 YEARS.

AVERAGE FOR 5 YEARS.

$134,055 49

$26,811 10

INCREASE.

36 18 22 75 89 278,501 40

55,700 28 $28,889 18

328,523 01

65,704 60

10,004 32 -•

. i 316,046 95

63,209 37

341,884 10

68,376 82

5,167 45

403,544 42

80,708 88

12,332 06

65,284 58 76,955 23 88,13104 86,386 55 86,787 02

.. +109,946 .. 93,142' .. 117,090 .. 116,265

11 24 14 45

* In addition $56,500 were given b y Mr. W a r r e n A c k e r m a n to r e m o v e the debt resting on the Board. , t In addition $45,335,06 were given for the E n d o w m e n t of the Theological S e m i ­ Inary in the Arcot Mission through the efforts of Rev. Jacob Chamberlain, D.D. T o this F u n d $2,293 were ad d e d in 1889-90. T h e total a m o u n t given since 1857 is $2,384,474.37.


A N N U A L REPORT •

OP

THE

Treasurer of the W o m a n ’s Board of Foreign Missions of the Reformed Church in America. RECEIPTS. Acquackanonck, N. J M Auxiliary..................... Albany, N. Y., First C h u r c h Auxiliary............... “ “ Golden Rule Mission B a n d “ “ Mission B a n d ........ ..... “ Madison A v e n u e Auxiliary........... . “ “ Mission B a n d ........ “ Third Ch u r c h Auxiliary........... . “ Holland “ ............... Alexandria Bay, N. Y;, Auxiliary..................... Altamont, “ “ .................... . Alto, Wis., u ..................... Amity, N.Y., “ ..................... A m s t e r d a m , N. Y., “ .................. . A s b u r y Park, N. J., “ ..................... Astoria, L. L, Auxiliary. ........................... “ Burroughs Mission B a n d ............... Athenia, N. J., B a n d of W o r k e r s .. ...........-....... Bayonne, N. J., Auxiliary........................... “ Mission Gleaners.. ................... B a c o n Hill, N. Y., Auxiliary......................... Bergen, South, N. J., Auxiliary..... ................. ‘Bergen Point, N. J., “ ■......... ........... Berne, N. Y., u ...................... Belleville, N. J., “ ....................... “ Willing W o r k e r s ................ Blawenburgh, N. J., Auxiliary................... Bushkill, Pa., “ .................. Blue Mountain, N..Y., u .................. Boght R e f o r m e d Church, Auxiliary............. Bloomingburgh, N. Y., “ ............. Bethlehem, N. Y., First Ch u r c h Auxiliary....... . “ Willing W o r k e r s .............. “ Second Auxiliary ............ Bushwick, L. I., Auxiliary...................... Brooklyn, N. Y., First C h u r c h Auxiliary......... “ Mrs. H. T. G r a y ................ “ t Crystal Society................ . “ North Auxiliary................ * “ South “ ................ “ Bedford “ ............... . “ K e n t Street, E. D., Auxiliary.... “ Church-on-the-Heights Auxiliary “ Twelfth Street Auxiliary...... “ “ Violet Circle.... Caatsban, N. Y., Auxiliary................ Canajoharie, N. Y., Auxiliary............. Catskill, N. V., “ .............. Cedar Grove, Wis., W o r k a n d Praying B a n d Centreville, Mich., Auxiliary..............

$214 $145 25 60 40 140 25

245 25 165 25 35 32 5 51 81 6 29

65 55 78 29

11 68 44 85

79 3 85

36 87 6°

,

82 40 35 .

