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HOPE COLLEGE -

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LIBRARY

Hope College Anchor Official Publication of the Students of Hope College at Holland, Michigan

LVIII—16

May 2 9 , 1 9 4 6

QUEEN MYRA NOW REIGNS Queen Announces Van Dis

Alcor Taps Eight Juniors; Blue Key Selects Members

Council Prexy at Banquet

Formal Acceptance To Be June 3, 1946

Student Council Prexy Announces Girls To New Court, Alcor Honorary Society

P. S+egenga Hears Men's Organization

At the Alcor t a p p i n g ceremony on Friday, May 24, eight new members were accepted into Hope's Honorary Society for women. The candidates, chosen on the basis of their scholastic average, character and campus activities, are Marian Dame, J o a n n e Decker, Vivian Dykema, Harriet Muyskens, Luella Pyle, Nellie Mae Kitsema, Rosalind Scholten, and Hetty Timmer.

Announcement of Blue Key members at the May Day banquet disclosed to the student body t h a t the Men's Honorary F r a t e r n i t y has selected seven new members. The Junior class men chosen were Tilenn Bruggers, A! DeVoogd, William Haak, Don Ingham, Harry Meiners, Preston Stegenga and Robert Van Dis. They were officially elected into the organization at a dinner meeting at Beach cottage on May 15. Past members, Clinton Harrison, Delbert VanderHaar and Harland Steele, and f a c u l t y members, Hinga, Lampen, McClean a n d Kleinheksel, were also present at tne meeting. A f t e r dinner. Dr. Kleinheksel' Mr. McClean and Dean Hinga presented short t a l k s on the significance of Blue Key and the aims for the coming year. Officers elected were: President, Preston Stegenga: vice-president, Robert Van Dis; corresponding sec-, retary, (llenn Bruggers; recording secretary. Bill Haak; t r e a s u r e r , A1 DeVoogd. Mr. Lampen will be their new facultv advisor.

These Junior girls were selected by l94()-47 Alcor members and the faculty advisors at a dinner party given by Miss Boyd on May 22. Escorted to the tnrone by Alcor members, Dorothy ^ t k i n s , Suzanne Leestma, Elaine Prins, Harriet van Donkelaar, Iviarjorie . an Vranken and Dorothy Wyenberg, the newlyelected members received their Alcor pins from President Atkins. The faculty advisors of Alcor are Miss L a u r a Boyd, Miss Elizabeth Lichty, and Miss M a r g a r e t Gibbs. The new girls will be formally initiated into the Alcor Society at a formal dinner to be held in the Marine Room of the Warm Friend on Monday evening. June

L. Pyle, V. Bilkerf Head English Group

Girls Sponsor Tea For Holland Seniors

English Majors met at the home of Dr. Clarence De Craaf on May 8 to elect officers for the coming year. Luella Pyle was elected president, and the office of vice-president w a r filled by Cinny Bilkert. The s e c r e t a r y - t r e a s u r e r is Hobbe

Wednesday a f t e r n o o n . May 22, found the co-eds of Hope's campus entertaining

some

(JU seniors of

the Holland High School and the ,, . 0 . , . I H " l l l i n d C h n s t m . . H.gh School at the High School Senior Tea. This

Bilkert. Plans for the coming year were discussed and ideas were given on how to increase membership. The p r o g r a m , in charge of Dorothy Weyenberg, followed the theme of regionalism and presented the authors of the South. A paper was given on Joel Chandler Harris, the originator of the Uncle Remus stories. This analyzed the style and content, and also stated some f a c t s about his life. A discussion of other southern authors followed. The characteristic, easy-go-lucky manner of writing seemed to be predominant in the South, it was pointed out. For this last meeting of the year, a social hour was planned and the meeting was adjourned a f t e r all tried their hand at composing a few lines of poetry.

is now an annual function of the W.A.L. A f t e r being welcomed, the girls were

conducted

on

a

half-hour

campus tour of the science building, Columbia Cottage, and Beach Cottage. On completion of the tour, they returned to Voorhees living room where tea was served and f u r t h e r acquaintances made. Sweetpeas with candles on either side formed the a t t r a c t i v e centerpiece of the tea table. Musical accompaniment was given by Nellie May Ritsema at the piano and Betty Fuller at the harp. The tea was a r r a n g e d by Katheryn Lock. Phyllis Dietrich assisted in planning the tours, and Vada Mae Efird was in c h a r g e of I the refreshments.

Llbby Crowns Myra Queen

Hope to A d d Three Lubbers Announces Droog Heads To College Faculty Speakers tor W e e k Group On Dr. Lubbers has announced t h a t of Commencement Foreign Affairs there will be three additions to the faculty. Dr. Jacob Geerlings, who is now at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, will be Professor of Classics. He is an author who has done research on t e x t s from the Gospels. Dr. Geerlings is interested in classical civilizations as well as the classics themselves. He graduated and received his A.B. degree from Hope. Another g r a d u a t e of Hope is Miss E m m a Reeverts who will become associate professor of English. At present she is instructing in English at Berea College, Berea, Kentucky, and is in charge of one of the g i r l s ' d o r m i t o r i e s . Miss Reeverts is a sister of Miss Clara Reeverts of Holland High School. Dr. Charles R. Wimmer will come to the college as Dean of the Faculty. He will also do some instructing in chemistry. Dr. Wimmer received his B.S. f r o m Allegheny College, M.S. f r o m Ohio State, and Ph.D. from the University of Cincinnati. He is now the dean at Union College, Barbourville, Kentucky, and head of the Department of Physical Science. Dr. Wimmer has also been a chemistry instructor at the University of Tennessee and Universitv of Cincinnati.

Concerning Russian, European Problems Vasady To Address Meetings, Classes Dr.

Bela Vasady, a prominent

figure

in the Reformed Church of

H u n g a r y , will be on the campus June 6 and 7.

He will speak to

the student body in chapel exercises, special meetings, and classes on

conditions

of

the

Reformed

churches in Hungary and E a s t e r n Europe. Students will also be given opportunities to question him on current

problems in

Russia

^

m

and

other parts of Europe. Dr. Vasady arrived very recently f r o m the European area where he has held conferences in Switzerland, France

England, concerning

Scotland, and cnurch

condi-

tions. He came to the United S t a t e s upon invitation of the American office of

the

World

Council

Dr. Bela Vasady

of

Churches. He was one of the first

the Hungarian Ecumenical Counclergymen to obtain Russian clear- cil. Dr. Vasady is at p r e s e n t on ance to leave H u n g a r y . leave of absence from the Reformed Before the war. Dr. Vasady had been in the United S t a t e s twice. He received his theological training f r o m Central Theological Seminary in Dayton, Ohio, and Princeton Theological Seminary and has degrees f r o m both institutions. In H u n g a r y , Dr. Vasady was f o r ten y e a r s secretary of t h e Ref o r m e d Ministers' Association in H u n g a r y . He is also s e c r e t a r y of

Theological faculty of which he is president at the University of Debrecan.

Debrecan has a l w a y s been

strongly Calvinistic since its establishment in 1531. The university is considered the best educational establishment in H u n g a r y , and Dr. vasady one of the foremost Christ i a n scholars.

At an impressive ceremony held in pine g r o v e on May 24, the lovely Miss M y r a Brower w a s crowned Queen of Hope's c a m p u s f o r 1946-1947. A f t e r Miss J o y c e V a n Oss, S t u d e n t Council P r e s i d e n t , gave a brief h i s t o r y of M a y Day, she read t h e n a m e s of t h e girls who were chosen f o r Alcor and t h e Q u e e n ' s C o u r t . T h e p r e s e n t Alcor and Q u e e n ' s C o u r t m e m bers escorted t h e incoming girls to last y e a r ' s Queen, Miss Libby Komaine. Those on t h e c o u r t a r e Miss V i r g i n i a Bilkert, Miss E s t h e r B o g a r t , Miss Glenna Gore, Miss Phyllis H a s k i n s , Miss B e t t y van Lente, and Miss E d n a Mae Van T a t e n h o v e . Alcor m e m b e r s a r e Miss Marion Dame, Miss J o a n n e Decker, Miss Vivian D y k e m a , Miss H a r r i e t M u y s k e n s , Miss Luella Pyle, Miss Nellie Mae R i t s e m a , Miss Rosalind Scholten, a n d Miss B e t t v T i m m e r .

Y Forum Discusses Politics in America

From the office of the president. Dr. Lubbers announces the speakers for the graduation week programs. The Baccalaureate address will be given by Dr. Luman J . Schafer, Secretary of the Board of Foreign Missions of the Reformed Church in America. He was at one time head of Ferris Seminary, the leading college for women in J a pan. Dr. Schafer recently visited J a p a n as a member of the commission representing P r o t e s t a n t ism. This was the first non-military deputation to visit J a p a n a f t e r the war. The Baccalaureate service is Sunday, J u n e ](>, at 7:80 P.M., in the Hope Memorial Chapel. F o r t h e C n i n m e n r e i n e n t in H o n e

Chapel on J u n e 19, P.M., Dr. John A. Dykstra has been secured as the speaker. He is president of the Board of Trustees of Hope College, and also pastor of the Central Reformed Church in G r a n d Rapids, Michigan. Rev. C. T. Tsai, from Amoy, China, will speak at the Alumni Banquet on Tuesday, J u n e 18, 6:30 P.M., in Carnegie Gymnasium. Rev. Tsai is the secretary of Y o u n g 'eople's Work in the Church of Christ in China.

Music Department Presents Program The Hope College Orchestra gave a spring concert in the Hope Memorial Chapel Tuesday evening. May 21, at 8:15 o'clock, with Mr. Palmer Quackenbush conducting. The varied program included numbers by the orchestra, vocal numbers by Claire Wierenga, soprano, accompanied by Dorothy Bergers, and harp selections by Betty Fuller. The program follows: I Russian Choral and Overture Isaac Symphony in B. Minor Schubert Allegro Moderator Orchestra II Florian Song Godard Ave Maria Bach-Gounod Dedication Franz Claire Wierengo — Soprano Dorothy Bergers — Accompanist III Chanson Dubey Song to an Evennig Star....Wagner Night Breeze Salzedo Betty Fuller — Harpist IV One Morning in May....Carmichael Chop Sticks ( F r e e F a n t a s y ) Evans Intermezzo Bizet Beautiful Lady Carlyll Orchestra

A few months ago the idea of another war would have been repudiated with the decisive resolution t h a t we shall see to it that there will be no next war. There is, however, a f a t a l line of progress of evil things. First they are abhorred, next they are tolerated, then they are embraced. It is not too soon to be on our guard. As a step in placing the students of Hope College "on g u a r d , " the Foreign Relations Club was organized on May 6th under the sponsorship of Miss Ross. Officers were chosen at this meeting and they are Chester Droog, president; Preston otegengd, \ ice-pteaiuvnl, J e a n Watson, recording secretary; Richard Matchinsky, t r e a s u r e r ; Douglas Cameron, corresponding s e c r e t a r y ; and Renze Hoeksema, public relations officer. The purpose of this club is to give its members a better understanding of current problems through study by the individual members and through combined discussions. The club realizes thLt the stones which must be laid into the foundation of our f u t u r e life are tolerance, patience, unselfishness, and, most important of all, faith — faith in ourselves, our future, and our Maker.

There is no more mistaken or perilous attitude among Christians today than the claim t h a t the Church should have nothing to do with economic and political questions. In a plague area, medical services are not satisfied to grapple only with those who have ;aught the disease, and, having ?ur»'d some of them, to send them back to an infected atmosphere laiming that the hardy ones ought to survive. They seek the putrid drains and the foul swamps which ire the cause of the trouble. The Church also must see t h a t it has a '.wo-fold fight on its hands — to •hange men and to change the environment in which they must live. To deny the second of these tasks is to be guilty of a heresy as seri)us as any Christian can commit. It is the task of the Church to bring the insights which come to it from its doctrines, its understanding of God, of human nature, of human destiny, to bear on the oroblems and the n a t u r e of society. It must warn men of the evils of power and the power of evil. It will tell men t h a t t h e r e is an ?ternal right to which t h e policies )f S t a t e s no less t h a n individuals must conform. It will f i g h t injus- Scalpel Club Terminates tice and wrong wherever they a r e Year's Speech Program to be found, and will think in t e r m s of the poor and the weak r a t h e r The climactic m e e t i n g of t h e than of the rich and t h e strong. y e a r w a s held by t h e Scalpel Club The above t h o u g h t s were con- on May 14 when it opened its meetcluded f r o m the opinions of t h e ing to all Hope students who w e r e members of the panel, composed of interested in h e a r i n g Dr. Byrd, Her address centered around Paul Fried, moderator; Lambert Ponstein, Eugene Rothi, A l f r e d "Modern Day Anesthesia." The hisPennings, and William Bennett, dis- tories of various anesthesias w e r e cussing "Christianity in American given and a most promising f u Politics," at the May 21st YMCA t u r e was predicted f o r work in t h i s field. meeting.

