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HOPE COLLEGE ANCHOR LXXII—27

Hope College — Holland, Michigan

Schedule Of Events HOPE COLLEGE COMMENCEMENT 1960

10:00

6:30

2:30

7:30 10:00

Thursday, Friday, June second and third A.M.—Meeting of the Board of Trustees Music Auditorium Saturday, June fourth P.M.—Alumni Dinner Holland Civic Center Speaker: Dr. Clarence H. Holleman '14 Retired Missionary Physician Sunday, June fifth P.M.—Baccalaureate Service Dimnent Memorial Chapel Speaker: Dr. Gerrit T. Vander Lugt President of Central College Professor Elect — Suydam Professorate of Theology New Brunswick Theological Seminary Monday, June sixth A.M.—Senior Breakfast President's House A.M.—Ninety-fifth Commencement Dimnent Memorial Chapel Speaker: Dr. Theodore O. Yntema '21 Vice-President of Ford Motor Company

Honor Courses Offered In '60 The 1960-1961 school year at Hope College will bring with it an expanded program in the honors area. Starting in 1959, Hope College offered honors courses in the English department. This curriculum will now be extended to the Psychology department. There have previously been two sections of freshmen honors English which will be combined into a sophomore literature class to be taught by Mr. ten Hoor. A class of Introduction to Psychology 31 will also be offered. One of the most important requirements for admission to these courses is a high scholastic average. In the case of the Freshmen, the high school record, test scores, and an essay determine admission. The sophomore candidates will be chosen by their records in previous college experience. Students in these classes may register by invitation only. The administration feels that such students have a better educational background, are ready to do more reading and studying than the average student. In this stepped up program, students will be able to cover more material and acquaint themselves with many additional areas. The administration is supporting a new idea for gradua-

World Refugee Year Results The results of Hope's participation in World Refugee Year have been tabulated and are as follows: $93.60 was contributed by fraternities and sororities and $250 by IRC from the proceeds of the Tulip-Time parking lot. This adds up to a total contribution of $343.60 donated as a result of the Refugee Walk undertaken by two Hope women studying in Edinburgh.

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tion honors also. The schedule includes special work in seminars and honor sessions for graduation recognition. In this way, only the better students will receive the honors at the end of their college career.

Retiring After 32 Years After 32 years on the Hope faculty. Miss Metta Ross, English and History Professor is retiring. A graduate of Hope, Miss Ross received her M.A. from the University of Michigan. She has also attained part of her education from Western State University, the University of Wisconsin and the University of Chicago. Before returning to Hope as a teacher Miss Ross taught high school for six years, five of which were spent at Holland High.

May 27, 1960

Visiting Notaries To Speak At Graduation Services Dr. Gerrit T. Vander Lugt, president of Central College, Pella, Iowa, will be the guest speaker at the Hope College Baccalaureate Service, Sunday afternoon, June 5, at 2:30 p.m. in Dimnent Memorial Chapel. The title of his address will be "Your's the Promise." Dr. Vander Lugt has served as president of Central College since 1946. This year he accepted the chair of the Suydam Professorate of Systematic Theology at New Brunswick Theological Seminary, a position which becomes effective this September. A graduate of Calvin College, he received his M.A. and Ph.D. at the University of Michigan. Previous to his position at Central, Dr. Vander Lugt was president of Carroll College, Waukesha, Wisconsin. An ordained minister of the Reformed Church in America, he has been active in the Reformed Church, serving as chairman of the Curriculum Committee of the Board of Education. In 1954 he was elected to the highest office in the church, president of General Synod. Dr. Theodore O. Yntema, vice-president of Finance of the Ford Motor Company, will be the guest speaker at Hope College's 95th annual commencement, June 6, 1960. The commencement will be held in Dimnent Memorial Chapel and the address is entitled "Liberal Education." A graduate of Hope in 1921, Dr. Yntema has served as Vicepresident of Ford since 1949. He received A.M. degrees • in chemistry and business from the University of Chicago in 1922 and 1924 respectively; his Ph.D. in economics from that institution in 1929.