17 75 8 50

203 S3 30 60

96 87 30 61 64 25 26 117 40 16 12 6 75 10 5 25 26 25 30 40

293 83 5 45 68 60 184

120 20

140 llo 33 27 104 20 105 35 56


Central Bridge, N. Y., Auxiliary............. C h a tham, N. Y., “ ............ Chicago, 111., “ ....... ..... Clarksville, N. Y., '* ............. Claverack, N. Y., Second Auxiliary........ . Closter, N. J., “ ......... Cohoes, N.Y., “ ......... Colt’s Neck, N. J., “ ........ . Coopersville, Mich., “ ......... Clover Hill, N. J., “ ..... . Coxsackie, N. Y., First C h u r c h Praying B a n d Second Churc h Auxiliary................ “ Mission B a n d ............ Currytown, N. Y., Auxiliary.... Drenthe, Mich., S u n d a y School... Ellenville, N. Y., Auxiliary...... English Neighborhood, Auxiliary Esopus, N. Y., Auxiliary.................................. Fairfield, N. J., Auxiliary................................. “ “ Mission Circle............................. Fairview, 111., Auxiliary................. ................ Fernwood, 111., Auxiliary................................. F a r m e r Village, N. Y., Auxiliary..... Fallsburgh, N. Y., Auxiliary..... *... Flatlands, L. I., Auxiliary........... Flatbush, Ulster Co., N. Y., Auxiliary “ L. I., Auxiliary............ • Fishkill Village, N. Y., Auxiliary.......................... “ Brinkerhoff Mission B a n d ..... .................... “ o n H u d s o n Auxiliary.............................. Freehold, N. J., Second Chur c h Auxiliary................. Franklin Furnace, N. J., Auxiliary........................ Franklin Park, N. J., Missionary1Guild.............. ...... “ “ Taylor Mission Circle,.............. .. Flushing, L. I., Auxiliary................................. Fultonville, N. Y., Auxiliary.............................. Fonda, “ Auxiliary............................ .. Dort Plain, “ Auxiliary.............°................ “ u Mission B a n d .......................... Fordham, “ Mission Band. ............ G r a n d Haven, Mich., Auxiliary............... G r a n d Rapids, (l Second Ch u r c h Auxiliary. “ “ Third Chu r c h Auxiliary.. “ “ Fourth Chu r c h Auxiliary Gravesend, L. I., Auxiliary................... Greenport, Col. Co., N. Y., Auxiliary...................... “ • “ ** S u n d a y School................. Greenville, N. J„ Auxiliary................................ Greenwich, N. Y., Auxiliary.............. .............. G e r m a n t o w n , N. Y., Auxiliary............................ Ghent, N. Y., Auxiliary...................... “ “ a memorial gift....... In m e m o r y of Mrs. E. V. Wyckhoff, b y her children.......... Gibbsville, Wis., Auxiliary....... Griggstown, N. J., Auxiliary..... Hackensack, N. J., First, Auxiliary. Harlingen, N. J., Auxiliary....... H i g h Bridge, N. J., Auxiliary.... Hastings o n Hudson, Auxiliary....

$5 86

100 5 60 37 43 76 20

17 16 8 46 » 1 50 $110

22

, 18 16

141 10 35 50 75 11 47 37 34

10 5 51 65 16 44 78 20 164 37 80

148 60 5

67 55 50 10 14 30 153 60 28

8 59 53 50 28 19 26

69 54 60 60 80 63 32 144 93

23

2

25 135 67 87 65 16 30

53 10

10

73 96 22 75 211 65 27 40 30

8


Helderberg, N. Y., Auxiliary........................ .... Herkimer, “ “ ..............................

*

H i g h Falls, “ Chu r c h of the Clove.................... “ “ Mission B a n d .......................... Holmdel, N. J., Auxiliary................................. Hopewell. N. Y., Auxiliary...............................

$79 57 33

“ “ three ladies.............................. Hudson, N. Y., Auxiliary................................. u “ Mission Circle....... ' .................... Holland, Mich., First a n d Third Church, W o m a n ’s Society... “ “

“ “

“ “ y o u n g ladies...... H o p e Church Auxiliary..... ..............

“ “ “ Mission Circle.......... ..... “ “ Ebenezer.................................. Irving Park, 111., Auxiliary................................

$26 58 89 03

184 05 20 72 58 12 22 219 51 45 21 13 3 50

“ “ “ “ “ “

“ “ “

Arrears of tithes........................ Y. P. S. C.E.:.......................... Lafayette Auxiliary........ .

“ Memorial Mission B a n d .... “ STouths’Mission B a n d ....... “ Collection..................

“ “ Bergen on Heights Auxiliary, Kalamazoo, Mich., First, Auxiliary............ “

First, Y o u n g Ladies........ Second, Auxiliary.......... “ ** Third, “ .......... Kingston, N. Y., Auxiliary.................... Kiskatom, u “ .................... Knox, “ “ ...................

“ “ “ “

124 50 100 9 36 62 39 64 10 ■ 10 34 35 30

“ “ Y o u n g Ladies’Society..... Niskayuna, N. Y., Auxiliary............... N e w D u r h a m , N. J., Grove C h u r c h Auxiliary N e w Baltimore, N. Y., Auxiliary........... N e w Paltz, “ 11 ........... N e w Utrecht, L. I., .lt ............ North B r a n c h , N. J., “ .......... .. “ Depot, N. J., Mission Circle. . N e w Brooklyn, L. I., Auxiliary............. North and South H a m p t o n , Pa., Auxiliary ... North Hempstead, L. I., “ ... N o r w o o d Park, 111., Auxiliary..............

264 15 24 36

233 86

146 73 232 51 65 5 76 3 70 64 . 26 50 8 65 30 25 20

.................. ...... ........... ................. .......... .......

Millstone, “ Mission Band, Nimble Fingers.. Montville, 44 Auxiliary.......... .......... Nassau, N. Y., “ .................. .*. Neshanic, N. J., “ .................... Newburgh, N. Y., “ .................... 'Newkirk. Iowa, “ ....................

84 57

94 128 19 10

Lawyersville, N. Y., “ .................... Linlithgo, at Livingston, N. Y., A u x iliary.... Lisha's Kill, N. Y., Auxiliary................. L o n g Branch, N. J., “ ................. Mt. Vernon, N. Y., “ ................. M a h w a h , N. J., ** ............... . Millbrook, N. Y., Marbletown, N. Y., Metuchen, N. J., Middlebush, “ .

154 05

8

Jamaica, L. I., workers in His N a m e ...................... Jerusalem, N. Y., Shining Lights....................... Jersey City, N. J., W a y n e Street Auxiliary................