The first r e g u l a r meeting of the d u o was held on Monday, May 2<)th, when the current world food s h o r t a g e was the topic for discussion. Dr. and Mrs. C. H. Hollenian were guests and contributed several worthwhile comments on a f fairs in China. Marian Korteling reviewed the situation in Asia, especially India; Preston Stegenga told about the crisis in the European countries; and Douglas Cameron told of what relief agencies were doing to relieve this suffering. The discussion was then turned over to the club members and several workable ways in which we students here at Hope can help were suggested. The next scheduled meeting is to be held on Monday, June 3, when our country's relations with Russia will be the discussion topic. AH students vitally interested are urged to contact Miss Ross, one of the club's officers, or a member for f u r t h e r information.

J. Hoffmaster Is Speaker A t Installation Service

As soon as Queen Myra and her court had descended f r o m t h e throne, everyone went to Carnegie Gymnasium where the annual May Day Banquet w a s held. The invocation was given by Rev. Paul E . Hinkamp. A f t e r the dinner Mr. John Vanden Broek, as Master of Ceremonies, introduced Mr. Milton Hinga, who gave a t o a s t to t h e new Queen. T o a s t s were also given by the class presidents—Miss Alice Laughlin of the Senior Class, Miss Elaine Meeusen of the J u n i o r class, Mr. Joe P a l m e r of the Sophomore class, and Mr. Dick Van Doren of the F r e s h m a n class. The Queen ascended her t h r o n e and gave a few words of thanks. The winning classes in the men and women's t r a c k meet w e r e given. Miss Luella Pyle and Mr. Walt Milewski were presented w i t h the J a c k Schouten medals. Queen Myra also announced t h e new S t u dent Council President, Gabby V a n Dis, and Vice-President, Betty Van Lente. Miss Elaine Prins as May D a y General C h a i r m a n thanked h e r committee chairmen f o r the work they had done on May Day. Miss Dorothy Atkins, Alcor President, presented Dr. Lubbers with a check for $500 to be used f o r an exhioition case f o r the library and a steel file f o r an a r t collection. A f t e r i»ir. K e n n e t h Lincoln played a Chopin number on t h e piano, the Six Hues of Blue, Miss Phyllis Darrow, Miss Betty Visscher, Miss Clair Wierenga, Miss J e a n Snow, Miss J a n e t Snow, a n d Miss P e g g y Prins, sang " N o c t u r n e " and "Love Walked In." Mr. Avison read t h r e e humorous poems as his p a r t in the p r o g r a m . Mr. Clarence Van Liere, Mr. H a r vey Buter, Mr. Ken Zuiverink, Mr. Don Scholten, and Mr. Robert Van Zanten concluded the program by singing an original song. A p a r t y sponsored by the Junior League was later held in the W a r m Friend Tavern.

Stegenga Becomes German Club Prexy On Wednesday evening. May 8th, President Pinks Mulder called the members of t h e German Club to order. Election of officers f o r t h e coming year w a s then held. P r e s ton S t e g e n g a succeeded Pinks t o the chair of president, while P h y l Haskin took over the role of vicepresident. The s e c r e t a r y - t r e a s u r e r is Nellie Mae Ritsema. Following t h e business meeting, Spike Sawitsky, accompanied by Nellie Mae Ritsema, led the singing of a f e w f a v o r i t e German ballads. R u t h Ruys gave an interesting account of the life of T h o m a s Mann, who is t h e g r e a t e s t modern German a u t h o r . He resides in California and is a citizen of t h e United S t a t e s . Germany is v e r y anxious to h a v e her noted a u t h o r back in Germany, but he is content to s t a y here. R u t h Dalenberg g a v e a review of the article, " G E R -

On May 8 a banquet was held at the Sixth r e f o r m e d Church f o r all members of Alpha Chi. Devotions were led by J a m e s Muddle and t h e n the newly elected officers were installed by Rev. Paul E. Hink a m p ; H a r r y Meiners, president; Harold Des Autels, vice-president; Harold Schaible, secretary; John MANY AND THE GERMANS" by De Vries, t r e a s u r e r . Thomas Mann, which appeared in The new president then received the 1946 winter quarter of the the constitution f r o m the retiring Yale Review. This centered around president, W a r r e n Hietbrink. his own philosophy of Germany, The Rev. J . Kenneth Hoffmaster, and how the German people should a Methodist minister of this city, be understood. was t h e n introduced as the speaker The meeting concluded with a of t h e evening. The message w a s summary of some interesting facts

"The Minister and His Calling.

about Thomas Mann by Miss Boyd.


Hop# College Anchor

Page Two

Hope College Anchor Member P t o o c U e d Cbfefikie Press STAFF VIVIAN DYKEMA Renze L. H o e k s e m a H o w a r d Koop Lois V a n W y k Dorothy W e y e n b e r g Louise Ter Beek Feature Editor Society Editor..... Circulation M a n a g e r Photographer —

R u t h Ruys L a u r a Johnson Rachel D y k s t r a Grace W a g e m a k e r Dick V r i e s m a n Ginny H e m m e s Marcie W e s t e r m a n G e r r y Scheerens Alida K l o o s t e r m a n Betty Timmer

A n n a Marie T a l l m a n M a r i a n Schroeder Marian Hanna

Athlynn Lundberg Dorothy A t k i n s Nelliemae W e z e m a n

Editor-in-Chief 1 ^Associate E d i t o r s J Business M a n a g e r A s s i s t a n t Business M a n a g e r -

REPORTERS Harriet Hains Peggy Prins A r k i e Wieten Mary Vander Wege Betty V a n d e r W e g e Carolyn I n g h a m Marian Hanna Ellene Bosland Phyllis Dietrich Ruth Bonga CIRCULATION Louise E d w a r d s M a r y Young Eleanor Rubingh Marcia De Y o u n g

Barbara Bilkert ...Glenna Gore Nellie Mae R i e t s m a A d r i a n Bos

J o a n n e Decker Meulendyke Van Wyck Meulendyke G e r t r u d e Vredeveld Ruth Probst Isla V a n d e r Heuvel Joyce Van Oss Elaine Prins H o w a r d Koop

Bonita Zandbergen B e r t h a Hellenga Lillian Sikkema

BUSINESS Bob Danhof Dale Drew Betty T i m m e r Marion T e r B o r g G e o r g i a n n a S c h i p p e r s Jo A n n e Biddle

Published e v e r y two weeks d u r i n g the school y e a r by the s t u d e n t s of H o p e College. E n t e r e d as second class m a t t e r a t the post office of Holland, Michigan, a t special r a t e of p o s t a g e provided f o r in section 1103 of Act of Congress, October 3, 1917, and authorized October 19, 1918. PRINTED AT OLD N E W S PRINTERY

E d i t o r i a l s Staff Seeks Cooperation, Criticism

Library - oh - Pedia Oh, t h e job of being l i b r a r i a n — especially d u r i n g t h e mid-class r u s h which e q u a l s n o t h i n g less t h a n a r u s h f o r nylons. I f e l t it coming so 1 steeled m y f e e t a g a i n s t t h e floor, g r a b b e d the desk, set a smile on my f a c e and waited. T h e n it h a p p e n e d — t h e bell r a n g , fifty s t u d e n t s j u m p e d up, s l a m m e d t h e i r books t o g e t h e r and began a mad r u s h t o w a r d t h e door. T h e y gained speed and excitement of tone as t h e y neared t h e i r goal— my, but these Hopeites love to go to class. F r a n t i c a l l y I flew a b o u t t r y i n g to keep t h e riot down t o a dull r o a r as I wore m y lungs out s h o u t i n g , 4 , Please don't talk in a monotone." At last, I g a v e up and limped back t o the desk — b a t t e r e d and t o r n f r o m the battle, only t o be c o n f r o n t e d with 50 books o r m o r e flying a t me. I j u s t got t h e f o r t in order when Don c a m e up and w a n t e d a H a r p e r ' s M a g a z i n e — a b r i g h t colored o n e — " t r y yellow," 1 smiled sweetly and hiked back to the s t a c k s t o come f o r t h t h e proud b e a r e r of a brilliant yellow H a r p e r ' s . He took one look and said, " N o p e , t r y r e d . " I g l a r e d fiercely but tried — no b e t t e r success, he simply said, " T r y o r a n g e . " Finally I found w h a t he wanted — but t h e s e people —. T h r e e t i m e s and out — well, he a lm ost was but 1 didn't d a r e hit him in the library. "Could you tell me how m a n y N e g r o e s t h e r e w e r e in Georgia in 1 8 6 0 ? " I blinked and finally reg a in e d my voice to s a y , " h u h , " and then, " t r y .Miss VorheeH." "Will you please put the l i g h t s on in the c o r n e r ? " So I w a d e t h r o u g h the crowd to the switch box and a f t e r I've tried about six of t h e switches to find the r i g h t one, t h e sun decides to shine a g a i n . Can I help it if this Michigan sun keeps p l a y i n g hide and seek with the c l o u d s ?

One of these d a y s I vow I'm s e t t i n g u p a n " I n f o r m a t i o n " sign on t h e desk. N e v e r a day goes by but I'm showered with such questions a s " H a v e you seen P a t a r o u n d h e r e l a t e l y ? " Did B e t t y J e a n go through here about ten minutes a g o ? " " I ' m looking f o r Mr. O s t e r haven, do you know w h e r e he i s ? " My p r i z e question, " D o e s Dr. Kuiper live on 14th St. or 18th and how would I get t h e r e ? " I've given directions to Zwemer Hall, to Prof e s s o r s ' homes, to t h e tulip f a r m s and even Kollen's P a r k . Oh, it's g r e a t to know so much a b o u t Holland????

be done is by h a v i n g t h e active s u p p o r t and cooperation of everyone. We of t h e A n c h o r Staff welcome any c o n t r i b u t i o n s or criticisms f r o m f a c u l t y and s t u d e n t s . C r i t i c i s m s should be sent to t h e p r o p e r a u t h o r i t i e s so action can be taken, and we will t r y to t a k e t h e m into consideration

T h e beginning of t h e new y e a r is t h e t i m e to m a k e y o u r abilities known. So, let us h e a r f r o m t h o s e who a r e i n t e r e s t e d . We ask y o u r full cooperation f o r t h e coming y e a r . o

Students Take Notice W i t h t h e college officials r e o r g a n i z i n g t h e f a c u l t y c o m m i t tees f o r m o r e efficient and b e t t e r a d m i n i s t r a t i o n all a r o u n d , t h e s t u d e n t s should t a k e notice and a t t e m p t to coordinate t h e i r activities. T h e r e have been r e p o r t s of combining the v a r i o u s l a n g u a g e clubs into one l a r g e g r o u p with t h e s e p a r a t e divisions t a k i n g c h a r g e of m e e t i n g s t h r o u g h o u t t h e ye a r . An organization such a s t h i s would eliminate m u c h of t h i s " h a l f - w a y " prepared and " c u t - a n d - d r i e d " m a t e r i a l t h a t is o f t e n t h e main p a r t of such p r o g r a m s . If each g r o u p would c o n c e n t r a t e i t s e f f o r t s on one w o r t h while p r o g r a m instead of d i s t r i b u t i n g t h e m o v e r several, both p a r t i c i p a n t s and audience would benefit. F u r t h e r m o r e , one m a j o r g r o u p t h a t is active and t h a t offers a n o p p o r t u n i t y f o r m o r e reflective t h i n k i n g is b e t t e r t h a n a n u m b e r of clubs which a r e not a s challenging.

