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HOPE COLLEGE ANCHOR

LXVI—13

Holland, Michigan

May 28, 1954

Trygve Lie, Renowned Statesman, Homrighausen To Give To Be First Memorial Lecturer Commencement Speech T r y g v e Lie, the first Secretary General of the United Nations, will open the new Hope College lecture series on November 2nd. In fulfilling its announced purpose of bringing to the c a m p u s o u t s t a n d i n g statesmen who have made distinguished contributions in world affairs, t h e Hawkinson Memorial Committee revealed t h a t Mr. Lie had accepted the invitation to come to Holland. Trygve Halvdan Lie was born in Oslo, Norway in 1896 and was gr aduated f r o m t h e Oslo Law school in 1919. Since t h a t time he has been awarded honorary degrees from almost every m a j o r university in the world, including Yale, H a r v a r d , Princeton, Columbia, and the University of Wisconsin, to mention only a f e w of the American institutions which have so honored him. Lie's Political Career His political career began in 1922 when he became the executive secretary o f t h e Norwegian Labor P a r t y , a position which he occupied until 1935, when he became Minister of Justice. D u r i n g the w a r Lie played a m a j o r role in the resistance movement and is credited with saving the Norwegian fleet f o r the allies. He served as c h a i r m a n of the Norwegian Delegation to the San Francisco Conference and became Foreign Minister in 1945. Mr. Lie was Secretary-General of the United Nations f r o m F e b r u a r y 1946 until April 1953. In his final speech to the United Nations Assembly, Mr. Lie called his seven y e a r s a s Secretary-General the One of Mr. Lie's most significant "hardest, a n d m o s t challenging y e a r s " of his life. During this time Lie, who had been chosen as

p e r m a n e n t opposition of the Soviet block, which eventually led to his resignation in the Spring of 1953. Since that t i m e Mr. Lie h a s been giving lectures in the United S t a t e s and abroad.

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Trygve Lie a compromise candidate, succeeded in building the U N S ecret ari at e into an efficient and purposeful working organization. Contributes to Peace contributions to world peace came on the 25th of J u n e 1950, when, as Secretary-General of the UN, he d e c i d e d to denounce the N o r t h Korean a t t a c k and called f o r member nations to help restore peace in Korea. As a result the United Nations became the champion of defense a g a i n s t aggression, but, a t the same time it earned him the

Dr. Elmer G. Homrighausen, Professor of Christian Education at Princeton Theological Seminary, will be t h e Hope College CommenceCommittee Gratified ment speaker, Dr. Irwin J. Lubbers, college president, announced. The Hawkinson Memorial Com- Exercises will be held in the Memorial Chapel on Monday, J u n e 14, at mittee is gratified and encouraged 10:00 A.M. by the real interest which h a s been Principal s p e a k e r for Baccalaureate services on J u n e 13 will be Dr. shown by individuals and organiza- John R. Mulder, President of Western Theological Seminary. tions in the proposed lecture series. Dr. Homrighausen is a native of Iowa who received his Bachelor of Particularly noteworthy a r e the A r t s degree f r o m Mission House College, Plymouth, Wisconsin, in 1921. financial pledge of the KnickerHe was presented his Bachelor of bocker F r a t e r n i t y and the offer of Theology degree f r o m Princeton publicity and other services made Theological Seminary in 1924 and by the International Relations Club. his Master of A r t s d e g r e e f r o m In addition the IRC is making Butler University the following plans for a regional conference of year. He also holds d e g r e e s of Western Michigan International ReMaster and Doctor of Theology lations Clubs, to be held at Hope f r o m t h e University of Dubuque. College on November 2nd, to coinDr. H o m r i g h a u s e n spent 13 years cide with Mr. Lie's presence on as a minister in the Evangelical the campus. and Reformed Church, s e r v i n g parishes in Freeport, Illinois, and in Indianapolis. He has also t a u g h t at the University of Dubuque, University of Geneva, Occidental ColP r o f e s s o r L a r s Granberg of the lege and Butler University before Psychology d e p a r t m e n t will be the taking his p r e s e n t position at s p e a k e r at t h e annual Honors AsPrinceton in 1938. sembly, T h u r s d a y , J u n e 3. The ceremony will f e a t u r e the A world traveler, Dr. Homrigpresentation of a w a r d s to outstandhausen attended the World Presing seniors, winners of scholarships byterian Alliance in Belfast, Ireand campus contests, and members land, in 1933; the Universal Counof t h e various e x t r a c u r r i c u l a r orcil on Life and Work in Fano, Dr. Elmer Homrighausen ganizations. Denmark, in 1934; the International Congress of Christian Education in Mexico City in 1941, and the Conference on Evangelism of the World C o u n c i l of Churches in Geneva in 1947. He h a s also atCompeting in the H e a r s t Contest tended conferences and h a s lectured of Orators, K. Don Jacobusse, t h r o u g h o u t the Near, F a r , and junior f r o m Holland, Michigan, Middle E a s t .

Granberg

To Speak

Faculty To Undergo Personnel Changes Several changes in the f a c u l t y of Hope College f o r the 1954-55 academic y e a r have recently been announced by Dr. Irwin J . Lubbers, college president.

Dr. William Vander Lugt, presently lecturing in philosophy a t Pennsylvania S t a t e College, has been appointed p r o f e s s o r of psychology and head of the d e p a r t m e n t . Receiving his u n d e r g r a d u a t e degree f r o m Calvin College, Dr. Vander L u g t studied f o r his M.A. and Ph.D. Results of the recent student degrees at t h e University of Michassume direction of the physical council elections held May 1, in- igan on a s t a t e scholarship. He education classes f o r m e r l y t a u g h t troduced Samuel J . H o f m a n , a has since held the position of proby Russ DeVette. He will not c a r r y junior f r o m Lynden, Washington fessor of philosophy at Central an academic load next year. Proto the post of Student Council College, Highlands University, and f e s s o r Lawrence Green h a s been President f o r the 1954-55 school the University of Indiana. Recently named the new head of the physyear. Carole Hoffs, a junior f r o m Dr. Vander L u g t was dean of inical education d e p a r t m e n t . Lake Odessa, Michigan was elected struction and p r o f e s s o r of philoVice-President. sophy at W e s t m i n s t e r College, New In the class elections, Bill Hey- Wilmington, Pennsylvania. dorn f r o m H a w t h o r n e , New York Mr. Roger Rietberg has been was named Senior President, while named i n s t r u c t o r in music theory Bob Bedingfield of Bronx, New York and organ. Mr. R i e t b e r g served won the J u n i o r Presidency. Neil this y e a r as musical director of the Petty, f r o m Marion, New York was Chancel Choir and the Third ReThe Publications Board h a s anchosen to lead the sophomores. f o r m e d Church of Holland. Mrs. nounced the appointment of MariE s t h e r Snow will be leaving Hope anne Wierks, a sophomore f r o m f o r a year's g r a d u a t e study at t h e Milwaukee, Wisconsin, as editor-inUniversity of Michigan. She will chief of the 1954 Milestone. r e t u r n as an i n s t r u c t o r in the DeU n d e r the system initiated this p a r t m e n t of German. year, the Board s e l e c t e d Miss The Hope College Anchor was W i e r k s f r o m a m o n g t h e five appliTwo Professors Leave recently recognized as being one The College will also lose the cants f o r the position and submitof the two most worth-while colservices of two professors. Miss ted her n a m e to the sophomore lege newspapers a m o n g all those Maxine Richardson of the physical class f o r a p p r o v a l . P r i o r to this representing the 92 m e m b e r coleducation d e p a r t m e n t is leaving, y e a r the sophomore class had conleges of the Blue Key National and Miss J e n n i e Spoelstra of the ducted the election itself. H o n o r a r y F r a t e r n i t y . The anMiss Wierks' previous experience biology d e p a r t m e n t is taking a nouncement was made by B. C. h a s included t h e f e a t u r e editor's year's leave of absence. Riley, executive officer of the Blue spot on her h i g h school newspaper P r o f e s s o r Robert Vanderham will and a f e a t u r e w r i t e r ' s position on Key and Dean of the General Extension Division of t h e University r e t u r n to t h e sociology d e p a r t m e n t the A N C H O R over the p a s t two of Florida. a f t e r a y e a r of extensive g r a d u a t e years. The decision of t h e national exe- work. Miss Helen, H a r t o n , instrucIn h e r application she advocated cutive committee was "based on tor in speech, will also r e t u r n f r o m a policy s t e m m i n g f r o m her coneditorials and i n f o r m a t i o n a l provo- doctoral s t u d y a t N o r t h w e s t e r n viction t h a t a yearbook is an effeccative articles" a p p e a r i n g in the University. tive a f u s i o n a s possible of a r t and Anchor t h r o u g h o u t t h e year. Basketball coach J o h n Visser will p h o t o g r a p h y . Consequently, she in-

Hofman, Hoffs To Head S. C.