112 75 52 42

1

3 87 21 20

*

24 90 39 21 27 88 25 44 14 20 26 55 30 145 107 21 38 123 60 118 98 160 50 50 52 10 34 60 41 79 2 73


Nyack, N. Y., Auxiliary.................. “ Mission Circle............. Newark, N. J., First Church, Me r r y Helpers “ Clinton Ave. Auxiliary ... “ North “ .... “ “ Infant Class......................... “ “ Girls’pible Class..................... “ “ A m e m b e r of the Class.............. N e w Brunswick, N. J., First C h u r c h Auxiliary............. “ 14 “

“ “ “

Mission B a n d ...................... Chinese department.... ;........... Second C h u r c h Auxiliary...........

“ “ “ S u n d a y School...... ....... “ u S u y d a m St. Auxiliary............ N e w Y o r k City, Collegiate, 48th St. a n d 5th Ave. Auxiliary__ 14 “ Mrs. S. H. Mead, In M e m o r i a m ............. “ “ In M e m o r i a m ............................. “ “ Adriel Mission B a n d ....................... “ “ S u n d a y School............................ “ “ Mrs. Jonathan Sturges..................... “ “ 29th St. a n d 5th Ave. Auxiliary............ “ ( “ . Birthday Box, De W i t t Chapel.............. “ “ Miss Josephine Fenfold.................... “ “ Fourth St. Collegiate...................... “ “ Madison Ave. Auxiliary.................... “ 44 “ 44 44

“ 44 44 44 “

4* “ 44 “ *4 44

“ 44 ,4 44 “ 44

“ 44 a n d 57th St. Mission......... South Auxiliary.......................... 34th St. Auxiliary......................... Sixth Ave. “ ........................ “ Birthday B o x ........ 44 Faith Mission B a n d . .. Grace Auxiliary............... . u Coral W o r k e r s . .......... Holland Auxiliary............... First H a r l e m Auxiliary......... Second 44 44 .........

“ “ St. Paul’s, Mott Haven, Auxiliary, “ 44 Union, H i g h Bridge, 44 . Overisel, Mich., Auxiliary..................... Ora n g e City, Iowa, Dorcas Society............ O w a s c o ....................................... 44 Outlet........................... Orange, East, N. J., Auxiliary............ Pascack, N. J., Auxiliary................ Passaic, N. J., North, Auxiliary ......... Paterson, N. J., First, 44 .......... “ 44 Second, “ .......... 44 44 Broadway, Auxiliary..... Pella, Iowa, Second, Auxiliary....... ..... “ “ B a n d of Little W o r k e r s ....... Peekskill, N. Y., Auxiliary............... Plainfield, N. J., Trinity Church Auxiliary. Plainville, N. J., Bright H o p e Mission B a n d Preakness, N. J., Auxiliary.............. . Port Jervis, N. Y., Deer Park, Auxiliary.... Princetown, N. Y., Auxiliary............. Piermont, N. Y., Auxiliary.......... •• •••• Philadelphia, Pa., First C h u r c h ........... “ 44 Second '4 ........... 44 44 F o r the Debt ..........

$303 75 60

271 56 77 50 90 100 110 60 17 184 63 60 642 80 80 20 30 50 325 2 120 660 35

91 30 62 30 12

144 80

72 75 60 25 14

$363 75 10 174 81

539 06

187 247 60 25

822 80 350

447 80 695 100 75 24

183 42 4 92 143 35 113 16 45 118 75 115 67 85 10 5 50 127 55 18 63 40 44 75 48 21 224 10 12 20 50 60 50 20 30


Philadelphia, Pa., Mite B o x e s ............................. “ “ Second S u n d a y school .................. “ “ W h a tsoever Society..................... “ “ Y o u n g Ladies'Society.............. Pompton, N. J., Auxiliary................................ P o m p t o n Plains, N. J., Cheerful Givers ......... ......... Port Ew e n , N. Y., Auxiliary............................... Poughkeepsie, N. Y., First................................ “ “ Y o u n g People’s Society.............. “ “ Second, Auxiliary Queens, L. I., Auxiliary... ............ Raritan, N. J., Third, Auxiliary....... “ 111., Auxiliary................ Readington, N. J., Auxiliary.......... R o c k y Hill, N. J., Auxiliary.......... Roxbury, N. Y., “ ........... Ridgewood, N. J., “ ............ R e d Hill Chapel, N. Y., Auxiliary..... Rhinebeck, N. Y., Auxiliary.......... Rochester, N. Y., First, Auxiliary..... . , “ “ Second, “ ...... Rotterdam, West, N. Y., “ ...... Saugerties, N. Y., Auxiliary.......... .................... “ “ Mission B a n d ........................... Sharon, N. Y., Auxiliary.................................. Scotia, “ u .................................. Shokan, “ “ ...................... .......... Schuylerville, N. Y., Auxiliary............................ Schoharie, N. Y., “ ............................ Shaw a n g u n k , N. Y., King's Daughters..................... Spring Lake, Mich., Auxiliary,............................ Spring Valley, N. Y., “ ........................... Schenectady, N. Y., First, Auxiliary....... ......... ..... “ “ Grifids B a n d ......................... Schraalenburgh, N. J., Auxiliary......................... Stuyvesant, N. Y., Auxiliary.............................. Somerville, N. J., First, Auxiliary......................... “ “ Second, “ ......................... Staten Island, Brighton Heights, Auxiliary................ “ Port R i chmond, “ ................ Tarrytown, N. Y., First, Auxiliary ....................... “ ** Second, “ ........................ Tappan, N. Y., Auxiliary................................. “ “ S u n d a y School............................ Troy, West, Auxiliary.................................... Utica, N. Y., 41 ..................................... “ “ S u n d a y School............................... U p p e r R e d Hook, N. Y., Auxiliary U p p e r Walpack, Pa., Auxiliary.... Warwick, N. Y., Auxiliary....... White House, N. J., Auxiliary... Walden, N. Y., “ ............................. W y n a n t ’s Kill, N. J., “ ............................ Westerlo, N. Y., “ .................. .......... Wyckoff, N. J., “ ............................. Yonkers, N. Y., “ ................... ...... ... “ Mission B a n d .................................. Zeeland, Mich., Auxiliary............ Receipts f r o m Churches