Are Students Interested in Vital Issues? "All r i g h t , children, f o r m t h e l i n e ! We shall go two-bytwo t o d a y ! \ \ e h a v e to v a r y o u r f o r m a t i o n a bit to keep you f r o m being bored. Now, I know you d o n ' t w a n t to g o ! You'd p r e f e r going d o w n t o w n f o r a coke, o r you'd r a t h e r sit o u t in t h e sun and bask in i t s w a r m r a y s . B u t t h i s m o r n i n g you shall h av e to be deprived of those privileges. I ' m v e r y s o r r y to h av e to do t h i s , because I know you need t h e o t h e r activities much m o r e . " Is t h i s t h e w a y o u r p r o f e s s o r s a r e going to have to talk t o us t o get us t o eleven o'clock chapel ? At the last two eleven o'clock chapels not fifty per cent of the student body was present at either one. One chapel program was a forum on World Government. The other program consisted of a pastor preaching on "Is Religion Adequate in the Atomic A g e ? " Certainly, no one can use for his excuse the f a c t that our programs are boring, or that t h e y do not deal with the vital questions of today. It's a sad fact, but the lack of attendance at these chapel services shows t h a t the average Hope student m a n i f e s t s no desire in his religious well-being, or no interest in the affairs of his country. A s long as he can go to classes, have his afternoons and evenings free, the average student is as happy a s a lark.

Leaders in world affairs, in the church, in local communities are pleading for an educated citizenry, yet we, with every advantage of the best type of Christian education, are neglect-

"You will h a v e no ' m o r n i n g a f t e r ' ; May D a y b r i n g s j u s t f u n and l a u g h t e r . " Did you see t h a t s i g n on t h e w a y between first and second floors in Van R a a l t e ? Well, it's a lie — p u r e a n d u n a d u l t e r a t e d ! ! T h i s is t h e w a y it is, s e e ? F o r weeks b e f o r e the big deal t h e m a i n topic w a s , " W h o will be q u e e n ? " S u b - t o p i c s : Is t h e r e any j u n i o r who c a n make A l c o r ? Who will make c o u r t ? — etc., etc. To g e t back t o the topic s e n t e n c e now — We had the whole d a y all set up with e a c h question a n s w e r e d correctly — we t h o u g h t .

M a y T i m e is T u l i p T i m e E v e r y Y e a r in Holland, Michigan — and to your l e f t we have a delightful l i t t l e — and o n second look you notice t h a t — a t o u r of t h e city f o r 50c — popcorn, p e a n u t s , b u y y o u r D u t c h s h o e s h e r e , etc. So ended the four day Tulip Festival and a s t h e l a s t o u t - o f - s t a t e c a r showed its license p l a t e t h e g e n e r a l population of Holland heaved a s i g h of relief. I t was a s t r a n g e , new s i g h t t o m o s t of t h e s t u d e n t s who had been a t Hope d u r i n g t h e w a r a n d didn't k n o w w h a t T u l i p T i m e w a s all a b o u t . I'm not s a y i n g t h e t o w n w a s packed with visitors but t h e last S a t u r d a y a f t e r n o o n I walked down 8th t o R i v e r and back and d i d n ' t see a soul I knew. I f e l t like someone had all of a sudden dropped m e in G r a n d C e n t r a l S t a tion, N. Y. — w i t h o u t a b a g . I g o t used t o the Dutch c o s t u m e s a f t e r awhile. I n f a c t they looked b e a u t i f u l , c o l o r f u l , and hot. T h e p a y o f f w a s w h e n a wooden shoe landed on my toes. I t didn't do a n y good to s t e p back on his. I t r i e d it and all I g o t out of it w a s a high arch. T h e Tulip F a r m w a s j a m m e d with v i s i t o r s if all the c a r s t h a t went out River A v e n u e ended up t h e r e . I now know w h a t H e n r y Ford feels like w h e n he s t a n d s and w a t c h e s his c a r s roll off t h e a s s e m b l y line. T h e policemen in Holland wore out an a v e r a g e of 5 w h i s t l e s a d a y and n u m e r o u s vocal cords. The p a r a d e s w e r e marvelous, a t least w h a t I s a w of t h e m . W h e n 1 got tired of c l a w i n g a windowp a n e f o r s u p p o r t I g a v e up and went home — I ' v e seen the back of peoples heads before. When t h e y started scrubbing the streets at one p a r a d e I o v e r h e a r d a t o u r i s t s a y , " I s n ' t t h a t nice — I u n d e r s t a n d t h e y do t h a t all t h e t i m e h e r e . " I envied the people s i t t i n g on the c u r b s t o n e s d u r i n g t h e parades, but I couldn't quite see waiting f r o m 2 o'clock to 5 o'clock j u s t to have a f r o n t s e a t .

With bated b r e a t h we s a w t h e new court, 1946-1947 ascend t h e i r places on t h e dais. At l a s t ! Can I stand i t ? I hope so. The droni n g voice of t h e a n n o u n c e r p a u s e d , then announced the queen. You The s w e e t e s t a n d most picknow who s h e is so I w o n ' t tell t u r e s q u e s i g h t , I think, w a s t h e you any way. y o u n g e r g e n e r a t i o n in Dutch g a r b , No m o r n i n g a f t e r ! Who w a s t h a t t u l i p s in h a n d , dog c a r t s , or on sign t r y i n g t o kid a n y w a y ? I decorated bicycles. They looked so awoke May 25th w i t h a horrible a n i m a t e d and e n t h r a l l e d w i t h t h e feeling, my confidence was gone, whole t h i n g . I expected m o s t of 1 w a s deflated t o the enth d e g r e e t h e m to spout Dutch p h r a s e s , but — absolutely no ego l e f t . I didn't even h e a r a " k r e e t - m a h o y . " And w h y ? You guessed it, c h u m ! People e a t to live and some even I missed completely every on ice live to eat. T r u e r words w e r e nevand honor t h a t was handed out, e r spoken. Quite a f e w a d v e n t u r didn't g u e s s r i g h t even once. 1 had ous s t u d e n t s braved the s t o r m of a " m o r n i n g a f t e r " because my here- i n t e s t i n a l s a t i s f i e r s and worked in t o f o r e infallible w o m a n ' s intuition local r e s t a u r a n t s . I t was a m a r failed me h o r r i b l y ! velous study in food appreciation. N u f f said.

and activities of t h e s t u d e n t body. T h e only way t h i s can

Any p r o g r e s s t h a t can be m a d e to p u t out an A n c h o r which a n y Hope s t u d e n t can be proud of m u s t of necessity come t h r o u g h t h e e f f o r t s of t h e staff with t h e ba c king of s t u d e n t s , f a c u l t y , and a d m i n i s t r a t i o n . T h e r e f o r e , a r m c h a i r criticism t h a t could be directed t o w a r d a c t u a l r e p o r t i n g and w r i t i n g would be especially a p p r e c i a t e d .

Tulip Cuttings

So c a m e M a y 24. With a whoop Of course, t h e r e ' s a l w a y s a few and a holler we lit o u t of c l a s s a t s t e a d y c u s t o m e r s here, too. Iris 10 o'clock s h a r p , dashed o v e r to and Clayt, Betty and H a r r y , and t h e .field to see all the e v e n t s . Mihaly and Meengs come here most (Well, we m a i n l y went to see t h e every d a y . I wonder w h a t s u b j e c t s M E N in action a f t e r all t h e s e t h e y ' r e t a k i n g — seem t o have a y e a r s . ) (Jur first d i s a p p o i n t m e n t c a m e lot of outside r e a d i n g or somewhen the t e a m s we had picked w e r e thing — o v e r w h e l m i n g l y d e f e a t e d in all the " C o a t s , s c a r f s , books, s t e p r i g h t events. W i t h a s h r u g of o u r shoulup and buy your w i n t e r or s p r i n g d e r s we t h o u g h t we could f o r g e t accessories. All s o r t s of v a r i e t y , t h e business easily and chalked it f o r sale c h e a p . " Yes, we have quite up to experience and the folly of a clothing business, too. The lost counting chickens before they are and f o u n d d e p a r t m e n t does quite hatched. a big business. We have a little S i x - t h i r t y w a s d r a w i n g n e a r e r and money e x c h a n g e unit, too. I t ' s not n e a r e r , but w i t h o u t a w o r r y I uncommon to hear, "Could you give dressed c a r e f u l l y , pinned a r o s e in me c h a n g e f o r fifty c e n t s in dimes, my hair, and waited p a t i e n t l y benickels and a q u a r t e r ? " cause I had u t t e r confidence t h a t Of course, t h e r e a r e a l w a y s some the queen would be . c o m p e n s a t i o n s — we have two men The s t r a i n s of " P o m p and Cirs t a c k w o r k e r s and it's s u r p r i s i n g c u m s t a n c e " s e n t the s a m e t i n g l e s the r e q u e s t s for books we g e t when down my s p i n e t h a t had been rethe men a r e working. But don't c u r r i n g in May for t h e last f e w rush t o join t h e staff g i r l s — t h e y ' r e y e a r s as 1 walked p a s t the chapel both m a r r i e d ! ! into the g r o v e . I hoped t h a t I Well, m y h o u r ' s almost up. Oops! could come back next year f o r t h e H e r e comes a F r e s h m a n — "Could s a m e experience — not e x a c t l y t h e you tell me who the full n a m e of s a m e — because I'd be an a l u m n a the a u t h o r of this poem signed then. Oh, well! ' a n o n ' is — ? " T h a t does it — I The Alcor babes (Koffee Kletz quit. Never will I be a librarian fools for work, t h a t is) of 1945again! 1946 s t a r t e d a r o u n d and finally tapped all t h e i r new m e m b e r s .

T h e p u r p o s e of a college p a p e r is to m i r r o r t h e t h o u g h t s

f o r f u t u r e issues. If necessary, we would be glad to run a special column.

No "MorningAf+er"

" H e y - b o b - a - r e - b a - r e d - h o t " and all t h a t m a l a r k e y . So the Hopeites run t h e i r last lap of t h a t ole perverbial intellectual rat race. T h e s a y i n g goes " i t isn't e a s y " but e v e r y b o d y ' s p e r f e c t l y a w a r e of t h a t f a c t so we eliminate t h e song "I'll Walk A l o n e " and chime into t h e well worn r e f r a i n "If I Had t h e W i n g s of An A n g e l " — d e - d a - d e - d a !