Dr. Gerrit T. Vander Lugt

As an educator, Dr. Yntema has taught business and economic courses at the University of Chicago and Stanford University. From 1929 until the time he joined Ford in 1949, he was an economic consultant for many firms, including Household Finance Corporation, The U.S. Defense Commission, War Shipping Administration, U.S. Steel, Stein, Roe and Farnham, and Lord-Abbett.

He also holds memberships in a number of Associations, such as the American Economic Association, the Mont Pelerim Society, and the Council of Foreign Relations. Dr. Yntema is also a trustee of the Cranbrook Institute of Science and Cranbrook Academy of Art, a trustee of the Michigan Colleges Foundation, Inc., a fellow of the American Economic Association and the Econometric Society.

When she first joined the faculty Miss Ross was as associate professor of English and History. As an English teacher she especially enjoyed courses in Shakespere. Within the History department she has taught all the courses offered except a study of the atomic age a recent addition to the curriculum. Among her many contributions to Hope College Miss Ross organized Palette and Masque. Also she coached women's oratory from-1932-36. Since her first years at Hope, Miss Ross has seen the enrollment triple. She has continually admired the character and quality of Hope students. Upon retirement she plans to complete the two manuscripts she has started. Her hobbies include wood carving and such outdoor activities as bird w a s h ing, fishing, and boating. Miss Ross will also have time to travel and read, which she enjoys doing very much.

He is presently chairman of the Ford Motor Credit Company, chairman of the American Road Insurance Company, a member of the Commission on Money and Credit, Director of the National Bureau of Economic Research, and Director of the National Industrial Conference Board.

As an author. Dr. Yntema has penned one book, "A Mathematical Reformulation of the Theory of International Trade" (1932) and was co-author for "Jobs and Markets" (194G).

Results Of Choir Elections

Dr. Theodore O. Yntema

The Officers of the Chapel Choir for the school year 196061 were elected at the annual choir party held at Castle Park. Elected were Leander Wang, President; Tom Bos, Vice-President; Bobbie Russell, Secretary; Jean Schregardus and Dean Nederveld, women's and men's Treasurers respectively; a n d Ruth Ausema and J a y Nyhuis, women's and men's Business Managers, respectively.


HOPE

Poge Two

Advice And Thanks From The Elders

.30-

By Jack DePond

To a printer, the appearance of —30— on an article announces that the article he's setting in type is completed. To the present ANCHOR staff, the appearance of —30— this week signifies the end of a year of hurridly met deadlines, hard work and turmoil. In addition, today's —30— closes a year of personal and educational growth for those working on the paper. At an em. for many are the priceless hours spent preparing ideals and thoughts for print in order to stir the campus intellectually. At an end for some are the hours of coming to know fellow students, faculty and administration members, as well as college problems — known more thoroughly from personal contact. Also ending are the enriched hours of experiment, success, and failure gained through a live educational experience. To the staff, today's —30— brings a close to hours of searching for, composing, and writing copy. Editors breathe a sigh of relief today for now they must not beg students to contribute to their student paper for another year. Also halting for many are tedious thankless hours spent pouring over copy, taking pictures, running to the printer, gathering advertising, writing headlines, and tending to the dull details which make a newspaper run smoothly. But today's —30— does not bring an end to the ANCHOR. For the new editors this —30— signals a beginning of a new adventure which will go into summer and on through the next year. Ahead of the two editors are the tedious thankless jobs as well as the pitfalls of a student run business. But also, ahead of them are the personal and educational experiences which cannot be found in any textbook. To help the editors avoid the pitfalls, the retiring staff appeals to you the student to volunteer to carry a part of the ANCHOR work. To help the editors find more time to run their business, the retiring staff appeals to the administration to pass the recommendation for an editors salary. With such an innovation, the quality of the paper will improve as students find more time to devote to the paper. To help the editors represent you the reader, the retiring staff appeals to you to receive the paper with an open critical attitude. The paper is meant for you the reader, and the retiring staff leaves the ANCHORS future in your hands. For we the retiring seniors of the ANCHOR, —30—. —N. B.