9

$131 18 40 10 30

$278 18

80 75

10

30 219 90 85

304 67 51 111 40 103

90 25 19 37 85

10 2 81 25

11 46 17 45 24 11 50 106 10

116 15 6 57 5 00 61 69

20

1 13 25 56 17

126 50

176 30 17 33 102 85

100 105 13 74 SO 25 21 70 10

31 70 '

123 50 30

17 153 66 7 78 35 11

50 23 63 40

10

8 16 160 50

210 128 $17,236 87


INDIVIDUALS. Mrs. M. N. Oliver............ ............................ Ulster, N. Y ............................................. Mrs. Gamaliel G. Smith .................................. Rev. E d w a r d Miller, Lawyersville, N. Y. ...'.............. Mrs. J o h n Laim b e r ....................................... Sam u e l Sloan............................................ Mrs. W m . B r u s h ......................................... J. P. D e J o n g ............................................. A poor m a n in A s h b u r y P a r k ............................. Sunshine, Randolph, M a s s ............................... Mrs. S. B. W i c k e s ................................... Albany, N. Y ........................... ' Mrs. Letitia Gibson, an aged m e m b e r of Fourth street..... Miss Elizabeth N i v e n .....................................

$5 10 5 5 5 25 16 90 10 50 . 6 60 25 10 5 8

A Friend, per Mrs. H. N. C o b b ............................ 25 E. C. D., Montclair, Fla ............................. 1 Mrs. H. N. C o b b .......................................... 22 03 15 Mrs. W m . B. Walker, in m e m o r y of little M a r t h a .......... C. C. Ferris.............................................. 2 Mrs. F. S. McKinstry......................................... 50 A m ’t m a d e b y five cents invested b y teacher, Keyport, N. J. 6 75 10 A ......................................... : ............ Miss Alice Dockstader........................................ 60 30 F. R. M ..................................................... Four Ladies $10 each, per Mrs. J a n e w a y .................. 40 Friend, Bushnell, 111...................................... 30 A Northfleld Student.................................... 10 A T h a n k offering f r o m t w o sisters.................. ..... - 25 A friend of little children, Newark, N. J .................. 25 O n e w h o loves little children, u ................. 100 Mrs. John Vansantvoord.................................... 40 . A friend, Catskill. N. Y ................................... 10 5 Mrs. J. H. V a n D o r e n .............................. >..... Mrs. E. C. Dunning, Montclair, N. J ....................... 5 A thank offering, Mrs. L. N. D ............................ 50 50 F r o m a Friend, L. N. D ...................................... Miss Hilda H. B e r g e n .................................... 25 T h a n k offering f r o m Treasurer........................... 20 Mrs. Charles C. Ferris.................................... 5 T h e Misses V a n W a g e n e n ...............‘................ 15 Mrs. C. B. B e e k m a n ...................................... 50 Miss M a r y K i n g .......................................... 3 L. N e w Y o r k ............................................. 10 Mrs. Charles V a n W y c k ................................... 5 L. B ............................................. ;....... 30 Ladies, Particular Synod, Alba n y ......................... 240 56 Miss A. M e d d i c k ............................................. 5 . Mrs. Sarah J. J a c kson.................................... 5 Rev. & Mrs. Garret Wyckoff, N. J ........................ 30 5 Mrs. W m . H. Gleason................. P e n n y a meal Mission B o x ........... .\...... ............. 5 Faith at W o r k ........ -.................................. 5 Cash for advertisement in GZeaner........................ 40 Subscriptions to Gleaner.................................... 396 95 Interest on B o n d a n d Mortgage for Charlotte Duryee H o m e . 250 A m o u n t f r o m Individuals.................

$1,894 29


DISBURSEMENTS. P a y m e n t s to S y n o d Bo a r d ...................... Sackett & Wilhelm,1100 Certificates............ $30 Engrossing Certificates................. ....... 18 97 E. Brinkerhoff, Printing Reports. ** Disbursements .. Treasurer's Disbursements..... Copying Report................