We extend a plea f o r p h o t o g r a p h s of any kind — they a r e urgentlyneeded and each and everyone of you can help. The s u g g e s t i o n has been made t h a t a b r o t h e r o r g a n i z a tion be s t a t r e d , candidates f o r the title a r e L a u r e e n Bacall, Betty Grabe, J a n e Russell and Cass Daley. N o m i n a t i o n s f r o m t h e floor will be t a k e n — send your vote in Miss Ross had the r i g h t idea t o d a y . Act immediately — t h e t i m e when she said " I t would probably is the p r e s e n t and t o m o r r o w might be b e t t e r if we didn't have a n y be too late. classes because all y o u r t i m e is Ah, s u m m e r time, green g r a s s , t a k e n up t r y i n g to a t t e n d all t h e a full moon, a cool breeze, and T h i s is the s t o r y of two little social f u n c t i o n s . " I wonder — do g o o s e b u m p s — are cotton dresses people mean w h a t they say or s a y the t h i n g or a r e s w e a t e r s still in g n u s . One g n u was a m a l e g n u what they mean ? vogue. Don't ask me, and the and his n a m e w a s Lou gnu. The The seniors a r e g e t t i n g hit t h e w e a t h e r m a n doesn't seem to know o t h e r g n u w a s a f e m a l e g n u a n d her n a m e w a s Sue gnu. T h e s e h a r d e s t . They all seem to be d r a g - either. two k n u s met o n e day and f i n a l l y g i n g t h e m s e l v e s around in a s t a t e How did J e r r y and P i n k s g e t fell in love ( a s g n u s will do). Well, of semi-existence; half glad, half those b e a u t i f u l t a n s a l r e a d y . I of course, Lou g n u and Sue knu sad, and I've contacted a f e w t h a t g u e s s t h e y ' r e j u s t on the " s u n " decided ( b e i n g good little g n u s and a p p e a r half mad. The last s t a t e - beam. in love) t h a t t h e y would h a v e to ment isn't as bad a s it sounds. It Cupid shot an a r r o w into t h e air is a s t a t e of mind to be proud of, — it fell t o e a r t h and the result g e t m a r r i e d ( a s g n u s will do). And a r r i v e d a t only a f t e r f o u r y e a r s of was a s p a r k l e r on Midge Voss' so Sue knu a n d Lou g n u w e r e m a r h a r d work, a s m a t t e r i n g of f u n third f i n g e r l e f t hand. C o n g r a t s , ried. This w e n t a l o n g f i n e f o r a while. Lou g n u a n d Sue g n u h e r e and t h e r e , with the idea t h a t M i d g e ! were exceedingly h a p p y little g n u s . a diploma in the hand is worth two T h e r e go J e a n n e Mihaly, Phil Lou g n u would go to w o r k in t h e in the stacks. Meengs, B e t t y T i m m e r a n d W a l t m o r n i n g and S u e g n u would do The t e a c h e r s leaving our over- Koop out again. I t ' s g e t t i n g so no her housework ( a s g n u wives will f l o w i n g halls have a l r e a d y got one's left in Van Vleck these balmy d o ) , and Lou g n u would r e t u r n a t t h e i r f u t u r e s all m a p p e d out. N a t s u m m e r evenings. The phone girl n i g h t ( a s g n u h u s b a n d s will d o ) . BoHman and Joyce Van Oss a r e now h a s it easy — every t i m e t h e phone T h e n t h e r e would be Sue g n u w a i t t a l k i n g about t h e b e a u t i f u l a p a r t - r i n g s it is "Good evening. Van ing a t the door and s a y i n g " W h o s e m e n t s th e y ' v e got in Plainwell a n d Vleck. I'm sorry she i s n ' t in." little g n u a r e y o u ? " a n d Lou g n u Allegan respectively. N e x t f a l l B a n g ! ! Which all goes t o show would kiss Sue g n u a n d say " L o u they'll come back to d e a r old Hope, t h a t n a t u r e is a w o n d e r f u l t h i n g g n u loves S u e g n u ! " B u t f i n a l l y , p r o d u c t s of a lost g e n e r a t i o n (lost and Hope s t u d e n t s a r e n ' t ones t o a f t e r a y e a r o r two, w h e n Lou to the cause) b e a r i n g t h e e a r m a r k s let it| go b y u n a p p r e c i a t e d . The g n u and Sue g n u w e r e g e t t i n g of c a r e e r w o m e n — n o t f o r long no l a t e s t r u l i n g is t h a t f e l l o w s w e a r used t o m a r r i e d life ( a s g n u s will doubt. Some of t h e poor girls I " G l o w - i n - t h e - d a r k " t i e s since t r a f d o ) , Lou g n u a n d Sue g n u s t a r t e d notice a r e a l r e a d y g i v i n g h e a r t fic l i g h t s a r e out of t h e question. t o c h a n g e . N o l o n g e r would Lou r e n d i n g o r a t o r i e s on t h e housing T h e r e h a v e n ' t b e e n m a n y g n u come h o m e f r o m w o r k a n d b e s h o r t a g e . Don't talk t o u s — w e c h a n g e s of l a t e in t h e couple s t a g r e e t e d w i t h " W h o s e little g n u a r e c a n ' t w a i t t o f i n d out w h e r e every- t u s — w h y doesn't somebody do y o u ? " f r o m Sue gnu. Nor would body's g o i n g to room n e x t y e a r . s o m e t h i n g a n d give u s a real scoop. Lou g n u say " L o u g n u loves S u e I u n d e r s t a n d t h e f r e s h m e n g i r l s M a r y Lou Heroines is still " W a i t g n u ! " They grew very grouchy f i n a l l y got t h e i r room a s s i g n m e n t s ing f o r the T r a i n t o Come i n " and and discontented ( a s g n u s will d o ) . — everybody h a p p y ? o t h e r g i r l s a r e j u s t — w a i t i n g . W h e n Lou g n u would come h o m e W i t h o u t a doubt the Van J o h n - S u m m e r p l a n s a r e being m a d e , f r o m work. Sue g n u would not even son club sponsored by Gabby Van b a t h i n g s u i t s a r e being d r a g g e d s a y a s much a s " H o w do you do, Dis is t h e most active club on t h e o u t w i t h t h e hope t h a t they'll still Lou g n u ? " R a t h e r , S u e g n u would c a m p u s . T h e club m e e t s every so f i t and I'm t a k i n g m y f i r s t y a w n look a t Lou g n u sadly a s if t o s a y o f t e n and its goal is t o b r i n g V a n which h e r a l d s t h e event of m y com- " L o u g n u , j u s t w h a t kind of a h e r e in the n e a r f u t u r e t o g i v e i n g h i b e r n a t i o n . g n u a r e y o u ? " A n d Lou g n u w o u l d w i t h a f e w words. All p i c t u r e s of Maliciously yours, look a t S u e g n u a s if t o s a y " S u e t h e f a n should be s e n t t o Gabby. T h e Ya-ti-ta-boid. g n u , j u s t w h a t kind of a g n u a r e y o u ? " And so t h e y w e n t on f o r q u i t e a while w i t h Lou g n u coming each opportunity placed before us. ing home f r o m work and f r o w n i n g No person has a right to be at college who is lazy or in- a t S u e g n u , a n d S u e g n u f r o w n i n g different. Perhaps those who are negligent in participating in back a t Lou g n u . T h e y w e r e t w o these educational phases of college life should be weeded out, lonely, u n h a p p y little g n u s . I t and the faculty given a chance to work with those that are looked a s if L o u g n u a n d S u e g n u would see t h e p a r t i n g of t h e w a y s eager to learn. Dead wood is rubbish, good only for burning. a n d become divorced ( a s g n u s will

Story with a Moral

R.J.

H e r e we are, back in p e a c e f u l Holland. T h e tulips a r e s t a l k i n g it now and t h e f i s h e s in Centennial Park have quit trying to "out-gill" each o t h e r . N e x t y e a r w e ' r e rooting f o r b i g g e r and b e t t e r crowds, f i s h e s and t u l i p s . A n d so t h e college won't f e e l o u t of it all, how a b o u t a f l o a t in t h e p a r a d e and a band f o r e x h i b i t . W h o s a y s we c a n ' t do it.

HI u s t r

21 n x A

busy y e a r

is d r a w i n g t o a

close f o r t h e musical o r g a n i z a t i o n s of t h e college. T h i s week and n e x t , both Glee Club and Chapel Choir will m a k e r e c o r d i n g s with a G r a n d R a p i d s c o m p a n y . T h e Glee Club r e c o r d s will be available f o r those who wish to buy t h e m . Glee Club had q u i t e a t i m e when t h e y s a n g in Zeeland on t h e 19th. I t w a s double d u t y t h a t nigl.t, a s we r u s h e d h o m e w i t h a " H a h a l u j a h " a t t h e h y m n sing. S u n d a y we w e r e off t o Coopersville f o r t h e e v e n i n g a n d J u n e f i n d s u s in Grand Rapids f o r several engagements. D o n ' t f o r g e t t h e h o m e concert in J u n e on t h e M o n d a y f o l l o w i n g Baccalaureate. Confidentially, we will even h a v e s o m e new s o n g s . So g l a d t o see so m a n y o u t t o B e t t y ' s recital. S h e g a v e a m a r velous p e r f o r m a n c e . Orchids t o t h e little lady. T h e Chopin w a s lovely, a n d t h e F r a n c k s u p e r b ! Congratulations, Van Lente!!

derful happened to Sue gnu. One day, when Lou gnu was coming home from work and expecting the usual frown from Sue gnu, he saw she was smiling happily (as gnus will do). And what do you think she said?? All she said was: do), until finally something won"I HAVE GNUS FOR YOUI!"


Hop# College Anchor

Page Three

HOPE A M B A S S A D O R S EDUCATION IN N A Z I GERMANY P A U L G. F R I E D During the latter p a r t of the nineteenth century and in the beginning of this century, German schools and (tcrman scholarship were highly respected throughout the world. To this day the biographies of Kmil Ludwig, the discoveries of Albert Kinstein, and the literary achievements of T h o m a s Mann remain unchallenged emitrihutions t«i the progress of human knowledge.

Think About Re-education of Yesterday's Enemy

" T h e a v e r a g e A m e r i c a n in E u r o p e was n o t a bad g u y . . . He f o u g h t bravely. He died by t h e t h o u s a n d s . . . lie was g e n e r o u s to both Allied and e n e m y people . . , Yet he was a f a i l u r e a s a p r o p a g a n d a a g e n t f o r d e m o c r a c y , f o r t h e AmerHut the same countr\ which produced these men and boasted of its ican way of life and f o r himself a s an individual . . This fine schools, was also the scene of uncounted murders, of concentration is w h a t a n e x - A r m y chaplain, Kenwick C. Kennedy said in camps, and was the breeding place of fanatical racial hatreds. It has his r e p o r t in t h e Christian Century a f e w w e e k s ago.

A PRISONER IN GERMANY DON SCHOLTEN I m i g h t h a v e been classed literally a s one of H o p e ' s f o r ward a m b a s s a d o r s in t h a t I w a s c a p t u r e d d u r i n g t h e B a t t l e of t h e Bulge, and did m y s i g h t - s e e i n g a s a P r i s o n e r of W a r . A f t e r being t a k e n n e a r t h e S i e g f r i e d Line in t h e region of St. Vith, Belgium, we were m a r c h e d t o w a r d Koblenz which is on t h e Rhine River. T h i s region between St. Vith and t h e R h i n e m i g h t be called m o u n t a i n o u s and would be compared to t h e A p p a l a c h i a n M o u n t a i n s in the E a s t e r n United S t a t e s . It w a s covered by e x t r e m e l y d e n s e f o r e s t and w a s b e a u t i f u l in t h i s respect. T h e heavy s n o w presented scenes applicable to s t o r y books b u t w a s much to o u r d i s c o m f o r t .

been claimed that Hitler and his party ruled the country by terrorism, Is lie w r o n g when he tells his r e a d e r s t h a t E u r o p e h a s t h a t Himmler and the (iestapo were responsible for most of the atrocities committed in the Third Reich and that the majority of the (ier- had e n o u g h of t h e bad m a n n e r s of t h e A m e r i c a n s , t h a t t h e m a n s were not a w a r e of these things. conduct of t h e a v e r a g e soldier w a s odious and d i s g u s t i n g ? Upon r e a c h i n g Koblenz we g a t h e r e d an enlarged a p p r e c i a To accept this view would be to a s s u m e that the nation which had Is it t r u e t h a t t h e A m e r i c a n occupation t r o o p s think of n o t h tion of t h e w o r k of t h e Allied Air F o r c e s . T h i s city, h a v i n g produced many o u t s t a n d i n g scholars ami the universities which had ing except g e t t i n g d r u n k ? Did t h e boys who went overseas enjoyed international fame, had suddenly heen stricken hy blindness. R a t h e r than to subscribe to this improbability, we must search else- really lack the c h a r a c t e r and pride to m a k e a good s h o w i n g where for the facts which made it possible for Hitler to replace the for t h e m s e l v e s , t h e i r a r m y and t h e i r c o u n t r y ? cultural achievements of (iermany with medieval superstition, blind If he is r i g h t t h e n we m u s t c o n f e s s t h a t we have f o u g h t nationalism, and warped morality. t h i s w a r in vain. Then we have d e f e a t e d one m a s t e r race in The answer can only be found in lite fact that under Hitler all Europe, only to set ourselves in t h e i r place. If he is r i g h t schools became the i n s t r u m e n t s of the purty. To he sure, there were then ail o u r talk of t h e f o u r f r e e d o m s , of democracy, of Chrisa number of teachers and university professors who refused to surrender the right to teach the truth, hut they were soun dismissed or tianity, a n d of an A m e r i c a n way of life, is n o t h i n g but e m p t y sent to concentration ca:! ps. The great majority of the German p r o p a g a n d a . If he is l i g h t , t h e n o u r t r o o p s a r e no less g u i l t y teachers found it iirpossihlr to resist the pressure of the party for b e f o r e God t h a n t h e SS men and w a r c r i m i n a l s now on t r i a l s any length of time. The}. so.»ii resigned themselves to the •"inevitable" in X u r e m e r g , and taught what they were told. The results were uh\i >us. German schools ceased to he concerned with the development of character, the search for Iruth. or the preparation of the stud'-nts for a peaceful occupation. The support of t he Nazi ideology was now th" p r m . a r . fuiH tjon of the trai her. In ordei to prove tlie theories -if the racial suporiority ..f tne German race, t he myth of the divine calling of (Iermany to rule the world, the fanatic hatred of the J e w s and other minorities, and the evils ••!' democratic ideas, it became necessary to provide textbooks which would serve this end. The following passages contain selections from a number of uradeschool and high school texts which were used in Germany since 1 'X',:',. They have been translated in order to show to what extent the youth of (iermany has heen exposed to corruption of truth and history. Perh a p s they will make it easier for us to understand some of the problems our occupation armies face in Germany today.