Mulder to Speak at Baccalaureate

Jacobusse Loses After State Win

went on to tie f o r first place in the Mid-Zone finals of the ChicagoPhiladelphia-Detroit a r e a a f t e r winning the s t a t e meet. He w a s later re-ranked to second place and dropped f r o m f u r t h e r competition. To reach the Mid-Zone finals, Jacobusse won the Local, Western M i c h i g a n , and S t a t e Contests against University of Michigan, Michigan State, Western Michigan, and the MIAA Colleges. The theme of the contest speeches was " A b r a ham Lincoln."

Milestone Honors Dr. Hawkinson With Dedication

Dr. Ella A. Hawkinson, f o r m e r head of the H i s t o r y and Political Science D e p a r t m e n t was honored today with the dedication of the 1954 Milestone in a ceremony following the morning chapel service. Dr. Hawkinson, who died l a s t wintends to emphasize a r t and lay-out ter, was president of the Michigan UNESCO. in the f o r t h c o m i n g annual. The appointment of a woman to Miss Victoria Hawkinson, sister the editors hip of the Milestone of the deceased, received t h e first m a r k s a d e p a r t u r e f r o m the suc- copy of the book f r o m E d i t o r Robcession of men who have handled e r t Muilenburg. She was l a t e r honthe annual since the close of t h e ored with a luncheon a t D u r f e e Second World W a r . In the w a r Hall given by t h e Milestone Staff. years, women editors turned out Dr. Hawkinson, who sponsored depleted versions of t h e Milestone. the s t u d e n t a m b a s s a d o r t r i p s and In addition to w o r k i n g on t h e promoted s u m m e r workshops in incollege newspaper. Miss Wierks is ternational relations, had j u s t coma m e m b e r of the Sorosis society, pleted a n international lectureship h a s participated in P and M activi- tour to Trondheim and Oslo, Norties, and the Spanish Club, and way, when she fell ill. In addition this p a s t y e a r filled a minor posi- she had conducted s u m m e r worktion on t h e Milestone. shops a t the University of K a n s a s , Dr. Lotus Snow, who acted as t h e Oregon College of Education, f a c u l t y advisor f o r the 1954 Mile- the University of S a s k a t c h e w a n , stone, h a s consented to continue in the School f o r Cerebral Palsied t h a t capacity next year. H e r ap- Children in California, t h e Unipointment will enable the novice versity of Rochester, the Southern staff to maintain some continuity College of Education, and t h e Uniwith the current Milestone. versity of Minnesota.

Marianne Wierks Chosen

To Edit '55 Milestone

Anchor Termed "Worth While"

Dr. H o m r i g h a u s e n is t h e a u t h o r of more than a dozen books among which include: " L e t the Church the C h u r c h ; " "God in A c t i o n ; " and "Christianity in America — A Crisis."


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To the Editor: Before the s u m m e r recess breaks up the Hope College f a m i l y of 1953-54, I wish to use this medium to express my g r a t e f u l n e s s to all of the students, faculty, and administration who have remembered me so f a i t h f u l l y during my illness. The cards and letters have been appreciated g r e a t l y , and your prayers have been very deeply felt. I wish it were possible to g r e e t each of you personally.

MEMBER ASSOCIATED COLLEGE PRESS

Then too, I m u s t bid my f o r m e r classmates a farewell, wishing for Entered as second class matter at the post office of Holland, Michigan, them much success and happiness at special rate of postage provided for in section 1103 of Act of as they face their new positions in life. Congress, October 3, 1917, and authorized October 19, 1918. It a p p e a r s t h a t I shall be back among you next fall, and believe me, I am looking f o r w a r d to it as much as, or more than, when I was a f r e s h m a n . Thank you again for your kindness. Sincerely, W a y n e Olson

Subscription Rate: $1.00 per year. Published every other week by the students of Hope College except during holidays or examination periods.

EDITORIALS This is the last issue of the 1953-54 Hope College Anchor. For those who have been unable to synthesize any m a j o r emphasis in Anchor policy throughout the year, may I say that we have constantly attempted to pursue a policy of open-minded liberalism plus variety of content in our newspaper. Whether you believe we have achieved the goals which were intended, or whether you feel we have failed miserably, both our accomplishments and our failures lie before you, and need no further

To the Editor: The recent visit of Dr. James J. Robinson to our campus prompts me to write this letter. Dr. Robinson's unique and enlightening talks left a profound impression not only on me, but also on most of the students and faculty members with whom I have talked. This reaction is not unusual. I have had the privilege of hearing Dr. Robinson before in New England and New York and have seen how he i n s p i r e d his audiences everywhere to greater awareness of t h e i r responsibility as both Christians and Americans. If at all possible I think we should make every effort to bring Dr. Robinson back to Hope College for next year's Religious Emphasis Week. By that time he will have returned from the African tour on which he is about to embark and should therefore be able to bring us new understanding of the Christian's role in the present world crisis. Peter M. Bakker

In the past few months several people have expressed their opinions on the YMCA program. These opinions range from those who think it is primarily a pre-seminary organization t o t h o s e who think that some people are subverting the group on this campus. Whatever their opinion, two things stand out; (1) students, faculty as the editor of a college news- members, and friends of Hope College are concerned about the YM to observe closely the attitudes, organization, and (2) the YM orstudent body concerning many ganization is not functioning as more strongly than ever, during well as it should.

mention at this time. Serving for an entire year paper gives one the opportunity opinions, and reactions of the subjects. This writer has noted, this past year, that here at Hope College the students show a marked hesitance in expressing freely their own opinions and prejudices. This may be a general trend in colleges throughout the United States today, but I am more inclined to believe that the students at Hope fail to air their attitudes indiscriminately because they believe that the emphasis Hope places upon the Christian way of living automically restricts any liberal thinking in regard to moral issues. Thus, a psychological state of mind is created which hinders the student in expressing himself freely on political and intellectual problems, also. I am convinced that this attitude prevails upon our campus, but I firmly believe that

What is to be done about this situation? The answer lies in that dynamic word, change. This is not a change away from Christian emphasis, but a change in just how to maintain a proper Christian influence on campus. This change has been seen in the kind of meetings the YM has scheduled in the last month. Starting with a freefor-all discussion on the YMCA, we have had a joint hymn sing, a Pacifist speaker, a discussion on athletic subsidies, a prisoner's exit should not. Since this year's Anchor professes to be a liberal newspaper perience in just being released provocating the free expression of ideas, a willingness to criticize from Jackson Prison, and a frank discussion on the well-publicized and be criticized, I am assuming the responsibility of taking Kinsey Report.