$18,282 87 48 97 287 53 04 61

12 3

416 11

Expenses of Mission Gleaner— 404

Rogers & Sherwood, Printing.... Salary of Editress............. Postage....................... Agent's Allowance............. Electrotype....................

100 23 68 35 1 50

Total p a y m e n t s ...................

• 564 18 $19,263 16

Receipts f r o m Churches....................... $17,236 88 “ “ Individuals..................... 1,894 29 ---------$19,131 16 Balance on hand, M a y 1,1890.................. 282 74

, *

Total receipts..................... * $19,418 90 P a y m e n t s to S y n o d B o a r d ..................... $18,282 87 Disbursements a n d Gleaner expenses........... 980 29 Balance on hand, April 30,1891 ................ . 150 74 $19,413 90 MRS. P E T E R D O N A L D ,

Treasurer.

T h e undersigned, having e xamined the foregoing accounts a n d c o m p a r e d the vouchers, finds the s a m e correct, a n d that the balance n o w in the hands of the Treasurer is one hundred a n d fifty dollars an d seventy-four cents. April 30, 1891.

T A L B O T W. CHAMBERS.


DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES •

FOE

T H E

C A L E N D A E

Y E A S

1890.

(In compliance with resolution of General Synod, .

EOE

T H E

A M O Y

1884.)

MISSION.

Salaries —

Rev. D. Rapalje to M a y 8th..................... Rev. Leonard W . K i p ......................... Rev. Philip W . Pitcher........ Rev. J o h n G. Fagg......... ....... . .......... Dr. J o h n A. Otte............. ...... ........... Miss K. M. T a l m a g e to April 30................ .. Miss M. E. T a l m a g e “ .................. Native Helpers a n d Personal Teachers.... .............. . Theological Students....... ..... ........................ . Schools — Parochial............................. Middle for B o y s .......... Girls1 School....................... W o m a n ’s H o m e ............................... Girls1 School at Sio-kho............... ......... Bible W o m e n ......................... .................. . Gospel Boat, working a n d w e a r ............................ , Public Worship, A m o y C h u r c h ............. ............ ...

Mexican dollars. 651 54 1,331 496 33 1,331 1,569 02 262 262

149 223 382 85 108

54 28 18 86 75

Medical Attendance a n d Medicine.................. ...... . Mission Printing................................ ... .... Rents, Taxes a n d Repairs...... ........... ........... Country Traveling for Missionaries......... ............. .. 521 92 “ “ Native Helpers ..................... 413 61 Hospital a n d Dispensary at Sio-khe...... ............ .... 1,32106 155 Purchase of Field for Hospital.... ............ .......... . Miscellaneous E x p enses .............. ......... . Ouf-Stfatfions— Salaries of Preachers, Rent, Repairs, etc. (16 Stations)................ .....................

5,902 99 256 261 25

949 61 91 50 192 71 42 356 65 22 71 250 77 , ,

935 53 1,476 06 127 74

0 2,658 49

Outside of Appropriations.— Mr. Pitcher a n d family. Passage h o m e ........ . 648 46 Mr. Rapalje................................... 1,108 .

T h e Misses T a l m a g e ............................ Freight on goods sent h o m e .*......... ......... Chinese Recorder for Dr. C h a m berlain ...... M e x ican Dollars ......................... E x c h a n g e at 82.65 cents for the Mexican Dollar,

Paid

780 47 67 27 3 24

.

is equal to U. S. currency or gold............. in America— Mr. Rapalje, July to*Deeember 31........ $930 Dr. Talmage, allowance................. ....... 1,690 Mr. V a n Dyck, “ ........................ . 1,603 73 Mr. Pitcher__ *.......................... 612 16 Mrs. Pitcher............................. 244 98 857 14 T h e Misses T a l m a g e ........................... 650 Total......................................

2,607 44 16,131 45 $13,331

5,730 87 $19,060 87


ARCOT

MISSION.

Rupees. W . Scudder, D.D., 81,200 G o l d .................. 3,168 Rev. J. W . Scudder, D “D ............................... 3,168 Rev. J. Chamberlain, D. D .............................. 3,168 Rev. J o h n Scudder, M . D ......................... ...... 3,168 Rev. E. C. Scudder, J r .......................... ....... 3,168 Rev. L. R. Scudder. M . D ......................... ...... 3,168 Rev. W . I. Chamberlain, $800................... :.... 2,112 Miss J. C. Scudder, $650................................ 1,715 Mi s s M . K. S cudder........ ..... ...................... 1,715 Mr. H. J. Scudder, 3^j mos., $196....................... 516 Rev. J. W . Conklin, 1% month, $187..................... 480 Miss I. S. Scudder, 3*^1 nxos,, $154 :...... ,.............. 406 Native Assistants— Salaries of Pastors, Catechists, Readers a n d E x p e n s e s .......................................... Arcot A c a d e m y — Teachers’salaries, board, clothing, books, etc.... 7,870 Less govt, grant a n d fees............................. 1,296

Salaries— Ruv. W .