What Is Evolving *7 hope there is a world war soon, because I dont know what to do next year; teach, go to grad school, or get married, or all three," said a senior sitting across the table from me at dinner. This of course was a and uniformity —

are predominate —

But is this a joke? Think what a 3rd World present scum of population would be demolished

attitudes

among ^,

War might bring. This and a new type could

replace the present race. Genetic factors could make a complete transformation from the race we know to one with grey skin color and three arms each ending with a clinging kind of a hand. They would the space where would have great would consist of

May 27, 1960

ANCHOR

Senior Swan Song

Editorial

joke, though indecision college students.

COLLEGE

have eyes all around their heads, which would consume the present head contains brain matter; thus, this being visibility. All mouths would be larger and the voice box an apparatus very similar to a tape recorder.

Their feet would all be the same size — facilitating following in each other s foot steps, but each person would have only one foot and be forced to lean upon someone strong in order to stand. The ears might be enlarged and especially

sensitive

to low deep voices,

while the sweetest smell would be that of white silk combined

with purity.

Although this describes the majority, one would be different in that he would have the present characteristics of the human race. He would be Dick Tator who appears to be a giant in character and strength. His dress is white silk (barely covering the armor of iron tradition) and is perfectly pure. Low and deep is his voice, perfectly suited for tape recordings; though his word power is limited to phrases such as "Follow me, the mighty Dick Tator —keeper of all securities". Senior, it appears to me that the genetic factors of the next world war are evolving. What are you going to do about it?

LH.

Assistantships From Oberlin College Donald R. Gallo and James L. Evers, both English majors at Hope, have each been awarded a $1500 teaching assistantship plus an $800 scholarship from Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio. The course work begins on June 20, followed by a fall semester of teaching high school English. The assistantship will lead to a Master of Arts in Teaching.

Announcing Homecoming Chairmen The Student Council wishes to announce that the general chairmen for next fall's Homecoming are Nancy Sonneveldt and Roger Achterhof, both members of the Class of '62.

Verse 1 To the Alumni: I like Hope. The ideal to which it is dedicated is the most essential ideal of our age. The f r e e pursuit of the liberal arts is healthy. Healthy not only for the individual but, for religion, the nation, and the world. We do no injustice to the God of Christian revelation when we call this a Christian College. Hope well deserves our spiritual, academic, and financial aid. Verse 2 To the Faculty: Those w o r t h y conductors whose task it is to direct us to the land of enlightenment. I never met a nicer group of tormenters. Some of you I don't like, but there is not one of you

t h a t does not command my respect. Something great takes place when: "It occurs to me . . as it does to Dr. Dykstra; "I think the thing through . . like Dr. Hollenbach; I mumble into a microscope with Mr. Thompson: or even when I make a speech to a wall for Dr. Schrier. It is called the "educational process"; the term seems a little cold. What takes place is a real struggle with and, an examination of ideas. It is more like a drama than a process. This drama taking place over and over again is the lifeblood of the college. It is the sacred ritual by which we learn. It is neither easy nor simple, but to the faculty I owe my thanks. You have helped me more than you will ever imagine.

Verse 3 To the students: As students something happens to us. We come here as opinionated prigs and leave here as heretical liberals with pieces of sheepskin under our arms. While here we get an education. Also we get some wool pulled over our eyes. We are "herded" into chapel for worship. We are robbed of $50 each for "Bible 71". These are two faults. You are in some of the abominable laws! It is past time for some changes. We need not rush in like fools, neither should we close our eyes in traditional contentment. If we do close our eyes, we are resting on our laurels, we are wearing them in the wrong place. Hope is a fine school, let's keep it t h a t way.