the initial step in "mentioning" some things which have been previously considered among the "unmentionable" on our campu s — in student-administration meetings at least. I see no reason why such subjects as dancing, women's smoking and even drinking (as unrelated as they are) should not be discussed honestly and realistically in the various group meetings on our campus. Such open public discussion would not automatically sanction any of these practices; but I do feel that a new atmosphere of freedom and non-restraint in thinking would prevail among the student body, and result consequently

To the Editor: Since the v e t e r a n s returned to Hope College f r o m World W a r II, the men on Hope's campus have been obliged to reside in what some people, with wide imagination, consider the men's dorm. In reality this men's dorm more resembles the a r m y b a r r a c k s it used to be instead of a college dormitory. As a m a t t e r of record, an ex G. I., who was working on replacing the termite infested wooden showers in " T " Dorm, commented t h a t the a r m y b a r r a c k s he had seen were heaven compared to this college edifice. My proposition is simple. It is that Hope College should build a new men's dorm right away. Not next y e a r or a y e a r f r o m then, but now. There a r e m a n y reasons why this project cannot be put off another minute, and one i m p o r t a n t reason is t h a t " T " dorm h a s been condemned f o r the p a s t f o u r years because of its terrible condition. The administration acknowledges this f a c t , but I would imagine t h a t their a r g u m e n t would be t h a t the school lacks f u n d s to u n d e r t a k e the Dorm building project at the pres-

Second, this change is seen in the composite group making up the YM Cabinet. This year 4 premeds, 3 business majors, 2 music majors, 1 pre-engineer, 4 pre-sems, and 1 history major will direct the year's activities.

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ent time. If this is so, then where, p r a y tell, is the college g e t t i n g the money to pay f o r the remodeling of the g y m n a s i u m and the erecting of a new music hall? The answer to t h a t question is simple. Formers t u d e n t s donate to f u n d s specifying w h a t the money should go to. To them it is of course more i m p o r t a n t t h a t they can boast about Hope's fine cultural and athletic facilities than to be able to say t h a t Hope College has a modern and clean men's dorm. Maybe these f o r m e r s t u d e n t s don't know how bad " T " Dorm is. A f t e r all, how could they when the college puts out p r o p a g a n d a sheets claiming t h a t "The Gym Project Is A t The Top Of The U r g e n t List." And where do they list " T " D o r m ? They list it third. Even the music hall precedes it on the U r g e n t list. Another reason that a new men's residence hall m u s t be erected immediately is t h a t many prospective male s t u d e n t s have turned on their heels and left Hope College before enrolling, because of the disgraceful dormitory. In college one learns not only to respect both public and private property, but also how to t a k e care of a place and keep it clean. However, there is no incentive toward this in " T " Dorm, f o r the "wall b o a r d " and " r o t t e n wood" edifice is literally s a g g i n g in every wing and splitting at the seams. The occupants of " T " Dorm pay the college j u s t as much money to live t h e r e as the girls do to live in their "modern palace," Durfee Hall. It seems to me t h a t the price of a " T " Dorm room should at least be lowered; in f a c t , the college should pay the men to live there. If the girls of this college had to live in " T " Dorm, Hope College would no longer be coed. Roger Leonard

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Third, this change is aimed at the average College Joe. It is an *.* attempt to change the upperclassmen's outlook and attitude toward Dependable Jewelers for Over a Quarter Century in a happier college community. the YM, and it is an approach to 6 West Eighth Street T h e fact that Hope College is supported by the Reformed incoming students that the YM is #.% HOLLAND, MICHIGAN Church in America, and cites as its ideal the Christian way of a well-rounded, and active group that builds the body, mind, and 21 «#•#%#« #> • • # • # • • • # • • • #,• •> f.• M f M ti M M M f« living, should aid the students and the administration all the spirit.

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more in discussing and in understanding these unmentionable questions, when and if they do arise. We must also remember that Hope College is composed of representatives of innumerable social groups from all over the United States, and the world. Each and every individual has been conditioned to certain social standards such as they may exist in the North, South, East, West, and mid-West. T o expect the students at Hope College to suppress absolutely certain practices which were normally accepted in their social environment at home, is simply unrealistic. And psychologically, absolute suppression is most unhealthy for the h u m a n being. R. J. V .

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It is a fact that the YM is trying to change. Time can only tell whether this attempt will be successful. You can do your part to make the YMCA the strong Christian influence it should be on Hope's campus.

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To the Editor:

Darlene De Tuncq and I would like to e x p r e s s our deepest appreciation to all those who cooperated so wonderfully in the building and presentation o f t h e Tulip Time M Float. Sincerely, J e r r y Kruyf

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HOPE

COLLEGE.

ANCHOR

Page Three

New Dept. Heads Are

Blue Key, Alcor Name New Members

Named Dr. J a m e s Dyke van P u t t e n has been named c h a i r m a n of t h e dep a r t m e n t of history and political science at Hope College according to a recent announcement by President Lubbers. Dr. van P u t t e n has d6ne extensive g r a d u a t e work in this country and abroad, receiving his Ph.D. f r o m the U n i v e r s i t y v)f Chicago. He was Director of the U.S. I n f o r m a t i o n Service f o r the S t a t e Dept. in. Peiping, China, in the Republic of South Korea, and in Formosa f r o m 1947-52. Dr. van Putten came to Hope in 1952. Alvin Vanderbush, head football coach since 1940, will a s s u m e the post of director of athletics. Professor Vanderbush will continue with a lightened teaching schedule in the history and political science department.

Two More Seniors Receive Scholorships

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New Anchor Staff Named For 1955 Appointments to the 1 9 5 4 - 5 5 A N C H O R staff's editorial d e p a r t ment were announced recently by Robert Muilenburg, editor-in-chief. Eugene Ouderkirk, a j u n i o r f r o m E a s t Greenbush, New J e r s e y , was named to the position of A N C H O R business m a n a g e r , w h i l e Donna Raymer, a junior f r o m Belding, Michigan, was given the post of associate editor. Page editorships include F r a n F r y e as f e a t u r e editor, Dorothea Lindahl and E r n e s t i n e B r u m m e l e r as society editors, K. Don Jacobusse as editorial editor, Jerold Veldman and David K e m p e r s as sports editors, and Nell Salm as rewrite editor. Recently appointed to t h e business staff were H e r b Morgan as assistant business m a n a g e r , Harold Ritsema as a d v e r t i s i n g m a n a g e r , and John Soeter as circulation manager.

Chapel Choir Chooses Leaders The m e m b e r s o f t h e Chapel Choir recently held an election which resulted in the following choices for the executive positions of the choir f o r next year. Lloyd Arnoldink of Holland was elected president of the organization. Voted in as vice-president was Rosalind Smith of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. B a r b a r a Grasman of Coopersville will p e r f o r m the secretarial duties. T r e a s u r e r s of the choir will be Tom Niles of Holland and Marcia Veldman of Grand Rapids. Business m a n a g i n g will be done by Dick TenHaken of Clymer, New York, and Joyce Vander Borgh of Sayville, Long Island.

Miss Carole Hoffs, 1954 May Day Queen

May Day, An Ancient Rite by Dave Angus Soviet Russia isn't the only nation to celebrate May Day. We do, too, but f o r different reasons. The Soviets make a show of bulging muscles, tumbling acts, blue s h i r t s and jet a i r c r a f t . We are content to hint at w h a t we could do if we tried. Ours is an imitation of t h e ancient Greek rites, when young virgins danced round the sacrificial a l t a r to honor the gods of purity and f e r t i l i t y , and w h a t athletic directors call "clean f u n . " The young men of the times used to run m a r a t h o n s a g a i n s t a girl named A t l a n t a , who had the habit of beaning her opponents with golden apples when she saw them p u t t i n g on speed. In keeping with modern morals, however, we now give the young women a pole to dance around, because a l t a r s are passe, except in divided chancels. We also s e p a r a t e the men f r o m the women in races, and provide judges with guns to chaper'one the events.