.FemaZe S e m i n a r y — Teachers, board, clothing, books, etc.......... 3,003 Less govt, grant, fees a n d donations................... 1,419

25,952 12,674 6,574 1,584

Vernacular Schools—

E x p e n d e d at stations an d out-stations, includ­ ing Anglo-Vernacular schools........ ............ 10,687 Less fees, govt, grant a n d sales of books............... 2,292

Hindu Girls' Schools— Teachers, board,

clothing a n d bo o k s........ Less fees, govt, grant a n d sales of books............... Mandanapalle Boys' School-Teachers, board.clothing an d books.. Less fees, govt, grant a n d donations................ /.... Mandanapalle Girls' School-Teachers, board, clothing a n d books.. Lees fees a n d govt, grant.............................. Preparandi School — Teachers, board, clothing a n d b o o k s ......... Less fees............................................. Building Dep a r t m e n t — E x p e n d e d at stations a n d out-stations (Tindiv a n a m Bungalow, Rs. 1,647).......................

6,060 1,767 3,247 874 1,524 407 1,164 142

7,695 4,293 2,373 1,117 1,022 3,521

Rents and

Repairs— E x p e n d e d o n stations a n d out-stations, includ­ ing C oonoor a n d R o y a p u r a m ....................... Touring and Traveling a m o n g the heathen a n d visiting the hills__ Medical Z>cpartme?iZ— Medicines an d fees for the whole Mission... Library F n m Z — An n u a l grant....................... Miscellaneous C/iaryes— Care of Churches, postage, stationery, Mis­ sion meetings, annual report, etc..................

4,424 3,908 500 100 1,472

Outside the Appropriations— Bev. J.

W . Conklin’s passage a n d e x ­ penses h o m e ....................................... 2,529 Fo r female medical student, special gift............... 599 634 Bibles, gift of A m e r i c a n Bible Society........

3,762

R u p e e s .......................... ......... 80,978 E x c h a n g e m a k e s the R u p e e valued at 38 cents, there* fore, the above is equal to g o l d ...... .... ....... $30,771 Paid in A m e r i c a — J o h n Heeren, o r p h a n ........................ $150 Miss Ida S. Scudder, part of the year................. 141 34 Rev. J. W . Conklin f r o m M a y 8th...... ............. 1,023 30 M t o R U R

l0utflt-P“ sage, etc., to India..

091

$2,305 64


N O R T H J A P A N MISSION. U.S. Gold.

Salaries— Rev.J.

H. Ballagh, part in A m e r i c a .............. $900 1,200 Rev. E. R. Miller................................. Rev. J. L. A m e r m a n .............................. 1,200 Rev. E. S. Booth.................................. 1,200 1,200 . Rev. H o w a r d Harris......................... .... Prof. M. N. W y c k o f f ............................. 161 67 MissM. L. W i n n .................................. 175 COO Miss A. deF. T h o m p s o n ........................... Miss M a r y D e y o ............................. 600 525 Miss M a r y E. B r o k a w .......................... Miss Julia Moul t o n ............ 600 $8,361 67 Allowance for Children— J.L. A m e r m a n a n d E. S. B o o t h ... 400 Rente— J. H. Ballagh, J. L. A m e r m a n an d H. Harris, $600 e a c h . 1,800 E. R. Miller, $400; M. N. Wyckoff, $161.67............ 561 672,36167 Literary Assistants— 3. H. Ballagh, $1.69; M. Miller, $244.89... 246 58 130 82 Dr. A m e r m a n , $32.84; H. Harris, $97.98............ Ladies of the Ferris S e m i n a r y __ * ...... 32 01 941

Traveling Expenses for the y e a r ......... ................... Medical Bills for the y e a r .................................. Pubte'roh'ons, on account................... ................ Miscellaneous Expenses ................................... Evangelistic Work— By m e m b e r s of the Mission...*........ . 2,390 21 B y the Board of the Church of Christ in J a p a n .... 888 Meiji f?afcw-/n^-Land Rent an d care of gr o u n d s........ ... 189 49 Students’support.............................. .. 514 97 Theological Department, current expenses........ 981 26 A c a d e m i c Department, current expenses— ......... 852

Training School for Non-ordained Evangelists........... ... Ferris Female S e m inary— L a n d rent, Insurance, etc., ■Mexican Dollars..... .... ..... ..... Extraordinary expenses...... ......... Current expenses............... .......

1,153 99 1,460 25 6,747 87

Less Receipts for Board, Tuition, etc....

4,391 16

9 89 338 76 300 34 02 3,27821

362,53808 150 93

<

,

9,862 11

5,470 95 Mexican Dollars............... .. Paid on account of the a b o v e ..................... Passage, etc.— Miss M. L. Wair, return to A m e r i c a ........... Order's in favor of Missionaries...................... .......

Paid in America—

• Rev. J. H. Ballagh. $300; Son, $150........

Miss Nellie A m e r m a n .......................*...... Dr. G. F. Verbeck, allowance a n d 3 children....... Prof. M. N. Wyckoff, to Aug. 23, a n d 4 children.... Rev. J. L. A m e r m a n , orders to I. N a k a g a w a . .;.... Miss M. L. W i n n ............................... .

3,785 25 . 350 260 77 $22,653 66 $450 . 150 2,018 25 2,008 596 87 396 60

Total G o l d ........................... .....