We believe t h a t Rev. Kennedy is s p e a k i n g of a noisy minority, not of t h e large m a j o r i t y . N e v e r t h e l e s s we cannot close our eyes t o t h e f a c t t h a t t h e b e h a v i o r of t h i s m i n o r i t y h a s i m p a i r e d the good r e p u t a t i o n of o u r c o u n t r y . But they a r e not t h e only ones to blame for t h e failure of o u r A r m y to i m p r e s s t h e people of E u r o p e ; to t h i s day n e i t h e r the A r m y nor t h e S t a t e D e p a r t m e n t have published a clear s t a t e m e n t r e g a r d i n g o u r a i m s in E u r o p e . W h a t e v e r t h e e x c u s e s f o r t h e s e o c c u r r e n c e s may be, we, as C h r i s t i a n s t u d e n t s , should s p a r e no e f f o r t to p r e v e n t t h i s u n d e r m i n i n g of our f u n d a m e n t a l A m e r i c a n principles. If we do not t a k e a f i r m s t a n d now and d e m a n d of our t r o o p s t h a t t h e y act a s t h e t r u e r e p r e s e n t a t i v e s of t h e A m e r i c a n people, we will be no b e t t e r t h a n t h e "good G e r m a n s " who closed t h e i r e y e s to t h e c r i m e s of t h e G e s t a p o . If we can not control o u r own t r o o p s now, t h e n we c e r t a i n l y have no r i g h t to c o n t e m p l a t e the re-education of t h e G e r m a n s . T h i s issue has been devoted t o an e x a m i n a t i o n of our form e r e n e m y , because we feel t h a t t h e f u t u r e of G e r m a n y will be t h e key to t h e f u t u r e of E u r o p e . If we succeed in re-educ a t i n g G e r m a n y along C h r i s t i a n a n d Democratic lines, t h e rest of E u r o p e will t u r n to us f o r s p i r i t u a l l e a d e r s h i p ; if we been one of t h e key cities along t h e Rhine, had t a k e n a t e r r i f i c fail E u r o p e will be forced to look e l s e w h e r e f o r guidance. pounding. One bridge r e m a i n e d t h a t w a s s u i t a b l e f o r t h e use Renze L. Hoeksema Paul G. Fried of e v e r y d a y t r a f f i c . T h e people w e r e e x t r e m e l y b i t t e r . M a n y p h r a s e s were u t t e r e d by t h e civilians which would not be were sole heirs, because they enlarged the positions of the monasteries found in a recognized G e r m a n d i c t i o n a r y .

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Most German Histories begin with the period just prior to the Hron/.e Age. This was found in an eighth urade histor\ : "Ahout the year IHno (R.C.I northern nomads ad'.anced to the South into I'pper Italy. Here they formed the ruling class of the country. From them later sprang the m a s t e r race of the Romans. Other troops of the northern race wandered through the Ralkans and became the root of the highly talented (ireeks . . . Still other groups of nomads surmounted the Caucasus mountains and reached Iran and India. Here in India the northern settlers proudly called themselves 'Ariens.' which means 'the noble ones.' ••Everywhere these settlers took over the leadership of the countries because the i n h a t m a n t s 01 o m e r rai r s w r r r much if** quaUfird for this task than the northern race. These movements of northern people to the South and Kast were the first which carried northern blood into far-off countries and created there new, talented master-nations of the northern race." Thus the German student gets his first glimpse of how his a n c e s t o r s ' even more, .lust this entry of the sons of noble families hastened their were actually members of that magnificent "northern race" which pro- dying out and therewith weakened the leading class of Germany." duced not only the Germans, but also the Romans, the Greeks, and the Rut this was not the only objection to Christianity. Others felt that ruling castes of India. He certainly could demand no better proof of j it had robbed the German people of their "ancient and holy traditions." his own superiority. Again and again this great calling of the Ger- In the f i f t h grade the student learns of the conversion of the Germanic m a n s to he the master-race is emphasized by the Nazi historian. tribes at the time of Charlemagne: " T h i s was a g r e a t disaster for the This passage is taken from a Imh grade t e x t : "The fyunding of German people. It was as if their very soul had been torn out of their Germanic empires in the time of the great migration (about'<10(1 A.D.) body. Kverything the G e r m a n s had hitherto loved and admired, which extended from Scandinavia to North Africa, from the Rlack Sea to had been holy and venerated, they were now told to despise, hate and forget. Countless deep and meaningful f e a s t s and customs were destroyed or their meaning was corrupted. Age old symbols which had grown out of Germanic experiences, such as the sunwheel, the swastika, and the tree of life were decried as evil."

S p a m V ^ e s e empires gave Europe for the first time a definite Germanic d^er, they were a tremendous achievement for that time, which showed Vfc^rly the racial t a l e n t s of the Germans. Their abiilty to f o r m political V j t s proved their calling as the master-race." ^'th \ e v i d e n c e s of the racial superiority of the Germans t h u s firmly irnVnted in the mind of the student, the Nazi teacher now t u r n s to e % i n e Christianity and its influence on the development of Germany. V i e not all writers will go so f a r as to condemn all of Christianitymost of them show clearly that in spite of the good the Church did m a r i o u s fields, "the conversion of the Germanic tribes nrtnl'-f v a s V r e a t tragedy." g r a d e t h e German children are told: "Monastic life GenMorigip When it penetrated into Germany it was our f a t h e r s to get used to the foreign ideas . . . Many ies a m p d only members of the nobility. Some went even Mf,, i ; 'nly high nobility could enter. Especially welcome

Th above objections to the conversion of Germany to Christianity are made because Nazism felt that the " R o m a n religion" had imposed alien ideas and foreign supervision on Germanic religious thinking. Rut the attack on Christianity had to go f u r t h e r . Even the reformation had to be pictured as an obstacle in the road to the fulfillment of the eternal mission of Germany. Luther 's only claim to g r e a t n e s s is his contribution to the German language and his attack against all non-German elements; especially the Jews. One of the reasons why Hitler feared the Church is that Christianity teaches the freedom of the individual and the equality of all men before God. It is only logical that the student should now be introduced to the evils of democracy and that he must be warned of expressions such as " f r e e d o m , " "equality" and "brotherhood." To the National Socialists and Hitler there was only one kind of freedom, the freedom of the German S t a t e to rule the earth. One of Rismarck's greatest achievements was that "he defended the Reich against democracy and liberal ideas." The g r e a t e s t indictment of democracy and the surest proof that it was a hindrance in the manifest destiny of the German Nation will be found in the discussion of the Weimer Republic. The student is shown how un-Germanic it was from the beginning. "Instead of creating a constitution which would have corresponded to t h e German Way, one imitated the examples of Western Europe," is the complaint of a teacher in the ninth grade. Having disposed of Christianity and Democracy as ideas alien to the German and detrimental to mankind (that is the German), there remained the task of showing the student how relatively unimportant the rest of the world was in comparison with Germany. Sometimes, as in the case of America, this might be a bit hard to prove to a youngster who had read about the opportunities found in the New World, which he did not see in the Eatherland. This was solved simply by showing t h a t any advance of this country was due to the contributions of Germans. One author even s u g g e s t s t h a t America should actually be a German s t a t e and only circumstances kept it from becoming just t h a t . "When from 15()U to 1900 the f i f t h northern blood-wave streamed into the lands across the sea and whole continents ( t h a t is) North America and Australia became Germanic, the German nation remained excluded f r o m gaining possessions overseas because of internal strife and religious quarrels." If this should not be enough to convince the student t h a t the United S t a t e s is actually Germanic the following passage found in an 8th g r a d e history m i g h t prove more helpful. "The f a r m e r George Washington f r o m Virginia beeame the leader of the beginning W a r of Independence. But at t h e outset the a r m y of untrained and wildly assorted volunteers held little promise of success. Many a man became sick, o t h e r s deserted their flags. A complete collapse was at hand, because h a r d l y more t h a n 5,000 men remained. Then a German o f f i c e r came t o t h e rescue. Fredrick Wilhelm von Steuben from M a g d e b u r g . . . made an a r m y which was able to f i g h t out of the undisciplined hordes of volunteers who had no t r a i n i n g (Continued on P a g e 4)

Outside of Koblenz we traveled (walked) o v e r rolling count r y s i d e which was possibly good g r a i n p r o d u c i n g land a t one time. H i t l e r m u s t h a v e had a good h i g h w a y d e p a r t m e n t f o r t h e r o a d s w e r e f o u n d generally to be v e r y well c o n s t r u c t e d b u t b o m b c r a t e r s a p p e a r e d to be s o m e t h i n g contagious and most of t h e r o a d s w e r e susceptible. L a t e r we w e r e privileged to ride in locked boxcars. Thes e were not of t h e P u l l m a n class but had f o r m e r l y been used f o r livestock. T h e G e r m a n s broke tlie " F o r t y - a n d - E i g h t " t r a dition of World W a r I by s h o v i n g s e v e n t y men in one car. T h i s m e a s u r e sort of curtailed o u r s i g h t - s e e i n g and a b o u t e v e r y t h i n g else f o r f i v e d a y s until we reached S t a l a g II B a t M u e l b u r g on N e w Y e a r ' s Eve. Tlie a i r raid s i r e n s b r o u g h t t h e New Y e a r in with a f l i g h t of English b o m b e r s headed f o r Berlin. A f t e r two weeks of f a i r t r e a t m e n t t h e r e , one h u n d r e d of us were shipped via b o x c a r s to our work c o m m a n d o a t Merseberg, G e r m a n y . This city was s o m e w h a t smaller t h a n G r a n d R a p i d s and had a lot of w a r i n d u s t r y , including a benzine factory. N a t u r a l l y , the A i r Forces w e r e f r e q u e n t visitors. T h e r e w e r e m a n y good G e r m a n s in G e r m a n y . A c o n s t a n t f e a r could be seen in individuals who tried to help us by giving us a f e w p o t a t o e s or a little bread. It w a s t h e old people who were t h e most s y m p a t h e t i c a n d u n d e r s t a n d i n g . W h e n I say old people, I m e a n those who had celebrated a t least t h e i r f i f t y - f i f t h b i r t h d a y . T h e y w e r e a g a i n s t w a r and had previously seen t h e f r u i t l e s s s u f f e r i n g . Peace couldn't come f a s t enough f o r t h e m . The younger generations were dangerous. The Hitler Youth M o v e m e n t had taken a f i r m g r a s p a n d we s a w much evidence of t h i s f a c t . Y o u t h s of nine and twelve y e a r s old d i g g i n g foxholes, p r a c t i c i n g with g r e n a d e s , and t a k i n g road m a r c h e s w e r e not an uncommon s i g h t . Boys and girls of f o u r t e e n and sixteen w e r e a m o n g t h e c r e w s o p e r a t i n g a n t i a i r c r a f t g u n s and e q u i p m e n t . T h e y also c a r r i e d w e a p o n s about with t h e m . We had m o r e f e a r of t h e G e r m a n y o u n g people t h a n w e had of o u r own g u a r d s . As t h e d a y of liberation d r e w n e a r e r , t h e general a t t i t u d e of t h e people became m o r e d e p r e s s i n g b u t f e w of H i t l e r ' s followers would a d m i t d e f e a t . T h e y did, h o w e v e r , hope t h a t t h e A m e r i c a n t r o o p s would t a k e t h e i r t o w n s f o r t h e r e w a s a d r e a d f u l , h o v e r i n g f e a r of t h e R u s s i a n s . A complete re-education of t h e G e r m a n y o u t h is needed and o u r policy of occupations should be of t h e s t i f f control type which M a c A r t h u r is a p p l y i n g in J a p a n .