The Greeks used to spread a big f e a s t and invite all citizens. This was the earlist known f o r m of potluck. Today we just bring money and t a k e our chances.

There are awards, too. But instead of a Stalin Peace Prize f o r the best hydrogen bomb, we are •##• • • satisfied with modest trophies. This •%•> y e a r the Class of '55 swept first #> place in the women's division for M %# the second time. A f r a t e r n i t y optimistically n a m e d Cosmopolitan won the men's a w a r d . %# •,%

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Instead of giving a medal to the Mother Who Gave the Most Sons to the People's A r m y (the record is something like 17), we choose a May Queen — a woman who best personifies the ideals of a liberal a r t s college — Beauty, Personality, and Scholarship. Miss Carole Hoffs (some say a reincarnation of Atl a n t a ) was chosen by overwhelming popular acclaim. Long live the Queen!

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Members of the active" 1953-54 Hope c h a p t e r of the Blue Key National Honor F r a t e r n i t y climaxed t h e i r year of service to the school with the f o r m a l initiation of ten Hope men recently elected to f o r m the 1954-55- chapter. This was held May 17, 1954, at a banquet in Durfee Hall. The new members had previously been announced at the May Day Banquet by this year's president, Bill Helder. They Were chosen by the old members on th^ basis 'of 1 leadership, character, personality, and scholarship. The men elected were: Robert Muilenberg, K. Don Jacobusse, Donald Maxam, William Heydorn, J a m e s Van Putten, Ronald Brown, B e n L e F e v r e , J . Two more. Hope s t u d e n t s have Samuel H o f m a n , William Coventry, been a w a r d e d scholarships f o r and Robert Hendrickson. Following the . initiation cere- g r a d u a t e study. This brings to mony and the r e g u l a r business eight the total number of seniors meeting, the new members elected who have received g r a n t s . Bob D e t h m e r s of Lansing h a s Donald Maxam as president, Ronald Brown as corresponding secre- been chosen to be one of t w e n t y t a r y and J a m e s Van P u t t e n as re- Root-Tilden Scholars at the New cording secretary for - the coming York University School of Law. year. Two a r e chosen f r o m each of the ten Federal Judicial Districts. Each Alcor Chooses Eleven Among the honors given at the Root-Tilden S c h o l a r is g r a n t e d May Day ceremonies was the tap- $6600 over the three years pf ping of the new members of the study. Bob m a j o r e d in Economics. Alcor Honor Society. The girls are Ray Vedder, English m a j o r f r o m chosen on the basis of scholarship, Schenectady, New York, will follow leadership, character, and c a m p u s a news editorial sequence at the activities. The new members selec- Medill School of Journalism of ted f r o m the present junior class N o r t h w e s t e r n University and h a s are as follows: Joyce Vanderborgh, been given a half tuition g r a t u i t y Mary Tervelt, Lucille Van Heest, f o r his work. He is the first Hope M a r g a r e t Cramer, Ardis Bishop, student ever to receive a journalDonna Raymer, Shirley Decker, ism scholarship. The Medill School Rosalind Smith, Betty Schepers, h a s a record of 100 f /r 'placement in Joan Kilian, and Marge MacEwan. the UP, AP, or m a j o r dailies.

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Padma Satya To Study Youth To Hold Under Mission Drive Aid Conference Mission Drive Chairmen Jim Van Putten and E r n i e Brummeler have announced t h a t the student selected as the recipient of the Mission Drive Fund is Miss P a d m a S a t y a . P a d m a , 24, is presently teaching at the Australian Presbyterian Mission High School at Sholinghur. She is the d a u g h t e r of Mr. Aaron C. Satya. She h a s done social work in the sweeper colony which is t h e lowest caste in India and has also worked among the leper patients at Deenabandupuram. She took h e r B.Sc. degree in Chemistry at t h e Padma Satya Madras Christian College. P a d m a will a r r i v e in the United States next fall. She will be assigned to live in one of the g i r l s ' dorms and will attend Hope College for at least one year. P a d m a was chosen f r o m a panel of six Alcor members of p a s t y e a r s recandidates whom the Arcot Coorcently presented to the men and dinating Committee selected f r o m women of Hope College two g i f t s our Mission Stations in India. of lasting value. Miss Phyllis Luidens, on behalf of Alcor of 195253, presented to Suzanne Zwemer, House Board President, ten longplaying classical and semi-classical records f o r the use of all s t u d e n t s This summer, from J u n e 21 to on campus. The records will be J u l y 30, a study committee headed kept at the desk in D u r f e e and by Dr. DeGraaf will hold a work- may be signed out f o r use in the shop on the campus. The purpose lounge.

Two Alcor Groups

Present Gifts

De Graaf To Head

Campus Workshop

of this committee will be to examine teaching procedures in the various disciplines to see wh et h er central thinking is given sufficient emphasis. For this purpose t h e members of the committee have been keeping diaries on one class for the past f o u r weeks to f u r n i s h them with the raw m a t e r i a l f o r careful evaluation and revision during the s u m m e r period. F o r one week, June 28 to J u l y 2, they will join the college f a c u l t y workshop a t t h e University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. There they will receive the services of special consultants b r o u g h t in by the university and also the cooperation of some of t h e r e g u l a r members in various fields. Other members of the committee a r e Dr. Brand, Mr. Kleis, Dr. Brown, Dr. D y k s t r a , Mr. Granberg, Miss Ross, Dr. Voogd, Dr. Yntema, Dr. Hollenbach, Mr. F o l k e r t , and Mrs. B a r b a r a Wilson, acting a s secretary.

The YMCA was the recipient of the g i f t presented by Mrs. B a r b a r a Bruins Hennings on behalf of Alcor 1951-52. A blue velvet table-cloth, two gold candlesticks, and a gold cross were presented f o r t h e worship center.

Van Zyl To Lecture The American Chemical Society, Division of Chemical Education, and the National Science Foundation, have asked Dr. Gerrit Van Zyl to represent the smaller colleges at a five week conference f o r college chemistry teachers to be held at t h e University of Wyoming, J u l y 19 - A u g u s t 20. Dr. Van Zyl will lecture f o r one week and lead discussions concerning r e c e n t advances in organic chemistry.

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. At Hope The apex of a year's activity f o r the young people of the Reformed Church in America will be reached when the F i r s t National Youth Assembly meets on t h e Hope College campus f r o m September 2 t h r o u g h 7. "Christ the A n s w e r for All of L i f e " will be the theme about which the conference will be centered. N e w w a y s of applying Christianity t ^ the total experience of living will be earnestly sought a f t e r and considered in classrooms and assemblies. Outstanding s p e a k e r s have been secured. Dr. Paul Harrison of A r a bia will give the missionary address; Dr. H e r b e r t Van Wyk will teach Bible H o u r ; Dr. Charles Templeton, E v a n g e l i s t f o r the NCCC will give the keynote address; and Rev. Don Benedict of E a s t Harlem will speak. Secretaries of the Boards, missionaries of the church, and young people who a r e the product of the mission field will make their contributions to the total thinking. Students on c a m p u s can obtain more information concerning this event f r o m B a r b a r a J e f f r e y and Don Van E t t e n .

Knicks "Bank" Their Blood The Holland Red Cross h a s announced the establishment of the Knickerbocker Blood Bank f r o m which a r e a persons can d r a w on the supposition t h a t they a r e unable to replenish or pay f o r an ordinary withdrawal. It was initiated on Monday, May 10, with the donation of 28 pints. Five more members will give next Monday. The entire initial 33 pints have already been designated, and f u r t h e r withdrawals f r o m w h a t Dr. Otto Vander Velde, Director of the local Red Cross chapter, calls "the walking blood bank", will be made as called f o r by Dr. V a n d e r Velde — as long as any m e m b e r is available and physiologically able.