,

SOUTH

JAPAN

5,619 72 $28,273 38

MISSION.

Salaries— Rev. H e n r y Stout...... ........................ $310 Rev. N. H. D e m a r e s t ....... ^.... ............. 478 21 . Rev. A. Oltmans .............................. 1,088 20 Mr. H. V. S. P e e k e ............................. 600 MissM. E. B r o k a w ............................. 70 33 Miss R. L. Irvine...... ........................ 600 Miss C. B. L a n t e r m a n .......................... 145 10

* 3,291 84


Allowances for Children— '8.

H. Demarest, $39 60;' A. Olt­ mans, $230 51.................... .........

$270 17

itesiYJenees— G r o u n d rent, three lots.............•.......... Insurance, $32 72; repairs, $87 00............... Rent for Mr. P e e k e ..... .......................

$223 10 120 32 100 12

Less rent of one house six m o n t h s ... ..........

443 5-1 101 30

Medical Bills.......................................... . Salary of Teacher............... ......................

282 24 378 33

* 18 93 300 86 71 20

Native Assistants, A. S e g a w a ................ . do do M. Ohgiini........... ........ Support of Students.................................... . Nagasaki Chapcl^uud rent..... .......... ................ • 47 Insurance, $8 23; repairs, $24 50; Janitor, $19 75; 52 54 Part salary of Pastor.......................... 100 23 Salary of Bible W o m a n , 3 m o n t h s . ........ ..... 7 40 Rent of Preaching Places in N a gasaki............... *...... 31 17 W o r k in villages near Nagasaki................ 80 35 Ou^-sfoi/ous— Hitayoshi, Kagoshima, Saga, Nakatsu, lUiyakonojo an d U s a g u n ......................... Students'1S u m m e r W o r k ................ .................. Home il/issjon— Society of Church in J a p a n ................ Traveling to Chiu-kai a n d Dai Kai Councils................ Evangelistic Work b y Mission....... ...... . — ......... Vacations— ll. Stout a n d Wife to Chifoo........ .......... 558' 40 A. O ltmans a n d family to Y o k o h a m a ........... 203 05 Passageot N. H. D e m a r e s t a n d family h o m e __ ____ _____ _ 850 50 Miss B r o k a w ’sexpenses to Y o k o h a m a .... . ..... 44 07 Mr. Oh g i m i an d family m o v i n g ......... ......... 47 98 Freight on G o o d s to A m erica............. ...... 8 70 Jonathan Sturges Seminary— Jjaml rent, $124 10; Insurance, $42 13; repairs,$88 62; furnishing, $12 13.___ 260 98 Current expenses an d b o a r d ............ $1,549 03 Less tuition, board, etc.................. 298 03 Y e n (extended in Mexican)............ 1,251 1,029 50 TFm. If. Steele, Jr., Memorial School— L a n d rent__ 238 78 134 61 37339 Insurance, $56 68; repairs, $77 93....... Current expenses.................... 1,352 Less tuition, etc......... 247 Y e n (extended in Mexican)— ......... 1,105 909 35 Books and Tracts, $23 38; exchange, postage, etc., $15 92— 39 30 Special orders, etc............................. 122 64

390 49 691 25

273 17 117 52 1,365 109 360 231 207

48 83 10 40 12

761 45

951 25

1,290 48

1,282 74 161 94 $12,432 80

Paid in America—

H e n r y Stout, balance of salary and allow­ ance for children........................... N. H. Demarest? allowance in full.............. Miss Lanterman, outfit, passage, etc............ Total

931 28 609 15 521 11

2,061 54 $14,494 34


H O M E EXPENSES. Salaries— Rav. H.

N. Cobb, Corresponding Secretary...... $2,700 Rev. J o h n M. Ferns, H o n o r a r y Secretary’........ 300 GOO. Bookkeeper............................ ....... Rent— Ot office..........?................................ G32 50 .Steam heat for office a y d care...................... 125 512 Printing, e£c.— Annual reports............................ Other printing, $130 75 ; mite boxes, $231 09.. 3G5 44 208 84 Stationery a n d incidental expenses......... Books a n d magazines sent to the missions__ 37 82 Postage, foreign a n d domestic............. 1G5 22 Traveling expenses..................... . 2G3 37 Interest on loans.............................. .......... 2,821 25 Deficiency on mission field................................ 147 95

$8,878 89

RECAPITULATION. Expenditures for A m o y Mission, Ch i n a ............... “ “ Arcot Mission, India................ “ North Japan Mission................ “ i4 South Japan Mission................

$19,OGO 33,076 28,273 14,494

87 G4 38 34

$94,905 23 H o m e expenses

8,878 89


MISSIONARIES OF T H E BOARD. The following List presente the names of Missionaries now connected with the various Missions, whether in the field or at home but expecting to return. ' .

AMOY

MISSION. WENT OUT.