Marshall And Rhodes Scholarships Are Now Open For Applications Applications are now being accepted for Marshall a n d Rhodes scholarships f o r study in the United Kingdom. Twenty-four Marshall scholarships will be offered in 1961 for tenure at any university in the United Kingdom f o r study of any subject which will lead to a British degree a f t e r two years. These scholarships are open to United States citizens of either sex. Each one contains a personal allowance of 550 pounds per annum, payment of tuition fees as approved by the commission, a grant of up to 25 pounds for books, and a similar grant for approved travel in the United Kingdom in connection with courses of study.

junior standing at some degree granting university or college in the United States of America is required. Selection will be made on four points: (a) Literary and scholastic ability and attainments; (b) Qualities of manhood, truthfulness, courage, devotion to duty, sympathy for and protection of the weak,

kindliness, unselfishness, and fellowship; (c) Exhibition of moral force of character and of instincts to lead and to take an interest in his fellows; and (d) Physical vigor, as shown by fondness f o r and success in sports. Further information and applications may be obtained from Dr. Wolters in room 312.

LITTLE MAN ON CAMPUS LINCOLN'^ NOCTURNAL t.UCU0KA>TlOf>J6 RESULTED IN HYPgRMlA OF THE OCUUAPe-YeTEAA.

No age limit is set for applicants f o r Marshall Scholarships, but an applicant shall, by the time of taking up residence in a British university, have obtained from some accredited university or college in the United States of America, a first degree requiring at least three years study.

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A candidate must not have completed his twenty-sixth year by 1st October 1961, but in exceptional circumstances (e.g. interruption of studies by military service) candidates up to the age of 28 may be considered. The thirty-two Rhodes scholarships are for the University of Oxford only. Appointments are made for two years, but during the course of his second year every Rhodes scholar is invited to state whether he wishes to apply for a third year at Oxford, and, if so, what work he proposes to undertake. The value of a Rhodes scholarship is 750 pounds a year. This stipend should be sufficient to enable a scholar to meet his necessary expenses for termtime and vacations, but those who can afford to supplement to a modest extent from their own resources are advised to do so. To be eligible a candidate must be an unmarried male citizen of the U.S. with at least five years residence. By October 1 of the year in which he applies he must have passed his eighteenth and not reached his twenty-fourth birthday. By the time of application at least

'1i&N6UATlON: UMCOLNl STUPlEP LATE" AT NIGHT AN' Hie EVES BECAME &LOOPSHOT.*

rn HOPE COLLEGE ANCHOR * m $ L M e m b e r ^ s s o c i a t e Collegiate Press PRESS

Published weekly by and for the students of Hope College except during holiday and examination periods, under the authority of the Student Council Publications Board. Entered as second class matter at the post office of Holland, Michigan, at a special rate of postage provided for in section 1103 of Act of Congress, October 3, 1917, and authorized October 19, 1918. Subscription Rate: $2.00 per school year to non-student subscribers. Editorial. Advisor Nancy Boyd Co-editors in Chief Norma De Boer, Louise Hunter News Editor Nancy Sonnevelt Feature Editor Barbara Mortinson Sports Editor Paul Armstrong Picture Editor .Mickey Hoffman Copy Editor Beverly Joeckel Proof Reader Hazel Montel Make-up Editors Dale Conklin, Sandra Vander Berg


May 27, 1960

HOPE

Final Meeting Of Pre Meds

Piano Stodents Present Recital

On May 19, 1960 the Hope College pre-med society held its final meeting of the 19591960 school year by having a banquet at Van Raalte's. After a sumptuous meal, president Phil Damstra extended thanks in behalf of the members to those who had worked so diligently during the year to make the society a success.

Sunday afternoon. May 22, in Dimnent Memorial Chapel, 7 piano students from the class of Anthony Kooiker presented a recital before an audience of friends and relatives.

Appreciation was also shown to those members of the faculty who had sponsored the society during the year, and by unanimous vote they were reelected for another year. Faculty members attending the banquet were Dr. Garrett Van Zyl, Dr. Phillip G. Crook, Dr. J. Harvey Kleinheksel, and Mr. Clarence Kleis. Gary Vandenburg was elected the new president, Mike Magan for vice-president and Merlin Kleinhuizen for secretary-treasurer. To close the meeting, after several "doctors" did minor repair on the movie projector, we saw a film "Patent Ductus Arteriosus".