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By Bruce Van Voorst A f t e r almost ten y e a r s of r a t h e r unsuccessful world leadership the diplomatic reverses at Geneva were enough to crystalize isolationist sentiment in America. Hope in success of the United Nations had drowned the pre-World W a r II "America F i r s t " movement but Korea and Indochina revived it as " F o r America." Sponsored by such noted e q u a l i t a r i a n s as Robert R. McCormick, Hamilton Fish, Robert Wood and Clarence Manion, t h e club is going to save this country by combating " S u p e r - i n t e r n a t i o n a l i s m , one-worldism, and Communism in America." In t h e i r h a s t e f o r a slogan, t h e Belf-styled s u p e r - p a t r i o t s have a r b i t r a r i l y linked these three f a c t o r s a s the source of the current world crisis. All of us a d m i t t h a t communism is a d a n g e r . Communism, t h e complete antithesis of everything f o r which our nation stands, is now supported by military forces at least equal to our own. But in w h a t m a n n e r will emphasizing " F o r A m e r i c a " meet this d a n g e r ? A policy based on bald selfishness will obviously result in an alienation with the world. Nations will only remain united with us when we work f o r mutual goals. They are hardly likely to send troops to aid a " F o r A m e r i c a " movement. And w h a t p a r t of our international responsibilities would these gentlemen suggest we a b a n d o n ? Are they willing to see Europe, Asia and p e r h a p s South America fall under communist domination? Even on a selfish basis can we get along without J a p a n , Indochina, West Germany, F r a n c e or E n g l a n d ? The f a c t is t h a t we have sent military forces and economic aid to these countries f o r our own interests and not merely to dabble in international a f f a i r s . We are a t t e m p t i n g to maintain our defenses a t these m a n y points, keep open lines of supply and retain f r i e n d l y relations with sources of r a w m a t e r i a l s . The United S t a t e s h a s tried isolationism, and found it impossible. W e entered t h e international scene because we saw it was to our interests. These international responsibilities have been a burden. F r e q u e n t l y our allies seem u n g r a t e f u l . Some of them don't a p p e a r to have a sufficient a w a r e n e s s of the communist menace. Some of them enjoy ridiculing America. Some of their g o v e r n m e n t s a r e c o r r u p t and inadequate. But America m u s t think in t e r m s of a showdown with communism. If Russia thinks it can d e f e a t the west, the showdown will be by w a r . To prevent this the west can only remain both militarily and ideologically strong and united. The key is t h a t while our own role seems impossible, Russia is f a c i n g serious problems. Revolts, defections, domestic unrest a r e p l a g u i n g the Russia leaders. As Secretary of S t a t e Dulles said, there a r e grave weaknesses behind " t h e solid and formidable exterior." F o r t h a t reason much of the real challenge to A m e r i c a is not communism, but r a t h e r democracy. We have a system t h a t s a y s t e r m s like brotherhood of man, equality and f r e e d o m have meaning. W e piously add "under God" to the flag s a l u t e because we claim to have something higher than communism's belief t h a t the f u n d a m e n t a l motivation of mankind is simply to exist. P e r h a p s it's one of t h e delusions of college idealism t h a t m a n y of us still believe in these Americanisms. P e r h a p s time and age can kill our hopes t h a t men t h r o u g h o u t the world m a y somehow find a common unity, a method of g e t t i n g along together. B u t then m a y b e we're not visionaries. World g o v e r n m e n t is out of vogue, but t h a t doesn't mean it's unworkable. People c a n ' t quite figure out why t h e y couldn't set up a United Nations, put it in a modern building, allow f o r it in t h e budget and then have p e r p e t u a l peace. But if peace has been the concern only of the idealists, t h e h a r d headed realists b e t t e r t a k e a good look at w h a t the n e x t w a r will involve. Russia j u s t m i g h t not be content to stop with bombing London and Rotterdam. No, gentlemen, the g r e a t t h r e a t to peace is not internationalism or one-worldism. I t is communist Russia. And peace will not come about by t u r n i n g our back on communism and t h e world. F o r a nation as g r e a t as America, the world's problems a r e our problems. As J o s h u a Kunitz p u t s it in dedicating a book to his son: May his love f o r America and A m e r i c a n s be ever broad enough to embrace all lands and peoples s t r u g g l i n g f o r the good life.

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Your Society Caimns Committee Tells of Fund H o p e ' s coeds 'are w i n d i n g u p t h e y e a r ' s a c t i v i t i e s with a series of i n f o r m a l p a r t i e s and o v e r n i g h t house p a r t i e s . T h e Delphis had t h e i r all n i g h t house p a r t y last F r i d a y . The g i r l s d i d n ' t get much sleep but t h e y had a good t i m e . A t t h e i r p a r t y t h e y elected t h e i r new officers who a r e : Bette Brewer, president; E r n i e B r u m m e 1 e r, v i c e - p r e s i d e n t ; P a t Pickens, s e c r e t a r y ; Mari H o w a r d , treasurer; Barb Grasman, W A L r e p r e s e n t a t i v e ; and Carol K u y p e r , P a n - H e l l e n i c Board r e p r e s e n t a t i v e . T h e Delphi i n f o r m a l p a r t y will be held Monday a t The T i m b e r s n e a r Muskegon. J a n e V a n d e r V e l d e is party chairman. T h e D o r i a n s had t h e i r " l o n g and sleepless n i g h t " l a s t F r i d a y at Tim-Buck-11 on Lake Mac. Between singing, eating, playing charades and b r i d g e t h e girls f o u n d t i m e to elect new officers f o r next f a l l . T h e officers a r e : p r e s i d e n t , D a r lyne D e T u n c q ; vice-president, B e t t y S c h e p e r s ; s e c r e t a r y , Helen Brugman; treasurer, Mary Anne Meyers; WAL representative, Judy K i n g m a ; and Pan-Hellenic Board r e p r e s e n t a t i v e . Barb J e f f r e y . The D o r i a n s had a tea with t h e Sibs in D u r f e e lounge last W e d n e s d a y . M a r y Anne M e y e r s w a s the D o r i a n c h a i r m a n f o r t h e tea. T h e D o r i a n s had a w o n d e r f u l s p r i n g f o r m a l p a r t y a t t h e Gull L a k e C o u n t r y Club on May 14. T h e Sibs had a joint m e e t i n g with the E m m i e s last F r i d a y . Phyl M a a t and H a r o l d R i t s e m a w e r e in c h a r g e of t h e m e e t i n g . L a s t Wednesday a f t e r n o o n the Sibs had a joint t e a with the Dorians. E t h e l Groeneveld w a s the Sib c h a i r m a n f o r t h e t e a . T o n i g h t the Sibs a r e h a v i n g t h e i r o v e r n i g h t house p a r t y a t Castle P a r k . S o r o s i t e s had a joint m e e t i n g with m e m b e r s of A.S.A. last F r i d a y night. P e n n y R a m a k e r w a s in c h a r g e of t h e m e e t i n g . T o n i g h t the S o r o s i t e s a r e having t h e i r overn i g h t house p a r t y . The Sorosis i n f o r m a l p a r t y will be Monday at C a s t l e P a r k with A r d i s Bishop as chairman. T h e T h e t a house p a r t y w a s last F r i d a y n i g h t . The g i r l s spent t h e n i g h t sleeping in a h a y l o f t . The new T h e t a officers a r e : Avis South, p r e s i d e n t ; E s t h e r S t e i n j e s , vicep r e s i d e n t ; Diane Vicha, s e c i e t a r y ; Doris Stoffregen, treasurer; Elaine Vruggink, W A L representative; and J a n C o n k l i n , Pan-Hellenic B o a r d r e p r e s e n t a t i v e . The T h e t a informal party, "Moonlight Bay", will be held a t P r o s p e c t P o i n t tod a y . Marilyn S p a c k m a n is p a r t y chairman. T h e A.S.A. m e m b e r s enjoyed a j o i n t m e e t i n g with t h e m e m b e r s of Sorosis last F r i d a y night. The f r e s h m a n g i r l s are looking f o r w a r d to t h e i r i n f o r m a l p a r t y which will be held t o n i g h t . Diane J o h n s o n is c h a i r m a n of t h e p a r t y .