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Hope College Anchor < Nazi Education

in discipline and m a n l y virtues. Now the r e v o l u t i o n a r y t r o o p s w e r e s u p e r i o r t o t h e E n g l i s h mercenaries. P r u s s i a n a r m y discipline b r o u g h t liberty to t h e N o r t h A m e r i c a n s . " The o t h e r l a r g e c o u n t r y which m i g h t h a v e p r e s e n t e d a question to t h e i n s t r u c t o r s w a s R u s s i a . At t h e time of the R u s s i a - G e r m a n t r e a t y it was s i m p l e to p o i n t o u t , however, t h a t a c t u a l l y R u s s i a had a l w a y s depended on the G e r m a n s for guidance. 44. . . Yes, now c a m e a t i m e ( f r o m 1700 t o 1870), w h e n the c z a r s , as much a s possible, filled all positions of leadership in the a r m y and in the a d m i n i s t r a t i o n with G e r m a n s . T a s k s which d e m a n d e d special c a r e and h o n e s t y w e r e deleg a t e d to G e r m a n s . . . I ' n t i l ahout 1870 the Leadership of RuHHia was in G e r m a n h a n d s . " These f e w e x a m p l e s m a y he s u f f i c i e n t to show t h a t t h e education in the T h i r d Reich had hut one aim — p r e p a r a t i o n of the youth to f a c e the world with t h e knowledge t h a t he and his c o u n t r y were superior to everyone else. He had no reason to doubt t h i s w h e n he considered the i m p o r t a n c e of his a n c e s t o r s and the i n f e r i o r i t y of o t h e r races, n a t i o n s , and peoples. Since he was prevented f r o m g i v i n g serious consideration to C h r i s t i a n ideals and Democratic principles, t h i s arrog a n t a t t i t u d e should not s u r p r i s e us. We m u s t realize t h a t t h e soldiers who f a r e d us in battle, t h e SS troops who committed a t r o c i t i e s in concentration camps, and the young women who p r o s t r a t e t h e m s e l v e s before t h e i r c o n q u e r o r s today, are all the p r o d u c t of t h i s education. Even t h e innocent boys and girls, who e a g e r l y accept the candy o f f e r e d to t h e m by A m e r i c a n soldiers, have been exposed to t h e s e teachings.

G . R. Consistorial Union Dorians EnteH-ain Sibs, Dorians Have Thetas, Tri-Alpha W i t h Beach Party Annual Joint Picnic Hold Joint Meeting Has Meeting On Campus The

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a n n u a l s p r i n g p a r t y on S a t u r d a y , May 25th. Miss Boven's c o t t a g e w a s the scene of t h e f e s t i v i t i e s . The dinner bell r a n g a t 6:30 a n d each girl was responsible f o r t h e p r e p a r a t i o n or her g u e s t ' s chickenin-the-rough. Baseball and t h e beach provided e n t e r t a i n m e n t f o r the evening as Mr. and Mrs. Robert C a v a n a u g h and Dr. and Mrs. T e u nis V e r g e e r chaperoned t h e e v e n t . Louise T e r Beek was g e n e r a l c h a i r m a n f o r the p a r t y and her comm i t t e e s were R u t h Quant, invitations; and Phyl Voss, Ruth Dalenb e r g and F r a n n i e Van Leeuwen, food.

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Following the r e g u l a r business W h e t h e r we t r e a t the Youth of G e r m a n y kindly, f r a t e r n i z e with meeting in which plans f o r t h e him and consider him o u r equal, or w h e t h e r we t r e a t him as the de- coming joint Delphi-Sorosis p a r t y feated e n e m y , will — in the long run — m a k e little d i f f e r e n c e if we were discussed, Lou J o n k m a n read do not succeed in r e - e d u c a t i n g him. We can only hope f o r a peaceful some very a p p r o p r i a t e S c r i p t u r e . G e r m a n y — and a p e a c e f u l Europe — if we can help the G e r m a n youth to recover m e n t a l l y and s p i r i t u a l l y , if we can i m p a r t to t h e m the love f o r f r e e d o m , democracy, and C h r i s t i a n i t y which is the f o u n d a t i o n of o u r way of life.

May 15th f o u n d t h e SibyllineDorian societies c o n g r e g a t e d a t O t t a w a Beach f o r t h e i r a n n u a l beach p a r t y . I t w a s n ' t long b e f o r e h o t dogs w e r e b e i n g r o a s t e d o v e r t h e bonfire and t h e e n t i r e g r o u p soon was c o n s u m i n g hot dogs — w i t h e v e r y t h i n g — ice cold chocolate milk, crisp p o t a t o chips and paddle pops. When eacn g i n was sufficiently filled, t h e r e m a i n s w e r e cleaned u p and baseball helped u s to work off t h a t " s t u f f e d " feeling. A r o u n d 7:30 we t u r n e d t o w a r d home a f t e r a n other extremely enjoyable gathering together. Gwen L e m m e n g a v e a brief s u m m a r y of " D e W a c h t e r , " or in o t h e r words, the E v e n i n g Sentinel. T h i s proved e x t r e m e l y benefiical f o r those of us who "can't find t i m e to read the p a p e r . " " I t ' s T u l i p Time In H o l l a n d " w a s the lovely solo by Betty De Vries, and finally J o a n n e Stillwell e n t e r t a i n e d with the very s h o r t and t o - t h e - p o i n t "Street Scrubbing" humor paper.

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W e of T r i A l p h a wish t o e x press our appreciation to the various societies f o r m a k i n g s u c c e s s f u l m e e t i n g s , n a m e l y , D o r i a n , Sorosis, Sibylline and T h e s a u r i a n . W e a l s o express our appreciation to t h e v a r i o u s co-chairmen. T r i A l p h a looks f o r w a r d to a n o t h e r y e a r of such m e e t i n g s and hopes t h a t t h e f u n content and t h e pun c o n t e n t m a y be equal, if not b e t t e r , t h a n it w a s this p a s t season.

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M a r y Young a n d Bill H a a k took c h a r g e of t h e evening's devotions, followed by a r a h - r a h boy f r o m t h e I n t e r p r e t i v e R e a d i n g c l a s s showing off b e f o r e P r o f . Avison, W a r r e n H i e t b r i n k . His i n t e r p r e t a t i o n of t h e h i s t o r y of H o l l a n d ' s Tulip F e s tival deserves a n " A " . Phyllis D a r row s a n g f o r t h e occasion " I n a Little Dutch G a r d e n , " accompanied by Marion Dame. B e t t y T i m m e r g a v e a rendition which w a s supposed to have a h u m o r o u s effect on t h e audience. T h e r e w a s one good joke in it a b o u t B a s h f u l S a m . Nice going, B e t t y . Bill Gee, his f u gitive f r o m the s c r a p pile, " B a b y F a c e d " De M e e s t e r and Bill Geiger and his eternal ivories g a v e a f e w sad renditions t h a t f a i n t l y resembled music f o r the g r o u p .

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H o p e College had t h e p r i v i l e g e On M a y 17, 1946, T r i - A l p h a held of e n t e r t a i n i n g t h e G r a n d R a p i d s i t s Tulip F e s t i v a l — n o t in con- Consistorial U n i o n m e m b e r s a n d junction with t h e nation-wide e v e n t t h e i r wives a t open h o u s e on M o n — and t h e a f f a i r s g o t u n d e r w a y d a y , May 21. with P r e s . S t e g e n g a a s m a s t e r of A t r i p t h r o u g h t h e college buildceremonies ably a s s i s t e d by J a n e t i n g s w a s t h e h i g h l i g h t of t h e v i s i t . Huizenga. R e f r e s h m e n t s w e r e served a t V o o r -

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P a n

Hollenbach Compiles Statement of Aims For Hope College From Work of Faculty

IN

DIGESTION

By Elaine Bielefeld

For the p a s t t h r e e months fac- " ulty members have been working on a series of s t a t e m e n t s t r y i n g to develop a clear-cut and workable s t a t e m e n t of " T h e Aims of Hope College." Dr. Lubbers has released " A n A t t e m p t a t a Composite Statement of the Aims of Hope College." Dr. John Hollenbach has prepared this compilation from p a p e r s submitted by Dr. Lubbers, Miss Boyd, Dr. Dimnent, Miss Ross, Dr. De G r a a f , and Prof. Vander Borgh. These s t a t e m e n t s are not to be considered definite or completed. They have been reelased to notify the student body t h a t the faculty is working on some sort of a "constitution" to which it can refer whenever the need arises. "Hope College aims to prepare its students f o r Christian leadership in church and society. Toward this end, Hope College seeks to promote in every s t u d e n t : 1. An understanding of his relationship and responsibility toward God. 2. A broad understanding of and the universe in which he lives, and especially an awareness of the basic problems man faces in fulfilling his responsibilities toward God and his fellowmen. Religious and moral principles t h a t really act as the touchstones f o r all his actions. 4. An appreciative u n d e r standing of man's cultural heritage. 5. A mind trained to acquire and interpret f a c t s and to evaluate them in the light of his principles. 6. A spirit of inquiry that will make him persevere in his search f o r truth. 7. An ability to handle effectively the tools of communication (reading, speaking ,and writing). 8. Habits conducive to sound physical health, based on an understanding of the principles of hygienic living. 9. An uiderstanding of his own special limitations and capacities. 10. Special proficiency in his chosen field of study." F u r t h e r study will be made in order to determine what are the aims of a Christian college that make it distinctive from the ordin a r y college or unversity. n o p e needs something like this t h a t will revitalize the student