More Seniors Receive Grants Douglas C. Neckers, son of Mr. and Mrs. Carlyle Neckers of Clymer, New York has received an assistantship at the University of Kansas for next year. A chemistry major at Hope, he will be teaching part time. The assistantship carries a stipend of $2000 and leads to a Ph.D. degree. Kenneth W. Brink, son of Mrs. Eleanor Brink, 175 E. 25th Street, Holland, has received the Michigan College Scholarship, presented each year by Hope College to a deserving student. Brink will study at the University of Michigan School of Business Administration. An economics major at Hope., he will work toward a Masters in business administration at Michigan. Kenneth L. Janssen, son of Mr. and Mrs. K. W. Janssen of 186 Grand Avenue, _JQ r a n d Haven has received a teaching assistantship at the University of Wisconsin.' Janssen, a Hope senior, will be working toward a Masters degree in Spanish. His graduate work will include six hours of teaching. The assistantship carries a stipend of $1400 plus remission of fees and has been granted for the academic year 1960-61. Duane M. Voskuil, son of Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Voskuil of Baldwin, Wisconsin, a senior at Hope, has received a $1900 Fellowship in Philosophy at Emory University, A t l a n t a , Georgia. Voskuil plans to work towards a Masters degree in philosophy and proceed towards his Doctorate. The grant is for the academic year 1960-61.

PERSONALITY BEAUTY SALON

A senior from Kalamazoo, Edna Hollander, presented "Impromptu in F Sharp Major" and "Scherzo in B Flat Minor" by Chopin. Hewitt Johnston, a junior from Holland, played "Paganini Etude No. 4" by Liszt and "Excursions, No. 1" by Barber. Bach was the order of the day for Janet Koopman, Connie Ling, and James Michmerhuizen. Janet, a sophomore from Martin, Michigan, played Bach's "Sinfonia (from Partita in C Minor)." Connie, a junior from Hong Kong, China, presented Bach's "Prelude and Fugue in F Minor." James, a Holland sophomore, presented "Prelude and Fugue in F Minor" and "Prelude and Fugue in F Sharp Minor" by Bach. Paul Lucas, a freshman from Holland, played "Three Preludes" by Debussy. Marilyn Vander Wilt, a sophomore from Ottumwa, Iowa, closed the recital with "Romance in F Sharp Major" by Schumann, and "Allegro Vivace" by Beethoven.

COLLEGE

ANCHOR

Explaining Service Fraternity On May 17, 1960, a dream that started just a year ago, came true to two Hope College students. This dream was to see the formation of a chapter of Alpha Phi Omega come to the campus of Hope. The project started in April of 1959 when Rod Iwema and Jack Millard approached the faculty-student committee in charge of student life. This committee gave the two men permission to proceed with the idea and they started to plan the future of the fraternity. After much work during the fall of this school term. Rod and Jack started to call meetings to see how many men would respond to the idea. The first meeting was held in December of 1959 and since then the group has been operating regularly and efficiently. The meetings, continuing on during the second semester have been able to bring together twenty-seven former scouts and five faculty members as well as two advisors from the community of Holland. The aims of the fraternity are as follows: 1. Service to the school 2. Service to the community 3. Service to the nation 4. Service to the individual With these aims in mind the group moved forward and has

Students Attend Speech Festival

Old Method Of Basketball Admitance Retained

The MISL Public Address Festival was held at Kalamazoo College on Saturday, May 21. Participants from Hope were the first and second semester winners of the Meengs -Speech 11 Contest; Dave Kleis, Robert Thomas, and Marcia A. Meengs. First semester first-place winner, B. J. Berghorst was unable to attend. The festival was not in the form of a contest. Each participant gave a speech on a subject of his own choosing, six to eight minutes in length. Following each speech the participants had a round-table discussion on the merits, liabilities, and ways of improving their speeches. The Hope speakers were accompanied by Dr. W i l l i a m Schrier, head of the speech department.

An item of discussion at the May 2 meeting of the Student Council was the method for admitting Hope Students to the college basketball games played in the Civic Center. Last year, student activity cards were accepted until 7:15 P.M. and after that time students had to purchase tickets at the regular price. An alternative method suggested that students who wanted to attend a game pick up a complimentary ticket sometime beforehand so that officials would know how many seats could be sold to the public. The Council decided, however, that this plan presented too many inconveniences and therefore voted in favor of retaining last year's system of admittance.