To Honor Dr. Schoon DIRE:

T h e Arcadj f r a t e r n i t y h e l d t h e i r S p r i n g i t y a t Castle P a r k on May 22. le c h a i r m a n of t h e p a r t y w a s Di T e n H a k e n and t h e t h e m e w a s leen f o r a K n i g h t . "

A l e t t e r h a s been s e n t to the v a r i o u s c a m p u s o r g a n i z a t i o n s inf o r m i n g them of a f u n d to be esThe C o s m l i t a n f r a t e r n i t y will tablished in m e m o r y of Rev. H e n r y E . Schoon. A c o m m i t t e e composed hold its S p ( P a r t y a t P r o s p e c t of Mrs. Schoon, P r o f e s s o r Ver Point on M 29. The t h e m e of Beek, Dr. Lubbers, Carole Hoffs, t h e p a r t y 1 be " D r i f t W o o d " with Don C p e n t i e r a s c h a i r m a n . A r t h u r J e n t z , and Edwin Coon Mr. and Russ D e V e t t e and shall decide t h e p u r p o s e of t h i s Mr. and Alvin V a n d e r b u s h f u n d . A m o n g t h e s u g g e s t i o n s m a d e t h u s f a r have been a s t u d e n t a w a r d . will s e r v e chaperones. J i m H u t : was recently elected as house .nager f o r next y e a r and J o h n Us a s S t u d e n t Council representae. The CosB have a g a i n been holding t h e i r :urday car w a s h , u n d e r the d i r e c t of Renny Kiemel. The proceeds .1 be used next y e a r to re-model e b a s e m e n t w h e r e the l i t e r a r y e t i n g s will be held. On Salday, May 29, E m e r s o n ian will 'Id its S p r i n g I n f o r m a l p a r t y . T t h e m e will be " D r i f t i n g a t C a s t l P a r k . " The p a r t y will be u n d e i e c h a r g e of Ken Gnade and J i m y n e s s . J o h n m g a n h a s been elected to s e r v e a r e x t y e a r ' s House m a n a g e r a n t a r o l d R i t s e m a will serve a s Studt Council r e p r e s e n t a t i v e . The Jersonian Alumni Association haJeen v e r y active t h i s y e a r . Recent; t h e E m m i e House w a s visitedod inspected by the presid e n t oSheir A l u m n i Association. The r a t e r n a l Society will hold their f i n g informal at Prospect Point i J u n e 11. R o b e r t Hoeksema h been appointed a s t h e chairrli. The annual " S w a n S o n g " will r held a t Castle P a r k on J u n e I w i t h Gene Westerhoff acting a c h a i r m a n . T h<Fraters recently appointed J o h n i d a m s a s S t u d e n t Council r e p r o n t a t i v e and Al D y k e m a a s h o u s f n a n a g e r f o r next y e a r . T h K n i c k e r b o c k e r f r a t e r n i t y recentl elected new officers f o r t h e fall frm of next year. J o h n Muld e r B t h e new p r e s i d e n t ; A r t Dagl, vice-president; A r t J e n t z , s e c t a r y ; J i m Galer, t r e a s u r e r ; C h i c k Pettingill, corresponding s e c t a r y ; Bob Cook, I n t e r - f r a t e r nit Council r e p r e s e n t a t i v e ; W a r reil Buitendorp, S t u d e n t Council repesentative; and D a v e K i n k e m a , ke)er of the Archives. The new lufte m a n a g e r is H a r o l d Goldzung ail the house custodian is Bob SJise.

or a small memorial chapel to be i n c o r p o r a t e d into t h e new men's d o m i t o r y . Additional s u g g e s t i o n s and c o m m e n t s on t h e p a r t of the s t u d e n t body and f a c u l t y would be a p p r e c i a t e d by the c o m m i t t e e .

T h a t S c h w e p p e s man is here a g a i n w i t h fond reflections while s i p p i n g Durfee-cotfee. ( A u t h o r ' s note: D r i n k i n g Durfee-coffee is achieved by p u t t i n g coffee g r o u n d s in one's m u s t a c h e and g u z z e l i n g hot w a t e r . ) Yes, as 1 sit here h o v e r i n g over my s t e a m i n g cup of Q u a t e m a l a n s w a m p w a t e r , my mind whisks back over f o u r y e a r s of college. On F r i d a y a f t e r n o o n . May 14, Little t h i n g s pop into my m e m o r y ; Graves L i b r a r y received six new the b u m p on my head f r o m g e t t i n g tables f o r the R e a d i n g Room tailor- in and out of p a d d y - w a g o n s ; the made by the B a k e r F u r n i t u r e Com- endless, blissful h o u r s s p e n t while p a n y in Zeeland. They a r e s t r e a m - g a z i n g upon D u r f e e ' s r o o f ; being lined and m a t c h t h e p a n e l i n g and in J o h n V i s s e r ' s A m e r i c a n H i s t o r y " a n t i q u e " of the room itself. Miss class so long t h a t he b e g a n to use Singleton r e m a r k e d t h a t t h e y had me as an eye-witness. Fellowseniors, do you r e m e m b e r also been m a d e lower with no w h a t a p e a c e f u l lot we w e r e ? a p r o n s u n d e r n e a t h to m a k e studyWhen we were f r e s h m e n , we never ing at them m o r e c o m f o r t a b l e . painted the sidewalks, g r e a s e d t h e The m a j o r i t y of the s t u d e n t s do flagpole, t u r n e d chickens loose in not realize t h a t the money f o r the dorm, rolled coke-bottles down these comes f r o m t h e Fine F u n d — fire escapes, got into the D u r f e e t u r n e d over to the S t u d e n t Council l a u n d r o m a t and t h r e w g a r m e n t s in f o u r y e a r s a g o so t h a t t h e y could the t r e e s , or d r e s s e d the s t a t u e in vote on w h a t t h e y w a n t e d with t h e l i b r a r y . W h o s a y s we d i d n ' t ? only s u g g e s t i o n s coming f r o m the And t h e n my r o o m m a t e , J o n a l i b r a r y . In p a s t y e a r s t h i s money t h a n . W h e n we w e r e sophomores, h a s been used to have periodicals we played William Tell. He'd put bound, Venetian blinds installed in the apple on his head and I'd shoot the R e a d i n g Room, and to h a v e the it off. Poor J o n a t h a n would have h a l l w a y in the office of t h e Head been 22 t o m o r r o w . L i b r a r i a n painted. But t i m e m a r c h e s on — ( t h i s is one of t h e a u t h o r ' s original deductions)—and graduation approaches. Patronize our Advertisers! This y e a r we have t h i r t y s e n i o r s g r a d u a t i n g M a g n a Cum Loaded. • * « • « • #.• • • * » . • » • • ».• » . « » • #.• #,• • • »,• #,• »,• ».• This is a g r e a t school, but 1 didn't g e t wise to t h e f a c t t h a t it was a school f o r Chiropody until we s a n g the A l m a M a t e r H y m n and everyone held t h e i r r i g h t shoe over t h e i r h e a r t . I wore a dunce cap so long, you can still squeeze an o r a n g e on m y head. And a t t h e football g a m e s I looked g r e a t in m y long raccoon coat, except I w a s so thin I looked m o r e like a pipe cleaner. And when I was a f r e s h man I w a s a sensation a t t h e " Y " Beach P a r t y — you see, I was the only boy t h e r e who w a s n ' t an upper c l a s s m a n . And once a g a i n a s the sun slowly f a d e s into the horizon, we, the seniors, r e l u c t a n t l y say f a r e w e l l to b e a u t i f u l Hope College, but we're w a r n i n g you now—when the " W e l come A l u m n i " signs go out next fall, we'll be back. If we r e t u r n Holland's Leading f o r a n y reason — it'll be f o r anPRINTERS o t h e r s t e a m i n g cup of D u r f e e coffee. Au Reservoir, Auf Wiener9 E. 10th St. Phone 2 3 2 6 schnitzel, H a s t y L u m b a g o , and •• * • •«• • • • # •»»»• #.• # • »,• #,• #,• #,• #,• ».• #,• #,• #,• C h e r r i o a t s !