SUNDAES

FW*

Post-War Conditions Cause Untold Hardships in Hungary

"Hope" appears in the minds and hearts of government officials and especially President Truman in regard to the railroad and soft coal disputes. Long discussions with railroad officials brought nought The following e x c e r p t s were and professors live in the smallest We read in a f o r m e r issue of except hopeful signs of averting a complete walk-out of some 300,000 t a ke n from a news release of the number of rooms possible, and workers. New terms of settlement appear repeatedly but nothing defithis infernal rag, all about the World Council of Churches con- must take time f r o m studies to g o nite has been accomplished. cerning conditions in Hungary. to the nearby forests, cut trees, beautification of our 42 acres. (LoThe orders have finally come through f o r Secretary of Interior J. A. They are especially appropriate a t d r a g them in and chop t h e m f o r cal statistics courtesy of our poor Krug to seize the bituminous coal mines of our country. This may this time during the Hungarian Re- fuel. Also, most of the schools bleeding lawn-loathing janitors.) have some effect on the armistice which is now in progress between lief Project in which the campus were looted by the combating a r Swell, we say, with mild enthusi- the coal miners and the government. Procedure f o r obtaining sufficient is now interested: mies. Lack of books is keenly felt, The Hungarian P r o t e s t a n t since none have been printed in asm! But there's something that output of work from the mines with the government in charge has not has been overlooked; something yet been publicized as yet, but it will be interesting to watch such churches have been hard hit, first recent years. Scholars feel too out development of government control. by the fact t h a t they had to face of touch with recent events in the perhaps not so important as things the spirit of Naziism in Hungary, western world to undertake serious go, but we've laughed ourselves Holland, Michigan's, wage dispute between the city and the municipal even before the war, and secondly, writing. silly over the situation night a f t e r employees is still unsettled although workers are on their jobs. A because a third of the Protestant In Budapest 45 per cent of the night and thought you kiddies board of mediation has arranged to meet with the ways and means churches and church buildings were babies die within the first f e w committee of the city council and with the union representatives. This demolished or seriously damaged weeks because of shortage of milk would get as big a bang out of the move for complete settlement was arranged through the e f f o r t s of while the country was a battlefield and medicaments, 20 per cent of situation. Anyways, whether you Governor Harry F. Kelly. in 1944. the inhabitants have TB or venedo or not makes no difference to Protestants comprise 20 per cent real disease, which has increased Of interest to us all, but especially to all navy v e t s — The committee us. We're bitter about the whole greatly during the occupation. mess and feel t h a t graphomanial for appropriations of the House of Representatives has appropriated of the population; there are two a new amount of $4,639,659,000 for the Navy for the next fiscal year million members of the Reformed Thousands of Hungarian boys f r o m urge, sooooo . . . beginning July 1. This is one billion dollars less than the Navy re- Church, one-half million Luther- 15 to 20 who were taken to work Note, if you wui, the tiny monuans, and Baptist and Methodist mi- camps in Germany are still there ment situated in the middle of our quested, but the committee has deemed this sufficient for the present awaiting transportation home. norities. needs of our Navy program. front yard: chapel side of Graves'. Collapse of the currency has proThousands are still prisoners of This, friends, is a sundial. It is duced a terrible hardship on the war, some in the West and some fully capable, if used correctly, of Protestant c h u r c h e s , rendering in Russia. Many r e t u r n home, so telling the exact hour of day. their invested funds and securities weak and exhausted from prison There are a few ironical notes to valueless. As an example of how experiences that they die within a "How Little We Know" — The this, however. In the first place, the inflation is working in Hun- short time. Food rations are only nature's clock is beneath the shadiFreshman Class. gary, it was stated that in October about 1,000 calories a day, and Dr. F r a n k W. Chandler gave a est of royal oaks, where the sun, "Just a Little Fond Affection" — of last year, street car f a r e in milk is less than one-tenth the nortry its hardest, fails to penetrate. new conception of the responsibili- Art Higgs and Betty Bisscher. Budapest was 20 pengoes,. or 100 may supply. Secondly, it is decidedly away from ties of American higher education "Time On My Hands" — Herk times what it was before the war; The great Roman Catholic bishthe beaten path. "Pish," we say, when he stated that the liberal arts Buter. but by February of this year, street oprics were extremely hard hit. "we can always walk over to it!" college must train gentlemen as "Give . .e the Moon o v e r Brook- car fare had come up to 20,000 The Reformed colleges and pension But nooooo! The olive plot stands lyn" — Don Ingham. well as scholars. pengoes, or 100,000 times normal. funds which had t h e i r assets to a in our way! We are obsessed with "Indian Love Call" — Glenna Gore. That would mean that subway f a r e large extent in land also came unIn his Phi Beta Kappa address, little signs warning us not to t a r r y "Onezy, Twozy" — J e r e Uppleger. in New York City would be $5,000. der this reform, which leaves t t a m on the turf, to keep off the com- Dr. Chandler recalled that he has "I Let a Song Go Out of My H e a r t " without income f o r pensions, mainSo fast are inflationary values mon, that pitter-pattering is pro- seen many scholars, male and fe— Gert Vredeveld. mounting that $1 which equalled tenance of schools, scholarships, hibited! And what is the result? male, some of whom could scarcely "I'm Sitting On Top of the World" eight million pengoes in April of and other phases of church work. Unmindful of the hour, we mozey be called gentlemen. — Jack de Kruif. 1946, must now be worth twelve At the time of expropriation, the to the Model for another malt and The most effective teachers in "I Don't Want to Set the World On million. government, recognizing t h a t the miss the morning meditations. any college are those who comF i r e " — Bob Pontier. income of the church estates was Since most ministers and theoThat, dear teacher, is one reason bine, social grace, personality, ex- "Here I Go Again" — Don Scholused f o r service and not f o r private logical professors have fixed infor our repeated absenteeism. Can perience and charm with knowlten. gain, promised indemnities f o r the comes, they are now living on what we be blamed ? Ascribe it to poor edge and ability. These men are "I Know a Little Bit About a Lot would be the equivalent of one church groups to t a k e care of the landscaping! those who exert the most influence. of Things" — Betty Van Dyke. American dollar per month. People general work of the colleges. The This fashioning of gentlemen as "Thanks for the Memories" — Don are existing largely on a basis of present inflationary state of the Evers. body and the faculty. It will cause well as scholars by a faculty which barter with the f a r m e r in the best currency, however, has made it everyone to revaluate the purpose thinks as much of making men as "Two In Love"—Phyll Meengs and position of all. Professors and min- impossible to fulfill these oDiigaJeanne Mihaly. of Christian education on a Re- of diffusing knowledge is especially isters have gradually been ex- tions, making somewhat of a ten"The One I Love Belongs to Someneedful today because persons are formed basis and then work with changing all their surplus clothing sion between the Church and State, body Else" — Sioux City Sue. new determination to attain this closer to one another. This same and h o u s e h o l d possessions f o r and tending to make the Church idea can be applied to the nations "Emperor's Waltz" — Bob Barry. purpose. something to eat. A used suit dependent on state support f o r its of the world who are closer to each "Got a Date with an Angel" — A r t would keep a family eating f o r activities. Slager. other and f o r t h a t reason should about a month. Thus, the land r e f or m long advohave mutual consideration f o r one "Eighteenth Century D r a w i n g cated by the Church has reacted to The University of Debrecen was Room — J. C. Petter. another. closed in April, 1944, when the Ger- curtail the Church's activities and Consideration for others, which "11:60 P.M." —Voorhees Hall. mans invaded the country and took influence. is the gentlemen's virtue, must be "And Let the Rest of the World over the buildings f o r hospitals or Go By" — I k e Boer. fostered, increasingly, in our colH ' i, i !> 1 f w I T; billeting. The Russians occupied "But I can't Remember Where or leges to counteract the individualthe city in October and teaching When" — Chuck Martindale. ism of war. "Let's Get Lost" — Tommy and began again in December. There ACCIDENT INSURANCE FOR Gentlemen should include in their have been no special food rations Sheppy. character something of the spiritHOPE COLLEGE STUDENTS "There'll Be a Jubilee" — On June or fuel allowances available f o r ual motives also. The last plea of the schools, however. The students Holland StaU Bank Bldg. 17. JEWELER Dr. Chandler is t h a t men become "You Tell Me Your Dream, and I'll gentlemen to save their own souls Tell You Mine" — Anne Vander 2 4 E. 8th St., Holland, Mich. as well as f o r material advantage. Veer. For "what is a man profited if he "Temptation" — 11:00 a.m. chapel shall gain the whole world and cut. lose his s o u l ? " A.C.P. "Oh, Lady Be Good" — B e t t y TimAT mer. "Weary Blues" — All of Us. "Do Nothin' T i l You Hear from me" — Editor Dykema. "I'll Be Around" — E x a m Time. "Why Don't We Do This More O f t e n ? " — Are you sure you 13 E. 8th St. want us t o ?

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Pag* Six

Hit ll, Dicdv

Students, Faculty Witness

Hope Defeats G. R> J> C ; Van Liere Pitches 4-hitter

Freshmen Win Track Meet

Jack

W . Milewski Wins J. Schou+en Award; Sophomores Take Second Place Honors T h e success of t h e 1946 M a y D a y is an established f a c t , and no small reason f o r i t s success w a s t h e T r a c k Meet held on t h e c a m p u s a t h l e t i c field. Despite t h e t h r e a t e n i n g w e a t h e r , h u n d r e d s of s t u d e n t s t u r n e d o u t f o r t h e event, a n d w e n t a w a y with a b e t t e r knowledge of t h e lesser known s p o r t s and a desire f o r more a c t i v e p a r t i c i p a t i o n n e x t year. T h e e n t i r e e v e n t was r u n off w i t h clocklike precision, d u e to t h e fine o r g a n i z a tion of t h e c h a i r m a n , Dell Koop, assisted by class leaders, A r t T i m m e r , Bob V a n Dis, Don Mulder, a n d Bob Koop. T h e inter-class competition was especially keen t h i s y e a r , with t h e l a r g e r F r e s h m a n and Sophomore g r o u p s e n t e r i n g most of the participants. According to the rules established by the May Day sports committee, first place winners in each event received five points, second place three, and third place one point. The total points were then added, and in this way the final r e s u l t s tabulated, which produced an individual top p e r f o r m e r and a class winner. Milewski Wins Honors Top individual honors went to diminutive Walt Milewski, f o r m e r Holland High School track s t a r , who emerged with a total of 11 points. Walt, a Freshman, received the Jack Scholten May Day medal, presented this year to the outstandi n g athlete in the meet. Second place honors were divided between Chuck Plogsma, a Freshman, and Vern Kraii, a Sophomore, each of whom had 11 points. Third place honors went to Don Oosterbaan, who took first division in the only two events he entered, the shot-put and football throwing contest. All four winners are g r a d u a t e s of Holland High School, and each is a discharged veteran. The poijjis were then tallied, and the Freshman class emerged victorious with a grand total of 61 points for all events. The Sophomores came in second with .'U, the Juniors 4 and the Seniors 3. F i r s t event in the meet was the football throwing contest, won by Don Oosterbaan, a Freshman, who tossed the cone KIT f e e t ; Ploegsma took second and Don Mulder third. The shot-put a r t i s t s stepped up next, and again Oosterbaan won with a nice throw of .S3 feet G inches; Don Mulder came in a close second, with Baskin third. Vern Kraii, Hope's MIAA champ in the 11)1) and 220-yard sprint, took an easy first in both events, with Jack Pontier running second, and Evers third. All three men are members of the track team and placed high in the MIAA track and field meet held recently at Albion. Kraii's time for the 110 was 10.6, and 24.1

for t h e 220. Ray Heemstra, a Sophomore, who participated in almost every event during the meet, threw a nice javelin to take t h a t event, the pole traveling 144 f e e t . Chuck Ploegsma came in a close second, and Ernie Post third. Kempers Takes Mile The long mile, t h a t test of endurance, was also won by a F r e s h man, Kempers, who crossed the tape in 5 minutes 25 seconds; another Frosh, Van Heest, came in second, with Horton third. Walt Milewski now entered the field in the 440-yard dash and gathered five of his points in this event with a first, clocked time 57.4. Gabby Van Dis changed shoes, rolled up his trousers and came in second, with Bob Koop close behind. High jumping is definitely an art, and very interesting to watch as testified by the many spectators who witnessed the event. Chuck Ploegsma eliminated all contestants when he cleared the bar at 5 foot f> inches; one notch down was Kay Heemstra, with Stegeman half a peg behind. The gruelling halfmile event was again dominated by Freshmen, the winner Lee, Boerman second, and a Soph., Paul Hinkamp. third. Last, and possibly most interesting event of the morning, w a s the broad jump, which Milewski took by an inch, his arc covering 18 feet three inches of ground; A1 De Voogd missed by an inch, with Vern Kraii taking third. I'pperclaHsmen Win It is interesting to note t h a t over half t h e events were won by men who did not participate in spring sports. Coach Jack Schouten and A1 Vanden Bosch are hoping to move May Day up a couple months next year, to g a t h e r material for their teams. The Softball game, held in the afternoon, was won by the upperclassmen who knocked out a 5-2 victory over the Frosh and Soph., getting revenge for their humiliation of the morning.

Glances . . . . . with Clary Van Liere You can t e a r another page off your s p o r t s calendar now and glance back at last week's May Day track meet as the f i r s t the campus has witnessed in a number of years. It was not only the quality of the particular e n t r a n t s t h a t made it so, but also the enthusiasm of both the spectators and participants. Track and football m e n t o r AI Vanden Bosch and his able aides deserve a "solid citizens" handshake f o r conducting a so well organized sports program . . . By way of reminder it might be well to inform some of the male seniors t h a t their presence on the cinderpaths was quite noticeable by their absence . . . Two plain clothesmen, Messrs. Van der Broek and Dalman did manage to o f f e r the high jump aspirants some competition, however . . . The only casualty of the day was the official starter. Coach Vanden Bosch. He sustained a neatly burned forefinger when a cap f r o m the s t a r t e r gun went off accidentally . . . Dick Higgs a n d Bill D r a p e r , both Marine shavetails and members of the 1942 football team were among those who enjoyed the festivities May Day evening. Sad news item: Bill Hillegonds, stellar reeciver for Coach J a c k Shouten's baseball a r r a y , will probably be out of action f o r the rest of t h e season with a broken finger on his right hand. Bill's catching ability and timely hitting will certainly be missed during the five g a m e s t h a t remain on the baseball schedule . . . Heir to his job will be " R e d " Cornell, a good backstop who packs plenty of power at the plate . . . Ernie Meeusen, recently returned third baseman, is one of the f e w men on the campus who served in both t h e European and J a p a n e s e W a r zones . . . Spring Song: If you've been he a ring any long, low wails f r o m the windy hill where stands Andrew Carnegie's monument, it's t h e cry of a score of athletes who sincerely trust t h a t this s u m m e r will bring a lot of improvements in the condition of the antiquated building . . . Note: they're needed!