Reynolds Attending College In France Katherine Reynolds, a Junior at Hope College and a French major, has enrolled with twenty-five other • students from various colleges and universities all members of "Classrooms Abroad", an independent studytravel organization, for six weeks of study at the University of Grenoble, Grenoble, France. Katherine will sail on June 11. While in Grenoble, she will live with a French family. At the conclusion of their studies, the group will spend two weeks traveling throughout France and Switzerland. Then Katherine will travel to the Netherlands and England where she plans to visit relatives. She will return in September.

Page Three

taken on many projects through out the second semester such as: 1. Baby Sitting for faculty and community residents. 2. The construction of a ride board which will make its appearance the beginning of next week. 3. Ushers for the basketball games. 4. Ushers for the May Day Activities. 5. Guide Service for the admissions office. 6. Building and planning of the Tulip Time Float. 7. Painting the inside of Prestatie Huis. 8. Helping the community move the books from the old library to the new one. 9. Assisting with the scout troops in town. 10. Mail Service between the dorms and Van Raalte. 11. Assistance with Student Council Elections. These activities were carried out under the leadership of the officers. President, Rod Iwema, 1st Vice-President, Jack Millard, Second Vice-President, Don Gallo, Secretary-Treasurer, Ed Seeley, and Historian Ralph Herron. On May 17, these officers were officially installed at the formal ceremonies. This night of May 17, saw the chapter installed as a full

National S e r v i c e Fraternity with the chapter name of Nu Beta. The future has the following awaiting the Nu Beta Chapter. 1. Baby Sitting. 2. Ushers for the Basketball games. 3. Guide Service. 4. Operation of the Ride Board 5. Assistance for the scout troops 6. Ugly Man Contest 7. Mail Service with expanding improvements 8. Working in activities at the chapel. The fraternity is very happy with the results of the past year. The members are looking forward to the coming year when they will be lead by the following officers. President, Jack Millard First Vice President, Ralph Herron Second Vice President, Charles Becher Treasurer, Bruce Holmes Historin, Fred Vande Vusse The fraternity will welcome anyone who might be interested in joining the chapter. All who might be interested must meet two qualifications of scouting experience and a scholastic average of 2. Joining this fraternity does NOT prevent membership in a social fraternity. O A. B. Cosmo-1959

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M. I. A. A. Field Day Ends Season; Hope 2nd In Trophy Race The track, tennis and golf teams ended their spring sports schedules last weekend in the rain at Kalamazoo. The Dutch tennis team acquitted itself admirably, and when rain called a halt to the proceedings, were in second place, only two points behind Kalamazoo, 28-26.

ship are well represented in Norm as can be attested by any sports fans lucky enough to see some of this seasons matches. Norm, a member of the Cosmopolitan Fraternity, hails from Ridgewood, New Jersey. His ability will be a big factor in years to come.

By agreement of the coaches, this was allowed to be the final scoring of the day, and the netmen had to settle for second place even before the doubles matches had started. The Allen B. Stowe tennis award, an annual presentation at the MIAA Field Day was won this year by Sophomore Norm Hess of Hope, who played first man for Coach Larry Green all season. The attributes of leadership, tennis ability and sportsman-

The track team copped third place behind Calvin, and second place Kalamazoo, on Saturday, winning three events under very muddy conditions. Despite the conditions however, Jim Rozeboom broke another record, again one of his own, as he set a new Hope and M.I.A.A. record for the 880. Winning by at least 20 yards, his time of 1:58.9 bettered his previous time of 2:00.2, and broke the league record set by

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Jim Krieder of Albion (1:59.7). Sophomore Tom Tomga took the pole vault with a jump of 12 feet 6 inches, and John Kleinheksel, starring in his last meet for the Flying Dutchmen, won the broad jump for the third straight year. (Last year, John set a League record of 23'6%" which still stands. The golf team finished fourth in Friday's play, with an outstanding performance b e i n g turned in by Bob Holt, a senior from Holland, whose 150 points entitled him to a share in the medalist honors. Following the completion of the Spring sports events, Kalamazoo College won the M.I.A.A. All-Sports Trophy with 69 points, while Hope once again finished second, this year with 64 points.