Rev. J. V. N . Tftlmage, D . D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mrs. M . E. T a l m a g e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rev. Daniel Rapalje.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mrs. Alice Rapalje. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rev. L. W . Kip, D . D . . . . . . . . . . . . .....'. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mrs. Helen C. K i p . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • • • Miss M a r y E. T a l m a g e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Miss Catharine M . T a l m a g e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • • Rev. Alex. S. V a n D y c k . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mrs. Alice K . V a n D y c k . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rev. Philip W . Pitcher. . . . . . . . . . Mrs. Annie T. Pitcher. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J o h n A. Otte, M . D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mrs. Prances C. Otte. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rev. J o h n G. F a g g . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mrs. Margaret G. F a g g . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

ARCOT

MISSION.'

1847 1865 1858 1878 1861 1861 3874 1881 1882 1886 1885 1885 1887 1887 1887 1889

;

Revi W m . W . Scudder, D . D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mrs. Frances A. Scudder. . . . . . . . . . . . '. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rev. Jared W . Scudder, M.D., D . D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mrs. Julia C. Scud d e r . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . . Rev. Jacob Chamberlain, M.D., D . D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mrs. Charlotte B. Chamberlain. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rev. J o h n Scudder, M . D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mrs. Sophia W . Scudder..... '. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Miss Julia C. S c u dder. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rev. Jo h n W . Conklin. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mrs. Jane E. Conklin. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rev. Ezekiel C. Scudder, Jr.. ........ Mrs. M a b e l J. Scudder. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Miss M . K . Scudder. . . . . . . . . . . . . Rev. W . I. Chamberlain. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rev. Lewis R. Scudder, M . D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mrs. Ethel T. Scudder. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mr. H . J. S c u d d e r . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Miss Ida S Scudder. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • ■

1852 1858 1855 1855 1859 1859 1861 1861 1879 1880 1880 1882 1889 1884 1887 1888 1888 1890 1890


NORTH

JAPAN

MISSION. W E N T OUT.

Rev. G u i d o F. Verbcck, D.t) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mrs. Maria M . V e r beck. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rev. J a m e s H. Ballagh. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mrs. Margaret T. Ballagh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rev. E. Rothesay Miller. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mrs. M a r y E. Miller. . . . . P.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rev. J a m e s L. A m e r m a n , D. D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mrs. Rebecca E. A m e r m a n . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rev. E u g e n e S. B o o t h . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mrs. E m i l y S. B o o t h . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Prof. Martin N . W y c k o f f . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mrs. A n n a C. W y c k o f f . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .'. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Miss M . Leila W i n n . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rev. H o w a r d Harris. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mrs. Lizzie B. Harris. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Miss M a r y E. B r o k a w . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Miss A n n a D c F . T h o m p s o n . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Miss M a r y D e y o . . . . :. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Miss Julia M o u l t o n . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

SOUTH

JAPAN

1859 1859 1861 1861 1875 1869 1876 1876 1879 1879 1881 1881 1882 1884 1884 1884 1886 ' 1888 1889

MISSION.

Rev. H e n r y Stout. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mrs. Elizabeth G. Stout. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rev. Albert O l t m a n s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mrs. Alice V. O l t m a n s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Miss Rebecca L. Irvine. . . . . :. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H a r m a n V. S. P e e k e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Miss Carrie B. L a n t e r m a n . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1869 1869 1886 1886 1886 1888 1890


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BOARD OF FOREIGH MISSIOHS. Members ivhose Term expires June, 1892. Rev. J. H. Whitehead, “ T . W . Chambers, D.D., “ W . J. K. Taylor, D.D., “ T. S. Brown,

Rev. J. II. Oerter, D.D., Mr. J a m e s A. Williamson, F. S. Douglas, “ Geo. E. Knight.

Members whose Term expires June, 1893. Rev. A. R. T h o m p s o n , D.D., “ Lewis Francis, “ W m . R. Duryee, D.D., “ E. G. Read,

Mr. “ “ “

William L. Brower, H e n r y Fitch, Jr.. Joseph C. Pool, W . L. M . Phelps.

Members ivhose Term expires June, 1894. Rev. A. P. V a n Gieson, D.D., “ C. L. Wells, D . D . , “ M. H. Hutton, D.D.,

" J- P- Riggs,

Mr. D. Jackson Steward, H o n . K. F. Graves, Mr. Jas. A. Seward, " J o h n C. Gifling.

E X E C U T I V E COMMITl'EE. Rev. “ " “ “

A. R. T h o m p s o n , D.D., Lewis Francis, C. L. Wells, D . D . , M. H. Hutton, D.D., E. G. Read,

Mr. J a m e s A. Williamson, ” D. Jackson Steward, “ F. S. Douglas, “ Joseph C. Pool, " J o h n C. Gifting.

O F F I C E R S F O R l888-’9. Rev. T W . Chambers, D.D., President. “ W m . J. R. Taylor, D.D., Vice-President. “ C. L. Wells, D.D., Recording Secretary. J o h n M. Ferris, D.D., Hon. Secretary. “ H e n r y N. Cobb, D.D., Cor. Sec., 26 Eeade St., N. Y. “ J o h n M . Ferris, D.D., Treasurer, 85-91 E l m St., X. Y. M E D I C A L ADVISERS. H e n r y R. Baldwin, M.D., X e w Brunswick. E. G. Janeway, M.D., N e w York.


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059 board of foreign missions rca 1891  
059 board of foreign missions rca 1891