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Hope Sends Representatives t o Albion; Dutch Place Second In Tennis Matches The Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association's Track and Field Meet, which was inoperative during the war, again resumed activity this year at Albion college, on May 17 and 18. All colleges in the association sent representatives, and lovers of spring sports witnessed some fine events in tennis, golf, and track. The tennis matches were played Friday, and a f t e r a full day of vollying the final results showed a sweeping victory for powerful Kalamazoo college, who has lost but three of some twenty odd matches since early spring. Hope's netters came through in fine form and took second place, dropping only their matches with Hornet players. Friday night it started raining and continued through S a t u r d a y which kept attendance at a minimum. On the Duke Lake golf course, with the participants soaked to the skin, Alma won handily 11 points in front of second place Albion, while Hope came " d r i p p i n g " in f o u r t h . Hope's golf clan consisted of Jalving, Mulder, Elhart and Timmer. In the track meet, it was Albion

Pyle Takes Honors In Women's Events Hope's lovely co-eds were not content with dominating May Dayactivities during the coronation ceremonies, so they took an active part in the Track Meet held on the morning of the festivities. Three events were staged, all hotly contested, and when the totals were compiled the Junior class emerged victorious, with two firsts and a second. Individual top honors went to Luella Pyle with 10 points, while Mulder and Visser tied for second with 4 points each. In the 75-yard dash Lou Pyle, a Junior, was first, Steketee, a Frosh second, and Ingham, another Frosh, third. Several casualties resulted from this race . . . The high jump, outstanding event f o r the women, was especially close, and finally resulted in a tie for first place. " P i n k s " Mulder and Shirley Visser fought it out to the bitter end, but neither could clear t h a t final inch, so divided the honors. Pinks is a Senior, Shirley a Sophomore. The Juniors again took the spotlight, in the broad jump, also won by Lou Pyle, with Marian Dame, another Junior, second, Thelma Van Leuwen third. The afternoon Softball match between the J u n i o r s and Seniors was rained out, but the spirited lowerclassmen played a determined g a m e in the drizzle, and when the smoke had c l e a r e d , the Sophomores reigned victorious, edging out the Frosh 19-18.

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practically all t h e way, iwith Alma second, Kalamazoo third, Hope f o u r t h and Adrian fifth. However, the Dutch took f o u r first events, in the 100 and 220-yard dash, the discus throw and the 880-yard r u n . Vern Kraai won both the 100 and 220, Dell k o o p the discus throw and Don Lee the 880. Kraai's t i m e in the 100 was 10.7 and in the 220, 24.1; Koop t h r e w the discus 110 feet, while Lee's winning time in the 880 was 2:10. In other track events Hope r u n n e r s and hurdlers placed well. The relay team of Boerman, Milewski, Lee and Bob Koop took third, Roger Kempers r a n fourth in the 880 and Jack Pontier got a f o u r t h in the low hurdles.

WITH .

Thursday

5-3

victory

To Give Views Each coach and athletic director will be asked to give his views as to w h a t this year will bring in t h e way of football activity, and the general t h e m e will be the f a c t t h a t our various colleges represent competition with m a j o r schools t h r o u g h o u t the nation. The last college broadcast will be on A u g u s t 31st and the following S a t u r d a y (Sept. ";) all sixteen footbai' coaches will be invited to Detroit to participate in a vast Round Table discussion of football on the eve of the 1946 season. To Include F i f t e e n

lege's seven-game w i n n i n g s t r e a k with

behind

a

smashing

the

four-hit

pitching of curve-ball a r t i s t Claire Van Liere. His t e a m m a t e s cooperated by knocking out seven hits while c o m m i t t i n g only two errors. Seven walks got Van Liere in trouble f r e q u e n t l y but he pitched his way out of holes in the first, f o u r t h and fifth innings. A twor u n h o m e r by L e f t y Butler, the J.C. pitcher, accounted f o r a couple of the t h r e e opponents runs. The Dutchmen scored in the second inning when Ray H e e m s t r a singled Bud Dorsch home; Dorsch, the cleanup man, had reached base on a n e a t double. The third inning saw some well timed hits which resulted in the remaining four runs for the O r a n g e and Blue. Mulder walked. Charlie Martindale singled and both he and Mulder advanced when the J.C. third baseman f u m b l e d Dorsch's drive. Ernie Meeusen singled to r i g h t sending in two r u n s . H e e m s t r a walked, and c h a t t e r y Bill Hillegonds smashed out a double to drive in Meeusen and H e e m s t r a to end the scoring f o r Hope. The Dutchmen have won three and lost two so f a r this season. Five more g a m e s a r e scheduled, two at home and three away. Hope AB R H Van Dorn, 2b 3 0 Mulder, ss 3 2 Brewer, rf 3 0 Martindale, cf 3 1 Dorsch, If 2 1 Meeusen, 3 b 3 1 Heemstra, lb 2 1 Hillegronds, c 3 1 Van Liere, p 3 0 x Bennett 1 0 26 x Replaced Brewer in 5th. Grand Rapids AB Horns, 3b 4 Afendoulis, 2b 2 Bailey, s s 3 3 Rayford, rf 3 Lappley, If 3 Hoffman, l b 2 O'Brien, cf 1 Butler, p 3

5

7

R 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1

H 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 1

Totals 24 3 4 Score by innings: Grand Rapids 0 0 1 0 2 0 0—3 Hope 0 1 4 0 0 0 x—5

G o l f Season Closes W i t h J. C . Defeat Coach AI T i m m e r ' s golf team wound up their season's play May 22, d r o p p i n g a close match to Muskegon J.C., making t h e tally two won and eight lost. The Dutch g o l f e r s ran into some keen competition t h i s year, and this coupled with a g r e a t deal of 18th hole bad luck p u t them in the losing average column. Hope opened the season on April 22 a g a i n s t Grand Rapids J.C., then Alma, Muskegon J.C. and Kalamazoo, all matches closely played but lost. On May 7 the boys clicked and defeated Albion, second place MIAA holders, then knocked off Kalamazoo in a Tri-meet with Alma. T h r e e more d e f e a t s by Albion, Grand Rapids J.C. and Muskegon J.C. ended the season, with the Dutch e m e r g i n g f o u r t h in the Intercollegiate Meet a t Albion. Golf games a r e won by one stroke, and it seems t h a t Hope lost more t h a n their s h a r e a s such. Of the eight defeats, f o u r were lost on t h e eighteenth hole; in t h e ent i r e conference t h e low score was made by a Hope player, Howie J a l v i n g , who shot a 71 p a r on the Holland Country Club course, while A r t T i m m e r , a n o t h e r local player, shot a f o u r over p a r 75 on t h e s a m e course.

Members of the squad during the season were Claire Hopkins, Don Ladewig, Chip Mulder, Howie Jalving, Baxter Elhart, and Art Timmer.

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Bud W a t s o n , W J R ' s Sports Edit o r , has s t a r t e d a new series of college f e a t u r e s on his broadcast on S a t u r d a y s a t 10:45 EST. F o r a period of sixteen weeks Watson will visit a different college each week to have a personal c h a t with the football coach and athletic director. The broadcasts come directly f r o m the campus of the colleges involved and will be t r a n s cribed via the W J R Wire Recorder. AH sixteen of the colleges a r e in the s t a t e of Michigan and all will be active on t h e football field this year. The t h e m e of the series will be " T h e r e t u r n of actual P o s t - W a r f o o t b a l l and what it m e a n s to Michigan colleges."

Net Team Finishes With Good Average

STRENGTHEN YOUR AFFECTIONS

nine

snapped Grand Rapids J u n i o r col-

in t r a c k

GREETING CARDS

baseball

Editor Interviews Athletic Directors

The fifteen colleges include: Unithis versity of Michigan; Michigan y e a r was not too keen due to t h e S t a t e College; Michigan S t a t e Norf a c t that many participants were mal; Central Michigan; Western Michigan; Adrian; Albion; A l m a ; recently returned servicemen who F e r r i s I n s t i t u t e ; Hillsdale; Hope; had little time to get in condition, Kalamazoo; Lawrence I n s t i t u t e ; but despite the many handicaps in- University of Grand Rapids; and volved, a fine meet evolved and Wayne University. Hope's coach, AI Vanden Bosch, ( L A T E F L A S H : Bud Watson has was well pleased with the boys' recently visited the Hope campus performance. and interviewed Athletic Director Milton L. (Bud) Hinga and football coach, AI Vanden Bosch. The exact Vanden Bosch To Coach date of the re-broadcast of this New Hope Football Team interview is unknown to date, but watch f o r an announcement!) That g r e a t American sport, football, will again be included in the curriculum of Hope next fall, a f t e r a three-year layoff, and Hope students and citizens of Holland will be privileged to witness this fine The first tennis team to t a k e the sport, college style. o r a n g e and blue into active compeCoach AI Vanden Bosch issued a tition in t h r e e years wound up the call in April and some f o r t y men 1946 season with a better t h a n avresponded for spring practice. As e r a g e record, memories of fine is always the case with coaches, he sportsmanship and a hope f o r a had little to say about t h e f o r t h better Hope on the courts next coming team, their prospects and spring. Coach Hinga's boys got a their shortcomings, but the field is late s t a r t , all of the t e a m ' s memwide open for any fellow who debers had played very little tennis sires to get knocked about. Many d u r i n g the war, yet ended t h e seaformer lettermen of pre-war Hope son in second place in the MIAA. squads are back, and many high The lads got off to a wobbly school players who developed durs t a r t , but squeezed t h r o u g h their ing the conflict are enrolled f o r first match with Grand Rapids J.C. the fall term. and emerged victorious 4-3. On Fall practice will begin before May 1 the Dutch repeated their the school term in September, and performance and dumped MuskeCoach Vanden Bosch will call a gon J.C. by the same score, with meeting in the n e a r f u t u r e to obvictories t u r n e d in by Scholten and tain addresses of men who plan on riolleman in singles, Barendse and playing, so he can notify them of Tirrell in t h e number one doubles the date f o r reporting. slot and Van Dis and Scholten in o the n u m b e r 3 doubles position. Vanden Bosch To Enter Three days later Albion college visited the Dutch, and went home Kraai, D. Koop, D. Lee s m a r t i n g f r o m a 6-1 d e f e a t ; only For Meet at Kalamazoo Holleman in the number 2 singles Coach AI Vanden Bosch has an- position lost his match, a very nounced t h a t he will e n t e r t h r e e close one. On May 9 and 13 the local netof his track men in the Michigan S t a t e Collegiate meet to be held ters took on one of the outstanding a t Western Michigan College J u n e tennis groups in the country, name1. Vern Kraii, winner of the 100 ly Kalamazoo College, who h a s deand 220-yard spr i nt in the MIAA, f e a t e d such squads as Duke uniDell Koop, champion discus throw- versity and t h e University of Miche r in the conference, and Don Lee, igan. The o r a n g e and blue failed top MIAA 880-yard man, will be to win a match, and went down entered in the meet f r o m Hope 7-0, 7-0. Only Barendse and TirCollege. Entered in the t o u r n a - rell in the n u m b e r 1 doubles hole ment will be t h e top t r a c k per- gave the H o r n e t s any trouble. On f o r m e r s f r o m all Michigan colleges, May 15 Albion college got revenge a n d the competition will be espe- f o r the b e a t i n g handed t h e m and cially keen. Although Coach Van- took Hope 4-3. van Dis, Holleman den Bosch has little hope f o r a n y and Lightvoet won their matches, first positions in this type of com- all singles. On the 18th t h e Dutch petition, he does expect his boys traveled to Albion to p a r t i c i p a t e in to place f a i r l y well among the top t h e Intercollegiate Field Meet, and emerged with a n e a t second. p e r f o r m e r s of t h e state. The competition

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05-29-1946