Tribute To Miss Breid A big hand goes to our hard working Physical Education Instructor, Miss Breid. Many will be sad to see her leave. A few will feel an extra degree of responsibility falling on them indicating the amount of work done for Hope by Miss Breid. These duties, although wellknown to some, included coaching women's athletic teams, helping many evenings with intramurals, sponsoring the Women's Athletic Association, and instructing all the girls at Hope in basic fundamentals of Physical Education as well as in pertinent information for those who enjoy continuing athletics or who wish to teach. Miss Breid's aid to us indirectly is not easily described. To unnumbered girls she has given that little word or look of encouragement which might not have seemed stupendous but which aided us appreciably in individual ways. We who know Miss Breid through her personal helpfulness and those who have been around long enough to see the long way the Women's Athletics have come in terms of organization and direction try to say what we certainly cannot express in it's entirety. THANK YOU, MISS BREID.

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Pictured above are Beverly Jaeckel, individual champion of Lee Barratt, Marcia Achterhof, ?????

Send the garments you want stored to us and we will clean, press and store them and you will only have to pay the regular cleaning charges.

Lura

HopeWomenTakeSecond The Hope College women's tennis and archery teams took second place in the Women's M.I.A.A. Tournaments. Beverly Joeckel, Hope sophomore, repeated as the M.I.A.A. individual archery champion with a total of 643 points. Adrian won the archery team title with a new M.I.A.A. women's archery record of 1,747 points. Hope was runner-up with 1,432 points and Albion took third with 1,288. Due to rain the tennis scores are incomplete. Kalamazoo has ten points and if Hope doubles, which are to be played after final exams, should win the finals Hope would have a total of eight points. Tennis single results were: Kathy Bakker (Hope) def. Kapnick (Adrian) 6-1, 6-4; Marilyn Scudder (Hope) def. Ericson (Kazoo) 6-2, 6-3; Bobbie Russell (Hope) lost to Luther (Kazoo) 6-0, 6-1; Garn (Adrian) def. Sibley (Albion) 6-1, 6-4; Kik (Kazoo) def. Love-

foy (Albion) 7-5, 6-2; Luther def. Kathy Bakker (Hope) 6-1, 6-1; Marilyn Scudder (Hope) was def. by Kik 6-2, 6-3. Final singles will be played between Kik and Luther both of Kalamazoo. Jean Schregardus and Jan Owen of Hope defeated Munt and Fargrieve of Albion 6-0, 6-1; Barbara Gray and Ula Oosterbaan of Hope defeated Lohrman and Lapham of Albion 6-3, 8-10, 6-4; Clair and Hartl (Kazoo) def. Smiggen and Korkala (Hillsdale) 6-0, 6-1. In double semi-finals Schregardus and Owen of Hope won over Clair and Hartl by default as a result of a knee injury; Gray and Oosterbaan of Hope lost to Dipple and Emmons of Kazoo 6-1, 7-5. Final doubles are to be played after final exams between Owen and Schregardus of Hope and Dipple and Emmons. Miss Mary Breid, women's physical education instructor, hosted the visiting schools.

SCRIPTEASE SOLUTION Store nearest your College Smartest Clothes on The Campus Special prices on rented Tux

TER HAAR CLOTHING

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KRONEMEYER'S MOBIL SERVICE STATION TIRES —

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LIMITED NUMBER OF APPLICATIONS BEING ACCEPTED NOW FOR 1 0 - 1 2 WEEKS SUMMER EMPLOYMENT. INTERNATIONALLY KNOWN CONCERN WITH BRANCHES IN ALL PRINCIPAL CITIES. LAST YEAR THOSE ACCEPTED AVERAGED OVER $130 WEEKLY.

BUNTE'S PHARMACY Prescriptions 54 E. 8th Street

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J£U1£LRY Dependable Jewelers for Over a Quarter Century 6 West Eighth Street HOLLAND, MICHIGAN

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Profile for Hope College Library

05-27-1960  

05-27-1960  

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