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In recognition of Chemical Prog r e s s Week, t h r e e d i s t i n g u i s h e d s c i e n t i s t s met with t h e C h e m i s t r y Club and g u e s t s f r o m t h e local Holland high schools T h u r s d a y evening, May 20, in Room 208 of t h e Science Building. Two of the g u e s t s r e p r e s e n t i n g the Dow Chemical C o m p a n y w e r e Mr. E. R. Cowherd and Mr. R. S. McClurg. The other, Dr. L e s t e r G. Lundsted, represented the Wyand o t t e Chemical C o m p a n y . Each man spoke f o r a p p r o x i m a t e l y five m i n u t e s , e s t a b l i s h i n g his field of i n t e r e s t and experience. A panel discussion followed, which was l a t e r opened to the audience. S u b j e c t s discussed w e r e job opportunities, n a t u r e of w o r k , s a l a r y , curriculum, t r a i n i n g , and new products.

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Page Six

HOPE

COLLEGE

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Dutchmen Retain All - Spots Trophy T h o u g h t e a r l i e r in the y e a r to h a v e only a slim chance to r e t a i n the all-ports t r o p h y won last y e a r , the Hope a t h l e t i c t e a m s collabor a t e d to win it a g a i n by a g r e a t e r m a r g i n t h a n 1953's single point. The Dutch t o t a l e d e i t h e r 82 o r 8c points, depending on t h e outcome of a dispute, to 78 f o r Albion's Britons, usual rival f o r the honors.

Track Squad Distant 2nd At Field Day

Basebaers Compile OLstandinq Record U n l e a s h i n g the m c p o t e n t off e n s e e v e r witnessed Hope, the 1954 b a s e b a l l e r s c o m ^ a n o u t . s t a n d i n g s e a s o n ' s rec( of twelve wins and t w o defeats,id f o r the second successive yea.hey were co-champions with Aa. Seven men finished above .8 and the t e a m itself finished a t x i l y .300, a h u n d r e d points b e t t t h a n the previous season.

Despite a n e a r l y lead in t h e field events, Hope was over-powered by Albion a s t h e Britons easily coasted to t h e M I A A t r a c k crown last Friday.

Tennis R e s u l t s Decisive Tennis proved to be the deciding s p o r t , the Dutch picking up m o r e t h a n the m a r g i n on a third place, Albion scored 90.6 points, Hope w o r t h 10 points, while t h e usually was second with 49.6, and Hillsdale s t r o n g Briton squad f a l t e r e d to a had 24.1. T h e scoreboard also s i x t h place to g a r n e r only 4 points. showed A d r i a n with 20.1, Calvin E n t e r i n g t h e s p r i n g season 20, K a l a m a z o o 15.6, A l m a 6, and s p o r t s , the e v e n t u a l c h a m p i o n s held Olivet 0. a n a r r o w two point lead. The first Hope had 30.6 points, Hillsdale o u t r i g h t title ever f o r a Hope f o o t - 16.1, and Albion 15.6 when the five ball team accounted f o r 14, while field e v e n t s were completed. Then Albion was r u n n e r - u p f o r 12. The the Albion s p e e d s t e r s p r o m p t l y o t h e r two p r e - s p r i n g s p o r t s s a w took c h a r g e and c a p t u r e d eight of the rival schools wind up dead- the nine r u n n i n g events. T H E M A R C H TO T H E ALL-SPORTS TROPHY compared to r u n n e r - u p Hope Albion Football 14 12 Cross-country _ - 1 3 13 Basketball 11 11 Baseball 13 10 Tennis 10 4 Golf . 10* 14 Track 12 14 1

1

locked in each, the c r o s s - c o u n t r y s q u a d s in first and t h e b a s k e t b a l l t e a m s in second behind Calvin. F o r the second consecutive y e a r the Dutch baseball was knotted in a first-place tie, to add t h r e e p o i n t s over Albion, which took a t h i r d . The powerhouse Briton t r a c k t e a m r o a r e d handily to a n o t h e r c h a m p ionship, but t h e Dutch, s h o w i n g s t r e n g t h in t h e field events, had enough to t a k e a second, t h o u g h f a r t r a i l i n g the winners. The Albion g o l f e r s also came t h r o u g h w i t h a title, but the Dutch did not lose too much g r o u n d a s t h e i r own linksmen, question m a r k s all season, shot t h e i r w a y to e i t h e r a n o u t r i g h t third o r a deadlock a t t h i r d , f o r e i t h e r ten or nine points. The results were disputed and a r e s u b j e c t to a final decision b e f o r e the season's t o t a l s become official. The end result will have no b e a r ing on the s t a t u s of the t r o p h y winner.

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d u r i n g t h e course of the season he struck out the side. J o i n i n g Rink in becoming the s t r o n g e s t chucking

duo seen here in m a n y a y e a r , w a s f r e s h m a n Jack Kempker. Hurling the second g a m e s of t h e doubleh e a d e r s , he a m a s s e d a s e a s o n ' s record of 4-1, and s t r u c k out 30 while giving 24 a f r e e ride. J o h n R U S S D E V E T T E , coach of B u s m a n toiled only two innings the 1953 and 1954 baseball A t the p l a t e t h e tei was led but w a s kept busy in t h e bull pen squads, both of which finished by Don York, who hit a y e n .355, in ties w i t h A l m a f o r t h e by Coach DeVette in case K e m p k e r and f o r the third conseive y e a r M I A A c h a m p i o n s h i p , will asmight falter. was named to the All-AA outs u m e coaching d u t i e s a t Maine U n i v e r s i t y next f a l l . De Vette field. R u n n e r - u p to YorWas surestablished f o r t h e first t i m e p r i s i n g Dick Ortquist, . second t h i s y e a r a m o s t valuable b a s e m a n who finished wt a .340 p l a y e r a w a r d f o r baseball, average. A n o t h e r sur^e w a s s i m i l a r t o t h e Den H e r d e r " H e n r y " , York, DeVries Win football a w a r d . rookie c a t c h e r Don Bee. The Bob Hendrickson took t h e shot Holland f r e s h m a n hit toie t u n e put by h e a v i n g the ball 45' 2", the of .316 a s he c a u g h t all t t h r e e best of his c a r e e r . D on York Hope g o l f e r s s u r p r i s e d everyone, innings behind t h e plate, t h o u g h switched f r o m the diamond to hurl no gem in the field, se)r Don including coach J o h n V i s s e r by the javelin 162' to c a p t u r e first copping a third on field day. T h e L u b b e r s took over t h e j o i t first place. T h i s w a s also the f u i t h e s t finish w a s especially s t a r t l i n g , bebase and t u r n e d in a .312 i r k . he h a s e v e r t h r o w n the javelin. cause p r e - d a y d o p e s t e r s had t h e More .300 H i t t e r s J o h n DeVries won the broad j u m p The o t h e r two s e n i o r s ^ the Dutch b a t t l i n g it out f o r fifth place with a leap of 21' 31/fc". DeVries squad, J o h n B u s m a n and n Van honors along with K a l a m a z o o and also tied f o r first in the pole vault Coach Russ D e V e t t e , our r e t i r i n g Hoeven hit .304 and .300espec- Olivet. The t h i r d place finish in a t 11' 4". Athletic D i r e c t o r , h a s announced tively. B u s m a n , displaced J a c k golf and a second place finish in J o e F o w l e r tied f o r second in t h e the installation of an annual a w a r d K e m p k e r as the n u m b e r twpitch- t r a c k a l o n g with a n o t h e r third in high j u m p w h e r e a new m e e t rec- to be p r e s e n t e d to t h e Most Valuer, played r i g h t field a n d , w a s tennis w e r e m o r e t h a n enough to ord of 6' 1" was e s t a b l i s h e d , bet- able P l a y e r of each Hope baseball his double in the first A l m g a m e retain t h e All S p o r t s T r o p h y . t e r i n g the old m a r k by an eighth squad. It will be in the f o r m of t h a t drove in t h r e e r u n s ai g a v e Man of the d a y as f a r a s golf is of an inch. Dave H o n d o r p tied f o r an inscribed pen to be given by Hope the g a m e . V a n Hoevt who concerned was f r e s h m a n Dave St. f o u r t h in the high j u m p . J o h n D e V e t t e to t h e p l a y e r selected by w a s c o : c a p t a i n with L b e r s , Aubin, who carded 75-86 f o r 36 Brannock, t h r o w i n g the discus six his t e a m m a t e s . s m a c k e d out one of t h e threeJutch holes. Bill Holt shot 83-87 while f e e t f u r t h e r t h a n last y e a r , still Willie Rink, who h a s been elected h o m e r s , and played a s t e a d ^ a m e Bob V i s s e r posted an 83 and a 90. m a n a g e d only a second place. Dave t h e M V P of H o p e ' s 3 954 baseball while holding down t h e hot m e r . Jim H u t t o n finished w i t h 84-89, K u y e r s also placed f o r Hope in the M I A A co-champs, will be the first T h e final m a n to hit in thielite and Gord H o n d o r p shot 92-94. to receive t h e a w a r d . Rink hurled pole vault. circle w a s t h e mound s t a r r illie F r o m a p e r s p e c t i v e p o i n t of six c o m p l e t e g a m e s , winning five, R u n n e r s Fail to Win Rink, who also relieved B m a n view, t h e 1954 golf s e a s o n w a s a The Dutch w e r e s h u t o u t in the and played r i g h t field when not in r i g h t field, when K e m p k e w a s h u g e success. B e f o r e t h e season pitching, h i t t i n g .300. Rink is a 100, 220, 440, and 880 yard dashes on the hill, and did some goc de- s t a r t e d . Coach V i s s e r w a s f a c e d except f o r a fifth place by Hen- f o r m e r Grand R a p i d s Godwin s t a r . f e n s i v e work. with t h e problem of p l a y i n g t h r e e T h r e e o t h e r W e s t e r n Michigan drickson in t h e 220. Ron Den Uyl T h e two r e g u l a r s not ab, to n e w c o m e r s — J i m H u t t o n , Dave St. diamond a t h l e t e s w e r e honored, acplaced second and J e s s e K i n g fifth m a k e t h e c h a r m e d g r o u p wei Al Aubin, and Gordon H o n d o r p . A in the two mile run and Den Uyl cording to Coach Russ DeVette. D y k e m a and Dick D e F r e e s e . Ekethird place finish was m o r e t h a n was third and King f o u r t h in the J i m Van Hoeven of O t t a w a Hills m a , the only man to hit above 100 could be expected. mile run. Don B r o e k s t r a gained and Don L u b b e r s of C o n s t a n t i n e l a s t y e a r , c a m e in with a diipH o w e v e r , t h e r e s t is h i s t o r y . second place and Bob D e Y o u n g were named h o n o r a r y c a p t a i n s f o r p o i n t i n g .209 but outweighed lis the p a s t season. H u t t o n improved r a p i d l y , while fifth in t h e high h u r d l e s . H o n d o r p dismal s h o w i n g with t h e batDy Don York, a n o t h e r Grand R a p i d s H o n d o r p developed into a " g o o d " took third in t h e low h u r d l e s . The c o n t i n u i n g to be one of the beer Godwin boy and t h e t e a m ' s leading college g o l f e r . Bill Holt and Bob Dutch w e r e disqualified in t h e mile flychasers in the league. DeFrete, h i t t e r , h a s been selected to c a p t a i n Visser played t h e i r u s u a l s t e a d y relay. next y e a r ' s unit, which will be who took over t h e shortfieldc's g a m e . B u t , t h e big difference c a m e Coach Green says t h i n g s look a m i n u s only t h r e e seniors. position, showed p r o g r e s s throuh in t h e person of Dave St. Aubin, little b r i g h t e r f o r next y e a r a s t h e the season, and a f t e r an e a y who proved to be the deciding f a c s l u m p , finished a t .200. seniors accounted f o r only a p p r o x i tor in t h e a m a z i n g Dutch finish m a t e l y 10 p o i n t s of Hope's 49.6. Rink Leads H u r l e r s Friday. On the pitching side of ledge K a l a m a z o o ' s H o r n e t s proved big Rink led the way. S t r i k i n New Freshman Award once a g a i n to be t h e " b e s t " as t h e y F o r m i n g a m o r e effective o r g a n - out 65 while w a l k i n g only 18, h T h i s y e a r , t h e E d u c a t i o n a l Di- ization, J o y c e Mulder a n d N a n lost only one of seven decisions, ti, s w e p t all but a f e w t e n n i s h o n o r s vision of t h e Chemical Rubber J o h n s o n , two Senior women, have Albion 5-3. The M I A A chuckei on Field Day. C o m p a n y will p r e s e n t a copy of recently revised the o u t d a t e d con- s h u t out Olivet, 22-0, and A l m a Hillsdale finished a recedent secChemical R u b b e r C o m p a n y Stan- s t i t u t i o n of t h e W o m e n ' s A t h l e t i c 5-0, and hurled t h r e e innings of ond, w h i l e Ken W e l l e r ' s H o p e d a r d M a t h e m a t i c a l T ables to a de- Association. the 12-0 white w a s h i n g of Grand c h a r g e r s ended u p a s t r o n g t h i r d . s e r v i n g m e m b e r of the f r e s h m a n T h e n e w organization, t o b e class as a n a c h i e v e m e n t a w a r d . called the W o m e n ' s Recreation AsThe M a t h e m a t i c s D e p a r t m e n t h a s sociation, will consist of all t h e made its selection and the presen- women on c a m p u s . But only t h o s e tation will be m a d e a t t h e Honors who p a r t i c i p a t e in one t e a m s p o r t PEOPLES STVTE BANK Assembly next T h u r s d a y . or two individual s p o r t s will be A Convenient anc Friendly Place considered active m e m b e r s and be allowed to vote. Also t h e election Patronize our Advertisers! to Do Yoir Banking of t h e board will be on a m o r e d e m o c r a t i c basis. Due to t h e r e s u l t s of a recent q u e s t i o n n a i r e which revealed t h a t 96% of t h e women p a r t i c i p a t e d in s p o r t s f o r e n j o y m e n t and only 4 % ODORLESS ECONOMY f o r a w a r d s , a new c o m m i t t e e h a s DRY AND LAUNDRY been set u p to review t h e a w a r d s CLEANING SERVICE s y s t e m and o f f e r s u g g e s t i o n s f o r improvement. STUDENT ECONOMSr SERVICE

DE FOUW'S ELECTRIC SHOP

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Go/fers, Neffers

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Finish

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Rink Named MVP, Wins DeVette Award

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Senior Women Revise W. A . A .

Welcome Hopeites

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3 Chain

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PICK-UP AND DEIIVERY

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05-28-1954